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Sample records for adjacent ridge segments

  1. Dike Interactions along the East Pacific Rise: Can Dike-Induced Static Stress Changes Trigger Diking at Adjacent Ridge Segments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applebee, G. M.; Cormier, M.

    2008-12-01

    Although the physical conditions that control dike intrusion at spreading centers are subject to debate, it is generally agreed these include a crustal section stressed close to failure and an overpressured magma chamber. Along the East Pacific Rise (EPR), fast spreading rates (100-150 mm/yr) and the presence of a narrow, shallow and nearly continuous melt lens (0.5-1.5 km wide, 1-1.5 km deep) imply that these two criteria are frequently met. Hence, a small incremental stress change at the EPR axis may be sufficient to trigger dike intrusion along a "4rth-order segment"- the elemental 10-20 km-long section of ridge that ruptures in a given volcanic episode. We use the COULOMB 3.1 software to investigate whether static stress changes induced by dike emplacement at a 4rth-order segment may be sufficient to trigger diking at neighboring segments. In the absence of any observational data about dike triggering, we adopt some conclusions from studies of stress transfer in earthquake sequences, and assume that static stress changes of 1-2 bar can promote dike intrusion in a favorably pre-stressed crust. Modeling results indicate that tensile stress changes of 1-2 bars extend as far as 10 km beyond the tip of a newly emplaced dike, suggesting that along the EPR, the intrusion of a dike may be sufficient to promote concomitant diking at adjacent 4rth-order segments. This 10 km distance varies only slightly when experimenting with reasonable dike geometries: dike heights of 1-1.5 km and widths of 0.5-2 m are used, as narrowly constrained from observations at the EPR. Hence, provided that a second-order segment (50 km-long or more) is critically stressed and that the subjacent magma chamber is overpressured, eruption of a 4rth-order segment somewhere along that segment may trigger a sequence of diking events on a relatively short time-scale. This model may soon be tested at the EPR "Integrated Study Site" at 9N, by a series of recent and on-going experiments funded by the NSF-RIDGE

  2. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  3. Biomechanical effects of pedicle screw fixation on adjacent segments.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Thein Aung; Wang, Zhuo; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Yoshikawa, Takamasa; Inaba, Tadashi; Kasai, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    Various biomechanical investigations have attempted to clarify the aetiology of adjacent segment disease (ASD). However, no biomechanical study has examined in detail the deformation behaviour of the adjacent segments when both pure torque and an angular displacement load are applied to the vertebrae along multiple segments. The purpose of this study is to investigate the biomechanical effects of pedicle screw fixation on adjacent segments. Ten cadaveric lumbar spines (L2-L5) of boars were used. Control and fusion models were prepared by disc damage and pedicle screw fixation of each specimen, and then, bending and rotation tests were performed using a six-axis material tester. In the biomechanical tests regulated by an angular displacement load, the range of motion (ROM) of the cranial and caudal adjacent segments in antero-posterior flexion and lateral bending was increased by about 20 % (p < 0.05), and the maximal torque in the fusion model was about threefold (p < 0.05) that in the control model. And in axial rotation, the ROM of cranial and caudal adjacent segments was increased by about 100 % (p < 0.001), and the maximal torque was about sixfold (p < 0.01) that in the control model. The ROM of adjacent segments was significantly increased after pedicle screw fixation as assessed by biomechanical tests regulated by an angular displacement load, but not in those regulated by torque. We present the results of biomechanical tests regulated by torque and angular displacement and show that the maximum torque of the fusion model was larger than that of the control model in the biomechanical test regulated by an angular displacement load, suggesting that mechanical stress on the segments adjacent to the fused segment is large. We think that ASD arises after spinal fusion surgery as a mechanism to compensate for the ROM lost due to excessive fusion by pedicle screw fixation, so that a large torque may be applied to adjacent segments within a physiologically

  4. The ridges of Europa: Extensions of adjacent topography onto their flanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Richard; Sak, Peter B.

    2014-03-01

    The surface of Europa displays numerous generations of intersecting arrays of linear ridges. At some locations along these ridges, older ridges on adjacent terrain appear to extend up the flank of a more recent ridge. It has thus been suggested that the ridges may have formed by upturning of that adjacent terrain. However, the newer ridges generally appear to be material deposited over the older terrain. Here we consider how the morphology of the overprinted topography may have been inherited by the more recent ridges. An analogous process occurs along some sediment-starved convergent plate boundaries on Earth, where the poorly consolidated material of a frontal prism of an overriding plate is pushed over preexisting ridges and seamounts on the downgoing plate. The overriding plate inherits the morphology of the downgoing plate even though the actual extension of that topography has been underthrust and buried. A well-studied example lies offshore of Costa Rica where the Caribbean plate overrides the Cocos plate. Experiments show other mechanisms as well: mass-wasting down a flank can result in extensions of adjacent ridges thanks to the geometry imposed by a constant angle of repose; in addition, more pronounced extensions of the older ridges result if the new ridge grows as it is bulldozed from behind (i.e., from the central groove of a double ridge on Europa). The shapes of the ridge extensions are distinctly different in these two cases. If tidal pumping extrudes material to the surface at the center of a double ridge, it might drive the latter mechanism. The ridge extensions observed on the flanks of more recent ridges may provide a crucial diagnostic of dominant ridge-building mechanisms when and if additional images are obtained at high resolution from future exploration. In additional to their morphology, the distribution of ridge extensions at only isolated locales may also provide constraints on ridge formation processes and their diversity.

  5. Management of adjacent segment disease after cervical spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Hilibrand, Alan S

    2012-01-01

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) was described after long-term follow-up of patients treated with cervical fusion. The term describes new-onset radiculopathy or myelopathy referable to a motion segment adjacent to previous arthrodesis and often attributed to alterations in the biomechanical environment after fusion. Evidence suggests that ASD affects between 2% and 3% of patients per year. Although prevention of ASD was one major impetus behind the development of motion-sparing surgery, the literature does not yet clearly distinguish a difference in the rate of ASD between fusion and disk replacement. Surgical techniques during index surgery may reduce the rate of ASD.

  6. Surgical treatment of complex axis fractures with adjacent segment instability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Xia, Tian; Dong, Shuanghai; Zhao, Qinghua; Tian, Jiwei

    2012-03-01

    This study investigates the clinical and radiographic characteristics of complex axis fractures with adjacent segment instability and describes the outcome of surgical treatment. Twenty-one patients (14 male, seven female; mean age=34 years) with complex axis fractures and adjacent segment instability who were treated between August 2003 and June 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Treatment selection was based on fracture type and stability of the upper cervical segments. All patients were immobilized with a hard collar for three months after surgery. The mean follow-up period was 12 months (range=6-36 months). No intraoperative surgery-related complications were observed and fusion was achieved in all patients. The outcome was excellent for 17 patients, good for two patients, fair for one patient, and poor for one patient. The upper cervical segments that can become unstable due to complex axis fractures include the atlantoaxial and C2-3 joints. Recommended surgical treatments produce good results.

  7. The influence of ridge migration on the magmatic segmentation of mid-ocean ridges.

    PubMed

    Carbotte, S M; Small, C; Donnelly, K

    2004-06-17

    The Earth's mid-ocean ridges display systematic changes in depth and shape, which subdivide the ridges into discrete spreading segments bounded by transform faults and smaller non-transform offsets of the axis. These morphological changes have been attributed to spatial variations in the supply of magma from the mantle, although the origin of the variations is poorly understood. Here we show that magmatic segmentation of ridges with fast and intermediate spreading rates is directly related to the migration velocity of the spreading axis over the mantle. For over 9,500 km of mid-ocean ridge examined, leading ridge segments in the 'hotspot' reference frame coincide with the shallow magmatically robust segments across 86 per cent of all transform faults and 73 per cent of all second-order discontinuities. We attribute this relationship to asymmetric mantle upwelling and melt production due to ridge migration, with focusing of melt towards ridge segments across discontinuities. The model is consistent with variations in crustal structure across discontinuities of the East Pacific Rise, and may explain variations in depth of melting and the distribution of enriched lavas.

  8. Mid-ocean ridges: discontinuities, segments and giant cracks.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, K C; Scheirer, D S; Carbotte, S M

    1991-08-30

    Geological observations reveal that mid-ocean ridges are segmented by numerous rigid and nonrigid discontinuities. A hierarchy of segmentation, ranging from large, long-lived segments to others that are small, migratory, and transient, determines the pattern and timing of creation of new ocean floor. To the extent that spreading segments behave like giant cracks in a plate, the crack propagation force at segment tips increases with segment length, which may explain why long segments tend to lengthen and prevail over shorter neighboring segments. Partial melting caused by decompression of the upper mantle due to plate separation and changes in the direction of spreading result in the spawning of new short segments so that a balance of long and short segments is maintained.

  9. Migration of mid-ocean-ridge volcanic segments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Dick, H.J.B.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1987-01-01

    The propagation of small-offset volcanic spreading-centre segments along mid-ocean ridge crests may reflect absolute motion of the plate boundary relative to the underlying mesospheric frame. Such a relationship could be caused by a purely vertical flow of the mantle under spreading centres and would have value in constraining past plate motions from non-transform trends generated during along-ridge propagation and in linking the major-element variability of oceanic crust and upper mantle to the bulk composition and temperatures of mantle ascending under mid-ocean ridges. ?? 1987 Nature Publishing Group.

  10. Segmentation of mid-ocean ridges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.; Whitehead, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of mid-ocean ridges in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans show that the volcanism that forms the oceanic crust along the spreading-plate boundaries is concentrated at regular intervals related to spreading rate. This observation and a new calculation for a Rayleigh-Taylor type of gravitational instability of a partially molten mantle region growing under spreading centres yield reasonable estimates of upper mantle viscosities. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. Adjacent Segment Disease in the Cervical and Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Tobert, Daniel G; Antoci, Valentin; Patel, Shaun P; Saadat, Ehsan; Bono, Christopher M

    2017-04-01

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is disappointing long-term outcome for both the patient and clinician. In contrast to adjacent segment degeneration, which is a common radiographic finding, ASD is less common. The incidence of ASD in both the cervical and lumbar spine is between 2% and 4% per year, and ASD is a significant contributor to reoperation rates after spinal arthrodesis. The etiology of ASD is multifactorial, stemming from existing spondylosis at adjacent levels, predisposed risk to degenerative changes, and altered biomechanical forces near a previous fusion site. Numerous studies have sought to identify both patient and surgical risk factors for ASD, but a consistent, sole predictor has yet to be found. Spinal arthroplasty techniques seek to preserve physiological biomechanics, thereby minimizing the risk of ASD, and long-term clinical outcome studies will help quantify its efficacy. Treatment strategies for ASD are initially nonoperative, provided a progressive neurological deficit is not present. The spine surgeon is afforded many surgical strategies once operative treatment is elected. The goal of this manuscript is to consider the etiologies of ASD, review its manifestations, and offer an approach to treatment.

  12. The sedimentary and crustal velocity structure of Makarov Basin and adjacent Alpha Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelatos, John; Funck, Thomas; Mosher, David C.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the velocity structure of Makarov Basin and the adjacent Alpha Ridge to determine the tectonic origins of these features and link them to the larger Amerasia Basin. Seismic data from sonobuoys distributed along a 650 km-long line extending from Alpha Ridge and across Makarov Basin to the Lomonosov Ridge were analyzed for this purpose. Forward modelling of traveltimes, supported by coincident multi-channel seismic reflection and shipborne gravity data, were used to determine the P-wave velocity structure along the line. The sedimentary cover averages 0.5 km-thick on Alpha Ridge and 1.9 km-thick in Makarov Basin, but reaches up to 5 km-thick at the base of Lomonosov Ridge. Velocities in the sedimentary section range from 1.6 to 4.3 km s- 1. As suggested by relatively high velocities, interbedded volcaniclastic or volcanic rock may occur in the deep sedimentary section. The shallow basement of Alpha Ridge (3.3 to 3.6 km s- 1) is characterized by semi-continuous high amplitude reflections and is interpreted as volcanic rock possibly intercalated with sedimentary rock. Velocities do not vary significantly in the upper and mid-crustal layers between Alpha Ridge and Makarov Basin. Total crustal thickness decreases from 27 km beneath Alpha Ridge to 5 km-thick in Makarov Basin then thickens to > 20 km over a short distance as part of Lomonosov Ridge. The crustal structure of Alpha Ridge is consistent with previous studies suggesting that the Alpha-Mendeleev ridge complex is part of a large igneous province (LIP) with thick igneous crust. The lack of change in crustal velocities between Alpha Ridge and Makarov Basin suggests that the basin, at least partly, either formed during or was influenced by LIP-related magmatism. The rapid transition of crustal thicknesses from Makarov Basin to Lomonosov Ridge supports the interpretation that this section of the ridge is a transform margin.

  13. Adjacent segment disease and C-ADR: promises fulfilled?

    PubMed Central

    Riew, K Daniel; Schenk-Kisser, Jeannette M.; Skelly, Andrea C.

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Systematic review. Clinical question: Do the rates and timing of adjacent segment disease (ASD) differ between cervical total disc arthroplasty (C-ADR) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in patients treated for cervical degenerative disc disease? Methods: A systematic search of MEDLINE/PubMed and bibliographies of key articles was done to identify studies with long-term follow-up for symptomatic and/or radiographic ASD comparing C-ADR with fusion for degenerative disc disease of the cervical spine. The focus was on studies with longer follow-up (48–60 months) of primary US Food and Drug Administration trials of Prestige ST, Prodisc-C, and Bryan devices as available. Trials of other discs with a minimum of 24 months follow-up were considered for inclusion. Studies evaluating lordosis/angle changes at adjacent segments and case series were excluded. Results: From 14 citations identified, four reports from three randomized controlled trials and four nonrandomized studies are summarized. Risk differences between C-ADR and ACF for symptomatic ASD were 1.5%–2.3% and were not significant across RCT reports. Time to development of ASD did not significantly differ between treatments. Rates of radiographic ASD were variable. No meaningful comparison of ASD rates based on disc design was possible. No statistical differences in adjacent segment range of motion were noted between treatment groups. Conclusion: Our analysis reveals that, to date, there is no evidence that arthroplasty decreases ASD compared with ACDF; the promise of arthroplasty decreasing ASD has not been fulfilled. PMID:23236312

  14. Is the Troodos ophiolite (Cyprus) a complete, transform fault-bounded Neotethyan ridge segment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Antony; Maffione, Marco

    2016-04-01

    We report new paleomagnetic data from the sheeted dike complex of the Troodos ophiolite (Cyprus) that indicate a hitherto unrecognized oceanic transform fault system marks its northern limit. The style, magnitude and scale of upper crustal fault block rotations in the northwestern Troodos region mirror those observed adjacent to the well-known Southern Troodos Transform Fault Zone along the southern edge of the ophiolite. A pattern of increasing clockwise rotation toward the north, coupled with consistent original dike strikes and inclined net rotation axes across this region, is compatible with distributed deformation adjacent to a dextrally-slipping transform system with a principal displacement zone just to the north of the exposed ophiolite. Combined with existing constraints on the spreading fabric, this implies segmentation of the Troodos ridge system on length scales of ~40 km, and suggests that a coherent strip of Neotethyan lithosphere, bounded by transforms and containing a complete ridge segment, has been uplifted to form the currently exposed Troodos ophiolite. Moreover, the inferred length scale of the ridge segment is consistent with formation at a slow-spreading rate during Tethyan seafloor spreading and with a supra-subduction zone environment, as indicated by geochemical constraints.

  15. Alkalic Basalt in Ridge Axis of 53˚E Amagmatic Segment Center, Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Wang, J.; Liu, Y.; Ji, F.; Dick, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) is key tracer of composition and process in the mantle. It is interesting to notice that some alkalic basalts occur in amagmatic spreading center of ultraslow spreading ridges, for examples, 9-16˚E of the Southwest Indian ridge (Standish et al., 2008) and Lena Trough of Arctic Ocean (Snow et al., 2011). The latter is interpreted as the result of the pre-existence of continental transform fault or the especially cold thermal structure of ancient continental lithosphere. 53˚E segment, east of the Gallieni transform fault, was discovered as an amagmatic segment (Zhou and Dick, 2013). On both sides of the ridge axis, peridotites with a little gabbro are exposed in an area more than 3200 km2. Basalts exist in the southern portion of 53˚E segment, indicating the transformation from magmatic to amagmatic spreading about 9.4 million years ago. In April of 2014, Leg 4 of the RV Dayang Yihao cruise 30, basaltic glasses was dredged at one location (3500 m water depth) in the ridge axis of 53˚E segment center. It is shown by electric probe analysis that the samples have extremely high sodium content (4.0-4.49 wt% Na­2O ), relative higher potassium content (0.27-0.32 wt% K2O) and silica (50.67-51.87 wt% SiO2), and lower MgO content (5.9-6.4 wt% MgO). Mg-number is 0.55-0.59. It is distinctly different from the N-MORB (2.42-2.68 wt% Na2O, 0.03-0.06 wt% K2O, 48.6-49.6 wt% Si2O, 8.8-9.0 wt% MgO, Mg-numbers 0.63) distributed in the 560-km-long supersegment, west of the Gallieni transform fault, where the active Dragon Flag hydrothermal field was discovered at 49.6˚E in 2007. The reasons for the alkalic basalt in the ridge axis of 53˚E amagmatic segment center, either by low melting degree of garnet stability field, by melting from an ancient subcontinental lithospheric mantle, or by sodium-metasomatism or even other mantle processes or their combination in the deep mantle, are under further studies.

  16. Congenital stenosis and adjacent segment disease in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Jason David; Belding, Jon; Schnaser, Erik; Rowan, Andrew; Moffitt, Gable; Weaver, John; Reich, Michael S; Bechtel, Chris; Xie, Ke; Gande, Abhiram; Hohl, Justin; Braly, Brett; Hilibrand, Alan; Kang, James D

    2013-10-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment disease (ASD) after anterior cervical fusion (ACF) is reported in 25% of patients at 10 years postoperatively. Debate continues as to whether this degeneration is due to the natural history of the disk or the changed biomechanics after ACF. This study explored whether congenital stenosis predisposes patients to an increased incidence of ASD after ACF. A retrospective review of 635 patients with myelopathy or radiculopathy was performed; 364 patients had complete records for review. Patients underwent 1- to 5-level ACF (94 one-level, 145 two-level, 79 three-level, 45 four-level, and 1 five-level). Radiographs were evaluated for bony congenital stenosis using validated parameters, and ASD was measured according to Hilibrand's criteria and correlated with symptomatic ASD. Congenital stenosis was found in 21.7% of patients and radiographic ASD in 33.5%, with a significant association between these parameters. However, symptomatic ASD occurred in 11.8% of patients; no association between congenital stenosis and symptomatic ASD or myelopathy and ASD was found. Clinical results demonstrated excellent or good Robinson scores in 86.2% of patients and Odom scores in 87% of patients. Despite mostly excellent to good outcomes, symptomatic ASD is common after ACF. Although congenital stenosis appears to increase the incidence of radiographic ASD, it does not appear to predict symptomatic ASD.

  17. Length Scales of Magmatic Segments at Intermediate and Fast Spreading Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulahanis, B.; Carbotte, S. M.; Klein, E. M.; Smith, D. K.; Cannat, M.

    2014-12-01

    A synthesis of observations from fast and magmatically-robust intermediate spreading ridges suggest that fine-scale tectonic segments, previously classified as 3rd order, correspond with principle magmatic segments along these ridges, each with their own magmatic plumbing system in the crust and shallow mantle. In this study, we use multi-beam sonar data available for fast and intermediate spreading ridges to determine the length distribution of these segments for comparison with the primary segmentation of the ridge axis found at slower spreading ridges. A study of intermediate, slow and ultraslow-spreading ridges using global satellite-derived bathymetry indicates a dominant segment length of 53 km [Briais and Rabinowicz, J. Geophys. Res. 2002]. However, satellite-derived bathymetry cannot be used to identify fine-scale tectonic segmentation of fast and magmatically-robust intermediate spreading ridges due to the subdued low-relief expression of ridge-axis discontinuities along these spreading rates. This study focuses on the well-mapped regions of the East Pacific Rise between 13.35°S and 18°N, and the Galapagos Spreading Center between 85° and 95.38° W. We reexamine tectonic segmentation of the ridge axis previously identified in the literature and modify the locations of ridge-axis discontinuities defining segment ends in regions where modern multi-beam bathymetric data coverage has improved relative to that available in early studies. Discontinuities of first, second, and third order are used to define tectonic segment lengths. Initial results show a mean segment length of 42 km (standard deviation of 27 km) and a median of 33 km, with 85 segments studied, similar to the segment length distributions observed at slower spreading ridges. To further evaluate the hypothesis of principle magmatic segments, we also examine the relationship between fine-scale tectonic segmentation and properties of the crustal magmatic system imaged in prior seismic studies of

  18. Basalt Geochemistry of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, J. P.; Gill, J.; Kela, J.; Michael, P.; Ramos, F.

    2006-12-01

    We present new trace element, volatile, isotope, and modeling data for mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) from the Endeavour Axial Ridge Volcano (EARV) segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Endeavour MORB are categorized to a first order using K2O/TiO2, with T-MORB = 0.15-0.25, N-MORB lower, and E- MORB higher. Within these groups, there are 2 subgroups of N-MORB and 3 of T-MORB, distinguished by differences in Si8, Fe8, Ti8, and differentiation paths. Liquid lines of descent are best explained by crystallization within the crust at measured water contents (0.2-0.5 wt. %). EARV basalts exhibit spatial heterogeneities that far exceed what can be explained by these fractional crystallization models. Incompatible trace element ratios such as Zr/Nb, La/Yb, and K2O/TiO2 exhibit 3- to 4-fold variations, indicating heterogeneity of source or melting processes. The heterogeneity is observed along axis in samples only tens to hundreds of meters apart and is most prominent along the western wall of the axial valley, suggesting that axial magma chambers may be short-lived. Despite their heterogeneity, axial samples have nearly constant 87Sr/86Sr and ^{143}Nd/^{144}Nd ratios. Pb isotopes are more variable (206Pb/204Pb = 18.35-18.90). The heterogeneity seems unrelated to the chemical influence of a plume or the thermal perturbations of a transform fault.

  19. Spatial and temporal evolution of magmatic systems beneath the endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Tectonic and petrologic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsten, Jill L.; Delaney, John R.; Rhodes, J. Michael; Liias, Raimo A.

    1990-11-01

    Major and trace element data for a suite of lavas from fifty-six dredges and ALVEN dives on the ridge axis and adjacent abyssal hills have been used to investigate the geometry and evolution of magmatic systems beneath the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. The morphology of the Endeavour Segment between the northward propagating Cobb Offset and the recently formed (<0.2 m.y.) Endeavour Offset is dominated by a shallow, rifted, elongate crestal volcano (Endeavour Ridge) that deepens along-strike into a broad, deep basin at each offset. A set of ridges, interpreted to be previous crestal volcanoes rifted apart by spreading, flank the Endeavour Ridge and chronicle the "dueling" propagator history of the Cobb Offset The tectonic evidence strongly suggests that a large portion of the Endeavour Segment may be a failing rift segment at this time. Lavas from the current axis of the Endeavour Segment are moderately fractionated (MgO: 6-8.5 wt %) and have generally higher SiO2, Al2O3, Na2O, and K2O, and lower FeO* man lavas from south of the Cobb Offset (SOCO lavas). Incompatible trace element abundances and ratios indicate the Endeavour lavas are primarily enriched E-MORBs and T-MORBs (e.g., Zr/Nb: 7-24; Zr/Y: 2.5-5.9; and Ba/TiO2: 6-64), in contrast with the SOCO lavas, which are more depleted in character. Thus, the 30-km wide Cobb Offset appears to mark a major geochemical boundary beneath the Juan de Fuca Ridge. In contrast with the Endeavour Segment axial lavas, samples from adjacent abyssal hills are more similar to the SOCO lavas in their major and trace element characteristics. These observations suggest that the parental magmas of the Endeavour Segment exhibit temporal variability, with more enriched material arriving only recently beneath the ridge axis. Pronounced compositional variability is observed at small spatial scales within the Endeavour Segment axial lavas, which does not correlate with axial morphology. This variability is interpreted to reflect

  20. Segment-Scale Melt Extraction at Mid-Ocean Ridges: A Play in Three Acts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesi, L. G.; Hebert, L. B.; Behn, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    the various parameters controlling each of these stages. We focus on two end-member study areas: the Siqueiros transform on the ultra-fast spreading East Pacific Rise and the ultra-slow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. Based on gravity data, the crust at the Siqueiros transform appears thicker than at the adjacent ridge segments [Gregg et al, Nature, 2007]. We can explain this observation as the result of melt extraction within a MEZ surrounding the transform as it travels along the permeability barrier toward the ridge axis [Gregg et al., JGR, 2009; Hebert and Montési, GRL, 2011]. The ultraslow Southwest Indian ridge (10°-15°E) displays dramatic variations in crustal accretion [Dick et al., Nature, 2003] that can be explained by focusing in 3-D along a permeability barrier and extraction at a MEZ [Montesi et al., JGR, 2011]. Thus both study areas show evidence for Stage 2 and Stage 3, with a MEZ that is 10 km wide and 30 km deep.

  1. Radiological Assessment of the Effect of Congenital C3-4 Synostosis on Adjacent Segments

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Myung-Sang; Kwon, Ki-Tae; Kim, Sung-Su; Lin, Jin-Fu; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To assess the effect of non-kyphotic aligned congenital C3-4 synostosis on the adjacent segment in 10 patients. Overview of Literature In the cervical spine, fusion disease at the adjacent motion segments may be a risk factor for potential neurological compromise and death. Methods Radiograms of 10 patients 13 to 69 years of age presenting with neck/shoulder discomfort or pain with or without trauma history were examined. C3-4 synostosis was found incidentally in all patients on routine examination radiographs of cervical spine. Results Adjacent segment disease (ASD) was not found in the three patients younger than 39 years of age. Five of the 10 (50%) patients, including a 67-year-old man, did not develop spondylosis in any of the cervical mobile segments. Spondylosis was observed only in the caudal 1-2 mobile segments in the remaining five patients. The youngest was a 40-year-old male who had spondylosis in the two caudal mobile segments (C4-5 and C5-6). Spondylosis was limited to the two close caudal mobile segments and was not in the cranial segments. Flaring of the lower part of synostotic vertebra associated with advanced narrowed degenerate disc was evident in five patients. Conclusions Mobile segment spondylosis in the individuals with congenital monosegment C3-4 synostosis over age of 40 years may be a natural manifestation of aging and is not solely an adjacent segment disease directly and fully related with congenital C3-4 synostosis. PMID:26713122

  2. Spreading Dynamics of an Intermediate Ridge: Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. R.; Ramos, F. C.; Gill, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    U/Th disequilibria analyses of 36 on- and off-axis MORB samples from the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, an intermediate spreading ridge off the Pacific Northwest coast of the USA, reflect recent spreading and time-integrated geochemical variability. Previous major and trace element and isotopic data from Endeavour samples exhibit a wide range of geochemical characteristics for samples within close spatial proximity, including EMORB, TMORB and NMORB. Morphology of Endeavour constrains lavas erupted on-axis to flow within the current axial valley, preventing axial lavas from flowing off-axis. This relationship can be used to date any MORB found outside of the axial valley, assuming all types lie on a single zero-age line from the most depleted to most enriched lavas. U-Th data indicate that all EMORB and the majority of TMORB are zero-age (<10 ka) within error and lie on a single zero-age line. EMORB with equivalent (within error) young ages on both sides of the axial valley and that span across the entire eastern flank of the ridge erupted prior to the formation of the current axial valley and within a short time interval (<10 ky). If the axial valley formed within the last 10 ky, the minimum full spreading rate falls around 8 cm/yr. If the majority of EMORB are <8 ka, the axial valley may have formed at a full spreading rate of 10 cm/yr or greater. These U-Th age constraints on EMORB yield a spreading rate faster than the time-integrated spreading rate (5 cm/yr). An EMORB sample located furthest east of the axis is at least 70 ky younger than expected based on the time-integrated spreading rate (5 cm/yr). One on-axis TMORB is not within error of the E-T zero-age line, and may be as old as 17 ka. U-Th ages of TMORB from the western flank fall between 25 and ~100 ka, older than all EMORB. NMORB generally have higher Th isotope ratios than E- or TMORB for a given U/Th ratio and lie on a second zero-age line. One NMORB, on the far western flank, is ~40 ky

  3. Species differences in contaminants in fish on and adjacent to the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Campbell, Kym Rouse

    2004-10-01

    Risks to humans and other organisms from consuming fish have become a national concern in the USA. In this paper, we examine the concentrations of 137Cs, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, lead, mercury, and selenium in three species of fish from two river reaches adjacent to the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. We were interested in whether there were species and locational differences in radiocesium and metal concentrations and whether concentrations were sufficiently high to pose a potential health risk to humans or other receptors. Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) were significantly larger than white bass (M. chrysops), and crappie (Pomoxis spp.) were the smallest fish. Lead was significantly lower in striped bass, mercury was significantly higher in striped bass, and selenium was significantly higher in white bass compared to the other species. There were no other species differences in contaminants. White bass, the only species that was sufficiently abundant for a comparison, had significantly higher concentrations of cadmium, lead, and selenium in fillets from the Clinch River and significantly higher concentrations of mercury in fillets from Poplar Creek. The low concentrations of most contaminants in fish from the Clinch River do not appear to present a risk to humans or other consumers, although mercury concentrations in striped bass ranged as high as 0.79 ppm, well above the 0.5-ppm action level for human consumption of some US states.

  4. Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Pathology after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Adult Low-Grade Isthmic Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Yamashita, Tomoya; Miwa, Toshitada; Ohzono, Kenji; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of symptomatic adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after fusion surgery for adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS) has been reported to be relatively low compared with other lumbar disease entities. However, there has been no study of symptomatic ASP incidence using posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with pedicle screw instrumentation. We investigated the incidence of symptomatic ASP after PLIF with pedicle screw instrumentation for adult low-grade IS and identified significant risk factors for symptomatic ASP. We retrospectively studied records of 40 consecutive patients who underwent PLIF with pedicle screw instrumentation at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kansai Rosai Hospital, Amagasaki, Japan. The patients were followed for ≥ 4 years. Patients' medical records were retrospectively examined for evidence of symptomatic ASP. Age at time of surgery, sex, fusion level, whole lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, preexisting laminar inclination angle, and facet tropism at the cranial fusion segment were analyzed to identify risk factors for symptomatic ASP. Four patients (ASP group) developed symptomatic ASP at the cranial segment adjacent to the fusion. There were no significant differences in age, sex, fusion level, lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, or facet tropism at the cranial segment adjacent to the fusion between the ASP and the non-ASP groups. In contrast, laminar inclination angle at the cranial vertebra adjacent to the fusion was significantly higher in the ASP group than in the non-ASP group. Four patients (10%) developed symptomatic ASP after PLIF with transpedicular fixation for adult low-grade IS. Preexisting laminar horizontalization at the cranial vertebra adjacent to the fusion was a significant risk factor for symptomatic ASP. PMID:24436872

  5. Segmentation of mid-ocean ridges attributed to oblique mantle divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbeek, Brandon P.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Wilcock, William S. D.

    2016-08-01

    The origin of mid-ocean ridge segmentation--the systematic along-axis variation in tectonic and magmatic processes--remains controversial. It is commonly assumed that mantle flow is a passive response to plate divergence and that between transform faults magma supply controls segmentation. Using seismic tomography, we constrain the geometry of mantle flow and the distribution of mantle melt beneath the intermediate-spreading Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Our results, in combination with prior studies, establish a systematic skew between the mantle-divergence and plate-spreading directions. In all three cases studied, mantle divergence is advanced with respect to recent changes in the plate-spreading direction and the extent to which the flow field is advanced increases with decreasing spreading rate. Furthermore, seismic images show that large-offset, non-transform discontinuities are regions of enhanced mantle melt retention. We propose that oblique mantle flow beneath mid-ocean ridges is a driving force for the reorientation of spreading segments and the formation of ridge-axis discontinuities. The resulting tectonic discontinuities decrease the efficiency of upward melt transport, thus defining segment-scale variations in magmatic processes. We predict that across spreading rates mid-ocean ridge segmentation is controlled by evolving patterns in asthenospheric flow and the dynamics of lithospheric rifting.

  6. New data on tectonics of Mendeleev Ridge and adjacent geological structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernykh, A. A.; Astafurova, E. G.; Glebovsky, V. Yu.; Korneva, M. S.; Egorova, A. V.; Red'ko, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    The comprehensive analysis of potential field data and recent seismic data revealed two systems of fractures bounding horsts and grabens in terms of the Mendeleev Ridge. The northern part of the ridge is marked by development of pull-apart structures indicating the former existence of oblique extension settings. The area between Mendeleev and Alpha ridges is occupied by a wide NW‒SE-extending sinistral strike-slip zone. It is concluded that these ridges are of continental origin representing former parts of Arctida (Hyperborea) in the pre-Cretaceous time. The ridges were separated and their crust significantly altered during Cretaceous tectono-magmatic activation in the region.

  7. Correlations between the Lomonosov Ridge, Marvin Spur and adjacent basins of the Arctic Ocean based on seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langinen, A. E.; Lebedeva-Ivanova, N. N.; Gee, D. G.; Zamansky, Yu. Ya.

    2009-07-01

    Seismic profiles across the Lomonosov Ridge, Marvin Spur and adjacent basins, acquired near the North Pole by the drifting ice-station NP-28, provide a reflection image of the upper parts of the Ridge that is readily correlatable with those acquired by the Alfred Wegner Institute closer to the Siberian margin. A prominent flat-lying composite reflection package is seen in most parts of the Ridge at a few hundred meters below the sea bottom. Underlying reflections are variable in intensity and also in dip. The base of this reflection package is often accompanied by a sharp increase in P-velocity and defines a major angular discontinuity, referred to here as the Lomonosov Unconformity. The Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX) cored the first c. 430 m section on the Lomonosov Ridge near the North Pole, in 2004 defining the deeper water character of the Neogene and the shallower water Paleogene sediments. These boreholes penetrated the composite reflection package towards the base of the hole and identified sediments (our Unit III) of late Paleocene and early Eocene age. Campanian beds at the very base of the hole were thought to be representative of the units below the Lomonosov Unconformity, but the P-velocity data suggest that this is unlikely. Correlation of the lithologies along the top of the Lomonosov Ridge and to the Marvin Spur indicates that the Marvin Spur is a sliver of continental crust closely related to, and rifted off the Ridge. This narrow (50 km wide) linear basement high can be followed into, beneath and across the Makarov Basin, supporting the interpretation that this Basin is partly resting on thinned continental crust. In the Makarov Basin, the Paleogene succession is much thicker than on the Ridge. Thus, the condensed, shallow water succession (with hiati) was deposited on the Ridge during rapid Eocene to Miocene subsidence of the Basin. In the Amundsen Basin, adjacent to the Lomonosov Ridge, the sedimentary successions thicken towards the Canadian

  8. Best Merge Region Growing Segmentation with Integrated Non-Adjacent Region Object Aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; Tarabalka, Yuliya; Montesano, Paul M.; Gofman, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    Best merge region growing normally produces segmentations with closed connected region objects. Recognizing that spectrally similar objects often appear in spatially separate locations, we present an approach for tightly integrating best merge region growing with non-adjacent region object aggregation, which we call Hierarchical Segmentation or HSeg. However, the original implementation of non-adjacent region object aggregation in HSeg required excessive computing time even for moderately sized images because of the required intercomparison of each region with all other regions. This problem was previously addressed by a recursive approximation of HSeg, called RHSeg. In this paper we introduce a refined implementation of non-adjacent region object aggregation in HSeg that reduces the computational requirements of HSeg without resorting to the recursive approximation. In this refinement, HSeg s region inter-comparisons among non-adjacent regions are limited to regions of a dynamically determined minimum size. We show that this refined version of HSeg can process moderately sized images in about the same amount of time as RHSeg incorporating the original HSeg. Nonetheless, RHSeg is still required for processing very large images due to its lower computer memory requirements and amenability to parallel processing. We then note a limitation of RHSeg with the original HSeg for high spatial resolution images, and show how incorporating the refined HSeg into RHSeg overcomes this limitation. The quality of the image segmentations produced by the refined HSeg is then compared with other available best merge segmentation approaches. Finally, we comment on the unique nature of the hierarchical segmentations produced by HSeg.

  9. Ridge Segmentation, Tectonic Evolution and Rheology of Slow-Spreading Oceanic Crust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    important source of motivation, information, and geological field trips (remember Canarias , HeMn3’?). Dave Aubrey guided me on my first steps in Woods Hole... volcanic Ruppel, C., and P. Shaw. An elastic plate thickness map of the Mid- segmentation of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Kane to Atlantis Fracture Atlantic Ridge...76, 156, 1995. Smith, D. K., J. R. Cann, M. E. Dougherty, J. Lin, J. Keeton, E. McAllister, C. J. MacLeod and S. Spencer, Mid-Atlantic ridge volcanism

  10. Mantle segmentation along the Oman ophiolite fossil mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Le Mée, Laurent; Girardeau, Jacques; Monnier, Christophe

    2004-11-11

    It has been difficult to relate the segmentation of mid-ocean ridges to processes occurring in the Earth's underlying mantle, as the mantle is rarely sampled directly and chemical variations observed in lavas at the surface are heavily influenced by details of their production as melt extracted from the mantle. Our understanding of such mantle processes has therefore relied on the analysis of pieces of fossil oceanic lithosphere now exposed at the Earth's surface, known as ophiolites. Here we present the phase chemistry and whole-rock major- and trace-element contents of 174 samples of the mantle collected along over 400 km of the Oman Sultanate ophiolite. We show that, when analysed along the fossil ridge, variations of elemental ratios sensitive to the melting process define a three-dimensional geometry of mantle upwellings, which can be related to the segmentation observed in modern mid-ocean ridge environments.

  11. Repeated adjacent segment diseases and fractures in osteoporotic patients: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yao; Chen, Chiu-Liang; Chen, Wei-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background Pedicle screw instrumentation for treating spinal disorder is becoming increasingly widespread. Many studies have advocated its use to facilitate rigid fixation for spine; however, adjacent segmental disease is a known complication. Instrumented fusion for osteoporotic spines remains a significant challenge for spine surgeons. Prophylactic vertebroplasty for adjacent vertebra has been reported to reduce the complications of junctional compression fractures but has raised a new problem of vertebral subluxation. This case report is a rare and an extreme example with many surgical complications caused by repeated instrumented fusion for osteoporotic spine in a single patient. This patient had various complications including adjacent segmental disease, vertebral subluxation, and junctional fractures on radiographs and magnetic resonance images. Case presentation An 81-year-old Taiwanese woman underwent decompression and instrumented fusion of L4-L5 in Taiwan 10 years ago. Due to degenerative spinal stenosis of L3-L4 and L2-L3, she had decompression with instrumented fusion from L5 to L1 at the previous hospital. However, catastrophic vertebral subluxations with severe neurologic compromise occurred, and she underwent salvage surgeries twice with prolonged instrumented fusion from L5 to T2. The surgeries did not resolve her problems of spinal instability and neurologic complications. Eventually, the patient remained with a Frankel Grade C spinal cord injury. Conclusion Adjacent segmental disease, junctional fracture, and vertebral subluxation are familiar complications following instrumented spinal fusion surgeries for osteoporotic spines. Neurologic injuries following long instrumentation are often serious and difficult to address with surgery alone. Conservative treatments should always be contemplated as an alternative method for patients with poor bone stock. PMID:27555778

  12. Small-Scale Mantle Heterogeneities Beneath the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, C. R.; Gill, J.; Woodcock, J.; Anderson, R.

    2008-12-01

    The Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge samples at least two different geochemical heterogeneities unrelated to adjacent hot spots. One is FOZO-like in isotopes and HFSE-rich. Another is K+LREE-rich. Both are sampled randomly in short spatial (few-km) and temporal succession through separate MORB melting events, but the FOZO-like MORB is restricted to axial magmas that rise along a major fault and by-pass the axial magma chamber. The large geochemical diversity and high density of submersible-collected samples creates opportunity for constraining melting processes and mantle dynamics beneath an intermediate spreading-rate ridge. Basalts from the Endeavour Axial Ridge Volcano (EARV) can be divided into N-type (normal) MORBs (K2O/TiO2 < 0.15), transitional, or T-MORBs (K2O/TiO2 = 0.15 - 0.25), and enriched, or E-MORBs (K2O/TiO2 > 0.25). N-MORBs have highest Zr/Nb and E-MORBs the lowest Zr/Nb. Recently we discovered the most trace element depleted N- MORB yet at Endeavour. This sample originates from the base of the western wall of the axial valley south of the Mothra vent field, located in the southern-most part of the EARV. However, none of the samples are as depleted as those from the sea floor beyond the ridge flanks or from the Heckle Seamounts to the north. Two subgroups of N-MORBs and three subgroups of T-MORBs are defined by consistent major and trace element characteristics. For example, T1 MORBs have the lowest SiO2; the T2 group has the lowest Na2O and higher Fe8 than T3. Trace element differences among the various groups can not be explained by crystal fractionation alone. Pb isotopes do not correlate with K2O/TiO2. T1 MORBs have the highest 206Pb/204Pb ratios and T3 MORBs generally have the lowest 206Pb/204Pb and lowest 143Nd/144Nd ratios. Pb isotopes of bulk rocks and sulfides define an array beneath the Northern Hemispheric Reference Line. The sulfide data (LaBonte et al., 2006; Cook, 1994; Tivey and Delaney, 1985) indicate deposition from

  13. Geology and hydrothermal evolution of the Mothra Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickson, Deborah A.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Delaney, John R.

    2007-06-01

    Detailed characterization of the Mothra Hydrothermal Field, the most southern and spatially extensive field on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, provides new insights into its geologic and hydrothermal development. Meter-scale bathymetry, side-scan sonar imagery, and direct dive observations show that Mothra is composed of six actively venting sulfide clusters spaced 40-200 m apart. Chimneys within each cluster have similar morphology and venting characteristics, and all clusters host a combination of active and extinct sulfide structures. Black smoker chimneys venting fluids above 300°C are rare, while more common lower-temperature, diffusely venting chimneys support dense colonies of macrofauna and bacterial mat. Hydrothermal sediment and extinct sulfide debris cover 10-15 m of the seafloor surrounding each vent cluster, obscuring the underlying basaltic substrate of light to moderately sedimented pillow, lobate, sheet, and chaotic flows, basalt talus, and collapse terrain. Extinct sulfide chimneys and debris between the clusters indicate that hydrothermal flow was once more widespread and that it has shifted spatially over time. The most prominent structural features in the axial valley at Mothra are regional (020°) trending faults and fissures and north-south trending collapse basins. The location of actively venting clusters within the field is controlled by (1) localization of fluid upflow along the western boundary fault zone, and diversion of these fluids by antithetic faults to feed vent clusters near the western valley wall, and (2) tapping of residual magmatic heat in the central part of the axial valley, which drives flow beneath vent clusters directly adjacent to the collapse basins 70-90 m east of the western valley wall. These processes form the basis for a model of axial valley and hydrothermal system development at Mothra, in which the field is initiated by an eruptive-diking episode and sustained through intense microseismicity

  14. Does Wallis implant reduce adjacent segment degeneration above lumbosacral instrumented fusion?

    PubMed Central

    Repantis, Thomas; Zacharatos, Spyros; Zafiropoulos, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Delayed complications following lumbar spine fusion may occur amongst which is adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). Although interspinous implants have been successfully used in spinal stenosis to authors’ knowledge such implants have not been previously used to reduce ASD in instrumented lumbar fusion. This prospective controlled study was designed to investigate if the implantation of an interspinous implant cephalad to short lumbar and lumbosacral instrumented fusion could eliminate the incidence of ASD and subsequently the related re-operation rate. Groups W and C enrolled initially each 25 consecutive selected patients. Group W included patients, who received the Wallis interspinous implant in the unfused vertebral segment cephalad to instrumentation and the group C selected age-, diagnosis-, level-, and instrumentation-matched to W group patients without interspinous implant (controls). The inclusion criterion for Wallis implantation was UCLA arthritic grade UCLA grade II in the adjacent two segments cephalad to instrumentation. All patients suffered from symptomatic spinal stenosis and underwent decompression and 2–4 levels stabilization with rigid pedicle screw fixation and posterolateral fusion by a single surgeon. Lumbar lordosis, disc height (DH), segmental range of motion (ROM), and percent olisthesis in the adjacent two cephalad to instrumentation segments were measured preoperatively, and postoperatively until the final evaluation. VAS, SF-36, and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used. One patient of group W developed pseudarthrosis: two patients of group C deep infection and one patient of group C ASD in the segment below instrumentation and were excluded from the final evaluation. Thus, 24 patients of group W and 21 in group C aged 65+ 13 and 64+ 11 years, respectively were included in the final analysis. The follow-up averaged 60 ± 6

  15. Interaction of a mantle plume and a segmented mid-ocean ridge: Results from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgen, Jennifer E.

    2014-04-01

    Previous investigations have proposed that changes in lithospheric thickness across a transform fault, due to the juxtaposition of seafloor of different ages, can impede lateral dispersion of an on-ridge mantle plume. The application of this “transform damming” mechanism has been considered for several plume-ridge systems, including the Reunion hotspot and the Central Indian Ridge, the Amsterdam-St. Paul hotspot and the Southeast Indian Ridge, the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Iceland hotspot and the Kolbeinsey Ridge, the Afar plume and the ridges of the Gulf of Aden, and the Marion/Crozet hotspot and the Southwest Indian Ridge. This study explores the geodynamics of the transform damming mechanism using a three-dimensional finite element numerical model. The model solves the coupled steady-state equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, including thermal buoyancy and viscosity that is dependent on pressure and temperature. The plume is introduced as a circular thermal anomaly on the bottom boundary of the numerical domain. The center of the plume conduit is located directly beneath a spreading segment, at a distance of 200 km (measured in the along-axis direction) from a transform offset with length 100 km. Half-spreading rate is 0.5 cm/yr. In a series of numerical experiments, the buoyancy flux of the modeled plume is progressively increased to investigate the effects on the temperature and velocity structure of the upper mantle in the vicinity of the transform. Unlike earlier studies, which suggest that a transform always acts to decrease the along-axis extent of plume signature, these models imply that the effect of a transform on plume dispersion may be complex. Under certain ranges of plume flux modeled in this study, the region of the upper mantle undergoing along-axis flow directed away from the plume could be enhanced by the three-dimensional velocity and temperature structure associated with ridge-transform-ridge

  16. Seismic Structure of the Shallow Mantle Beneath the Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderBeek, B. P.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Soule, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present tomographic images of the seismic structure of the shallow mantle beneath the intermediate-spreading Endeavor segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge. Our results provide insight into the relationship between magma supply from the mantle and overlying ridge crest processes. We use seismic energy refracted below the Moho (Pn), as recorded by the Endeavor tomography (ETOMO) experiment, to image the anisotropic and isotropic P wave velocity structure. The ETOMO experiment was an active source seismic study conducted in August 2009 as part of the RIDGE2000 science program. The experimental area extends 100 km along- and 60 km across-axis and encompasses active hydrothermal vent fields near the segment center, the eastern end of the Heck seamount chain, and two overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at either end of the segment. Previous tomographic analyses of seismic arrivals refracted through the crust (Pg), and reflected off the Moho (PmP), constrain a three-dimensional starting model of crustal velocity and thickness. These Pg and PmP arrivals are incorporated in our inversion of Pn travel-time data to further constrain the isotropic and anisotropic mantle velocity structure. Preliminary results reveal three distinct mantle low-velocity zones, inferred as regions of mantle melt delivery to the base of the crust, that are located: (i) off-axis near the segment center, (ii) beneath the Endeavor-West Valley OSC, and (iii) beneath the Cobb OSC near Split Seamount. The mantle anomalies are located at intervals of ~30 to 40 km along-axis and the low velocity anomalies beneath the OSCs are comparable in magnitude to the one located near the segment center. The direction of shallow mantle flow is inferred from azimuthal variations in Pn travel-time residuals relative to a homogeneous isotropic mantle. Continuing analysis will focus on constraining spatial variations in the orientation of azimuthal anisotropy. On the basis of our results, we will discuss the transport of

  17. Segmentation and Enhancement of Latent Fingerprints: A Coarse to Fine Ridge Structure Dictionary.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kai; Liu, Eryun; Jain, Anil K

    2014-09-01

    Latent fingerprint matching has played a critical role in identifying suspects and criminals. However, compared to rolled and plain fingerprint matching, latent identification accuracy is significantly lower due to complex background noise, poor ridge quality and overlapping structured noise in latent images. Accordingly, manual markup of various features (e.g., region of interest, singular points and minutiae) is typically necessary to extract reliable features from latents. To reduce this markup cost and to improve the consistency in feature markup, fully automatic and highly accurate ("lights-out" capability) latent matching algorithms are needed. In this paper, a dictionary-based approach is proposed for automatic latent segmentation and enhancement towards the goal of achieving "lights-out" latent identification systems. Given a latent fingerprint image, a total variation (TV) decomposition model with L1 fidelity regularization is used to remove piecewise-smooth background noise. The texture component image obtained from the decomposition of latent image is divided into overlapping patches. Ridge structure dictionary, which is learnt from a set of high quality ridge patches, is then used to restore ridge structure in these latent patches. The ridge quality of a patch, which is used for latent segmentation, is defined as the structural similarity between the patch and its reconstruction. Orientation and frequency fields, which are used for latent enhancement, are then extracted from the reconstructed patch. To balance robustness and accuracy, a coarse to fine strategy is proposed. Experimental results on two latent fingerprint databases (i.e., NIST SD27 and WVU DB) show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art segmentation and enhancement algorithms and boosts the performance of a state-of-the-art commercial latent matcher.

  18. Breaking into the Plate: Seismic and Hydroacoustic Analysis of a 7.6 Mw Oceanic Fracture Zone Earthquake Adjacent to the Central Indian Ridge Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Chapp, E.

    2003-12-01

    Where oceanic spreading segments are offset laterally from one another, the differential motion of the plates is accommodated by strike-slip motion along ridge-perpendicular transform faults. Off-axis from the ridge-transform intersection, no differential motion is require, and the fracture zone trace is thought to be inactive except where reactivated by intra-plate stresses. On 15 July 2003, an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.6 Mw occurred near the northern Central Indian Ridge (CIR), the divergent boundary separating the Somalian plate from the Indian and Australian plates. The size of this event places it within the 99th quantile of magnitude for shallow (< 40 km depth) strike-slip events (null axis plunge >45 deg) within the global Harvard CMT catalog. The earthquake's epicenter is near 2.5 deg S, 68.33 deg E, where the CIR is marked by a series of short (<100 km long) right-stepping transforms that offset the northwest trending spreading segments (20 mm/yr). Seismic signals associated with the mainshock and its largest aftershocks were recorded well by land-based seismic networks. Regional seismic phases (Pn, Sn), as well oceanic T-waves, where also recorded at an IMS hydroacoustic station to the north of the Diego Garcia atoll. T-wave signals recorded at Diego Garcia were cross correlated to determine accurate travel time differences. These traveltime differences were used in a plane wave fitting inversion to determine the horizontal slowness components and estimate the back azimuth to the epicenter. Aftershock locations are derived using the azimuthal information and Pn-T traveltime differences. Together, the seismically- and hydroacoustically-derived epicenters show a linear band of aftershocks extending more than 200 km along the off-axis trace of a right stepping transform. We interpret these aftershock events as delineating the length of the mainshock rupture. As the well-constrain hypocenter of the mainshock lies near the western edge of this

  19. Near-axis crustal structure and thickness of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soule, Dax; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Weekly, Robert T.

    2016-06-01

    A model of crustal thickness and lower crustal velocities is obtained for crustal ages of 0.1-1.2 Ma on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge by inverting travel times of crustal paths and non-ridge-crossing wide-angle Moho reflections obtained from a three-dimensional tomographic experiment. The crust is thicker by 0.5-1 km beneath a 200 m high plateau that extends across the segment center. This feature is consistent with the influence of the proposed Heckle melt anomaly on the spreading center. The history of ridge propagation on the Cobb overlapping spreading center may also have influenced the formation of the plateau. The sharp boundaries of the plateau and crustal thickness anomaly suggest that melt transport is predominantly upward in the crust. Lower crustal velocities are lower at the ends of the segment, likely due to increased hydrothermal alteration in regions influenced by overlapping spreading centers, and possibly increased magmatic differentiation.

  20. Seismic Evidence of Abundant Flank Magmatism at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooft, E. E.; Wells, A. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Wilcock, W. S.

    2013-12-01

    Oceanic crust forms primarily within a narrow, several-kilometer wide, neovolcanic zone at mid-ocean ridges; however, there is an increasing recognition that crustal structure at fast-spreading ridges is modified by off-axis magmatism. Here we use seismic data to show that flank magmatism is also common at an intermediate spreading-rate ridge. We detect several crustal-level, low-velocity, high-attenuation regions on the eastern and western ridge flanks, 7 to 16 km from the neovolcanic zone at the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Seismic refraction data were collected using 64 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) and 5,567 airgun shots from the 6600 in3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth in a region extending along the entire ridge segment and out to ~30 km from the rise axis on either side. We observe amplitude anomalies for crustal phases, Pg, for a variety of source-receiver azimuths indicative of numerous anomalous seismic regions on the ridge flanks. We use finite-difference waveform forward modeling to estimate the dimensions, depth, and seismic properties of two of the inferred anomalous regions. The attenuating regions extend horizontally from 2 to 15 km beneath off-axis, ridge-parallel bathymetric highs and from 2 to 4 km below the seafloor. The velocity reduction and the attenuation anomalies suggest the presence of high temperatures and perhaps a small percentage of melt. One anomalous region is associated with a mid-crustal reflector observed in multi-channel seismic data and other mid-crustal reflectors are also present off axis in the region. We attribute the observed seismic anomalies to off-axis magmatic intrusions. Seismic tomography has shown that the upper-crustal, low-velocity layer is thickened on the outer flanks of these highs. This suggests that off-axis volcanism could contribute to the formation of the highs, with erupted lava flowing down the off-axis slopes forming the thicker upper-crustal low-velocity layer. The

  1. Reduction in adjacent-segment degeneration after multilevel posterior lumbar interbody fusion with proximal DIAM implantation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kang; Liliang, Po-Chou; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Liang, Cheng-Loong; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Chen, Tai-Been; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Chen, Han-Jung

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Multilevel long-segment lumbar fusion poses a high risk for future development of adjacent-segment degeneration (ASD). Creating a dynamic transition zone with an interspinous process device (IPD) proximal to the fusion has recently been applied as a method to reduce the occurrence of ASD. The authors report their experience with the Device for Intervertebral Assisted Motion (DIAM) implanted proximal to multilevel posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) in reducing the development of proximal ASD. METHODS This retrospective study reviewed 91 cases involving patients who underwent 2-level (L4-S1), 3-level (L3-S1), or 4-level (L2-S1) PLIF. In Group A (42 cases), the patients received PLIF only, while in Group B (49 cases), an interspinous process device, a DIAM implant, was put at the adjacent level proximal to the PLIF construct. Bone resection at the uppermost segment of the PLIF was equally limited in the 2 groups, with preservation of the upper portion of the spinous process/lamina and the attached supraspinous ligament. Outcome measures included a visual analog scale (VAS) for low-back pain and leg pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) for functional impairment. Anteroposterior and lateral flexion/extension radiographs were used to evaluate the fusion status, presence and patterns of ASD, and mobility of the DIAM-implanted segment. RESULTS Solid interbody fusion without implant failure was observed in all cases. Radiographic ASD occurred in 20 (48%) of Group A cases and 3 (6%) of Group B cases (p < 0.001). Among the patients in whom ASD was identified, 9 in Group A and 3 in Group B were symptomatic; of these patients, 3 in Group A and 1 in Group B underwent a second surgery for severe symptomatic ASD. At 24 months after surgery, Group A patients fared worse than Group B, showing higher mean VAS and ODI scores due to symptoms related to ASD. At the final follow-up evaluations, as reoperations had been performed to treat symptomatic ASD in some

  2. Preserving Posterior Complex Can Prevent Adjacent Segment Disease following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgeries: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun-Peng; Du, Cheng-Fei; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Zhong, Zheng-Cheng; Chen, Xuan-Wei; Wu, Gui; Li, Zhe-Cheng; Ye, Jin-Duo; Lin, Jian-Hua; Wang, Li Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the biomechanical effects of the lumbar posterior complex on the adjacent segments after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgeries. Methods A finite element model of the L1–S1 segment was modified to simulate PLIF with total laminectomy (PLIF-LAM) and PLIF with hemilaminectomy (PLIF-HEMI) procedures. The models were subjected to a 400N follower load with a 7.5-N.m moment of flexion, extension, torsion, and lateral bending. The range of motion (ROM), intradiscal pressure (IDP), and ligament force were compared. Results In Flexion, the ROM, IDP and ligament force of posterior longitudinal ligament, intertransverse ligament, and capsular ligament remarkably increased at the proximal adjacent segment in the PLIF-LAM model, and slightly increased in the PLIF-HEMI model. There was almost no difference for the ROM, IDP and ligament force at L5-S1 level between the two PLIF models although the ligament forces of ligamenta flava remarkably increased compared with the intact lumbar spine (INT) model. For the other loading conditions, these two models almost showed no difference in ROM, IDP and ligament force on the adjacent discs. Conclusions Preserved posterior complex acts as the posterior tension band during PLIF surgery and results in less ROM, IDP and ligament forces on the proximal adjacent segment in flexion. Preserving the posterior complex during decompression can be effective on preventing adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) following PLIF surgeries. PMID:27870867

  3. New Classification for Clinically Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Pathology in Cervical Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) is common after cervical disc surgery. A critical examination of 320 patients operated for cervical disc prolapse revealed that CASP can also occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of cervical spine. This has not been studied in depth and there is a need for a practically applicable classification of CASP. Purpose To develop a new classification scheme of CASP. Overview of Literature A review of the literature did not reveal a practically applicable classification incorporating the occurrence of CASP in congenital and degenerative fusion cases. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 320 patients operated (509 disc spaces) on for cervical disc prolapse. Cases (n=316) were followed-up for 3-11 years. Random sampling of 220 patients with postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 165 cases was analyzed. Results Six symptomatic CASP cases required resurgery (1.9%), eight cases involved MRI proven CASP with axial neck pain only and 13 patients were asymptomatic with radiological adjacent segment pathology (RASP). The frequency rate was 8.5% (27/316). Four cases of congenital or degenerative fusion of vertebra developed CASP requiring surgery. CASP is classified as primary or secondary follows. Primary A1 was congenital fusion of vertebra and primary A2 was degenerative fusion of the vertebra. Secondary, which was after cervical disc surgery, comprised B1 (RASP in asymptomatic patients), B2 (CASP in patients with axial neck pain), and B3 (CASP with myeloradiculopathy). B3 was subdivided into single-level CASP (B3a) and multiple-level CASP (B3b). Conclusions Symptomatic CASP requiring resurgery is infrequent. CASP can occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of the cervical spine. A new classification for CASP along with treatment strategy is proposed. Patients in Primary CASP and B3 CASP require resurgery while others require only observation. PMID:26712514

  4. Comparison of Volatile and Major Element Concentrations in Melt Inclusions from Juan de Fuca Ridge Seamounts and the Adjacent Ridge Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanless, V. D.; Behn, M. D.; Perfit, M. R.; Clague, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Here we present volatile (CO2, H2O, F, S, Cl) and major element data from >200 naturally glassy, olivine-hosted melt inclusions and glasses erupted from five seamounts proximal to the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This includes 90 analyses of melt inclusions from the Vance Seamount chain and 126 analyses from two small, mafic (glass MgO > 9 wt%) near-axis cones (T461 and T881). We provide geochemical constraints on both the compositional variations and the depths of crystallization beneath the seamounts using vapor-saturation pressures derived from CO2-H2O concentrations. These data suggest crystallization occurs beneath the two near-axis cones from seafloor pressures to 6400 bars corresponding to depths up to 9 km below the seafloor. This range of crystallization is similar to that calculated from olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the adjacent Juan de Fuca Ridge axis. By contrast, crystallization pressures from Vance Seamounts are more limited with pressures ranging from 400 to 1300 bars or depths of 0.7 to 3.8 km below seafloor. The Vance Seamounts have a prominent peak in depths of crystallization at ~2-3 km below seafloor in histograms, perhaps suggesting that it is the preferred depth of melt storage and crystallization beneath seamounts chains. By contrast, crystallization peaks beneath the small, near-axis cones are less prominent and occur slightly deeper at 3-4 km below seafloor. Overall, S and F concentrations in the seamount melt inclusions are similar to on-axis inclusions; however, Cl concentrations in the seamounts are remarkably low. On-axis inclusions have an average of 61 ppm Cl and range from 4-163 ppm. By contrast, Cl concentrations in the seamounts range from 3-82 ppm, but have an average of only 11 ppm. Excess Cl in mid-ocean ridge lavas is often attributed to contamination by seawater or brines associated with hydrothermal circulation. We suggest that the low Cl concentrations in the seamount inclusions may result from either a seamount mantle source

  5. Biomechanical Analysis of Fusion Segment Rigidity Upon Stress at Both the Fusion and Adjacent Segments: A Comparison between Unilateral and Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Kim, Jang-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of unilateral pedicle screw fixation on the fusion segment and the superior adjacent segment after one segment lumbar fusion using validated finite element models. Materials and Methods Four L3-4 fusion models were simulated according to the extent of decompression and the method of pedicle screws fixation in L3-4 lumbar fusion. These models included hemi-laminectomy with bilateral pedicle screw fixation in the L3-4 segment (BF-HL model), total laminectomy with bilateral pedicle screw fixation (BF-TL model), hemi-laminectomy with unilateral pedicle screw fixation (UF-HL model), and total laminectomy with unilateral pedicle screw fixation (UF-TL model). In each scenario, intradiscal pressures, annulus stress, and range of motion at the L2-3 and L3-4 segments were analyzed under flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsional moments. Results Under four pure moments, the unilateral fixation leads to a reduction in increment of range of motion at the adjacent segment, but larger motions were noted at the fusion segment (L3-4) in the unilateral fixation (UF-HL and UF-TL) models when compared to bilateral fixation. The maximal von Mises stress showed similar patterns to range of motion at both superior adjacent L2-3 segments and fusion segment. Conclusion The current study suggests that unilateral pedicle screw fixation seems to be unable to afford sufficient biomechanical stability in case of bilateral total laminectomy. Conversely, in the case of hemi-laminectomy, unilateral fixation could be an alternative option, which also has potential benefit to reduce the stress of the adjacent segment. PMID:25048501

  6. Fusion angle affects intervertebral adjacent spinal segment joint forces-Model-based analysis of patient specific alignment.

    PubMed

    Senteler, Marco; Weisse, Bernhard; Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Farshad, Mazda T; Snedeker, Jess G

    2017-01-01

    This study addresses the hypothesis that adjacent segment intervertebral joint loads are sensitive to the degree of lordosis that is surgically imposed during vertebral fusion. Adjacent segment degeneration is often observed after lumbar fusion, but a causative mechanism is not yet clearly evident. Altered kinematics of the adjacent segments and potentially nonphysiological mechanical joint loads have been implicated in this process. However, little is known of how altered alignment and kinematics influence loading of the adjacent intervertebral joints under consideration of active muscle forces. This study investigated these effects by simulating L4/5 fusions using kinematics-driven musculoskeletal models of one generic and eight sagittal alignment-specific models. Models featured different spinopelvic configurations but were normalized by body height, masses, and muscle properties. Fusion of the L4/5 segment was implemented in an in situ (22°), hyperlordotic (32°), and hypolordotic (8°) fashion and kinematic input parameters were changed accordingly based on findings of an in vitro investigation. Bending motion from upright standing to 45° forward flexion and back was simulated for all models in intact and fused conditions. Joint loads at adjacent levels and moment arms of spinal muscles experienced changes after all types of fusion. Hypolordotic configuration led to an increase of adjacent segment (L3/4) shear forces of 29% on average, whereas hyperlordotic fusion reduced shear by 39%. Overall, L4/5 in situ fusion resulted in intervertebral joint forces closest to intact loading conditions. An artificial decrease in lumbar lordosis (minus 14° on average) caused by an L4/5 fusion lead to adverse loading conditions, particularly at the cranial adjacent levels, and altered muscle moment arms, in particular for muscles in the vicinity of the fusion. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:131-139, 2017.

  7. Analysis and simulation of ground-water flow in Lake Wales Ridge and adjacent areas of central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, Dann K.

    1996-01-01

    The Lake Wales Ridge is an uplands recharge area in central Florida that contains many sinkhole lakes. Below-normal rainfall and increased pumping of ground water have resulted in declines both in ground-water levels and in the water levels of many of the ridge lakes. A digital flow model was developed for a 3,526 square-mile area to help understand the current (1990) ground-water flow system and its response to future ground-water withdrawals. The ground-water flow system in the Lake Wales Ridge and adjacent area of central Florida consists of a sequence of sedimentary aquifers and confining units. The uppermost water-bearing unit of the study area is the surficial aquifer. This aquifer is generally unconfined and is composed primarily of clastic deposits. The surficial aquifer is underlain by the confined intermediate aquifer and confining units which consists of up to three water-bearing units composed of interbedded clastics and carbonate rocks. The lowermost unit of the ground- water flow system, the confined Upper Floridan aquifer, consists of a thick, hydraulically connected sequence of carbonate rocks. The Upper Floridan aquifer is about 1,200 to 1,400 feet thick and is the primary source for ground-water withdrawals in the study area. The generalized ground-water flow system of the Lake Wales Ridge is that water moves downward from the surficial aquifer to the intermediate aquifer and the Upper Floridan aquifer in the central area, primarily under the ridges, with minor amounts of water flow under the flatlands. The water flows laterally away fromn the central area, downgradient to discharge areas to the west, east, and south, and locally along valleys of major streams. Upward leakage occurs along valleys of major streams. The model was initially calibrated to the steady-state conditions representing September 1989. The resulting calibrated hydrologic parameters were then tested by simulating transient conditions for the period October 1989 through 1990. A

  8. Porosity estimates of the upper crust in the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Weekly, R. T.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate upper crustal porosity variations using the differential effective medium (DEM) theory to interpret the observed seismic velocity variations for the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, an intermediate spreading center [Weekly et al., 2014]. We use six P-wave vertical velocity profiles averaged within 5 km × 10 km areas to estimate the porosity at depths from 0.4 km to 2 km. The profile regions cover on-axis, east and west flanks of the central Endeavour segment and three regions of the segment ends including the Endeavour-West Valley (E-WV) and the Cobb overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) and the relict Middle Valley. At the segment center, our calculated porosities on-axis and on the east and west flanks agree well with the apparent bulk porosities measured in Hole 504B at intermediate-spreading Costa Rica Rift [Becker, 1990] and decrease from 5-15% to 2-7% from 0.5 km to 1 km depth and seal by 2 km depth. At all depths, our calculated porosities on the east and west flanks are lower than those on-axis by ~1.3-3%. This indicates the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation [Newman et al., 2011]. At the segment ends, upper crustal velocities are lower than those in the segment center at depths < 2 km. These lower velocities are attributed to higher porosities (10-20% at 0.4 km decreasing to 3-6% at 2 km depth). This may indicate that fracturing in the OSCs strongly affects porosity at shallow depths. Between 0.7 km and 1 km, porosities estimated in all regions using pore aspect ratios of 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 are higher than those from Hole 504B indicating that the aspect ratio of cracks may be smaller than 0.05. There also appears to be a spreading rate dependence to upper crustal porosity structure. On-axis at the Endeavour segment, the calculated porosities from 0.4 km to 2 km are higher than those at the Lucky Strike segment, a slow spreading center [Seher et al., 2010]. Specifically at 2

  9. Volcanic accretion, tectonic extension and the second-order segmentation of slow and ultraslow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannat, M.; Sauter, D.; Escartin, J.

    2011-12-01

    In this presentation we compare the segmentation and seafloor geology record of slow and ultraslow ridges with variable volcanic input. The easternmost Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), where long stretches of the axis lack volcanism is our volcanism-poor end-member, which we contrast with volcanically more active parts of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Keeping the differences of spreading rates in perspective, we use this comparison to analyze and discuss the respective roles of tectonic extension, which ultimately leads to the exhumation of deeply-derived rocks (ultramafics and gabbros), and of volcanic accretion, in shaping the geometry of the plate boundary. Second-order segments at slow and ultraslow ridges are typically 30 to 100 km-long, and separated by transform, or so-called "non-transform" discontinuities. Segment centers typically have a thicker crust, and in most cases have a thinner axial lithosphere, than segment ends. Although we do not resolve the controversy of whether these characteristics are produced by discrete melt and/or mantle diapirs in the subaxial asthenosphere (eg Lin et al. 1990), or by melt channeling toward regions of thinner axial lithosphere (eg Magde and Sparks, 1997), we show that melt supply and volcanism are needed to initiate second-order ridge segmentation. Axial valley bounding faults in our SWIR volcanism-poor end-member go un-segmented for up to 170 km along-axis.

  10. A dynamic bundle of four adjacent hydrophobic segments in the denatured state of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Shortle, D.

    1996-01-01

    In an earlier study of the denatured state of staphylococcal nuclease (Wang Y, Shortle D, 1995, Biochemistry 34:15895-15905), we reported evidence of a three-strand antiparallel beta sheet that persists at high urea concentrations and is stabilized by a local "non-native" interaction with four large hydrophobic residues. Because the amide proton resonances for all of the involved residues are severely broadened, this unusual structure is not amenable to conventional NMR analysis and must be studied by indirect methods. In this report, we present data that confirm the important role of interactions involving four hydrophobic residues (Leu 36, Leu 37, Leu 38, and Val 39) in stabilizing the structure formed by the chain segments corresponding to beta 1-beta 2-beta 3-h, interactions that are not present in the native state. Glycine substitutions for each of these large hydrophobic residues destabilizes or disrupts this beta structure, as assessed by HN line sharpening and changes in the CD spectrum. The 13C resonances of the carbonyl carbon for several of the residues in this structure indicate conformational dynamics that respond in a complex way to addition of urea or changes in sequence. Studies of hydrogen exchange kinetics in a closely related variant of staphylococcal nuclease demonstrate the absence of the stable hydrogen bonding between the strands expected for a native-like three-strand beta sheet. Instead, the data are more consistent with the three beta strand segments plus the four adjacent hydrophobic residues forming a dynamic, aligned array or bundle held together by hydrophobic interactions. PMID:8880914

  11. In-Depth Analysis on Influencing Factors of Adjacent Segment Degeneration After Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chaojie; Mu, Xiaoping; Wei, Jianxun; Chu, Ye; Liang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore the related influencing factors of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Material/Methods A retrospective analysis of 263 patients who underwent ACDF was carried out. Cervical x-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were required before operation, after operation, and at the last follow-up. General information and some radiographic parameters of all patients were measured and recorded. According to the imaging data, patients were put into one of two groups: non-ASD group and ASD group. The differences between the two groups were compared by t-test and χ2-test, and the related influencing factors of ASD were analyzed by logistic regression. Results In all, 138 patients had imaging ASD. Comparing the age, the postoperative cervical arc chord distance (po-CACD), and the plate to disc distance (PDD) of the two groups, differences were statistically significant (p<0.05). The gender, the fusion segment number, the pre-CACD, the pre-and-po CACD, the preoperative cervical spinal canal ratio, and the upper and lower disc height (DH) showed no statistical difference between the two groups (p>0.05). The results of logistic regression analysis showed that there were significant correlations in the following characteristics: age, postoperative po-CACD, and the PDD (p<0.05). Of all these characteristics, the correlation of age was the highest (R=1.820). Conclusions Age, po-CACD, and PDD were risk factors for ASD after ACDF. The older the operation age, the worse the recovery was of postoperative physiological curvature of cervical spine, and a PDD < 5 mm was more likely to lead to ASD. PMID:27965512

  12. In-Depth Analysis on Influencing Factors of Adjacent Segment Degeneration After Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chaojie; Mu, Xiaoping; Wei, Jianxun; Chu, Ye; Liang, Bin

    2016-12-14

    BACKGROUND To explore the related influencing factors of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective analysis of 263 patients who underwent ACDF was carried out. Cervical x-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were required before operation, after operation, and at the last follow-up. General information and some radiographic parameters of all patients were measured and recorded. According to the imaging data, patients were put into one of two groups: non-ASD group and ASD group. The differences between the two groups were compared by t-test and χ²-test, and the related influencing factors of ASD were analyzed by logistic regression. RESULTS In all, 138 patients had imaging ASD. Comparing the age, the postoperative cervical arc chord distance (po-CACD), and the plate to disc distance (PDD) of the two groups, differences were statistically significant (p<0.05). The gender, the fusion segment number, the pre-CACD, the pre-and-po CACD, the preoperative cervical spinal canal ratio, and the upper and lower disc height (DH) showed no statistical difference between the two groups (p>0.05). The results of logistic regression analysis showed that there were significant correlations in the following characteristics: age, postoperative po-CACD, and the PDD (p<0.05). Of all these characteristics, the correlation of age was the highest (R=1.820). CONCLUSIONS Age, po-CACD, and PDD were risk factors for ASD after ACDF. The older the operation age, the worse the recovery was of postoperative physiological curvature of cervical spine, and a PDD < 5 mm was more likely to lead to ASD.

  13. Segment-scale volcanic episodicity: Evidence from the North Kolbeinsey Ridge, Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, I. A.; Devey, C. W.,; LeBas, T. P.; Augustin, N.; Steinführer, A.

    2016-04-01

    The upper oceanic crust is produced by magmatism at mid-ocean ridges, a process thought to be characterized by cyclic bouts of intense magmatic activity, separated by periods when faulting accommodates most or even all of the plate motion. It is not known whether there is a distinct periodicity to such magmatic-tectonic cycles. Here we present high-resolution sidescan sonar data from the neovolcanic zone of the North Kolbeinsey Ridge, a shallow slow-spreading ridge where high glacial and steady post-glacial sedimentation rates allow relative flow ages to be determined with a resolution of around 2 kyr using backscatter amplitude as a proxy for sediment thickness and hence age. We identify 18 lava flow fields covering 40% of the area surveyed. A group of 7 flow fields showing the highest (and similar) backscatter intensity are scattered along 75 km of axial valley surveyed, suggesting that at least this length of the segment was magmatically active within a 1.2 kyr time window. Based on conservative age estimates for all datable flows and estimated eruption volumes, the post-glacial volcanic activity imaged is insufficient to maintain crustal thickness, implying that episode(s) of enhanced activity must have preceded the volcanism we image.

  14. Distribution of Seismicity and thermal structure at Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Segment of Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, A.; Singh, S. C.; Crawford, W. C.; Escartin, J.; Cannat, M.; Seher, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Lucky-strike segment (37.2 deg. N), located at the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) south of the Azores hot-spot, is characterized by a large hydrothermal field underlain by a 3-km deep magma chamber. To study the seismic activity in the Lucky-strike segment, four short-period and one broad-band ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) were deployed in a diamond shape at an spacing of 4.5 km, and centered at the hydrothermal field. These five OBSs recorded two horizontal, one vertical and one pressure channels, over a period of 13 months (06/08-08/09) as a part of the BBMOMAR experiment. All the five equipments have recorded large number of micro-earthquakes, earthquake swarms and teleseismic earthquakes. Here, we present the preliminary analysis of distribution of micro-seismicity in and around the Lucky-strike segment. We have detected about 6000 earthquakes to date. Out of these, we have located about 800 earthquakes which have been recorded by at-least four equipments with clear P- and S- arrivals. The distribution of earthquakes show a concentration of events at both inside corners North and South of the Lucky Strike segment, reaching maximum depths of more than 10 km, and a relative low number of events at the segment center, below the central volcano, with maximum depths reaching only 6 km. We have also identified several swarm activity in the region. This study will be extended to include the new data of 8/08-9/09 time period, after recovery and redeployment of instruments during the BATHYLUCK09 cruise. These additional data will thus provide the best constraints to date on the thermal structure throughout the segment and around the magma chamber at its center, and intern on the links between hydrothermal activity and deformation of the oceanic lithosphere at this site.

  15. Incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disorders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Yang, Dalong; Wang, Tao; Liu, Sen; Yang, Sidong; Ding, Wenyuan

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease (ASD) following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disorders, and hope to provide references in decision making and surgical planning for both spinal surgeon and surgically treated patients.By retrieving the medical records from January 2011 to December 2013 in our hospital, 237 patients were retrospectively reviewed. According to the occurrence of ASD at follow up, patients were divided into 2 groups: ASD and N-ASD group. To investigate risk values for the occurrence of ASD, 3 categorized factors were analyzed statistically: Patient characteristics: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), bone mineral density (BMD), duration. Surgical variables: surgical strategy, number of fusion level, surgery segment, surgery time, blood loss, intraoperative superior facet joint violation. Radiographic parameters: preoperative lumbar lordosis, preoperative angular motion at adjacent segment, preoperative adjacent segment disc degeneration, preoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration.Postoperative ASD was developed in 15 of 237 patients (6.3%) at final follow up. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups in patient characteristics of age, sex composition, BMD, duration, while the BMI was higher in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. There was no difference in surgical variables of surgical strategy, number of fusion level, surgery segment, surgery time, blood loss, while intraoperative superior facet joint violation was more common in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. There was no difference in radiographic parameters of preoperative lumbar lordosis, preoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration, while preoperative adjacent segment disc degeneration were more severe in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. The Logistic regression analysis revealed that, BMI >25 kg/m, preoperative disc degeneration, and superior facet joint

  16. Incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Yang, Dalong; Wang, Tao; Liu, Sen; Yang, Sidong; Ding, Wenyuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to explore incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease (ASD) following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disorders, and hope to provide references in decision making and surgical planning for both spinal surgeon and surgically treated patients. By retrieving the medical records from January 2011 to December 2013 in our hospital, 237 patients were retrospectively reviewed. According to the occurrence of ASD at follow up, patients were divided into 2 groups: ASD and N-ASD group. To investigate risk values for the occurrence of ASD, 3 categorized factors were analyzed statistically: Patient characteristics: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), bone mineral density (BMD), duration. Surgical variables: surgical strategy, number of fusion level, surgery segment, surgery time, blood loss, intraoperative superior facet joint violation. Radiographic parameters: preoperative lumbar lordosis, preoperative angular motion at adjacent segment, preoperative adjacent segment disc degeneration, preoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration. Postoperative ASD was developed in 15 of 237 patients (6.3%) at final follow up. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups in patient characteristics of age, sex composition, BMD, duration, while the BMI was higher in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. There was no difference in surgical variables of surgical strategy, number of fusion level, surgery segment, surgery time, blood loss, while intraoperative superior facet joint violation was more common in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. There was no difference in radiographic parameters of preoperative lumbar lordosis, preoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration, while preoperative adjacent segment disc degeneration were more severe in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. The Logistic regression analysis revealed that, BMI >25 kg/m2, preoperative disc degeneration, and superior

  17. Tectonic pattern of the Mendeleev Ridge and adjacent basins: results of joint analysis of potential fields and recent Russian seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernykh, Andrey; Astafurova, Ekaterina; Korneva, Maria; Egorova, Alena; Redko, Anton; Glebovsky, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    The work was performed under Russian Federation State Geological mapping at a scale of 1:1 000 000 and UNCLOS programs. The study area is located between 76N-84N and 156E-168W and covers the Mendeleev Ridge, adjacent Podvodnikov, Mendeleev, Chukchi Basins and northern part of the East-Siberian Sea shelf. It is characterized by very poor magnetic and gravity data coverage. Majority of airborne magnetic and on-ice gravity surveys were carried out in the region about 40 years ago and have low spatial resolution and poor navigation. Seismic data collected earlier in the study area are presented by sparse lines of historical seismic reflection soundings and by results of deep seismic refraction and reflection observations along several geotransects. Hence, conclusions concerning tectonic structure and spatial relation of the Mendeleev Ridge with adjacent geological structures up to present day remain speculative. Joint analysis of recent seismic reflection and refraction data collected during Russian expeditions «Arctic-2011» and «Arctic-2012» with mentioned above geophysical information allowed to clarify the contours of geological structures in the study area and reveal some new peculiarities of their tectonic pattern. Particularly complex tectonic structure of the Mendeleev Ridge, changing from it's southern to the northern part and represented by two main systems of tectonic displacements is discovered. The first fault system comprises horsts/graben-bounding faults oriented preferably in N-S direction. The second system is presented by faults of NW-SE direction disturbing the first one. In the southern part of the Mendeleev Ridge such faults are the strike-slip faults with small horizontal displacements. Starting from the central part of the ridge and further to the north, displacements along strike-slip faults become progressively more pronounced and have sinistral character. In the northern part of the ridge a pull-apart structures are recognized which

  18. Hydrothermal sulfide accumulation along the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Clague, D. A.; Hannington, M. D.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide deposits that form on the seafloor are often located by the detection of hydrothermal plumes in the water column, followed by exploration with deep-towed cameras, side-scan sonar imaging, and finally by visual surveys using remotely-operated vehicle or occupied submersible. Hydrothermal plume detection, however, is ineffective for finding hydrothermally-inactive sulfide deposits, which may represent a significant amount of the total sulfide accumulation on the seafloor, even in hydrothermally active settings. Here, we present results from recent high-resolution, autonomous underwater vehicle-based mapping of the hydrothermally-active Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Analysis of the ridge bathymetry resulted in the location of 581 individual sulfide deposits along 24 km of ridge length. Hydrothermal deposits were distinguished from volcanic and tectonic features based on the characteristics of their surface morphology, such as shape and slope angles. Volume calculations for each deposit results in a total volume of 372,500 m3 of hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate-silica material, for an equivalent mass of ∼1.2 Mt of hydrothermal material on the seafloor within the ridge's axial valley, assuming a density of 3.1 g/cm3. Much of this total volume is from previously undocumented inactive deposits outside the main active vent fields. Based on minimum ages of sulfide deposition, the deposits accumulated at a maximum rate of ∼400 t/yr, with a depositional efficiency (proportion of hydrothermal material that accumulates on the seafloor to the total amount hydrothermally mobilized and transported to the seafloor) of ∼5%. The calculated sulfide tonnage represents a four-fold increase over previous sulfide estimates for the Endeavour Segment that were based largely on accumulations from within the active fields. These results suggest that recent global seafloor sulfide resource estimates, which were based mostly

  19. Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, Integrated Studies Site (ISS) Update and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, D.; Ridge Community

    2003-12-01

    The Ridge 2000 (R2K) Integrated Studies bull's eye on the Juan de Fuca Ridge is focused on the Main Endeavour hydrothermal field, located on the central portion of the Endeavour Segment. This vent field is one of the most vigorously venting systems along the global mid-ocean ridge spreading network, hosting at least 18 large sulfide structures that contains more than100 smokers. Prior to a magmatic event in 2000 some of the edifices had been venting 380C, volatile-rich fluids with extremely low chlorinities for a decade. In addition to the Main Endeavour Field there are four other known high temperature vent fields spaced approximately 2 kilometers apart along the segment (with hints of more) and abundant areas of diffuse flow, both nearby and distal to the high temperature venting. Diffuse flow from the structures and from a variety of basaltic-hosted sites provides rich habitats abundant with microbial and macrofaunal communities. There are well-developed gradients in volatile concentrations along axis that may reflect influence from a sedimentary source to the north, and high chlorinity fluids vent from the most southern (Mothra) and northern fields (Sasquatch). Twenty years of research have laid a firm base for the 5-year plans of R2K at this site, which include examining the response of this segment to perturbations induced by tectonic and magmatic events, identification of the reservoirs, fluxes, and feedbacks of mass and energy at this site, and predictive modeling coupled with field observations. Since designation as an IS site, high-resolution bathymetric mapping (EM300) and an extensive multi-channel seismic survey have been conducted along the entire segment. Smaller focused areas have also been mapped at meter resolution by SM2000 sonar. Intense field programs in 2003 established the first in-situ seismic array along a mid-ocean ridge, which includes installation of a buried broadband seismometer and 7 short-period seismometers emplaced within basaltic

  20. Heat Flux From the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, W. J.; McDuff, R. E.; Stahr, F. R.; Yoerger, D. R.; Jakuba, M.

    2005-12-01

    The very essence of a hydrothermal system is transfer of heat by a convecting fluid, yet the flux of heat remains a poorly known quantity. Past studies of heat flux consisted primarily of point measurements of temperature and fluid flow at individual vent sites and inventories of the neutrally buoyant plume above the field. In 2000 the Flow Mow project used the Autonomous Benthic Explorer (ABE) to determine heat flux from Main Endeavour Field (MEF) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge by intersecting the stems of rising buoyant plumes. ABE carries instruments to measure conductivity, temperature and depth, and a MAVS current meter to determine the vertical velocity of the fluid, after correcting for vehicle motion. Complementary work on horizontal fluxes suggests that the vertical flux measured by ABE includes both the primary high buoyancy focused "smoker" sources and also entrained diffuse flow. In 2004, ABE was again used to determine heat flux not only from MEF, but also from the other four fields in the Endeavour Segment RIDGE 2000 Integrated Study Site. In this four year interval the flux of heat from MEF has declined by approximately a factor of two. The High Rise vent field has the greatest heat flux, followed by MEF, then Mothra, Salty Dawg and Sasquatch (of order 500, 300, 100, 50 MW respectively; heat flux at Sasquatch was below detection).

  1. Pulmonary lobe segmentation based on ridge surface sampling and shape model fitting

    PubMed Central

    Ross, James C.; Kindlmann, Gordon L.; Okajima, Yuka; Hatabu, Hiroto; Díaz, Alejandro A.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Washko, George R.; Dy, Jennifer; Estépar, Raúl San José

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Performing lobe-based quantitative analysis of the lung in computed tomography (CT) scans can assist in efforts to better characterize complex diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). While airways and vessels can help to indicate the location of lobe boundaries, segmentations of these structures are not always available, so methods to define the lobes in the absence of these structures are desirable. Methods: The authors present a fully automatic lung lobe segmentation algorithm that is effective in volumetric inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography (CT) datasets. The authors rely on ridge surface image features indicating fissure locations and a novel approach to modeling shape variation in the surfaces defining the lobe boundaries. The authors employ a particle system that efficiently samples ridge surfaces in the image domain and provides a set of candidate fissure locations based on the Hessian matrix. Following this, lobe boundary shape models generated from principal component analysis (PCA) are fit to the particles data to discriminate between fissure and nonfissure candidates. The resulting set of particle points are used to fit thin plate spline (TPS) interpolating surfaces to form the final boundaries between the lung lobes. Results: The authors tested algorithm performance on 50 inspiratory and 50 expiratory CT scans taken from the COPDGene study. Results indicate that the authors' algorithm performs comparably to pulmonologist-generated lung lobe segmentations and can produce good results in cases with accessory fissures, incomplete fissures, advanced emphysema, and low dose acquisition protocols. Dice scores indicate that only 29 out of 500 (5.85%) lobes showed Dice scores lower than 0.9. Two different approaches for evaluating lobe boundary surface discrepancies were applied and indicate that algorithm boundary identification is most accurate in the vicinity of fissures detectable on CT. Conclusions: The proposed

  2. Pulmonary lobe segmentation based on ridge surface sampling and shape model fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, James C.; Kindlmann, Gordon L.; Okajima, Yuka; Hatabu, Hiroto; Díaz, Alejandro A.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Washko, George R.; Dy, Jennifer; Estépar, Raúl San José

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Performing lobe-based quantitative analysis of the lung in computed tomography (CT) scans can assist in efforts to better characterize complex diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). While airways and vessels can help to indicate the location of lobe boundaries, segmentations of these structures are not always available, so methods to define the lobes in the absence of these structures are desirable. Methods: The authors present a fully automatic lung lobe segmentation algorithm that is effective in volumetric inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography (CT) datasets. The authors rely on ridge surface image features indicating fissure locations and a novel approach to modeling shape variation in the surfaces defining the lobe boundaries. The authors employ a particle system that efficiently samples ridge surfaces in the image domain and provides a set of candidate fissure locations based on the Hessian matrix. Following this, lobe boundary shape models generated from principal component analysis (PCA) are fit to the particles data to discriminate between fissure and nonfissure candidates. The resulting set of particle points are used to fit thin plate spline (TPS) interpolating surfaces to form the final boundaries between the lung lobes. Results: The authors tested algorithm performance on 50 inspiratory and 50 expiratory CT scans taken from the COPDGene study. Results indicate that the authors' algorithm performs comparably to pulmonologist-generated lung lobe segmentations and can produce good results in cases with accessory fissures, incomplete fissures, advanced emphysema, and low dose acquisition protocols. Dice scores indicate that only 29 out of 500 (5.85%) lobes showed Dice scores lower than 0.9. Two different approaches for evaluating lobe boundary surface discrepancies were applied and indicate that algorithm boundary identification is most accurate in the vicinity of fissures detectable on CT. Conclusions: The proposed

  3. Apparatus and methods for impingement cooling of an undercut region adjacent a side wall of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2001-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The inturned flange has a plurality of apertures for directing cooling steam to cool the side wall between adjacent nozzle segments.

  4. Precordial ST segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction: early thallium-201 scintigraphic evidence of adjacent posterolateral or inferoseptal involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, A.S.; Weiss, A.T.; Shah, P.K.; Maddahi, J.; Peter, T.; Ganz, W.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1985-02-01

    To investigate the myocardial perfusion correlates of precordial ST segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction, a rest thallium-201 scintigram and a closely timed 12 lead electrocardiogram were obtained within 6 hours of the onset of infarction in 44 patients admitted with their first acute inferior myocardial infarction. Thirty-six patients demonstrated precordial ST segment depression (group 1) and eight did not (group 2). A perfusion defect involving the inferior wall was present in all 44 patients. Additional perfusion defects of the adjacent posterolateral wall (n . 20), the ventricular septum (n . 9) or both (n . 6) were present in 35 of 36 patients from group 1 compared with only 1 of 8 patients from group 2 (p less than 0.001). There was no significant difference in the frequency of multivessel coronary artery disease or disease of the left anterior descending artery between group 1 and group 2 or between patients with and those without a thallium-201 perfusion defect involving the ventricular septum. Thus, precordial ST segment depression during an acute inferior myocardial infarction is associated with thallium-201 scintigraphic evidence of more extensive involvement of the adjacent posterolateral or inferoseptal myocardial segments, which probably reflects the extent and pattern of distribution of the artery of infarction, rather than the presence of coexistent multivessel coronary artery disease or disease of the left anterior descending artery.

  5. Frequently Shifting Magma Sources at Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, J.; Gill, J.; Ramos, F.; Michael, P.

    2007-12-01

    Different mantle sources and magma batches contribute to crustal growth over short temporal and spatial scales at the 10-km-long summit of the Endeavour segment of the intermediate spreading rate Juan de Fuca Ridge. Based on analyses of >275 basalts collected by submersible, about twenty "chemo-stratigraphic units" have been identified and mapped. Each reflects a different combination of mantle sources, differentiation path, and mixing history. Each represents a different filling of a magma chamber and most include a range in differentiation. Most occur within the <1 km-wide axial valley that is thought to be <10 Ka in age. The maximum along-strike length of any one unit is ~2 km. The flanking ridges differ from each other and from most of the axis in their uppermost basalts. The maximum extent of fractional crystallization within any single chemostratigraphic unit is about 30%; more fractionated magmas do not erupt, or mix in the chamber with subsequent magma batches. Two types of enriched basalts are recognized. E-MORB is enriched in K, LREE, and Nb, and depleted in Y+HREE, but is similar isotopically to axial N-MORB. We attribute it to low degree deep melting of damp peridotite. In contrast, although T-MORB has K/Ti ratios intermediate between N- and E-MORB, this is because of preferential enrichment in HFSE. Its Pb, Sr, Nd, and Hf isotope ratios are maxima, approaching those of FOZO. It is attributed to low degree melting of a chemically distinct component, perhaps pyroxenitic. Both enriched components lie on the same Pb isotope chords so are thought to be similar in age and origin.

  6. Homogeneous geochemical signal of Jan Mayen intraplate volcanism and its radial dispersion along adjacent ultra-slow spreading ridges.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelin, C.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanically active Jan Mayen Island is found on the northern tip of the Jan Mayen microcontinent, a continental fragment rifted from the Greenland coast 25 My ago following the ridge jump from Aegir to Kolbeinsey Ridge. The recurrent debate about the origin of Jan Mayen is partly due to the complex geological setting of the island. It is located directly south of the Jan Mayen Fracture Zone (JMFZ) and between the ultraslow Mohns and Kolbeinsey spreading ridges. Over the years, this intraplate volcanic suite has been diversely interpreted as an isolated hotspot, as Icelandic plume material dispersed in the northern Atlantic, as the result of melting of a sub-continental lithospheric mantle, or as a result from the coincidence of a continental fragment in the prolongation of a spreading center. However, recent U-series data (Elkins et al., 2011; 2014; in prep.) as well as geophysical high-resolution S-velocity model (Rickers et al., 2013) both indicate a high-temperature anomaly in this area, supporting the hotspot hypothesis. We present new major, trace elements, Sr, Nd, Pb and Hf isotope data for samples collected near Jan Mayen and along Kolbeinsey and Mohns Ridges, together with a new bathymetry map. One of the most striking results from Jan Mayen area is the relative homogeneity in the geochemical signature around the island compared to other hotspots. These limited geochemical variations are surprising considering that these lavas are erupted on top of a fragment of continental crust in a ridge-hotspot-fracture zone context. Along Kolbeinsey and Mohns Ridges, we observed a radial dispersion and mixing of Jan Mayen signature within the local depleted upper mantle. The difference in the geochemical gradients on both sides of the JMFZ could be linked to the difference in ridge morphology between Kolbeinsey (orthogonal, symmetric spreading, shallow and high magma supply) and Mohns Ridges (oblique, asymmetric spreading, deeper and weaker magma supply).

  7. Dyking at EPR 16°N hypermagmatic ridge segment: Insights from near-seafloor magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szitkar, Florent; Dyment, Jérôme; Le Saout, Morgane; Honsho, Chie; Gente, Pascal

    2016-11-01

    High-resolution, near-seafloor magnetic data have been acquired over the 16°N hypermagmatic segment of the East-Pacific Rise using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle. This survey proves to be ideal to test the relative efficiency of various inversion methods applied to data acquired at a more or less constant altitude above the seafloor. Unlike other methods, a recently published Bayesian inversion preserves the short wavelengths and allows for the resolution of a high-resolution reduced-to-the-pole magnetic anomaly. This anomaly unveils the presence of several laterally adjacent dykes associated with individually separated Axial Summit Troughs. The observation of such anomalies, and therefore of shallow dykes, confirms the hypermagmatic character of the segment in a location where complex magma chambers have been imaged in seismic reflection studies. Variable intensity of the magnetic anomalies reflects the depth of the dyke swarms and, ultimately, the timing and style of eruptive events, helping to constrain the spreading axis evolution.

  8. Concatemeric intermediates of equine herpesvirus type 1 DNA replication contain frequent inversions of adjacent long segments of the viral genome.

    PubMed

    Slobedman, B; Simmons, A

    1997-03-17

    In common with other alpha-herpesviruses, the genome of equine herpesvirus type-1 (EHV-1) comprises covalently linked long and short unique sequences of DNA, each flanked by inverted repeats. Equimolar amounts of two genomic isomers, generated by free inversion of the short segment, relative to the long segment, are packaged into EHV-1 virions. In contrast with herpes simplex virus (HSV), inversion of genomic long segments has not been described. In the current work, the structures of high molecular weight intermediates of EHV-1 DNA replication were studied by field inversion gel electrophoresis. It is shown that adjacent long segments of the viral genome are frequently inverted in concatemeric intermediates of EHV-1 DNA replication. Further, like HSV concatemers, high molecular weight intermediates of EHV-1 replication are flanked exclusively by the long segment of the viral genome. Hence, despite the fact that only two, rather than four, isomers of EHV-1 DNA are packaged into virions, the intermediates of EHV-1 DNA replication closely resemble those of herpes simplex virus type 1 in structure. These data have implications relating to the mechanisms involved in packaging of alpha-herpesvirus DNA.

  9. Upper crustal seismic structure of the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge from traveltime tomography: Implications for oceanic crustal accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, Robert T.; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-04-01

    isotropic and anisotropic P wave velocity structure of the upper oceanic crust on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is studied using refracted traveltime data collected by an active-source, three-dimensional tomography experiment. The isotropic velocity structure is characterized by low crustal velocities in the overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at the segment ends. These low velocities are indicative of pervasive tectonic fracturing and persist off axis, recording the history of ridge propagation. Near the segment center, velocities within the upper 1 km show ridge-parallel bands with low velocities on the outer flanks of topographic highs. These features are consistent with localized thickening of the volcanic extrusive layer from eruptions extending outside of the axial valley that flow down the fault-tilted blocks that form the abyssal hill topography. On-axis velocities are generally relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields likely due to the infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed beneath the most vigorous vent fields in a seismically active region above the axial magma chamber and may reflect increased fracturing and higher temperatures. Seismic anisotropy is high on-axis but decreases substantially off axis over 5-10 km (0.2-0.4 Ma). This decrease coincides with an increase in seismic velocities resolved at depths ≥1 km and is attributed to the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation. The orientation of the fast-axis of anisotropy is ridge-parallel near the segment center but curves near the segment ends reflecting the tectonic fabric within the OSCs.

  10. Temporal variations of the segmentation of slow to intermediate spreading mid-ocean ridges 1. Synoptic observations based on satellite altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briais, Anne; Rabinowicz, Michel

    2002-05-01

    The high-resolution geoid and gravity maps derived from ERS-1 and Geosat satellite geodetic missions reveal a set of small-scale lineations on the flanks of slow to intermediate spreading mid-ocean ridges. Assuming that these lineations reflect the variations in crustal structure induced by mid-ocean ridge axial discontinuities, we use them to investigate how the discontinuities, and the segments they bound, appear, migrate, and disappear. We provide a synoptic description of the main characteristics of the crustal structure variations, as well as their evolution in time, over the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific-Antarctic Ridges. The second-order segment length does not appear to vary with the spreading rate for the slow to intermediate spreading ridges investigated here. The amplitude of the gravity signal associated with off-axis discontinuity traces increases with the obliquity of the ridge to spreading and decreases with spreading rate and with the proximity of a ridge section to a hot spot. The patterns of the gravity lineations appear to be very homogeneous over 500- to 1000-km-large corridors bounded by large fracture zones. Far from hot spots, corridors are characterized either by segments bounded by discontinuities migrating back and forth along the axis, implying a lifetime of 10-30 Myr for the segments, or by segments and discontinuities very stable in space and time, surviving for 40-50 Myr. Closer to hot spots, the segmentation is affected in two ways. First, segments tend to migrate along axis away from hot spots, or toward cold spots. Second, asymmetric spreading tends to keep sections of ridges closer to hot spots than normal spreading would. These observations support the hypothesis that ridge segmentation and its evolution are controlled by mantle dynamics. Our analysis provides observational constraints for further models of crustal production along ridges, which are presented in the companion paper by Rabinowicz and Briais [2002].

  11. A geological model for the structure of ridge segments in slow spreading ocean crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucholke, Brian E.; Lin, Jian

    1994-06-01

    First-order (transform) and second-order ridge-axis discontinuities create a fundamental segmentation of the lithosphere along mid-ocean ridges, and in slow spreading crust they commonly are associated with exposure of subvolcanic crust and upper mantle. We analyzed available morphological, gravity, and rock sample data from the Atlantic Ocean to determine whether consistent structural patterns occur at these discontinuities and to constrain the processes that control the patterns. The results show that along their older, inside-corner sides, both first-and second-order discontinuities are characterized by thinned crust and/or mantle exposures as well as by irregular fault patterns and a paucity of volcanic features. Crust on young, outside-corner sides of discontinuities has more normal thickness, regular fault patterns, and common volcanic forms. These patterns are consistent with tectonic thinning of crust at inside corners by low-angle detachment faults as previously suggested for transform discontinuities by Dick et al. [1981] and Karson [1990]. Volcanic upper crust accretes in the hanging wall of the detachment, is stripped from the inside-corner footwall, and is carried to the outside comer. Gravity and morphological data suggest that detachment faulting is a relatively continuous, long-lived process in crust spreading at <25-30 mm/yr, that it rnay be intermittent at intermediate rates of 25-40 mm/yr, and that it is unlikely to occur at faster rates. Detachment surfaces are dissected by later, high-angle faults formed during crustal uplift into the rift mountains; these faults can cut through the entire crust and may be the kinds of faults imaged by seismic reflection profiling over Cretaceous North Atlantic crust. Off-axis variations in gravity anomalies indicate that slow spreading crust experiences cyclic magmatic/amagmatic extension and that a typical cycle is about 2 m.y. long. During magmatic phases the footwall of the detachment fault probably exposes

  12. Magma system along fast-spreading centers controlled by ridge segmentation: Evidence from the northern Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Sumio; Adachi, Yoshiko

    2013-04-01

    Mid-ocean ridges are segmented at various scales with a hierarchy, from the biggest 1st- order to the smallest 4th-order segments. These segment structures control magmatic processes beneath the mid-ocean ridges such as mantle upwelling, partial melting of the upper mantle, and magma delivery system to form the oceanic crust (Macdonald, 1998). However, systematic studies on the segment control for magmatic processes are rare at modern mid-ocean ridges due to the difficulty of obtaining in-situ samples from different crustal-lithospheric depths. Sampling at ocean floors is generally exclusively limited only to the surface (i.e. the seafloor). Furthermore, the samples obtained from the surface of the ocean floor may likely represent the products of off-axis magmatism (Kusano et al., 2012). Therefore, studies of ocean ridge segmentation in ophiolites provide important constraints for the magmatic processes beneath seafloor spreading centers, because the precise 3-D architecture of the upper mantle and the crust (all the way to the uppermost extrusive layer) and their lateral variations could be observed and investigated in ophiolites. We have studied the northern Oman ophiolite where a complete succession from the upper mantle peridotites to the uppermost extrusive rocks is well exposed. Miyashita et al. (2003), Adachi and Miyashita (2003) and Umino et al. (2003) proposed a segment structure in the northern Oman ophiolite; the Wadi Fizh area is regarded as a northward propagating tip of a mid-ocean ridge based on geological evidence (Adachi and Miyashita. 2003). On the other hand, the Wadi Thuqbah area, about 25 km south of Wadi Fizh, is regarded as a segment center based on the thickest Moho transition zone, well developed EW-trending lineations in the MTZ and layered gabbro, and the comparatively primitive compositions of the layered gabbros. Furthermore, the southern margin of the Hilti block (Salahi block), about 40 km south of Wadi Thuqbah, is inferred to be the

  13. Vent Field Distribution and Evolution Along the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Lilley, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    Five major vent fields have now been discovered along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. From the north to the south they include Sasquatch, Salty Dawg, High Rise, Main Endeavour, and Mothra. Spacing between the distinct, high-temperature fields increases from the north to the south. For example Sasquatch is located 1.6 km north of Salty Dawg and Mothra is 2.7 km south of the Main Endeavour Field. In addition to changes in spacing of the vent fields along axis there are also dramatic changes in the style, intensity, and thermal-chemical characteristics of venting. The newly discovered Sasquatch field extends for >200 m in length, and venting is limited to a few isolated, small structures that reach 284° C. Active venting is confined to the northern portion of the field. In contrast, extinct, massive sulfide edifices and oxidized sulfide talus can be followed continuously for over 200 m along a 25-30 m wide, 020 trending ridge indicating that this field was very active in the past. In contrast to the delicate active structures, older extinct structures reach at least 25 m in height and the aspect ratios are similar to active pillars in the Mothra Field 7.5 km, to the south. It is unclear if venting at this site represents rejuvenation of the field, or whether it is in a waning stage. Within Salty Dawg, vent fluid temperatures reach 296° C and vigorous venting is constrained to a few, multi-flanged edifices that reach 25 m in height and 25 m in length. The field hosts over 25 structures, oxidized sulfide is abundant, and diffuse flow is dominant. Fluid compositions and temperatures are consistent with Salty Dawg being in a waning stage of evolution. Venting intensity and incidence of venting increase dramatically at High Rise where numerous multi-flanged structures are active; temperatures reach 343° C. The most intense and active of the fields is the Main Endeavour, with at least 21 actively venting, multi-flanged edifices that contain at least 100

  14. Compressional and Shear Wave Structure of the Upper Crust Beneath the Endeavour Segment, Juan De Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Weekly, R. T.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We present tomographic images of the compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocity structure of the upper crust beneath the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This ridge segment is bounded by the Endeavour and Cobb overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) to the north and south, respectively. Near the segment center an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector underlies 5 hydrothermal vent fields. Our analysis uses data from the Endeavour tomography (ETOMO) experiment. A prior study of the Vp structure indicates that the shallow crust of the Endeavour segment is strongly heterogeneous [Weekly et al., 2014]. Beneath the OSCs Vp is anomalously low, indicating tectonic fracturing. Near the segment center, upper crustal Vp is relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields, likely due to infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed immediately above the AMC, reflecting increased fracturing or higher temperatures. Anisotropic tomography reveals large amplitude ridge-parallel seismic anisotropy on-axis (>10%), but decreases in the off-axis direction over 5-10 km. Here we use crustal S-wave phases (Sg) — generated by P-to-S conversions near the seafloor — to better constrain crustal properties. Over half the OBSs in the ETOMO experiment recorded horizontal data on two channels that are of sufficiently high quality that we can orient the geophones using the polarizations of water waves from shots within 12 km. For these OBSs, crustal Sg phases are commonly visible out to ranges of ~20-25 km. We invert the Sg data separately for Vs structure, and also jointly invert Pg and Sg data to constrain the Vp/Vs ratio. Preliminary inversions indicate that Vs and Vp/Vs varies both laterally and vertically. These results imply strong lateral variations in both the physical (e.g., crack density and aspect ratio) and chemical (e.g., hydration) properties of oceanic crust.

  15. Heat flux from black smokers on the Endeavour and Cleft segments, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginster, Ursula; Mottl, Michael J.; von Herzen, Richard P.

    1994-03-01

    We have estimated the heat flux from black smoker vents on the Juan de Fuca Ridge to evaluate their importance for heat transfer from young oceanic crust. The velocity and temperature of smoker effluent were measured from the manned submersible Alvin within a few centimeters of vent orifices, using a turbine flowmeter with an attached temperature probe. Exit velocity was calculated from a simple plume model, and vent orifices were measured in photographs and video records. The estimated power output from smokers alone is 49 plus or minus 13 MW for the Plume site, Vent 1 and Vent 3 on the southern Cleft segment near 45 deg N; 364 plus or minus 73 MW for the main vent field on the Endeavour Segment near 48 deg N; and 122 plus or minus 61 MW for the Tubeworm field 2 km north. The estimates for the Cleft and Tubeworm fields could be too low because of undiscovered vents. These values constitute only 4% to 14% of the total advective heat flux estimated for these vent fields from measurements in the nonbuoyant plume and of diffuse flow at the seafloor, indicating that most of the heat advected at these hydrothermal vent sites is carried by diffuse rather than focused flow. Values for individual smokers vary from 0.1 to 94 MW, with an average of 6.2 MW at the Endeavour field and 3.1 MW at the Cleft field. Our estimates agree well at all scales with those of Bemis et al. (1993) based on measurements made during the same dives, in some cases simultaneously, up to 50 m high in the buoyant plume. The good agreement between the two techniques implies that little diffuse flow at either high or low temperature is incorporated into the buoyant plumes generated by smokers at these sites. Velocity-temperature measurements at vents excavated by Alvin could not be modeled successfully, suggesting that vent structures may grow in equilibrium with the force of the exiting water such that orifice size is determined by volume flux. At the Endeavour field the heat flux is focused by

  16. Sulfide geochronology along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, John W.; Hannington, Mark D.; Clague, David A.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Delaney, John R.; Holden, James F.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Kimpe, Linda E.

    2013-07-01

    Forty-nine hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate rock samples from the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeastern Pacific Ocean, were dated by measuring the decay of 226Ra (half-life of 1600 years) in hydrothermal barite to provide a history of hydrothermal venting at the site over the past 6000 years. This dating method is effective for samples ranging in age from ˜200 to 20,000 years old and effectively bridges an age gap between shorter- and longer-lived U-series dating techniques for hydrothermal deposits. Results show that hydrothermal venting at the active High Rise, Sasquatch, and Main Endeavour fields began at least 850, 1450, and 2300 years ago, respectively. Barite ages of other inactive deposits on the axial valley floor are between ˜1200 and ˜2200 years old, indicating past widespread hydrothermal venting outside of the currently active vent fields. Samples from the half-graben on the eastern slope of the axial valley range in age from ˜1700 to ˜2925 years, and a single sample from outside the axial valley, near the westernmost valley fault scarp is ˜5850 ± 205 years old. The spatial relationship between hydrothermal venting and normal faulting suggests a temporal relationship, with progressive younging of sulfide deposits from the edges of the axial valley toward the center of the rift. These relationships are consistent with the inward migration of normal faulting toward the center of the valley over time and a minimum age of onset of hydrothermal activity in this region of 5850 years.

  17. Crustal Thickness and Lower Crustal Velocity Structure Beneath the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R.; Soule, D. C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Weekly, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    In 2009, a multi-scale seismic tomography experiment was conducted on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge aboard the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. Ocean bottom seismometers were deployed at 64 sites and recorded 5567 shots of a 36-element, 6600 in.3 airgun array. The experiment extended 100 km along-axis and 60 km cross-axis. Two crustal tomographic analyses have previously been completed using data from the experiment. First, 93,000 manually picked crustal refraction arrivals (Pg) were used to develop a three-dimensional model of crustal velocity and thickness in the upper crust (Weekly et al. 2014). Second, this model was used as the starting model in an analysis that incorporated ~19,000 Moho reflection arrivals (PmP) for non-ridge crossing paths to image lower crustal velocity structure and crustal thickness off-axis. A key feature of this model is a ~0.5-1 km increase in crustal thickness beneath a bathymetric plateau that extends to either side of the central portion of the Endeavour segment. We present a tomographic inversions that incorporates ridge-crossing paths to examine spatial variations in lower crustal velocity and crustal thickness beneath the ridge axis. The preliminary results from an inversion that incorporates ~8700 manually picked ridge-crossing PmP arrival times reveals a ~10-km-wide low velocity zone extending throughout the lower crust with a velocity anomaly of -0.3 to -0.5 km/s at ≥4 km depth. This low velocity zone extends both to the north and south of the axial magma chamber reflector imaged previously beneath the central Endeavour. The inversion also shows significant variations in apparent crustal thickness along axis but additional analysis is required to understand whether these variations are well resolved.

  18. Gravity anomalies over the Central Indian Ridge between 3∘S and 11∘S, Indian Ocean: Segmentation and crustal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, Kiranmai; Kamesh Raju, K. A.; Rao, P. Rama

    2016-12-01

    High-resolution shipboard geophysical investigations along the Indian Ocean ridge system are sparse especially over the Carlsberg and Central Indian ridges. In the present study, the shipboard gravity and multibeam bathymetry data acquired over a 750 km long section of the Central Indian Ridge between 3 ∘S and 11 ∘S have been analysed to understand the crustal structure and the ridge segmentation pattern. The mantle Bouguer anomalies (MBA) and the residual mantle Bouguer anomalies (RMBA) computed in the study area have shown significant variations along the ridge segments that are separated by transform and non-transform discontinuities. The MBA lows observed over the linear ridge segments bounded by well-defined transform faults are attributed to the thickening of the crust at the middle portions of the ridge segments. The estimates of crustal thickness from the RMBA shows an average of 5.2 km thick crust in the axial part of the ridge segments. The MBA and relative RMBA highs along the two non-transform discontinuities suggests a thinner crust of up to 4.0 km. The most significant MBA and RMBA highs were observed over the Vema transform fault suggesting thin crust of 4 km in the deepest part of the transform fault where bathymetry is more than 6000 m. The identified megamullion structures have relative MBA highs suggesting thinner crust. Besides MBA lows along the ridge axis, significant off-axis MBA lows have been noticed, suggesting off-axis mantle upwelling zones indicative of thickening of the crust. The rift valley morphology varies from the typical V-shaped valley to the shallow valley floor with undulations on the inner valley floor. Segments with shallow rift valley floor have depicted well-defined circular MBA lows with persistent RMBA low, suggesting modulation of the valley floor morphology due to the variations in crustal thickness and the mantle temperature. These are supported by thicker crust and weaker lithospheric mantle.

  19. Posterior lumbar dynamic stabilization instead of arthrodesis for symptomatic adjacent-segment degenerative stenosis: description of a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Mashaly, Hazem; Paschel, Erin E; Khattar, Nicolas K; Goldschmidt, Ezequiel; Gerszten, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The development of symptomatic adjacent-segment disease (ASD) is a well-recognized consequence of lumbar fusion surgery. Extension of a fusion to a diseased segment may only lead to subsequent adjacent-segment degeneration. The authors report the use of a novel technique that uses dynamic stabilization instead of arthrodesis for the surgical treatment of symptomatic ASD following a prior lumbar instrumented fusion. METHODS A cohort of 28 consecutive patients was evaluated who developed symptomatic stenosis immediately adjacent to a previous lumbar instrumented fusion. All patients had symptoms of neurogenic claudication refractory to nonsurgical treatment and were surgically treated with decompression and dynamic stabilization instead of extending the fusion construct using a posterior lumbar dynamic stabilization system. Preoperative symptoms, visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, and perioperative complications were recorded. Clinical outcome was gauged by comparing VAS scores prior to surgery and at the time of last follow-up. RESULTS The mean follow-up duration was 52 months (range 17-94 months). The mean interval from the time of primary fusion surgery to the dynamic stabilization surgery was 40 months (range 10-96 months). The mean patient age was 51 years (range 29-76 years). There were 19 (68%) men and 9 (32%) women. Twenty-three patients (82%) presented with low-back pain at time of surgery, whereas 24 patients (86%) presented with lower-extremity symptoms only. Twenty-four patients (86%) underwent operations that were performed using single-level dynamic stabilization, 3 patients (11%) were treated at 2 levels, and 1 patient underwent 3-level decompression and dynamic stabilization. The most commonly affected and treated level (46%) was L3-4. The mean preoperative VAS pain score was 8, whereas the mean postoperative score was 3. No patient required surgery for symptomatic degeneration rostral to the level of dynamic stabilization during the

  20. Minimally invasive procedure reduces adjacent segment degeneration and disease: New benefit-based global meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Chuan; Huang, Chun-Ming; Zhong, Cheng-Fan; Liang, Rong-Wei; Luo, Shao-Jian

    2017-01-01

    Objective Adjacent segment pathology (ASP) is a common complication presenting in patients with axial pain and dysfunction, requiring treatment or follow-up surgery. However, whether minimally invasive surgery (MIS), including MIS transforaminal / posterior lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF/PLIF) decreases the incidence rate of ASP remains unknown. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the incidence rate of ASP in patients undergoing MIS versus open procedures. Methods This systematic review was undertaken by following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. We searched electronic databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, SinoMed, and the Cochrane Library, without language restrictions, to identify clinical trials comparing MIS to open procedures. The results retrieved were last updated on June 15, 2016. Results Overall, 9 trials comprising 770 patients were included in the study; the quality of the studies included 4 moderate and 5 low-quality studies. The pooled data analysis demonstrated low heterogeneity between the trials and a significantly lower ASP incidence rate in patients who underwent MIS procedure, compared with those who underwent open procedure (p = 0.0001). Single-level lumbar interbody fusion was performed in 6 trials of 408 patients and we found a lower ASP incidence rate in MIS group, compared with those who underwent open surgery (p = 0.002). Moreover, the pooled data analysis showed a significant reduction in the incidence rate of adjacent segment disease (ASDis) (p = 0.0003) and adjacent segment degeneration (ASDeg) (p = 0.0002) for both procedures, favoring MIS procedure. Subgroup analyses showed no difference in follow-up durations between the procedures (p = 0.93). Conclusion Therefore, we conclude that MIS-TLIF/PLIF can reduce the incidence rate of ASDis and ASDeg, compared with open surgery. Although the subgroup analysis did not indicate a difference in follow-up duration between the two

  1. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P.-M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment, to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. We have identified a new on-axis site with diffuse flow, Ewan, and an active vent structure ∼1.2 km from the axis, Capelinhos. These sites are minor relative to the Main field, and our total heatflux estimate for all active sites (200-1200 MW) is only slightly higher than previously published estimates. We also identify fossil sites W of the main Lucky Strike field. A circular feature ∼200 m in diameter located on the flanks of a rifted off-axis central volcano is likely a large and inactive hydrothermal edifice, named Grunnus. We find no indicator of focused hydrothermal activity elsewhere along the segment, suggesting that the enhanced melt supply and the associated melt lenses, required to form central volcanoes, also sustain hydrothermal circulation to form and maintain large and long-lived hydrothermal fields. Hydrothermal discharge to the seafloor occurs along fault traces, suggesting focusing of hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust along permeable fault zones.

  2. Apparatus for impingement cooling a side wall adjacent an undercut region of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and vanes therebetween. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. Slots are formed through the inturned flange along the nozzle side wall. A plate having through-apertures extending between opposite edges thereof is disposed in each slot, the slots and plates being angled such that the cooling medium exiting the apertures in the second cavity lie close to the side wall for focusing and targeting cooling medium onto the side wall.

  3. Ascending and descending particle flux from hydrothermal plumes at Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, James P.; Bertram, Miriam A.; Wakeham, Stuart G.; Thomson, Richard E.; William Lavelle, J.; Baker, Edward T.; Feely, Richard A.

    2001-04-01

    Bio-acoustic surveys and associated zooplankton net tows have documented anomalously high concentrations of zooplankton within a 100 m layer above the hydrothermal plumes at Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. These and other data suggest that congregating epi-plume zooplankton are exploiting a food substrate associated with the hydrothermal plume. Ascending, organic-rich particles could provide a connection. Consequently, two paired sequentially sampling ascending and descending particle flux traps and a current meter were deployed on each of three moorings from July 1994 to May 1995. Mooring sites included an on-axis site (OAS; 47°57.0'N, 129°05.7'W) near the main Endeavour vent field, a "down-current" site 3 km west of the main vent field (WS), and a third background station 43 km northeast of the vent field (ES). Significant ascending and descending particle fluxes were measured at all sites and depths. Lipid analyses indicated that ascending POC was derived from mid-depth and deep zooplankton whereas descending POC also contained a component of photosynthetically derived products from the sea surface. Highest ascending POC fluxes were found at the hydrothermal plume-swept sites (OAS and WS). The limited data available, however, precludes an unequivocal conclusion that hydrothermal processes contribute to the ascending flux of organic carbon at each site. Highest ascending to descending POC flux ratios were also found at WS. Observed trends in POC, PMn/PTi, and PFe/PTi clearly support a hydrothermal component to the descending flux at the plume-swept WS site (no descending data was recovered at OAS) but not at the background ES site. Alternative explanations for ascending particle data are discussed. First-order calculations for the organic carbon input (5-22 mg C m -2 d -1) required to sustain observed epi-plume zooplankton anomalies at Endeavour are comparable both to measured total POC flux to epi-plume depths (2-5 mg C m -2 d -1: combined hydrothermal

  4. Evolution of the Mothra Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickson, D.; Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J.

    2005-12-01

    The Mothra Hydrothermal Field (MHF) is a 600 m long, high-temperature hydrothermal field. It is located 2.7 km south of the Main Endeavour Field at the southern end of the central Endeavour Segment. Mothra is the most areally extensive field along the Endeavour Segment, composed of six active sulfide clusters that are 40-200 m apart. Each cluster contains rare black smokers (venting up to 319°C), numerous diffusely venting chimneys, and abundant extinct chimneys and sulfide talus. From north to south, these clusters include Cauldron, Twin Peaks, Faulty Towers, Crab Basin, Cuchalainn, and Stonehenge. As part of the Endeavour Integrated Study Site (ISS), the MHF is a site of intensive interdisciplinary studies focused on linkages among geology, geochemistry, fluid chemistry, seismology, and microbiology. Axial valley geology at MHF is structurally complex, consisting of lightly fissured flows that abut the walls and surround a core of extensively fissured, collapsed terrain. Fissure abundance and distribution indicates that tectonism has been the dominant process controlling growth of the axial graben. Past magmatic activity is shown by the 200 m long chain of collapse basins between Crab Basin and Stonehenge, which may have held at least ~7500 m3 of lava. Assuming a flow thickness of 0.5 m, this amount of lava could cover over half the valley floor during a single volcanic event. At a local scale, MHF clusters vary in size, activity, and underlying geology. They range in size from 400-1600 m2 and consist of isolated chimneys and/or coalesced cockscomb arrays atop ramps of sulfide talus. In the northern part of the field, Cauldron, Twin Peaks, Faulty Towers, and Crab Basin are located near the western valley wall, bounded by basalt talus and a combination of collapsed sheet flows, intermixed lobate and sulfide, disrupted terrain, and isolated pillow ridges. The southern clusters, Cuchalainn and Stonehenge, are associated with collapse basins in the central valley

  5. Long-term Seismicity Comparisons from Oceanic Transforms Bounded by Slow, Intermediate, and Fast Mid-ocean Ridge Spreading Segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxel, J. H.; Dziak, R. P.; Matsumoto, H.; Fowler, M. J.; Lau, T. K.

    2007-12-01

    Long-term observations of seismicity along oceanic transform faults have traditionally been difficult due to limited coverage provided by land based seismic networks. More recently, hydroacoustically recorded earthquakes have been catalogued along the East Pacific Rise (EPR), Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR), and in the northeast Pacific by the NOAA/PMEL and Oregon State University Acoustic Monitoring Program. These catalogs reduce earthquake detection thresholds by nearly 2 orders of magnitude for the slow spreading MAR, the intermediate spreading Juan de Fuca system, and the fast spreading EPR allowing for a more complete long-term time series of seismic activity along the associated transforms in each spreading regime. Using these hydroacoustically derived earthquake catalogs from 1996-2005, this study examines the long-term temporal and spatial seismicity rate patterns of oceanic transform faults bounded by slow, intermediate, and fast mid-ocean ridge spreading. Our analysis includes 5 MAR transforms, 1 northeast Pacific, and 7 EPR tranform faults. Using standard time series analysis techniques in addition to empirical orthogonal functions (EOF), we describe time space patterns along each transform, characterize seismic behavior between transforms within each spreading regime, and finally compare seismicity time series between transforms bounded by different spreading rates. Through our analysis we anticipate the development of an oceanic tranform fault index parameterized by background seismicity rate, seismicity rate variability during seismic events, fault length, degree of tranform segmentation, and rate of spreading along bounding ridge segments. Utilizing a more complete hydroacoustically derived earthquake catalog provides an unprecedented and comprehensive approach for examining long-term seismicity patterns in transform faulting within these 3 mid-ocean ridge settings.

  6. Melt extraction and mantle source at a Southwest Indian Ridge Dragon Bone amagmatic segment on the Marion Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changgui; Dick, Henry J. B.; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Huaiyang

    2016-03-01

    This paper works on the trace and major element compositions of spatially associated basalts and peridotites from the Dragon Bone amagmatic ridge segment at the eastern flank of the Marion Platform on the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. The rare earth element compositions of basalts do not match the pre-alteration Dragon Bone peridotite compositions, but can be modeled by about 5 to 10% non-modal batch equilibrium melting from a DMM source. The Dragon Bone peridotites are clinopyroxene-poor harzburgite with average spinel Cr# 27.7. The spinel Cr# indicates a moderate degree of melting. However, CaO and Al2O3 of the peridotites are lower than other abyssal peridotites at the same Mg# and extent of melting. This requires a pyroxene-poor initial mantle source composition compared to either hypothetical primitive upper mantle or depleted MORB mantle sources. We suggest a hydrous melting of the initial Dragon Bone mantle source, as wet melting depletes pyroxene faster than dry. According to the rare earth element patterns, the Dragon Bone peridotites are divided into two groups. Heavy REE in Group 1 are extremely fractionated from middle REE, which can be modeled by 7% fractional melting in the garnet stability field and another 12.5 to 13.5% in the spinel stability field from depleted and primitive upper mantle sources, respectively. Heavy REE in Group 2 are slightly fractionated from middle REE, which can be modeled by 15 to 20% fractional melting in the spinel stability field from a depleted mantle source. Both groups show similar melting degree to other abyssal peridotites. If all the melt extraction occurred at the middle oceanic ridge where the peridotites were dredged, a normal 6 km thick oceanic crust is expected at the Dragon Bone segment. However, the Dragon Bone peridotites are exposed in an amagmatic ridge segment where only scattered pillow basalts lie on a partially serpentinized mantle pavement. Thus their depletion requires an earlier melting

  7. Monitoring Change on Hydrothermal Edifices by Photogrammetric Time Series: Case Studies from the Endeavour Segment (Juan de Fuca Ridge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesemann, M.; Kwasnitschka, T.; Kelley, D. S.; Mihaly, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution photogrammetric surveys derived from ROV or AUV imagery yield seafloor geometry at centimeter resolution with full color texture while modeling overhangs and crevasses, generating vastly more detailed terrain models compared to most acoustic methods. The models furthermore serve as geographic reference frames for localized studies. Repetitive surveys consequently facilitate the precise, quantitative study of edifice buildup and erosion as well as the development of the biological habitat. We compare data gathered by the Ocean Networks Canada maintenance cruises with earlier surveys at two sites (Mothra, Main Endeavour Field) along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  8. Enhancement of Lumbar Fusion and Alleviation of Adjacent Segment Disc Degeneration by Intermittent PTH(1-34) in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuang; Tian, Fa-Ming; Gou, Yu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Heng; Song, Hui-Ping; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Zhang, Liu

    2016-04-01

    Osteoporosis, which is prevalent in postmenopausal or aged populations, is thought to be a contributing factor to adjacent segment disc degeneration (ASDD), and the incidence and extent of ASDD may be augmented by osteopenia. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1-34) has already been shown to be beneficial in osteoporosis, lumbar fusion and matrix homeostasis of intervertebral discs. However, whether PTH(1-34) has a reversing or retarding effect on ASDD in osteopenia has not been confirmed. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of intermittent PTH(1-34) on ASDD in an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model. One hundred 3-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent L4 -L5 posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) with spinous-process wire fixation 4 weeks after OVX surgery. Control groups were established accordingly. PTH(1-34) was intermittently administered immediately after PLF surgery and lasted for 8 weeks using the following groups (n = 20) (V = vehicle): Sham+V, OVX+V, Sham+PLF+V, OVX+PLF+V, OVX+PLF+PTH. The fused segments showed clear evidence of eliminated motion on the fusion-segment based on manual palpation. Greater new bone formation in histology was observed in PTH-treated animals compared to the control group. The extent of ASDD was significantly increased by ovariotomy. Intermittent PTH(1-34) significantly alleviated ASDD by preserving disc height, microvessel density, relative area of vascular buds, endplate thickness and the relative area of endplate calcification. Moreover, protein expression results showed that PTH(1-34) not only inhibited matrix degradation by decreasing MMP-13, ADAMTS-4 and Col-I, but also promote matrix synthesis by increasing Col-II and Aggrecan. In conclusion, PTH(1-34), which effectively improves lumbar fusion and alleviates ASDD in ovariectomized rats, may be a potential candidate to ameliorate the prognosis of lumbar fusion in osteopenia.

  9. Temporal variations of the segmentation of slow to intermediate spreading mid-ocean ridges 2. A three-dimensional model in terms of lithosphere accretion and convection within the partially molten mantle beneath the ridge axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowicz, Michel; Briais, Anne

    2002-06-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical models of convection within the partially molten mantle beneath the ridge axis. The modeling takes into account the cavity flow driven by plate spreading, the diffuse upwelling due to plate accretion, and the shearing movement generated by large-scale mantle flow. The ridge axis is free to move in the spreading direction to adjust to the maxima of tension at the lithosphere-mantle interface induced by the convective circulation. The melt distribution in the mantle and the crustal production at the ridge axis are estimated using the formalism of McKenzie and Bickle [1988]. During the experiments the record of the ridge axis positions and crustal production is used to compute synthetic maps of the isochrons and oceanic crustal thickness. Close to the ridge, the ascending convective flow consists of 80- to 100-km-long hot sheets oriented either roughly parallel or orthogonal to spreading. Most ridge segments fit with the top of hot upwelling sheets, while transient transform faults coincide with the top of cold downwelling flows. The crustal maps display lineations subparallel or slightily oblique to spreading, a few tens of million years long, and separated by ~60-50 km, resulting from the lithospheric record of the excess crust produced at the junction of hot sheets. When a junction of two hot sheets migrates outside the ridge axial plane, the crustal thickness maximum splits into two maxima along axis, and the induced lineation in the crustal map splits into two branches. The merging of lineations occurs when the ridge plane traps the junction of hot sheets. When the large-scale mantle circulation moves parallel to the ridge crest, it slowly pushs the spreading-parallel convective sheets. The resulting lineations form V shapes pointing in the same direction as the large-scale flow. When the large-scale flow parallels spreading, it slowly pushes the ridge-parallel hot sheets in the upflow direction. Thus the ridge segments

  10. Volatile, Major and Trace Element Chemistry of Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions and Host Glasses in Cleft and Coaxial Segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, D. M.; Wanless, V. D.; Lytle, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    To assess the influence of hotspot anomalies on crustal accretion along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, we examine lavas and olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) erupted at segments adjacent to (Coaxial) and isolated from (Cleft) the Cobb Hotspot, which currently intersects the ridge at Axial Seamount. Coaxial samples (host basalt N = 7; MIs N=113) were collected from the center of an axial rise, ~60 km north of Axial Seamount. Cleft samples were collected within the axial graben, ~100 km south of Axial Seamount (host basalts N=3; MIs N=38). The MIs and host glasses were analyzed for major, trace and volatile element concentrations. Vapor-saturation pressures of each MI were determined using CO2-H2O concentrations. Entrapment depths for Coaxial MIs range from 0-16 km below seafloor (bsf) with a broad frequency peak centered about 1.5 km bsf. By contrast, the Cleft segment MIs have a narrower range of entrapment depths (0 to 12 km bsf), with a narrow and deeper frequency distribution centered around 3 km bsf. The average rare-earth element (REE) concentrations for the MIs closely resemble those of the host-basalt glasses. Coaxial MIs display variably depleted light and heavy REE patterns and indicate variable degrees of fractional crystallization. The Cleft MIs are uniformly depleted in light REEs only, and span a narrower compositional range, indicating similar crystallization histories. This suggests a model of accretion at Cleft, where relatively homogeneous mantle melts crystallize from ~10 km bsf to the seafloor, with significant storage and crystallization in a shallow (3 km depth) melt lens. At Coaxial, crystallization begins at greater depths (~15 km bsf) with a broader, shallower peak of MI entrapment depths and more variable trace element patterns. The peaks in crystallization depths are broadly consistent with the depths for seismically imaged melt lenses (Carbotte et al., 2006) at both segments. The broader peak of MI entrapment depths observed at Coaxial may

  11. Eruptive and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, based on AUV mapping data and lava flow ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, David. A.; Dreyer, Brian M.; Paduan, Jennifer B.; Martin, Julie F.; Caress, David W.; Gill, James B.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Thomas, Hans; Portner, Ryan A.; Delaney, John R.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McGann, Mary L.

    2014-08-01

    bathymetric surveys from autonomous underwater vehicles ABE and D. Allan B. were merged to create a coregistered map of 71.7 km2 of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Radiocarbon dating of foraminifera in cores from three dives of remotely operated vehicle Doc Ricketts provide minimum eruption ages for 40 lava flows that are combined with the bathymetric data to outline the eruptive and tectonic history. The ages range from Modern to 10,700 marine-calibrated years before present (yr BP). During a robust magmatic phase from >10,700 yr BP to ˜4300 yr BP, flows erupted from an axial high and many flowed >5 km down the flanks; some partly buried adjacent valleys. Axial magma chambers (AMCs) may have been wider than today to supply dike intrusions over a 2 km wide axial zone. Summit Seamount formed by ˜4770 yr BP and was subsequently dismembered during a period of extension with little volcanism starting ˜4300 yr BP. This tectonic phase with only rare volcanic eruptions lasted until ˜2300 yr BP and may have resulted in near-solidification of the AMCs. The axial graben formed by crustal extension during this period of low magmatic activity. Infrequent eruptions occurred on the flanks between 2620-1760 yr BP and within the axial graben since ˜1750 yr BP. This most recent phase of limited volcanic and intense hydrothermal activity that began ˜2300 yr BP defines a hydrothermal phase of ridge development that coincides with the present-day 1 km wide AMCs and overlying hydrothermal vent fields.

  12. Eruptive and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, based on AUV mapping data and lava flow ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, David A.; Dreyer, Brian M; Paduan, Jennifer B; Martin, Julie F; Caress, David W; Gillespie, James B.; Kelley, Deborah S; Thomas, Hans; Portner, Ryan A; Delaney, John R; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McGann, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution bathymetric surveys from autonomous underwater vehicles ABE and D. Allan B. were merged to create a coregistered map of 71.7 km2 of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Radiocarbon dating of foraminifera in cores from three dives of remotely operated vehicle Doc Ricketts provide minimum eruption ages for 40 lava flows that are combined with the bathymetric data to outline the eruptive and tectonic history. The ages range from Modern to 10,700 marine-calibrated years before present (yr BP). During a robust magmatic phase from >10,700 yr BP to ~4300 yr BP, flows erupted from an axial high and many flowed >5 km down the flanks; some partly buried adjacent valleys. Axial magma chambers (AMCs) may have been wider than today to supply dike intrusions over a 2 km wide axial zone. Summit Seamount formed by ~4770 yr BP and was subsequently dismembered during a period of extension with little volcanism starting ~4300 yr BP. This tectonic phase with only rare volcanic eruptions lasted until ~2300 yr BP and may have resulted in near-solidification of the AMCs. The axial graben formed by crustal extension during this period of low magmatic activity. Infrequent eruptions occurred on the flanks between 2620–1760 yr BP and within the axial graben since ~1750 yr BP. This most recent phase of limited volcanic and intense hydrothermal activity that began ~2300 yr BP defines a hydrothermal phase of ridge development that coincides with the present-day 1 km wide AMCs and overlying hydrothermal vent fields.

  13. Magmatic activities on the Southwest Indian Ridge between 35°E and 40°E, the closest segment to the Marion hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Taichi; Okino, Kyoko; Sato, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Mariko; Hanyu, Tomoko; Seama, Nobukazu

    2013-12-01

    We conducted geophysical surveys, including bathymetry, gravity, and magnetism, within a first-order segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) between the Prince Edward and Eric Simpson fracture zones (FZs) (latitude 35°-40°E, segment PE), in the vicinity of the Marion hotspot. Segment PE includes four orthogonally spreading second-order segments (PE-1, PE-2, PE-3, and PE-4) and a long, oblique axial valley (NTD-1). Segments PE-1, PE-2, and PE-4 are magmatic, whereas segment PE-3 and NTD-1 are characterized by low magmatic activity. Segment PE-3 is a nascent segment and NTD-1 contains three tiny magmatic sections. Each low-magmatic interval along the axis of segment PE lies between two magmatic segments. This segmentation pattern is similar to the SWIR between the Gallieni and Melville FZs; therefore, a strong melt-focusing process can be expected. Different characteristics of second-order magmatic segments suggest that the magmatic activity in each segment varies among each other as well as that of the other segments of SWIR. Continuous seafloor morphology and isochrons over off-axis areas of segment PE-1 and NTD-1 suggest that PE-1 shortened after the C2An chron. The V-shaped bathymetric structure between segment PE-1 and NTD-1 suggests that the melt supply center has migrated westward. This westward melt migration would have reduced magmatic activity at NTD-1 after C2An. Ridge obliquity may also have reduced magmatic activity. Geophysical characteristics of second-order segments suggest that magmatic activity of segment PE is mainly controlled by a strong melt-focusing process and a comparatively low contribution of melt supply from Marion hotspot.

  14. Microearthquake activity, lithospheric structure, and deformation modes at an amagmatic ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera

    2016-07-01

    While nascent oceanic lithosphere at slow to fast spreading mid-ocean ridges (MOR) is relatively well studied, much less is known about the lithospheric structure and properties at ultraslow MORs. Here we present microearthquake data from a 1 year ocean bottom seismometer deployment at the amagmatic, oblique supersegment of the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. A refraction seismic experiment was performed to constrain upper lithosphere P-velocities and results were used to construct a 1D velocity model for earthquake location. Earthquake foci were located individually and subsequently relocated relative to each other to sharpen the image of seismically active structures. Frequent earthquake activity extends to 31 km beneath the seafloor, indicating an exceptionally thick brittle lithosphere and an undulating brittle-ductile transition that implies significant variations in the along-axis thermal structure of the lithosphere. We observe a strong relation between petrology, microseismicity distribution, and topography along the ridge axis: Peridotite-dominated areas associate with deepest hypocenters, vast volumes of lithosphere that deforms aseismically as a consequence of alteration, and the deepest axial rift valley. Areas of basalt exposure correspond to shallower hypocenters, shallower and more rugged axial seafloor. Focal mechanisms deviate from pure extension and are spatially variable. Earthquakes form an undulating band of background seismicity and do not delineate discrete detachment faults as common on slow spreading ridges. Instead, the seismicity band sharply terminates to the south, immediately beneath the rift boundary. Considering the deep alteration, large steep boundary faults might be present but are entirely aseismic.

  15. Survival Rates and Risk Factors for Cephalad and L5-S1 Adjacent Segment Degeneration after L5 Floating Lumbar Fusion : A Minimum 2-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Seok; Park, Seung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although the L5-S1 has distinct structural features in comparison with other lumbar spine segments, not much is known about adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) at the L5-S1 segment. The aim of study was to compare the incidence and character of ASD of the cephalad and L5-S1 segments after L5 floating lumbar fusion. Methods From 2005 to 2010, 115 patients who underwent L5 floating lumber fusion were investigated. The mean follow-up period was 46.1 months. The incidence of radiological and clinical ASD of the cephalad and the L5-S1 segments was compared using survival analysis. Risk factors affecting ASD were analyzed using a log rank test and the Cox proportional hazard model. Results Radiological ASD of the L5-S1 segment had a statistically significant higher survival rate than that of the cephalad segment (p=0.001). However, clinical ASD of the L5-S1 segment was significantly lower survival rates than that of the cephalad segment (p=0.038). Risk factor analysis showed that disc degeneration of the cephalad segment and preoperative spinal stenosis of the L5-S1 segment were risk factors. Conclusion In L5 floating fusion, radiological ASD was more common in the cephalad segment and clinical ASD was more common in the L5-S1 segment. At the L5-S1 segment, the degree of spinal stenosis appears to be the most influential risk factor in ASD incidences, unlike the cephalad segment. PMID:25733991

  16. Age, Episodicity and Migration of Hydrothermal Activity within the Axial Valley, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Kelley, D. S.; Clague, D. A.; Holden, J. F.; Tivey, M. K.; Delaney, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide deposits record the history of high-temperature venting along the Endeavour Segment. Active venting is currently located within five discreet vent fields, with minor diffuse venting occurring between the fields. However, inactive and/or extinct sulfide structures are found throughout the entire axial valley of the ridge segment, suggesting that hydrothermal activity has been more vigorous in the past or focused venting has migrated with time. Here, we present age constraints from U-series dating of 44 sulfide samples collected by manned submersible from between the Mothra Field in the south to Sasquatch in the north. Samples are dated using 226Ra/Ba ratios from hydrothermal barite that precipitates along with the sulfide minerals. Most samples have been collected from within or near the active vent fields. Fifteen samples from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) show a spectrum of ages from present to 2,430 years old, indicating that this field has been continuously active for at least ~2,400 years. MEF appears to be oldest currently active field. This minimum value for the age of hydrothermal activity also provides a minimum age of the axial valley itself. Ages from thirteen samples from the High-Rise Field indicate continuous venting for at least the past ~1,250 years. These age data are used in conjunction with age constraints of the volcanic flows to develop an integrated volcanic, hydrothermal and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment. The total volume of hydrothermal sulfide within the axial valley, determined from high-resolution bathymetry, is used in conjunction with the age constraints of the sulfide material to determine the mass accumulation rates of sulfide along the Endeavour Segment. These data can be used to calibrate the efficiency of sulfide deposition from the hydrothermal vents, and provide a time-integrated history of heat, fluid and chemical fluxes at the ridge-segment scale. The comparison of time-integrated rates with

  17. Unraveling a graveyard of core complexes at the 13N segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, H.; Smith, D. K.

    2006-12-01

    On the west flank of the 13N MAR segment lies a veritable graveyard of core complexes capped by low-angle corrugated detachment surfaces in various stages of evolution [Smith et al. 2006]. The numerous detachment surfaces that cover the seafloor in this region may answer some important questions: Where do core complexes initiate and how regularly? How do they evolve as they are exhumed, get rafted away from the axis, and become extinct? Our goal is to reconstruct the formation and development of the more than 30 core complexes that we observe both on and off axis in this unique region of the Atlantic. Seafloor magnetic anomaly data are essential to decipher the spreading history and to study the effect of repeated core complex formation on the symmetry of spreading. The magnetic anomaly data can be used to estimate the kinematic history of each individual core complex, in particular the age, duration and velocity of its opening, and the distance from the axis that the core complex initiated. The analysis is based on the assumption that for the duration of core complex exhumation, symmetric spreading continues at the magmatic axis, albeit at a reduced rate. We show examples of the application of this analysis to core complexes identified near the MAR. In the first example, we investigate a single core complex on the eastern side of the ridge at 14.7N [Fujiwara et al. 2003]. We use magnetic anomalies on the western side of the ridge to show that a significant reduction of spreading half rate from about 12 km/My to 5 km/My occurs at 1.1 Ma. This we interpret to be the time at which exhumation of the core complex began while the magmatic spreading center did not shut down but remained active at a reduced rate. Simultaneous spreading of a magmatic spreading center and an amagmatic detachment fault has been documented at the TAG segment of the MAR (26 N) [Tivey et al. 2003]. On the eastern side of the ridge we identify a "gap" of about 12 km in the magnetic anomaly

  18. Adjacent Segment Disease in a Patient With Klippel-Feil Syndrome and Radiculopathy: Surgical Treatment With Two-Level Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro; Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel

    2007-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a complex congenital condition characterized by improper segmentation of cervical motion segments that could contribute to undesirable adjacent segment degeneration. KFS patients have a strong tendency to present with disease in the adjacent segments. When this condition is present, anterior decompression followed by total disc replacement can be performed safely and can lead to good clinical results. This treatment has theoretical advantages compared with anterior decompression and fusion. Comparative studies and long-term follow-up are needed. Complications associated with fusion include loss of a motion segment, disc height loss, subsidence of the graft, progressive degenerative changes at the adjacent level, graft-related complications, and graft-site complications. Such new technologies as motion preservation spine arthroplasty represent attempts to avoid these complications. Here we present a case report of a 62-year-old female patient with type I congenital fusion at the C5–6 level, with a history of neck pain and right radiculopathy at C5–7. X-rays and MRI show evidence of adjacent segment degeneration at levels above and below congenital fusion. The patient's preoperative visual analog score (VAS) for neck pain was 7 out of a possible 10, her score for right upper extremity pain was 8 out of 10, and her Neck Disability Index (NDI) was 32%. Surgical treatment consisted of anterior decompression and total disc replacement at both levels. At 1-year follow-up, the patient's VAS for neck pain was 2 out of 10, her VAS score for right upper extremity pain was 1 of 10, and her NDI was 9%. PMID:25802590

  19. Adjacent segment disease in a patient with klippel-feil syndrome and radiculopathy: surgical treatment with two-level disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro; Zárate-Kalfópulos, Barón; Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel

    2007-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a complex congenital condition characterized by improper segmentation of cervical motion segments that could contribute to undesirable adjacent segment degeneration. KFS patients have a strong tendency to present with disease in the adjacent segments. When this condition is present, anterior decompression followed by total disc replacement can be performed safely and can lead to good clinical results. This treatment has theoretical advantages compared with anterior decompression and fusion. Comparative studies and long-term follow-up are needed. Complications associated with fusion include loss of a motion segment, disc height loss, subsidence of the graft, progressive degenerative changes at the adjacent level, graft-related complications, and graft-site complications. Such new technologies as motion preservation spine arthroplasty represent attempts to avoid these complications. Here we present a case report of a 62-year-old female patient with type I congenital fusion at the C5-6 level, with a history of neck pain and right radiculopathy at C5-7. X-rays and MRI show evidence of adjacent segment degeneration at levels above and below congenital fusion. The patient's preoperative visual analog score (VAS) for neck pain was 7 out of a possible 10, her score for right upper extremity pain was 8 out of 10, and her Neck Disability Index (NDI) was 32%. Surgical treatment consisted of anterior decompression and total disc replacement at both levels. At 1-year follow-up, the patient's VAS for neck pain was 2 out of 10, her VAS score for right upper extremity pain was 1 of 10, and her NDI was 9%.

  20. Upper Crustal Structure of the Cleft Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge using 2D Streamer travel time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Canales, J.; Carbotte, S. M.; Nedimovic, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    We use long off-set (6 km) multichannel seismic reflection data to obtain the P-wave seismic structure of the upper ~2 km of the crust along the southern part of the intermediate-spreading Juan de Fuca Ridge (Cleft segment). Along this segment, the top of the Axial Magma Chamber (AMC) deepens from south to north from about 2.0 km at the southern end of the segment to about 2.3 km at the northern end. Both segment ends are characterized by high-temperature hydrothermal venting. Our objective is to study the effects of high temperature hydrothermal circulation on the seismic structure of the shallow crust. We jointly inverted refracted and reflected travel times (from the top of the AMC) to obtain the 2 dimensional velocity structure of the earth along ~60 km of the ridge axis. Prior to tomographic inversion, processing of marine seismic data included trace editing, trapezoidal band pass filtering (3-5-15-30 Hz), formation of partial off-set stacks of 5 shots (i.e, supershots) to increase the signal to noise ratio and downward continuation of the wavefield to a datum just above the sea floor (i.e, phase shift in the frequency-wave number domain of both source and receiver gathers to extract travel time information from refracted arrivals at near offset. Traveltime picking of the arrivals was done using a semi automated first break routine. The picked travel times of the first refracted arrivals and the reflected arrivals from the AMC are then input into a tomography inversion algorithm to build a 2D velocity model. Our results do not show detectable velocity variations associated with the presence of active high-temperature hydrothermal discharge, probably because the length scale of hydrothermal alteration is smaller than the resolving power of traveltime tomography. However our results are a first step towards higher-resolution seismic imaging models using waveform inversion. We will also present results from off-axis data to understand the early evolution of the

  1. Causes of long-term landscape evolution of "passive" margins and adjacent continental segments at the South Atlantic Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton; Hackspacher, Peter C.

    2013-04-01

    During the last 10 years research efforts have been devoted to understand the coupling between tectonic and surface processes in the formation of recent topography. Quantification of the rate at which landforms adapt to a changing tectonic, heat flow, and climate environment in the long term has become an important research object and uses intensively data revealed by low-temperature thermochronology, terrigenous cosmogenic nuclides, and geomorphological analyses. The influence of endogenic forces such as mantle processes as one of the causes for "Dynamic Topography Evolution" have been explored in a few studies, recently. In addition, the increased understanding how change in surface topography, and change in the amount of downward moving cold surface water caused by climate change affects warping isotherms in the uppermost crust allows further interpretation of low-temperature thermochronological data. "Passive" continental margins and adjacent continental segments especially at the South Atlantic ocean are perfect locations to quantify exhumation and uplift rates, model the long-term landscape evolution, and provide information on the influence of mantle processes on a longer time scale. This climate-continental margin-mantle process-response system is caused by the interaction between endogenic and exogenic forces that are related to the mantle-process driven rift - drift - "passive" continental margin evolution of the South Atlantic, and the climate change since the Early/Late Cretaceous climate maximum. Furthermore, the influence of major transform faults (also called: transfer zones, Fracture Zones (FZ)) on the long-term evolution of "passive" continental margins is still very much in debate. The presentation will provide insight in possible causes for the differentiated long-term landscape evolution along the South Atlantic Ocean.

  2. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-Yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  3. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  4. Modeling mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal response to earthquakes, tides, and ocean currents: a case study at the Grotto mound, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Bemis, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems feature intricate interconnections among oceanic, geological, hydrothermal, and biological processes. The advent of the NEPTUNE observatory operated by Ocean Networks Canada at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge enables scientists to study these interconnections through multidisciplinary, continuous, real-time observations. The multidisciplinary observatory instruments deployed at the Grotto Mound, a major study site of the NEPTUNE observatory, makes it a perfect place to study the response of a seafloor hydrothermal system to geological and oceanic processes. In this study, we use the multidisciplinary datasets recorded by the NEPTUNE Observatory instruments as observational tools to demonstrate two different aspects of the response of hydrothermal activity at the Grotto Mound to geological and oceanic processes. First, we investigate a recent increase in venting temperature and heat flux at Grotto observed by the Benthic and Resistivity Sensors (BARS) and the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) respectively. This event started in Mar 2014 and is still evolving by the time of writing this abstract. An initial interpretation in light of the seismic data recorded by a neighboring ocean bottom seismometer on the NEPTUNE observatory suggests the temperature and heat flux increase is probably triggered by local seismic activities. Comparison of the observations with the results of a 1-D mathematical model simulation of hydrothermal sub-seafloor circulation elucidates the potential mechanisms underlying hydrothermal response to local earthquakes. Second, we observe significant tidal oscillations in the venting temperature time series recorded by BARS and the acoustic imaging of hydrothermal plumes by COVIS, which is evidence for hydrothermal response to ocean tides and currents. We interpret the tidal oscillations of venting temperature as a result of tidal loading on a poroelastic medium. We then invoke poroelastic

  5. Geology of a vigorous hydrothermal system on the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, J.R.; Robigou, V.; McDuff, R.E. ); Tivey, M.K. )

    1992-12-10

    A high-precision, high-resolution geologic map explicitly documents relationships between tectonic features and large steep-sided, sulfide-sulfate-silica deposits in the vigorously venting Endeavour hydrothermal field near the northern end of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Location of the most massive sulfide structures appears to be controlled by intersections of ridge-parallel normal faults and other fracture-fissure sets that trend oblique to, and perpendicular to the overall structural fabric of the axial valley. As presently mapped, the field is about 200 by 400 m on a side and contains at least 15 large (> 1,000 m[sup 3]) sulfide edifices and many tens of smaller, commonly inactive, sulfide structures. The larger sulfide structures are also the most vigorously venting features in the field; they are commonly more than 30 m in diameter and up to 20 m in height. Maximum venting temperatures of 375[degrees]C are associated with the smaller structures in the northern portion of the field are consistently 20[degrees]-30[degrees]C lower. Hydrothermal output from individual active sulfide features varies from no flow in the lower third of the edifice to vigorous output from fracture-controlled black smoker activity near the top of the structures. Two types of diffuse venting in the Endeavour field include a lower temperature 8[degrees]-15[degrees]C output through colonies of large tubeworms and 25[degrees]-50[degrees]C vent fluid that seems to percolate through the tops of overhanging flanges. The large size and steep-walled nature of these structures evidently results from sustained venting in a mature hydrothermal system, coupled with dual mineral depositional mechanisms involving vertical growth by accumulation of chimney sulfide debris and lateral growth by means of flange development.

  6. Could the Topping-Off Technique Be the Preventive Strategy against Adjacent Segment Disease after Pedicle Screw-Based Fusion in Lumbar Degenerative Diseases? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Po-Hsin; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; An, Howard S.; Liu, Kang-Ying

    2017-01-01

    The “topping-off” technique is a new concept applying dynamic or less rigid fixation such as hybrid stabilization device (HSD) or interspinous process device (IPD) for the purpose of avoiding adjacent segment disease (ASD) proximal to the fusion construct. A systematic review of the literature was performed on the effect of topping-off techniques to prevent or decrease the occurrence of ASD after lumbar fusion surgery. We searched through major online databases, PubMed and MEDLINE, using key words related to “topping-off” technique. We reviewed the surgical results of “topping-off” techniques with either HSD or IPD, including the incidence of ASD at two proximal adjacent levels (index and supra-adjacent level) as compared to the fusion alone group. The results showed that the fusion alone group had statistically higher incidence of radiographic (52.6%) and symptomatic (11.6%) ASD at the index level as well as higher incidence (8.1%) of revision surgery. Besides, the HSD (10.5%) and fusion groups (24.7%) had statistically higher incidences of radiographic ASD at supra-adjacent level than the IPD (1%). The findings suggest that the “topping-off” technique may potentially decrease the occurrence of ASD at the proximal motion segments. However, higher quality prospective randomized trials are required prior to wide clinical application. PMID:28321409

  7. Fishing along the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar reservoir adjacent to the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee: behavior, knowledge and risk perception.

    PubMed

    Rouse Campbell, Kym; Dickey, Richard J; Sexton, Richard; Burger, Joanna

    2002-11-01

    Catching and eating fish is usually viewed as a fun, healthy and safe activity. However, with continuing increases in fish consumption advisories due to the contamination of our environment, anglers have to decide whether or not to eat the fish they catch. The Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir is under a fish consumption advisory because of elevated PCB concentrations in striped bass (Morone saxatilis), catfish (Ictalurus spp.) and sauger (Stizostedion canadense) due in part from contaminants released from the US Department of Energy's (USDOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in East Tennessee. To obtain information about the demographics, fishing behavior, knowledge, fish consumption and risk perception of anglers, a survey was conducted of 202 people actively fishing either on land or by boat along the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir adjacent to the ORR from Melton Hill Dam to the Poplar Creek confluence or on Poplar Creek within ORR boundaries from mid-March to early November 2001. Even though 81% of people interviewed knew about the fish consumption advisories for the study area, 48% of them thought the fish were safe to eat, while 38% ate the fish that they caught from the study area. Approximately 36% of anglers who had knowledge of the fish consumption warnings ate fish from the study area. Providing confirmation that people fish for many reasons, 35% of anglers interviewed did not eat fish at all. The majority of anglers interviewed knew about the fish consumption advisories because of the signs posted throughout the study area. However, few people knew the correct fish advisories. Significantly fewer blacks had knowledge of the fish consumption warnings than whites. Information resulting from this study could be used to design a program with the objective of reaching the people who may be most at risk from eating fish caught from the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir.

  8. Segment-scale variations in seafloor volcanic and tectonic processes from multibeam sonar imaging, Mid-Atlantic Ridge Rainbow region (35°45'-36°35'N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eason, Deborah E.; Dunn, Robert A.; Pablo Canales, J.; Sohn, Robert A.

    2016-09-01

    Along-axis variations in melt supply and thermal structure can lead to significant variations in the mode of crustal accretion at mid-ocean ridges. We examine variations in seafloor volcanic and tectonic processes on the scale of individual ridge segments in a region of the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (35°45'-36°35'N) centered on the Rainbow nontransform discontinuity (NTD). We use multibeam sonar backscatter amplitude data, taking advantage of multifold and multidirectional coverage from the MARINER geophysical study to create a gridded compilation of seafloor reflectivity, and interpret the sonar image within the context of other data to examine seafloor properties and identify volcanic flow fields and tectonic features. Along the spreading segments, differences in volcanic productivity, faulting, eruption style, and frequency correlate with inferred magma supply. Regions of low magma supply are associated with more widely spaced faults, and larger volcanic flow fields that are more easily identified in the backscatter image. Identified flow fields with the highest backscatter occur near the ends of ridge segments. Their relatively smooth topography contrasts with the more hummocky, cone-dominated terrain that dominates most of the neovolcanic zone. Patches of seafloor with high, moderately high, and low backscatter intensity across the Rainbow massif are spatially correlated with observations of basalt, gabbro and serpentinized peridotite, and sediment, respectively. Large detachment faults have repeatedly formed along the inside corners of the Rainbow NTD, producing a series of oceanic core complexes along the wake of the NTD. A new detachment fault is currently forming in the ridge segment just north of the now inactive Rainbow massif.

  9. Time-series measurement of hydrothermal heat flux at the Grotto mound, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangyu; Jackson, Darrell R.; Bemis, Karen G.; Rona, Peter A.

    2014-10-01

    Continuous time-series observations are key to understanding the temporal evolution of a seafloor hydrothermal system and its interplay with thermal and chemical processes in the ocean and Earth interior. In this paper, we present a 26-month time series of the heat flux driving a hydrothermal plume on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge obtained using the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS). Since 2010, COVIS has been connected to the North East Pacific Time-series Underwater Networked Experiment (NEPTUNE) observatory that provides power and real-time data transmission. The heat flux time series has a mean value of 18.10 MW and a standard deviation of 6.44 MW. The time series has no significant global trend, suggesting the hydrothermal heat source remained steady during the observation period. The steadiness of the hydrothermal heat source coincides with reduced seismic activity at Endeavour observed in the seismic data recorded by an ocean bottom seismometer from 2011 to 2013. Furthermore, first-order estimation of heat flux based on the temperature measurements made by the Benthic and Resistivity Sensors (BARS) at a neighboring vent also supports the steadiness of the hydrothermal heat source.

  10. Understanding Plume Bending at Grotto Vent on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.; Rabinowitz, J.; Rona, P. A.; Jackson, D. R.; Jones, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    Our improved understanding of black smoker plume bending derives from acoustic imaging of the plume at Grotto, a 30 m diameter vent cluster in the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. In July 2000, the VIP2000 cruise collected 15 acoustic images over 24 hours. In September 2010, the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) was connected to the NEPTUNE Canada Endeavour Observatory and acquired a 29 day time series capturing plume bending in 479 independent images. Inclination and declination are extracted for one or more plumes from the acoustic images using 2D Gaussian fitting. The bending of the large plume above the northwest end of Grotto is consistent with a dominant tidal sloshing and secondary rift valley inflow based a spectral analysis of the COVIS time series compared with a spectral analysis of current data from 2.9 km north of Grotto. The smaller plume above the eastern end of Grotto behaves in a more complicated fashion as it sometimes bends towards the larger plume. The overall shape of the larger plume is highly variable: sometimes the plume just leans in the direction of the presumed ambient current; other times, the plume bends-over and, in a few cases, the plume bends in two or more directions (forming a sinusoidal shape). Several factors influence bending direction, magnitude and shape. First, for a fluctuating plume, the instantaneous plume centerline wiggles around within the time-averaged plume boundaries; this will certainly produce a "sinusoidal" shape and may be the best explanation for the small scale multi-directional bending observed in individual acoustic images. Second, the transition from jet to plume could produce a change in bending magnitude (but not direction); however, this is unlikely to be visible on the acoustic images as the transition from jet to plume is anticipated to occur within the first 1 m of rise. Third, the ratio of rise velocity W to cross-flow velocity U controls the magnitude and direction of bending

  11. Anatomical relationship between the position of the sigmoid sinus, tympanic membrane and digastric ridge with the mastoid segment of the facial nerve.

    PubMed

    Boemo, R L; Navarrete, M L; Lareo, S; Pumarola, F; Chamizo, J; Perelló, E

    2008-04-01

    Our study was carried out to examine the relationships of the sigmoid sinus, tympanic membrane and digastric ridge with the mastoid segment of the facial nerve. We studied 33 adult temporal bones. The distances among these structures were evaluated according specific landmarks that can be repeated in a simple manner. We found a good relation, in a proportional and lineal order, between these three structures and the facial nerve. This study indicated a correlation between the position of these three structures and the mastoid segment of the facial nerve through a simple morphometric method.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION REPORT FOR STRONTIUM TITANATE IN SWSA 7 AND ADJACENT PARCELS IN SUPPORT OF THE NATIONAL PRIORITIES LIST SITE BOUNDARY DEFINITION PROGRAM OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    David A. King

    2011-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office requested support from the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract to delineate the extent of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) contamination in and around Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 7 as part of the Oak Ridge National Priorities List Site boundary definition program. The study area is presented in Fig. 1.1 relative to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The investigation was executed according to Sampling and Analysis Plan/Quality Assurance Project Plan (SAP/QAPP) (DOE 2011) to supplement previous investigations noted below and to determine what areas, if any, have been adversely impacted by site operations.

  13. Changes in the Expressions of Iba1 and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Adjacent Lumbar Spinal Segments after Lumbar Disc Herniation in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Kyung; Ahn, Sang Ho; Kim, So-Yeon; Choi, Mi-Jung; Hwang, Se Jin; Cho, Yun Woo

    2015-12-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is commonly encountered in clinical practice and can induce sciatica due to mechanical and/or chemical irritation and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. However, symptoms are not confined to the affected spinal cord segment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether multisegmental molecular changes exist between adjacent lumbar spinal segments using a rat model of lumbar disc herniation. Twenty-nine male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a sham-operated group (n=10) or a nucleus pulposus (NP)-exposed group (n=19). Rats in the NP-exposed group were further subdivided into a significant pain subgroup (n=12) and a no significant pain subgroup (n=7) using mechanical pain thresholds determined von Frey filaments. Immunohistochemical stainings of microglia (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1; Iba1), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein; GFAP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) was performed in spinal dorsal horns and dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) at 10 days after surgery. It was found immunoreactivity for Iba1-positive microglia was higher in the L5 (P=0.004) dorsal horn and in the ipsilateral L4 (P=0.009), L6 (P=0.002), and S1 (P=0.002) dorsal horns in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group. The expression of CGRP was also significantly higher in ipsilateral L3, L4, L6, and S1 segments and in L5 DRGs at 10 days after surgery in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group (P<0.001). Our results indicate that lumbar disc herniation upregulates microglial activity and CGRP expression in many adjacent and ipsilateral lumbar spinal segments.

  14. Changes in the Expressions of Iba1 and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Adjacent Lumbar Spinal Segments after Lumbar Disc Herniation in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is commonly encountered in clinical practice and can induce sciatica due to mechanical and/or chemical irritation and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. However, symptoms are not confined to the affected spinal cord segment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether multisegmental molecular changes exist between adjacent lumbar spinal segments using a rat model of lumbar disc herniation. Twenty-nine male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a sham-operated group (n=10) or a nucleus pulposus (NP)-exposed group (n=19). Rats in the NP-exposed group were further subdivided into a significant pain subgroup (n=12) and a no significant pain subgroup (n=7) using mechanical pain thresholds determined von Frey filaments. Immunohistochemical stainings of microglia (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1; Iba1), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein; GFAP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) was performed in spinal dorsal horns and dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) at 10 days after surgery. It was found immunoreactivity for Iba1-positive microglia was higher in the L5 (P=0.004) dorsal horn and in the ipsilateral L4 (P=0.009), L6 (P=0.002), and S1 (P=0.002) dorsal horns in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group. The expression of CGRP was also significantly higher in ipsilateral L3, L4, L6, and S1 segments and in L5 DRGs at 10 days after surgery in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group (P<0.001). Our results indicate that lumbar disc herniation upregulates microglial activity and CGRP expression in many adjacent and ipsilateral lumbar spinal segments. PMID:26713069

  15. Fifth lumbar spinal nerve injury causes neurochemical changes in corresponding as well as adjacent spinal segments: a possible mechanism underlying neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Shehab, Safa Al-Deen Saudi

    2014-01-01

    Previous investigations of the anatomical basis of the neuropathic-like manifestations in the spinal nerve ligation animal model have shown that the central terminations of the unmyelinated primary afferents of L5 spinal nerve are not restricted to the corresponding L5 spinal segment, and rather extend to two spinal segments rostrally and one segment caudally where they intermingle with primary afferents of the adjacent L4 spinal nerve. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neurochemical changes in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and DRGs after L5 nerve injury in rats. In the first experiment, the right L5 nerve was ligated and sectioned for 14 days, and isolectin B4 (IB4, a tracer for unmyelinated primary afferents) was injected into the left L5 nerve. The results showed that the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was up-regulated in laminae I-II of L3-L6 spinal segments on the right side in exactly the same areas where IB4 labelled terminals were revealed on the left side. In the second experiment, L5 was ligated and sectioned and the spinal cord and DRGs were stained immunocytochemically with antibodies raised against various peptides known to be involved in pain transmission and hyperalgesia. The results showed that L5 nerve lesion caused down-regulation of substance P, calcitonin-gene related peptide and IB4 binding and up-regulation of neuropeptide Y and neurokinin-1 receptor in the dorsal horn of L4 and L5 spinal segments. Similar neurochemical changes were observed only in the corresponding L5 DRG with minimal effects observed in L3, L4 and L6 DRGs. Although, L5 nerve injury caused an up-regulation in NPY, no change in SP and CGRP immunoreactivity was observed in ipsilateral garcile nucleus. These neuroplastic changes in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, in the adjacent uninjured territories of the central terminations of the adjacent uninjured nerves, might explain the mechanism of hyperalgesia after peripheral nerve injury.

  16. High-resolution near-bottom vector magnetic anomalies over Raven Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; Johnson, H. Paul; Salmi, Marie S.; Hutnak, Michael

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution, near-bottom vector magnetic data were collected by remotely operated vehicle Jason over the Raven hydrothermal vent field (47°57.3'N 129°5.75'W) located north of Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The survey was part of a comprehensive heat flow study of the Raven site using innovative thermal blanket technology to map the heat flux and crustal fluid pathways around a solitary hydrothermal vent field. Raven hydrothermal activity is presently located along the western axial valley wall, while additional inactive hydrothermal deposits are found to the NW on the upper rift valley wall. Magnetic inversion results show discrete areas of reduced magnetization associated with both active and inactive hydrothermal vent deposits that also show high conductive heat flow. Higher spatial variability in the heat flow patterns compared to the magnetization is consistent with the heat flow reflecting the currently active but ephemeral thermal environment of fluid flow, while crustal magnetization is representative of the static time-averaged effect of hydrothermal alteration. A general NW to SE trend in reduced magnetization across the Raven area correlates closely with the distribution of hydrothermal deposits and heat flux patterns and suggests that the fluid circulation system at depth is likely controlled by local crustal structure and magma chamber geometry. Magnetic gradient tensor components computed from vector magnetic data improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly source and indicate that the hydrothermally altered zone directly beneath the Raven site is approximately 15 × 106 m3 in volume.

  17. Heat flux measured acoustically at Grotto Vent, a hydrothermal vent cluster on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past several decades, quantifying the heat output has been a unanimous focus of studies at hydrothermal vent fields discovered around the global ocean. Despite their importance, direct measurements of hydrothermal heat flux are very limited due to the remoteness of most vent sites and the complexity of hydrothermal venting. Moreover, almost all the heat flux measurements made to date are snapshots and provide little information on the temporal variation that is expected from the dynamic nature of a hydrothermal system. The Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS, https://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/covis/) is currently connected to the Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory network (http://www.neptunecanada.ca) to monitor the hydrothermal plumes issuing from a vent cluster (Grotto) on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. COVIS is acquiring a long-term (20-months to date) time series of the vertical flow rate and volume flux of the hydrothermal plume above Grotto through the Doppler analysis of the acoustic backscatter data (Xu et al., 2013). We then estimate the plume heat flux from vertical flow rate and volume flux using our newly developed inverse method. In this presentation, we will briefly summarize the derivation of the inverse method and present the heat-flux time series obtained consequently with uncertainty quantification. In addition, we compare our heat-flux estimates with the one estimated from the plume in-situ temperatures measured using a Remotely Operative Vehicle (ROV) in 2012. Such comparison sheds light on the uncertainty of our heat flux estimation. Xu, G., Jackson, D., Bemis, K., and Rona, P., 2013, Observations of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar, Geochemistry, Geophysics Geosystems, 2013 (in press).

  18. Space-time relations of hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate-silica deposits at the northern Cleft Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, R.A.; Smith, V.K. ); Embley, R.W. ); Jonasson, I.R. ); Kadko, D.C. . Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science)

    1993-04-01

    Submersible investigations along the northern Cleft Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge indicate that a newly erupted sheet flow and two recent megaplume events are spatially related to a NNE-trending fissure system that is now the locus for active hydrothermal venting and deposition of massive sulfide mounds and chimneys. Samples from active high-temperature vent sites located east and north of the sheet flow terrain include zoned Cu-sulfide-rich chimneys (Type 1), bulbous anhydrite-rich chimneys (Type 2), and columnar Zn-sulfide-rich chimneys (Type 3). Type 1 chimneys with large open channelways result from the focused discharge of fluid at temperatures between 310 and 328 C from the Monolith sulfide mound. Type 2 chimneys are constructed on the Monolith and Fountain mounds where discharge of fluid at temperatures between 293 and 315 C is diffuse and sluggish. Type 3 chimneys, characterized by twisting narrow channelways, are deposited from focused and relatively low-temperature fluid discharging directly from basalt substrate. Inactive sulfide chimneys (Type 4) located within 100 m of the fissure system have bulk compositions, mineral assemblages, colloform and bacteroidal textures, and oxygen isotope characteristics consistent with low-temperature (< 250 C ) deposition from less robust vents. Field relations and [sup 210]Pb ages (> 100 years) indicate that the Type 4 chimneys formed prior to the sheet flow eruption. The sulfide mounds and Type 1 and Type 2 chimneys at the Monolith and Fountain vents, however, are an expression of the same magmatic event that caused the sheet flow eruption and megaplume events.

  19. Linkages between mineralogy, fluid chemistry, and microbial communities within hydrothermal chimneys from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. J.; Ver Eecke, H. C.; Breves, E. A.; Dyar, M. D.; Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Dahle, H.; Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.; Kelley, D. S.; Lilley, M. D.; Baross, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Rock and fluid samples were collected from three hydrothermal chimneys at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge to evaluate linkages among mineralogy, fluid chemistry, and microbial community composition within the chimneys. Mössbauer, midinfrared thermal emission, and visible-near infrared spectroscopies were utilized for the first time to characterize vent mineralogy, in addition to thin-section petrography, X-ray diffraction, and elemental analyses. A 282°C venting chimney from the Bastille edifice was composed primarily of sulfide minerals such as chalcopyrite, marcasite, and sphalerite. In contrast, samples from a 300°C venting chimney from the Dante edifice and a 321°C venting chimney from the Hot Harold edifice contained a high abundance of the sulfate mineral anhydrite. Geochemical modeling of mixed vent fluids suggested the oxic-anoxic transition zone was above 100°C at all three vents, and that the thermodynamic energy available for autotrophic microbial redox reactions favored aerobic sulfide and methane oxidation. As predicted, microbes within the Dante and Hot Harold chimneys were most closely related to mesophilic and thermophilic aerobes of the Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria and sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria. However, most of the microbes within the Bastille chimney were most closely related to mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobes of the Deltaproteobacteria, especially sulfate reducers, and anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaea. The predominance of anaerobes in the Bastille chimney indicated that other environmental factors promote anoxic conditions. Possibilities include the maturity or fluid flow characteristics of the chimney, abiotic Fe2+ and S2- oxidation in the vent fluids, or O2 depletion by aerobic respiration on the chimney outer wall.

  20. Analysis of off-axis low-velocity zones on the flanks of the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, A. E.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.

    2011-12-01

    At mid-ocean ridges of all spreading rates, oceanic crust forms primarily within a 1-2 km wide neovolcanic zone; however, there is an increasing recognition that crustal structure is modified by off-axis volcanism. We present seismic data from the intermediate-spreading Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge that reveal several crustal-level, low-velocity regions on the eastern and western flanks 7 to 16 km from the neovolcanic zone. The ~90 km long Endeavour segment lies between the Cobb and Endeavour overlapping spreading centers (OSCs). Seismic reflection data indicates the center of the segment is on a ~40 km wide plateau of greater crustal thickness that is interpreted to have developed when the Juan de Fuca Ridge overrode the melting anomaly associated with the Heckle seamount chain. Using the three-dimensional geometry of the Endeavour active source seismic tomography experiment conducted in 2009, we examine the travel times and amplitude anomalies of the Pg phase for a wide variety of source-receiver azimuths. In several locations on the eastern and western flanks of the Endeavour segment we observe significant and localized decreases in the amplitude of P waves, suggesting diffraction of energy around low-velocity bodies in the mid-crust. We model ray paths to estimate the depth of the anomalous regions. We also generate synthetic seismograms using finite difference waveform propagation through the three-dimensional seismic velocity structure that includes the seafloor topography. We test how low-velocity zones with various dimensions, depths, and physical properties affect the amplitudes and waveforms of crustal phases. We compare these synthetics with the observed anomalous regions to constrain the properties and geometry of the low velocity zones. We infer that the observed low velocity bodies are due to magma complexes at 2 to 3 km depth beneath bathymetric highs. On the eastern flank, three magma complexes are located 9 to 11 km from the axis

  1. Precipitation and growth of barite within hydrothermal vent deposits from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, John William; Hannington, Mark D.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Hansteen, Thor; Williamson, Nicole M.-B.; Stewart, Margaret; Fietzke, Jan; Butterfield, David; Frische, Matthias; Allen, Leigh; Cousens, Brian; Langer, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal vent deposits form on the seafloor as a result of cooling and mixing of hot hydrothermal fluids with cold seawater. Amongst the major sulfide and sulfate minerals that are preserved at vent sites, barite (BaSO4) is unique because it requires the direct mixing of Ba-rich hydrothermal fluid with sulfate-rich seawater in order for precipitation to occur. Because of its extremely low solubility, barite crystals preserve geochemical fingerprints associated with conditions of formation. Here, we present data from petrographic and geochemical analyses of hydrothermal barite from the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean, in order to determine the physical and chemical conditions under which barite precipitates within seafloor hydrothermal vent systems. Petrographic analyses of 22 barite-rich samples show a range of barite crystal morphologies: dendritic and acicular barite forms near the exterior vent walls, whereas larger bladed and tabular crystals occur within the interior of chimneys. A two component mixing model based on Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr of both seawater and hydrothermal fluid, combined with 87Sr/86Sr data from whole rock and laser-ablation ICP-MS analyses of barite crystals indicate that barite precipitates from mixtures containing as low as 17% and as high as 88% hydrothermal fluid component, relative to seawater. Geochemical modelling of the relationship between aqueous species concentrations and degree of fluid mixing indicates that Ba2+ availability is the dominant control on mineral saturation. Observations combined with model results support that dendritic barite forms from fluids of less than 40% hydrothermal component and with a saturation index greater than ∼0.6, whereas more euhedral crystals form at lower levels of supersaturation associated with greater contributions of hydrothermal fluid. Fluid inclusions within barite indicate formation temperatures of between ∼120 °C and 240 °C during

  2. FAMOUS and AMAR segments on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: ubiquitous hydrothermal Mn, CH 4, δ3He signals along the rift valley walls and rift offsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougault, H.; Aballéa, M.; Radford-Knoery, J.; Charlou, J. L.; Baptiste, P. Jean; Appriou, P.; Needham, H. D.; German, C.; Miranda, M.

    1998-09-01

    Dynamic hydrocast experiments enabled Mn (TDM), CH 4 concentrations and δ3He ratio to be recorded through vertical cross-sections of hydrothermal plumes along the FAMOUS segment and the southern part of the AMAR segment on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 36°N and 37°N. Mn, CH 4 and δ3He figures all along both segments are well above the seawater background in the open ocean: they are interpreted to be the result of time-integrated hydrothermal discharges dispersed and mixed in a closed basin delineated by the rift valley and the segment ends. Hydrothermal activity along the FAMOUS and AMAR segments appears to be similar. A comparison of the residence times of the three tracers from the dispersed, time-integrated signals is proposed. Although the background values in these closed basin are high, some proximal and (or) large hydrothermal inputs, overprinted on the general time-integrated plume, can be detected (i.e. the Rainbow site south of AMAR). Based on the depth and the location of plumes, hydrothermal activity is not, by far, limited to the neo-volcanic inner floor of the valley and should involve the walls and complex offsets of the rift valley. Considering the Mn and CH 4 concentrations in these plumes, two types of ocean-mantle interaction may be represented: hot, focused discharges on ultramafic exposures (Rainbow site) and low-temperature diffuse serpentinisation.

  3. Seismic Structure of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Correlations of Crustal Magma Chamber Properties With Seismicity, Faulting, and Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ark, E. M.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J. B.; Harding, A.; Kent, G.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Wilcock, W. S.

    2003-12-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection data collected in July 2002 at the RIDGE2000 Integrated Studies Site at the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge show a high-amplitude, mid-crustal reflector underlying all of the known hydrothermal vent fields at this segment. This reflector, which has been identified with a crustal magma body [Detrick et al., 2002], is found at a two-way travel time of 0.85-1.5 s (1.9-4.0 km) below the seafloor and extends approximately 25 km along axis although it is only 1-2 km wide on the cross-axis lines. The reflector is shallowest (2.5 km depth on the along-axis line) beneath the central, elevated part of the Endeavour segment and deepens toward the segment ends, with a maximum depth of 4 km. The cross axis lines show the mid-crustal reflector dipping from 9 to 50? to the east with the shallowest depths under the ridge axis and greater depths under the eastern flank of the ridge. The amplitude-offset behavior of this mid-crustal axial reflector is consistent with a negative impedance contrast, indicating the presence of melt or a crystallizing mush. We have constructed partial offset stacks at 2-3 km offset to examine the variation of melt-mush content of the axial magma chamber along axis. We see a decrease in P-wave amplitudes with increasing offset for the mid-crustal reflector beneath the Mothra and Main Endeavour vent fields and between the Salty Dawg and Sasquatch vent fields, indicating the presence of a melt-rich body. Beneath the High Rise, Salty Dawg, and Sasquatch vent fields P-wave amplitudes vary little with offset suggesting the presence of a more mush-rich magma chamber. Hypocenters of well-located microseismicity in this region [Wilcock et al., 2002] have been projected onto the along-axis and cross-axis seismic lines, revealing that most axial earthquakes are concentrated in a depth range of 1.5 - 2.7 km, just above the axial magma chamber. In general, seismicity is distributed diffusely within this zone indicating thermal

  4. Somatostatin inhibits activation of dorsal cutaneous primary afferents induced by antidromic stimulation of primary afferents from an adjacent thoracic segment in the rat.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Yao, Fan-Rong; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Pickar, Joel G; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Zhao, Yan

    2008-09-10

    To investigate the effect of somatostatin on the cross-excitation between adjacent primary afferent terminals in the rats, we recorded single unit activity from distal cut ends of dorsal cutaneous branches of the T10 and T12 spinal nerves in response to antidromic stimulation of the distal cut end of the T11 dorsal root in the presence and absence of somatostatin and its receptor antagonist applied to the receptive field of the recorded nerve. Afferent fibers were classified based upon their conduction velocity. Mean mechanical thresholds decreased and spontaneous discharge rates increased significantly in C and Adelta but not Abeta fibers of the T10 and T12 spinal nerves in both male and female rats following antidromic electrical stimulation (ADES) of the dorsal root from adjacent spinal segment (DRASS) indicating cross-excitation of thin fiber afferents. The cross-excitation was not significantly different between male and female rats. Microinjection of somatostatin into the receptive field of recorded units inhibited the cross-excitation. This inhibitory effect, in turn, was reversed by the somatostation receptor antagonist cyclo-somatostatin (c-SOM). Application of c-SOM alone followed by ADES of DRASS significantly decreased the mechanical thresholds and increased the discharge rates of C and Adelta fibers, indicating that endogenous release of somatostatin plays a tonic inhibitory role on the cross-excitation between peripheral nerves. These results suggest that somatostatin could inhibit the cross-excitation involved in peripheral hyperalgesia and have a peripheral analgesic effect.

  5. Fast inter-mode decision algorithm for high-efficiency video coding based on similarity of coding unit segmentation and partition mode between two temporally adjacent frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Guo-Yun; He, Xiao-Hai; Qing, Lin-Bo; Li, Yuan

    2013-04-01

    High-efficiency video coding (HEVC) introduces a flexible hierarchy of three block structures: coding unit (CU), prediction unit (PU), and transform unit (TU), which have brought about higher coding efficiency than the current national video coding standard H.264/advanced video coding (AVC). HEVC, however, simultaneously requires higher computational complexity than H.264/AVC, although several fast inter-mode decisions were proposed in its development. To further reduce this complexity, a fast inter-mode decision algorithm is proposed based on temporal correlation. Because of the distinct difference of inter-prediction block between HEVC and H.264/AVC, in order to use the temporal correlation to speed up the inter prediction, the correlation of inter-prediction between two adjacent frames needs to be analyzed according to the structure of CU and PU in HEVC. The probabilities of all the partition modes in all sizes of CU and the similarity of CU segmentation and partition modes between two adjacent frames are tested. The correlation of partition modes between two CUs with different sizes in two adjacent frames is tested and analyzed. Based on the characteristics tested and analyzed, at most, two prior partition modes are evaluated for each level of CU, which reduces the number of rate distortion cost calculations. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm further reduces coding time by 33.0% to 43.3%, with negligible loss in bitrate and peak signal-to-noise ratio, on the basis of the fast inter-mode decision algorithms in current HEVC reference software HM7.0.

  6. Lucky Strike seamount: Implications for the emplacement and rifting of segment-centered volcanoes at slow spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartín, J.; Soule, S. A.; Cannat, M.; Fornari, D. J.; Düşünür, D.; Garcia, R.

    2014-11-01

    history of emplacement, tectonic evolution, and dismemberment of a central volcano within the rift valley of the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge at the Lucky Strike Segment is deduced using near-bottom sidescan sonar imagery and visual observations. Volcano emplacement is rapid (<1 Myr), associated with focused eruptions, and with effusion rates feeding lava flows that bury tectonic features developed prior to and during volcano construction. This volcanic phase likely requires efficient melt pooling and a long-lived crustal magma chamber as a melt source. A reduction in melt supply triggers formation of an axial graben rifting the central volcano, and the onset of seafloor spreading may eventually split it. At Lucky Strike, this results in two modes of crustal construction. Eruptions and tectonic activity focus at a narrow graben that bisects the central volcano and contains the youngest lava flows, accumulating a thick layer of extrusives. Away from the volcano summit, deformation and volcanic emplacement is distributed throughout the rift valley floor, lacking a clear locus of accretion and deformation. Volcanic emplacement on the rift floor is characterized by axial volcanic ridges fed by dikes that propagate from the central axial magma chamber. The mode of rapid volcano construction and subsequent rifting observed at the Lucky Strike seamount is common at other central volcanoes along the global mid-ocean ridge system.

  7. We are in need of sampling the sedimentary cover and bedrock in the Amerasia Basin. (Suggested site locations in the Makarov Basin, the Mendeleev and Lomonosov ridges and adjacent areas.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva-Ivanova, N. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Amerasia Basin has a complex origin; alone, the geophysical data can support very different hypotheses. For understanding the tectonic evolution of the Basin and origin of the ridges and troughs it is important to collect geological samples. Based on analyzed seismic data (NP-28 and 26, HOTRAX, Arctic-2000 and TransArctic) over the Makarov Basin, the Mendeleev and Lomonosov ridges and adjacent areas, numbers of key drill sites are proposed. All proposed sites in combinations with other geophysical research of the area are fit well with most of the Site Survey Data Requirements (IODP) for a drilling site. Bedrock samples from key locations are especially needed, with full video or photo documentation of the sampling for avoiding later debates about whether bedrock or ice-drift was collected. Due to close locations to a sea bottom, bedrock can be sampled by gravity piston-cores or shallow drilling. Full stratigraphic sections though the Cenozoic and older sedimentary successions are needed at other proposed key locations for understanding the tectonic evolution of the Amerasia Basin. The depositional environment of the key reflections related to Cenozoic shallow water environments, as recorded in the ACEX drillholes, needs to be investigated in other locations. We will then be able to define better the nature of particular morphological features and construct more reliable tectonic models of the Amerasia Basin, in general.

  8. Segments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a market taxonomy for higher education, including what it reveals about the structure of the market, the model's technical attributes, and its capacity to explain pricing behavior. Details the identification of the principle seams separating one market segment from another and how student aspirations help to organize the market, making…

  9. Imaging of Lower-crustal Magma Chambers at an Ultraslow Spreading Ridge Segment using Elastic Waveform Inversion of a Sparse OBS Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, H.; Singh, S. C.; Chen, Y. J.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    The existence of axial magma chambers (AMC) is indicative of the magmatic crustal accretion at Mid-Ocean Ridges. They have been extensively imaged with seismic reflection data (e.g. multichannel seismic data), showing that the depth of the top reflector increases from 1 km to ~3 km below the seafloor, when the spreading rate decreases from fast to slow spreading. Under the ultraslow spreading environment, we have previously reported the discovery of a large lower-crustal low-velocity zone at the Southwest Indian Ridge at 50°28'E from 3-D travel time tomography of refraction data registered by an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) array. These results suggest the presence of partial melt within the lower crust (>4 km bsf). Here we further improve the resolution of the AMC image by employing a 2-D time-domain elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) method. The FWI gives a higher resolution than travel time tomography as it utilizes amplitude information and does not require the high-frequency approximation used in travel time tomography. The non-linearity of the FWI is overcome by using the tomographic results as a starting model. We have selected a 70-km long profile running across the ridge axis around the segment center, where 340 shots spaced at ~220 m were recorded on 3 OBSs. The small number of OBS poses serious challenge for the success of the full waveform inversionFWI. In order to examine the resolvability of this sparse OBS dataset, we first performed FWI over a sparse synthetic data set. We find that the FWI of these this sparse dataset is capable of retrieving an isolated lower-crustal AMC anomaly beneath the ridge axis, although the resulting velocity anomaly is smeared out, particularly along the lateral direction. For the real-data inversion, the starting model was built from the 3-D travel time tomography. The inverted results clearly show the sharp boundary of the top of the low velocity zone, suggesting that the low velocity zone indeed corresponds to

  10. Water and Streambed Sediment Quality, and Ecotoxicology of a Stream along the Blue Ridge Parkway, Adjacent to a Closed Landfill, near Roanoke, Virginia: 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebner, Donna Belval; Cherry, Donald S.; Currie, Rebecca J.

    2004-01-01

    A study was done of the effects of a closed landfill on the quality of water and streambed sediment and the benthic macroinvertebrate community of an unnamed stream and its tributary that flow through Blue Ridge Parkway lands in west-central Virginia. The primary water source for the tributary is a 4-inch polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe that protrudes from the slope at the base of the embankment bordering the landfill. An unusual expanse of precipitate was observed in the stream near the PVC pipe. Stream discharge was measured and water and streambed sediment samples were collected at a nearby reference site and at three sites downstream of the landfill in April and September 1999. Water samples were analyzed for major ions, nitrate, total and dissolved metals, total dissolved solids, total organic carbon, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, including organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Streambed sediment samples were analyzed for total metals, total organic carbon, percent moisture, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, including organochlorine pesticides and PCBs. The benthic macroinvertebrate community within the stream channel also was sampled at the four chemical sampling sites and at one additional site in April and September. Each of the five sites was assessed for physical habitat quality. Water collected periodically at the PVC pipe discharge between November 1998 and November 1999 was used to conduct 48-hour acute and 7-day chronic toxicity tests using selected laboratory test organisms. Two 10-day chronic toxicity tests of streambed sediments collected near the discharge pipe also were conducted. Analyses showed that organic and inorganic constituents in water from beneath the landfill were discharged into the sampled tributary. In April, 79 percent of inorganic constituents detected in water had their highest concentrations at the site closest to the landfill; at the same site, 59 percent of inorganic

  11. Detailed geological mapping of two contrasting second-order segments of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between Oceanographer and Hayes fracture zones (33°30‧N-35°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grã Cia, Eulã Lia; Bideau, Daniel; Hekinian, Roger; Lagabrielle, Yves

    1999-10-01

    We present detailed geological mapping of the axial valley floor and ridge flanks of two neighboring but contrasting spreading segments (OH1 and OH3) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between Oceanographer and Hayes fracture zones. New in situ observations from the submersible Nautile correlated with swath bathymetry and acoustic backscattering data from these segments reveal that the along-and across-axis volcanic-tectonic variability within second-order segments is larger than commonly acknowledged. Segment OH1 is a long and robust segment with a narrow and shallow axial valley. The most intense magmatic activity is found at the segment center where the thickest crust has been imaged, suggesting focused magma supply. Away from this part of the segment, faulting and sedimentary cover predominate. In contrast, the center of segment OH3 is dominated by extensive sedimentary cover, fissuring, and faulting. Furthermore, the most recent constructional volcanism is located away from the segment center in a region of greater depth and thinner crust. This relocation of volcanism suggests either a recent shift in the magmatic source or the last vestige of a centrally located source fed by lateral dike injection. Segment tip magmatic oscillations are suggested by the distribution of rock types at both segment ends. Serpentinized peridotites and associated dolerites are exposed at the massifs located at the intersection with nontransform offsets (NTOs), whereas only basaltic rocks crop out on the nodal basin floors. We suggest that the combination of low magmatic budget and extension taking place at the NTOs during a segment retreat favors the uplift and exposure of ultramafic massifs.

  12. Off-axis Crustal Thickness and Lower Crustal Velocity Structure from Seismic Tomography on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soule, D. C.; Wilcock, W. S.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Weekly, R. T.

    2013-12-01

    In August 2009, we conducted a seismic tomography experiment on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge to constrain the processes of crustal accretion. The experiment footprint extended 100 km along- and 60 km across-axis and covered the hydrothermally active central portion of the segment, two large overlapping spreading centers and the eastern end the Heck seamount chain. A total of 68 four-component ocean bottom seismometers were deployed at 64 sites and recorded 5567 shots of the 36-element, 6600 in.3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. The data return rate was high, with good quality data recorded on either the vertical or hydrophone channel at all but two sites. In a prior study, 93,000 manually picked crustal refraction arrivals (Pg) were used to invert for three-dimensional upper crustal velocity. Here we add wide-angle PmP arrival times for non-ridge crossing paths in order to constrain the velocity of the lower crust and crustal thickness on both the Pacific and Juan de Fuca plates at crustal ages of 0.1-1.0 Ma. The starting model was obtained by extending the three-dimensional upper crustal model obtained from the Pg data downward, assuming no vertical velocity gradient in the lower crust and by adding a Moho at 6.3 km depth. Preliminary results using ~7000 PmP arrivals with reflection points at ages of 0.3-1.0 Ma show that crustal thicknesses varies from 6.1 to 7.6 km. The thickest crust is found beneath a 40-km-wide plateau located on the central portion of the Endeavour Segment. This region has been previously interpreted as a region of enhanced crustal production associated with the Heckle melt anomaly. Velocities at the base of the crust range from 6.9-7.2 km/s and tend to be slightly higher beneath the bathymetric plateau consistent with decreased levels of magmatic differentiation near the segment center. Thickened crust is also found on the Juan de Fuca plate beneath a failed propagator of the Cobb overlapping spreading center

  13. Analysis and modeling of hydrothermal plume data acquired from the 85°E segment of the Gakkel Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranne, Christian; Sohn, Robert A.; Liljebladh, Bengt; Nakamura, Ko-Ichi

    2010-06-01

    We use data from a CTD plume-mapping campaign conducted during the Arctic Gakkel Vents (AGAVE) expedition in 2007 to constrain the nature of hydrothermal processes on the Gakkel Ridge at 85°E. Thermal and redox potential (Eh) anomalies were detected in two discrete depth intervals: 2400-2800 m (Interval 1) and 3000-3800 m (Interval 2). The spatial and temporal patterns of the signals indicate that the Interval 1 anomalies were most likely generated by a single large, high-temperature (T > 100°C) vent field located on the fault terraces that form the NE axial valley wall. In contrast, the Interval 2 anomalies appear to have been generated by up to 7 spatially distinct vent fields associated with constructional volcanic features on the floor of the axial valley, many of which may be sites of diffuse, low-temperature (T < 10°C) discharge. Numerical simulations of turbulent plumes rising in a weakly stratified Arctic Ocean water column indicate that the high-temperature field on the axial valley wall has a thermal power of ˜1.8 GW, similar to the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse and Rainbow fields in the Atlantic Ocean, whereas the sites on the axial valley floor have values ranging from 5 to 110 MW.

  14. OBS records of Whale vocalizations from Lucky-strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge during 2007-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, A.; Rai, A.; Singh, S. C.; Crawford, W. C.; Escartin, J.; Cannat, M.

    2009-12-01

    Passive seismic experiments to study seismicity require a long term deployment of ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs). These instruments also record a large amount of non-seismogenic signals such as movement of large ships, air-gun shots, and marine mammal vocalizations. We report a bi-product of our passive seismic experiment (BBMOMAR) conducted around the Lucky-strike hydrothermal field of the slow-spreading mid-Atlantic ridge. Five multi-component ocean-bottom seismometers (recording two horizontal, one vertical and one pressure channel) were deployed during 2007-2008. During 13 months of deployment, abundant vocalizations of marine mammals have been recorded by all the five equipments. By analyzing the frequency content of data and their pattern of occurrence, we conclude that these low-frequency vocalizations (~20-40 Hz) typically corresponds to blue and fin-whales. These signals if not identified, could be mis-interpreted as underwater seismic/hydrothermal activity. Our data show an increase in the number of vocalizations recorded during the winter season relative to the summer. As part of the seismic monitoring of the Lucky-strike site, we anticipate to extend this study to the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 periods, after the recovery and deployment of the array during the BATHYLUCK09 cruise. Long-term and continuous records of calls of marine mammals provide valuable information that could be used to identify the species, study their seasonal behaviour and their migration paths. Our study suggestes that passive experiments such as ocean-bottom seismometers deployed at key locations, could provide useful secondary infromation about oceanic species besides recording seismicity, which is otherwise not possible without harming or interfering with their activity.

  15. Seismicity Along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Automated Event Locations for an Ocean-Bottom Seismometer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, R. T.; Wilcock, W. S.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; McGill, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    From 2003-2006, the W.M. Keck Foundation supported the operation of a network of eight ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) that were deployed with a remotely operated vehicle along the central portion of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge as part of a multidisciplinary prototype NEPTUNE experiment. Data from 2003-2004 were initially analyzed during a research apprenticeship class at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories. Eight student analysts located ~13,000 earthquakes along the Endeavour Segment. Analysis of data from 2004-2005 has to date been limited to locating ~6,000 earthquakes associated with a swarm in February-March 2005 near the northern end of the Endeavour Segment. The remaining data includes several significant swarms and it is anticipated that tens of thousands of earthquakes still need to be located. In order to efficiently obtain a complete catalog of high-quality locations for the 3-year experiment, we are developing an automatic method for earthquake location. We first apply a 5-Hz high-pass filter and identify triggers when the ratio of the root-mean square (RMS) amplitudes in short- and long- term windows exceeds a specified threshold. We search for events that are characterized by triggers within a short time interval on the majority of stations and use the signal spectra to eliminate events that are the result of 20-Hz Fin and Blue whale vocalizations. An autoregressive technique is applied to a short time window centered on the trigger time to pick P-wave times on each station's vertical channel. We locate the earthquake with these picks and either attempt to repick or eliminate arrivals with unacceptable residuals. Preliminary S-wave picks are then made on the horizontal channels by applying a 5-12 Hz bandpass filter, identifying the peak RMS amplitude for a short running window, and making a pick at the time the RMS amplitude rises above 50% of this value. The picks are refined using the

  16. Seismicity Along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Automated Event Locations for an Ocean-Bottom Seismometer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, R. T.; Wilcock, W. S.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; McGill, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    From 2003-2006, the W.M. Keck Foundation supported the operation of a network of eight ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) that were deployed with a remotely operated vehicle along the central portion of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge as part of a multidisciplinary prototype NEPTUNE experiment. Data from 2003-2004 were initially analyzed during a research apprenticeship class at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories. Eight student analysts located ~13,000 earthquakes along the Endeavour Segment. Analysis of data from 2004-2005 has to date been limited to locating ~6,000 earthquakes associated with a swarm in February-March 2005 near the northern end of the Endeavour Segment. The remaining data includes several significant swarms and it is anticipated that tens of thousands of earthquakes still need to be located. In order to efficiently obtain a complete catalog of high-quality locations for the 3-year experiment, we are developing an automatic method for earthquake location. We first apply a 5-Hz high-pass filter and identify triggers when the ratio of the root-mean square (RMS) amplitudes in short- and long- term windows exceeds a specified threshold. We search for events that are characterized by triggers within a short time interval on the majority of stations and use the signal spectra to eliminate events that are the result of 20-Hz Fin and Blue whale vocalizations. An autoregressive technique is applied to a short time window centered on the trigger time to pick P-wave times on each station's vertical channel. We locate the earthquake with these picks and either attempt to repick or eliminate arrivals with unacceptable residuals. Preliminary S-wave picks are then made on the horizontal channels by applying a 5-12 Hz bandpass filter, identifying the peak RMS amplitude for a short running window, and making a pick at the time the RMS amplitude rises above 50% of this value. The picks are refined using the

  17. Magnetite formation from ferrihydrite by hyperthermophilic archaea from Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal vent chimneys.

    PubMed

    Lin, T Jennifer; Breves, E A; Dyar, M D; Ver Eecke, H C; Jamieson, J W; Holden, J F

    2014-05-01

    Hyperthermophilic iron reducers are common in hydrothermal chimneys found along the Endeavour Segment in the northeastern Pacific Ocean based on culture-dependent estimates. However, information on the availability of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxides within these chimneys, the types of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxides utilized by the organisms, rates and environmental constraints of hyperthermophilic iron reduction, and mineral end products is needed to determine their biogeochemical significance and are addressed in this study. Thin-section petrography on the interior of a hydrothermal chimney from the Dante edifice at Endeavour showed a thin coat of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxide associated with amorphous silica on the exposed outer surfaces of pyrrhotite, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite in pore spaces, along with anhydrite precipitation in the pores that is indicative of seawater ingress. The iron sulfide minerals were likely oxidized to Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxide with increasing pH and Eh due to cooling and seawater exposure, providing reactants for bioreduction. Culture-dependent estimates of hyperthermophilic iron reducer abundances in this sample were 1740 and 10 cells per gram (dry weight) of material from the outer surface and the marcasite-sphalerite-rich interior, respectively. Two hyperthermophilic iron reducers, Hyperthermus sp. Ro04 and Pyrodictium sp. Su06, were isolated from other active hydrothermal chimneys on the Endeavour Segment. Strain Ro04 is a neutrophilic (pH opt 7-8) heterotroph, while strain Su06 is a mildly acidophilic (pH opt 5), hydrogenotrophic autotroph, both with optimal growth temperatures of 90-92 °C. Mössbauer spectroscopy of the iron oxides before and after growth demonstrated that both organisms form nanophase (<12 nm) magnetite [Fe3 O4 ] from laboratory-synthesized ferrihydrite [Fe10 O14 (OH)2 ] with no detectable mineral intermediates. They produced up to 40 mm Fe(2+) in a growth-dependent manner, while all abiotic and biotic controls produced <3 mm Fe

  18. Finescale parameterizations of energy dissipation in a region of strong internal tides and sheared flow, the Lucky-Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquet, Simon; Bouruet-Aubertot, Pascale; Reverdin, Gilles; Turnherr, Andreas; Laurent, Lou St.

    2016-06-01

    The relevance of finescale parameterizations of dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy is addressed using finescale and microstructure measurements collected in the Lucky Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). There, high amplitude internal tides and a strongly sheared mean flow sustain a high level of dissipation rate and turbulent mixing. Two sets of parameterizations are considered: the first ones (Gregg, 1989; Kunze et al., 2006) were derived to estimate dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy induced by internal wave breaking, while the second one aimed to estimate dissipation induced by shear instability of a strongly sheared mean flow and is a function of the Richardson number (Kunze et al., 1990; Polzin, 1996). The latter parameterization has low skill in reproducing the observed dissipation rate when shear unstable events are resolved presumably because there is no scale separation between the duration of unstable events and the inverse growth rate of unstable billows. Instead GM based parameterizations were found to be relevant although slight biases were observed. Part of these biases result from the small value of the upper vertical wavenumber integration limit in the computation of shear variance in Kunze et al. (2006) parameterization that does not take into account internal wave signal of high vertical wavenumbers. We showed that significant improvement is obtained when the upper integration limit is set using a signal to noise ratio criterion and that the spatial structure of dissipation rates is reproduced with this parameterization.

  19. Microearthquakes beneath the Hydrothermal Vent Fields on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Results from the Keck Seismic/Hydrothermal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D.; Parker, J.; Wilcock, W.; Hooft, E.; Barclay, A.; Toomey, D.; McGill, P.; Stakes, D.; Schmidt, C.; Patel, H.

    2005-12-01

    The W.M. Keck Foundation is supporting the operation of a small seismic network in the vicinity of the hydrothermal vent fields on the central portion of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This is part of a program to conduct prototype seafloor observatory experiments to monitor the relationships between episodic deformation, fluid venting and microbial productivity at oceanic plate boundaries. The Endeavour seismic network was installed in the summer of 2003 and comprises seven GEOSense three-component short-period corehole seismometers and one buried Guralp CMG-1T broadband seismometer. A preliminary analysis of the first year of data was undertaken as part of an undergraduate research apprenticeship class taught at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories and additional analysis has since been completed by two of the apprentices and by two IRIS undergraduate interns. Over 12,000 earthquakes were located along the ridge-axis of the Endeavour, of which ~3,000 occur within or near the network and appear to be associated with the hydrothermal systems. The levels of seismicity are strongly correlated with the intensity of venting with particularly high rates of seismicity beneath the Main and High Rise Fields and substantially lower rates to the north beneath the relatively inactive Salty Dawg and Sasquatch fields. We have used both HYPOINVERSE and a grid search algorithm to investigate the distribution of focal depths assuming a variety of one-dimensional velocity models. The preliminary results show that the majority of earthquakes occur within a narrow depth range and may represent an intense zone of seismicity within a reaction overlying the axial magma chamber at ~2.5 km depth. However, the mean focal depth is strongly dependent on the relative weights assigned to the S arrivals. We infer from the inspection of residuals that no combination of the P- and S-wave velocity models we have so far investigated are fully consistent with

  20. Compositions, growth mechanisms, and temporal realtions of hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate-silica chimneys at the northern Cleft segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, Randolph A.; Jonasson, Ian R.; Kadko, David C.; Smith, Virginia K.; Wong, Florence L.

    1994-03-01

    Three active hydrothermal vents forming sulfide mounds and chimneys (Monolith, Fountain, and Pipe Organ) and more widely distributed inactive chimneys are spatially related to a system of discontinuous fissures and young sheet flow lavas at the northern Cleft segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. The formation of zoned tubular Curich chimneys (type I) on the Monolith sulfide mound is related to focused flow of high-temperature (to 328 C) fluid. Bulbous chimneys (type II or 'beehives') at the Monolith and Fountain vents are products of diffuse high-temperature (to 315 C) discharge. A broader zone of vigorous mixing between the hydrothermal fluid and seawater results in quench crystallization of anhydrite-rich shells. Columnar Zn-sulfide-rich chimneys with narrow channelways (type III) are constructed where focused and relatively low-temperature (261 C) fluid vents directly from the basalt substrate. The bulk chemistry (low Cu; high Pb, Ag, and SiO2 contents), mineralogy (pyrite-marcasite-wurtzite-amorphous silica-anglesite), colloform and filamentous textures, and oxygen isotope characteristics of inactive (type IV) chimneys indicate a low-temperature (less than 250 C) origin involving diffuse and sluggish flow patterns and conductive cooling. Seafloor observations and Pb-210 data indicate that (1) type IV chimneys are products of an earlier period of hydrothermal activity that ended no more than 60 years ago but prior to the sheet flow eruption; (2) the high-temperature Monolith and Fountain vents are manifestations of the same heating event (shallow emplacement of magma) that led to the sheet flow eruption and recent megaplumes; and (3) the Pipe Organ Vent is in a very youthful stage of development, and chimney deposition postdates the sheet flow eruption.

  1. Undegassed Carbon Content from a Highly Depleted Segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (1-5°S): Evidence from Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Voyer, M.; Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.; Hauri, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    As carbon solubility is low in basalts, MORB contain little dissolved CO2 (189±61 ppm, 1σ, n=600 [1]). A global negative correlation between CO2/Nb (proxy for amount of CO2 lost by degassing) and Ba/La (proxy for source enrichment) indicates that depleted MORB are less affected by degassing than enriched MORB: CO2/Nb ratios range from 0-100 for samples with Ba/La>4, while CO2/Nb range from 50 to 400 for samples with Ba/La<4 [1]. To assess the CO2 content of undegassed MORB, we analyzed the volatile content of 70 olivine-hosted, glassy melt inclusions (MIs) from four basalts dredged along MAR 1-5°S, a ridge segment that produces highly depleted MORB in terms of trace element enrichment and radiogenic isotopes [2, 3]. MIs contain CO2 contents (180-1420 ppm) that are higher than their respective matrix glasses (130-220 ppm, typical for vapor-saturated melts erupted at 3-5 km b.s.l.). One of the four dredges (EN061 5D-3Ag) contains MIs that do not exhibit shrinkage bubbles. For this sample only, we find a positive correlation between the CO2 content (240-770 ppm) and the Cl content (6-20 ppm) of the MIs that is not found in the matrix glasses (see Fig.). We infer that the correlation between CO2 and Cl, both highly incompatible in silicate minerals during fractional crystallization, is strong evidence for vapor-undersaturation, as any CO2 degassing would have erased the correlation. Together with MIs from the Siqueiros Fracture Zone [4] and from northern Iceland [5], the MIs from EN061 5D-3Ag may represent another occurrence of carbon-undersaturated MORB. Our results will be used to model the primary carbon content of MORB and of the depleted upper mantle. Note that the average Cl content of the matrix glasses (20±1 ppm) is higher than those of the MIs (12±3 ppm, see Fig.). This indicates either that the matrix glasses assimilated a small amount of seawater Cl, or that the MIs are all more depleted than the matrix glass. We will acquire major and trace element

  2. Microbial and Mineral Descriptions of the Interior Habitable Zones of Active Hydrothermal Chimneys from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, J. F.; Lin, T.; Ver Eecke, H. C.; Breves, E.; Dyar, M. D.; Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.; Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Actively venting hydrothermal chimneys and their associated hydrothermal fluids were collected from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge to determine the mineralogy, chemistry and microbial community composition of their interiors. To characterize the mineralogy, Mössbauer, FTIR, VNIR and thermal emission spectroscopies were used for the first time on this type of sample in addition to thin-section petrography, x-ray diffraction and elemental analyses. A chimney from the Bastille edifice was Fe-sulfide rich and composed primarily of chalcopyrite, marcasite-sphalerite, and pyrrhotite while chimneys from the Dante and Hot Harold edifices were Fe-sulfide poor and composed primarily of anhydrite. The bulk emissivity and reflectance spectroscopies corroborated well with the petrography and XRD analyses. The microbial community in the interior of Bastille was most closely related to mesophilic-to-thermophilic anaerobes of the deltaproteobacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea while those in the interiors of Dante and Hot Harold were most closely related to mesophilic-to-thermophilic aerobes of the beta-, gamma- and epsilonproteobacteria. The fluid temperatures (282-321°C) and chemistries of the three chimneys were very similar suggesting that differences in mineralogy and microbial community compositions were more dependent on fluid flow characteristics and paragenesis within the chimney. Thin-section petrography of the interior of another hydrothermal chimney collected from the Dante edifice (emitting 336°C fluid) shows a thin coat of Fe3+ oxide associated with amorphous silica on the exposed outer surfaces of pyrrhotite, sphalerite and chalcopyrite in pore spaces, along with anhydrite precipitation in the pores that is indicative of seawater ingress. The Fe-sulfide minerals were likely oxidized to ferrihydrite with increasing pH and Eh due to cooling and seawater exposure, providing reactants for bioreduction. Culture-based most-probable-number estimates of

  3. A combined basalt and peridotite perspective on 14 million years of melt generation at the Atlantis Bank segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge: Evidence for temporal changes in mantle dynamics?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coogan, L.A.; Thompson, G.M.; MacLeod, C.J.; Dick, H.J.B.; Edwards, S.J.; Hosford, Scheirer A.; Barry, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about temporal variations in melt generation and extraction at midocean ridges largely due to the paucity of sampling along flow lines. Here we present new whole-rock major and trace element data, and mineral and glass major element data, for 71 basaltic samples (lavas and dykes) and 23 peridotites from the same ridge segment (the Atlantis Bank segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge). These samples span an age range of almost 14 My and, in combination with the large amount of published data from this area, allow temporal variations in melting processes to be investigated. Basalts show systematic changes in incompatible trace element ratios with the older samples (from ???8-14 Ma) having more depleted incompatible trace element ratios than the younger ones. There is, however, no corresponding change in peridotite compositions. Peridotites come from the top of the melting column, where the extent of melting is highest, suggesting that the maximum degree of melting did not change over this interval of time. New and published Nd isotopic ratios of basalts, dykes and gabbros from this segment suggest that the average source composition has been approximately constant over this time interval. These data are most readily explained by a model in which the average source composition and temperature have not changed over the last 14 My, but the dynamics of mantle flow (active-to-passive) or melt extraction (less-to-more efficient extraction from the 'wings' of the melting column) has changed significantly. This hypothesised change in mantle dynamics occurs at roughly the same time as a change from a period of detachment faulting to 'normal' crustal accretion. We speculate that active mantle flow may impart sufficient shear stress on the base of the lithosphere to rotate the regional stress field and promote the formation of low angle normal faults. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural processes at slow-spreading ridges.

    PubMed

    Mutter, J C; Karson, J A

    1992-07-31

    Slow-spreading (<35 millimeters per year) mid-ocean ridges are dominated by segmented, asymmetric, rifted depressions like continental rifts. Fast-spreading ridges display symmetric, elevated volcanic edifices that vary in shape and size along axis. Deep earthquakes, major normal faults, and exposures of lower crustal rocks are common only along slow-spreading ridges. These contrasting features suggest that mechanical deformation is far more important in crustal formation at slow-spreading ridges than at fast-spreading ridges. New seismic images suggest that the nature and scale of segmentation of slow-spreading ridges is integral to the deformational process and not to magmatic processes that may control segmentation on fast-spreading ridges.

  5. Carlsberg Ridge and Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Comparison of slow spreading centre analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murton, Bramley J.; Rona, Peter A.

    2015-11-01

    Eighty per cent of all mid-ocean spreading centres are slow. Using a mixture of global bathymetry data and ship-board multibeam echosounder data, we explore the morphology of global mid-ocean ridges and compare two slow spreading analogues: the Carlsberg Ridge in the north-west Indian Ocean between 57°E and 60°E, and the Kane to Atlantis super-segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 21°N and 31°N. At a global scale, mid-ocean spreading centres show an inverse correlation between segment length and spreading rate with segmentation frequency. Within this context, both the Mid-Atlantic Ridge super-segment and Carlsberg Ridge are similar: spreading at 22 and 26 mm/yr full rates respectively, being devoid of major transform faults, and being segmented by dextral, non-transform, second-order discontinuities. For these and other slow spreading ridges, we show that segmentation frequency varies inversely with flank height and ridge axis depth. Segments on both the Mid-Atlantic Ridge super-segment and Carlsberg Ridge range in aspect ratio (ridge flank height/axis width), depth and symmetry. Segments with high aspect ratios and deeper axial floors often have asymmetric rift flanks and are associated with indicators of lower degrees of melt flux. Segments with low aspect ratios have shallower axial floors, symmetric rift flanks, and evidence of robust melt supply. The relationship between segmentation, spreading rate, ridge depth and morphology, at both a global and local scale, is evidence that rates of melting of the underlying mantle and melt delivery to the crust play a significant role in determining the structure and morphology of slow spreading mid-ocean ridges.

  6. Carslberg Ridge and Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Slow-spreading Apparent Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, P. A.; Murton, B. J.; Bostrom, K.; Widenfalk, L.; Melson, W. G.; O'Hearn, T.; Cronan, D. S.; Jenkins, W. J.

    2005-12-01

    We compare morphology, tectonics, petrology, and hydrothermal activity of a known section of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) between the Kane and Atlantis fracture zones (full multi-beam coverage 21N to 31N) to the lesser known Carlsberg Ridge (CR; limited multi-beam coverage plus satellite altimetry). The CR extends from the Owen Fracture Zone (10N) to the Vityaz Fracture Zone (5S) and spreads at half-rates (~1.2-1.8 cm/yr) similar to the MAR: 1) Morphology: Both ridges exhibit distinct segmentation (primarily sinistral) and axial valleys with high floor to crest relief (range 1122-1771 m). Average lengths of segments (CR: 70 km; MAR: 50 km) and crest-to crest width of the axial valley are greater on the CR (40 km) than MAR (23 km). Axial volcanic ridges form the neovolcanic zone on both ridges, typically 2.6 km wide and 213 m high on the CR. Average water depth near segment centers is greater on the MAR (3933 m) than the CR (3564 m). V-shaped patterns oblique to the spreading axis are present on both ridges. 2) Tectonics: Segments on each ridge are predominantly separated by short-offset (<30 km) non-transform discontinuities with longer transform faults generally spaced hundreds of kilometers apart. Bulls-eye Mantle Bouguer Lows (-30 to -50 mgal) are present at centers of spreading segments on both ridges. Metamorphic core complexes of lower crust and upper mantle are present on the MAR section (at fracture zones) and at least at one locality at 58.33E on the CR. 3) Petrology: MORB composition from our 20 stations along the CR fall into the MORB family, with no evidence of hotspot inputs (no excess K or Nb), or extreme fractionation, similar to the MAR section. REE and trace element patterns between 57E and 61E on the CR indicate increasing melt depletion to the northwest, while glasses exhibit a striking systematic increase in MgO (decrease in fractionation) to the northwest and attain among the most primitive composition of any ocean ridge adjacent to the Owen

  7. Development of Land Segmentation, Stream-Reach Network, and Watersheds in Support of Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF) Modeling, Chesapeake Bay Watershed, and Adjacent Parts of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martucci, Sarah K.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Raffensperger, Jeff P.; Hopkins, Katherine J.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Chesapeake Bay Program Office, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Maryland Department of the Environment, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are collaborating on the Chesapeake Bay Regional Watershed Model, using Hydrological Simulation Program - FORTRAN to simulate streamflow and concentrations and loads of nutrients and sediment to Chesapeake Bay. The model will be used to provide information for resource managers. In order to establish a framework for model simulation, digital spatial datasets were created defining the discretization of the model region (including the Chesapeake Bay watershed, as well as the adjacent parts of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia outside the watershed) into land segments, a stream-reach network, and associated watersheds. Land segmentation was based on county boundaries represented by a 1:100,000-scale digital dataset. Fifty of the 254 counties and incorporated cities in the model region were divided on the basis of physiography and topography, producing a total of 309 land segments. The stream-reach network for the Chesapeake Bay watershed part of the model region was based on the U.S. Geological Survey Chesapeake Bay SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) model stream-reach network. Because that network was created only for the Chesapeake Bay watershed, the rest of the model region uses a 1:500,000-scale stream-reach network. Streams with mean annual streamflow of less than 100 cubic feet per second were excluded based on attributes from the dataset. Additional changes were made to enhance the data and to allow for inclusion of stream reaches with monitoring data that were not part of the original network. Thirty-meter-resolution Digital Elevation Model data were used to delineate watersheds for each

  8. Deep versus shallow melt stagnation in an ultra-slow / ultra-cold ridge segment: the Andrew Bain southern RTI (SWIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganelli, E.; Brunelli, D.; Seyler, M.; Bonatti, E.; Cipriani, A.; Ligi, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Andrew Bain Fracture Zone (ABFZ) represents one of the largest transform faults in the ridge system spanning 750 km in length with a characteristic lens-shape structure. The southern Ridge-Transform Intersection represents the deepest sector of the whole South West Indian Ridge system. During the Italian-Russian expedition S23-AB06, the seafloor in the Southern Ridge Transform Intersection (RTI) has been sampled recovering only ultramafic material in the majority of the dredging sites. The sampled spinel and plagioclase peridotites show hybrid textures, characterized either by deep spinel-field impregnation assemblages (sp+cpx±opx±ol) or by plagioclase-field equilibrated patches and mineral trails (pl+cpx±ol) marked by both crystallization of newly formed plagioclase-field equilibrated trails and formation of plagioclase coronas around spinel. The ones collected from ridge axis show also late gabbroic pockets and veins, variably enriched in clinopyroxene. Overall textures account for important melt percolation/stagnation events occurred in the plagioclase and spinel field. Major and trace element distribution in pyroxenes and spinels from spinel-bearing peridotites overall follow a general melting trend accompanied by a progressive re-equilibration to lower P/T facies at all scales. However, only few samples can be linked to near fractional melting, while the majority of them shows REE pattern and trace element concentrations that cannot be reproduced by fractional melting process. Open-system melting (OSM) better reproduces measured REE patterns. Modeling melting in an open system scenario requires high residual porosity to be accounted for along with generally enriched melts to influx the melting parcel at depth. Melting at high residual porosity suggests a near-batch regime in which enriched melts stagnate in the spinel field. Inhibition of melt segregation during melt/rock interaction asks for a permeability barrier to develop in the region where the

  9. Hydrothermal Activity on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Connelly, D. P.; Evans, A. J.; Parson, L. M.

    2002-12-01

    We present evidence for high-temperature hydrothermal venting along the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) 2-14S. The MAR south of the equator has been identified as a key target for hydrothermal exploration because the large-offset Romanche and Chain fracture zones may act as important barriers to biological communication along the ridge-axis (Van Dover et al., Science, 2002). During RRS James Clark Ross cruise JR65 (Sept-Oct. 2001) we occupied a series of 13 CTD hydrocast stations, one each at the centre of a series of 2nd-order ridge-segments, close to and away from the influence of the Ascension Island "hotspot". Post-cruise laboratory analyses have revealed TDMn anomalies of >2nmol/litre (background = 0.5 nmol/litre) at stations within each of four segments located between the Chain and Ascension Fracture Zones (away from the "hotspot") and in the two northernmost "hot-spot influenced" segments to the south, between the Ascension and Boca Verde Fracture Zones. Strongest anomalies were observed in the segment closest to Ascension Island itself, where TDMn anomalies measured in bottle-samples coincided with optical back-scatter anomalies measured in situ using a SeaTech LSS light scattering sensor. A weaker TDMn anomaly was also observed adjacent to the Boca Verde Fracture Zone and coincident with a WOCE section which has previously reported evidence for primordial 3He release from the MAR-crest (Ruth et al., Deep Sea Res., 2000). Our survey covered a large section of ridge-crest, comparable to that investigated by Klinkhammer et al. (Nature, 1985) on the northern MAR. Multiple offset segments have been investigated and the data support the presence of multiple discrete hydrothermal sources. To-date, the best positional information we have for any one vent-site is in the segment immediately south of the Ascension Fracture Zone. Water depth in this segment is >3000m yet it is situated <100km from the port of Georgetown, Ascension. We believe this station to be

  10. Ultraslow Ridges through Binoculars: Teleseismic Earthquake Characteristics Illuminate Accretion Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlindwein, V.; Laederach, C.; Korger, E.

    2011-12-01

    events, while teleseismic swarms occur only in segments with magmatic spreading. A comparison with local seismicity studies on ice floes in the Arctic shows the same cluster pattern for small earthquakes at a local scale. A prominent example for a teleseismically recorded mid-ocean ridge earthquake swarm is the highly unusual seismic episode at Gakkel Ridge during 9 months in 1999 with 250 teleseismic earthquakes. The sites of swarms usually coincide with well developed central magnetic anomalies which either extend along an entire segment or define pronounced isolated volcanic centers. Some swarms extend for more than 50 km along-axis or occur simultaneously at adjacent volcanic centers probably indicating along-axis distribution of magma. Other volcanic centres display focussed repetitive short swarms. Most of the source mechanisms of the swarm earthquakes indicate tectonic failure on normal faults but the clear spatial relation between the swarms and volcanic centers indicates a magmatic origin.

  11. Metopic ridge

    MedlinePlus

    ... plates allow for growth of the skull. The places where these plates connect are called sutures or suture lines. They do not fully close until the 2nd or 3rd year of life. A metopic ridge occurs when ...

  12. Development of Relations of Stream Stage to Channel Geometry and Discharge for Stream Segments Simulated with Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF), Chesapeake Bay Watershed and Adjacent Parts of Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, Douglas; Bennett, Mark

    2007-01-01

    streamflow-gaging stations included in the areal extent of the model. These regression models were developed on the basis of data from stations in four physiographic provinces (Appalachian Plateaus, Valley and Ridge, Piedmont, and Coastal Plain) and were used to predict channel geometry for all 738 stream segments in the modeled area from associated basin drainage area. Manning's roughness coefficient for the channel and floodplain was represented in the XSECT program in two forms. First, all available field-estimated values of roughness were compiled for gaging stations in each physiographic province. The median of field-estimated values of channel and floodplain roughness for each physiographic province was applied to all respective stream segments. The second representation of Manning's roughness coefficient was to allow roughness to vary with channel depth. Roughness was estimated at each gaging station for each 1-foot depth interval. Median values of roughness were calculated for each 1-foot depth interval for all stations in each physiographic province. Channel and floodplain slope were determined for every stream segment in CBRWM using the USGS National Elevation Dataset. Function tables were generated by the XSECT program using values of channel geometry, channel and floodplain roughness, and channel and floodplain slope. The FTABLEs for each of the 290 USGS streamflow-gaging stations were evaluated by comparing observed discharge to the XSECT-derived discharge. Function table stream discharge derived using depth-varying roughness was found to be more representative of and statistically indistinguishable from values of observed stream discharge. Additionally, results of regression analysis showed that XSECT-derived discharge accounted for approximately 90 percent of the variability associated with observed discharge in each of the four physiographic provinces. The results of this study indicate that the methodology developed to generate FTABLEs for every s

  13. Physical inter-relationships between hydrothermal activity, faulting and magmatic processes at the center of a slow-spreading, magma-rich mid-ocean ridge segment: A case study of the Lucky Strike segment (MAR, 37°03'-37‧N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, F. J.; Cannat, M.; Escartin, J.; Crawford, W. C.; Singh, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The modalities and efficiency of hydrothermal heat evacuation at mid-ocean ridges (25% of the global heat loss) are controlled by the lithosphere thermal and permeability structures for which we had robust constraints only for fast/intermediate spreading axis until the last past few years during which integrated geophysical, geological and geochemical studies focused on some hydrothermal sites at slow-spreading ridges. At the Lucky Strike vent field of the mid-atlantic ridge - a hydrothermal complex composed of high-temperature (maximum T=340°C), smoker-like vents and associated diffuse flow and extracting a few hundreds MW from the oceanic lithosphere - a seafloor observatory which installation started in 2005 highlights local interactions between hydrothermal, tectonic and magmatic processes. Detailed geophysical and geological investigations stress the role of the local axial fault system on localizing high- and low-temperature ventings around the faulted rim of a paleo lava lake. Microseismic studies bring constraints on the subseafloor hydrology and suggest an along-axis flow pattern, with a privileged recharge area located about a kilometer north off the active discharges. Seismic reflection studies image a central magma chamber fueling the hydrothermal sites and also reveal its along-axis depth variations likely influencing hydrothermal cell organization and flow focusing. Such linkages among hydrothermal dynamics, heat source and crustal permeability geometries usually lack quantitative constraints at mid-ocean ridges in general, and the Lucky Strike segment settings offers a unique opportunity to couple high-resolution geophysical data to hydrodynamic model. Here we develop a series of original two- and three-dimensional numerical and physical models of hydrothermal activity, tailored to this slow-spreading environment. Our results highlight physical linkages among magmatism, tectonics and crustal hydrology stressing the key role of faulting and magma

  14. Ridge 2000 Data Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; Haxby, W. F.; Ryan, W. B.; Chayes, D. N.; Lehnert, K. A.; Shank, T. M.

    2005-12-01

    Hosted at Lamont by the marine geoscience Data Management group, mgDMS, the NSF-funded Ridge 2000 electronic database, http://www.marine-geo.org/ridge2000/, is a key component of the Ridge 2000 multi-disciplinary program. The database covers each of the three Ridge 2000 Integrated Study Sites: Endeavour Segment, Lau Basin, and 8-11N Segment. It promotes the sharing of information to the broader community, facilitates integration of the suite of information collected at each study site, and enables comparisons between sites. The Ridge 2000 data system provides easy web access to a relational database that is built around a catalogue of cruise metadata. Any web browser can be used to perform a versatile text-based search which returns basic cruise and submersible dive information, sample and data inventories, navigation, and other relevant metadata such as shipboard personnel and links to NSF program awards. In addition, non-proprietary data files, images, and derived products which are hosted locally or in national repositories, as well as science and technical reports, can be freely downloaded. On the Ridge 2000 database page, our Data Link allows users to search the database using a broad range of parameters including data type, cruise ID, chief scientist, geographical location. The first Ridge 2000 field programs sailed in 2004 and, in addition to numerous data sets collected prior to the Ridge 2000 program, the database currently contains information on fifteen Ridge 2000-funded cruises and almost sixty Alvin dives. Track lines can be viewed using a recently- implemented Web Map Service button labelled Map View. The Ridge 2000 database is fully integrated with databases hosted by the mgDMS group for MARGINS and the Antarctic multibeam and seismic reflection data initiatives. Links are provided to partner databases including PetDB, SIOExplorer, and the ODP Janus system. Improved inter-operability with existing and new partner repositories continues to be

  15. Controls on melting at spreading ridges from correlated abyssal peridotite - mid-ocean ridge basalt compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regelous, Marcel; Weinzierl, Christoph G.; Haase, Karsten M.

    2016-09-01

    Variations in the volume and major element composition of basalt erupted along the global mid-ocean ridge system have been attributed to differences in mantle potential temperature, mantle composition, or plate spreading rate and lithosphere thickness. Abyssal peridotites, the residues of mantle melting beneath mid-ocean ridges, provide additional information on the melting process, which could be used to test these hypotheses. We compiled a global database of abyssal peridotite compositions averaged over the same ridge segments defined by Gale et al. (2013). In addition, we calculated the distance of each ridge segment to the nearest hotspots. We show that Cr# in spinel in abyssal peridotites is negatively correlated with Na90 in basalts from the same ridge segments on a global scale. Ridge segments that erupt basalts apparently produced by larger degrees of mantle melting are thus underlain by peridotites from which large amounts of melt have been extracted. We find that near-ridge hotspots have a more widespread influence on mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) composition and ridge depth than previously thought. However, when these hotspot-influenced ridge segments are excluded, the remaining segments show clear relationships between MORB composition, peridotite composition, and ridge depth with spreading rate. Very slow-spreading ridges (<20 mm/yr) are deeper, erupt basalts with higher Na90, Al90, K90/Ti90, and lower Fe90, Ca90/Al90, and expose peridotites with lower Cr# than intermediate and fast-spreading ridges. We show that away from hotspots, the spreading-rate dependence of the maximum degree of mantle melting inferred from Cr# in peridotites (FM) and the bulk degree of melting inferred from Na90 in basalts (FB) from the same ridge segments is unlikely to be due to variations in mantle composition. Nor can the effects of dynamic mantle upwelling or incomplete melt extraction at low spreading rates satisfactorily explain the observed compositions of abyssal

  16. Wolf-Darwin lineament and plume-ridge interaction in northern Galápagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpp, Karen; Geist, Dennis

    2002-11-01

    The Wolf-Darwin Lineament (WDL), located in the northwestern sector of the Galápagos Archipelago, lies between the focus of the Galápagos hot spot and the Galápagos Spreading Center. Consequently, most researchers have attributed its origin to the interaction between the plume and the adjacent ridge. We propose that the WDL is caused only partially by the plume-ridge interaction, and instead that it is primarily the result of tensional stresses emanating from the inside corner of the transform fault at 91°W. An additional factor that amplifies the tension in this region is the oblique orientation of the major transform fault with respect to the Nazca plate's spreading direction. This setting creates a transtensional zone whereby strain is partitioned into strike-slip motion along the transform and extension throughout the inside corner of the ridge-transform system. The area under tension is magmatic owing to the overlapping effects of the ridge and the Galápagos plume. The extensional model predicts no age-progressive volcanism, which is supported by observed age relationships. The WDL volcanoes define two distinct chemical groups: lavas erupted south of Wolf Island have compositions similar to those produced along the GSC west of 93°W, while those from the northern WDL resemble GSC lavas from the segment directly north of the lineament. This geographic distribution implies that the WDL is supplied by the same type of plume-affected mantle as the segment of the GSC that produced the lithosphere underlying the volcanoes. The observed WDL geochemical gradients are consistent with the extension model; the region under tension simply taps hybrid products of mixing at the margins of the subridge convection system and the periphery of the plume. Essentially, the stress field around the transform fault, normally not observable in a typical midocean ridge setting, is illuminated by the presence of melt from the adjacent hot spot.

  17. An ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Dick, Henry J B; Lin, Jian; Schouten, Hans

    2003-11-27

    New investigations of the Southwest Indian and Arctic ridges reveal an ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge that is characterized by intermittent volcanism and a lack of transform faults. We find that the mantle beneath such ridges is emplaced continuously to the seafloor over large regions. The differences between ultraslow- and slow-spreading ridges are as great as those between slow- and fast-spreading ridges. The ultraslow-spreading ridges usually form at full spreading rates less than about 12 mm yr(-1), though their characteristics are commonly found at rates up to approximately 20 mm yr(-1). The ultraslow-spreading ridges consist of linked magmatic and amagmatic accretionary ridge segments. The amagmatic segments are a previously unrecognized class of accretionary plate boundary structure and can assume any orientation, with angles relative to the spreading direction ranging from orthogonal to acute. These amagmatic segments sometimes coexist with magmatic ridge segments for millions of years to form stable plate boundaries, or may displace or be displaced by transforms and magmatic ridge segments as spreading rate, mantle thermal structure and ridge geometry change.

  18. A preliminary 1-D model investigation of tidal variations of temperature and chlorinity at the Grotto mound, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Larson, B. I.; Bemis, K. G.; Lilley, Marvin D.

    2017-01-01

    Tidal oscillations of venting temperature and chlorinity have been observed in the long-term time series data recorded by the Benthic and Resistivity Sensors (BARS) at the Grotto mound on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. In this study, we use a one-dimensional two-layer poroelastic model to conduct a preliminary investigation of three hypothetical scenarios in which seafloor tidal loading can modulate the venting temperature and chlorinity at Grotto through the mechanisms of subsurface tidal mixing and/or subsurface tidal pumping. For the first scenario, our results demonstrate that it is unlikely for subsurface tidal mixing to cause coupled tidal oscillations in venting temperature and chlorinity of the observed amplitudes. For the second scenario, the model results suggest that it is plausible that the tidal oscillations in venting temperature and chlorinity are decoupled with the former caused by subsurface tidal pumping and the latter caused by subsurface tidal mixing, although the mixing depth is not well constrained. For the third scenario, our results suggest that it is plausible for subsurface tidal pumping to cause coupled tidal oscillations in venting temperature and chlorinity. In this case, the observed tidal phase lag between venting temperature and chlorinity is close to the poroelastic model prediction if brine storage occurs throughout the upflow zone under the premise that layers 2A and 2B have similar crustal permeabilities. However, the predicted phase lag is poorly constrained if brine storage is limited to layer 2B as would be expected when its crustal permeability is much smaller than that of layer 2A.

  19. Lomonosov Ridge as a Natural Component of Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poselov, V.; Kaminsky, V. D.; Butsenko, V. V.; Grikurov, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    In geodynamic context, Lomonosov Ridge is interpreted as a rifted passive margin framing the Eurasian oceanic basin. At the same time its near-Siberian segment is intimately associated with the Russian Arctic shelf, as evidenced by morphological data and the results of “Trans-Arctic 1992” and “Arctic-2007” geotransect studies. Coring and ACEX data demonstrated the presence in the uppermost geological section of the ridge of Late Cretaceous through Cenozoic sediments and Jurassic-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks; the latter may belong to deeper levels of sedimentary cover, or may represent the Mesozoic folded basement. Coarse bottom debris contains also the fragments of Riphean-Paleozoic rocks probably derived from the local bedrock source. Structure of sedimentary cover is imaged by continuous seismic observations from the shelf of East Siberian Sea along the length of Lomonosov Ridge to 85 N. In the upper part of the section there are two sedimentary sequences separated by a regional unconformity; their seismic velocities are 2.4-3.1 km/s in the upper sequence and 3.4-4.0 km/s in the lower one, and the total thickness reaches ~ 8 km in the deepest part of New Siberian Basin. Both these sequences and the unconformity are traced from Lomonosov Ridge into Amundsen Basin on seismic reflection sections obtained by drifting ice stations North Pole 2479 and 2480. The low-velocity sediments are underlain by a metasedimetary sequence with velocities decreasing from 4.7-4.9 km/s on the shelf to 4.4-4.9 km/s beneath continental slope and 4.2-4.8 km/s on Lomonosov Ridge. The thickness of metasedimentary sequence is about 7 km on the shelf, up to 3.5 km under continental slope, and strongly variable (1-5 km) on Lomonosov Ridge. The upper layer of consolidated crust is 8-9 km thick on the shelf with velocities 6.1-6.2 km/s; on Lomonosov Ridge both its thickness and velocities increase to 10 km and 6.0-6.4 km/s, respectively. In the lower crust the velocities do not exceed 6

  20. Velocity structure from forward modeling of the eastern ridge-transform intersection area of the Clipperton Fracture Zone, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begnaud, Michael L.; McClain, James S.; Barth, Ginger A.; Orcutt, John A.; Harding, Alistair J.

    1997-04-01

    In the spring of 1994, we undertook an extensive geophysical study of the Clipperton Fracture Zone (FZ) on the fast spreading East Pacific Rise. The Clipperton Area Seismic Study to Investigate Compensation experiment (CLASSIC) included surveys to examine the deep structures associated with the fracture zone and adjacent northern ridge segment. In this paper, we report the results from five seismic profiles acquired over the eastern ridge-transform intersection (RTI), including profiles over the RTI high, the northern ridge segment, and the eastern transform region. The travel time data for crustal phases, Moho reflections, and mantle phases were modeled using two-dimensional ray tracing. Seismic profiles reveal that the crust is similar in thickness north and south of the Clipperton FZ, despite differences in axial topography that have previously been interpreted in terms of differences in magma supply. When compared to older crust, the northern ridge axis is characterized by lower seismic velocities and higher attenuation. In our model, a low-velocity zone exists beneath the ridge axis, probably associated with a zone of partial melt and/or very high temperatures. Within the transform zone, we find that the southeastern trough is underlain by nearly normal crustal structure. The crust is slightly thinner than the adjacent aseismic extension but not enough to compensate for the depths of the trough. Toward the RTI, the trough is replaced by an intersection high which appears underlain by a thickened crust, and a thicker upper crustal section. Both characteristics indicate that the intersection high is a volcanic feature produced by excess volcanism at the intersection. The volcanism acts to "fill in" the transform trough, creating the thicker crust that extends under the eastern aseismic extension of the transform. Our results show that the northern ridge segment, often identified as magma-starved, displays the crustal thickness and apparent signal attenuation

  1. Correlated patterns in hydrothermal plume distribution and apparent magmatic budget along 2500 km of the Southeast Indian Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Edward; Christophe Hémond,; Anne Briais,; Marcia Maia,; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Sharon L. Walker,; Tingting Wang,; Yongshun John Chen,

    2014-01-01

    Multiple geological processes affect the distribution of hydrothermal venting along a mid-ocean ridge. Deciphering the role of a specific process is often frustrated by simultaneous changes in other influences. Here we take advantage of the almost constant spreading rate (65–71 mm/yr) along 2500 km of the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) between 77°E and 99°E to examine the spatial density of hydrothermal venting relative to regional and segment-scale changes in the apparent magmatic budget. We use 227 vertical profiles of light backscatter and (on 41 profiles) oxidation-reduction potential along 27 first and second-order ridge segments on and adjacent to the Amsterdam-St. Paul (ASP) Plateau to map ph, the fraction of casts detecting a plume. At the regional scale, venting on the five segments crossing the magma-thickened hot spot plateau is almost entirely suppressed (ph = 0.02). Conversely, the combined ph (0.34) from all other segments follows the global trend of ph versus spreading rate. Off the ASP Plateau, multisegment trends in ph track trends in the regional axial depth, high where regional depth increases and low where it decreases. At the individual segment scale, a robust correlation between ph and cross-axis inflation for first-order segments shows that different magmatic budgets among first-order segments are expressed as different levels of hydrothermal spatial density. This correlation is absent among second-order segments. Eighty-five percent of the plumes occur in eight clusters totaling ∼350 km. We hypothesize that these clusters are a minimum estimate of the length of axial melt lenses underlying this section of the SEIR.

  2. Correlated patterns in hydrothermal plume distribution and apparent magmatic budget along 2500 km of the Southeast Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward T.; Hémond, Christophe; Briais, Anne; Maia, Marcia; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Walker, Sharon L.; Wang, Tingting; Chen, Yongshun John

    2014-08-01

    geological processes affect the distribution of hydrothermal venting along a mid-ocean ridge. Deciphering the role of a specific process is often frustrated by simultaneous changes in other influences. Here we take advantage of the almost constant spreading rate (65-71 mm/yr) along 2500 km of the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) between 77°E and 99°E to examine the spatial density of hydrothermal venting relative to regional and segment-scale changes in the apparent magmatic budget. We use 227 vertical profiles of light backscatter and (on 41 profiles) oxidation-reduction potential along 27 first and second-order ridge segments on and adjacent to the Amsterdam-St. Paul (ASP) Plateau to map ph, the fraction of casts detecting a plume. At the regional scale, venting on the five segments crossing the magma-thickened hot spot plateau is almost entirely suppressed (ph = 0.02). Conversely, the combined ph (0.34) from all other segments follows the global trend of ph versus spreading rate. Off the ASP Plateau, multisegment trends in ph track trends in the regional axial depth, high where regional depth increases and low where it decreases. At the individual segment scale, a robust correlation between ph and cross-axis inflation for first-order segments shows that different magmatic budgets among first-order segments are expressed as different levels of hydrothermal spatial density. This correlation is absent among second-order segments. Eighty-five percent of the plumes occur in eight clusters totaling ˜350 km. We hypothesize that these clusters are a minimum estimate of the length of axial melt lenses underlying this section of the SEIR.

  3. Spatial variations in isostatic compensation mechanisms of the Ninetyeast Ridge and their tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, K. M.; Krishna, K. S.

    2013-10-01

    Ninetyeast Ridge (NER), one of the longest linear volcanic features on the Earth, offers an excellent opportunity of understanding the isostatic response to the interactions of mantle plume with the migrating mid-ocean ridge. Bathymetry, geoid, and gravity (shipborne and satellite) data along 72 closely spaced transects and 17 overlapping grids on the NER are analyzed and modeled to determine the effective elastic thickness (Te) beneath the entire ridge. The results of 2-D and 3-D flexural modeling of the NER show large spatial variations in Te values ranging from 4 to 35 km, suggesting that the ridge was compensated along its length by different isostatic mechanisms. The southern (south of 22°S latitude) and northern (north of 2°N latitude) parts of the NER have Te values of >10 and >23 km, respectively, revealing that the southern part was emplaced on a lithosphere of intermediate strength possibly on flank of the Indian plate, whereas the northern part was emplaced in an intraplate setting. In contrast, in the central part of the NER (between latitudes 22°S and 2°N), highly variable Te values (4-22 km) are estimated. The scattered Te values in the central NER suggest that this part may have evolved due to the occurrence of frequent ridge jumps caused by the interaction of Kerguelen hot spot with rapid northward migration of the Wharton spreading ridge. Residual Mantle Bouguer Anomaly (RMBA) map of the NER and adjacent basins reveals that the entire length of the NER is associated with a significant negative anomaly up to 200 mGal, indicating the presence of thickened crust or less dense mantle beneath the ridge. 3-D crustal thickness map of the NER, generated by inversion of the RMBA data, shows a thick crust ranging from 15 to 19 km. The present study clearly shows that NER possesses a highly segmented isostatic pattern with the occurrence of subcrustal underplating or subsurface loading.

  4. Structural Analysis of the Knipovich Ridge, 74° -78° N, North Atlantic Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curewitz, D.; Okino, K.; Asada, M.; Tamaki, K.

    2001-12-01

    suggest that faulting in segment centers is strongly influenced by dike intrusion in an orientation controlled by the spreading direction, producing dike-related faults normal to plate motion. In time intervals between dike intrusions, or in areas away from segment centers, mechanical interaction between the oblique rift axis and plate motion produces oblique-normal faults in orientations compatible with results from analog experiments and observations in other oblique rifting environments. Faulting in segment ends (non-transform discontinuities) is controlled by accommodation between adjacent, en echelon spreading segments, producing short, oblique-slip faults characteristic of accommodation zones and transfer zones. The oblique spreading regime along the Knipovich Ridge enables discrimination between dike-related faulting and rift-related faulting, and that the structures observed are useful for illuminating the relationships between tectonism and magmatism along this ultra-slow-spreading ridge.

  5. Repeat ridge jumps associated with plume-ridge interaction, melt transport, and ridge migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstaedt, Eric; Ito, Garrett; van Hunen, Jeroen

    2011-01-01

    Repeated shifts, or jumps, of mid-ocean ridge segments toward nearby hot spots can produce large, long-term changes to the geometry and location of the tectonic plate boundaries. Ridge jumps associated with hot spot-ridge interaction are likely caused by several processes including shear on the base of the plate due to expanding plume material as well as reheating of lithosphere as magma passes through it to feed off-axis volcanism. To study how these processes influence ridge jumps, we use numerical models to simulate 2-D (in cross section) viscous flow of the mantle, viscoplastic deformation of the lithosphere, and melt migration upward from the asthenospheric melting zone, laterally along the base of the lithosphere, and vertically through the lithosphere. The locations and rates that magma penetrates and heats the lithosphere are controlled by the time-varying accumulation of melt beneath the plate and the depth-averaged lithospheric porosity. We examine the effect of four key parameters: magmatic heating rate of the lithosphere, plate spreading rate, age of the seafloor overlying the plume, and the plume-ridge migration rate. Results indicate that the minimum value of the magmatic heating rate needed to initiate a ridge jump increases with plate age and spreading rate. The time required to complete a ridge jump decreases with larger values of magmatic heating rate, younger plate age, and faster spreading rate. For cases with migrating ridges, models predict a range of behaviors including repeating ridge jumps, much like those exhibited on Earth. Repeating ridge jumps occur at moderate magmatic heating rates and are the result of changes in the hot spot magma flux in response to magma migration along the base of an evolving lithosphere. The tendency of slow spreading to promote ridge jumps could help explain the observed clustering of hot spots near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Model results also suggest that magmatic heating may significantly thin the lithosphere

  6. Global Characterization of the Ocean Ridge System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, A.; Langmuir, C. H.; Dalton, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-ocean ridge system is a window into the upper mantle, producing over 80% of Earth’s volcanism. Fundamental, first-order questions remain debated and require a reliable global perspective. Such questions include the relative roles of mantle temperature, mantle heterogeneity and spreading rate on mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) compositions, and the importance of spreading rate to melting and fractionation processes. To address these issues and provide a common reference for geochemists and geophysicists, we have assembled a comprehensive petrological presentation of global MORB. The data are compiled from PetDB as well as unpublished data. Transforming the raw data into a useful catalog poses several challenges. First, to link each sample with a particular ridge segment requires defining the individual segments of the ridge system. Using the highest resolution bathymetry available, we identified 771 global ridge segments with a total length of 60,864km. For each segment we also generated a digital along-strike depth profile, enabling precise characterization of both mean depth and depth range. Second, as noted in earlier work, different laboratories calibrate their analyses to different standards, which can lead to significant, systematic offsets among analyses. It is therefore important to apply correction factors to the data to make them consistent with one another. Erroneous data and mislocated samples were identified and either eliminated or manually corrected, leading to a total dataset of 11,366 glass and 874 whole-rock analyses that have had interlab correction values carefully applied. These results show that the mean depth of the global ridge system is 2981m, calculated by averaging the segment mean depths, weighted by segment length. Of the 771 ridge segments, 476 have at least one basalt sample within 10km of the ridge axis but only 181 segments have samples from three or more unique locations. Using these data, a far more reliable composition can

  7. Crustal manifestations of a hot transient pulse at 60°N beneath the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell-Turner, R. E.; White, N. J.; Maclennan, J.; Henstock, T. J.; Murton, B. J.; Jones, S. M.

    2013-02-01

    Since its inception at 62 Ma, mantle convective upwelling beneath Iceland has had a significant influence on Cenozoic vertical motions, magmatism and paleoceanography in the North Atlantic Ocean. Crucially, intersection of the Reykjanes Ridge with the Icelandic Plume provides us with a useful window into the transient activity of this plume. Here, the spreading ridge acts as a linear sampler of plume activity, which is recorded as a series of time-transgressive V-shaped ridges and troughs. We present the results of a detailed study of the spreading ridge close to 60°N, where the youngest V-shaped ridge of thickened oceanic crust is forming today. A combination of multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection profiles, acquired along and across the ridge axis, is used to map the detailed pattern of volcanism and normal faulting. Along the ridge axis, the density of volcanic seamounts varies markedly, increasing by a factor of two between 59°N and 62°N. Within this zone, seismic imaging shows that there is enhanced acoustic scattering at the seabed. These observations are accompanied by a decrease in mean fault length from ∼12 km to ∼6 km. A 1960-2009 catalog of relocated teleseismic earthquake hypocenters indicates that there is a pronounced gap in seismicity between 59°N and 62°N where the cumulative moment release is two orders of magnitude smaller than that along adjacent ridge segments. A steady-state thermal model is used to show that a combination of increased melt generation and decreased hydrothermal circulation accounts for this suite of observations. The predicted decrease in the thickness of the brittle seismogenic layer is consistent with geochemical modeling of dredged basaltic samples, which require hotter asthenospheric material beneath the spreading axis. Thus, along-axis variation in melt supply caused by passage of a pulse of hot material modulates crustal accretion processes and rheological properties.

  8. The "pressures" of being a ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeman, K.; Scott, J. L.; Barton, M.

    2015-12-01

    As part of a larger project aimed at understanding the magma plumbing systems and magmatic processes responsible for crust formation at divergent plate margins, we have begun a study of the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC), an intermediate spreading ridge off the west coast of South America and connected to the East Pacific Rise. This ridge is of interest because it passes close to the Galapagos Islands, allowing the effects of a mantle plume on sub-ridge processes and magma plumbing systems to be examined. In addition, the effects of ridge-ridge intersection, ridge propagation, and ridge offsets by transform faults on magma evolution can be examined. Published compositional data for glasses collected along the ridge were used to calculate pressures of partial crystallization and to examine variations in magma chemistry along the ridge. To aid interpretation of the results, the ridge was divided into 12 segments based on sample distribution and the occurrence of ridge offsets. Calculated pressures for most segments range from 100 and 300 MPa, and indicate depths of partial crystallization of ~3-9 km. This suggests that accretion occurs mostly near the base of the crust. However, the range of pressures for some segments is relatively large with maximum calculated values of 500-750 MPa. For example, near the major transform fault at ~85OW, the calculated maximum pressure is 741 MPa and the average pressure is ~ 300 MPa. We consider it unlikely that the calculated high pressures represent the true pressure of partial crystallization, and suggest that the compositions of some magmas result from processes other than simple crystallization. Correlations between Pressure and MgO, between Na2O and MgO, P2O5 and K2O, and between Na8 and longitude suggest that the processes operating beneath this ridge are complex. Near the transform fault for example, MgO vs Pressure shows a negative correlation with an R2 value of 0.546. Such trends are inconsistent with magma evolution

  9. Three-dimensional seismic structure of a Mid-Atlantic Ridge segment characterized by active detachment faulting (TAG, 25°55’N-26°20’N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; Canales, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) (25°55'N-26°20'N) is characterized by massive active and relict high-temperature hydrothermal deposits. Previous geological and geophysical studies indicate that the active TAG hydrothermal mound sits on the hanging wall of an active detachment fault. The STAG microseismicity study revealed that seismicity associated to detachment faulting extends deep into the crust/uppermost mantle (>6 km), forming an arcuate band (in plan view) extending along ~25 km of the rift valley floor (deMartin et al., Geology, 35, 711-714, 2007). Two-dimensional analysis of the STAG seismic refraction data acquired with ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) showed that the eastern rift valley wall is associated with high P-wave velocities (>7 km/s) at shallow levels (>1 km depth), indicating uplift of lower crustal and/or upper mantle rocks along the detachment fault (Canales et al., Geochem., Geophys., Geosyst., 8, Q08004, doi:08010.01029/02007GC001629, 2008). Here we present a three-dimensional (3D) seismic tomography analysis of the complete STAG seismic refraction OBS dataset to illuminate the 3D crustal architecture of the TAG segment. Our new results provide, for the first time, a detailed picture of the complex, dome-shaped geometry and structure of a nascent oceanic core complex being exhumed by a detachment fault. Our results show a relatively low-velocity anomaly embedded within the high-velocity body forming the footwall of the detachment fault. The low velocity sits 2-3 km immediately beneath the active TAG hydrothermal mound. Although velocities within the low-velocity zone are too high (6 km/s) to represent partial melt, we speculate that this low velocity zone is intimately linked to hydrothermal processes taking place at TAG. We consider three possible scenarios for its origin: (1) a highly fissured zone produced by extensional stresses during footwall exhumation that may help localize fluid flow

  10. Transverse dune trailing ridges and vegetation succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; ‘Marisa' Martinez, M. L.

    2008-07-01

    We describe the evolution of, and vegetation succession on, a previously undescribed landform: transverse dune trailing ridges at El Farallón transgressive dunefield in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Three-dimensional clinometer/compass and tape topographic surveys were conducted in conjunction with 1 m 2 contiguous percent cover and presence/absence vegetation survey transects at eight locations across two adjacent trailing ridges. At the study site, and elsewhere, the transverse dune trailing ridges are formed by vegetation colonization of the lateral margins of active transverse, barchanoidal transverse, and aklé or network dunes. For simplicity, all trailing ridges formed from these dune types are referred to as transverse dune trailing ridges. Because there are several transverse dunes in the dunefield, multiple trailing ridges can be formed at one time. Two adjacent trailing ridges were examined. The shortest length ridge was 70 m long, and evolving from a 2.5 m-high transverse dune, while the longer ridge was 140 m long, and evolving from an 8 m-high dune. Trailing ridge length is a proxy measure of ridge age, since the longer the ridge, the greater the length of time since initial formation. With increasing age or distance upwind, species diversity increased, as well as species horizontal extent and percent cover. In turn, the degree of bare sand decreased. Overall, the data indicate a successional trend in the vegetation presence and cover with increasing age upwind. Those species most tolerant to burial ( Croton and Palafoxia) begin the process of trailing ridge formation. Ipomoea and Canavalia are less tolerant to burial and also are typically the next colonizing species. Trachypogon does not tolerate sand burial or deposition very well and only appears after significant stabilization has taken place. The ridges display a moderately defined successional sequence in plant colonization and percentage cover with time (and upwind distance). They are

  11. Infiltration of Refractory Melts into the Sub-Oceanic Mantle: Evidence from Major and Minor Element Compositions of Minerals from the 53° E Amagmatic Segment Abyssal Peridotites at the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, C.; Dick, H. J.; Zhou, H.; Liu, Y.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated sodium and titanium in pyroxene and spinel with high TiO2 (> 0.2 wt%) are suggested as the geochemical characteristic for the MORB-like melt infiltration of peridotites. The petrological and geochemical results of melt infiltrating in mantle peridotites are controlled by not only the melt composition but also the melt/rock ratio. Large discordant dunite bodies in the mantle transition zone are the direct observation of large volume melt (high melt/rock ratio) infiltrating by channeled porous flow in the shallow mantle (1). In addition to dunites, melt infiltrating results in a large variety of vein lithologies in mantle, and the occurrence of plagioclases are considered as a petrological signal of melt-reaction at shallow depth (2, 3) with a medium melt/rock ratio. Because the lacking of obviously petrological and geochemical variation of peridotites, melt infiltration of peridotites with a low melt/rock ratio are rarely reported. Peridotites in this study are from the 53° E amagmatic segment at the Southwest Indian Ridge. These peridotites are suggested as highly depleted buoyant mantle drawn up from the asthenosphere beneath southern Africa during the breakup of Gondwanaland (4) and are residues of multi-stage melt extracting in both spinel and garnet field. We present a detailed analysis of mineral compositions by both the EMPA and LA-ICPMS. Mineral phases in 53°E peridotites have mantle major element compositions, although minerals show variations with the crystal size and the location from cores to rims (Fig.1). In conjunction with the profile analysis of large clinopyroxene crystals, our results document the melt infiltration occurred at the ultraslow-spreading environment. At least two kinds of percolation melts are distinguished. They are normally MORB-like melt and ultra-depleted melt. Reference1.P. B. Kelemen, H. J. B. Dick, Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth 100, 423 (Jan, 1995). 2.J. M. Warren, N. Shimizu, Journal of Petrology 51

  12. Geochemistry of Axial seamount lavas: Magmatic relationship between the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.M.; Morgan, C.; Lilas, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Axial seamount, located along the central portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and at the eastern end of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, is the current center of the Cobb hotspot. Lava chemistry and bathymetry indicate that Axial seamount is a discrete volcanic unit, with a more productive shallow magmatic plumbing system separate from the adjacent ridge segments. Despite this classic association of spreading center and hotspot volcanic activity, there is no evidence in the lavas for geochemical or isotopic enrichment typical of hotspot or mantle plume activity. The differences in composition between the Axial seamount lavas and the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas are attributed to melting processes rather than to any fundamental differences in their mantle source compositions. The higher magma production rates, higher Sr, and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas relative to the ridge lavas are thought to be a consequence of melt initiation at greater depths. The melting column producing the seamount lavas is thought to be initiated in the stability field of spinel peridotite, whereas the ridge lavas are produced from a melting column initiated at shallower levels, possibly within or close to the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. Implicit in this interpretation is the conclusion that the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas, and by analogy most MORB, are generated at shallow mantle levels, mostly within the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. This interpretation also requires that for the upwelling mantle to intersect the solidus at different depths, the mantle supplying Axial seamount must be hotter than the rest of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Axial seamount, therefore, reflects a thermal anomaly in the mantle, rather than a geochemically enriched ocean island basalt type mantle plume.

  13. Mantle Sources Beneath the SW Indian Ridge - Remelting the African Superplume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, H. J. B.; Zhou, H.

    2012-04-01

    The SW Indian Ridge runs some 7700 km from the Bouvet to the Rodgriguez Triple Junction, crossing over or near two postulated mantle plumes. The latter are associated with large oceanic rises where the ridge axis shoals dramatically in the vicinity of the mantle hotspot. The Marion Rise, extends 3100 km from the Andrew Bain FZ to near the Rodriguez TJ, with an along axis rise of 5600-m to it crest north of Marion Island. The rise has thin crust inferred on the basis of abundant exposures of mantle peridotites along its length. We suggest that this is the result of its sub-axial mantle source, which is a depleted residue originally emplaced by the African Superplume into the asthenosphere beneath southern Africa during the Karoo volcanic event ~185 Ma. Based on shallow mantle anisotropy, plate reconstructions, and hotspot traces, it now forms the mantle substrate for the SW Indian Ridge due to the breakup of Gondwanaland. The Marion Rise is associated with Marion Island, the present location of the Marion Hotspot, some 256 km south of the modern ridge. This plume is a vestigial remnant of the African Superplume now imbedded in and centered on asthenospheric mantle derived from the Karoo event. Based on the numerous large offset fracture zones, which would dam sub-axial asthenospheric flow along the ridge, the low postulated flux of the Marion plume, its off-axis position, and the thin crust along the ridge it is clear that the present day plume does not support the Marion Rise. Instead, this must be supported isostatically by the underlying mantle residue of the Karoo event. The Bouvet Rise is much shorter than the Marion Rise, extending ~664 km from the Conrad FZ on the American-Antarctic Ridge to the Shaka FZ on the SW Indian Ridge. It has ~3000-m of axial relief, peaking at Speiss Smt at Speiss Ridge: the last spreading segment of the SW Indian Ridge adjacent to the Bouvet TJ. Unlike the Marion plume, Bouvet is ridge-centered, and much of its rise is likely

  14. Ridge suction drives plume-ridge interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Hékinian, R.

    2003-04-01

    Deep-sourced mantle plumes, if existing, are genetically independent of plate tectonics. When the ascending plumes approach lithospheric plates, interactions between the two occur. Such interactions are most prominent near ocean ridges where the lithosphere is thin and the effect of plumes is best revealed. While ocean ridges are mostly passive features in terms of plate tectonics, they play an active role in the context of plume-ridge interactions. This active role is a ridge suction force that drives asthenospheric mantle flow towards ridges because of material needs to form the ocean crust at ridges and lithospheric mantle in the vicinity of ridges. This ridge suction force increases with increasing plate separation rate because of increased material demand per unit time. As the seismic low-velocity zone atop the asthenosphere has the lowest viscosity that increases rapidly with depth, the ridge-ward asthenospheric flow is largely horizontal beneath the lithosphere. Recognizing that plume materials have two components with easily-melted dikes/veins enriched in volatiles and incompatible elements dispersed in the more refractory and depleted peridotitic matrix, geochemistry of some seafloor volcanics well illustrates that plume-ridge interactions are consequences of ridge-suction-driven flow of plume materials, which melt by decompression because of lithospheric thinning towards ridges. There are excellent examples: 1. The decreasing La/Sm and increasing MgO and CaO/Al_2O_3 in Easter Seamount lavas from Salas-y-Gomez Islands to the Easter Microplate East rift zone result from progressive decompression melting of ridge-ward flowing plume materials. 2. The similar geochemical observations in lavas along the Foundation hotline towards the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge result from the same process. 3. The increasing ridge suction force with increasing spreading rate explains why the Iceland plume has asymmetric effects on its neighboring ridges: both topographic and

  15. Ridge Regression: A Panacea?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Joseph M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Ridge regression is an approach to the problem of large standard errors of regression estimates of intercorrelated regressors. The effect of ridge regression on the estimated squared multiple correlation coefficient is discussed and illustrated. (JKS)

  16. Grafts for Ridge Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Jamjoom, Amal; Cohen, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome. PMID:26262646

  17. Upper crustal densities derived from sea floor gravity measurements: Northern Juan De Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Mark L.; Johnson, H. Paul

    1993-01-01

    A transect of sea floor gravity stations has been analyzed to determine upper crustal densities on the Endeavour segment of the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge. Data were obtained using ALVIN along a corridor perpendicular to the axis of spreading, over crustal ages from 0 to 800,000 years. Calculated elevation factors from the gravity data show an abrupt increase in density with age (distance) for the upper 200 m of crust. This density change is interpreted as a systematic reduction in bulk porosity of the upper crustal section, from 23% for the axial ridge to 10% for the off-axis flanking ridges. The porosity decrease is attributed to the collapse and filling of large-scale voids as the abyssal hills move out of the crustal formation zone. Forward modeling of a plausible density structure for the near-axis region agrees with the observed anomaly data only if the model includes narrow, along-strike, low-density regions adjacent to both inner and outer flanks of the abyssal hills. The required low density zones could be regions of systematic upper crustal fracturing and faulting that were mapped by submersible observers and side-scan sonar images, and whose presence was suggested by the distribution of heat flow data in the same area.

  18. Submersible observations along the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge: 1984 Alvin program.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, William R.; Morton, Janet L.; Ross, Stephanie L.

    1987-01-01

    In September 1984, the research submersible Alvin provided direct observations of three major hydrothermal vent areas along the southernmost segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR). The submersible operations focused on specific volcanologie, structural, and hydrothermal problems that had been identified during the preceding 4 years of photographic, dredging, acoustic imaging, and geophysical studies along a 12-km-long section of the ridge. A continuously maintained (from 1981 to the present) net of seafloor-anchored acoustic transponders allowed the observations from Alvin to be directly tied to all previous U.S. Geological Survey data sets and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration water column surveys from 1984 to the present. The three vent areas studied are the largest of at least six areas identified by previous deep-towed camera surveys that lie within a deep cleft, which marks the axis of symmetry of the JFR in this region. The cleft appears to be the locus of eruption for this segment of the JFR. The vent areas, at least in part, are localized near what appear to be previous volcanic eruptive centers marked by extensive lava lake collapse features adjacent to the cleft at these sites. Each hydrothermal area has several active discharge sites, and sulfide deposits occur as clusters (15–100 m2) of small chimneys, individual large chimneys, or clusters of large branched chimneys. We review the dive program and present a brief synthesis of the geology of the vent sites together with sample and track line compilations.

  19. Mid-ocean ridge dynamics - Observations and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps morgan, J. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of midocean-ridge extension and its relation to melting, magmatic, deformation, and hydrothermal processes are discussed in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics examined include segmentation, along-axis crustal variations and gravity, axial crust and lithosphere structure and seismics, ophiolite studies, and the interaction of ridge and continental rift studies. Consideration is given to theoretical models of axial topography; mantle flow, melting, and melt migration; mantle rheology and flow beneath a midoceanic ridge; upwelling structure and segmentation; the role of the lithosphere in shaping ridge segmentation; thermal stress and the origin of fracture zones; and hydrothermal cooling. A comprehensive bibliography is provided.

  20. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Nanda; Ravindran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. Aim To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). Results The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Conclusion Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas. PMID:26816991

  1. The relationship between oceanic transform fault segmentation, seismicity, and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson-Schwehr, Monica

    Mid-ocean ridge transform faults (RTFs) are typically viewed as geometrically simple, with fault lengths readily constrained by the ridge-transform intersections. This relative simplicity, combined with well-constrained slip rates, make them an ideal environment for studying strike-slip earthquake behavior. As the resolution of available bathymetric data over oceanic transform faults continues to improve, however, it is being revealed that the geometry and structure of these faults can be complex, including such features as intra-transform pull-apart basins, intra-transform spreading centers, and cross-transform ridges. To better determine the resolution of structural complexity on RTFs, as well as the prevalence of RTF segmentation, fault structure is delineated on a global scale. Segmentation breaks the fault system up into a series of subparallel fault strands separated by an extensional basin, intra-transform spreading center, or fault step. RTF segmentation occurs across the full range of spreading rates, from faults on the ultraslow portion of the Southwest Indian Ridge to faults on the ultrafast portion of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). It is most prevalent along the EPR, which hosts the fastest spreading rates in the world and has undergone multiple changes in relative plate motion over the last couple of million years. Earthquakes on RTFs are known to be small, to scale with the area above the 600°C isotherm, and to exhibit some of the most predictable behaviors in seismology. In order to determine whether segmentation affects the global RTF scaling relations, the scalings are recomputed using an updated seismic catalog and fault database in which RTF systems are broken up according to their degree of segmentation (as delineated from available bathymetric datasets). No statistically significant differences between the new computed scaling relations and the current scaling relations were found, though a few faults were identified as outliers. Finite element

  2. The effect of fault segmentation on the dynamics of fast-slipping oceanic transform faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, P. M.; Behn, M. D.; Lin, J.; Grove, T. L.; Montési, L. G.

    2007-12-01

    The majority of oceanic transform faults (OTFs) systems along the fast-spreading equatorial East Pacific Rise are segmented into two or more strike-slip fault strands as a result of plate motion reorganization. Fresh basaltic lava sampled from these locations (e.g., the Siqueiros and Garrett OTFs) indicate that active crustal accretion is occurring within these transform systems. New Residual Mantle Bouguer gravity Anomalies (RMBA) calculated along fast-slipping OTFs are found to be more negative than the RMBA values along adjacent ridge segments. One possible explanation for these observations is enhanced magmatic upwelling and crustal accretion at intra- transform spreading centers (ITSC) and within the transform valley of the fast-slipping OTFs. In this study, we examine two end-member 3-D thermal models (constant viscosity rheology versus visco-plastic rheology) to explore mantle flow and melt extraction beneath segmented transform faults. Melt fraction is calculated using the parameterized fractional melting model of Kinzler and Grove (JGR, 1992a, 1992b, and 1993), and the fractional crystallization models of Yang et al. (Cont. Min. Pet., 1996). We evaluate the sensitivity of these models to various parameters including transform fault geometry, mantle potential temperature, and initial mantle composition. Preliminary results for a 100 km-long transform fault, slipping at 100 mm/yr, segmented by a single 10 km-long ITSC indicate that incorporating a visco-plastic rheology results in an approximately 35 percent decrease in the brittle fault area (< 600°C isotherm) compared to a constant viscosity model. Assuming upward melt migration along the base of the lithosphere, we find that crustal production is enhanced at ITSC by 1-1.5 km compared to the adjacent ridge segments. However, crustal thickness variations are sensitive to transform fault geometry and assumptions made about the pooled melt region. For example, if melt migration is not permitted across the

  3. Electro-Optic Segment-Segment Sensors for Radio and Optical Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramovici, Alex

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses an electro-optic sensor that consists of a collimator, attached to one segment, and a quad diode, attached to an adjacent segment. Relative segment-segment motion causes the beam from the collimator to move across the quad diode, thus generating a measureable electric signal. This sensor type, which is relatively inexpensive, can be configured as an edge sensor, or as a remote segment-segment motion sensor.

  4. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Marder, Barry M.

    1996-01-01

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces.

  5. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-09-03

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces. 6 figs.

  6. Sea-floor drainage features of Cascadia Basin and the adjacent continental slope, northeast Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, M.A.; Karl, Herman A.; Kenyon, Neil H.

    1989-01-01

    Sea-floor drainage features of Cascadia Basin and the adjacent continental slope include canyons, primary fan valleys, deep-sea valleys, and remnant valley segments. Long-range sidescan sonographs and associated seismic-reflection profiles indicate that the canyons may originate along a mid-slope escarpment and grow upslope by mass wasting and downslope by valley erosion or aggradation. Most canyons are partly filled with sediment, and Quillayute Canyon is almost completely filled. Under normal growth conditions, the larger canyons connect with primary fan valleys or deep-sea valleys in Cascadia Basin, but development of accretionary ridges blocks or re-routes most canyons, forcing abandonment of the associated valleys in the basin. Astoria Fan has a primary fan valley that connects with Astoria Canyon at the fan apex. The fan valley is bordered by parallel levees on the upper fan but becomes obscure on the lower fan, where a few valley segments appear on the sonographs. Apparently, Nitinat Fan does not presently have a primary fan valley; none of the numerous valleys on the fan connect with a canyon. The Willapa-Cascadia-Vancouver-Juan de Fuca deep-sea valley system bypasses the submarine fans and includes deeply incised valleys to broad shallow swales, as well as within-valley terraces and hanging-valley confluences. ?? 1989.

  7. Geometry Guided Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Stanley M.; Liang, Tajen

    1989-03-01

    Our overall goal is to develop an image understanding system for automatically interpreting dental radiographs. This paper describes the module that integrates the intrinsic image data to form the region adjacency graph that represents the image. The specific problem is to develop a robust method for segmenting the image into small regions that do not overlap anatomical boundaries. Classical algorithms for finding homogeneous regions (i.e., 2 class segmentation or connected components) will not always yield correct results since blurred edges can cause adjacent anatomical regions to be labeled as one region. This defect is a problem in this and other applications where an object count is necessary. Our solution to the problem is to guide the segmentation by intrinsic properties of the constituent objects. The module takes a set of intrinsic images as arguments. A connected components-like algorithm is performed, but the connectivity relation is not 4- or 8-neighbor connectivity in binary images; the connectivity is defined in terms of the intrinsic image data. We shall describe both the classical method and the modified segmentation procedures, and present experiments using both algorithms. Our experiments show that for the dental radiographs a segmentation using gray level data in conjunction with edges of the surfaces of teeth give a robust and reliable segmentation.

  8. Caught in the Act: Crustal Manifestations of a Hot Transient Pulse Beneath the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 60°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell-Turner, Ross; White, Nicky; Henstock, Tim; Murton, Bramley; Jones, Stephen; Maclennan, John

    2013-04-01

    Since its inception, mantle convective upwelling beneath Iceland has had a significant influence on the history of vertical motion, magmatism and paleoceanography in the North Atlantic Ocean. Crucially, intersection of the Reykjanes Ridge with the Icelandic plume provides us with an important window into the transient activity of the plume. The spreading ridge acts as a linear sampler of plume activity, which is recorded as a series of time-transgressive V-shaped ridges and troughs. Here, we present the results of a detailed study along the spreading ridge close to 60°N, where the youngest V-shaped ridge of thickened oceanic crust, is forming today. A combination of multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection profiles, acquired along and across the ridge axis, is used to map the detailed pattern of volcanism and normal faulting. Along the ridge axis, the density of volcanic seamounts varies markedly, increasing by a factor of two between 59° and 62°N. Within this area, seismic imaging shows that there is enhanced acoustic scattering at the seabed. These observations are accompanied by a decrease in mean fault length from ~12 km to ~6 km. A 1960-2009 catalog of relocated teleseismic earthquake hypocenters shows that there is a pronounced gap in seismicity between 59° and 62°N where the cumulative moment release is two orders of magnitude smaller than that along adjacent ridge segments. A steady-state thermal model is used to show that a combination of increased melt generation and decreased hydrothermal circulation accounts for this suite of observations. Our results suggest that the thickness of the brittle seismogenic layer is smaller where the youngest V-shaped ridge intersects the ridge axis. This decrease is consistent with geochemical modeling of dredged basaltic samples, which require horizontal flow of hotter asthenospheric material within a channel beneath the spreading axis. Thus, along-axis variation in melt supply arising from the passage of a pulse

  9. Ridges and scarps in the equatorial belt of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Klockenbrink, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The morphology and distribution of ridges and scarps on Mars in the ?? 30?? latitude belt were investigated. Two distinct types of ridges were recognized. The first is long and linear, resembling mare ridges on the Moon; it occurs mostly in plains areas. The other is composed of short, anastomosing segments and occurs mostly in ancient cratered terrain and intervening plateaus. Where ridges are eroded, landscape configurations suggest that they are located along regional structures. The age of ridges is uncertain, but some are as young as the latest documented volcanic activity on Mars. The origins of ridges are probably diverse-they may result from wrinkling due to compression or from buckling due to settling over subsurface structures. The similar morphologic expressions of ridge types of various origins may be related to a similar deformation mechanism caused by two main factors: (1) most ridges are developed in thick layers of competent material and (2) ridges formed under stresses near a free surface. ?? 1981 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  10. Tectonic evolution of the Resolution Ridge System, New Zealand: insights gained through UNCLOS surveying for natural prolongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, R.; Barker, D.

    2005-12-01

    For coastal States, demonstration of submerged natural prolongation of the land mass is a key element in delimiting the extent of the continental margin under the terms of UNCLOS article 76. Straddling an active plate boundary and with continental margins encompassing most major tectonic settings, the New Zealand (NZ) continent presents numerous, varied examples of natural prolongation of the land mass. The mostly submerged NZ continent covers over 5,000,000 km2. The continent grew by the accretion of basement terranes and the Hikurangi Plateau, a large igneous province, along the eastern margin of Gondwana during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic. Fragmentation of Gondwana initially involved thinning and extension of the continental rocks of New Zealand, and ultimately resulted in the separation of the New Zealand continent from Australia and Antarctica. Renewed tectonic activity in the Cenozoic resulted in the formation of the Resolution Ridge System (RRS) southwest of NZ and several volcanic arcs north of NZ. These volcanic arcs extend onto NZ and are a submerged natural prolongation of the land mass. Geological and geophysical surveys undertaken for the NZ Continental Shelf Project established that most of the RRS was not a prolongation of the NZ land mass, and advanced understanding of NZ's tectonic evolution. The RRS is a series of bathymetric highs extending southwest of Fiordland, NZ, from Resolution Ridge itself, adjacent to the northern limit of the Puysegur Trench, to the southeast termination of the fossil spreading centre in the Tasman Sea (TS; 158°40'E, 48°10'S). A 40° bend at 162°E, 46°30'S divides the ridge system into a northeastern segment, comprising large, en echelon, northeast-southwest-trending basement ridges and basins, and a southwest segment composed of longer, more continuous ridges trending northeast-southwest. The ridge system was formed by rapid reorientation of seafloor spreading directions (through c. 90°) in the TS at ~50 Ma. The

  11. Hydrothermal activity on the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Tectonically- and volcanically-controlled venting at 4 5°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Bennett, S. A.; Connelly, D. P.; Evans, A. J.; Murton, B. J.; Parson, L. M.; Prien, R. D.; Ramirez-Llodra, E.; Jakuba, M.; Shank, T. M.; Yoerger, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Nakamura, K.

    2008-09-01

    We report results from an investigation of the geologic processes controlling hydrothermal activity along the previously-unstudied southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (3-7°S). Our study employed the NOC (UK) deep-tow sidescan sonar instrument, TOBI, in concert with the WHOI (USA) autonomous underwater vehicle, ABE, to collect information concerning hydrothermal plume distributions in the water column co-registered with geologic investigations of the underlying seafloor. Two areas of high-temperature hydrothermal venting were identified. The first was situated in a non-transform discontinuity (NTD) between two adjacent second-order ridge-segments near 4°02'S, distant from any neovolcanic activity. This geologic setting is very similar to that of the ultramafic-hosted and tectonically-controlled Rainbow vent-site on the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The second site was located at 4°48'S at the axial-summit centre of a second-order ridge-segment. There, high-temperature venting is hosted in an ˜ 18 km 2 area of young lava flows which in some cases are observed to have flowed over and engulfed pre-existing chemosynthetic vent-fauna. In both appearance and extent, these lava flows are directly reminiscent of those emplaced in Winter 2005-06 at the East Pacific Rise, 9°50'N and reference to global seismic catalogues reveals that a swarm of large (M 4.6-5.6) seismic events was centred on the 5°S segment over a ˜ 24 h period in late June 2002, perhaps indicating the precise timing of this volcanic eruptive episode. Temperature measurements at one of the vents found directly adjacent to the fresh lava flows at 5°S MAR (Turtle Pits) have subsequently revealed vent-fluids that are actively phase separating under conditions very close to the Critical Point for seawater, at ˜ 3000 m depth and 407 °C: the hottest vent-fluids yet reported from anywhere along the global ridge crest.

  12. Geochemical "Moats" around Near-ridge Hot Spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, A.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been known that ridge basalts tend to become enriched in both isotopic and incompatible trace element ratios with proximity to a hot spot. Less recognized is that at a certain distance from the hot spot, samples are relatively depleted in moderately incompatible element ratios (e.g., Zr/Y, Dy/Yb) even as the enrichment in highly incompatible element ratios (e.g., Ba/La, La/Sm) persists. This leads in some cases to trace element patterns that are concave downward for moderately incompatible elements, indicating a depleted source, and concave upward for highly incompatible elements, indicating an enriched source. Clear offsets for samples near hot spots exist on plots such as Ba/La vs. Dy/Yb, and they also often have low Na8.0 for their depth. Areas where such geochemical characteristics occur are adjacent to hot spots—they form a kind of geochemical "moat" of combined depletion and enrichment. Moats can result from two sequential processes: first removal of a melt in the presence of garnet, leading to a source with low Dy/Yb, etc., followed by addition of a low-degree (low F) enriched melt to produce incompatible element and isotope enrichment. Two hypotheses for the moats are (1) they result from recent plume flow, where mantle that loses melt to the hot spot center is refertilized and enriched as it flows down the ridge. (2) Increased melting associated with a hot spot permits melting of ancient sources depleted by melt loss in the presence of garnet. High Hf isotopes for some moat samples from the N. Atlantic support model (2). Geochemical moats have global regularities. Using segment means from previous work, we show that the maximum distance of a moat segment from a hot spot correlates with plume flux normalized to spreading rate, with an R2 >0.9. A higher plume flux at slower spreading rates creates a larger moat. While high Hf isotopes are typical of N. Atlantic moat samples, this is not the case near Afar and Galapagos. This supports model (1

  13. Historical Gorda Ridge t-phase swarms: relationships to ridge structure and the tectonic and volcanic state of the ridge during 1964 1966

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Daniel A.; Hammond, Stephen R.

    1998-12-01

    The U.S. Navy's Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) hydrophone arrays are extemely efficient receptors of a high-frequency earthquake energy phase known as the t(ertiary)-wave, or t-phase (Fox et al., 1994). After a nearly 30-year hiatus in such studies, SOSUS arrays are again being utilized to detect t-phases and to locate seismic and volcanic events occurring along the Gorda seafloor spreading center (Fox et al., 1995; Fox and Dziak, 1998). Earlier, Northrop et al. (1968) also used other military arrays to infer tectonic structure along the Gorda Ridge. From October 1964 through December 1966, over 600 low-magnitude earthquakes occurred along the Gorda Ridge. Nearly all of these events had magnitudes below the detection thresholds of land-based seismic networks. Northrop et al. (1968) interpreted the geographic distribution of these events as evidence for a nascent fracture zone near the midpoint of the ridge. In the present study, the spatial distributions of these older data and, for the first time, their temporal distributions as well, were examined with respect to detailed bathymetry of the ridge that was acquired in the early 1980s. This analysis, of 570 on-axis and 74 off-axis events, led to the following observations: (1) nearly all of the Gorda Ridge t-phase events occurred in discreet swarms centered about the ridge axis, (2) most of the events within each of 8 (of 9) observed swarms occurred mainly along single ridge segments, and, (3) reconfirming the earlier Northrop et al. (1968) conclusion, most of the events originated in the region of a major change in the strike of the ridge axis. During the 27-month interval that the ridge was observed, relatively few t-phase events took place along the northernmost segment of the Gorda Ridge where the 1996 eruption occurred. However, a unique sequence of small events which visually resemble the events associated with a Juan de Fuca Ridge eruption in 1993 (Fox et al., 1995) and a Gorda Ridge eruption in 1996 (Fox

  14. Topography adjacent to Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Topography adjacent to Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5, showing conditions before construction, May 28, 1943, this drawing shows the Bonita Ridge access road retaining wall and general conditions at Bonita Ridge before the construction of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  15. 1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION TOWER. WATER BRAKE TROUGH SEGMENT AT LOWER RIGHT. Looking north northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. Improved Digitization of Lunar Mare Ridges with LROC Derived Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, J. M.; Robinson, M. S.; Watters, T. R.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Enns, A. C.; Lawrence, S.

    2011-12-01

    Lunar wrinkle ridges (mare ridges) are positive-relief structures formed from compressional stress in basin-filling flood basalt deposits [1]. Previous workers have measured wrinkle ridge orientations and lengths to investigate their spatial distribution and infer basin-localized stress fields [2,3]. Although these plots include the most prominent mare ridges and their general trends, they may not have fully captured all of the ridges, particularly the smaller-scale ridges. Using Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Wide Angle Camera (WAC) global mosaics and derived topography (100m pixel scale) [4], we systematically remapped wrinkle ridges in Mare Serenitatis. By comparing two WAC mosaics with different lighting geometry, and shaded relief maps made from a WAC digital elevation model (DEM) [5], we observed that some ridge segments and some smaller ridges are not visible in previous structure maps [2,3]. In the past, mapping efforts were limited by a fixed Sun direction [6,7]. For systematic mapping we created three shaded relief maps from the WAC DEM with solar azimuth angles of 0°, 45°, and 90°, and a fourth map was created by combining the three shaded reliefs into one, using a simple averaging scheme. Along with the original WAC mosaic and the WAC DEM, these four datasets were imported into ArcGIS, and the mare ridges of Imbrium, Serenitatis, and Tranquillitatis were digitized from each of the six maps. Since the mare ridges are often divided into many ridge segments [8], each major component was digitized separately, as opposed to the ridge as a whole. This strategy enhanced our ability to analyze the lengths, orientations, and abundances of these ridges. After the initial mapping was completed, the six products were viewed together to identify and resolve discrepancies in order to produce a final wrinkle ridge map. Comparing this new mare ridge map with past lunar tectonic maps, we found that many mare ridges were not recorded in the previous works. It was noted

  17. Structural Responses to the Chile Ridge Subduction, Southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E. E.; Russo, R. M.; Mocanu, V. I.; Gallego, A.; Murdie, R.; Comte, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Nazca-Antarctic plate boundary, the Chile spreading ridge, subducts beneath South America, forming the northward-migrating Chile Triple Junction (CTJ), now at ~46.5°S, where an actively spreading segment is currently in the Nazca trench. Ridge subduction is associated with diachronously developed variable structure and magmatism of overriding South America. To assess the effects of ridge subduction, we deployed a network of 39 broadband seismometers in southern Chile between 43 - 49°S and 71 - 76°W from Dec. 2004 - Feb. 2007, recording 102 earthquakes suitable for receiver function analyses, i.e., M > 5.9, of various backazimuths, and at epicentral distances of 30 - 90°. The network encompassed onland portions of the current triple junction and ridge subduction, areas to the south of the CTJ where ridge segments subducted during the last 6 m.y., and regions north of the CTJ not yet affected by ridge subduction, allowing the assessment of the effects of ridge subduction on crustal structure of overriding South America. We constructed 551 teleseismic receiver functions to estimate crustal thicknesses, H, and average compressional to shear wave velocity ratios, Vp/Vs = k, using the iterative time deconvolution method of Ligorria and Ammon (1999). H and k were calculated using the grid search method of Zhu and Kanamori (2000). Beneath stations closest to the trench, where the Nazca plate subducts, we found Moho depths between 28 and 55 km, thickening northward. At the locus of current ridge subduction, in the Taitao Pennisula, thinner crust ranges from 27 - 36 km. H is 36-38 km where the Antarctic plate subducts and the Chile ridge recently subducted. The direct effect of the subducting ridge on South America can be seen in H differences between forearc regions that have sustained ridge subduction versus those that have not. South American forearc crust above the subducted Nazca plate is as much as 28 km thicker than forearc crust recently affected by ridge

  18. Divergent Ridge Features on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, M. E.; Sautter, L.; Steele, M.

    2014-12-01

    Multibeam data collected using a Kongsberg EM122 sonar system on the NOAA ship R/V Marcus G. Langseth led by chief scientist Douglas Toomey (University of Oregon) in 2009 and with a Simrad EM302 sonar system on two NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer cruises led by chief scientists James Gardner (University of New Hampshire) and Catalina Martinez (University of Rhode Island) in 2009 show the morphology of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges, as well as the Blanco and Mendocino Fracture Zones. These ridges and fracture zones comprise the divergent plate boundary of the eastern edge of the Pacific Plate and the western edges of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Plates. Both plates are being subducted beneath the western edge of the North American Plate. CARIS HIPS 8.1 software was used to process the multibeam data and create bathymetric images. The ridge axes, located off the coast of Washington and Oregon (USA) adjacent to the Cascadia Basin, indicate obvious signs of spreading, due to the series of faults and rocky ridges aligned parallel to the plate boundaries. Fault and ridge orientations are used to compare the direction of seafloor spreading, and indicate that both the Juan de Fuca Plate and Gorda Plate are spreading in a southeastern direction. Younger ridges from the Gorda Ridge system mapped in the study run parallel to the boundary, however older ridges do not show the same orientation, indicating a change in spreading direction. The presence of hydrothermal vents along the Juan de Fuca Ridge is also evidence of the active boundary, as the vent chimneys are composed of minerals and metals precipitated from the hot water heated by magma from beneath the spreading seafloor. In this study, the data are used to compare and contrast earthquake seismicity and ridge morphologies at a depth range of approximately 762 to 2134 meters. The diverging Pacific, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda Plates along with the San Andreas Fault have potential to increase seismic and volcanic activity around

  19. Geophysical Characteristics of the Australian-Antarctic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. S.; Lin, J.; Park, S. H.; Choi, H.; Lee, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Between 2011 and 2013, the Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI) conducted three consecutive geologic surveys at the little explored eastern ends of the Australian-Antarctic Ridge (AAR) to characterize the tectonics, geochemistry, and hydrothermal activity of this intermediate spreading system. Using the Korean icebreaker R/V Araon, the multi-disciplinary research team collected bathymetry, gravity, magnetics, and rock and water column samples. In addition, Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorders (MAPRs) were deployed at wax-core rock sampling sites to detect the presence of active hydrothermal vents. Here we present a detailed analysis of a 300-km-long supersegment of the AAR to quantify the spatial variations in ridge morphology and robust axial and off-axis volcanisms. The ridge axis morphology alternates between rift valleys and axial highs within relatively short ridge segments. To obtain a geological proxy for regional variations in magma supply, we calculated residual mantle Bouguer gravity anomalies (RMBA), gravity-derived crustal thickness, and residual topography for seven sub-segments. The results of the analyses revealed that the southern flank of the AAR is associated with shallower seafloor, more negative RMBA, thicker crust, and/or less dense mantle than the conjugate northern flank. Furthermore, this north-south asymmetry becomes more prominent toward the KR1 supersegment of the AAR. The axial topography of the KR1 supersegment exhibits a sharp transition from axial highs at the western end to rift valleys at the eastern end, with regions of axial highs being associated with more magma supply as indicated by more negative RMBA. We also compare and contrast the characteristics of the AAR supersegment with that of other ridges of intermediate spreading rates, including the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Galápagos Spreading Center, and Southeast Indian Ridge west of the Australian-Antarctic Discordance, to investigate the influence of ridge-hotspot interaction on

  20. The Role of Plume-Ridge Interaction in Magma Genesis I: The Northern Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpp, K. S.; Geist, D. J.

    2002-12-01

    A group of enigmatic volcanoes populates the ocean floor between the hotspot and the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC), including many seamounts, a few isolated islands (Pinta, Marchena, and Genovesa), and the Wolf-Darwin Lineament (WDL). The WDL is a NW trending bathymetric high between the Galapagos platform and the GSC. Many of the northern Galapagos volcanoes are unusually elongate edifices that trend parallel to the strike of their local lineament. The seafloor between Pinta and Marchena is cut by fractures and fissures parallel to the WDL, and a major submarine ridge extends NE from fissures that cross-cut Genovesa Island. Elongate volcanic structures are unusual in off-axis seamount provinces and indicate strong deviatoric stresses on a regional scale. Individual volcanoes in the northern Galapagos generally exhibit homogeneous geochemical signatures, although this may be an artifact of sparse sampling (see Blair et al. abstract). Regionally, however, lavas range from plume-like enrichment (Pinta) to MORB-like depletion (Genovesa, S. WDL), with many volcanoes of intermediate composition (Darwin, Marchena). The WDL volcanoes define two distinct chemical groups; lavas erupted south of Wolf Island are similar to those from the GSC west of 93°W, while the northern WDL resembles lavas from the GSC segment directly to their north. This distribution implies that the WDL is supplied by the same type of plume-affected mantle as the GSC segment that produced the lithosphere underlying the volcanoes. We propose that the WDL and perhaps other northern volcanoes are primarily the result of tensional stresses emanating from the inside corner of the GSC transform fault at 91°W. The oblique orientation of the fault with respect to the Nazca plate spreading direction may further enhance regional tensional forces. The area is magmatic owing to the overlapping effects of the ridge and the plume. The volcanoes simply tap hybrid products of mixing at the margins of the sub-ridge

  1. An ultrasonic linear motor using ridge-mode traveling waves.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Masahiko; Kaminaga, Ryuta; Friend, James R; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki

    2005-10-01

    A new type of ultrasonic linear motor is presented using traveling waves excited along a ridge atop a substrate. The ridge cross section was designed to permit only the fundamental mode to be excited during operation of the motor, with a Langevin transducer used as the source of vibration in this study. The ridge waveguide was first made of lossy media to avoid reflecting vibration energy back toward the vibration source, forming a traveling wave. A 5-mm-wide, 15-mm-tall rectangular acrylic ridge was used to move a slider placed upon it toward the vibration source, in opposition to the direction of the traveling wave transmitted along the waveguide ridge. Using a low-loss 3 x 6-mm aluminum rectangular ridge combined with a damper clamped onto the far end of the waveguide, similar results were obtained. To obtain bidirectional operation, the damper was replaced with a second Langevin transducer, giving a pair of transducers located perpendicularly to the ends of the ridge and driven with an appropriate phase difference. The moving direction of the slider was reversed by shifting this phase difference by about 180 degrees. With this simple configuration, it may soon be possible to fabricate a linear micromotor system on a silicon substrate or other semiconductor wafer adjacent to other electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  2. The Galapagos Spreading Center. Galapagos Rifts Expedition--Grades 9-12. Mid-Ocean Ridges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This activity introduces students to the basic concept of seafloor spreading, the processes involved in creating new seafloor at a mid- ocean ridge, the Galapagos Spreading Center system, and the different types of plate motion associated with ridge segments and transform faults. The activity provides learning objectives, a list of needed…

  3. How thick is the magmatic crust at slow spreading oceanic ridges?

    SciTech Connect

    Cannat, M.

    1996-02-10

    This report explores the composition and structure of ultramafic and gabbroic rocks used to constrain the geology of thick lithosphere, thin crust regions of slow spreading ridges, and proposes a geological model that would affect the understanding of the relation between axial segmentation and magma supply variations along slow spreading ridges.

  4. Closure Report for Underground Storage Tank 2310-U at the Pine Ridge West Repeater Station

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This document represents the Closure Report for Underground Storage Tank (UST) 2310-U at the Pine Ridge West Repeater Station, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Tank 2310-U was a 200-gal gasoline UST which serviced the emergency generator at the Repeater Station. The tank was situated in a shallow tank bay adjacent to the Repeater Station along the crest of Pine Ridge. The tank failed a tightness test in October 1989 and was removed in November 1989. The purpose of this report is to document completion of soil corrective action, present supporting analytical data, and request closure for this site.

  5. Diverse styles of volcanism at slow-spreading ridges (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, I. A.; Devey, C. W.; Searle, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    Slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge segments display an incredible diversity in morphology as a result of the volcanic processes occurring on them. The may have prominent axial highs or be floored by smooth, tectonised terrains. Where highs are present they may be smooth or hummocky, fill the valley or be surrounded by lower profile lava flows, and may exist not only in the centre, but also at the ends of segments. Individual eruptions may form one or more lava morphologies, be continuous or discontinuous and occur anywhere along the segment. This diversity is illustrated well in bathymetry and sidescan sonar from along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Multibeam bathymetry from sites along the MAR reveal large scale differences in morphology between segments, while higher resolution multibeam and sidescan datasets from AUVs alongside video and photographic information from ROVs help to elucidate the detailed volcanic morphologies associated with these larger scale differences. Hummocky terrain and smooth terrain are present in varying proportions on almost all slow-spreading segments, however may form in differing locations, or as parts of larger edifices. For example, smooth volcanic highs are morphologically and probably volcanologically different to hummocky axial volcanic ridges. In this contribution we compare and contrast bathymetric data from a number of different slow-spreading segments, including recently collected bathymetry from previously unsurveyed sections of the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, with high-resolution sidescan, multibeam and video observations to look at the variety of volcanic features on slow-spreading ridges and their impact for the construction of the upper oceanic crust.

  6. Environmental baseline survey report for West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge and parcel 21D in the vicinity of the East Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    King, David A.

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE?s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only no-further-investigation (NFI) reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision. Based on available data West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, and West Pine Ridge are not impacted by site operations and are not subject to actions per the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). This determination is supported by visual inspections, records searches and interviews, groundwater conceptual modeling, approved NFI reports, analytical data, and risk analysis results. Parcel 21d data, however, demonstrate impacts from site

  7. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (<40 Hz) vibration modes of the primary mirror segments. Each of the six segments has three or more modes in this bandwidth, and resonant vibration excited by acoustics or small disturbances on the structure can result in phase mismatches between adjacent segments thereby degrading image quality. The damping system consists of two tuned mass dampers (TMDs) for each of the mirror segments. An adjustable TMD with passive magnetic damping was selected to minimize sensitivity to changes in temperature; both frequency and damping characteristics can be tuned for optimal vibration mitigation. Modal testing was performed with a laser vibrometry system to characterize the SMT segments with and without the TMDs. Objectives of this test were to determine operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  8. Adjacent-level arthroplasty following cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Deshpande V; Hari, Akshay; Krishna, Murali; Konar, Subhas; Sharma, Ankit

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-level disc degeneration following cervical fusion has been well reported. This condition poses a major treatment dilemma when it becomes symptomatic. The potential application of cervical arthroplasty to preserve motion in the affected segment is not well documented, with few studies in the literature. The authors present their initial experience of analyzing clinical and radiological results in such patients who were treated with arthroplasty for new or persistent arm and/or neck symptoms related to neural compression due to adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS During a 5-year period, 11 patients who had undergone ACDF anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and subsequently developed recurrent neck or arm pain related to adjacent-level cervical disc disease were treated with cervical arthroplasty at the authors' institution. A total of 15 devices were implanted (range of treated levels per patient: 1-3). Clinical evaluation was performed both before and after surgery, using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiological outcomes were analyzed using pre- and postoperative flexion/extension lateral radiographs measuring Cobb angle (overall C2-7 sagittal alignment), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and range of motion (ROM). RESULTS There were no major perioperative complications or device-related failures. Statistically significant results, obtained in all cases, were reflected by an improvement in VAS scores for neck/arm pain and NDI scores for neck pain. Radiologically, statistically significant increases in the overall lordosis (as measured by Cobb angle) and ROM at the treated disc level were observed. Three patients were lost to follow-up within the first year after arthroplasty. In the remaining 8 cases, the duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 3 years. None of these 8 patients required surgery for the same vertebral level during the follow

  9. Experimental study of structure-forming deformations in obliquely spreading ultra-slow ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, Evgeniy; Kokhan, Andrey; Grokholsky, Andrey

    2013-04-01

    -discontinued AVRs; on the other hand we received short and displaced AVRs. Higher obliquity of Reikjanes ridge results in formation of s-shaped strongly en-echeloned fractures. Mohns ridge is spreading with obliquity of 55°. Its rifting zone consists of a set of magmatic segments connected by accommodation zones lacking magmatic activity, they orient subparallel to spreading direction. Their length is 30-55 kilometers. The main peculiarity of experimental sets was a formation of pattern of stably developing slip and semi slip semi extensive segments connecting perpendicular to extension segments of the ridge. All of them had almost equal length. Knipovich Ridge obliquity varies from 33 to 63° on different parts of the ridge. It consists of short divergent magmatic segments and long transform-like amagmatic segments with unstable relation of slip and extension components. Length of amagmatic portions of the ridge varies from 40 to 150 kilometers. Experimental setting was the following. We emplaced three weak zones according to natural geometry of spreading modeling three neighboring ridges: Knipovich, Mohns, Gakkel. Short spreading segments orthogonal to direction of extension formed in area of Knipovich model zone. They were connected by subparallel to extension direction. Under increase of angle between extension direction and trend of "Knipovich" weak zone the length of slip segments gradually decreased and reached minimum under the angle of 50°. Thus, experiments let to distinguish key peculiarities of structure-forming in rifting zones of these ridges. For Kolbeynsey and Reikjanes ridge this is a system of fractures which are used as channels for eruption and subsequent formation of AVRs, their parameters depend on distance from Iceland plume and thickness of crustal brittle layer. For Knipovich ridge this is an unstable system of pull-apart basins connected by long largely slip segments. For Mohns ridge this is a system of extension basins connected by accommodation zones

  10. Beach ridges as paleoseismic indicators of abrupt coastal subsidence during subduction zone earthquakes, and implications for Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone paleoseismology, southeast coast of the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Witter, Robert C.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Briggs, Richard; Nelson, Alan R.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Corbett, D. Reide

    2015-01-01

    The Kenai section of the eastern Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone straddles two areas of high slip in the 1964 great Alaska earthquake and is the least studied of the three megathrust segments (Kodiak, Kenai, Prince William Sound) that ruptured in 1964. Investigation of two coastal sites in the eastern part of the Kenai segment, on the southeast coast of the Kenai Peninsula, identified evidence for two subduction zone earthquakes that predate the 1964 earthquake. Both coastal sites provide paleoseismic data through inferred coseismic subsidence of wetlands and associated subsidence-induced erosion of beach ridges. At Verdant Cove, paleo-beach ridges record the paleoseismic history; whereas at Quicksand Cove, buried soils in drowned coastal wetlands are the primary indicators of paleoearthquake occurrence and age. The timing of submergence and death of trees mark the oldest earthquake at Verdant Cove that is consistent with the age of a well documented ∼900-year-ago subduction zone earthquake that ruptured the Prince William Sound segment of the megathrust to the east and the Kodiak segment to the west. Soils buried within the last 400–450 years mark the penultimate earthquake on the southeast coast of the Kenai Peninsula. The penultimate earthquake probably occurred before AD 1840 from its absence in Russian historical accounts. The penultimate subduction zone earthquake on the Kenai segment did not rupture in conjunction with the Prince William Sound to the northeast. Therefore the Kenai segment, which is presently creeping, can rupture independently of the adjacent Prince William Sound segment that is presently locked.

  11. West Chestnut Ridge hydrologic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, J.L.; Huff, D.D.; Jones, J.R.

    1985-08-01

    Preliminary site characterization work for the proposed West Chestnut Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility included collection and analysis of data on stream flows, watershed areas, precipitation, water levels at piezometer sites, and physiochemical properties of surface water. Seven temporary water-flow-gaging installations were established and used to characterize runoff patterns in the study area. Chip-floating and regression techniques were used to estimate stream flows after some of the temporary structures were destroyed during high flows. Stream flow fluctuations were quantified using coefficients of variation and percent change in total flow between adjacent sampling dates. The difference between precipitation and observed flows (net loss) was calculated for all stations. Two headwater stations (4 and 6) exhibited lower flows per watershed area and channel length, and higher levels of fluctuation in flow than the other stations. These two stations were also similar in watershed area and flow magnitude. Two other headwater stations (5 and 7) with comparable flows had total drainage areas that were similar in size and smaller than those of the other stations. Stations 5 and 7 exhibited high flows per drainage area and section length, especially in the dry period of the year when flows were higher than at all other stations. Fluctuations in flows were lowest at these two stations. Data indicate that these two sections are fed by sources of dependable groundwater. 7 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Propagating buoyant mantle upwelling on the Reykjanes Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Fernando; Hey, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Crustal features of the Reykjanes Ridge have been attributed to mantle plume flow radiating outward from the Iceland hotspot. This model requires very rapid mantle upwelling and a "rheological boundary" at the solidus to deflect plume material laterally and prevent extreme melting above the plume stem. Here we propose an alternative explanation in which shallow buoyant mantle upwelling instabilities propagate along axis to form the crustal features of the ridge and flanks. As only the locus of buoyant upwelling propagates this mechanism removes the need for rapid mantle plume flow. Based on new geophysical mapping we show that a persistent sub-axial low viscosity channel supporting buoyant mantle upwelling can explain the current oblique geometry of the ridge as a reestablishment of its original configuration following an abrupt change in opening direction. This mechanism further explains the replacement of ridge-orthogonal crustal segmentation with V-shaped crustal ridges and troughs. Our findings indicate that crustal features of the Reykjanes Ridge and flanks are formed by shallow buoyant mantle instabilities, fundamentally like at other slow spreading ridges, and need not reflect deep mantle plume flow.

  13. Evidence for melt channelization in Galapagos plume-ridge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, T.; Richards, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many present-day hot spots are located within ~ 1000 km of a mid-ocean ridge, either currently or in the geologic past, leading to frequent interaction between these two magmatic regimes. The consequent plume-ridge interactions provide a unique opportunity to test models for asthenosphere-lithosphere dynamics, with the plume acting as a tracer fluid in the problem, and excess magmatism reflecting otherwise unsampled sub-surface phenomena. Galapagos is an off-ridge hotspot with the mantle plume located ~150-250 km south of the plate boundary. Plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos is expressed by the formation of volcanic lineaments of islands and seamounts - e.g., the Wolf-Darwin lineament (WDL) - providing a direct probe of the plume-ridge interaction process, especially in regards to geochemical data. Although several models have been proposed to explain plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos, none adequately explain the observed characteristics, especially the WDL. In particular, predicted lithospheric fault orientations and melt density considerations appear at odds with observations, suggesting that lithospheric extension is not the primary process for formation of these islands. Other off-ridge hotspots interacting with nearby spreading ridges, such as Reunion and Louisville, also exhibit volcanic lineaments linking the plume and the ridge. Thus these lineament-type features are a common outcome of plume-ridge interaction that are indicative of the underlying physics. We propose that the lineaments are surface expressions of narrow sub-lithospheric melt channels focused towards the spreading ridge. These channels should form naturally due to the reactive infiltration instability in a two-phase flow of magma and solid mantle as demonstrated in two-phase flow simulations (e.g., Katz & Weatherley 2012). For Galapagos, we show that melt channels can persist thermodynamically over sufficient length-scales to link the plume and nearby ridge segments. We also show that

  14. The axial topographic high at intermediate and fast spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, Suzanne M.; MacDonald, Ken C.

    1994-12-01

    An axial topographic high is commonly observed at both fast spreading ridges and some segments of intermediate spreading ridges. At fast rates the axial high is primarily created by the buoyancy of hot rock and magma beneath the rise. As newly formed crust is transported off axis, little vestige of an axial high is observed on the ridge flanks. In contrast, at intermediate rates, a significant component of the positive topography may be a volcanic construction, preserved on the ridge flanks as abyssal hills, which are slit axial volcanoes. We suggest this difference in the nature of the axial high reflects a lithosphere strong enough to support construction of a volcanic crestal ridge at intermediate spreading rates, but only rarely at fast rates. Relict overlap ridges, found within the discordant zones left by overlapping spreading centers, is one class of ridge-flank topography which appears to have a significant volcanic constructional component even at fast spreading ridges. Unlike topography away from these discontinuities, the relief and shape of overlapping spreading centers is preserved as relict ridge tips are rafted onto the ridge flanks. Reduced magma supply at these discontinuities may give rise to an axial lithosphere strong enough to support volcanic construction of overlap ridges. Low axial lithospheric strength may also account for the lack of normal faults within the innermost 1-2 km of fast, and some intermediate, spreading ridges. With a thin/weak brittle layer at the ridge crest, tensile failure will predominate and few normal faults will form. Depths to the axial magma chamber reflector observed in multi-channel seismic data limit the thickness of the brittel layer on axis to less than 1-2 km for much of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). This depth is comparable to depths over which tensile failure within the oceanic crust will predominate, estimated from the Griffith criteria for fracture initiation (approx. 0.5-1.5 km). As the brittle layer

  15. Strain gauge ambiguity sensor for segmented mirror active optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyman, C. L.; Howe, T. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A system is described to measure alignment between interfacing edges of mirror segments positioned to form a segmented mirror surface. It serves as a gauge having a bending beam with four piezoresistive elements coupled across the interfaces of the edges of adjacent mirror segments. The bending beam has a first position corresponding to alignment of the edges of adjacent mirror segments, and it is bendable from the first position in a direction and to a degree dependent upon the relative misalignment between the edges of adjacent mirror segments to correspondingly vary the resistance of the strain guage. A source of power and an amplifier are connected in circuit with the strain gauge whereby the output of the amplifier varies according to the misalignment of the edges of adjacent mirror segments.

  16. Formation and Significance of the Greenland-Iceland-Faores Ridge: Importance of Crustal Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. M.; Maclennan, J.

    2003-12-01

    The Greenland-Iceland-Faroes Ridge (GIFR) is regarded as a classic hotspot track, built by interaction between the Iceland Plume and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. However, the GIFR-plume link remains poorly understood beyond this general concept because of uncertainty over the mantle, crustal and plate tectonic processes that govern GIFR morphology via crustal thickness. The main mantle processes controling crustal thickness are thought to be plate-driven vs plume-driven upwelling and variations in asthenosphere temperature and composition. The most important tectonic events are the ridge jumps that progressively relocate the spreading axis within the GIFR eastwards relative to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Here, we argue that lower crustal flow is an equally important process that governs many major morphological features of the GIFR. Theoretical and experimental studies suggest that when crust is hotter than about 750oC, variations in crustal thickness drive ductile flow within a channel bounded by the brittle upper crust and the top of the mantle. Controlled source and earthquake seismology results show that Icelandic crust varies in thickness between 20 and 40km, and suggest that the 750oC isotherm lies at a depth of a few km beneath the spreading axes and no deeper than 15km across Iceland. Conditions are therefore ideal for crustal flow, and several observations strongly suggest that it occurs. First, there is topographic asymmetry about both the Reykjanes and Kolbeinsey Ridges where they intersect the GIFR. Secondly, axis-parallel variation in crustal thickness differs markedly between zero-age crust within the Eastern Volcanic Zone and off-axis crust adjacent within 100km. Thirdly, spreading ridge segments are linked by zones of en-echelon fractures rather than by `hard' transform faults. Lower crustal flow can also explain the sharp topographic step bounding the Iceland Shelf, the roughly circular plateau of average diameter ˜ 600km encompassing Iceland itself. This

  17. Calculating a Stepwise Ridge Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, John D.

    1986-01-01

    Although methods for using ordinary least squares regression computer programs to calculate a ridge regression are available, the calculation of a stepwise ridge regression requires a special purpose algorithm and computer program. The correct stepwise ridge regression procedure is given, and a parallel FORTRAN computer program is described.…

  18. The Northern Kolbeinsey Ridge, North Atlantic: Excess volcanism and ridge relocations close to Jan Mayen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, I. A.; Augustin, N.; Devey, C. W.; Deutschmann, M.; Elkins, L. J.; Laurila, T.; Meisenhelder, K.; Rivers, E.; Rothenbeck, M.; van der Zwan, F. M.

    2012-12-01

    The slow-spreading (1.8 cm/yr full rate) Northern Kolbeinsey Ridge (NKR) segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which lies immediately south of the major Jan Mayen Transform Fault, is characterised by anomalously thick crust and unusually shallow water depths. A lack of precise surveying meant that the tectonics and volcanology of the ridge were previously unknown. We present the preliminary findings from 20 days of sampling and mapping of the NKR between 70°30 N and 71°45 N in July 2012. Over 3,130 km2 of the ridge axis were imaged with ship-based multibeam at 35 m or better resolution, while a further 290 km2 were imaged with high-resolution (~ 1 m) sidescan sonar and multibeam surveys using the AUV "ABYSS". This unique dataset, alongside dredge and volcanic rock corer sampling, allows us to define the location of current volcanic crustal accretion for the first time and reveals a complex pattern of volcanism and tectonics along the ridge. At its northern, deeper end we image a single, 025° trending, 4 -5 km wide axial valley, divided into zones dominated alternately by flatter seafloor and closely spaced flat-topped seamounts. As the seafloor shallows southward, the number of flat-topped seamounts decreases and the axial volcanism becomes dominated by sheet- and hummocky flows. At its shallowest point, the axis is flanked on its eastern side by a large, 5 km diameter central volcano (forming Eggvin Bank, min. water depth 20m). The volcano displays a summit caldera containing fresh basalts (the freshest sampled on the entire ridge) as well as relatively fresh flows on its southern flank. South of Eggvin volcano the ridge is cut by an oblique (68° trending), normal fault bounded valley, which extends 7 km southwest from the current active ridge to the north. This oblique valley connects with two further 025° trending parallel valleys to the south: one in line with the axis to the north and a second 7 km to the west. Both valleys appear to have been recently

  19. An extensive region of off-ridge normal-faulting earthquakes in the southern Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, E. A.; Nabelek, J. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    A verified prediction of the theory of plate tectonics is that the focal mechanisms of earthquakes on the mid-ocean ridge system indicate either normal faulting on ridge segments or strike-slip faulting on transform faults. A broad region in the southern Indian Ocean which differs from typical ridge and intraplate regimes has been identified. In this region a number of large off-ridge earthquakes have occurred in the last 20 years. The mechanisms for these events, where known, all involve normal faulting. Nine of these earthquakes have been studied in detail using a formal inversion technique based on matching synthetic body waves to observed seismograms.

  20. Improvement in Recursive Hierarchical Segmentation of Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.

    2006-01-01

    A further modification has been made in the algorithm and implementing software reported in Modified Recursive Hierarchical Segmentation of Data (GSC- 14681-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 6 (June 2006), page 51. That software performs recursive hierarchical segmentation of data having spatial characteristics (e.g., spectral-image data). The output of a prior version of the software contained artifacts, including spurious segmentation-image regions bounded by processing-window edges. The modification for suppressing the artifacts, mentioned in the cited article, was addition of a subroutine that analyzes data in the vicinities of seams to find pairs of regions that tend to lie adjacent to each other on opposite sides of the seams. Within each such pair, pixels in one region that are more similar to pixels in the other region are reassigned to the other region. The present modification provides for a parameter ranging from 0 to 1 for controlling the relative priority of merges between spatially adjacent and spatially non-adjacent regions. At 1, spatially-adjacent-/spatially- non-adjacent-region merges have equal priority. At 0, only spatially-adjacent-region merges (no spectral clustering) are allowed. Between 0 and 1, spatially-adjacent- region merges have priority over spatially- non-adjacent ones.

  1. Tier-Adjacency Is Not a Necessary Condition for Learning Phonotactic Dependencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koo, Hahn; Callahan, Lydia

    2012-01-01

    One hypothesis raised by Newport and Aslin to explain how speakers learn dependencies between nonadjacent phonemes is that speakers track bigram probabilities between two segments that are adjacent to each other within a tier of their own. The hypothesis predicts that a dependency between segments separated from each other at the tier level cannot…

  2. Modification of mandibular ridge splitting technique for horizontal augmentation of atrophic ridges

    PubMed Central

    Abu Tair, Jawad A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A two stage approach of ridge splitting and lateral expansion in the mandible to achieve enough bone width for the purpose of dental implants is presented. Materials and Methods: A total of 13 consecutive patients with 16 long-span edentulous areas of the mandibular ridge were included in this study and 42 dental implants were inserted. Corticotomy of a rectangular buccal segment was carried out followed by 3 weeks of recovery; the mandibular ridge was stretched laterally, leaving the buccal periosteum attached to the lateralized segment. In this modification, there was no need for the use of grafted foreign materials to fill the defect and neither the use of barrier membranes, since it was treated practically as a fresh extraction site. To prevent the undesirable movement of the lateral plate, a small chip (2-3 mm in diameter) of bone spacer was properly fixed. The dental implants were placed 3-5 months later on. Results: Approximately, 86% of the expanded areas were successful in providing an adequate width to accommodate an implant. The average gain in width was 3.22 ± 0.97 mm. All intended implants were inserted. Prosthetic loading with fixed prosthesis was successfully implemented in all cases. Conclusion: This modified technique is a simple and short procedure with satisfactory results and minimal morbidity. Of note, this approach is devoid of foreign materials usage and has a low rate cost, therefore, should be employed more often. PMID:24987593

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR WEST BLACK OAK RIDGE, EAST BLACK OAK RIDGE, MCKINNEY RIDGE, WEST PINE RIDGE, AND PARCEL 21D IN THE VICINITY OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    David A. King

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. The goal is to obtain all media no-further-investigation (NFI) determinations for the subject parcels considering existing soils. To augment the existing soils-only NFI determinations, samples of groundwater, surface water, soil, and sediment were collected to support all media NFI decisions. The only updates presented here are those that were made after the original issuance of the NFI documents. In the subject parcel where the soils NFI determination was not completed for approval (Parcel 21d), the full process has been performed to address the soils as well. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only NFI

  4. Ridge regression processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    Current navigation requirements depend on a geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) criterion. As long as the GDOP stays below a specific value, navigation requirements are met. The GDOP will exceed the specified value when the measurement geometry becomes too collinear. A new signal processing technique, called Ridge Regression Processing, can reduce the effects of nearly collinear measurement geometry; thereby reducing the inflation of the measurement errors. It is shown that the Ridge signal processor gives a consistently better mean squared error (MSE) in position than the Ordinary Least Mean Squares (OLS) estimator. The applicability of this technique is currently being investigated to improve the following areas: receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM), coverage requirements, availability requirements, and precision approaches.

  5. Segmentation and the coseismic behavior of Basin and Range normal faults: examples from east-central Idaho and southwestern Montana, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.; Haller, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    The range-front normal faults of the Lost River and Lemhi Ranges, and the Beaverhead and Tendoy Mountains in east-central Idaho and southwestern Montana have well-preserved fault scarps on Quaternary deposits along much of their lengths. Fault-scarp morphology, the age of deposits displaced by the faults, and the morphology of the range fronts provide a basis for dividing the faults into segments that are typically 20-25 km long. The Lost River, Lemhi and Beaverhead fault zones are 141-151 km long, and each has six segments. The 60-km-long Red Rock fault (the range-front fault of the Tendoy Mountains) has two central segments that have been active in late Quaternary time; these two segments span the central 27 km of the fault. We recognize four characteristics that help to identify segment boundaries: (1) major en e??chelon offsets or pronounced gaps in the continuity of fault scarps; (2) distinct, persistent, along-strike changes in fault-scarp morphology that indicate different ages of faulting; (3) major salients in the range front; and (4) transverse bedrock ridges where the cumulative throw is low compared to other places along the fault zone. Only features whose size is measured on the scale of kilometers are regarded as significant enough to represent a segment boundary that could inhibit or halt a propagating rupture. The ability to identify segments of faults that are likely to behave as independent structural entities will improve seismic-hazard assessment. However, one should not assume that the barriers at segment boundaries will completely stop all propagating ruptures. The topographic expression of mountain ranges is evidence that, at times during their history, all barriers fail. Some barriers apparently create 'leaky' segment boundaries that impede propagating ruptures but do not completely prevent faulting on adjacent segments. ?? 1991.

  6. Apparatus For Laminating Segmented Core For Electric Machine

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, Robert Anthony; Stabel, Gerald R

    2003-06-17

    A segmented core for an electric machine includes segments stamped from coated electric steel. The segments each have a first end, a second end, and winding openings. A predetermined number of segments are placed end-to-end to form layers. The layers are stacked such that each of the layers is staggered from adjacent layers by a predetermined rotation angle. The winding openings of each of the layers are in vertical alignment with the winding openings of the adjacent layers. The stack of layers is secured to form the segmented core.

  7. EVENT SEGMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Swallow, Khena M.

    2012-01-01

    One way to understand something is to break it up into parts. New research indicates that segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful events is a core component of ongoing perception, with consequences for memory and learning. Behavioral and neuroimaging data suggest that event segmentation is automatic and that people spontaneously segment activity into hierarchically organized parts and sub-parts. This segmentation depends on the bottom-up processing of sensory features such as movement, and on the top-down processing of conceptual features such as actors’ goals. How people segment activity affects what they remember later; as a result, those who identify appropriate event boundaries during perception tend to remember more and learn more proficiently. PMID:22468032

  8. A customized distraction device for alveolar ridge augmentation and alignment of ankylosed teeth.

    PubMed

    Nocini, Pier Francesco; De Santis, Daniele; Ferrari, Francesca; Bertele, Gian Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an extraosseous, tooth-supported miniature intraoral device that could produce prosthetically driven bone distraction of small atrophic alveolar ridge segments. Extraosseous distraction requires that the distraction device be anchored to a dental implant previously placed into the ridge according to its anatomic axis. A distractor can also correct the position of implants placed in young patients before skeletal growth is completed. Similarly, it allows the alignment of ankylosed teeth not treatable by orthodontics. The device is made of (1) an engine consisting of an orthodontic micrometric screw; (2) a joint between the implant and the engine, ie, the ball attachment/o-ring system; and (3) an anchorage system to the oral cavity provided by an orthodontic appliance and a mini-implant for possible additional support. Surgery involves an osteotomy of the atrophic alveolar ridge segment, incorporating the implant, from the basal bone; afterward the device can be applied and distraction of the segment can be carried out. Distraction was successfully performed in 3 clinical cases: 2 bone-implant segments and 1 bone-ankylosed tooth segment. All cases were clinically uneventful. This mini-device for osteogenic distraction of small atrophic ridge segments can provide for accurate and precise ridge augmentation, as is required for ideal prosthetic rehabilitation.

  9. Heat transfer tube having internal ridges, and method of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.L.; Campbell, B.J.

    1987-04-28

    This patent describes in a metallic heat transfer tube having an integral, external superstructure which includes adjacent, generally circumferential channels formed in the superstructure and channels formed in the superstructure which interconnect adjacent pairs of the generally circumferential channels and are positioned transversely to the generally circumferential channels; the improvement wherein the inner surface of the tube is characterized by helical ridges which have a pitch of less than 0.124 inch, a ridge height of at least 0.015 inch, a ratio of ridge base width to pitch, as measured along the tube axis, which is greater than 0.45 and less than 0.90 and a helix lead angle which is between about 29 and 42 degrees, as measured from the tube axis, the first plurality of generally circumferential channels being spaced at a pitch which is less than 50% of the pitch of the helical ridges.

  10. Ultra-slow-spreading - A New Class of Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, H. J.; Lin, J.; Michael, P. J.; Schouten, H.; Snow, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    Surveys of the the SW Indian and Gakkel Ridges show that ultra-slow spreading ridges are as different from slow spreading ridges as fast spreading ridges are from slow ? perhaps more so. At an effective spreading rate for mantle upwelling <~12 mm/yr (the full rate spreading component measured orthogonal to the ridge trend) there are dramatic changes. Magmatism becomes discontinuous, with mantle peridotite emplaced directly to the sea floor over large regions. Local magmatic centers are either ephemeral point source or occur at long-lived cross-axis volcanic highs. The latter are principally localized at bends in the ridge trend or at ridge transform intersections. Mantle peridotites emplaced to the sea floor range from harzburgite to lherzolite, despite low levels of melt production, suggesting that much of this variability predates the ridge melting event. While high-pressure vein assemblages are not present, evidence for late stage low-pressure melt impregnation is common, suggesting that the peridotites underwent partial fusion. This likely eliminated pre-existing vein assemblages. Ridge basalts differ from those at faster spreading ridges as they are generally enriched - possible evidence of a pre-existing vein assemblage. In magmatically active areas, rift axes are sub-orthogonal to the spreading direction with high-angle normal faults dominating the formation of axial and rift valley relief. In the absence of active magmatism, rift valley walls are more subdued, and follow the ridge trend. The walls of amagmatic spreading segments are often lower than those at magmatic segments and are either highly irregular or dominated by low-angle normal faults. The latter dip ~14°-18° and slope down from the crest of the rift valley wall to the floor of the axial trough on essentially a single fault surface. Despite this an orthogonal fabric defined by 50 to 200-m high-angle normal fault scarps, reflecting brittle plate extension, is ubiquitous. This is most easily

  11. Visual Observations and Geologic Settings of the Newly-Discovered Black Smoker Vent Sites Across the Galapagos Ridge-Hotspot Intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P.; Haymon, R.; MacDonald, K.; White, S.

    2006-12-01

    Nearly one-fifth of the global mid-ocean ridge is hotspot-affected, yet very little is known about how hotspots affect quantity and distribution of high-temperature hydrothermal vents along the ridge. During the 2005-06 GalAPAGoS expedition, acoustic and plume sensor surveys were conducted across the Galapagos ridge- hotspot intersection, lon. 94.5ºW- lon. 89.5ºW, to map fine scale geologic features and locate hydrothermal plumes emanating from the ridge crest. Where significant plumes were detected, the Medea fiber-optic camera sled was used successfully to find and image high-temperature vents on the seafloor. With Medea we discovered and imaged the first active and recently extinct black smokers known along the entire Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC), and documented the geologic setting of these vents. The Medea survey imaged numerous inactive vents as well as 3 active high-temperature vent fields along the ridge at 94º 04.5'W (Navidad Site), 91º56.2'W (Iguanas Site) and 91º54.3'W (Pinguinos Site). Two recently extinct vent fields also were identified at 91º23.4'-23.7'W and 91º13.8'W. All of the high-temperature vent sites that we identified along the GSC are found above relatively shallow AMC reflectors and are located in the middle 20% of ridge segments. Without exception the vent sites are located along fissures atop constructional axial volcanic ridges (AVR's) composed of relatively young pillow basalts. In some cases, the vents were associated with collapses adjacent to the fissures. The fissures appear to be eruptive sources of the pillow lavas comprising the AVR's. Video images of the chimneys show mature, cylindrical structures, up to 14m high; little diffuse flow; few animals; and some worm casts and dead clam shells, suggesting prior habitation. We conclude that distribution of the vents is controlled by magmatic processes, (i.e., by locations of shallow AMC magma reservoirs and eruptive fissures above dike intrusions), and that there is

  12. Design of Layered Ridge Dielectric Waveguide for Millimeter and Sub-Millimeter Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1997-01-01

    Design rules for Layered Ridge Dielectric Waveguide (LRDW) are presented for the first time through simple figures and closed form equations. The Effective Dielectric Constant (EDC) method is used to develop the design rules that account for typical circuit specifications such as higher order mode suppression, dispersion, attenuation, and coupling between adjacent transmission lines. Comparisons between the design of LRDW, image guide, and millimeter-wave dielectric ridge guide are made.

  13. Lithospheric Structure, Stress, and Magmatism at the Rainbow Non-Transform Offset on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulatto, M.; Canales, J. P.; Dunn, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    New oceanic lithosphere is formed at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges by a combination of eruption and intrusion of magma and by tectonic exhumation and alteration of lower crustal and mantle rocks. We look at the relationship between these two processes and how their relative contributions vary at non-transform ridge-segment offsets (NTOs). Models of mantle upwelling predict magmatic input and heat flux to be relatively low at NTOs, yet many host high-temperature hydrothermal systems, which are difficult to explain without the presence of a crustal magmatic source. We analyzed newly acquired swath bathymetry, gravity and magnetic data from the MARINER experiment together with archived data from the Rainbow NTO (36º10' N) on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This NTO is currently experiencing both mantle exhumation and magmatic input as evidenced by the active Rainbow high-temperature hydrothermal field. We calculate mantle Bouguer gravity anomalies and crustal magnetization to constrain the lithospheric structure and tectonic evolution of the NTO during the past ~2 Myr. The swath bathymetry data are used to map faults, extrusive volcanic terrain and tectonized blocks and show that the style of crustal accretion varies along the adjacent ridge segments. Spatial changes in the style of extensional faulting are indicative of variations in the mechanical properties and the state of stress of the lithosphere. We suggest that the availability of magma to drive hydrothermal activity at Rainbow and other similar settings is controlled not only by the thermal regime and the structure of the lithosphere but also by the effect of local stress conditions on magma migration. Models of magma migration and dyking show that changes in the direction of minimum compressive stress affect the propagation of magmatic intrusions. We argue that stress rotation can explain the formation of crustal magma chambers at NTOs despite a reduced magmatic flux. These constraints help determine the role of

  14. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  15. Noachian Impact Ejecta on Murray Ridge and Pre-impact Rocks on Wdowiak Ridge, Endeavour Crater, Mars: Opportunity Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Schroeder, C.; Yen, A. S.; Farrand, W. H.; Arvidson, R. E.; Franklin, B. J.; Grant, J. A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Jolliff, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring Meridiani Planum since January 2004, and has completed 4227% of its primary mission. Opportunity has been investigating the geology of the rim of 22 km diameter Endeavour crater, first on the Cape York segment and now on Cape Tribulation. The outcrops are divided York; (ii) the Shoemaker fm, impact breccias representing ejecta from the crater; into three formations: (i) the lower Matijevic fm, a pre-impact lithology on Cape and (iii) the upper Grasberg fm, a post-impact deposit that drapes the lower portions of the eroded rim segments. On the Cape Tribulation segment Opportunity has been studying the rocks on Murray Ridge, with a brief sojourn to Wdowiak Ridge west of the rim segment. team member Thomas Wdowiak, who died in 2013.) One region of Murray Ridge has distinctive CRISM spectral characteristics indicating the presence of a small concentration of aluminous smectite based on a 2.2 micron Al-OH combination band (hereafter, the Al-OH region).

  16. Segmented amplifier configurations for laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hagen, Wilhelm F.

    1979-01-01

    An amplifier system for high power lasers, the system comprising a compact array of segments which (1) preserves high, large signal gain with improved pumping efficiency and (2) allows the total amplifier length to be shortened by as much as one order of magnitude. The system uses a three dimensional array of segments, with the plane of each segment being oriented at substantially the amplifier medium Brewster angle relative to the incident laser beam and with one or more linear arrays of flashlamps positioned between adjacent rows of amplifier segments, with the plane of the linear array of flashlamps being substantially parallel to the beam propagation direction.

  17. Evidence of 60 meter deep Arctic pressure-ridge keels

    SciTech Connect

    Reimnitz, E.; Barnes, P.W.; Phillips, R.L.

    1985-11-01

    Numerous efforts have been made during the last two decades to determine the ice thickness distribution in the Arctic Ocean and in particular to learn the keel depth of the largest modern pressure ridges. With the discovery of oil and gas in the arctic offshore and the trend to extend exploration into deeper water and increasing distance from shore, knowledge of the maximum ice thickness in the continental shelf is becoming increasingly important. Various approaches have been used to directly obtain keel depth data in the Arctic, but no satisfactory technique for water depths of less than 100 meters exists. For continental shelves, virtually all public data on ridge keel configuration stems from spot measurements made with horizontally held sonar transducers lowered through the ice adjacent to ridges, and from cores of ridges. Because these techniques are time-consuming, the depths of only a few ridge keels have been determined by such methods. Fixed upward-looking sonar devices have been used with limited success in several applications to record under-ice relief and movement, but any data so obtained is not public. This report is an attempt to interpret the age of deepwater gouges seen on the Alaskan Arctic shelf.

  18. Scaling Relations for the Thermal Structure of Segmented Oceanic Transform Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson-Schwehr, M.; Boettcher, M. S.; Behn, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridge-transform faults (RTFs) are a natural laboratory for studying strike-slip earthquake behavior due to their relatively simple geometry, well-constrained slip rates, and quasi-periodic seismic cycles. However, deficiencies in our understanding of the limited size of the largest RTF earthquakes are due, in part, to not considering the effect of short intra-transform spreading centers (ITSCs) on fault thermal structure. We use COMSOL Multiphysics to run a series of 3D finite element simulations of segmented RTFs with visco-plastic rheology. The models test a range of RTF segment lengths (L = 10-150 km), ITSC offset lengths (O = 1-30 km), and spreading rates (V = 2-14 cm/yr). The lithosphere and upper mantle are approximated as steady-state, incompressible flow. Coulomb failure incorporates brittle processes in the lithosphere, and a temperature-dependent flow law for dislocation creep of olivine activates ductile deformation in the mantle. ITSC offsets as small as 2 km affect the thermal structure underlying many segmented RTFs, reducing the area above the 600˚C isotherm, A600, and thus the size of the largest expected earthquakes, Mc. We develop a scaling relation for the critical ITSC offset length, OC, which significantly reduces the thermal affect of adjacent fault segments of length L1 and L2. OC is defined as the ITSC offset that results in an area loss ratio of R = (Aunbroken - Acombined)/Aunbroken - Adecoupled) = 63%, where Aunbroken = C600(L1+L2)1.5V-0.6 is A600 for an RTF of length L1 + L2; Adecoupled = C600(L11.5+L21.5)V-0.6 is the combined A600 of RTFs of lengths L1 and L2, respectively; and Acombined = Aunbroken exp(-O/ OC) + Adecoupled (1-exp(-O/ OC)). C600 is a constant. We use OC and kinematic fault parameters (L1, L2, O, and V) to develop a scaling relation for the approximate seismogenic area, Aseg, for each segment of a RTF system composed of two fault segments. Finally, we estimate the size of Mc on a fault segment based on Aseg. We

  19. New evidence suggesting segmentation of Cocos Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, L.R.; Sauermann, R.P.; De Boer, J.

    1985-02-01

    Compilation and analysis of geophysical and geological data indicate that the Cocos plate consists of three segments that have individual poles of rotation and independent motion vectors. Contoured heat-flow and gravity maps of the region delineate the boundaries of the segments within the Cocos plate. These segments have different focal-plane solutions along the Middle America Trench and different sedimentary-basin configurations within the Central America-Mexico island arc. Recent studies of seismic data from the region also have suggested that the subducted Cocos plate consists of three segments. The proposed northern and central segments are separated by the northeast-trending Siqueros-Tehuantepec Ridge fracture zone. The proposed central and southern segments are separated by the northeast-trending Costa Rica fracture zone that is located just northwest of the Cocos Ridge and extends from the Galapagos rift to the central valley of Costa Rica. Poles of rotation and relative motion vectors have been calculated with respect to the Caribbean plate for each segment. The northern segment is moving N75/sup 0/E, oblique to the trench; the central segment is moving N50/sup 0/E, perpendicular to the trench; the southern segment is moving north, perpendicular to the trench. The Siqueros-Tehuantepec and Costa Rice fracture zones appear to join with tectonized zones that dissect the Central America-Mexico island arc and extend across the Caribbean plate, suggesting that it too is segmented. Structural and stratigraphic data from the sedimentary basins on the island arc suggest that these fracture zones have existed throughout the Tertiary history of the region.

  20. Factors predisposing to adjacent 2 and 3:1 disjunctions: study of 161 human reciprocal translocations.

    PubMed Central

    Jalbert, P; Sele, B

    1979-01-01

    Reciprocal translocations produce imbalances by three types of disjunction which are, in decreasing frequency, adjacent 1, 3:1, and adjacent 2. Adjacent 1 disjunction produces duplication deficiencies of inverse topography to those of adjacent 2. The imbalanced chromosome segments in one of these types are balanced in the other. The disjunction 3:1 produces pure trisomies and monosomies. The following situations predispose to adjacent 2 disjunction: translocations between the long arms of two acrocentric chromosomes or between one of these and that of a No 9 chromosome; centric segments, either short or carrying a heterochromatic zone (9qh); a balanced translocation in the mother. The factors predisposing to the disjunction adjacent 2 operate by selection, or directly on the meiotic configuration. Some of them (shortness of the interstitial segment, shortness of the short arms of translocation chromosomes) act in both these ways. Their influence is probably responsible for the repetitive and exclusive character of this disjunction. The conditions for the occurrence of the 3:1 disjunctions seem less strict than those for adjacent 2, although they should be of the same nature (involvement of acrocentrics or a chromosome 9 in the translocation, maternal origin). Images PMID:395305

  1. Segmented Coil Fails In Steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stedman, Ronald S.

    1990-01-01

    Electromagnetic coil degrades in steps when faults occur, continues to operate at reduced level instead of failing catastrophically. Made in segments connected in series and separated by electrically insulating barriers. Fault does not damage adjacent components or create hazard. Used to control valves in such critical applications as cooling systems of power generators and chemical process equipment, where flammable liquids or gases handled. Also adapts to electrical control of motors.

  2. The Effects of Single-Level Instrumented Lumbar Laminectomy on Adjacent Spinal Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bisschop, Arno; Holewijn, Roderick M.; Kingma, Idsart; Stadhouder, Agnita; Vergroesen, Pieter-Paul A.; van der Veen, Albert J.; van Dieën, Jaap H.; van Royen, Barend J.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Biomechanical study. Objective Posterior instrumentation is used to stabilize the spine after a lumbar laminectomy. However, the effects on the adjacent segmental stability are unknown. Therefore, we studied the range of motion (ROM) and stiffness of treated lumbar spinal segments and cranial segments after a laminectomy and after posterior instrumentation in flexion and extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR). These outcomes might help to better understand adjacent segment disease (ASD), which is reported cranial to the level on which posterior instrumentation is applied. Methods We obtained 12 cadaveric human lumbar spines. Spines were axially loaded with 250 N for 1 hour. Thereafter, 10 consecutive load cycles (4 Nm) were applied in FE, LB, and AR. Subsequently, a laminectomy was performed either at L2 or at L4. Thereafter, load-deformation tests were repeated, after similar preloading. Finally, posterior instrumentation was added to the level treated with a laminectomy before testing was repeated. The ROM and stiffness of the treated, the cranial adjacent, and the control segments were calculated from the load-displacement data. Repeated-measures analyses of variance used the spinal level as the between-subject factor and a laminectomy or instrumentation as the within-subject factors. Results After the laminectomy, the ROM increased (+19.4%) and the stiffness decreased (−18.0%) in AR. The ROM in AR of the adjacent segments also increased (+11.0%). The ROM of treated segments after instrumentation decreased in FE (−74.3%), LB (−71.6%), and AR (−59.8%). In the adjacent segments after instrumentation, only the ROM in LB was changed (−12.9%). Conclusions The present findings do not substantiate a biomechanical pathway toward or explanation for ASD. PMID:25649753

  3. Polygonal Ridge Networks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Laura; Dickson, James; Grosfils, Eric; Head, James W.

    2016-10-01

    Polygonal ridge networks, also known as boxwork or reticulate ridges, are found in numerous locations and geological contexts across Mars. While networks formed from mineralized fractures hint at hot, possibly life-sustaining circulating ground waters, networks formed by impact-driven clasting diking, magmatic dikes, gas escape, or lava flows do not have the same astrobiological implications. Distinguishing the morphologies and geological context of the ridge networks sheds light on their potential as astrobiological and mineral resource sites of interest. The most widespread type of ridge morphology is characteristic of the Nili Fossae and Nilosyrtis region and consists of thin, criss-crossing ridges with a variety of heights, widths, and intersection angles. They are found in ancient Noachian terrains at a variety of altitudes and geographic locations and may be a mixture of clastic dikes, brecciated dikes, and mineral veins. They occur in the same general areas as valley networks and ancient lake basins, but they are not more numerous where these features are concentrated, and can appear in places where they morphologies are absent. Similarly, some of the ridge networks are associated with hydrated mineral detections, but some occur in locations without detections. Smaller, light-toned ridges of variable widths have been found in Gale Crater and other rover sites and are interpreted to be smaller version of the Nili-like ridges, in this case formed by the mineralization of fractures. This type of ridge is likely to be found in many other places on Mars as more high-resolution data becomes available. Hellas Basin is host to a third type of ridge morphology consisting of large, thick, light-toned ridges forming regular polygons at several superimposed scales. While still enigmatic, these are most likely to be the result of sediment-filled fractures. The Eastern Medusae Fossae Formation contains large swaths of a fourth, previously undocumented, ridge network type

  4. Seismic Structure of Malpelo and Cocos Volcanic Ridges and Implications for Hotspot - Mid-Oceanic Ridge Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallares, V.; Charvis, P.; Flueh, E.; Walther, C.; Bialas, J.

    2001-12-01

    In this work we investigate the seismic structure of the Cocos and Malpelo Volcanic Ridges along three wide-angle profiles acquired during the PAGANINI-1999 experiment. The 2D velocity field and Moho geometry have been obtained using a joint refraction/reflection traveltime inversion method. Uncertainty and robustness of the results have been estimated by performing a Monte Carlo-type analysis. The results show that maximum crustal thickness along the three profiles range between 16 km (Southern Cocos) and 19 km (Northern Cocos and Malpelo). Oceanic Layer 2 thickness is quite uniform regardless of the crustal thickness variations, and thus crustal thickening is mainly accomodated in Layer 3. Seismic velocities of Layer 3 are similar in all profiles. We found several low velocity anomalies in the long-wavelength structure (up to ~6.8 km/s), which lead to an overall anticorrelation between crustal thickness and bulk lower crustal velocities. The Moho geometry of the Southern Cocos profile is highly asymmetric. The steep transition into a normal oceanic crust in the easternmost segment of this profile can be associated with the presence of the Inca Fracture Zone at the Cocos-Nazca Spreading Center. The rapid thinning of the northernmost segment of Malpelo Ridge can be most likely related with a rifting process that splitted the ancient Malpelo Ridge into Regina and Malpelo Ridges after the initiation of the movement along the Panam Fracture Zone.

  5. The Mozambique Ridge: a document of massive multistage magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Maximilian D.; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Jacques, Guillaume; Werner, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    The Mozambique Ridge, a prominent basement high in the southwestern Indian Ocean, consists of four major geomorphological segments associated with numerous phases of volcanic activity in the Lower Cretaceous. The nature and origin of the Mozambique Ridge have been intensely debated with one hypothesis suggesting a Large Igneous Province origin. High-resolution seismic reflection data reveal a large number of extrusion centres with a random distribution throughout the southern Mozambique Ridge and the nearby Transkei Rise. Intrabasement reflections emerge from the extrusion centres and are interpreted to represent massive lava flow sequences. Such lava flow sequences are characteristic of eruptions leading to the formation of continental and oceanic flood basalt provinces, hence supporting a Large Igneous Province origin of the Mozambique Ridge. We observe evidence for widespread post-sedimentary magmatic activity that we correlate with a southward propagation of the East African Rift System. Based on our volumetric analysis of the southern Mozambique Ridge we infer a rapid sequential emplacement between ˜131 and ˜125 Ma, which is similar to the short formation periods of other Large Igneous Provinces like the Agulhas Plateau.

  6. Are Axial Volcanic Ridges where all the (volcanic) action is?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Although axial volcanic ridges (AVRs) are generally recognised as the main loci for lithospheric generation at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges, various recent studies have suggested that axial volcanism is not confined to them. Here I present evidence from three studies for significant amounts of off-AVR volcanism at three slow-spreading ridges. 1) Near-bottom side-scan sonar (TOBI) images of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 13°N show a complex pattern of closely-spaced, active oceanic core complexes (OCCs) where plate separation is largely a-volcanic, separated by short segments of vigorous volcanic spreading. In one such volcanic segment, the brightest sea floor and therefore inferred youngest volcanism occurs not on the topographic axis (an apparently 'old' AVR) but at the edge of a broad axial valley. 2) A similar TOBI survey of the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre reveals AVRs in the north and south flanking an OCC (Mt. Dent) and a non-volcanic ridge interpreted as tectonically extruded peridotite ('smooth' sea floor). In both AVR segments there are clear, young lava flows that have erupted from perched sources part way up the median valley walls and have partly flowed down into the valley. 3) The third case is from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 45°N, where we conducted a detailed geophysical and geological study of an AVR and surrounding median valley floor. The AVR is largely surrounded by flat sea floor composed mainly of lobate and sheet flows, whereas the AVR comprises predominantly pillow lavas. Although we have no firm dates, various indicators suggest most lavas on the AVR are around 10ka old or somewhat less. The apparently youngest (brightest acoustic returns, thinnest sediment cover) of the flat-lying lava flows appears to have a similar age from its degree of sediment cover. Contact relations between these lavas and the AVR flanks show no evidence of a clear age difference between the two, and we think both types of eruption may have occurred roughly

  7. Abyssal Peridotites and Mantle Melting Beneath Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, H. J.; Snow, J. E.; Hellebrand, E.; Shimizu, N.

    2005-12-01

    Studies of abyssal peridotite from ultraslow and slow spreading ridges show significant regional variability; with a strong correlation between the compositions of peridotite averaged by locality and spatially associated MORB reflecting higher degrees of mantle melting near mantle hot spots. Local variability of peridotite compositions, however, is often large, and may equal the regional variability along ocean ridges. The latter is attributed to local melting and melt transport processes such as melt channelization or late-stage melt impregnation in the lithosphere. The observed regional correlation appears only when many samples are averaged to eliminate local and outcrop scale variability. Almost all the peridotites used in these correlations are from transforms, and therefore represent similar thermal and mantle melting histories. Thus, regional differences in mantle composition are preserved. Until recently, little data were available for peridotites away from transforms representing the central mantle environment beneath magmatic segments. This is key, as geophysical and geologic evidence suggest focused melt flow beneath slow spreading ridges. If so, beneath individual magmatic segments there should be a corresponding mantle melting cell in which melt is focused from a broad melting region to a melt transport zone at its mid-point that feeds an overlying crustal magmatic center. High melt fluxes in the transport zone would produce very depleted peridotites stripped of pyroxene by melt-rock reaction during magma ascent. Studies of peridotites far from transforms at ultraslow Gakkel and SW Indian Ridges indicate this is the case: with near-Cpx free intergranular harzburgite and dunite locally abundant in contrast to transform peridotites. Recent mapping of the plutonic foundation of an ancient 35-km long slow spreading ridge segment at the Kane Core Complex also found a narrow 10-km wide zone of focused melt flow through the mantle marked by abundant dunite

  8. The timescales of magma evolution at mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, Philipp A.; Regelous, Marcel; Beier, Christoph; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.; Nebel, Oliver; Haase, Karsten M.

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic crust is continuously created at mid-ocean ridges by decompression melting of the upper mantle as it upwells due to plate separation. Decades of research on active spreading ridges have led to a growing understanding of the complex magmatic, tectonic and hydrothermal processes linked to the formation of new oceanic igneous crust. However, less is known about the timescales of magmatic processes at mid-ocean ridges, including melting in and melt extraction from the mantle, fractional crystallisation, crustal assimilation and/or magma mixing. In this paper, we review the timescales of magmatic processes by integrating radiometric dating, chemical and petrological observations of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) and geophysical models. These different lines of evidence suggest that melt extraction and migration, and crystallisation and mixing processes occur over timescales of 1 to 10,000 a. High-resolution geochemical stratigraphic profiles of the oceanic crust using drill-core samples further show that at fast-spreading ridges, adjacent flow units may differ in age by only a few 100 a. We use existing chemical data and new major- and trace-element analyses of fresh MORB glasses from drill-cores in ancient Atlantic and Pacific crust, together with model stratigraphic ages to investigate how lava chemistry changes over 10 to 100 ka periods, the timescale of crustal accretion at spreading ridges which is recorded in the basalt stratigraphy in drilled sections through the oceanic crust. We show that drilled MORBs have compositions that are similar to those of young MORB glasses dredged from active spreading ridges (lavas that will eventually be preserved in the lowermost part of the extrusive section covered by younger flows), showing that the dredged samples are indeed representative of the bulk oceanic crust. Model stratigraphic ages calculated for individual flows in boreholes, together with the geochemical stratigraphy of the drilled sections, show that at

  9. Geophysical Investigation of Australian-Antarctic Ridge Using High-Resolution Gravity and Bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. S.; Lin, J.; Park, S. H.; Choi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the Australian-Antarctic Ridge (AAR) has been remained uncharted until 2011 because of its remoteness and harsh weather conditions. From 2011, the multidisciplinary ridge program initiated by the Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI) surveyed the little-explored eastern ends of the AAR to characterize the tectonics, geochemistry, and hydrothermal activity of this intermediate spreading system. In this study, we present a detailed analysis of a 300-km-long supersegment of the AAR to quantify the spatial variations in ridge morphology and axial and off-axis volcanisms as constrained by high-resolution shipboard bathymetry and gravity. The ridge axis morphology alternates between rift valleys and axial highs within relatively short ridge segments. To obtain a geological proxy for regional variations in magma supply, we calculated residual mantle Bouguer gravity anomalies (RMBA), gravity-derived crustal thickness, and residual topography for neighboring seven sub-segments. The results of the analyses revealed that the southern flank of the AAR is associated with shallower seafloor, more negative RMBA, thicker crust, and/or less dense mantle in comparison to the conjugate northern flank. Furthermore, this north-south asymmetry becomes more prominent toward the KR1 supersegment of the AAR. The axial topography of the KR1 supersegment exhibits a sharp transition from axial highs at the western end to rift valleys at the eastern end, with regions of axial highs being associated with more robust magma supply as indicated by more negative RMBA. We also compare and contrast the characteristics of the AAR supersegment with that of other ridges of intermediate spreading rates, including the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Galápagos Spreading Center, and Southeast Indian Ridge west of the Australian-Antarctic Discordance, to investigate the influence of ridge-hotspot interaction on ridge magma supply and tectonics.

  10. Magmatic effects of the Cobb hot spot on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, J.; Perfit, M.; Ridley, I.; Jonasson, I.; Kamenov, G.; Chadwick, W.; Embley, R.; le, Roux P.; Smith, M.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the Juan de Fuca Ridge with the Cobb hot spot has had a considerable influence on the magmatism of the Axial Segment of the ridge, the second-order segment that overlies the hot spot. In addition to the construction of the large volcanic edifice of Axial Seamount, the Axial Segment has shallow bathymetry and a prevalence of constructional volcanic features along its 100-km length, suggesting that hot spot-derived magmas supplement and oversupply the ridge. Lavas are generally more primitive at Axial Seamount and more evolved in the Axial Segment rift zones, suggesting that fractional crystallization is enhanced with increasing distance from the hot spot because of a reduced magma supply and more rapid cooling. Although the Cobb hot spot is not an isotopically enriched plume, it produces lavas with some distinct geochemical characteristics relative to normal mid-ocean ridge basalt, such as enrichments in alkalis and highly incompatible trace elements, that can be used as tracers to identify the presence and prevalence of the hot spot influence along the ridge. These characteristics are most prominent at Axial Seamount and decline in gradients along the Axial Segment. The physical model that can best explain the geochemical observations is a scenario in which hot spot and mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) magmas mix to varying degrees, with the proportions controlled by the depth to the MORB source. Modeling of two-component mixing suggests that MORB is the dominant component in most Axial Segment basalts. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  12. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  13. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  14. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  15. Remedial investigation work plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 4 (Rogers Quarry/Lower McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant includes - 800 acres near the northeast comer of the reservation and adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge (Fig. 1-1). The plant is a manufacturing and developmental engineering facility that produced components for various nuclear weapons systems and provides engineering support to other Energy Systems facilities. More than 200 contaminated sites have been identified at the Y-12 Plant that resulted from past waste management practices. Many of the sites have operable units (OUs) based on priority and on investigative and remediation requirements. This Remedial Investigation RI work plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Chestnut Ridge OU 4 consists of Rogers Quarry and Lower McCoy Branch (MCB). Rogers Quarry, which is also known as Old Rogers Quarry or Bethel Valley Quarry was used for quarrying from the late 1940s or early 1950s until about 1960. Since that time, the quarry has been used for disposal of coal ash and materials from Y-12 production operations, including classified materials. Disposal of coal ash ended in July 1993. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern, support an Ecological Risk Assessment and a Human Health Risk Assessment, support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this work plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the risk posed to human health and the environment by OU 4.

  16. The Mid-Ocean Ridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Kenneth C.; Fox, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    Described are concepts involved with the formation and actions of the Mid-Ocean Ridge. Sea-floor spreading, the magma supply model, discontinuities, off-axis structures, overlaps and deviation, and aquatic life are discussed. (CW)

  17. Growth of a tectonic ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R.W.; Messerich, J.A.; Johnson, A.M.

    1997-12-31

    The 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake of M 7.6 created an impressive record of surface rupture and ground deformation. Fractures extend over a length of more than 80 km including zones of right-lateral shift, steps in the fault zones, fault intersections and vertical changes. Among the vertical changes was the growth of a tectonic ridge described here. In this paper the authors describe the Emerson fault zone and the Tortoise Hill ridge including the relations between the fault zone and the ridge. They present data on the horizontal deformation at several scales associated with activity within the ridge and belt of shear zones and show the differential vertical uplifts. And, they conclude with a discussion of potential models for the observed deformation.

  18. Sinuous Ridges in Peta Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, T. J.

    2011-03-01

    Peta Crater (21°S,351°E) contains a system of sinuous ridges similar to, but smaller than, the well-known Dorsa Argyre and Dorsa Argentea ridges. Recent CTX and HiRISE images of the Peta crater ridges is enabling a detailed examination of this confined system of ridges.

  19. Experimental study of structure-forming deformations in ultra-slow spreading Arctic and Polar Atlantic ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E. P.; Grokholsky, A. L.; Kokhan, A. V.

    2010-05-01

    . Ridge obliquity varies from 35 to 60° on different parts of the ridge. It consists of short divergent magmatic segments and long transform-like amagmatic segments with unstable relation of slip and extension components. Experimental setting was the following. We emplaced three weak zones according to natural geometry of spreading modeling three neighboring ridges: Knipovich, Mohns, Gakkel. Short spreading segments orthogonal to direction of extension formed in area of Knipovich model zone. They were connected by long slip segments subparallel to extension direction. Under increase of angle between extension direction and trend of "Knipovich" weak zone the length of slip segments gradually decreased and reached minimum under the angle of 50°. The Gakkel ridge is the slowest in all the system of spreading ridges. Spreading velocity is less than 13 mm/year. Spreading is orthogonal here. Areas of volcanism are separated by 100 km long segments with minimal volcanic activity. This volcanic centers form orthogonal rises which has been stable for the last 30 Myr. Also the ridge has practically no discontinuities except the smallest with amplitude less than 13 km. Experiments were held in conditions of orthogonal extension with the smallest velocity. Formation of fractures had a linear pattern. Perpendicular to the ridge lineaments were the basic feature of structure forming. They were inherited from the primary discontinuities of fracture patterns. Thus, experiments let to distinguish key peculiarities of structure-forming in rifting zones of these ridges. For Reikjanes ridge this is a system of s-shaped fractures which are used as channels for eruption and subsequent formation of AVRs. For Knipovich ridge this is an unstable system of pull-aparts. For Gakkel ridge this is a system of linear fractures and stable lineaments perpendicular to the ridge.

  20. High Tech High School Interns Develop a Mid-Ocean Ridge Database for Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, D.; Delaney, R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A. A.; Miller, S. P.

    2004-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges (MOR) represent one of the most important geographical and geological features on planet Earth. MORs are the locations where plates spread apart, they are the locations of the majority of the Earths' volcanoes that harbor some of the most extreme life forms. These concepts attract much research, but mid-ocean ridges are still effectively underrepresented in the Earth science class rooms. As two High Tech High School students, we began an internship at Scripps to develop a database for mid-ocean ridges as a resource for science and education. This Ridge Catalog will be accessible via http://earthref.org/databases/RC/ and applies a similar structure, design and data archival principle as the Seamount Catalog under EarthRef.org. Major research goals of this project include the development of (1) an archival structure for multibeam and sidescan data, standard bathymetric maps (including ODP-DSDP drill site and dredge locations) or any other arbitrary digital objects relating to MORs, and (2) to compile a global data set for some of the most defining characteristics of every ridge segment including ridge segment length, depth and azimuth and half spreading rates. One of the challenges included the need of making MOR data useful to the scientist as well as the teacher in the class room. Since the basic structure follows the design of the Seamount Catalog closely, we could move our attention to the basic data population of the database. We have pulled together multibeam data for the MOR segments from various public archives (SIOExplorer, SIO-GDC, NGDC, Lamont), and pre-processed it for public use. In particular, we have created individual bathymetric maps for each ridge segment, while merging the multibeam data with global satellite bathymetry data from Smith & Sandwell (1997). The global scale of this database will give it the ability to be used for any number of applications, from cruise planning to data

  1. Geochemical constraints on the formation of near-ridge Vance seamount chain at the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. L.; Hann, N.; Perfit, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Observations and sampling of off-axis lava flows and near-ridge seamounts, coupled with the recent discovery of large melt bodies away from ridge axes, attest to the significance of off-axis magmatic phenomena for the formation of the oceanic lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges (MORs). One of the most crucial unsolved questions of oceanic volcanism surrounds the physical mantle processes that cause the initial formation of near-ridge seamounts and sustain volcanism over several million years to produce seamount chains. The Vance Seamounts are just one example of a series of near-ridge seamount chains on the Pacific Plate. The chain comprises six submarine mountains that sit more than 1km above the surrounding oceanic crust just west of the Vance segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR). Dive observations indicate that the seamount chain formed sequentially with the oldest seamount furthest from the ridge axis. The geochemical characteristics of the oldest seamount suggest that the initiation of seamount volcanism was associated with a localized chemical (× thermal) heterogeneity in the mantle. Trace element and isotopic signatures suggest that the chemical heterogeneity was progressively depleted as subsequent seamounts were formed. Central seamount lavas have N-MORB compositions with trace element and isotopic ratios that are significantly more depleted than N-MORB lavas erupted at the JdFR axis. Depletion in the most incompatible elements is so severe for the central seamounts that no physically realistic forward geochemical models involving average depleted MORB mantle can reproduce potential parental melt compositions. The lava compositions from seamounts closest to the ridge reverse the trend in trace element depletion becoming more similar to N-MORB erupted at the current axis. We suggest that excess melt is generated off-axis due to the impingement of a discrete chemical heterogeneity that is more fusible than the DMM matrix. A variety of 2D model ridge

  2. Segmented seal plate for a turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.P.; Light, S.H.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a gas turbine engine. It comprises: a radial outflow, rotary compressor; a radial inflow turbine wheel; means coupling the compressor and the turbine wheel in slightly spaced, back to back relation so that the turbine wheel may drive the compressor; a housing surrounding the compressor and the turbine wheel; and a stationary seal mounted on the housing and extending into the space between the compressor and the turbine wheel, the seal including a main sealing and support section adjacent the compressor and an insulating section adjacent the turbine wheel and mounted on but generally spaced from the main support section; the insulating section comprising segments disposed in a circular array and angularly movable with respect to each other, and means sealing adjacent segments to each other.

  3. Near-ridge seamount chains in the northeastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, David A.; Reynolds, Jennifer R.; Davis, Alicé S.

    2000-07-01

    High-resolution bathymetry and side-scan data of the Vance, President Jackson, and Taney near-ridge seamount chains in the northeast Pacific were collected with a hull-mounted 30-kHz sonar. The central volcanoes in each chain consist of truncated cone-shaped volcanoes with steep sides and nearly flat tops. Several areas are characterized by frequent small eruptions that result in disorganized volcanic regions with numerous small cones and volcanic ridges but no organized truncated conical structure. Several volcanoes are crosscut by ridge-parallel faults, showing that they formed within 30-40 km of the ridge axis where ridge-parallel faulting is still active. Magmas that built the volcanoes were probably transported through the crust along active ridge-parallel faults. The volcanoes range in volume from 11 to 187 km3, and most have one or more multiple craters and calderas that modify their summits and flanks. The craters (<1 km diameter) and calderas (>1 km diameter) range from small pit craters to calderas as large as 6.5×8.5 km, although most are 2-4 km across. Crosscutting relationships commonly show a sequence of calderas stepping toward the ridge axis. The calderas overlie crustal magma chambers at least as large as those that underlie Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes in Hawaii, perhaps 4-5 km in diameter and ˜1-3 km below the surface. The nearly flat tops of many of the volcanoes have remnants of centrally located summit shields, suggesting that their flat tops did not form from eruptions along circumferential ring faults but instead form by filling and overflowing of earlier large calderas. The lavas retain their primitive character by residing in such chambers for only short time periods prior to eruption. Stored magmas are withdrawn, probably as dikes intruded into the adjacent ocean crust along active ridge-parallel faults, triggering caldera collapse, or solidified before the next batch of magma is intruded into the volcano, probably 1000-10,000 years

  4. Seismostratigraphy, tectonics and geological history of the Ninetyeast Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinova, Yulia; Levchenko, Oleg; Sborshchikov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    The Ninetyeast Ridge (NER) is a ~5000 km-long, aseismic volcanic ridge trending N-S in the Central Indian Ocean Basin. It is widely accepted that NER formed as a hotspot track created by northward migration of the Indian plate over the Kerguelen hotspot during the Late Cretaceous and Early Cenozoic. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry data and multichannel seismic profiles collected over the NER at seven sites between 5.5° N and 26.1° S during cruise KNOX06RR of RV Roger Revelle with the participation of P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology supplemented ideas about its seismostratigraphy and tectonics to clarify geological history [Sager et al.,2007]. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry data and 2D multichannel seismic data clearly show active faulting along the entire length of the NER. Bathymetry data collected in cruise show significant changes of NER's morphology varies with latitude - from large, individual seamounts in the north segment to smaller, linear, narrow seamounts and ridges in the central segment to high, nearly continuous, and often highly asymmetric with a steep eastern slope and low western slope ridge in the south. Three its distinct morphological segments are characterized also by different internal tectonic structure (faults geometry). The faults have different directions for each segment of NER - they trend to NW-SE less NE-SW in the northern segment, E-W in the central segment and NE-SW in the south. Large near E-W grabens mostly filled by intensively deformed sediments are widespread along the ridge. All three identified types of the faults are extension structures and no compression structures, predictable from the regional stress field, is not observed yet. Additional features were traced within the sedimentary cover of NER as a result of seismic stratigraphy analysis of the multichannel seismic data collected in proximity to DSDP and ODP drill holes (Sites 758, 216, 214, and 253) - eight reflectors: 0, 0A, 1, 1A, 2, 3, 4 and 5 and

  5. ORLaND - Oak Ridge Laboratory for Neutrino Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.

    2001-06-01

    The proposed Oak Ridge Laboratory for Neutrino Detectors (ORLaND), to be located adjacent to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), is described. ORLaND will take advantage of the fact that the SNS will be the world's best intermediate-energy pulsed neutrino source in the world. A broad range of neutrino measurements is contemplated by means of a number of detectors, including the large CoNDOR detector. Specifics of neutrino oscillation investigations, and of the possible impact of certain neutrino measurements on our understanding of supernova explosions, are discussed.

  6. A detailed study of the Cobb Offset of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Evolution of a propagating rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. Paul; Karsten, Jill L.; Delaney, John R.; Davis, Earl E.; Currie, Ralph G.; Chase, Richard L.

    1983-03-01

    The Cobb Offset on the northern portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge has been identified as the tip of a northward propagating rift [Hey and Wilson, 1982]. Map compilations of magnetic and seismic data from four new cruises define the present locus of spreading and volcanism on the two ridge segments abutting the Offset and permit detailed modeling of the recent evolution within this transform zone. The axis of recent spreading on the southern ridge segment bends from the normal ridge trend (N20°E) to a N-S trend, north of 47°15'N. The spreading axis on the northern ridge segment generally defines a N20°E trend, except at the southern terminus, where the spreading center is offset slightly to the east. The two spreading centers overlap by about 33 km in the Offset vicinity, and there is evidence of recent volcanism on both segments. Present ridge axis morphology exhibits a transitional sequence from a symmetrical, axial high along the more `normal' portions of each ridge segment to a grabenlike depression as the tip is approached. The magnetic anomaly patterns observed in the Cobb Offset vicinity are not consistent with the patterns predicted by models of continuous, northward propagation. The magnetic anomaly patterns of the Brunhes Epoch require an event of rapid northward propagation about 0.7 m.y. B.P., followed by a more gradual southward propagation in the middle Brunhes Epoch; most recently, the spreading center on the southern ridge has extended northward to its present configuration. Prior to the Brunhes Epoch, modeling of the magnetic anomaly patterns does not indicate a unique solution; however, net propagation has been northward. We present alternative models for the period beginning 1.7 m.y. B.P. In the first model, the Cobb Offset has evolved by a series of northward and southward events of propagation, with net advance to the north. In the second model, stable asymmetric spreading from overlapping ridge segments has evolved into a transform fault

  7. Carpenter Ridge Tuff, CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Olivier; Deering, Chad D.; Lipman, Peter W.; Plummer, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The ~1,000 km3 Carpenter Ridge Tuff (CRT), erupted at 27.55 Ma during the mid-tertiary ignimbrite flare-up in the western USA, is among the largest known strongly zoned ash-flow tuffs. It consists primarily of densely welded crystal-poor rhyolite with a pronounced, highly evolved chemical signature (high Rb/Sr, low Ba, Zr, Eu), but thickly ponded intracaldera CRT is capped by a more crystal-rich, less silicic facies. In the outflow ignimbrite, this upper zone is defined mainly by densely welded crystal-rich juvenile clasts of trachydacite composition, with higher Fe-Ti oxide temperatures, and is characterized by extremely high Ba (to 7,500 ppm), Zr, Sr, and positive Eu anomalies. Rare mafic clasts (51-53 wt% SiO2) with Ba contents to 4,000-5,000 ppm and positive Eu anomalies are also present. Much of the major and trace-element variations in the CRT juvenile clasts can be reproduced via in situ differentiation by interstitial melt extraction from a crystal-rich, upper-crustal mush zone, with the trachydacite, crystal-rich clasts representing the remobilized crystal cumulate left behind by the melt extraction process. Late recharge events, represented by the rare mafic clasts and high-Al amphiboles in some samples, mixed in with parts of the crystal cumulate and generated additional scatter in the whole-rock data. Recharge was important in thermally remobilizing the silicic crystal cumulate by partially melting the near-solidus phases, as supported by: (1) ubiquitous wormy/sieve textures and reverse zoning patterns in feldspars and biotites, (2) absence of quartz in this very silicic unit stored at depths of >4-5 km, and (3) heterogeneous melt compositions in the trachydacite fiamme and mafic clasts, particularly in Ba, indicating local enrichment of this element due mostly to sanidine and biotite melting. The injection of hot, juvenile magma into the upper-crustal cumulate also imparted the observed thermal gradient to the deposits and the mixing overprint that

  8. Magma plumbing system and seismicity of an active mid-ocean ridge volcano.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera; Koulakov, Ivan; Plötz, Aline; Scholz, John-Robert

    2017-02-20

    At mid-ocean ridges volcanism generally decreases with spreading rate but surprisingly massive volcanic centres occur at the slowest spreading ridges. These volcanoes can host unexpectedly strong earthquakes and vigorous, explosive submarine eruptions. Our understanding of the geodynamic processes forming these volcanic centres is still incomplete due to a lack of geophysical data and the difficulty to capture their rare phases of magmatic activity. We present a local earthquake tomographic image of the magma plumbing system beneath the Segment 8 volcano at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. The tomography shows a confined domain of partial melt under the volcano. We infer that from there melt is horizontally transported to a neighbouring ridge segment at 35 km distance where microearthquake swarms and intrusion tremor occur that suggest ongoing magmatic activity. Teleseismic earthquakes around the Segment 8 volcano, prior to our study, indicate that the current magmatic spreading episode may already have lasted over a decade and hence its temporal extent greatly exceeds the frequent short-lived spreading episodes at faster opening mid-ocean ridges.

  9. Magma plumbing system and seismicity of an active mid-ocean ridge volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera; Koulakov, Ivan; Plötz, Aline; Scholz, John-Robert

    2017-02-01

    At mid-ocean ridges volcanism generally decreases with spreading rate but surprisingly massive volcanic centres occur at the slowest spreading ridges. These volcanoes can host unexpectedly strong earthquakes and vigorous, explosive submarine eruptions. Our understanding of the geodynamic processes forming these volcanic centres is still incomplete due to a lack of geophysical data and the difficulty to capture their rare phases of magmatic activity. We present a local earthquake tomographic image of the magma plumbing system beneath the Segment 8 volcano at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. The tomography shows a confined domain of partial melt under the volcano. We infer that from there melt is horizontally transported to a neighbouring ridge segment at 35 km distance where microearthquake swarms and intrusion tremor occur that suggest ongoing magmatic activity. Teleseismic earthquakes around the Segment 8 volcano, prior to our study, indicate that the current magmatic spreading episode may already have lasted over a decade and hence its temporal extent greatly exceeds the frequent short-lived spreading episodes at faster opening mid-ocean ridges.

  10. Magma plumbing system and seismicity of an active mid-ocean ridge volcano

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera; Koulakov, Ivan; Plötz, Aline; Scholz, John-Robert

    2017-01-01

    At mid-ocean ridges volcanism generally decreases with spreading rate but surprisingly massive volcanic centres occur at the slowest spreading ridges. These volcanoes can host unexpectedly strong earthquakes and vigorous, explosive submarine eruptions. Our understanding of the geodynamic processes forming these volcanic centres is still incomplete due to a lack of geophysical data and the difficulty to capture their rare phases of magmatic activity. We present a local earthquake tomographic image of the magma plumbing system beneath the Segment 8 volcano at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. The tomography shows a confined domain of partial melt under the volcano. We infer that from there melt is horizontally transported to a neighbouring ridge segment at 35 km distance where microearthquake swarms and intrusion tremor occur that suggest ongoing magmatic activity. Teleseismic earthquakes around the Segment 8 volcano, prior to our study, indicate that the current magmatic spreading episode may already have lasted over a decade and hence its temporal extent greatly exceeds the frequent short-lived spreading episodes at faster opening mid-ocean ridges. PMID:28218270

  11. Interaction of the Reunion hotspot and the Central Indian Ridge near Rodrigues Island (Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Hémond, C.; Bissessur, D.; Scientific Party, Cruises Magofond 2; Gimnaut Scientific Party, Cruise; Knox11RR Scientific Party, Cruise

    2009-04-01

    Reunion hotspot is often viewed as a typical intraplate hotspot, which can be traced back along the southern Mascarene Plateau and the Chagos - Laccadive Ridge to the Deccan flood basalt, caused by the inception of a mantle plume head by the Indian lithosphere. The Rodrigues Ridge, an E-W trending structure more than 600 km-long and 2500 m-high above the seafloor, and small volcanic features that extend it up to the Central Indian Ridge axis at 19°S, do not fit well into this scheme and more probably correspond to the manifestation of an interaction of the Reunion hotspot with the Central Indian Ridge. In this talk we present bathymetric, geophysical and geochemical evidences for such a ridge-hotspot interaction as provided by the analysis of data and samples collected by cruises Magofond 2 of R/V Marion Dufresne (IPEV, France), Gimnaut of R/V L'Atalante with deep-sea submersible Nautile (IFREMER, France), and KNOX11RR of R/V Revelle (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA). The reality of the ridge hotspot interaction is substantiated by the shallow bathymetry and the "hot" morphology of the Central Indian Ridge, as well as the presence of volcanic ridges - the Rodrigues, Three Magi and Gasitao ridges - which exhibit isotopic signatures intermediate between those of the Reunion hotspot and MORB. The few age determinations obtained on the Rodrigues Ridge and its eastern extension suggest synchronous pulses of activity on the hotspot and the region of interaction with the spreading centre: the first pulse, between 12 and 8 Ma, corresponds to the shield volcano building of Mauritius Island and the formation of the Rodrigues Ridge, whereas the second pulse, since about 2 Ma, results in the building of Reunion Island, the formation of Rodrigues Island, Three Magi and Gasitao ridges close to the Central Indian Ridge. These pulses are further confirmed by the detailed evolution of the ridge segmentation of the Central Indian Ridge for the last 10 Ma, deciphered from

  12. Geodynamic and Geochemical Modeling of Mantle Processes along the Southwest Indian Ridge at 35°-40°E: A Hotspot-Mid-Ocean Ridge Interaction Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, M. O.; Okino, K.; Montesi, L.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle convection can be regarded as the superposition of two convective models: aplate mode and a plume mode. Geodynamic modeling of these regimes has grantedinsight into surface features, and tells us about the mantle processes in a system largelydevoid of observables. Our study of the 35°-40°E segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge(SWIR) seeks to link geochemical and geological observations with the underlying mantleprocesses.Both plate and plume modes interact and combine at the SWIR 35°-40°E segment. Themid-ocean ridge itself is a manifestation of the plate tectonics mode of mantle convection.The slow opening rate and obliquity of this segment should lead to low volcanic activityalong this segment. However, this segment is the point along the SWIR closest to theMarion hotspot, a manifestation of the plume mode of mantle convection. When interactingwith the mid-ocean ridges, hotspots like the Azores, Iceland, Galápagos, and Rodriguezproduce distinctive patterns, such as propagating rifts, triple junctions, and enriched MORBsignatures. The Marion hotspot does not have a similar effect on the SWIR even thoughit is associated with a bathymetric high and residual mantle Bouguer anomaly low. Anotable feature along the ridge is a V-shaped bathymetric anomaly around one of the non-transform discontinuities (NTD).As for the SWIR 10°-16°E area (Montési et al., 2011) geodynamics modeling predictsmagma focusing to highly segmented non-transform oblique segments (NTOS) along theridge. However, geophysical observations show a thinning crust at these regions. Modelingwithout the segmentation along the oblique segments shows much better agreement withthe observations. So either the NTOS are a crustal structure that does not influence mantleupwelling, melt extraction parameters vary along the ridge, or the density of the crust isanomalous in NTOS due to a different fractionation history.We will incorporate whole rock chemistry (including trace element, & REEs

  13. Comparison of Ridges on Triton and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Pappalardo, R. .

    2003-01-01

    Triton and Europa each display a variety of ridges and associated troughs. The resemblance of double ridges on these two satellites has been previously noted [R. Kirk, pers. comm.], but as yet, the similarities and differences between these feature types have not been examined in any detail. Triton s ridges, and Europa s, exhibit an evolutionary sequence ranging from isolated troughs, through doublet ridges, to complex ridge swaths [1, 2]. Comparison of ridges on Europa to those on Triton may provide insight into their formation on both satellites, and thereby have implications for the satellites' histories.

  14. The Tribolium castaneum ortholog of Sex combs reduced controls dorsal ridge development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In insects, the boundary between the embryonic head and thorax is formed by the dorsal ridge, a fused structure composed of portions of the maxillary and labial segments. However, the mechanisms that promote development of this unusual structure remain a mystery. In Drosophila, mutations in the Hox ...

  15. HIGHLAND RIDGE ROADLESS AREA, NEVADA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitebread, Donald H.; Brown, S. Don

    1984-01-01

    The mineral-resource potential of the Highland Ridge Roadless Area, Nevada was evaluated on the basis of results from field investigations. One area along the west border of the Highland Ridge Roadless Area has substantiated mineral-resource potential for tungsten. Several other areas are classed as having probable mineral-resource potential, based mainly upon anomalously high values of tungsten, lead, silver, and zinc in concentrates of stream sediments. Most of the roadless area is underlain by rocks in the upper plate of the Snake Range decollement, and is considered to have little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. No energy resource potential was identified in the area.

  16. RESEARCH NOTE: Slow-ridge/hotspot interactions from global gravity, seismic tomography and 87Sr/86Sr isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goslin, Jean; Thirot, Jean-Louis; Noël, Olivier; Francheteau, Jean

    1998-11-01

    Among the mantle hotspots present under oceanic areas, a large number are located on-or close to-active oceanic ridges. This is especially true in the slow-spreading Atlantic and Indian oceans. The recent availability of worldwide gravity grids and the increasing coverage of geochemical data sets along active spreading centres allow a fruitful comparison of these data with global geoid and seismic tomography models, and allow one to study interactions between mantle plumes and active slow-spreading ridges. The observed correlations allow us to draw preliminary conclusions on the general links between surficial processes, which shape the detailed morphology of the ridge axes, and deeper processes, active in the upper mantle below the ridge axial domains as a whole. The interactions are first studied at the scale of the Atlantic (the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from Iceland to Bouvet Island) from the correlation between the zero-age free-air gravity anomaly, which reflects the zero-age depth of the ridge axis, and Sr isotopic ratios of ridge axis basalts. The study is then extended to a more global scale (the slow ridges from Iceland to the Gulf of Aden) by including geoid and upper-mantle tomography models. The interactions appear complex, ranging from the effect of large and very productive plumes, almost totally overprinting the long-wavelength segmentation pattern of the ridge, to that of weaker hotspots, barely marking some of the observables in the ridge axial domain. Intermediate cases are observed, in which hotspots of medium activity (or whose activity has gradually decreased) located at some distance from the ridge axis produce geophysical or geochemical signals whose variation along the axis can be correlated with the geometry of the plume head in the upper mantle. Such observations tend to preclude the use of a single hotspot/ridge interaction model and stress the need for additional observations in various plume/ridge configurations.

  17. Geophysical and geochemical evidence for deep temperature variations beneath mid-ocean ridges.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Colleen A; Langmuir, Charles H; Gale, Allison

    2014-04-04

    The temperature and composition of Earth's mantle control fundamental planetary properties, including the vigor of mantle convection and the depths of the ocean basins. Seismic wave velocities, ocean ridge depths, and the composition of mid-ocean ridge basalts can all be used to determine variations in mantle temperature and composition, yet are typically considered in isolation. We show that correlations among these three data sets are consistent with 250°C variation extending to depths >400 kilometers and are inconsistent with variations in mantle composition at constant temperature. Anomalously hot ridge segments are located near hot spots, confirming a deep mantle-plume origin for hot spot volcanism. Chemical heterogeneity may contribute to scatter about the global trend. The coherent temperature signal provides a thermal calibration scale for interpreting seismic velocities located distant from ridges.

  18. Uranium-series disequilibria of inflated sections of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for mantle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Gill, J. B.; Ramos, F. C.; Clague, D. A.; Scott, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    U-Th disequilibria are reported for the two inflated portions (defined by bathymetric highs) of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR): Axial Seamount and the northern Endeavour segment. Both have broad axis-centered bathymetric plateaus, commonly attributed to the influence of the adjacent Heckle and Cobb melt anomalies, respectively. We explore structural and geochemical contrasts between them that imply fundamental differences in magma plumbing and/or transport processes. The depth to the axial magma chamber (AMC) within the JdFR crust is shallowest beneath Axial Seamount and deepest and most variable beneath Endeavour. Lavas from Endeavour include the most enriched and diverse compositions of the JdFR. Endeavour N-MORBs are most similar to Axial basalts in K2O/TiO2, La/Yb, Na8, and Fe8 although most Axial basalts have lower MgO. Major element trends suggest clinopyroxene saturation at higher MgO at Endeavour. Additional basalt types from Endeavour (i.e., those with K2O/TiO2 >0.15), the West Valley segment to the north, and Southwest Seamount to the west share similar enrichments in incompatible trace elements (Th, Nb) and radiogenic-Pb. Similar characteristics are absent from basalts from the adjacent Heck and Heckle seamount chains, which are highly-depleted N-MORBs, precluding the hypothesis that thickened and inflated crust at Endeavour is associated with increased melt supply due to transit over the seamount source. In contrast, Axial basalts are more chemically homogeneous, and share selected geochemical characteristics with the adjacent Cobb seamount chain. New uranium-series data suggest fundamental differences in melting parameters between inflated and non-inflated portions of the JdFR. Average Th/U at Endeavour (3.03 ± 6, n=10) is nearly indistinguishable from Axial (2.83 ± 9, n=17), but both are distinct from elsewhere on the JdFR (~2.1-2.5). That is, basalts erupted from regions of inflated crust have higher Th/U. Despite high overall compositional

  19. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  20. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  1. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  2. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  3. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  4. East Pacific Rise 18 deg-19 deg S: Asymmetric spreading and ridge reorientation by ultrafast migration of axial discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Marie-Helene; MacDonald, Ken C.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed bathymetric, side scan, and magnetic survey of the East Pacific Rise out to a seafloor age of 1 Ma has been carried out between 18 deg and 19 deg S. It reveals that some left-stepping axial discontinuities have been migrating southward at rates an order of magnitude faster than the spreading rates (1000 mm/a or higher). These rapid migration events have left on the Nazca plate discordant features striking nearly parallel to the ridge axis. A discontinuity with an offset of several kilometers has migrated in two stages at around 0.45 and 0.3 Ma, and has left two large discordant zones consisting of a series of unfaulted, hummocky basins bounded to the east by short ridges oriented about N-S, oblique to the ambient 013 deg fabric. The morphology and reflectivity characteristics of these discordant zones are akin to the overlap basins and abandoned ridge tips which make up the migration trails of large, slowly-migrating overlapping spreading centers. Between 18 deg 35 min and 19 deg 03 min S, the ridge axis is flanked a few kilometers to the east by a prominent, sedimented ridge previously recognized as a recent abandoned ridge axis. The present ridge segment steadily deepens and narrows southward, which suggests the abandoned ridge has been rafted onto the Nazca plate during the ultrafast southward propagation of the ridge segment rather than by one discrete ridge jump. By transferring Pacific lithosphere to the Nazca plate, these migration events account for most of the asymmetric accretion observed (faster to the east). This process is consistent with the features common to asymmetric spreading, namely the sudden onset or demise of asymmetric spreading, and the ridge segment to ridge segment variablity. Because the discordant zones left by these rapid migration events are near-parallel to the ambient seafloor fabric, they are unlikely to be detected by conventional bathymetry or magnetic surveys, and so-called 'ridge-jumps' may actually often represent

  5. Seismic evidence for hotspot-induced buoyant flow beneath the Reykjanes Ridge.

    PubMed

    Gaherty, J B

    2001-08-31

    Volcanic hotspots and mid-ocean ridge spreading centers are the surface expressions of upwelling in Earth's mantle convection system, and their interaction provides unique information on upwelling dynamics. I investigated the influence of the Iceland hotspot on the adjacent mid-Atlantic spreading center using phase-delay times of seismic surface waves, which show anomalous polarization anisotropy-a delay-time discrepancy between waves with different polarizations. This anisotropy implies that the hotspot induces buoyancy-driven upwelling in the mantle beneath the ridge.

  6. Helium isotope variations between Réunion Island and the Central Indian Ridge (17°-21°S): New evidence for ridge-hot spot interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füri, Evelyn; Hilton, David R.; Murton, Bramley J.; HéMond, Christophe; Dyment, JéRome; Day, James M. D.

    2011-02-01

    We report new helium abundance and isotope results for submarine basaltic glasses from the Central Indian Ridge (CIR) between the Marie Celeste (16.7°S) and Egeria fracture zones (FZ) (20.6°S); the adjacent Gasitao, Three Magi, and Rodrigues ridges; and for olivine separates from lavas and cumulate xenoliths from the Mascarene Islands (Réunion, Mauritius, and Rodrigues). Helium isotope ratios in basaltic glasses range from 7.1 to 12.2 RA (where RA = air 3He/4He) and lie between values of Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) (8 ± 1 RA) and samples from Réunion Island (11.5 to 14.1 RA). The highest 3He/4He values (up to 12.2 RA) are found in glasses recovered off axis from the Three Magi and Gasitao ridges. Along the CIR axis, MORB-like 3He/4He ratios are found near the Egeria FZ, and there is a marked increase to values of ˜11 RA between ˜19° and 20°S. The lowest 3He/4He values (<8 RA) are found immediately south of the Marie Celeste FZ, where incompatible trace element ratios (e.g., La/Sm) are highest. These low 3He/4He ratios can be explained by closed system radiogenic 4He ingrowth in either (1) a "fossil" Réunion hot spot mantle component, embedded into the subridge mantle when the CIR migrated over the hot spot at ˜34 Ma or (2) trace element enriched MORB mantle. In contrast, the high 3He/4He ratios observed on the CIR axis adjacent to the Gasitao Ridge, and along the off-axis volcanic ridges, are consistent with flow of hot spot mantle material from Réunion (˜1100 km to the west) toward the CIR.

  7. Unsupervised Segmentation Of Texture Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Xavier; Leonardi, Riccardo; Gersho, Allen

    1988-10-01

    Past work on unsupervised segmentation of a texture image has been based on several restrictive assumptions to reduce the difficulty of this challenging segmentation task. Typically, a fixed number of different texture regions is assumed and each region is assumed to be generated by a simple model. Also, different first order statistics are used to facilitate discrimination between different textures. This paper introduces an approach to unsupervised segmentation that offers promise for handling unrestricted natural scenes containing textural regions. A simple but effective feature set and a novel measure of dissimilarity are used to accurately generate boundaries between an unknown number of regions without using first order statistics or texture models. A two stage approach is used to partition a texture image. In the first stage, a set of sliding windows scans the image to generate a sequence of feature vectors. The windowed regions providing the highest inhomo-geneity in their textural characteristics determine a crude first-stage boundary, separating textured areas that are unambiguously homogeneous from one another. These regions are used to estimate a set of prototype feature vectors. In the second stage, supervised segmentation is performed to obtain an accurate boundary between different textured regions by means of a constrained hierarchical clustering technique. Each inhomo-geneous window obtained in the first stage is split into four identical subwindows for which the feature vectors are estimated. Each of the subwindows is assigned to a homogeneous region to which it is connected. This region is chosen according to the closest prototype vector in the feature space. Any two adjacent subwindows that are assigned to different regions will in turn be considered as inhomogeneous windows and each is then split into four subwindows. The classification scheme is repeated in this hierarchical manner until the desired boundary resolution is achieved. The

  8. THE EQUATION AT OAK RIDGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MORRELL, KEN

    THE STEPS TAKEN TO DESEGREGATE THE OAK RIDGE, TENN., SCHOOLS ARE DESCRIBED IN THIS ARTICLE. ONE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, SEGREGATED BECAUSE OF RESIDENTIAL PATTERNS, WAS CLOSED AND ITS STUDENTS REDISTRIBUTED AMONG OTHER SCHOOLS IN THE CITY. UNDER THE INITIATIVE OF THE SCHOOL BOARD, THIS PLAN WENT INTO EFFECT IN THE FALL OF 1967 AND IS SAID TO HAVE…

  9. Geochemistry of Basalt Lava and Hyaloclastite From Young (President Jackson) and old (Taney) Near-ridge Seamount Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. S.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.

    2005-12-01

    Short linear chains of seamounts are common near Pacific spreading centers. They are most abundant near fast spreading centers but also occur at moderate and slow spreading ridge segments. We explored two such near-ridge chains of vastly different ages. The young President Jackson chain, located at 42°20' N west of the northern Gorda Ridge, resides on ocean crust that is 2.2 to 4.2 million years old. An Ar-Ar age of ~26 Ma (G.B. Dalrymple as cited by Davis et al., 1998) for the Taney seamounts indicates they formed during the Miocene on the later subducted Farallon-East Pacific Rise spreading center. Three dives with MBARI's ROV Tiburon explored the eastern end of the President Jackson seamounts. Two dives explored two of the eastern seamounts of the Taney chain. Volcanoes in both chains are similar steep-sided, flat-topped structures with multiple, nested, overlapping calderas. The Taney seamounts, however, are considerably larger with volumes roughly three times that of the typical seamount in the President Jackson chain. Samples of glassy rimmed pillow lava and hyaloclastite were recovered from both chains, although those from the Taney chain are covered with thick manganese oxide crusts. The hyaloclastite samples from both sites consist of dense angular glass shards compositionally identical to pillow rims, suggesting they formed by quench granulation. One of the President Jackson Seamount samples is loosely consolidated ash, containing fluidal and bubble wall fragments, indicating some mildly explosive eruptions occurred. Glass data for the eastern President Jackson seamounts are all low-K2O N-MORB (0.04-0.13% K2O). Two distinct groups can be identified. One more depleted composition with exceedingly low K2O and MgO >8% and the second, overlapping group includes somewhat more evolved (7.3 -8.3% MgO) and slightly more enriched (>0.1-0.15% K2O) compositions. Both compositions erupted on a single volcano. Glass compositions of dive samples from the Taney

  10. Investigating the Relationship between Fin Whales, Zooplankton Concentrations and Hydrothermal Venting on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    1992). Composition of a deep scattering layer overlying a mid - ocean ridge hydrothermal plume, Mar. Biol. 113, 517-526. Croll, D. A., Clark, C. W...Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Weekly et al., 2013) that included a network of eight ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) that operated from... mid -1990s, the Institute of Ocean Sciences in Sidney, BC conducted summer cruises to the Endeavour to collect a series of plankton net tows in

  11. A comprehensive segmentation analysis of crude oil market based on time irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jianan; Shang, Pengjian; Lu, Dan; Yin, Yi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we perform a comprehensive entropic segmentation analysis of crude oil future prices from 1983 to 2014 which used the Jensen-Shannon divergence as the statistical distance between segments, and analyze the results from original series S and series begin at 1986 (marked as S∗) to find common segments which have same boundaries. Then we apply time irreversibility analysis of each segment to divide all segments into two groups according to their asymmetry degree. Based on the temporal distribution of the common segments and high asymmetry segments, we figure out that these two types of segments appear alternately and do not overlap basically in daily group, while the common portions are also high asymmetry segments in weekly group. In addition, the temporal distribution of the common segments is fairly close to the time of crises, wars or other events, because the hit from severe events to oil price makes these common segments quite different from their adjacent segments. The common segments can be confirmed in daily group series, or weekly group series due to the large divergence between common segments and their neighbors. While the identification of high asymmetry segments is helpful to know the segments which are not affected badly by the events and can recover to steady states automatically. Finally, we rearrange the segments by merging the connected common segments or high asymmetry segments into a segment, and conjoin the connected segments which are neither common nor high asymmetric.

  12. Prosodic cues enhance rule learning by changing speech segmentation mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    de Diego-Balaguer, Ruth; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Prosody has been claimed to have a critical role in the acquisition of grammatical information from speech. The exact mechanisms by which prosodic cues enhance learning are fully unknown. Rules from language often require the extraction of non-adjacent dependencies (e.g., he plays, he sings, he speaks). It has been proposed that pauses enhance learning because they allow computing non-adjacent relations helping word segmentation by removing the need to compute adjacent computations. So far only indirect evidence from behavioral and electrophysiological measures comparing learning effects after exposure to speech with and without pauses support this claim. By recording event-related potentials during the acquisition process of artificial languages with and without pauses between words with embedded non-adjacent rules we provide direct evidence on how the presence of pauses modifies the way speech is processed during learning to enhance segmentation and rule generalization. The electrophysiological results indicate that pauses as short as 25 ms attenuated the N1 component irrespective of whether learning was possible or not. In addition, a P2 enhancement was present only when learning of non-adjacent dependencies was possible. The overall results support the claim that the simple presence of subtle pauses changed the segmentation mechanism used reflected in an exogenously driven N1 component attenuation and improving segmentation at the behavioral level. This effect can be dissociated from the endogenous P2 enhancement that is observed irrespective of the presence of pauses whenever non-adjacent dependencies are learned. PMID:26483731

  13. A segmentation algorithm for noisy images

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Olman, V.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a 2-D image segmentation algorithm and addresses issues related to its performance on noisy images. The algorithm segments an image by first constructing a minimum spanning tree representation of the image and then partitioning the spanning tree into sub-trees representing different homogeneous regions. The spanning tree is partitioned in such a way that the sum of gray-level variations over all partitioned subtrees is minimized under the constraints that each subtree has at least a specified number of pixels and two adjacent subtrees have significantly different ``average`` gray-levels. Two types of noise, transmission errors and Gaussian additive noise. are considered and their effects on the segmentation algorithm are studied. Evaluation results have shown that the segmentation algorithm is robust in the presence of these two types of noise.

  14. Coarse-clast ridge complexes of the Caribbean: A preliminary basis for distinguishing tsunami and storm-wave origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.; Richmond, B.M.; Jaffe, B.E.; Gelfenbaum, G.

    2008-01-01

    Coastal gravel-ridge complexes deposited on islands in the Caribbean Sea are recorders of past extreme-wave events that could be associated with either tsunamis or hurricanes. The ridge complexes of Bonaire, Jamaica, Puerto Rico (Isla de Mona), and Guadeloupe consist of polymodal clasts ranging in size from sand to coarse boulders that are derived from the adjacent coral reefs or subjacent rock platforms. Ridge-complex morphologies and crest elevations are largely controlled by availability of sediments, clast sizes, and heights of wave runup. The ridge complexes are internally organized, display textural sorting and a broad range of ages including historical events. Some display seaward-dipping beds and ridge-and-swale topography, and some terminate in fans or steep avalanche slopes. Together, the morphologic, sedimentologic, lithostratigraphic, and chronostratigraphic evidence indicates that shore-parallet ridge complexes composed of gravel and sand that are tens of meters wide and several meters thick are primarily storm-constructed features that have accumulated for a few centuries or millennia as a result of multiple high-frequency intense-wave events. They are not entirely the result of one or a few tsunamis as recently reported. Tsunami deposition may account for some of the lateral ridge-complex accretion or boulder fields and isolated blocks that are associated with the ridge complexes. Copyright ?? 2008, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  15. Handwritten text line segmentation by spectral clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuecheng; Yao, Hui; Zhong, Guoqiang

    2017-02-01

    Since handwritten text lines are generally skewed and not obviously separated, text line segmentation of handwritten document images is still a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose a novel text line segmentation algorithm based on the spectral clustering. Given a handwritten document image, we convert it to a binary image first, and then compute the adjacent matrix of the pixel points. We apply spectral clustering on this similarity metric and use the orthogonal kmeans clustering algorithm to group the text lines. Experiments on Chinese handwritten documents database (HIT-MW) demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Feature Learning Based Random Walk for Liver Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yongchang; Ai, Danni; Zhang, Pan; Gao, Yefei; Xia, Likun; Du, Shunda; Sang, Xinting; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Liver segmentation is a significant processing technique for computer-assisted diagnosis. This method has attracted considerable attention and achieved effective result. However, liver segmentation using computed tomography (CT) images remains a challenging task because of the low contrast between the liver and adjacent organs. This paper proposes a feature-learning-based random walk method for liver segmentation using CT images. Four texture features were extracted and then classified to determine the classification probability corresponding to the test images. Seed points on the original test image were automatically selected and further used in the random walk (RW) algorithm to achieve comparable results to previous segmentation methods. PMID:27846217

  17. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  19. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, C.; Pearce, J.; Zucker, A.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of the following programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The effects of pollution and climate change on forests; automation to improve the safety and efficiency of rearming battle tanks; new technologies for DNA sequencing; ORNL probes the human genome; ORNL as a supercomputer research center; paving the way to superconcrete made with polystyrene; a new look at supercritical water used in waste treatment; and small mammals as environmental monitors.

  20. Segmentation and segment connection of obstructed colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medved, Mario; Truyen, Roel; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2004-05-01

    Segmentation of colon CT images is the main factor that inhibits automation of virtual colonoscopy. There are two main reasons that make efficient colon segmentation difficult. First, besides the colon, the small bowel, lungs, and stomach are also gas-filled organs in the abdomen. Second, peristalsis or residual feces often obstruct the colon, so that it consists of multiple gas-filled segments. In virtual colonoscopy, it is very useful to automatically connect the centerlines of these segments into a single colon centerline. Unfortunately, in some cases this is a difficult task. In this study a novel method for automated colon segmentation and connection of colon segments' centerlines is proposed. The method successfully combines features of segments, such as centerline and thickness, with information on main colon segments. The results on twenty colon cases show that the method performs well in cases of small obstructions of the colon. Larger obstructions are mostly also resolved properly, especially if they do not appear in the sigmoid part of the colon. Obstructions in the sigmoid part of the colon sometimes cause improper classification of the small bowel segments. If a segment is too small, it is classified as the small bowel segment. However, such misclassifications have little impact on colon analysis.

  1. Complete cage migration/subsidence into the adjacent vertebral body after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Corniola, Marco V; Jägersberg, Max; Stienen, Martin N; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2015-03-01

    A variety of implant-related short and long-term complications after lumbar fusion surgery are recognized. Mid to long-term complications due to cage migration and/or cage subsidence are less frequently reported. Here, we report a patient with a complete cage migration into the superior adjacent vertebral body almost 20 years after the initial posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure. In this patient, the cage migration/subsidence was clinically silent, but a selective decompression for adjacent segment degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis was performed. We discuss the risk factors for cage migration/subsidence in view of the current literature.

  2. Mantle plume capture, anchoring, and outflow during Galápagos plume-ridge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Geist, D. J.; Richards, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    Compositions of basalts erupted between the main zone of Galápagos plume upwelling and adjacent Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC) provide important constraints on dynamic processes involved in transfer of deep-mantle-sourced material to mid-ocean ridges. We examine recent basalts from central and northeast Galápagos including some that have less radiogenic Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions than plume-influenced basalts (E-MORB) from the nearby ridge. We show that the location of E-MORB, greatest crustal thickness, and elevated topography on the GSC correlates with a confined zone of low-velocity, high-temperature mantle connecting the plume stem and ridge at depths of ˜100 km. At this site on the ridge, plume-driven upwelling involving deep melting of partially dehydrated, recycled ancient oceanic crust, plus plate-limited shallow melting of anhydrous peridotite, generate E-MORB and larger amounts of melt than elsewhere on the GSC. The first-order control on plume stem to ridge flow is rheological rather than gravitational, and strongly influenced by flow regimes initiated when the plume was on axis (>5 Ma). During subsequent northeast ridge migration material upwelling in the plume stem appears to have remained "anchored" to a contact point on the GSC. This deep, confined NE plume stem-to-ridge flow occurs via a network of melt channels, embedded within the normal spreading and advection of plume material beneath the Nazca plate, and coincides with locations of historic volcanism. Our observations require a more dynamically complex model than proposed by most studies, which rely on radial solid-state outflow of heterogeneous plume material to the ridge.

  3. Image Segmentation for Improvised Explosive Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    zj, αj) measuring the similarity between adjacent pixels zi and zj . The function V (zi, αi, zj, αj) results 22 in large values when similar pixels... value distribution. The second and the third rows show the histogram for the object and the background after they were segmented...Images B and C show the directly assembled gray- value histograms for the background (B) and the object (C) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Figure

  4. Advanced Seismic Studies of the Endeavour Ridge: Understanding the Interplay among Magmatic, Hydrothermal, and Tectonic Processes at Mid-Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoux, G. M.; VanderBeek, B. P.; Morgan, J. V.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Warner, M.

    2014-12-01

    At mid-ocean ridges magmatic, hydrothermal, and tectonic processes are linked. Understanding their interactions requires mapping magmatic systems and tectonic structures, as well as their relationship to hydrothermal circulation. Three-dimensional seismic images of the crust can be used to infer the size, shape, and location of magma reservoirs, in addition to the structure of the thermal boundary layer that connects magmatic and hydrothermal processes. Travel time tomography has often been used to study these processes, however, the spatial resolution of travel time tomography is limited. Three-dimensional full waveform inversion (FWI) is a state-of-the art seismic method developed for use in the oil industry to obtain high-resolution models of the velocity structure. The primary advantage of FWI is that it has the potential to resolve subsurface structures on the order of half the seismic wavelength—a significant improvement on conventional travel time tomography. Here, we apply anisotropic FWI to data collected on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Starting models for anisotropic P-wave velocity were obtained by travel time tomography [Weekly et al., 2014]. During FWI, the isotropic velocity model is updated and anisotropy is held constant. We have recovered low-velocity zones approximately 2-3 km beneath the ridge axis that likely correspond to a segmented magma-rich body and are in concert with those previously resolved using multi-channel seismic reflection methods. The segmented crustal magma body underlies all five known high-temperature hydrothermal vent fields along the Endeavour segment. A high-velocity zone, shallower than the observed low-velocity zones, underlies the southernmost hydrothermal vent field. This may be indicative of waning hydrothermal activity in which minerals are crystallizing beneath the vent field. Our FWI study of the Endeavour Ridge will provide the most detailed three-dimensional images of the crustal structure to

  5. Mineralogy of the mid-ocean-ridge basalt source from neodymium isotopic composition of abyssal peridotites.

    PubMed

    Salters, Vincent J M; Dick, Henry J B

    2002-07-04

    Inferring the melting process at mid-ocean ridges, and the physical conditions under which melting takes place, usually relies on the assumption of compositional similarity between all mid-ocean-ridge basalt sources. Models of mantle melting therefore tend to be restricted to those that consider the presence of only one lithology in the mantle, peridotite. Evidence from xenoliths and peridotite massifs show that after peridotite, pyroxenite and eclogite are the most abundant rock types in the mantle. But at mid-ocean ridges, where most of the melting takes place, and in ophiolites, pyroxenite is rarely found. Here we present neodymium isotopic compositions of abyssal peridotites to investigate whether peridotite can indeed be the sole source for mid-ocean-ridge basalts. By comparing the isotopic compositions of basalts and peridotites at two segments of the southwest Indian ridge, we show that a component other than peridotite is required to explain the low end of the (143)Nd/(144)Nd variations of the basalts. This component is likely to have a lower melting temperature than peridotite, such as pyroxenite or eclogite, which could explain why it is not observed at mid-ocean ridges.

  6. Magmatic and amagmatic seafloor generation at the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Michael, P J; Langmuir, C H; Dick, H J B; Snow, J E; Goldstein, S L; Graham, D W; Lehnert, K; Kurras, G; Jokat, W; Mühe, R; Edmonds, H N

    2003-06-26

    A high-resolution mapping and sampling study of the Gakkel ridge was accomplished during an international ice-breaker expedition to the high Arctic and North Pole in summer 2001. For this slowest-spreading endmember of the global mid-ocean-ridge system, predictions were that magmatism should progressively diminish as the spreading rate decreases along the ridge, and that hydrothermal activity should be rare. Instead, it was found that magmatic variations are irregular, and that hydrothermal activity is abundant. A 300-kilometre-long central amagmatic zone, where mantle peridotites are emplaced directly in the ridge axis, lies between abundant, continuous volcanism in the west, and large, widely spaced volcanic centres in the east. These observations demonstrate that the extent of mantle melting is not a simple function of spreading rate: mantle temperatures at depth or mantle chemistry (or both) must vary significantly along-axis. Highly punctuated volcanism in the absence of ridge offsets suggests that first-order ridge segmentation is controlled by mantle processes of melting and melt segregation. The strong focusing of magmatic activity coupled with faulting may account for the unexpectedly high levels of hydrothermal activity observed.

  7. Constraints on the mantle mineralogy of an ultra-slow ridge: Hafnium isotopes in abyssal peridotites and basalts from the 9-25°E Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Soumen; Standish, Jared J.; Bizimis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We report on the Hf isotopic compositions of clinopyroxene mineral separates from eleven abyssal peridotites and Nd and Hf-isotopic compositions of twenty-seven co-located basalts from 9-25°E South West Indian Ridge (SWIR). In Nd-Hf isotope space the SWIR peridotites plot within the global MORB field (εNd = 4.5- 12.5, εHf = 9.6- 18.7), with the 15.23°E peridotites being the most radiogenic. The lack of correlation between Hf isotopes and trace or major element systematics including Lu/Hf ratios suggests that the 15.23°E peridotites were recently processed beneath the ridge and therefore participated in the production of the SWIR lavas. The Hf isotopic compositions of 15.23°E peridotites are more radiogenic than all basalts from the 9-25°E ridge, whereas the 9.98°E and 16.64°E peridotites partially overlap with the Hf isotope ratios of the spatially co-located basalts. This indicates the upwelling mantle beneath the SWIR contains material with enriched isotope signatures in addition to an isotopically depleted peridotitic mantle, which is consistent with the SWIR peridotites and basalt Nd isotope systematics from previously published studies. As the enriched isotope signatures are not observed in the peridotites we assume that they are sourced from material with lower solidus temperature than a typical peridotite. This enriched material was consumed during melting, and therefore may be mineralogically distinct (e.g. pyroxenite). Moreover, the variable spatial distribution of the enriched isotope signatures requires preferential sampling of the enriched component at distinct along-axis locations. The Hf-Nd isotope variability of the 9-25°E basalts can be entirely explained by mixing between a depleted peridotitic mantle end-member with the isotope composition of the 15.23°E peridotites and an enriched end-member with the isotope composition of the Narrowgate Segment lavas at 14.6°E. We estimate a maximum of 5% modal abundance of the enriched material in a

  8. Malaguana-Gadao Ridge: Identification and implications of a magma chamber reflector in the southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Nathan C.; Fryer, Patricia; Moore, Gregory F.

    2010-04-01

    Six-channel seismic reflection data reveal a magma chamber reflector beneath the Malaguana-Gadao Ridge, the southernmost segment of the spreading center in the Mariana Trough. For most of its length the spreading center in this active back-arc basin is morphologically similar to slow spreading mid-ocean ridges, having a deep central graben flanked by a zone of abyssal hill fabric. This southernmost segment, however, has a broad, smooth cross section, lacks a deep central graben, and is thus similar in morphology to fast spreading ridges (e.g., the East Pacific Rise). We identify a magma chamber at 1.5 s two-way travel time below the crest of the ridge. Observations from remotely operated vehicles along the ridge reveal not only fresh pillows, lobate, and sheet lava flows but also an abundance of volcaniclastic debris and intense hydrothermal activity. These observations, together with the "fast spreading" morphology of the ridge, suggest that this segment has a considerably higher magma supply than is typical in the Mariana Trough. We suggest that the volcanic arc or enhanced melting of a hydrated mantle is supplying volatile-rich magma as evidenced by a highly negative coefficient of reflection, -0.42, for this MCR and the presence of evolved, highly vesicular lava and volcaniclastic materials. The southeastern Mariana back-arc basin spreading ridge does not compare readily with mechanical models for global mid-ocean ridge data sets because of marked asymmetry in both volcanism and deformation that may be the consequence of slab-related geometry in this part of the convergent margin system.

  9. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  10. Agulhas Ridge, South Atlantic: the peculiar structure of a transform fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenzelmann-Neben, G.; Gohl, K.

    2003-04-01

    Transform faults constitute conservative plate boundaries, where adjacent plates are in tangential contact. Transform faults in the ocean are marked by fracture zones, which are long, linear, bathymetric depressions. One of the largest transform offsets on Earth can be found in the South Atlantic. The 1200 km long Agulhas Falkland Fracture Zone (AFFZ), form by this, developed during the Early Cretaceous break-up of West Gondwana. Between approx. 41°S, 16°E and 43°S, 9°E the Agulhas Falkland Fracture Zone is characterised by a pronounced topographic anomaly, the Agulhas Ridge. The Agulhas Ridge rises more than 2 km above the surrounding seafloor. The only equivalent to this kind of topographic high, as part of the AFFZ, is found in form of marginal ridges along the continental parts of the fracture zone, namely the Falkland Escarpment at the South American continent and the Diaz Ridge adjacent to South Africa. But the Agulhas Ridge differs from both the Falkland Escarpment and the Diaz Ridge in the facts (1) that it was not formed during the early rift-drift phase, and (2) that it separates oceanic crust of different age and not continental from oceanic crust. A set of high-resolution seismic reflection data (total length 2000 km) and a seismic refraction line across the Agulhas Ridge give new information on the crustal and basement structure of this tectonic feature. We have observed that within the Cape Basin, to the North, the basement and sedimentary layers are in parts strongly deformed. We observe basement highs, which point towards intrusions. Both the basement and the sedimentary sequence show strong faulting. This points towards a combined tectono-magmatic activity, which led to the formation of basement ridges parallel to the Agulhas Ridge. Since at least the pre-Oligocene parts and, locally, the whole sedimentary column are affected we infer that the renewed activity began in the Middle Oligocene and may have lasted into the Quaternary. As an origin

  11. Effects of axially variable diking rates on faulting at slow spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaochuan; Choi, Eunseo

    2017-01-01

    Magma supply for dike injection can be highly variable within a segment of a slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge but the tectonic impact of this variability is not fully understood. Here, we use three-dimensional numerical models to quantify the effects of variable diking rates on the faulting mode at a 20 km-long slow spreading ridge segment. In addition to end-member faulting modes in which long-lived detachment faults or short-lived normal faults form along the whole segment, we newly identify a transitional mode in which a detachment and a short-lived normal fault form simultaneously but in respective domains separated by a transfer fault. Different faulting modes can be better correlated with the average dike intrusion rate, rather than the highest or lowest rate along the segment. Along-axis stress coupling tends to homogenize fault offset along the segment, inhibiting the domination of a particular faulting mode associated with an extreme local diking rate. This homogenizing effect explains why detachment faults can sometimes form even in the regions previously considered as unfavorable. Our results further suggest that a long (>15 km) and continuous detachment, partially overlain by younger faults, can create an oceanic core complex when faults weaken fast and diking rate is low. When faults weaken slow and diking rate is moderate, however, faulting occurs in the transitional mode, producing a detachment over only a part of the segment length.

  12. Feedback between ridge and swale bathymetry and barrier island storm response and transgression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, Chris

    2012-11-01

    bathymetry emerged on the Gulf of Mexico shoreface it was able to reinforce the alongshore variation in dune height and storm response. It is further argued that the cuspate spits are reinforced by the shoreface ridges through alongshore transport of sediment from adjacent washover fans although the ridge orientation suggests that the spits have migrated westward by ~ 750 m. In this respect, the alongshore variation in beach and dune morphology on this island is the expression of this large-scale feedback and suggests a top-down model in which meso-scale processes and landforms depend on the geologic context.

  13. Geochemical Diversity of Near-Ridge Seamounts: Insights into Oceanic Magmatic Processes and Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, N. L.; Perfit, M. R.; Wendt, R. E.; Lundstrom, C.; Clague, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Geochemical studies of lavas erupted at seamounts that form in close proximity to active mid-ocean ridges provide an opportunity to better understand the composition of shallow mantle underneath spreading ridges and how it melts in order to form new oceanic crust. This is because while on-axis samples mostly reflect homogenization of melts within the axial magma lens, seamount lavas bypass this process providing a window into the diversity of melts produced in the melting column. We have analyzed lavas from small near-axis seamounts and two larger near-ridge seamount chains for trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes: the Lamont Seamounts adjacent to the East Pacific Rise (EPR) ~ 10°N and the Vance Seamounts next to the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) ~45°N. One purpose of the study is to test the hypothesis that near ridge seamount chains reflect focusing of melts by dunite channels in the upwelling asthenospheric mantle and that such conduits might affect melting in the shallow mantle (Lundstrom et al., 2000). Our results indicate that lavas from these seamounts have incompatible trace element patterns varying from very depleted to moderately enriched (found at the oldest, most distant Vance seamounts) relative to typical mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). Trace element compositions and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data show that lava compositions vary significantly between seamounts in the chain as well as within individual seamounts. Overall, the Vance and Lamont seamount lavas are more primitive and diverse than associated ridge samples. These variations can be explained by multiple sources as well as different extents of melting, and are unlikely to reflect shallow level fractional crystallization. Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data also indicate some mixing between mantle end members. The significant variations in incompatible trace element and isotopic compositions that are somewhat correlated suggest that the mantle underneath the seamounts is heterogeneous on a small scale. The fact that

  14. Gas hydrate distribution and hydrocarbon maturation north of the Knipovich Ridge, western Svalbard margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumke, Ines; Burwicz, Ewa B.; Berndt, Christian; Klaeschen, Dirk; Feseker, Tomas; Geissler, Wolfram H.; Sarkar, Sudipta

    2016-03-01

    A bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) occurs west of Svalbard in water depths exceeding 600 m, indicating that gas hydrate occurrence in marine sediments is more widespread in this region than anywhere else on the eastern North Atlantic margin. Regional BSR mapping shows the presence of hydrate and free gas in several areas, with the largest area located north of the Knipovich Ridge, a slow spreading ridge segment of the Mid Atlantic Ridge system. Here heat flow is high (up to 330 mW m-2), increasing toward the ridge axis. The coinciding maxima in across-margin BSR width and heat flow suggest that the Knipovich Ridge influenced methane generation in this area. This is supported by recent finds of thermogenic methane at cold seeps north of the ridge termination. To evaluate the source rock potential on the western Svalbard margin, we applied 1-D petroleum system modeling at three sites. The modeling shows that temperature and burial conditions near the ridge were sufficient to produce hydrocarbons. The bulk petroleum mass produced since the Eocene is at least 5 kt and could be as high as ~0.2 Mt. Most likely, source rocks are Miocene organic-rich sediments and a potential Eocene source rock that may exist in the area if early rifting created sufficiently deep depocenters. Thermogenic methane production could thus explain the more widespread presence of gas hydrates north of the Knipovich Ridge. The presence of microbial methane on the upper continental slope and shelf indicates that the origin of methane on the Svalbard margin varies spatially.

  15. Mechanisms of Basalt-plains Ridge Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watters, T. R.; Maxwell, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    The morphologic similarities between the Columbia Plateau ridges and ridges on the Moon, Mercury and Mars form a strong basis for the interpretation of basalt-plains ridges as compressional folds. The basalt-plains ridges appear to have formed on competent flood basalt units deformed at the surface with essentially no confining pressure. Estimates of compressive strain for planetary ridges range from a few tenths of a percent on the Moon to up to 0.4% on Mars, to as high as 35% for Columbia Plateau folds with associated thrust faults. Such values have strong implications for both deformational mechanisms as well as for the source of stress. Deformational mechanisms that will attempt to account for the morphology, fold geometry, possible associated thrust faulting and regular spacing of the basalt-plains ridges on the terrestrial planets are under investigation.

  16. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek remedial action project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has three major operating facilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee: the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the K-25 Site, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed by Lockheed Martin Environmental Research Corporation. All facilities are managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (Energy Systems) for the DOE. The Y-12 Plant is adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge and is also upstream from Oak Ridge along East Fork Poplar Creek. The portion of the creek downstream from the Y-12 Plant is Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC). This project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the LEFPC floodplain, transport the soils to Industrial Landfill V (ILF-V), and restore any affected areas. This project contains areas that were designated in 1989 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site. The site includes DOE property and portions of commercial, residential, agricultural, and miscellaneous areas within the city of Oak Ridge.

  17. Constitutive Parameter Measurement Using Double Ridge Waveguide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    CONSTITUTIVE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE THESIS Nathan J. Lehman, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENG-13-M-30 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE...copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENG-13-M-30 CONSTITUTIVE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE THESIS Presented to the Faculty...PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE Nathan J. Lehman, B.S.E.E. Captain, USAF Approved: Michael Havrilla, PhD (Chairman) Maj Milo Hyde, PhD

  18. Seismicity and active accretion processes at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest and intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridges from hydroacoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, Eve; Royer, Jean-Yves; Perrot, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Volcanic and tectonic events are the main processes involved in the generation of the oceanic crust and responsible for the seismicity associated with seafloor spreading. To monitor this activity, usually not or poorly detected by land-based seismological stations, we deployed from February 2012 to February 2013 a network of autonomous hydrophones to compare the behaviour of the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) with that of the intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridge (SEIR). The rate of seismicity is similar for both ridges, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. The along-axis distribution of the seismic events, however, does differ, reflecting the rate dependence of accretion modes. Earthquakes are sparse and regularly spaced and scattered along the SWIR, reflecting prevailing tectonic processes. By contrast, along the SEIR, events are irregularly distributed and focus at ridge-segment ends and transforms faults, reflecting the ridge segmentation; only two swarms occurred at a segment centre and are probably caused by a magmatic event. This seismicity distribution thus looks controlled by segment-scale crustal heterogeneities along the SEIR and by regional-scale contrasting accretion processes along the SWIR, probably driven by different lithospheric and asthenospheric dynamics on either side of the Melville fracture zone. The comparison of hydroacoustic and teleseismic catalogues shows that, along these spreading ridges, the background seismicity observed in 1 yr by a hydroacoustic network is representative of the seismicity observed over two decades by land-based networks.

  19. Evidence from gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite for lateral magma transport along a slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Abelson, M; Baer, G; Agnon, A

    2001-01-04

    The lateral flow of magma and ductile deformation of the lower crust along oceanic spreading axes has been thought to play a significant role in suppressing both mid-ocean ridge segmentation and variations in crustal thickness. Direct investigation of such flow patterns is hampered by the kilometres of water that cover the oceanic crust, but such studies can be made on ophiolites (fragments of oceanic crust accreted to a continent). In the Oman ophiolite, small-scale radial patterns of flow have been mapped along what is thought to be the relict of a fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge. Here we present evidence for broad-scale along-axis flow that has been frozen into the gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite in Cyprus (thought to be representative of a slow-spreading ridge axis). The gabbro suite of Troodos spans nearly 20 km of a segment of a fossil spreading axis, near a ridge-transform intersection. We mapped the pattern of magma flow by analysing the rocks' magnetic fabric at 20 sites widely distributed in the gabbro suite, and by examining the petrographic fabric at 9 sites. We infer an along-axis magma flow for much of the gabbro suite, which indicates that redistribution of melt occurred towards the segment edge in a large depth range of the oceanic crust. Our results support the magma plumbing structure that has been inferred indirectly from a seismic tomography experiment on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

  20. Underlying fracture zone nature of Astrid Ridge off Antarctica's Queen Maud Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergh, Hugh W.

    1987-01-01

    New geophysical data are used to refine the extent and setting of Astrid Ridge, a volcanic edifice lying off the Princess Astrid Coast section (5°E to 20°E) of Queen Maud Land in Antarctica. New findings presented here include a well-defined fracture zone, occurring as a narrow basement ridge which extends northeast from Astrid Ridge, and an adjacent set of Mesozoic magnetic anomalies M0 to M9, which are offset by 120 km from an identical, previously described set. These two sets of anomalies are combined with the conjugate Mozambique Basin anomalies to define an Africa-Antarctica rotation pole at 10°S, 29°W for anomaly M2 time. The northern edge of Astrid Ridge and the sharp southern margin of the Mozambique Ridge on the African plate are probably related to the same cessation of excess volcanic activity near the end of the Cretaceous normal polarity interval. Both features had their eastern and western limits confined by a contiguous pair of fracture zones. A possible major swing in fracture zone trend prior to anomaly M9 is also suggested.

  1. Widespread active detachment faulting and core complex formation near 13 degrees N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Smith, Deborah K; Cann, Johnson R; Escartín, Javier

    2006-07-27

    Oceanic core complexes are massifs in which lower-crustal and upper-mantle rocks are exposed at the sea floor. They form at mid-ocean ridges through slip on detachment faults rooted below the spreading axis. To date, most studies of core complexes have been based on isolated inactive massifs that have spread away from ridge axes. Here we present a survey of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 13 degrees N containing a segment in which a number of linked detachment faults extend for 75 km along one flank of the spreading axis. The detachment faults are apparently all currently active and at various stages of development. A field of extinct core complexes extends away from the axis for at least 100 km. Our observations reveal the topographic characteristics of actively forming core complexes and their evolution from initiation within the axial valley floor to maturity and eventual inactivity. Within the surrounding region there is a strong correlation between detachment fault morphology at the ridge axis and high rates of hydroacoustically recorded earthquake seismicity. Preliminary examination of seismicity and seafloor morphology farther north along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggests that active detachment faulting is occurring in many segments and that detachment faulting is more important in the generation of ocean crust at this slow-spreading ridge than previously suspected.

  2. Hydrothermal Exploration of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 5-10°S, using the AUV ABE and the ROV Quest a brief overview of RV Meteor Cruise M68/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koschinsky, A.; Devey, C.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; German, C.; Yoerger, D.; Shank, T.

    2006-12-01

    We report a brief overview of results from a recent expedition to the first vent sites ever located on the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These results are part of an on-going study by the German Ridge program, in collaboration with NOAA-OE in the USA and with NERC in the UK. During the M68/1 Cruise (April 27-June 2, 2006), we targeted three specific areas:- the 5°S area where hydrothermal fields had previously been located (German et al., EOS, 2005; Haase et al., EOS, 2005); the Nibelungen area near 8°S where strong hydrothermal plume signals had been determined (Devey et al., EOS, 2005) and the 9°S area where the shallow ridge-crest hosts diffuse hydrothermal venting (Devey et al., EOS, 2005). At 5°S, we confirmed the temperature of the hottest known hydrothermal vents issuing fluids at 407°C at 3000m water depth, corresponding directly to the critical point for seawater at these depths. In addition to revisiting the "Turtle Pits" vents and the previously discovered "Red Lion" sites we also located new high-temperature and low-temperature vents with ABE which we were able to return to and sample with Quest during a single dive day. At 8°S, we used the ABE AUV to pinpoint and photograph a new tectonically-hosted vent site situated within a non-transform discontinuity between two adjacent ridge segments similar to, for example, the Rainbow hydrothermal field on the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This vent, when revisited by Quest was too vigorous to allow end-member fluid-sampling: it was extremely vigorous and situated in a crater most closely resembling those observed at the Logatchev vent-field (MAR 15°N). The atypical absence of vent-fauna at this "Drachenschlund" (Dragon's throat) vent site is currently under investigation. Finally, at 9°S we detected evidence for numerous additional low-temperature sites similar to the already known Lilliput site and all intimately associated with collapse pits in extensive lava-flows.

  3. Magnetic Interface for Segmented Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H.

    2012-01-01

    Newly developed magnetic devices are used to create an interface between adjacent mirror segments so that once assembled, aligned, and phased, the multiple segments will behave functionally equivalent to a monolithic aperture mirror. One embodiment might be a kinematic interface that is reversible so that any number of segments can be pre-assembled, aligned, and phased to facilitate fabrication operations, and then disassembled and reassembled, aligned, and phased in space for operation. The interface mechanism has sufficient stiffness, force, and stability to maintain phasing. The key to producing an interface is the correlated magnetic surface. While conventional magnets are only constrained in one direction -- the direction defined by their point of contact (they are in contact and cannot get any closer) -- correlated magnets can be designed to have constraints in multiple degrees of freedom. Additionally, correlated magnetic surfaces can be designed to have a limited range of action.

  4. Geo-Morphological Analyses of the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorschel, B.; Schlindwein, V. S. N.; Eagles, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean and the Southwest Indian Ridge in the Southwest Indian Ocean between Africa and Antarctica are ultraslow-spreading (<20 mm yr-1) mid ocean ridges. This type of mid ocean ridge has distinct geo-morphologies that are influenced by the slow rate of plate divergence and by mantle potential temperature, which control the processes (peridotite diapirism and intersticial melt migration) by which material rises to fill the space vacated by plate divergence. These ridges are characterised by non-orthogonal spreading. Transform faults, typical of faster spreading mid ocean ridges, are far less common at ultraslow spreading mid ocean ridges. Thus in return, detailed geo-statistical analyses of the geo-morphology of ultraslow-spreading mid ocean ridges can provide valuable information towards a better understanding of these slowest of spreading ridges. We have generated high resolution bathymetric grids for the Gakkel and Southwest Indian ridges based on high resolution multibeam echosounder data from various expeditions with RV Polarstern. On the basis of these grids, geo-statistical analyses allow for an assessment of the geo-morphological elements of the ridges on various scales. The results of these analyses show that, approximately 200 km long medium-scale sections of the ridges can be characterised by the lengths and orientations of the short-scale (hundreds of meters to tens of kilometres) ridges and troughs. The geomorphologies of short-scale ridges and troughs situated at the junctions between medium scale sections often exhibit a mixture of the geomorphological elements seen in the neighbouring sections. These geo-morphological patterns provide insights into the overall spreading-geometry along the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge.

  5. Seismic anisotropy of the shallow crust at the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almendros, J.; Barclay, A.H.; Wilcock, W.S.D.; Purdy, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    Microearthquake data recorded on four ocean bottom seismometers are used to study shear-wave splitting on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The covariance matrix decomposition method is used to determine the sensor orientation from explosive shot data and to estimate the anisotropy parameters for 238 earthquake records. At three of the four sites, the results show a remarkably consistent fast direction parallel to the ridge axis. The time delays between the fast and the slow waves range from 40 to 200 ms, with an average of 90 ms. They are not clearly related to earthquake range, focal depth or source-receiver azimuth. The splitting of the shear waves is interpreted as an effect of structural anisotropy due to the presence of ridge-parallel cracks in the shallow crust. If we assume that anisotropy is concentrated in the upper 1-2 km, the splitting times require a high crack density of ~0.1.

  6. Min-cut segmentation of cursive handwriting in tabular documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Brian L.; Barrett, William A.; Swingle, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Handwritten tabular documents, such as census, birth, death and marriage records, contain a wealth of information vital to genealogical and related research. Much work has been done in segmenting freeform handwriting, however, segmentation of cursive handwriting in tabular documents is still an unsolved problem. Tabular documents present unique segmentation challenges caused by handwriting overlapping cell-boundaries and other words, both horizontally and vertically, as "ascenders" and "descenders" overlap into adjacent cells. This paper presents a method for segmenting handwriting in tabular documents using a min-cut/max-flow algorithm on a graph formed from a distance map and connected components of handwriting. Specifically, we focus on line, word and first letter segmentation. Additionally, we include the angles of strokes of the handwriting as a third dimension to our graph to enable the resulting segments to share pixels of overlapping letters. Word segmentation accuracy is 89.5% evaluating lines of the data set used in the ICDAR2013 Handwriting Segmentation Contest. Accuracy is 92.6% for a specific application of segmenting first and last names from noisy census records. Accuracy for segmenting lines of names from noisy census records is 80.7%. The 3D graph cutting shows promise in segmenting overlapping letters, although highly convoluted or overlapping handwriting remains an ongoing challenge.

  7. Unexpected Widespread Detachment Faulting During Formation of Lithosphere at the Northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. K.; Schouten, H.; Escartin, J.; Cann, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    The region of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) near 13N displays the topographic characteristics of prevalent and vigorous tectonic extension. Normal faults show large amounts of rotation, dome-shaped corrugated detachment surfaces (core complexes) intersect the seafloor within the inner valley floor, and dead core complexes cover the seafloor off-axis. Steep outward facing slopes indicate that the footwalls of many of the normal faults have rotated by more than 30 degrees suggesting at least 3 km of extension. The rotation occurs very close to the ridge axis and produces distinctive linear ridges with roughly symmetrical slopes. This morphology is very different from linear abyssal hill faults formed at magmatic sections of the ridge which display a smaller amount of backtilt (typically less than 15 degrees implying 1-1.5 km of extension). We suggest that the severe backtilt of faults is diagnostic of a region undergoing large amounts of tectonic extension on single faults. If faults are long-lived (more than 5 km extension) a dome-shaped corrugated surface develops in front of the ridges and lower crustal and upper mantle rocks are exposed. We have applied our understanding of the 13N region to the northern MAR between 15 and 35N and find up to15 ridge segments dominated by extreme fault rotation and core complex exhumation. Core complexes are not limited to inside corners of ridge-transform intersections but may occur anywhere along the length of a segment. A single ridge segment can have several active core complexes, some less than 25 km apart that are separated by swales. We present two models for multiple core complex formation: a continuous model in which a single detachment surface extends along axis to include all of the core complexes and swales, and a discontinuous model in which local detachment faults form the core complexes and magmatic spreading forms the intervening swales. Either model can explain the morphology that we observe. If there is a

  8. Amagmatic Accretionary Segments, Ultraslow Spreading and Non-Volcanic Rifted Margins (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, H. J.; Snow, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The evolution of non-volcanic rifted margins is key to understanding continental breakup and the early evolution of some of the world’s most productive hydrocarbon basins. However, the early stages of such rifting are constrained by limited observations on ancient heavily sedimented margins such as Newfoundland and Iberia. Ultraslow spreading ridges, however, provide a modern analogue for early continental rifting. Ultraslow spreading ridges (<20 mm/yr) comprise ~30% of the global ridge system (e.g. Gakkel, Southwest Indian, Terceira, and Knipovitch Ridges). They have unique tectonics with widely spaced volcanic segments and amagmatic accretionary ridge segments. The volcanic segments, though far from hot spots, include some of the largest axial volcanoes on the global ridge system, and have, unusual magma chemistry, often showing local isotopic and incompatible element enrichment unrelated to mantle hot spots. The transition from slow to ultraslow tectonics and spreading is not uniquely defined by spreading rate, and may also be moderated by magma supply and mantle temperature. Amagmatic accretionary segments are the 4th class of plate boundary structure, and, we believe, the defining tectonic feature of early continental breakup. They form at effective spreading rates <12 mm/yr, assume any orientation to spreading, and replace transform faults and magmatic segments. At amagmatic segments the earth splits apart with the mantle emplaced directly to the seafloor, and great slabs of peridotite are uplifted to form the rift mountains. A thick conductive lid suppresses mantle melting, and magmatic segments form only at widely spaced intervals, with only scattered volcanics in between. Amagmatic segments link with the magmatic segments forming curvilinear plate boundaries, rather than the step-like morphology found at faster spreading ridges. These are all key features of non-volcanic rifted margins; explaining, for example, the presence of mantle peridotites emplaced

  9. Emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Skipper, M.N.

    1990-03-01

    Emergency preparedness for industry was commonly believed to be an essential responsibility on the part of management. Therefore, this study was conducted to research and accumulate information and data on emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to conduct a thorough evaluation of emergency preparedness knowledge among employees to determine if they were properly informed or if they needed more training. Also, this study was conducted to provide insight to management as to what their responsibility was concerning this training. To assess employee emergency preparedness knowledge, a questionnaire was developed and administered to 100 employees at ORNL. The data was analyzed using frequencies and percentages of response and was displayed through the use of graphs within the report. 22 refs., 22 figs.

  10. Quality Assurance Plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, G.P.; Miller, D.E. )

    1992-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 Site Investigation (SI)includes the lower portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) drainage and enbayment, and associated floodplain and subsurface environment. The ORNL main plant and the major waste storage and disposal facilities at ORNL are located in the WOC watershed and are drained by the WOC system to the Clinch River, located off-site. Environmental media are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from hydrologically upgradient WAGS. WAG 2 is important as a conduit from upgradient areas to the Clinch River. The general objectives of the WAG 2 SI Project are to conduct a multimedia monitoring and characterization program to define and monitor the input of contaminants from adjacent WAGS, monitor and gather sufficient information for processes controlling or driving contaminant fluxes to construct an appropriate conceptual model for WAG 2, and prepare for the eventual remediation of WAG 2.

  11. Three-Dimensional Shear Wave Velocity Structure of the Peru Flat Slab Subduction Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies focused on flat slab subduction segments in central Chile (L. S. Wagner, 2006) and Alaska (B. R. Hacker and G. A. Aber, 2012) suggest significant differences in seismic velocity structures, and hence, composition in the mantle wedge between flat and normal "steep" subducting slabs. Instead of finding the low velocities and high Vp/Vs ratios common in normal subduction zones, these studies find low Vp, high Vs, and very low Vp/Vs above flat slabs. This may indicate the presence of dry, cold material in the mantle wedge. In order to investigate the seismic velocities of the upper mantle above the Peruvian flat segment, we have inverted for 2D Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps using data from the currently deployed 40 station PULSE seismic network and some adjacent stations from the CAUGHT seismic network. We then used the sensitivity of surface waves to shear wave velocity structure with depth to develop a 3D shear wave velocity model. This model will allow us to determine the nature of the mantle lithosphere above the flat slab, and how this may have influenced the development of local topography. For example, dry conditions (high Vs velocities) above the flat slab would imply greater strength of this material, possibly making it capable of causing further inland overthrusting, while wet conditions (low Vs) would imply weaker material. This could provide some insight into the ongoing debate over whether the Fitzcarrald arch (along the northern most flank of the Altiplano) could be a topographical response to the subducted Nazca ridge hundred kilometers away from the trench (N. Espurt, 2012, P. Baby, 2005, V. A. Ramos, 2012) or not (J. Martinod, 2005, M. Wipf, 2008, T. Gerya, 2008).

  12. Depth and Morphology of Wrinkle Ridge Detachments at Solis Planum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, S. L.; Ferrill, D. A.; Smart, K. J.

    2005-12-01

    Wrinkle ridges -- long, linear to sinuous anticlines separated by relatively broad, flat synclinal valleys -- are a fundamental component of Martian geomorphology. The anticlinal crests show variable morphologies, but are often characterized by weak to strong asymmetry with variable vergence directions between adjacent ridges and along strike for any given ridge. Although wrinkle ridges are typically interpreted as contractional features, there is ongoing debate about their underlying structure and whether thrust faults penetrate to tens of kilometers of depth ("thick-skinned shortening") or sole into a detachment in the upper few kilometers of the Martian crust ("thin-skinned shortening"). Previous workers have estimated depth to the detachment horizon using a variety of methods including gravity inversion, geometry of crater-ridge intersections, mechanical modeling, and geometric modeling. Here we use a well-established terrestrial technique to calculate depth to the detachment horizon for wrinkle ridges in the Solis Planum region of Mars. We interpolate topographic profiles perpendicular to the regional trend of wrinkle ridges from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Mission Experiment Gridded Data Record (MEGDR) altimetry data, set vertical reference lines on both sides of the ridge that define the limits of our measurement range, estimate the topographic surface prior to wrinkle ridge formation, and calculate the area uplifted above the original topographic surface. Dividing this excess area by the amount of shortening (the topographic profile length minus the length prior to deformation), provides depth to detachment. We calibrate the results with profiles from the less spatially-extensive but greater along-track density MOLA Precision Experiment Data Record (PEDR). Additional topographic and structural interpretation and analysis of wrinkle ridge morphology are conducted with Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and High

  13. Petrogenesis of Near-Ridge Seamounts: AN Investigation of Mantle Source Heterogeneity and Melting Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, N. L.; Perfit, M. R.; Lundstrom, C.; Clague, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Near-ridge (NR) seamounts offer an important opportunity to study lavas that have similar sources to ridge basalts but have been less affected by fractionation and homogenization that takes place at adjacent spreading ridge axes. By studying lavas erupted at these off-axis sites, we have the potential to better understand source heterogeneity and melting and transport processes that can be applied to the ridge system as a whole. One purpose of our study is to investigate the role of dunite conduits in the formation of near-ridge seamount chains. We believe that near-ridge seamounts could form due to focusing of melts in dunite channels located slightly off-axis and that such conduits may be important in the formation and transport of melt both on- and off-axis (Lundstrom et al., 2000). New trace element and isotopic analyses of glasses from Rogue, Hacksaw, and T461 seamounts near the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), the Lamont Seamounts adjacent to the East Pacific Rise (EPR) ~ 10°N, and the Vance Seamounts next to the JdFR ~45°N provide a better understanding of the petrogenesis of NR seamounts. Our data indicate that lavas from these seamounts have diverse incompatible trace element compositions that range from highly depleted to slightly enriched in comparison to associated ridge basalts. Vance A lavas (the oldest in the Vance chain) have the most enriched signatures and lavas from Rogue seamount on the JdFR plate have the most depleted signatures. Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios indicate that NR seamount lava compositions vary within the chains as well as within individual seamounts, and that there is some mixing between heterogeneous, small-scale mantle sources. Using the program PRIMELT2.XLS (Herzberg and Asimow, 2008), we calculated mantle potential temperatures (Tp) for some of the most primitive basalts erupted at these seamounts. Our data indicate that NR seamount lavas have Tp values that are only slightly higher than that of average ambient mantle. Variations in

  14. Seismic Investigations of the O'Higgins Seamount Group: Aseismic Ridge Emplacement and Hydration of Hot Spot Modified Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, H.; Flueh, E. R.; Papenberg, C.; Klaeschen, D.; Scientists, S.

    2003-12-01

    The segmentation of the South American continental margin has been linked to the subduction of bathymetric elevations on the oceanic plate. Offshore Valparaiso, Chile, the subduction of the hot spot generated aseismic Juan Fernandez Ridge correlates with the southern segment boundary of the Chilean flat slab. A causative relationship has been attributed to the enhanced buoyancy of anomalous crust and the shallowing of the Wadati-Benioff zone. In 2001, the SPOC project set out to investigate the effects of subducting aseismic ridges on the seismicity and structure of the Chilean margin. A seismic study along the easternmost extent of the Juan Fernandez Ridge reveals a magmatic origin dominated by extrusive processes for the O'Higgins Seamount Group. Hot spot magmatic processes have only moderately added to the crust of the Juan Fernandez Ridge. Thus only limited increased buoyancy may be expected from crustal thickening, insufficient to cause the shallowing of the subduction zone in the flat slab segment. The modest size of the volcanic edifices causes a flexural bending of the upper crust underneath O'Higgins Guyot, but does not affect the trend of the crust-mantle boundary. The off-axis aseismic ridge emplacement caused deficiencies of the lithosphere. These syngenetic structures are reactivated in the outer rise setting and evolve to ridge-parallel fracture zones with vertical offsets exceeding 800 m. Tomographic inversion of seismic mantle phases reveals reduced uppermost mantle velocities indicative of mineral alterations in the hot spot modified lithosphere. Uppermost mantle hydration is solely limited to the flawed lithosphere of the Juan Fernandez Ridge and is linked to the reactivation of hot spot induced fractures. Enhanced buoyancy due to crustal and upper mantle hydration may represent an important additional mechanism for shallow subduction.

  15. Eskers in Ireland, analogs for sinuous ridges on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicer, Xavier; Bourke, Mary

    2014-05-01

    Sinuous ridges on the surface of Mars are often inferred as putative esker ridges. Eskers cover several hundred kilometers of the Irish landscape and are one of the dominant landforms in the Irish Midlands. Well exposed stratigraphic sections and the body of existing knowledge due to extensive research carried out on these landforms make the Irish eskers an excellent analog for sinuous ridges on Mars. The Irish Eskers are sinuous ridges 0.1 - 80 km long, 20 - 500 m wide and 4 - 50 m high laid down by glacial meltwater in tunnels and crevasses in stationary or retreating ice sheets. They are commonly composed of sands and gravels with rounded boulders and cobbles. The gravels are usually bedded and the beds often slump towards the flank of the esker, indicating collapse as the confining ice walls melt. Four types of eskers have been identified in Ireland: (i) Continuous subglacial tunnel fill represents deposition within tunnels underneath or within an ice body originally used as water escape conduits; (ii) Continuous fluvial ice-channel fill deposit in channels cut into the ice on top of the glacier or down to the substrate subsequently infilled by sediments; (iii) Long beads - subglacial tunnel fill are segmented ridges, with a length-width ratio of 5:1 to 10:1, representing sequential deposition near or at the ice margin as the ice sheet retreats; (iv) Short beads are glaciolacustrine deposits interpreted as sequential deposition of ice-contact subaqueous outwash fans. Irish eskers have significant morphological similarities with those identified on Mars providing an opportunity for an insightful morphological and morphometric analysis to determine potential formative environments on Mars. Putative Martian eskers are 2-300 km long, 50-3000 m wide and 10-150 m high. The Irish eskers are similar in scale and present dimensions within these ranges. Eskers in Ireland are composed of sand and gravel with cobbles and boulders. Mars esker-like ridges observed in high

  16. Isotopically enriched N-MORB: A new geochemical signature of off-axis plume-ridge interaction—A case study at 50°28'E, Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, A. Y.; Zhao, T.-P.; Zhou, M.-F.; Deng, X.-G.

    2017-01-01

    Interaction between the Southwest Indian Ridge (46°E and 52°20'E) and Crozet hotspot has been proposed by geophysical studies but remains controversial mostly due to the lack of E-MORB (enriched mid-ocean ridge basalts). Forty-seven new samples collected from this region, including 15 from segment 27 centered at 50°28'E with a 10 km thick crust, are all N-MORB (normal MORB) and can be classified into two groups: a high-Al group only at 50°28'E and a Main group widespread. The former, with higher Al2O3 and lower TiO2 and SiO2, have slightly enriched Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic compositions. We propose that their major and trace elemental signatures were modified by reaction with primitive cumulate in the crust, whereas the enriched isotopic compositions indicate the contribution of Crozet plume materials. During upslope flow of the Crozet plume to the ridge, decompression melting would occur along the path, which would deplete the plume in incompatible elements but not significantly change the isotopic compositions. Thus, when they finally reach the ridge, the depleted residue would remelt due to further decompression at MOR and produce isotopically enriched N-MORB at segment 27. Isotopically enriched N-MORB are known elsewhere, mostly at slower-spreading ridges possibly influenced by plumes with large plume-ridge distances. In particular, the constant Nd isotopic compositions with decreasing (La/Sm)N ratios for off-axis magmatism between the Réunion hotspot toward the CIR perfectly match such a plume-ridge interaction model. Therefore, aside from E-MORB, isotopically enriched N-MORB can also be considered as the geochemical signature for off-axis plume-ridge interaction.

  17. Station Tour: Russian Segment

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams concludes her tour of the International Space Station with a visit to the Russian segment, which includes Zarya, the first segment of the station launched in 1...

  18. Student Health Services at Orchard Ridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Don D.

    This paper provides a synoptic review of student health services at the community college level while giving a more detailed description of the nature of health services at Orchard Ridge, a campus of Oakland Community College. The present College Health Service program provides for a part-time (24 hrs./wk.) nurse at Orchard Ridge. A variety of…

  19. Ridges and tidal stress on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bart, G.D.; Turtle, E.P.; Jaeger, W.L.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Greenberg, R.

    2004-01-01

    Sets of ridges of uncertain origin are seen in twenty-nine high-resolution Galileo images, which sample seven locales on Io. These ridges are on the order of a few kilometers in length with a spacing of about a kilometer. Within each locale, the ridges have a consistent orientation, but the orientations vary from place to place. We investigate whether these ridges could be a result of tidal flexing of Io by comparing their orientations with the peak tidal stress orientations at the same locations. We find that ridges grouped near the equator are aligned either north-south or east-west, as are the predicted principal stress orientations there. It is not clear why particular groups run north-south and others east-west. The one set of ridges observed far from the equator (52?? S) has an oblique azimuth, as do the tidal stresses at those latitudes. Therefore, all observed ridges have similar orientations to the tidal stress in their region. This correlation is consistent with the hypothesis that tidal flexing of Io plays an important role in ridge formation. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tectonics and magmatism of ultraslow spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E. P.; Kokhan, A. V.; Sushchevskaya, N. M.

    2013-05-01

    The tectonics, structure-forming processes, and magmatism in rift zones of ultraslow spreading ridges are exemplified in the Reykjanes, Kolbeinsey, Mohns, Knipovich, Gakkel, and Southwest Indian ridges. The thermal state of the mantle, the thickness of the brittle lithospheric layer, and spreading obliquety are the most important factors that control the structural pattern of rift zones. For the Reykjanes and Kolbeinsey ridges, the following are crucial factors: variations in the crust thickness; relationships between the thicknesses of its brittle and ductile layers; width of the rift zone; increase in intensity of magma supply approaching the Iceland thermal anomaly; and spreading obliquety. For the Knipovich Ridge, these are its localization in the transitional zone between the Gakkel and Mohns ridges under conditions of shear and tensile stresses and multiple rearrangements of spreading; nonorthogonal spreading; and structural and compositional barrier of thick continental lithosphere at the Barents Sea shelf and Spitsbergen. The Mohns Ridge is characterized by oblique spreading under conditions of a thick cold lithosphere and narrow stable rift zone. The Gakkel and the Southwest Indian ridges are distinguished by the lowest spreading rate under the settings of the along-strike variations in heating of the mantle and of a variable spreading geometry. The intensity of endogenic structure-forming varies along the strike of the ridges. In addition to the prevalence of tectonic factors in the formation of the topography, magmatism and metamorphism locally play an important role.

  1. Cedar Ridge Camp: Using the Local Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Grayson

    2007-01-01

    In 2007 Cedar Ridge Camp opened for its first season as a traditional co-ed summer camp and year-round outdoor education and recreation centre. The mission would centre on creating a program that would encourage personal development and growth through a shared outdoor experience. Cedar Ridge's main goals were to promote the formation of close…

  2. Building Roof Segmentation from Aerial Images Using a Line-and Region-Based Watershed Segmentation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Merabet, Youssef El; Meurie, Cyril; Ruichek, Yassine; Sbihi, Abderrahmane; Touahni, Raja

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel strategy for roof segmentation from aerial images (orthophotoplans) based on the cooperation of edge- and region-based segmentation methods. The proposed strategy is composed of three major steps. The first one, called the pre-processing step, consists of simplifying the acquired image with an appropriate couple of invariant and gradient, optimized for the application, in order to limit illumination changes (shadows, brightness, etc.) affecting the images. The second step is composed of two main parallel treatments: on the one hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed regions. Even if the first segmentation of this step provides good results in general, the image is often over-segmented. To alleviate this problem, an efficient region merging strategy adapted to the orthophotoplan particularities, with a 2D modeling of roof ridges technique, is applied. On the other hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed lines. The third step consists of integrating both watershed segmentation strategies into a single cooperative segmentation scheme in order to achieve satisfactory segmentation results. Tests have been performed on orthophotoplans containing 100 roofs with varying complexity, and the results are evaluated with the VINETcriterion using ground-truth image segmentation. A comparison with five popular segmentation techniques of the literature demonstrates the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach. Indeed, we obtain a good segmentation rate of 96% with the proposed method compared to 87.5% with statistical region merging (SRM), 84% with mean shift, 82% with color structure code (CSC), 80% with efficient graph-based segmentation algorithm (EGBIS) and 71% with JSEG. PMID:25648706

  3. Phase 1 report on the Bear Creek Valley treatability study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Bear Creek Valley (BCV) is located within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation and encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes associated with past operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The BCV Remedial Investigation determined that disposal of wastes at the S-3 Site, Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) has caused contamination of both deep and shallow groundwater. The primary contaminants include uranium, nitrate, and VOCs, although other metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and cadmium persist. The BCV feasibility study will describe several remedial options for this area, including both in situ and ex situ treatment of groundwater. This Treatability Study Phase 1 Report describes the results of preliminary screening of treatment technologies that may be applied within BCV. Four activities were undertaken in Phase 1: field characterization, laboratory screening of potential sorbents, laboratory testing of zero valent iron products, and field screening of three biological treatment systems. Each of these activities is described fully in technical memos attached in Appendices A through G.

  4. Fault rotation and core complex formation: Significant processes in seafloor formation at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 13°-15°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Deborah K.; EscartíN, Javier; Schouten, Hans; Cann, Johnson R.

    2008-03-01

    The region of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) between the Fifteen-Twenty and Marathon fracture zones displays the topographic characteristics of prevalent and vigorous tectonic extension. Normal faults show large amounts of rotation, dome-shaped corrugated detachment surfaces (core complexes) intersect the seafloor at the edge of the inner valley floor, and extinct core complexes cover the seafloor off-axis. We have identified 45 potential core complexes in this region whose locations are scattered everywhere along two segments (13° and 15°N segments). Steep outward-facing slopes suggest that the footwalls of many of the normal faults in these two segments have rotated by more than 30°. The rotation occurs very close to the ridge axis (as much as 20° within 5 km of the volcanic axis) and is complete by ˜1 My, producing distinctive linear ridges with roughly symmetrical slopes. This morphology is very different from linear abyssal hill faults formed at the 14°N magmatic segment, which display a smaller amount of rotation (typically <15°). We suggest that the severe rotation of faults is diagnostic of a region undergoing large amounts of tectonic extension on single faults. If faults are long-lived, a dome-shaped corrugated surface develops in front of the ridges and lower crustal and upper mantle rocks are exposed to form a core complex. A single ridge segment can have several active core complexes, some less than 25 km apart that are separated by swales. We present two models for multiple core complex formation: a continuous model in which a single detachment surface extends along axis to include all of the core complexes and swales, and a discontinuous model in which local detachment faults form the core complexes and magmatic spreading forms the intervening swales. Either model can explain the observed morphology.

  5. Internal architecture of a raised beach ridge system (Anholt, Denmark) resolved by ground-penetrating radar investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmensen, Lars B.; Nielsen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The internal architecture of raised beach ridge and associated swale deposits on Anholt records an ancient sea level. The Holocene beach ridges form part of a progradational beach ridge plain, which has been interpreted to have formed during an isostatic uplift and a relative fall in the sea level over the past 7700 years. The ridges are covered by pebbles and cobbles and commonly show evidence of deflation. Material presumably removed from the beach ridges and adjacent swales form the present dune forms on Anholt. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) reflection lines have been collected with 250 MHz shielded antennae across the fossil ridge and swale structures. The signals penetrate the subsurface to a maximum depth of ˜ 10 m below the fossil features. The GPR data resolve the internal architecture of the beach ridges and swales with a vertical resolution of about 0.1 m. GPR mapping indicates that the Holocene beach ridges are composed of seaward-dipping beachface deposits as well as minor amounts of inland dipping deposits of wash-over origin. The beachface deposits downlap on underlying shoreface deposits, and we use these surfaces as markers of a relative palaeo-sea level. The new data indicate that the highest relative sea level at about 8.5 m was reached 6500 years ago; 700 years later the relative sea level had dropped 0.7 m indicating a change in the relative sea level around 1 mm/year. This fall in the relative sea level most likely records the influence of an isostatic rebound causing younger beach ridge deposits to indicate lower sea levels.

  6. Hydroforming Applications at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    bird, e.l.; ludtka, g.m.

    1999-03-10

    Hydroforming technology is a robust forming process that produces components with high precision and complexity. The goal of this paper is to present a brief description of the sheet hydroforming process with respect to the authors' experience and capabilities. Following the authors' discussion of the sheet-metal forming application, the tubular hydroforming process is described in the context of one of our technology development programs with an automotive industrial partner. After that is a summary of the tubular hydroforming advisor (expert system) development activity, which was a significant part of this overall program based on previous experience in developing a design and manufacturing support hydroforming advisor for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's weapons-component manufacturing needs. Therefore, this paper is divided into three sections: (1) Hydroforming of Stainless Steel Parts, (2) Tubular Hydroforming, and (3) Components of a Tubular Hydroforming Advisor.

  7. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF ENTRANCE TO BLUE RIDGE TUNNEL (LEFT) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF ENTRANCE TO BLUE RIDGE TUNNEL (LEFT) FROM SOUTHEAST. ORIGINAL BLUE RIDGE R.R. (CROZET) TUNNEL IS VISIBLE AT RIGHT. - Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, Blue Ridge Tunnel, Highway 250 at Rockfish Gap, Afton, Nelson County, VA

  8. Iterative cross section sequence graph for handwritten character segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dawoud, Amer

    2007-08-01

    The iterative cross section sequence graph (ICSSG) is an algorithm for handwritten character segmentation. It expands the cross section sequence graph concept by applying it iteratively at equally spaced thresholds. The iterative thresholding reduces the effect of information loss associated with image binarization. ICSSG preserves the characters' skeletal structure by preventing the interference of pixels that causes flooding of adjacent characters' segments. Improving the structural quality of the characters' skeleton facilitates better feature extraction and classification, which improves the overall performance of optical character recognition (OCR). Experimental results showed significant improvements in OCR recognition rates compared to other well-established segmentation algorithms.

  9. Configuration of Miocene Basins Along the Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge, California Continental Borderland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoller, A. R.; Legg, M.; Malone, D. H.

    2015-12-01

    Miocene basins associated with the oblique rifting of the Inner Continental Borderland offshore Southern California are preserved along the flanks of the transpressional Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge. Using 184 lines of two-dimensional seismic data including high resolution records from Oregon State University and deep penetration data from Western Geco archived in USGS/NAMSS, we were able to map the configuration of the Miocene basin along the flanks of the northern core complex on the Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge. There are distinct early and middle Miocene basins along the flanks of the ridge, which we are using to try to define the initial configuration of the Inner Borderland Rift. Along the hinge, between the uplifted ridge and the sub-horizontal basement in the Santa Monica Basin, lies the thickest part of the sequence. Pliocene to Recent sediments lap on to the tilted and uplifted Miocene basin sequences and constrain timing of uplift when transpression commenced. Segmentation and other distinctive character of the basin along the ridge flank may be correlated with similar features in the Miocene basin on the conjugate margin of the rift. Our working model for oblique rifting in the Borderland resembles of the Gulf of California, where right-stepping echelon transform faults link left-stepping extensional basins. The objective of our project is to reconstruct the configuration of the middle Miocene rift and to further our quest to understand the rifting process and tectonic evolution of the Pacific-North American plate boundary.

  10. The Mozambique Ridge: a document of massive multi-stage magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Maximilian D.; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Jacques, Guillaume; Werner, Reinhard

    2016-10-01

    The Mozambique Ridge, a prominent basement high in the southwestern Indian Ocean, consists of four major geomorphological segments associated with numerous phases of volcanic activity in the Lower Cretaceous. The nature and origin of the Mozambique Ridge have been intensely debated with one hypothesis suggesting a Large Igneous Province origin. High-resolution seismic reflection data reveal a large number of extrusion centres with a random distribution throughout the southern Mozambique Ridge and the nearby Transkei Rise. Intra-basement reflections emerge from the extrusion centres and are interpreted to represent massive lava flow sequences. Such lava flow sequences are characteristic of eruptions leading to the formation of continental and oceanic flood basalt provinces, hence supporting a Large Igneous Province origin of the Mozambique Ridge. We observe evidence for widespread post-sedimentary magmatic activity that we correlate with a southward propagation of the East African Rift System. Based on our volumetric analysis of the southern Mozambique Ridge we infer a rapid sequential emplacement between ˜131 Ma and ˜125 Ma, which is similar to the short formation periods of other Large Igneous Provinces like the Agulhas Plateau.

  11. Plume-ridge interaction: Shaping the geometry of mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstaedt, Eric L.

    Manifestations of plume-ridge interaction are found across the ocean basins. Currently there are interactions between at least 21 hot spots and nearby ridges along 15--20% of the global mid-ocean ridge network. These interactions produce a number of anomalies including the presence of elevated topography, negative gravity anomalies, and anomalous crustal production. One form of anomalous crustal production is the formation of volcanic lineaments between hotspots and nearby mid-ocean ridges. In addition, observations indicate that mantle plumes tend to "capture" nearby mid-ocean ridges through asymmetric spreading, increased ridge propagation, and discrete shifts of the ridge axis, or ridge jumps. The initiation of ridge jumps and the formation of off-axis volcanic lineaments likely involve similar processes and may be closely related. In the following work, I use theoretical and numerical models to quantify the processes that control the formation of volcanic lineaments (Chapter 2), the initiation of mid-ocean ridge jumps associated with lithospheric heating due to magma passing through the plate (Chapter 3), and the initiation of jumps due to an upwelling mantle plume and magmatic heating governed by melt migration (Chapter 4). Results indicate that lineaments and ridge jumps associated with plume-ridge interaction are most likely to occur on young lithosphere. The shape of lineaments on the seafloor is predicted to be controlled by the pattern of lithospheric stresses associated with a laterally spreading, near-ridge mantle plume. Ridge jumps are likely to occur due to magmatic heating alone only in lithosphere ˜1Myr old, because the heating rate required to jump increases with spreading rate and plate age. The added effect of an upwelling plume introduces competing effects that both promote and inhibit ridge jumps. For models where magmatic heating is controlled by melt migration, repeat ridge jumps are predicted to occur as the plume and ridge separate, but

  12. The deep hydrogeologic flow system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Nativ, R.; Hunley, A.E.

    1993-07-01

    The deep hydrogeologic system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation contains some areas contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, nitrates, and organic compounds. The groundwater at that depth is saline and has previously been considered stagnant. On the basis of existing and newly collected data, the nature of flow of the saline groundwater and its potential discharge into shallow, freshwater systems was assessed. Data used for this purpose included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the deep system, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) spatial temperature variations, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline groundwater. In addition, chemical analyses of brine in adjacent areas in Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia were compared with the deep water underlying the reservation to help assess the origin of the brine. Preliminary conclusions suggest that the saline water contained at depth is old but not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and freshwater-bearing units. The confined water (along with dissolved solutes) moves along open fractures (or man-made shortcuts) at relatively high velocity into adjacent, more permeable units. Groundwater volumes involved in this flow probably are small.

  13. Pressures of Partial Crystallization of Magmas from the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for Crustal Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. L.; Barton, M.

    2010-12-01

    Plate spreading at the mid-ocean ridges is accompanied by intrusion of dikes and eruption of lava along the ridge axis. It has been suggested that the depth of magma chambers that feed the flows and dikes is related to the rate of spreading. As part of a larger effort to examine this hypothesis, we determined the depths of magma chambers beneath the intermediate spreading Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdF) which extends from the Blanco fracture zone at about 44.5 degrees North to the Triple junction of the JdF, Nootka Fault, and the Socanco fracture zone at 48.7 degrees North. Pressures of partial crystallization were determined by comparing the compositions of natural liquids (glasses) with those of experimental liquids in equilibrium with olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene at different pressures and temperatures using the method described by Kelley and Barton (2008). Chemical analyses mid-ocean ridge basalts glasses sampled from along the JdF were used as liquid compositions. Samples with anomalous chemical compositions and samples that yielded pressures associated with unrealistically large uncertainties were filtered out of the database. The calculated pressures for the remaining 533 samples were used to calculate the depths of partial crystallization and to identify the likely location of magma chambers. Preliminary results indicate that the pressure of partial crystallization decreases from 2 to 1±0.5 kbars from the Blanco fracture zone to the north along the Cleft segment of the ridge. Calculated pressures remain approximately constant at 0.87±0.53 kbars along ridge segments to the north of the Cleft. These low pressures for the remaining segments of the ridge are interpreted to indicate magma chambers at depths of 1.3-4.9 km and agree reasonably well with the depths of seismically imaged tops of axial magma chambers (2-3 km) (Canales et al 2009). The higher pressures obtained for lavas erupted along the Cleft segment of the JdF agree very well with recent

  14. Spatial and temporal distribution of the seismicity along two mid-oceanic ridges with contrasted spreading rates in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, E.; Perrot, J.; Royer, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The seismicity of the ultra-slow spreading Southwest (14 mm/y) and intermediate spreading Southeast (60 mm/y) Indian ridges was monitored from February 2012 to March 2013 by the OHASISBIO array of 7 autonomous hydrophones. A total of 1471 events were located with 4 instruments or more, inside the array, with a median location uncertainty < 5 km and a completeness magnitude of mb = 3. Both ridges display similar average rates of seismicity, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. Accretion modes do differ, however, by the along-axis distribution of the seismic events. Along the ultra-slow Southwest Indian Ridge, events are sparse but regularly spaced and scattered up to 50 km off-axis. Along the fast Southeast Indian Ridge, events are irregularly distributed, focusing in narrow regions near the ridge axis at segment ends and along transform faults, whereas ridge-segment centers generally appear as seismic gaps (at the level of completeness of the array). Only two clusters, 6 months apart, are identified in a segment-center at 29°S. From the temporal distribution of the clustered events and comparisons with observations in similar mid-oceanic ridge setting, both clusters seem to have a volcanic origin and to be related to a dike emplacement or a possible eruption on the seafloor. Their onset time and migration rate are comparable to volcanic swarms recorded along the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Overall, the rate of seismicity along the two Indian spreading ridges correlates with the large-scale variations in the bathymetry and shear-wave velocity anomaly in the upper mantle, suggesting that the distribution of the low-magnitude seismicity is mainly controlled by along-axis variations in the lithosphere rheology and temperature.

  15. A visual basic program for ridge axis picking on DEM data using the profile-recognition and polygon-breaking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yet-Chung; Sinha, Gaurav

    2007-02-01

    For many scientists working with digital topographic data, extracting lineaments or linear features is an important step in structuring and analyzing raw data. A ridge axis, which represents the top a mountain ridge, is one of the most important topographic features used in a wide variety of applications. Algorithms and software for automating the extraction of ridges or ridge axes from DEMs are, however, still not easily available or not widely acceptable. In this paper, we present a user-friendly Visual Basic program that automates the extraction of the ridge axis system from DEM data, based on the profile-recognition and polygon-breaking algorithm (PPA). An important feature of PPA is that it takes a global approach, as opposed to the local neighborhood operators used in many other algorithms. Each segment detected by PPA considers not only relations with contiguous neighboring grid points, but also strives to preserve the continuity of the global trend. This is an attempt to simulate human operators, who always factor in the overall trend of the lineament before delineating its local parts. PPA starts by connecting all points in a neighborhood that can possibly lie on the ridge axis, thus forming a belt of polygons in the first step. Next, a polygon breaking process eliminates unwanted segments according to the assumption that a ridge segment cannot be the side of any closed polygon, and that the result should be a purely dendritic line pattern. Finally, a branch-reduction process is executed to eliminate all parallel false ridges that remained due to the conservative approach taken in the first step. Results indicate that PPA is reasonably successful in picking out ridges that would have been identified manually by experts. In addition to providing a detailed user interface for executing PPA, several modifications were made to significantly improve the computational efficiency of PPA, as compared to the original version published in 1998. The source codes are

  16. Microsurgical treatment of ophthalmic segment aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gross, Bradley A; Du, Rose

    2013-08-01

    Ophthalmic segment aneurysms refer to superior hypophyseal artery aneurysms, true ophthalmic artery aneurysms, and their dorsal variant. Indications for treatment of these aneurysms include concerning morphological features, large size, visual loss, or rupture. Although narrow-necked aneurysms are ideal endovascular targets, more complex and larger lesions necessitating adjunctive stent or flow-diversion techniques may be suitably treated with long-lasting, effective clip ligation instead. This is particularly relevant in the consideration of ruptured ophthalmic segment aneurysms. This article provides a depiction of microsurgical treatment of ophthalmic segment aneurysms with an accompanying video demonstration. Emphasis is placed on microsurgical anatomy, the intradural anterior clinoidectomy and clipping technique. The intradural anterior clinoidectomy, demonstrated in detail in our Supplementary video, provides significant added exposure of the ophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery, allowing for improved aneurysm visualization. In the management of superior hypophyseal artery aneurysms, emphasis is placed on identifying and preserving superior hypophyseal artery perforators, using serial fenestrated straight clips rather than a single right-angled fenestrated clip to obliterate the aneurysm. Post-clipping indocyanine green dye angiography is a crucial tool to confirm aneurysm obliteration and the preservation of the parent vasculature and adjacent superior hypophyseal artery perforators. With careful attention to the nuances of microsurgical clipping of ophthalmic segment aneurysms, rewarding results can be obtained.

  17. Human habenula segmentation using myelin content.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-won; Naidich, Thomas P; Ely, Benjamin A; Yacoub, Essa; De Martino, Federico; Fowkes, Mary E; Goodman, Wayne K; Xu, Junqian

    2016-04-15

    The habenula consists of a pair of small epithalamic nuclei located adjacent to the dorsomedial thalamus. Despite increasing interest in imaging the habenula due to its critical role in mediating subcortical reward circuitry, in vivo neuroimaging research targeting the human habenula has been limited by its small size and low anatomical contrast. In this work, we have developed an objective semi-automated habenula segmentation scheme consisting of histogram-based thresholding, region growing, geometric constraints, and partial volume estimation steps. This segmentation scheme was designed around in vivo 3 T myelin-sensitive images, generated by taking the ratio of high-resolution T1w over T2w images. Due to the high myelin content of the habenula, the contrast-to-noise ratio with the thalamus in the in vivo 3T myelin-sensitive images was significantly higher than the T1w or T2w images alone. In addition, in vivo 7 T myelin-sensitive images (T1w over T2*w ratio images) and ex vivo proton density-weighted images, along with histological evidence from the literature, strongly corroborated the in vivo 3 T habenula myelin contrast used in the proposed segmentation scheme. The proposed segmentation scheme represents a step toward a scalable approach for objective segmentation of the habenula suitable for both morphological evaluation and habenula seed region selection in functional and diffusion MRI applications.

  18. Early to Middle Ordovician back-arc basin in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge: characteristics, extent, and tectonic significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tull, James; Holm-Denoma, Christopher S.; Barineau, Clinton I.

    2014-01-01

    Fault-dismembered segments of a distinctive, extensive, highly allochthonous, and tectonically significant Ordovician (ca. 480–460 Ma) basin, which contains suites of bimodal metavolcanic rocks, associated base metal deposits, and thick immature deep-water (turbiditic) metasediments, occur in parts of the southern Appalachian Talladega belt, eastern Blue Ridge, and Inner Piedmont of Alabama, Georgia, and North and South Carolina. The basin's predominantly metasedimentary strata display geochemical and isotopic evidence of a mixed provenance, including an adjacent active volcanic arc and a provenance of mica (clay)-rich sedimentary and felsic plutonic rocks consistent with Laurentian (Grenvillian) upper-crustal continental rocks and their passive-margin cover sequences. Geochemical characteristics of the subordinate intercalated bimodal metavolcanic rocks indicate formation in a suprasubduction environment, most likely a back-arc basin, whereas characteristics of metasedimentary units suggest deposition above Neoproterozoic rift and outer-margin lower Paleozoic slope and rise sediments within a marginal basin along Ordovician Laurentia's Iapetus margin. This tectonic setting indicates that southernmost Appalachian Ordovician orogenesis (Taconic orogeny) began as an extensional accretionary orogen along the outer margin of Laurentia, rather than in an exotic (non-Laurentian) arc collisional setting. B-type subduction polarity requires that the associated arc-trench system formed southeast of the palinspastic position of the back-arc basin. This scenario can explain several unique features of the southern Appalachian Taconic orogen, including: the palinspastic geographic ordering of key tectonic elements (i.e., back-arc, arc, etc.), and a lack of (1) an obducted arc sensu stricto on the Laurentian margin, (2) widespread Ordovician regional metamorphism, and (3) Taconic klippen to supply detritus to the Taconic foreland basin.

  19. Global ridge orientation modeling for partial fingerprint identification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi Alice; Hu, Jiankun

    2011-01-01

    Identifying incomplete or partial fingerprints from a large fingerprint database remains a difficult challenge today. Existing studies on partial fingerprints focus on one-to-one matching using local ridge details. In this paper, we investigate the problem of retrieving candidate lists for matching partial fingerprints by exploiting global topological features. Specifically, we propose an analytical approach for reconstructing the global topology representation from a partial fingerprint. First, we present an inverse orientation model for describing the reconstruction problem. Then, we provide a general expression for all valid solutions to the inverse model. This allows us to preserve data fidelity in the existing segments while exploring missing structures in the unknown parts. We have further developed algorithms for estimating the missing orientation structures based on some a priori knowledge of ridge topology features. Our statistical experiments show that our proposed model-based approach can effectively reduce the number of candidates for pair-wised fingerprint matching, and thus significantly improve the system retrieval performance for partial fingerprint identification.

  20. Seismicity rates of slow, intermediate, and fast spreading ridges: Insights from long-term hydroacoustic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziak, R. P.; Haxel, J. H.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Goslin, J.

    2004-12-01

    Ocean basin earthquakes recorded on NOAA/OSU and U.S. Navy hydrophone arrays are used to evaluate long-term volcano-tectonic seismicity levels from segments of the fast-spreading rate East Pacific Rise (EPR) from 20° S-20° N, intermediate-spreading rate Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) from 39° -52° N and Galapagos Rift (GR) from 90° -103° W, and the slow-spreading northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) from 5° -60° N. The hydrophones record the acoustic energy of seafloor earthquakes that propagate along the ocean sound channel with little attenuation over large distances. Frequency-magnitude relationships (Bohnenstiehl et al., 2002; Dziak et al., 2004) indicate the hydrophone catalogs are complete in these regions to body-wave magnitude ˜2.5 (EPR and GR), 2.5 (JdFR), and 3.0 (MAR), an improvement of 1.5 to 2 units over the land-based seismic catalogs for mid-ocean ridge systems. Using the hydrophone earthquake catalog, we will compare seismicity rates of the JdFR (12 years of data), to seismicity rates along the GR (6 years) and EPR (6 years) and MAR (4 years of data from 5° -39° N; 16 months from 39° -60° N). During these monitoring periods, five confirmed seafloor spreading events (four of which were associated with magmatic activity) were recorded on discrete JdFR segments, while 6 possible magmatic events were observed on the EPR, one on the GR, and one on the MAR. Empirical orthogonal functions will be used to elucidate the space-time patterns of seismicity and compare between the various spreading rates ridges, as well as to investigate the recurrence rate of seafloor spreading events present. In addition, single-link cluster analysis (SLC; Frolich and Davis, 1990) will be used to de-cluster the earthquake databases to reduce the effects of aftershock sequences and magmatic swarms, allowing us to evaluate how overall plate motion and changes in spreading rate effect levels of seismicity between ridge segments and different ridge systems. Preliminary

  1. Lead Isotopic Compositions of the Endeavour Sulfides, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labonte, F.; Hannington, M. D.; Cousens, B. L.; Blenkinsop, J.; Gill, J. B.; Kelley, D. S.; Lilley, M. D.; Delaney, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    32 sulfide samples from the main structures of the Endeavour vent field, Juan de Fuca Ridge, were analyzed for their Pb isotope composition. The samples were collected from 6 main vent fields between 1985 and 2005 and encompass a strike length of more than 15 km along the ridge crest. The sulfides are typical of black smoker deposits on sediment-starved mid-ocean ridges. Pb isotope compositions of the massive sulfides within the six hydrothermal fields vary within narrow ranges, with 206Pb/204Pb = 18.58 18.75, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.45 15.53 and 208Pb/204Pb = 37.84 38.10. A geographic trend is observed, with the lower Pb ratios restricted mostly to the northern part of the segment (Salty Dawg, Sasquatch and High Rise fields), and the higher Pb ratios restricted mostly to the southern part of the segment (Main Endeavour, Clam Bed and Mothra fields). Variations within individual fields are much smaller than those between fields, and variation within individual sulfide structures is within the uncertainty of the measurements. Therefore, it is unlikely that the ranges of Pb isotope compositions along the length of the segment reflect remobilization, replacement, and recrystallization of sulfides, as suggested for the observed Pb isotope variability in some large seafloor sulfide deposits. Instead, the differences in isotopic compositions from north to south are interpreted to reflect differences in the source rocks exposed to hydrothermal circulation of fluids below the seafloor. Possible sources of the somewhat more radiogenic Pb may be small amounts of buried sediment, either from turbidites or from hemipelagic sediment. This possibility is supported by high concentrations of CH4 and NHC4 found in the high-temperature vent fluids at the Main Endeavour Field, which are interpreted to reflect subseafloor interaction between hydrothermal fluids and organic material in buried sediments. However, the majority of the samples fall below and are approximately parallel to the

  2. The effect of fault-bend folding on seismic velocity in the marginal ridge of accretionary prisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cai, Y.; Wang, Chun-Yong; Hwang, W.-t.; Cochrane, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluid venting in accretionary prisms, which feeds chemosynthetic biological communities, occurs mostly on the marginal thrust ridge. New seismic data for the marginal ridge of the Cascadia prism show significantly lower velocity than that in the adjacent oceanic basin and place important constraints on the interpretations of why fluid venting occurs mostly on the marginal ridge. We employed a finite-element method to analyze a typical fault-bend folding model to explain the phenomenon. The fault in the model is simulated by contact elements. The elements are characterized not only by finite sliding along a slide line, but also by elastoplastic deformation. We present the results of a stress analysis which show that the marginal ridge is under subhorizontal extension and the frontal thrust is under compression. This state of stress favors the growth of tensile cracks in the marginal ridge, facilitates fluid flow and reduces seismic velocities therein; on the other hand, it may close fluid pathways along the frontal thrust and divert fluid flow to the marginal ridge. ?? 1995 Birkha??user Verlag.

  3. Inferring the width of the upwelling region at mid-ocean ridges from the throttling effect of small-offset transforms: Implications for the dynamics of `normal' and plume-influenced mid- ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps Morgan, J.; Ranero, C. R.

    2006-12-01

    The fundamental question "How wide is the upwelling and melting region beneath mid-ocean ridges (MORs)?" remains a subject of ongoing debate after 4 decades of intensive study. The basic observational difficulty is that lateral melt migration has the potential to bring melt produced within a wide subaxial region to the ~2km- wide neovolcanic zone that has been observed to be the site of almost all oceanic crustal emplacement. Here we use an indirect approach to infer this width from the minimum length of the ridge-offsets that mark the limits of the `region of influence' of on-ridge plumes on the axial relief, axial morphology, and crustal thickness along the ridge — e.g. as seen along ridge segments influenced by the Galapagos and Iceland plumes, and at the terminations of fossil volcanic rifted margins and the paleo-Azores plume-ridge interaction. We adopt Vogt's [1972] hypothesis for along-ridge asthenospheric flow in a narrow vertical slot beneath the axis of plume- influenced `macro-segments'. We find that: (1) There is a threshold distance to the lateral offsets that bound plume-influenced macrosegments; all such `barrier offsets' are greater than ~30km, while smaller offsets do not appear to be a barrier to along-axis flow. (2) Recent seismic and E-M observations along the southern EPR are consistent with a narrow westward-dipping subaxial slot. (3) A similar pattern is seen in the often abrupt transitions between volcanic and non-volcanic rifted margins, which is discussed in a companion presentation by Ranero and Phipps Morgan (this meeting). (4) A ~30km width for the region of ridge upwelling and melting offers a simple conceptual explanation for the apparent ~30km threshold length for the existence of strike-slip transform faults and the occurrence of non-transform offsets at smaller ridge offset-distances. (5) It also offers a simple conceptual explanation for the largest scale of segmentation of axial relief seen at fast-spreading ridges; these 500

  4. SRTM Anaglyph: Wheeler Ridge, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Wheeler Ridge and vicinity, California, is a site of major tectonic activity, both historically and over recent geologic time. The epicenter of the 7.5 magnitude Kern County earthquake occurred here on July 21,1952, and numerous geologic and topographic features indicate rapid geologic processes. The ridge itself (upper-right center) is a geologic fold that is growing out of the southern San Joaquin Valley. A prominent 'wind gap,' now used for passage of the California aquaduct (with the aid of a pumping station), is evidence that the ridge grew faster than tranversing streams could erode down. Nearby abrupt and/or landslid mountain fronts similarly indicate a vigorous tectonic setting here, just north of the San Andreas fault. The Interstate 5 freeway can be seen crossing agricultural fields on the right and entering the very rugged and steep Grapevine Canyon toward the bottom.

    This anaglyph was generated by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a preliminary topographic map from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30 meter resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive.

    The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect

  5. The structure of mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Toomey, Douglas R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research results on the structure of midocean ridges are reviewed. The new view of ridge-axis crustal structure obtained from high-resolution seismology is reviewed, emphasizing the variation of that structure with spreading rate and along-axis at a given spreading rate. Recent results on upper mantle structure beneath ridges are examined, including variations with seafloor age, indications from anisotropy for directions of mantle flow, and long-wavelength along-axis variations in structure and their implications for lateral heterogeneity in mantle temperature and composition.

  6. Stratigraphic framework and distribution of lignite on Crowleys Ridge, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meissner, Charles R.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to establish a stratigraphic framework of lignite beds and associated strata of Crowleys Ridge, Arkansas. Drill hole data provided by the Arkansas Geological Commission is used in the synthesis and interpretation. Areas containing lignite of potential resource value are also delineated. To illustrate the regional stratigraphic framework of Crowleys Ridge, a cross section was constructed from logs of selected oil and gas test wells, along or adjacent to the north-south trending ridge over a distance of about 115 miles. This section reveals that lignite-bearing Tertiary formations dip gently southward along the ridge. The Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group forms the bedrock in the northern part of the ridge and successively younger bedrock of the Eocene Claiborne and Jackson Groups is identified in the central and southern part of the ridge. Crowleys Ridge is mantled with alluvium and loess of Quaternary age, and sand and gravel beds of the Lafayette Formation of Pliocene (?) age that unconformably overlie the Paleocene and Eocene rocks. The thickness of lignite-bearing sedimentary deposits ranges from 830 feet in the north to 2,480 feet in the south. The Wilcox, Claiborne, and Jackson Groups of Paleocene and Eocene age are believed to be fluvial-deltaic in origin. The detailed vertical and horizontal stratigraphic characteristics and distribution of lignite beds in the sediments were determined by constructing seven cross sections from lithologic and geophysical logs of the lignite investigations on Crowleys Ridge by the Arkansas Geological Commission and private companies. Correlation and interpretation of the lignite-bearing strata reveal ten lignite beds of resource potential. These lignite beds range from a few inches to 9.5 ft in thickness and are assigned to stratigraphic intervals that are designated as zone 1 through 7. Zone 1 is near the middle of the Wilcox Group and zone 7 is near the middle of the overlying Claiborne Group. Some

  7. 1996 structural integrity assessments for the Category C Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This document provides a report of the efforts made to satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement for the structural integrity certification of ten Category C Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) tank systems on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Within this document, each Category C tank system is described including the associated pipeline segments evaluated as a part of those tank systems. A separate structural integrity assessment was conducted for each of the LLLW Tank Systems, four of which are located in Melton Valley, and six of which are located in Bethel Valley. The results of the structural integrity assessments are reported herein. The assessments are based on (1) a review of available tank design drawings, (2) a qualitative assessment of corrosion on the tank and pipelines, and primarily (3) leak testing program results.

  8. Low Sun from 'Low Ridge'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    A spectacular field of Martian sand ripples separates NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit from the slopes of 'Husband Hill.' It has been 200 Martian days, or sols, since the rover started a descent from the top of the peak to the rover's current position on 'Low Ridge.' Looking back to the north on sol 813 (April 17, 2006), Spirit acquired this blue-filter (436-nanometer) view with the right panoramic camera (Pancam) while the Sun was low in the sky late in the afternoon. Because of the low-angle lighting (sunlight is coming from the left), images like this provide superb views of subtle textures in the topography both near and far. Husband Hill, where the rover was perched late last summer, rises prominently just left of center in this view. A 150-meter wide (500 foot) field of curving sand ripples named 'El Dorado' lies at the base of Husband Hill.

    By collecting photos like this at different times of day, when lighting comes from different directions, scientists can distinguish surface properties such as color and reflectivity from topography and roughness. By separating these components they can map more details of the geologic terrain, providing new clues about the geologic history of Gusev Crater.

  9. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in northern... Quadrangle map at the intersection of a light-duty road known locally as Albertson Road and Dopp Road...

  10. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in northern... Quadrangle map at the intersection of a light-duty road known locally as Albertson Road and Dopp Road...

  11. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in northern... Quadrangle map at the intersection of a light-duty road known locally as Albertson Road and Dopp Road...

  12. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in northern... Quadrangle map at the intersection of a light-duty road known locally as Albertson Road and Dopp Road...

  13. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in northern... Quadrangle map at the intersection of a light-duty road known locally as Albertson Road and Dopp Road...

  14. Impact assisted segmented cutterhead

    DOEpatents

    Morrell, Roger J.; Larson, David A.; Ruzzi, Peter L.

    1992-01-01

    An impact assisted segmented cutterhead device is provided for cutting various surfaces from coal to granite. The device comprises a plurality of cutting bit segments deployed in side by side relationship to form a continuous cutting face and a plurality of impactors individually associated with respective cutting bit segments. An impactor rod of each impactor connects that impactor to the corresponding cutting bit segment. A plurality of shock mounts dampening the vibration from the associated impactor. Mounting brackets are used in mounting the cutterhead to a base machine.

  15. Fully automatic segmentation of complex organ systems: example of trachea, esophagus and heart segmentation in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Carsten; Peters, Jochen; Weese, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    Automatic segmentation is a prerequisite to efficiently analyze the large amount of image data produced by modern imaging modalities. Many algorithms exist to segment individual organs or organ systems. However, new clinical applications and the progress in imaging technology will require the segmentation of more and more complex organ systems composed of a number of substructures, e.g., the heart, the trachea, and the esophagus. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that such complex organ systems can be successfully segmented by integrating the individual organs into a general model-based segmentation framework, without tailoring the core adaptation engine to the individual organs. As an example, we address the fully automatic segmentation of the trachea (around its main bifurcation, including the proximal part of the two main bronchi) and the esophagus in addition to the heart with all chambers and attached major vessels. To this end, we integrate the trachea and the esophagus into a model-based cardiac segmentation framework. Specifically, in a first parametric adaptation step of the segmentation workflow, the trachea and the esophagus share global model transformations with adjacent heart structures. This allows to obtain a robust, approximate segmentation for the trachea even if it is only partly inside the field-of-view, and for the esophagus in spite of limited contrast. The segmentation is then refined in a subsequent deformable adaptation step. We obtained a mean segmentation error of about 0.6mm for the trachea and 2.3mm for the esophagus on a database of 23 volumetric cardiovascular CT images. Furthermore, we show by quantitative evaluation that our integrated framework outperforms individual esophagus segmentation, and individual trachea segmentation if the trachea is only partly inside the field-of-view.

  16. Dark and Bright Ridges on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This high-resolution image of Jupiter's moon Europa, taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft camera, shows dark, relatively smooth region at the lower right hand corner of the image which may be a place where warm ice has welled up from below. The region is approximately 30 square kilometers in area. An isolated bright hill stands within it. The image also shows two prominent ridges which have different characteristics; youngest ridge runs from left to top right and is about 5 kilometers in width (about 3.1 miles). The ridge has two bright, raised rims and a central valley. The rims of the ridge are rough in texture. The inner and outer walls show bright and dark debris streaming downslope, some of it forming broad fans. This ridge overlies and therefore must be younger than a second ridge running from top to bottom on the left side of the image. This dark 2 km wide ridge is relatively flat, and has smaller-scale ridges and troughs along its length.

    North is to the top of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from the upper left. This image, centered at approximately 14 degrees south latitude and 194 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 15 kilometers by 20 kilometers (9 miles by 12 miles). The resolution is 26 meters (85 feet) per picture element. This image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 1300 kilometers (800 miles) by Galileo's solid state imaging system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  17. Internal Tide Generation by Tall Ocean Ridges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    April 26th, 1996, of the area enclosed by the solid line in the map of the South China Sea (right). The dashed line indicates the location of the Luzon...115 15 4-9 Bathymetry of (a) the ridge at French Frigate Shoals (FFS) and (b) the Keana Ridge (KR) in the Kauai Channel. The...The thick lines in panel (b) indicate the raw bathymetry data (solid) and a smoothed version of the profile (dashed), and the inset presents the local

  18. Seasonal trends in environmental tritium concentrations in a small forest adjacent to a radioactive waste storage area

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Hikaru ); Garten, C.T. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Tritium (HTO) concentrations were studied for an entire year in a floodplain forest adjacent to a low-level radioactive solid waste storage area (SWSA No. 5) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. Tritium in soil was the principal source of HTO to the deciduous forest. Evaporation from the surface soil along with transpiration from trees leaves both contributed to HTO in the forest atmosphere. During the growing season, transpiration was the principal contributor of HTO to the forest atmosphere, while during the dormant season, the main source of atmospheric HTO was evaporation from the surface soil. Seasonal changes and the characteristics of vegetation will influence the relative importance of evaporation and transpiration as sources of atmospheric HTO near the ground in temperate deciduous forests. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Seasonal trends in environmental tritium concentrations in a small forest adjacent to a radioactive waste storage area

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, H. ); Garten, C.T. Jr. . Environmental Sciences Div.)

    1992-03-01

    Tritium (HTO) concentrations were studied for an entire year in a floodplain forest adjacent to a low-level radioactive solid waste storage areas (SWSA No. 5) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. Tritium in soil was the principal source of HTO to the deciduous forest. Evaporation from the surface soil along with transpiration from tree leaves both contributed to HTO in the forest atmosphere. During the growing season, transpiration was the principal contributor of HTO to the forest atmosphere, while during he dormant season, the main source of atmospheric HTO was evaporation from the surface soil. This paper discovers seasonal changes and the characteristics of vegetation which will influence the relative importance of evaporation and transpiration as sources of atmospheric HTO near the ground in temperate deciduous forests.

  20. Slow-Spreading Oceanic Crust Formed By Steady-State Axial Volcanic Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murton, B. J.; Schroth, N.; LeBas, T.; Van Calsteren, P. W.; Yeo, I. A.; Achenbach, K. L.; Searle, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Oceanic crust originates at mid-ocean spreading ridges (MORs), covers almost three quarters of the earth's surface and dominates the global magmatic flux. Axial volcanic ridges (AVRs) are almost ubiquitous features of orthogonal slow-spreading ridges, which account for three quarters of the global mid-ocean spreading ridge system today. Typically 3-6 km wide, 200-500 m high and 10-20 km long, AVRs are the loci of recent volcanic activity and form the most prominent topography rising above the otherwise flat-lying Median Valley floor. Previous studies indicate that AVRs, and their related crustal magma reservoirs are episodic, on a time scale of 150-300 ka. Yet their near ubiquitous occurrence at slow-spreading ridge segments provides us with a paradox: if AVRs have a life cycle of formation and degradation, does their near ubiquitous presence at slow spreading ridges imply their life-cycles are synchronised? In this contribution, we report the findings from a high-resolution study of a well-developed axial volcanic ridge (AVR) at 45°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Here, the MAR is typical of most slow-spreading ridges: it spreads generally symmetrically and orthogonally, at a full rate of 23.6 mm per year, has second and third-order segmentation, and contains a typical AVR. Using a combination of detailed micro-bathymetry, sidescan sonar, visual surveying and petrology, we suggest that the AVR is the product of quasi-steady state volcanotectonic processes. Small volume lava flows, originating at or near the crest and with short run-out lengths, form ~60 m high hummocky pillow-lava mounds that dominate the construction of the AVR. The lavas are the product of moderate degrees of mantle melting that are typical for normal mid-ocean ridge basalt. Synchronous with these eruptions the flanks of the AVR subside forming a structural horst. Subsidence is partially accommodated by a series of outward-facing volcanic growth faults that step-down and away from the AVR

  1. Biomechanics of Artificial Disc Replacements Adjacent to a 2-Level Fusion in 4-Level Hybrid Constructs: An In Vitro Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhenhua; Fogel, Guy R.; Wei, Na; Gu, Hongsheng; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background The ideal procedure for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases remains controversial. Recent studies on hybrid surgery combining anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR) for 2-level and 3-level constructs have been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study was to estimate the biomechanics of 3 kinds of 4-level hybrid constructs, which are more likely to be used clinically compared to 4-level arthrodesis. Material/Methods Eighteen human cadaveric spines (C2–T1) were evaluated in different testing conditions: intact, with 3 kinds of 4-level hybrid constructs (hybrid C3–4 ACDR+C4–6 ACDF+C6–7ACDR; hybrid C3–5ACDF+C5–6ACDR+C6–7ACDR; hybrid C3–4ACDR+C4–5ACDR+C5–7ACDF); and 4-level fusion. Results Four-level fusion resulted in significant decrease in the C3–C7 ROM compared with the intact spine. The 3 different 4-level hybrid treatment groups caused only slight change at the instrumented levels compared to intact except for flexion. At the adjacent levels, 4-level fusion resulted in significant increase of contribution of both upper and lower adjacent levels. However, for the 3 hybrid constructs, significant changes of motion increase far lower than 4P at adjacent levels were only noted in partial loading conditions. No destabilizing effect or hypermobility were observed in any 4-level hybrid construct. Conclusions Four-level fusion significantly eliminated motion within the construct and increased motion at the adjacent segments. For all 3 different 4-level hybrid constructs, ACDR normalized motion of the index segment and adjacent segments with no significant hypermobility. Compared with the 4-level ACDF condition, the artificial discs in 4-level hybrid constructs had biomechanical advantages compared to fusion in normalizing adjacent level motion. PMID:26694835

  2. Assessing the clarity of friction ridge impressions.

    PubMed

    Hicklin, R Austin; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Roberts, Maria Antonia

    2013-03-10

    The ability of friction ridge examiners to correctly discern and make use of the ridges and associated features in finger or palm impressions is limited by clarity. The clarity of an impression relates to the examiner's confidence that the presence, absence, and attributes of features can be correctly discerned. Despite the importance of clarity in the examination process, there have not previously been standard methods for assessing clarity in friction ridge impressions. We introduce a process for annotation, analysis, and interchange of friction ridge clarity information that can be applied to latent or exemplar impressions. This paper: (1) describes a method for evaluating the clarity of friction ridge impressions by using color-coded annotations that can be used by examiners or automated systems; (2) discusses algorithms for overall clarity metrics based on manual or automated clarity annotation; and (3) defines a method of quantifying the correspondence of clarity when comparing a pair of friction ridge images, based on clarity annotation and resulting metrics. Different uses of this approach include examiner interchange of data, quality assurance, metrics, and as an aid in automated fingerprint matching.

  3. Hydrothermal activity on the Gorda Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    Near-bottom plumes of materials indicative of discharge of metal-rich hot springs were discovered at sites on the Gorda Ridge by a research team of government and university scientists on a cruise of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship Surveyor during May 1985 as part of the NOAA Vents Program. The Gorda Ridge, off northern California and Oregon, is the only seafloor spreading center within the proclaimed 200-mile U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (370 km wide) of the conterminous United States and is one of the last oceanic ridges to be explored for metal-rich hot springs. One reason for this neglect is that the Gorda Ridge is slow spreading, with half-rates ranging from 1.1 cm/yr in the southern portion to 2.2 cm/yr in the northern portion. Slow spreading centers have not been fully evaluated with regard to hydrothermal activity by many members of the research community, who have concentrated their attention on the faster spreading East Pacific Rise to the south and the Juan de Fuca Ridge to the north of the Gorda Ridge.

  4. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R.

    1990-10-01

    This two-volume report, the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Report for 1989, is the nineteenth in an annual series that began in 1971. It reports the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at the three major US Department of Energy (DOE) production and research installations in Oak Ridge on the immediate areas' and surrounding region's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation and wildlife, and through these multiple and varied pathways, the resident human population. Information is presented for the environmental monitoring Quality Assurance (QA) Program, audits and reviews, waste management activities, land special environmental studies. Data are included for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). Volume 1 presents narratives, summaries, and conclusions based on environmental monitoring at the three DOE installations and in the surrounding environs during calendar year (CY) 1989. Volume 1 is intended to be a stand-alone'' report about the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the reader who does not want an in-depth review of 1989 data. Volume 2 presents the detailed data from which these conclusions have been drawn and should be used in conjunction with Volume 1.

  5. Multi-segment coherent beam combining

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Tucker, S.D.; Morgan, R.; Smith, T.G.; Warren, M.E.; Gruetzner, J.K.; Rosenthal, R.R.; Bentley, A.E.

    1994-12-31

    Scaling laser systems to large sizes for power beaming and other applications can sometimes be simplified by combing a number of smaller lasers. However, to fully utilize this scaling, coherent beam combination is necessary. This requires measuring and controlling each beam`s pointing and phase relative to adjacent beams using an adaptive optical system. We have built a sub-scale brass-board to evaluate various methods for beam-combining. It includes a segmented adaptive optic and several different specialized wavefront sensors that are fabricated using diffractive optics methods. We have evaluated a number of different phasing algorithms, including hierarchical and matrix methods, and have demonstrated phasing of several elements. The system is currently extended to a large number of segments to evaluate various scaling methodologies.

  6. Results from a 14-month hydroacoustic monitoring of the three mid-oceanic ridges in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, J.-Y.; Dziak, R. P.; Delatre, M.; Chateau, R.; Brachet, C.; Haxel, J. H.; Matsumoto, H.; Goslin, J.; Brandon, V.; Bohnenstielh, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    From October 2006 to January 2008, an hydroacoustic experiment in the Indian Ocean was carried out by the CNRS/University of Brest and NOAA/Oregon State University to monitor the low-level seismic activity associated with the three contrasting spreading ridges and deforming zones in the Indian Ocean. Three autonomous hydrophones were moored in the SOFAR channel by R/V Marion Dufresne for 14 months in the Madagascar Basin, and northeast and southwest of Amsterdam Island, complementing the two permanent hydroacoustic stations of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) located near Diego Garcia Island and off Cape Leeuwin. The three instruments successfully collected 14 month of continuous acoustic records. Combined with the records from the permanent stations, the array detected 1780 acoustic events consisting mostly of earthquake generated T-waves, but also of iceberg tremors from Wilkes Land, Antarctica. Within the triangle defined by the temporary array, the three ridges exhibit contrasting seismicity patterns. Along the Southeast Indian ridge (SEIR), the 272 acoustic events (vs 24 events in the NEIC catalog) occur predominantly along the transform faults ; only one ridge segment (76˚E) displays a continuous activity for 10 months. Along the Central Indian Ridge (CIR), seismicity is distributed along fracture zones and ridge segments (269 events vs 45 NEIC events), with two clusters of events near the triple junction (24-25S) and south of Marie-Celeste FZ (18.5S). Along the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), the 222 events (vs 31 NEIC events) are distributed along the ridge segments with a larger number of events west of Melville FZ and a cluster at 58E. The immediate vicinity of the Rodrigues triple junction shows periods of quiescence and of intense activity. Some large earthquakes (Mb>5) near the triple junction (SEIR and CIR) seem to be preceded by several acoustic events that may be precursors. Finally, off-ridge seismicity is mostly

  7. 77 FR 68818 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office, Oak Ridge, TN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office, Oak Ridge... Oak Ridge Office has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary object, in... associated funerary object may contact the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office. Repatriation of...

  8. 78 FR 2431 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office, Oak Ridge, TN...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office, Oak Ridge.... Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office has corrected an inventory of human remains and associated funerary... of Energy Oak Ridge Office. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary object to...

  9. Hydrothermal activity at slow-spreading ridges: variability and importance of magmatic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, Javier

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity along mid-ocean ridge axes is ubiquitous, associated with mass, chemical, and heat exchanges between the deep lithosphere and the overlying envelopes, and sustaining chemiosynthetic ecosystems at the seafloor. Compared with hydrothermal fields at fast-spreading ridges, those at slow spreading ones show a large variability as their location and nature is controlled or influenced by several parameters that are inter-related: a) tectonic setting, ranging from 'volcanic systems' (along the rift valley floor, volcanic ridges, seamounts), to 'tectonic' ones (rift-bounding faults, oceanic detachment faults); b) the nature of the host rock, owing to compositional heterogeneity of slow-spreading lithosphere (basalt, gabbro, peridotite); c) the type of heat source (magmatic bodies at depth, hot lithosphere, serpentinization reactions); d) and the associated temperature of outflow fluids (high- vs.- low temperature venting and their relative proportion). A systematic review of the distribution and characteristics of hydrothermal fields along the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggests that long-lived hydrothermal activity is concentrated either at oceanic detachment faults, or along volcanic segments with evidence of robust magma supply to the axis. A detailed study of the magmatically robust Lucky Strike segment suggests that all present and past hydrothermal activity is found at the center of the segment. The association of these fields to central volcanos, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the remaining of the ridge segment, suggests that long-lived hydrothermal activity in these volcanic systems is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build these volcanic edifices. In this setting, hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal fluids in the shallow crust exploit permeable fault zones to circulate. While

  10. Hospital benefit segmentation.

    PubMed

    Finn, D W; Lamb, C W

    1986-12-01

    Market segmentation is an important topic to both health care practitioners and researchers. The authors explore the relative importance that health care consumers attach to various benefits available in a major metropolitan area hospital. The purposes of the study are to test, and provide data to illustrate, the efficacy of one approach to hospital benefit segmentation analysis.

  11. A shallow high-resolution seismic reflection study of dudley ridge, south-east missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, M.; Vaughn, J. D.; Anderson, N. L.; Hoffman, D.; Palmer, J. R.

    1997-12-01

    Geosol beneath lower terraces adjacent to Dudley Ridge and the geosol's apparent absence, or near-total truncation, beneath modern soils on Dudley Ridge suggest that one or more periods of tectonic bulging and accelerated erosion may have occurred between the Farmdale Interstadial and the Holocene about 25,000-10,000 years before present.

  12. Unusual Rocks of the Yap Ridge - Metamorphosed Basal Cumulates of an Arc ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, J. W.; Castillo, P. R.; Batiza, R.

    2002-12-01

    The 8 to 9 km deep Yap trench, and adjacent Yap Ridge, extend from the southwest end of the Mariana Trench near 11o N, to near 7o 15' N where the trench swings west to intersect the Palau Trench. Unlike other western Pacific subduction systems, the Yap Ridge rises directly from the trench, it has no forearc, neither a remnant nor active volcanic arc, and no inclined seismic zone. The few seismic events recorded are mainly < 70 km depth. Yap Ridge crest depths range from 2.5 km to emergent; there are no emergent volcanoes. Rocks from the islands Yap and Map, are mainly strongly schistose, amphibole-rich, mafic and ultramafic rocks. Metamorphic lineations, and meter-sized mullions having lenticular cross-sections, define inclined (15o southerly dip) tectonic transport. Yap and Map schists are in greenschist facies (actinolite - chlorite - Na-plagioclase, rare titanite and epidote). Talc - tremolite schists, serpentinite, and chlorite-pyroxenite are less common. Small areas of altered andesite are present; quartz diorite and hornblende-rich gabbro occur as clasts in breccias, bomb craters yielded fragments of basalt and diabase. Scattered blankets of laterite several meters thick, and jungle, obscure many details. Deeper crustal rocks exposed on inner wall of Yap Trench, (5 - 2.5 km depths) include amphibolite (Al-hornblende-andesine-titanite) interlayered with calcite- diopside - grossularite marble, and calc-silicate gneisses. Rocks dredged from Yap Ridge include metabasite similar toYap schists, island arc tholeiite series basalt, basaltic andesite, and 2-PX gabbro. These have late Miocene ages (Beccaluva et al., AGU Mon. 23, 1980). Assuming isochemical behavior for immobile elements, protolith for mafic and ultramafic schists had high Mg# (52-83), CaO/Al2O3 0.7-6, Cr 288-1490, Ni 64-609, Zr 13-145, Y 3-28 (ppm).These data suggest picrite, high-Mg basalt, boninite, or OL-PX rich ultramafic cumulates as parents. REE data, e.g. negative slope and (La/Sm)N 0

  13. 30 CFR 56.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 56.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  14. 30 CFR 57.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 57.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  15. 49 CFR 236.404 - Signals at adjacent control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.404 Signals at adjacent control points. Signals at adjacent controlled... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signals at adjacent control points....

  16. 49 CFR 236.404 - Signals at adjacent control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.404 Signals at adjacent control points. Signals at adjacent controlled... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signals at adjacent control points....

  17. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  18. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  2. Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Panahi, Behrouz M.

    2006-03-23

    So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

  3. Tracking the Tristan-Gough Mantle Plume Using Discrete Chains of Intraplate Volcanic Centers Buried in the Walvis Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. M.; Jokat, W.; Wijbrans, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Explanations for hotspot trails range from deep mantle plumes rising from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) to shallow plate cracking. Such mechanisms cannot explain uniquely the scattered hotspot trails distributed across a 2,000-km-wide swell in the sea floor of the southeast Atlantic Ocean. While these hotspot trails formed synchronously, in a pattern consistent with movement of the African Plate over plumes rising from the edge of the African LLSVP, their distribution is controlled by the interplay between plumes and the motion and structure of the African Plate (O'Connor et al., 2012). A significant challenge is to establish how the vigor and flow of hotspot material to the mid-ocean ridge constructed the Walvis Ridge. 40Ar/39Ar ages for three sites across the central Walvis Ridge sampled by Ocean Drilling (DSDP Leg 74) (Rohde et al., 2013; O'Connor and Jokat, 2015a) indicate an apparent inverse relation between the volume flux of hotspot volcanism and the distance between the mid-ocean ridge and the Tristan-Gough hotspot. Moreover, since ca. 93 Ma the geometry and motion of the mid-ocean ridge determined where hotspot material was channeled to the plate surface to build the Walvis Ridge. Interplay between hotspot flow, and the changing geometry of the mid-ocean ridge as it migrated relative to the Tristan-Gough hotspot, might explain much of the age and morphology of the Walvis Ridge. Thus, tracking the location of the Tristan-Gough plume might not be practicable if most of the complex morphology of the massive Walvis Ridge is related to the proximity of the South Atlantic mid-ocean ridge. But 40Ar/39Ar basement ages for the Tristan-Gough hotspot track (Rohde et al., 2013; O'Connor and Jokat, 2015b), together with information about morphology and crustal structure from new swath maps and seismic profiles, suggest that separated age-progressive intraplate segments track the location of the Tristan-Gough mantle plume. The apparent continuity of the inferred age

  4. Tracking the Tristan-Gough Mantle Plume Using Discrete Chains of Intraplate Volcanic Centers Buried in the Walvis Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, John; Jokat, Wilfried; Wijbrans, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Explanations for hotspot trails range from deep mantle plumes rising from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) to shallow plate cracking. Such mechanisms cannot explain uniquely the scattered hotspot trails distributed across a 2,000-km-wide swell in the sea floor of the southeast Atlantic Ocean. While these hotspot trails formed synchronously, in a pattern consistent with movement of the African Plate over plumes rising from the edge of the African LLSVP, their distribution is controlled by the interplay between plumes and the motion and structure of the African Plate (O'Connor et al. 2012). A significant challenge is to establish how the vigor and flow of hotspot material to the mid-ocean ridge constructed the Walvis Ridge. 40Ar/39Ar stratigraphy for three sites across the central Walvis Ridge sampled by Ocean Drilling (DSDP Leg 74) (Rohde et al., 2013; O'Connor & Jokat 2015a) indicates an apparent inverse relation between the volume flux of hotspot volcanism and the distance between the mid-ocean ridge and the Tristan-Gough hotspot. Moreover, since ˜93 Ma the geometry and motion of the mid-ocean ridge determined where hotspot material was channeled to the plate surface to build the Walvis Ridge. Interplay between hotspot flow, and the changing geometry of the mid-ocean ridge as it migrated relative to the Tristan-Gough hotspot, might explain much of the age and morphology of the Walvis Ridge. Thus, tracking the location of the Tristan-Gough plume might not be practicable if most of the complex morphology of the massive Walvis Ridge is related to the proximity of the South Atlantic mid-ocean ridge. But 40Ar/39Ar basement ages for the Tristan-Gough hotspot track (Rohde et al., 2013; O'Connor & Jokat 2015b), together with information about morphology and crustal structure from new swath maps and seismic profiles, suggest that separated age-progressive intraplate segments track the location of the Tristan-Gough mantle plume. The apparent continuity of the inferred age

  5. Formation and stability of ridge-ridge-ridge triple junctions in rheologically realistic lithosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    -branch junction formation and evolution by using high-resolution 3D numerical mechanical experiments that take into account realistic thermo-rheological structure and rheology of the lithosphere. We find that two major types of quadruple and triple junctions are formed under bi-directional or multidirectional far-field stress field: (i) plate rifting junctions are formed by the initial plate fragmentation and can be subsequently re-arranged into (ii) oceanic spreading junctions controlled by the new oceanic crust accretion. In particular, we document initial formation and destabilization of quadruple R-R-R-R junctions as initial plate rifting structures under bi-directional extension. In most cases, quadruple plate rifting junctions rapidly (typically within 1-2 Myr) evolve towards formation of two diverging triple oceanic spreading junctions connected by a linear spreading center lengthening with time. This configuration remains stable over long time scales. However, under certain conditions, quadruple junctions may also remain relatively stable. Asymmetric stretching results in various configurations, for example formation of "T-junctions" with trans-extensional components and combination of fast and slow spreading ridges. Combined with plume impingement, this scenario evolves in realistic patterns closely resembling observed plate dynamics. In particular, opening of the Red Sea and of the Afar rift system find a logical explanation within a single model. Numerical experiments also suggest that several existing oceanic spreading junctions form as the result of plate motions rearrangements after which only one of two plates spreading along the ridge become subjected to bi-directional spreading.

  6. Geomorphology and structural geology of Saturnalia Fossae and adjacent structures in the northern hemisphere of Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Yin, A.; Russell, C. T.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Williams, D. A.; Blewett, D. T.; Ruesch, O.; Hiesinger, H.; Le Corre, L.; Mercer, C.; Yingst, R. A.; Garry, W. B.; Jaumann, R.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Gaskell, R. W.; Schröder, S. E.; Ammannito, E.; Pieters, C. M.; Raymond, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Vesta is a unique, intermediate class of rocky body in the Solar System, between terrestrial planets and small asteroids, because of its size (average radius of ∼263 km) and differentiation, with a crust, mantle and core. Vesta's low surface gravity (0.25 m/s2) has led to the continual absence of a protective atmosphere and consequently impact cratering and impact-related processes are prevalent. Previous work has shown that the formation of the Rheasilvia impact basin induced the equatorial Divalia Fossae, whereas the formation of the Veneneia impact basin induced the northern Saturnalia Fossae. Expanding upon this earlier work, we conducted photogeologic mapping of the Saturnalia Fossae, adjacent structures and geomorphic units in two of Vesta's northern quadrangles: Caparronia and Domitia. Our work indicates that impact processes created and/or modified all mapped structures and geomorphic units. The mapped units, ordered from oldest to youngest age based mainly on cross-cutting relationships, are: (1) Vestalia Terra unit, (2) cratered highlands unit, (3) Saturnalia Fossae trough unit, (4) Saturnalia Fossae cratered unit, (5) undifferentiated ejecta unit, (6) dark lobate unit, (7) dark crater ray unit and (8) lobate crater unit. The Saturnalia Fossae consist of five separate structures: Saturnalia Fossa A is the largest (maximum width of ∼43 km) and is interpreted as a graben, whereas Saturnalia Fossa B-E are smaller (maximum width of ∼15 km) and are interpreted as half grabens formed by synthetic faults. Smaller, second-order structures (maximum width of <1 km) are distinguished from the Saturnalia Fossae, a first-order structure, by the use of the general descriptive term 'adjacent structures', which encompasses minor ridges, grooves and crater chains. For classification purposes, the general descriptive term 'minor ridges' characterizes ridges that are not part of the Saturnalia Fossae and are an order of magnitude smaller (maximum width of <1 km vs

  7. The Analysis of Scarp Populations to Constrain Slow--Spreading Ridge Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. F.; Irving, D. B.

    2006-12-01

    Quantitative studies of scarps and associated mass--wasting complexes show that the evolution of off--axis topography, in particular inner Corner High (ICHs) but also at other locations, are a function of measured seismicity and may correlate with the presence of serpentinized Peridotites. Deep-tow sidescan sonar data from the Fifteen-Twenty, Kane and Atlantis fracture zones (15--30 degrees N, Mid Atlantic Ridge) allow high-resolution morphotectonic models to be developed for ridge--transform intersections. These intersections are characterised by ridge-asymmetric extensional faulting which causes "megamullion" exhumation surfaces to reach high relief before distal normal faulting and crustal cooling lower the topography back to the abyssal plain. Scarp development occurs in two distinct locations: i) the walls of the axial valley, which correspond to fault scarps where constant slumping occurs. Here, frequency--magnitude analysis suggests seismicity is the main driving force. ii) Inward facets of ICHs possess long--lived (1--3 Ma) scarp slopes which fail along hydrothermally--altered normal fault zones. Several episodes of failure are inferred from geomorphic analysis of downslope deposits. Ridge kinematics are modelled using fabric studies from recovered core, interpolated magnetic isochrons and teleseismic data. We suggest that ICHs are stable and necessary features at transform- controlled slow- spreading segments and that the variation in scarp populations that give them such differing morphologies can be explained by a combination of seismicity and exposure to hydrothermal alteration during exhumation.

  8. Fast and intuitive segmentation of gyri of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Florian; Hahn, Horst K.

    2015-03-01

    The cortical surface of the human brain consists of a large number of folds forming valleys and ridges, the gyri and sulci. Often, it is desirable to perform a segmentation of a brain image into these underlying structures in order to assess parameters relative to these functional components. Typical examples for this include measurements of cortical thickness for individual functional areas, or the correlation of functional areas derived from fMRI data to corresponding anatomical areas seen in structural imaging. In this paper, we present a novel interactive technique, that allows for fast and intuitive segmentation of these functional areas from T1-weighted MR images of the brain. Our segmentation approach is based exclusively on morphological image processing operations, eliminating the requirement for explicit reconstruction of the brains surface.

  9. Gulf of California analogue for origin of Late Paleozoic ocean basins adjacent to western North America

    SciTech Connect

    Murchey, B.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Ocean crust accreted to the western margin of North America following the Late Devonian to earliest Missippian Antler orogeny is not older than Devonian. Therefore, ocean crust all along the margin of western North America may have been very young following the Antler event. This situation can be compared to the present-day margin of North America which lies adjacent to young ocean crust as a result of the subduction of the Farallon plate and arrival of the East Pacific spreading ridge. Syn- and post-Antler rifting that occurred along the North American margin may well be analogous to the formation of the Gulf of California by the propagation of the East Pacific spreading ridge. Black-arc rifting associated with the subduction of very old ocean crust seems a less likely mechanism for the early stages of ocean basin formation along the late Paleozoic margin of western North America because of the apparent absence of old ocean crust to the west of the arc terranes. The eastern Pacific basins were as long-lived as any truly oceanic basins and may have constituted, by the earliest Permian, a single wedge-shaped basin separated from the western Pacific by rifted fragments of North American arc-terranes. In the Permian, the rifted arcs were once again sites of active magmatism and the eastern Pacific basins began to close, from south (Golconda terrane) to north. Final closure of the northernmost eastern Pacific basin (Angayucham in Alaska) did not occur until the Jurassic.

  10. Keypoint Transfer Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Toews, M.; Langs, G.; Wells, W.; Golland, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present an image segmentation method that transfers label maps of entire organs from the training images to the novel image to be segmented. The transfer is based on sparse correspondences between keypoints that represent automatically identified distinctive image locations. Our segmentation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) keypoint matching, (ii) voting-based keypoint labeling, and (iii) keypoint-based probabilistic transfer of organ label maps. We introduce generative models for the inference of keypoint labels and for image segmentation, where keypoint matches are treated as a latent random variable and are marginalized out as part of the algorithm. We report segmentation results for abdominal organs in whole-body CT and in contrast-enhanced CT images. The accuracy of our method compares favorably to common multi-atlas segmentation while offering a speed-up of about three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, keypoint transfer requires no training phase or registration to an atlas. The algorithm’s robustness enables the segmentation of scans with highly variable field-of-view. PMID:26221677

  11. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  12. Keypoint Transfer Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wachinger, C; Toews, M; Langs, G; Wells, W; Golland, P

    2015-01-01

    We present an image segmentation method that transfers label maps of entire organs from the training images to the novel image to be segmented. The transfer is based on sparse correspondences between keypoints that represent automatically identified distinctive image locations. Our segmentation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) keypoint matching, (ii) voting-based keypoint labeling, and (iii) keypoint-based probabilistic transfer of organ label maps. We introduce generative models for the inference of keypoint labels and for image segmentation, where keypoint matches are treated as a latent random variable and are marginalized out as part of the algorithm. We report segmentation results for abdominal organs in whole-body CT and in contrast-enhanced CT images. The accuracy of our method compares favorably to common multi-atlas segmentation while offering a speed-up of about three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, keypoint transfer requires no training phase or registration to an atlas. The algorithm's robustness enables the segmentation of scans with highly variable field-of-view.

  13. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This document outlines the activities necessary to conduct a Remedial Investigation (RI) of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The CRSP, also designated Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 1, is one of four OUs along Chestnut Ridge on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The purpose of the RI is to collect data to (1) evaluate the nature and extent of known and suspected contaminants, (2) support an Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) and a Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA), (3) support the feasibility study in the development and analysis of remedial alternatives, and (4) ultimately, develop a Record of Decision (ROD) for the site. This chapter summarizes the regulatory background of environmental investigation on the ORR and the approach currently being followed and provides an overview of the RI to be conducted at the CRSP. Subsequent chapters provide details on site history, sampling activities, procedures and methods, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, and waste management related to the RI.

  14. Cell migration on ridges and cliffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; McCann, Colin; Kopace, Rael; Watts, John; Homan, Tess; Losert, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is a model system for the study of cellular migration, an important physiological process that occurs in embryonic development, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. We study the motion of D. discoideum on surfaces with various topographies, particularly those that affect the direction of cellular migration. Topographical features, such as ridges and cliffs, were fabricated using multiphoton absorption polymerization. As the cells encountered these topographical features, we tracked their overall motions and shapes, as well as the locations and intensities of certain intracellular signals. We found that when cells undergoing chemokinesis, random migration in response to a chemical signal, encounter a ridge, they tend to move along that ridge, even if the ridge is shorter than the cell. When cells undergoing chemotaxis, directed migration in response to a chemical signal, are directed off of a cliff, they do not fall off the cliff. Instead, they search for new attachment points, eventually change direction, and continue moving along the edge of the cliff. Both ridges and cliffs affect more than just the motion of a cell; they also affect its shape.

  15. Arctic Ocean: hydrothermal activity on Gakkel Ridge.

    PubMed

    Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Fourré, Elise

    2004-03-04

    In the hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges, sea water penetrates the fractured crust, becomes heated by its proximity to the hot magma, and returns to the sea floor as hot fluids enriched in various chemical elements. In contradiction to earlier results that predict diminishing hydrothermal activity with decreasing spreading rate, a survey of the ultra-slowly spreading Gakkel Ridge (Arctic Ocean) by Edmonds et al. and Michael et al. suggests that, instead of being rare, the hydrothermal activity is abundant--exceeding by at least a factor of two to three what would be expected by extrapolation from observation on faster spreading ridges. Here we use helium-3 (3He), a hydrothermal tracer, to show that this abundance of venting sites does not translate, as would be expected, into an anomalous hydrothermal 3He output from the ridge. Because of the wide implications of the submarine hydrothermal processes for mantle heat and mass fluxes to the ocean, these conflicting results call for clarification of the link between hydrothermal activity and crustal production at mid-ocean ridges.

  16. Cancer mortality near Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Mangano, J J

    1994-01-01

    Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is the site of one of the two oldest nuclear facilities in the United States. Although precise records have not been maintained, low levels of radioactive products have been released into the environment since the facility began operation in World War II. Changes in age-adjusted cancer mortality rates for whites between the periods 1950-1952 and 1987-1989 were analyzed to assess whether these radioactive releases have had any adverse effects on the population living near Oak Ridge. Results indicate that the increases in the local area (under 100 miles from Oak Ridge) exceeded regional increases and far exceeded national increases. Within the region, increases were greatest in rural areas, in Anderson County (where Oak Ridge is located), in mountainous counties, and in the region downwind of Oak Ridge. Each of these findings suggest that low levels of radiation, ingested gradually by local residents, were a factor in the increases in local cancer death rates. Results indicate that more studies of this type are called for and that cessation of all future radioactive emissions from nuclear facilities should be considered.

  17. Segmented ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for large-area, high-power ion engines comprise dividing a single engine into a combination of smaller discharge chambers (or segments) configured to operate as a single large-area engine. This segmented ion thruster (SIT) approach enables the development of 100-kW class argon ion engines for operation at a specific impulse of 10,000 s. A combination of six 30-cm diameter ion chambers operating as a single engine can process over 100 kW. Such a segmented ion engine can be operated from a single power processor unit.

  18. Dacite petrogenesis on mid-ocean ridges: Evidence for oceanic crustal melting and assimilation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanless, V.D.; Perfit, M.R.; Ridley, W.I.; Klein, E.

    2010-01-01

    general. Additionally, these processes are likely to be more common in regions of episodic magma supply and enhanced magma-crust interaction such as at the ends of ridge segments. ?? The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  19. Hedgehog signaling pathway function conserved in Tribolium segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Farzana, Laila

    2008-01-01

    In Drosophila, maintenance of parasegmental boundaries and formation of segmental grooves depend on interactions between segment polarity genes. Wingless and Engrailed appear to have similar roles in both short and long germ segmentation, but relatively little is known about the extent to which Hedgehog signaling is conserved. In a companion study to the Tribolium genome project, we analyzed the expression and function of hedgehog, smoothened, patched, and cubitus interruptus orthologs during segmentation in Tribolium. Their expression was largely conserved between Drosophila and Tribolium. Parental RNAi analysis of positive regulators of the pathway (Tc-hh, Tc-smo, or Tc-ci) resulted in small spherical cuticles with little or no evidence of segmental grooves. Segmental Engrailed expression in these embryos was initiated but not maintained. Wingless-independent Engrailed expression in the CNS was maintained and became highly compacted during germ band retraction, providing evidence that derivatives from every segment were present in these small spherical embryos. On the other hand, RNAi analysis of a negative regulator (Tc-ptc) resulted in embryos with ectopic segmental grooves visible during germband elongation but not discernible in the first instar larval cuticles. These transient grooves formed adjacent to Engrailed expressing cells that encircled wider than normal wg domains in the Tc-ptc RNAi embryos. These results suggest that the en–wg–hh gene circuit is functionally conserved in the maintenance of segmental boundaries during germ band retraction and groove formation in Tribolium and that the segment polarity genes form a robust genetic regulatory module in the segmentation of this short germ insect. PMID:18392879

  20. Infrastructure and evolution of ocean-ridge discontinuities in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2007-01-01

    There are two main ocean-ridge discontinuities in Iceland: the Tjörnes Fracture Zone (TFZ) and the South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ). The TFZ is a 120-km-long and as much as 70-km-wide WNW-trending zone of high seismicity. It has three main seismic lineaments: the Husavik-Flatey Fault (HFF), the Dalvik lineament, and the Grimsey lineament. The HFF, a dextral strike-slip fault and active as a transform fault for about 9 Ma, has a cumulative transform-parallel displacement of some 60 km. Offshore, the HFF is marked by a transform (fracture-zone) valley, 5-10 km wide and 3-4 km deep. Onshore the Flateyjarskagi Peninsula the HFF is marked by a 3-5-km-wide zone of intense crustal deformation with numerous strike-slip and normal faults, transform-parallel dykes, dense sets of mineral veins, and subzones of completely crushed rocks, that is, fault cores. Where the HFF comes on land on Tjörnes there is a similar, but much thinner, zone of crushed rocks. The seismic lineaments are located a few tens of kilometres south (Dalvik) and north (Grimsey) of, and run subparallel with, the HFF. Both lineaments are composed of sets of NNW-trending sinistral faults arranged en echelon. The SISZ is a 70-km-long and 10-20-km wide zone of almost continuous seismicity located between the overlapping West and East Volcanic Zones. It produces the largest earthquakes in Iceland, some of which exceed M7, during which the N-S width of the zone may be as great as 50-60 km. The SISZ is partly covered with Holocene lava flows where the seismogenic faults occur as dextral NNE-trending and sinistral ENE-trending conjugate arrays with push-ups between their nearby ends. The same fault-segment trends occur in the Pleistocene pile north of the Holocene lava flows. The HFF is neither perpendicular to the nearby ridge segments nor parallel with the spreading vector. As a consequence, the North Volcanic Zone has propagated to the north and the Kolbeinsey Ridge to the south during the past 1 Ma

  1. Intraplate compressional deformation in West-Congo and the Congo basin: related to ridge-puch from the South Atlantic spreading ridge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, Damien; Everaerts, Michel; Kongota Isasi, Elvis; Ganza Bamulezi, Gloire

    2016-04-01

    After the break-up and separation of South America from Africa and the initiation of the South-Atlantic mid-oceanic ridge in the Albian, at about 120 Ma, ridge-push forces started to build-up in the oceanic lithosphere and were transmitted to the adjacent continental plates. This is particularly well expressed in the passive margin and continental interior of Central Africa. According to the relations of Wiens and Stein (1985) between ridge-push forces and basal drag in function of the lithospheric age of oceanic plates, the deviatoric stress reaches a compressional maximum between 50 and 100, Ma after the initiation of the spreading ridge, so broadly corresponding to the Paleocene in this case (~70-20 Ma). Earthquake focal mechanism data show that the West-Congo margin and a large part of the Congo basin are still currently under compressional stresses with an horizontal compression parallel to the direction of the active transform fracture zones. We studied the fracture network along the Congo River in Kinshasa and Brazzaville which affect Cambrian sandstones and probably also the late Cretaceous-Paleocene sediments. Their brittle tectonic evolution is compatible with the buildup of ridge-push forces related to the South-Atlantic opening. Further inland, low-angle reverse faults are found affecting Jurassic to Middle Cretaceous cores from the Samba borehole in the Congo basin and strike-slip movements are recorded as a second brittle phase in the Permian cores of the Dekese well, at the southern margin of the Congo basin. An analysis of the topography and river network of the Congo basin show the development of low-amplitude (50-100 m) long wavelengths (100-300 km) undulations that can be interpreted as lithospheric buckling in response to the compressional intraplate stress field generated by the Mid-Atlantic ridge-push. Wiens, D.A., Stein, S., 1985. Implications of oceanic intraplate seismicity for plate stresses, driving forces and theology. Tectonophysics

  2. CPCs with segmented absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Keita, M.; Robertson, H.S. )

    1991-01-01

    One of the most promising means of improving the performance of solar thermal collectors is to reduce the energy lost by the hot absorber. One way to do this, not currently part of the technology, is to recognize that since the absorber is usually not irradiated uniformly, it is therefore possible to construct an absorber of thermally isolated segments, circulate the fluid in sequence from low to high irradiance segments, and reduce loss by improving effective concentration. This procedure works even for ideal concentrators, without violating Winston's theorem. Two equivalent CPC collectors with single and segmented absorber were constructed and compared under actual operating conditions. The results showed that the daily thermal efficiency of the collector with segmented absorber is higher (about 13%) than that of the collector with nonsegmented absorber.

  3. Robust and efficient ridge-based palmprint matching.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jifeng; Feng, Jianjiang; Zhou, Jie

    2012-08-01

    During the past decade, many efforts have been made to use palmprints as a biometric modality. However, most of the existing palmprint recognition systems are based on encoding and matching creases, which are not as reliable as ridges. This affects the use of palmprints in large-scale person identification applications where the biometric modality needs to be distinctive as well as insensitive to changes in age and skin conditions. Recently, several ridge-based palmprint matching algorithms have been proposed to fill the gap. Major contributions of these systems include reliable orientation field estimation in the presence of creases and the use of multiple features in matching, while the matching algorithms adopted in these systems simply follow the matching algorithms for fingerprints. However, palmprints differ from fingerprints in several aspects: 1) Palmprints are much larger and thus contain a large number of minutiae, 2) palms are more deformable than fingertips, and 3) the quality and discrimination power of different regions in palmprints vary significantly. As a result, these matchers are unable to appropriately handle the distortion and noise, despite heavy computational cost. Motivated by the matching strategies of human palmprint experts, we developed a novel palmprint recognition system. The main contributions are as follows: 1) Statistics of major features in palmprints are quantitatively studied, 2) a segment-based matching and fusion algorithm is proposed to deal with the skin distortion and the varying discrimination power of different palmprint regions, and 3) to reduce the computational complexity, an orientation field-based registration algorithm is designed for registering the palmprints into the same coordinate system before matching and a cascade filter is built to reject the nonmated gallery palmprints in early stage. The proposed matcher is tested by matching 840 query palmprints against a gallery set of 13,736 palmprints. Experimental

  4. Squaring a Circular Segment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Consider a circular segment (the smaller portion of a circle cut off by one of its chords) with chord length c and height h (the greatest distance from a point on the arc of the circle to the chord). Is there a simple formula involving c and h that can be used to closely approximate the area of this circular segment? Ancient Chinese and Egyptian…

  5. GPS Control Segment Improvements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    Systems Center GPS Control Segment Improvements Mr. Tim McIntyre GPS Product Support Manager GPS Ops Support and Sustainment Division Peterson...hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...DATE 29 APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GPS Control Segment Improvements 5a. CONTRACT

  6. ORLANDO -- Oak Ridge Large Neutrino Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Efremenko, Yu.; Gabriel, T.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Plasil, F.; Fazely, A.; Svoboda, R.

    1997-12-01

    The authors discuss a proposal for construction of an Oak Ridge LArge Neutrino DetectOr (ORLANDO) to search for neutrino oscillations at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A 4 MW SNS is proposed to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the first stage to be operative around 2006. It will have two target stations, which makes it possible with a single detector to perform a neutrino oscillation search at two different distances. Initial plans for the placement of the detector and the discovery potential of such a detector are discussed.

  7. Unsupervised spectral mesh segmentation driven by heterogeneous graphs.

    PubMed

    Theologou, Panagiotis; Pratikakis, Ioannis; Theoharis, Theoharis

    2016-03-21

    A fully automatic mesh segmentation scheme using heterogeneous graphs is presented. We introduce a spectral framework where local geometry affinities are coupled with surface patch affinities. A heterogeneous graph is constructed combining two distinct graphs: a weighted graph based on adjacency of patches of an initial over-segmentation, and the weighted dual mesh graph. The partitioning relies on processing each eigenvector of the heterogeneous graph Laplacian individually, taking into account the nodal set and nodal domain theory. Experiments on standard datasets show that the proposed unsupervised approach outperforms the state-of-the-art unsupervised methodologies and is comparable to the best supervised approaches.

  8. Unsupervised Spectral Mesh Segmentation Driven by Heterogeneous Graphs.

    PubMed

    Theologou, Panagiotis; Pratikakis, Ioannis; Theoharis, Theoharis

    2017-02-01

    A fully automatic mesh segmentation scheme using heterogeneous graphs is presented. We introduce a spectral framework where local geometry affinities are coupled with surface patch affinities. A heterogeneous graph is constructed combining two distinct graphs: a weighted graph based on adjacency of patches of an initial over-segmentation, and the weighted dual mesh graph. The partitioning relies on processing each eigenvector of the heterogeneous graph Laplacian individually, taking into account the nodal set and nodal domain theory. Experiments on standard datasets show that the proposed unsupervised approach outperforms the state-of-the-art unsupervised methodologies and is comparable to the best supervised approaches.

  9. Fluid venting and seepage at accretionary ridges: the Four Way Closure Ridge offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaucke, Ingo; Berndt, Christian; Crutchley, Gareth; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lin, Saulwood; Muff, Sina

    2016-06-01

    Within the accretionary prism offshore SW Taiwan, widespread gas hydrate accumulations are postulated to occur based on the presence of a bottom simulating reflection. Methane seepage, however, is also widespread at accretionary ridges offshore SW Taiwan and may indicate a significant loss of methane bypassing the gas hydrate system. Four Way Closure Ridge, located in 1,500 m water depth, is an anticlinal ridge that would constitute an ideal trap for methane and consequently represents a site with good potential for gas hydrate accumulations. The analysis of high-resolution bathymetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar imagery, high-resolution seismic profiling and towed video observations of the seafloor shows that Four Way Closure Ridge is and has been a site of intensive methane seepage. Continuous seepage is mainly evidenced by large accumulations of authigenic carbonate precipitates, which appear to be controlled by the creation of fluid pathways through faulting. Consequently, Four Way Closure Ridge is not a closed system in terms of fluid migration and seepage. A conceptual model of the evolution of gas hydrates and seepage at accretionary ridges suggests that seepage is common and may be a standard feature during the geological development of ridges in accretionary prisms. The observation of seafloor seepage alone is therefore not a reliable indicator of exploitable gas hydrate accumulations at depth.

  10. Line segments in homogeneous scalar turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauding, Michael; Goebbert, Jens Henrik; Hasse, Christian; Peters, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    The local structure of a turbulent scalar field in homogeneous isotropic turbulence is analyzed by direct numerical simulations (DNS) with different Taylor micro-scale based Reynolds numbers between 119 and 529. A novel signal decomposition approach is introduced where the signal of the scalar along a straight line is partitioned into segments based on the local extremal points of the scalar field. These segments are then parameterized by the distance ℓ between adjacent extremal points and the scalar difference Δϕ at the extrema. Both variables are statistical quantities and a joint distribution function of these quantities contains most information to statistically describe the scalar field. It is highlighted that the marginal distribution function of the length becomes independent of Reynolds number when normalized by the mean length ℓm. From a statistical approach, it is further shown that the mean length scales with the Kolmogorov length, which is also confirmed by DNS. For turbulent mixing, the scalar gradient plays a paramount role. Turbulent scalar fields are characterized by cliff-ramp-like structures manifesting the occurrence of localized large scalar gradients. To study turbulent mixing, a segment-based gradient is defined as Δϕ/ℓ. Joint statistics of the length and the segment-based gradient provide novel understanding of cliff-ramp-like structures. Ramp-like structures are unveiled by the asymmetry of the joint distribution function of the segment-based gradient and the length. Cliff-like structures are further analyzed by conditional statistics and it is shown from DNS that the width of cliffs scales with the Kolmogorov length scale.

  11. Plio-Quaternary uplift of the Manta Peninsula and La Plata Island and the subduction of the Carnegie Ridge, central coast of Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedoja, K.; Dumont, J. F.; Lamothe, M.; Ortlieb, L.; Collot, J.-Y.; Ghaleb, B.; Auclair, M.; Alvarez, V.; Labrousse, B.

    2006-11-01

    This paper quantifies the uplift of the Manta Peninsula and La Plata Island (Ecuador) using marine terraces. These marine terraces are part of a more extensive segment of uplifting coast extending all along the Talara arc, from 6.5°S to 1°N. Along this arc, the highest terraces are observed on the Manta Peninsula with five marine terraces up to 360 ± 10 m. On La Plata Island, four marine terraces are raised up to 170 ± 10 m. The terraces are dated using infrared-stimulated luminescence (IRSL) and U-Th methods. The calculated uplifts range from 0.3 to 0.5 mm yr -1 for the past 300 ka. The oldest terraces show a transition to the synsedimentary uplifted Plio-Pleistocene deposits of the Canoa Formation. In comparison with the lower uplift rates documented in the Santa Elena Peninsula to the south and the Esmeraldas area to the north, the uplift of the Manta Peninsula gives an account of the effect of the subduction of the Carnegie Ridge since the late Pliocene. The coastal uplift ends to the north outside the projection point of the border of the Carnegie Ridge but extends southward along the northern margin of the Gulf of Guayaquil, outside of the effect of the Carnegie Ridge, which suggests that other elements must be considered for uplift in this area. A weak scan pattern of the Carnegie Ridge along the coast is observed, but instead of a true scan motion, the context suggests the possibility of a segmented ridge and the head-on introduction in the trench of a new segment with a beveled front trending parallel to the Grijalva fracture zone. The onset of subduction of the Carnegie Ridge seems correlated with a change in the tectonic deformation of the coast, from compression conditions before the middle-late Pliocene to extension conditions during the subduction of the ridge.

  12. Wrinkle Ridges and Young Fresh Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 May 2002) The Science Wrinkle ridges are a very common landform on Mars, Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. These ridges are linear to arcuate asymmetric topographic highs commonly found on smooth plains. The origin of wrinkle ridges is not certain and two leading hypotheses have been put forth by scientists over the past 40 years. The volcanic model calls for the extrusion of high viscosity lavas along linear conduits. This thick lava accumulated over these conduits and formed the ridges. The other model is tectonic and advocates that the ridges are formed by compressional faulting and folding. Today's THEMIS image is of the ridged plains of Lunae Planum located between Kasei Valles and Valles Marineris in the northern hemisphere of the planet. Wrinkle ridges are found mostly along the eastern side of the image. The broadest wrinkle ridges in this image are up to 2 km wide. A 3 km diameter young fresh crater is located near the bottom of the image. The crater's ejecta blanket is also clearly seen surrounding the sharp well-defined crater rim. These features are indicative of a very young crater that has not been subjected to erosional processes. The Story The great thing about the solar system is that planets are both alike and different. They're all foreign enough to be mysterious and intriguing, and yet familiar enough to be seen as planetary 'cousins.' By comparing them, we can learn a lot about how planets form and then evolve geologically over time. Crinkled over smooth plains, the long, wavy raised landforms seen here are called 'wrinkle ridges,' and they've been found on Mars, Mercury, Venus, and the Moon - that is, on rocky bodies that are a part of our inner solar system. We know from this observation that planets (and large-enough moons) follow similar processes. What we don't know for sure is HOW these processes work. Scientists have been trying to understand how wrinkle ridges form for 40 years, and they still haven't reached a conclusion. That

  13. Alveolar Ridge Preservation Using Xenogeneic Collagen Matrix and Bone Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Parashis, Andreas O.; Kalaitzakis, Charalampos J.; Tatakis, Dimitris N.; Tosios, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) has been shown to prevent postextraction bone loss. The aim of this report is to highlight the clinical, radiographic, and histological outcomes following use of a bilayer xenogeneic collagen matrix (XCM) in combination with freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) for ARP. Nine patients were treated after extraction of 18 teeth. Following minimal flap elevation and atraumatic extraction, sockets were filled with FDBA. The XCM was adapted to cover the defect and 2-3 mm of adjacent bone and flaps were repositioned. Healing was uneventful in all cases, the XCM remained in place, and any matrix exposure was devoid of further complications. Exposed matrix portions were slowly vascularized and replaced by mature keratinized tissue within 2-3 months. Radiographic and clinical assessment indicated adequate volume of bone for implant placement, with all planned implants placed in acceptable positions. When fixed partial dentures were placed, restorations fulfilled aesthetic demands without requiring further augmentation procedures. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis from 9 sites (4 patients) indicated normal mucosa with complete incorporation of the matrix and absence of inflammatory response. The XCM + FDBA combination resulted in minimal complications and desirable soft and hard tissue therapeutic outcomes, suggesting the feasibility of this approach for ARP. PMID:25328523

  14. A double island arc between Taiwan and Luzon: consequence of ridge subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsanyao F.; Lee, Typhoon; Chen, Cheng-Hong; Cheng, Shih-Nan; Knittel, Ulrich; Punongbayan, Raymundo S.; Rasdas, Ariel R.

    1996-06-01

    Analysis of geomorphological, geochronological, geochemical and geophysical features in the segment of the Taiwan-Luzon Arc between Taiwan and Luzon (the Bashi Segment) allows the recognition of a double arc structure. The two volcanic chains are separated by 50 km just north of Luzon (18°N), and converge near 20°N. Islets in the western chain are older and largely composed of volcanic rocks of Miocene to Pliocene age. They all show low relief, lateritic platforms and wave-cut terraces, and are covered by massive recrystallized limestone. In contrast, all active volcanoes in this segment of the Taiwan-Luzon Arc belong to the eastern chain, where most islets are Quaternary in age. The volcanoes have well-developed cone shapes, and well-preserved deposits of near-vent facies. Magmas of the eastern chain have higher KSi, (La) n,(La/Yb) n, and lowerɛ Nd than their counterparts at the same latitude in the western chain. Therefore, the magmas erupted in the eastern chain were derived from more enriched mantle sources than the magmas erupted in the western chain. Moreover, the available seismological data seem to suggest an abrupt increase of the dip angle from 30° at 18°N to 80° at 20°N. Thus, the double arc structure is located in the region where the Benioff zone suddenly changes. In analogy with the Lesser Antilles Arc, we propose a geodynamic model in which the double arc in the Bashi Strait is the tectonic manifestation of the subduction of the aseismic Scarborough Seamount Chain, the extinct mid-ocean ridge of the South China Sea. Before that ridge reached the Manila Trench, the western chain was the volcanic front. When the ridge reached the subduction zone at 5-4 Ma, its buoyancy temporarily interrupted the subduction thus causing a time gap in magmatic activity. Furthermore, this ridge-arc collision was probably also responsible for regional uplift causing extensive sub-aerial weathering and erosion as well as massive reef formation in the western chain

  15. Biomechanical evaluation of segmental instability in degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Hasegewa, Kazuhiro; Kitahara, Ko; Hara, Toshiaki; Takano, Ko; Shimoda, Haruka

    2009-04-01

    Here we investigated the biomechanical properties of spinal segments in patients with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS) using a novel intraoperative measurement system. The measurement system comprised spinous process holders, a motion generator, a load cell, an optical displacement transducer, and a computer. Cyclic displacement of the holders produced flexion-extension of the segment with all ligamentous structures intact. Stiffness, absorption energy (AE), and neutral zone (NZ) were determined from the load-deformation data. Forty-one patients with DLS (M/F = 15/26, mean age 68.6 years; Group D) were studied. Adjacent segments with normal discs in six patients (M/F = 3/3, mean age 35 years) were included as a control group (Group N). Flexion stiffness was significantly lower in Group D than in Group N. The NZ, however, was significantly greater in Group D than in Group N. Thus, compared to normal segments, spinal segments with DLS had a lower flexion stiffness and a higher NZ. NZs in Group D were, however, widely distributed compared to those in Group N that showed NZ <2 mm/N in all cases, suggesting that the segment with DLS is not always unstable and that the segments with NZ >2 mm/N can be considered as unstable.

  16. Hippocampus segmentation using locally weighted prior based level set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achuthan, Anusha; Rajeswari, Mandava

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation of hippocampus in the brain is one of a major challenge in medical image segmentation due to its' imaging characteristics, with almost similar intensity between another adjacent gray matter structure, such as amygdala. The intensity similarity has causes the hippocampus to have weak or fuzzy boundaries. With this main challenge being demonstrated by hippocampus, a segmentation method that relies on image information alone may not produce accurate segmentation results. Therefore, it is needed an assimilation of prior information such as shape and spatial information into existing segmentation method to produce the expected segmentation. Previous studies has widely integrated prior information into segmentation methods. However, the prior information has been utilized through a global manner integration, and this does not reflect the real scenario during clinical delineation. Therefore, in this paper, a locally integrated prior information into a level set model is presented. This work utilizes a mean shape model to provide automatic initialization for level set evolution, and has been integrated as prior information into the level set model. The local integration of edge based information and prior information has been implemented through an edge weighting map that decides at voxel level which information need to be observed during a level set evolution. The edge weighting map shows which corresponding voxels having sufficient edge information. Experiments shows that the proposed integration of prior information locally into a conventional edge-based level set model, known as geodesic active contour has shown improvement of 9% in averaged Dice coefficient.

  17. Biomechanical evaluation of segmental instability in degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Ko; Hara, Toshiaki; Takano, Ko; Shimoda, Haruka

    2008-01-01

    Here we investigated the biomechanical properties of spinal segments in patients with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS) using a novel intraoperative measurement system. The measurement system comprised spinous process holders, a motion generator, a load cell, an optical displacement transducer, and a computer. Cyclic displacement of the holders produced flexion-extension of the segment with all ligamentous structures intact. Stiffness, absorption energy (AE), and neutral zone (NZ) were determined from the load-deformation data. Forty-one patients with DLS (M/F = 15/26, mean age 68.6 years; Group D) were studied. Adjacent segments with normal discs in six patients (M/F = 3/3, mean age 35 years) were included as a control group (Group N). Flexion stiffness was significantly lower in Group D than in Group N. The NZ, however, was significantly greater in Group D than in Group N. Thus, compared to normal segments, spinal segments with DLS had a lower flexion stiffness and a higher NZ. NZs in Group D were, however, widely distributed compared to those in Group N that showed NZ <2 mm/N in all cases, suggesting that the segment with DLS is not always unstable and that the segments with NZ >2 mm/N can be considered as unstable. PMID:19066987

  18. Geochemistry of Rift Valley Sediments at the Ultra-slow Spreading Mohns-Knipovich Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesland, K.; Pedersen, R.; Haflidason, H.; Thorseth, I. H.

    2010-12-01

    activity along this ridge segment.

  19. Rapid cooling rates at an active mid-ocean ridge from zircon thermochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Perfit, Michael R.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Smith, Matthew C.; Cotsonika, Laurie A.; Zellmer, Georg F.; Ridley, W. Ian

    2011-01-01

    Oceanic spreading ridges are Earth's most productive crust generating environment, but mechanisms and rates of crustal accretion and heat loss are debated. Existing observations on cooling rates are ambiguous regarding the prevalence of conductive vs. convective cooling of lower oceanic crust. Here, we report the discovery and dating of zircon in mid-ocean ridge dacite lavas that constrain magmatic differentiation and cooling rates at an active spreading center. Dacitic lavas erupted on the southern Cleft segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge, an intermediate-rate spreading center, near the intersection with the Blanco transform fault. Their U–Th zircon crystallization ages (29.3-4.6+4.8 ka; 1δ standard error s.e.) overlap with the (U–Th)/He zircon eruption age (32.7 ± 1.6 ka) within uncertainty. Based on similar 238U-230Th disequilibria between southern Cleft dacite glass separates and young mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) erupted nearby, differentiation must have occurred rapidly, within ~ 10–20 ka at most. Ti-in-zircon thermometry indicates crystallization at 850–900 °C and pressures > 70–150 MPa are calculated from H2O solubility models. These time-temperature constraints translate into a magma cooling rate of ~ 2 × 10-2 °C/a. This rate is at least one order-of-magnitude faster than those calculated for zircon-bearing plutonic rocks from slow spreading ridges. Such short intervals for differentiation and cooling can only be resolved through uranium-series (238U–230Th) decay in young lavas, and are best explained by dissipating heat convectively at high crustal permeability.

  20. Volatiles beneath mid-ocean ridges: Deep melting, channelised transport