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Sample records for adjacent ridge segments

  1. Adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  2. PROPAGATION AND LINKAGE OF OCEANIC RIDGE SEGMENTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, David D.; Aydin, Atilla

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was made of spreading ridges and the development of structures that link ridge segments using an analogy between ridges and cracks in elastic plates. The ridge-propagation force and a path factor that controls propagation direction were calculated for echelon ridge segments propagating toward each other. The ridge-propagation force increases as ridge ends approach but then declines sharply as the ends pass, so ridge segments may overlap somewhat. The sign of the path factor changes as ridge ends approach and pass, so the overlapping ridge ends may diverge and then converge following a hook-shaped path. The magnitudes of shear stresses in the plane of the plate and orientations of maximum shear planes between adjacent ridge segments were calculated to study transform faulting. For different loading conditions simulating ridge push, plate pull, and ridge suction, a zone of intense mechanical interaction between adjacent ridge ends in which stresses are concentrated was identified. The magnitudes of mean stresses in the plane of the plate and orientations of principal stress planes were also calculated.

  3. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  4. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  5. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  6. Mapping oceanic ridge segments in Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Boudier, F.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents the results of detailed mapping of high-temperature flow structures in the mantle and crust of two massifs of the Oman ophiolite. In these massifs, the dominant structures, including large-scale folds, shear zones, and fractures, were generated at elevated temperatures and are ascribed to the ridge or ridge environment activity; this means that the structural maps presented can be viewed as those of partly dissected ridge segments. It has been possible in the two massifs to locate the paleoaxis of the oceanic ridge which created this crust. This location, which is constrained by several independent tests, is a prerequisite to reconstruct the structure and to investigate the dynamics of a fast spreading ridge. In the Nakhl-Rustaq massif, high temperature tectonic activity at the ridge rotated the Moho toward a vertical altitude and folded the layered gabbros on the scale of several hundred meters. This tectonism is attributed to a propagating ridge deforming a slightly older lithosphere. The propagating ridge segment extends in the field from a diapir area to a domain located along strike some 20 km away, where the sheeted dike complex roots directly in the mantle, without layered gabbros in between. The diapir area represents the mantle feeder for the ridge segment, and the rooted dikes represent the propagating tip. Other results include the detailed mapping of two mantle diapirs and of the diverging mantle flow issued from them. Magma chambers are centered over diapirs and are tent-shaped, in accord with our previous models.

  7. Life and death of axial volcanic ridges: Segmentation and crustal accretion at the Reykjanes Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirce, C.; Sinha, M. C.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we present a description of ridge segmentation and segment evolution at the slow spreading Reykjanes Ridge, based on the combined and integrated interpretation of several geophysical datasets acquired along this section of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. At the Reykjanes Ridge, segmentation is manifest at the seabed most clearly as axial volcanic ridges (AVRs). These correspond to third-order segments, while multiple adjacent AVRs collectively represent the larger-scale pattern of second-order segmentation. AVRs are known to undergo a life cycle of multiple phases of magmatic accretion, tectonic extension and dismemberment. Our combined interpretation of the results of the previously independently analysed datasets indicates that magma influx from the mantle to the crust associated with these cycles is initially focused towards second-order segment centres. Adjacent AVRs within a second-order segment are progressively rejuvenated from the segment centre towards the segment tips during each cycle, with the redistribution of magma along-axis occurring within individual AVRs at mid-crustal to upper-crustal level during the magmatic phase. In some cases, offset basins between adjacent AVRs are characterised by significant crustal melt accumulation and increased crustal thickness, indicating that they are currently sites of incipient AVR growth. The initiation of new AVRs within former offset basins, and the abandonment of other AVRs, indicates that third-order segments have a finite and limited life span. As part of this study we have mapped the geometry and location of all abandoned (inactive), relict AVRs preserved off-axis to form the basis of a reconstruction of the pattern of asymmetric spreading. Using this reconstruction we have developed a new model of AVR evolution, spanning ˜ 2 Myr of crustal accretion, that reveals nested scales and phases of accretion, in which each AVR undergoes multiple tectonomagmatic cycles before ending its life once it has

  8. Adjacent Segment Disease Perspective and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra-Pozo, Fanor M.; Deusdara, Renato A. M.; Benzel, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adjacent segment disease has become a common topic in spine surgery circles because of the significant increase in fusion surgery in recent years and the development of motion preservation technologies that theoretically should lead to a decrease in this pathology. The purpose of this review is to organize the evidence available in the current literature on this subject. Methods For this literature review, a search was conducted in PubMed with the following keywords: adjacent segment degeneration and disease. Selection, review, and analysis of the literature were completed according to level of evidence. Results The PubMed search identified 850 articles, from which 41 articles were selected and reviewed. The incidence of adjacent segment disease in the cervical spine is close to 3% without a significant statistical difference between surgical techniques (fusion vs arthroplasty). Authors report the incidence of adjacent segment disease in the lumbar spine to range from 2% to 14%. Damage to the posterior ligamentous complex and sagittal imbalances are important risk factors for both degeneration and disease. Conclusion Insufficient evidence exists at this point to support the idea that total disc arthroplasty is superior to fusion procedures in minimizing the incidence of adjacent segment disease. The etiology is most likely multifactorial but it is becoming abundantly clear that adjacent segment disease is not caused by motion segment fusion alone. Fusion plus the presence of abnormal end-fusion alignment appears to be a major factor in creating end-fusion stresses that result in adjacent segment degeneration and subsequent disease. The data presented cast further doubt on previously established rationales for total disc arthroplasty, at least with regard to the effect of total disc arthroplasty on adjacent segment degeneration pathology. PMID:24688337

  9. The ridges of Europa: Extensions of adjacent topography onto their flanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Richard; Sak, Peter B.

    2014-03-01

    The surface of Europa displays numerous generations of intersecting arrays of linear ridges. At some locations along these ridges, older ridges on adjacent terrain appear to extend up the flank of a more recent ridge. It has thus been suggested that the ridges may have formed by upturning of that adjacent terrain. However, the newer ridges generally appear to be material deposited over the older terrain. Here we consider how the morphology of the overprinted topography may have been inherited by the more recent ridges. An analogous process occurs along some sediment-starved convergent plate boundaries on Earth, where the poorly consolidated material of a frontal prism of an overriding plate is pushed over preexisting ridges and seamounts on the downgoing plate. The overriding plate inherits the morphology of the downgoing plate even though the actual extension of that topography has been underthrust and buried. A well-studied example lies offshore of Costa Rica where the Caribbean plate overrides the Cocos plate. Experiments show other mechanisms as well: mass-wasting down a flank can result in extensions of adjacent ridges thanks to the geometry imposed by a constant angle of repose; in addition, more pronounced extensions of the older ridges result if the new ridge grows as it is bulldozed from behind (i.e., from the central groove of a double ridge on Europa). The shapes of the ridge extensions are distinctly different in these two cases. If tidal pumping extrudes material to the surface at the center of a double ridge, it might drive the latter mechanism. The ridge extensions observed on the flanks of more recent ridges may provide a crucial diagnostic of dominant ridge-building mechanisms when and if additional images are obtained at high resolution from future exploration. In additional to their morphology, the distribution of ridge extensions at only isolated locales may also provide constraints on ridge formation processes and their diversity.

  10. The influence of ridge migration on the magmatic segmentation of mid-ocean ridges.

    PubMed

    Carbotte, S M; Small, C; Donnelly, K

    2004-06-17

    The Earth's mid-ocean ridges display systematic changes in depth and shape, which subdivide the ridges into discrete spreading segments bounded by transform faults and smaller non-transform offsets of the axis. These morphological changes have been attributed to spatial variations in the supply of magma from the mantle, although the origin of the variations is poorly understood. Here we show that magmatic segmentation of ridges with fast and intermediate spreading rates is directly related to the migration velocity of the spreading axis over the mantle. For over 9,500 km of mid-ocean ridge examined, leading ridge segments in the 'hotspot' reference frame coincide with the shallow magmatically robust segments across 86 per cent of all transform faults and 73 per cent of all second-order discontinuities. We attribute this relationship to asymmetric mantle upwelling and melt production due to ridge migration, with focusing of melt towards ridge segments across discontinuities. The model is consistent with variations in crustal structure across discontinuities of the East Pacific Rise, and may explain variations in depth of melting and the distribution of enriched lavas. PMID:15201906

  11. Segmentation of mid-ocean ridges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.; Whitehead, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of mid-ocean ridges in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans show that the volcanism that forms the oceanic crust along the spreading-plate boundaries is concentrated at regular intervals related to spreading rate. This observation and a new calculation for a Rayleigh-Taylor type of gravitational instability of a partially molten mantle region growing under spreading centres yield reasonable estimates of upper mantle viscosities. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  12. Migration of mid-ocean-ridge volcanic segments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Dick, H.J.B.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1987-01-01

    The propagation of small-offset volcanic spreading-centre segments along mid-ocean ridge crests may reflect absolute motion of the plate boundary relative to the underlying mesospheric frame. Such a relationship could be caused by a purely vertical flow of the mantle under spreading centres and would have value in constraining past plate motions from non-transform trends generated during along-ridge propagation and in linking the major-element variability of oceanic crust and upper mantle to the bulk composition and temperatures of mantle ascending under mid-ocean ridges. ?? 1987 Nature Publishing Group.

  13. Is the Troodos ophiolite (Cyprus) a complete, transform fault-bounded Neotethyan ridge segment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Antony; Maffione, Marco

    2016-04-01

    We report new paleomagnetic data from the sheeted dike complex of the Troodos ophiolite (Cyprus) that indicate a hitherto unrecognized oceanic transform fault system marks its northern limit. The style, magnitude and scale of upper crustal fault block rotations in the northwestern Troodos region mirror those observed adjacent to the well-known Southern Troodos Transform Fault Zone along the southern edge of the ophiolite. A pattern of increasing clockwise rotation toward the north, coupled with consistent original dike strikes and inclined net rotation axes across this region, is compatible with distributed deformation adjacent to a dextrally-slipping transform system with a principal displacement zone just to the north of the exposed ophiolite. Combined with existing constraints on the spreading fabric, this implies segmentation of the Troodos ridge system on length scales of ~40 km, and suggests that a coherent strip of Neotethyan lithosphere, bounded by transforms and containing a complete ridge segment, has been uplifted to form the currently exposed Troodos ophiolite. Moreover, the inferred length scale of the ridge segment is consistent with formation at a slow-spreading rate during Tethyan seafloor spreading and with a supra-subduction zone environment, as indicated by geochemical constraints.

  14. Compositional Comparison of Iceland Rift Zones and Adjacent Portions of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D.; Barton, M.

    2007-12-01

    Iceland is a portion of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) that has been built by anomalous crustal production throughout the 55ma spreading history of the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The anomalously thick crust of Iceland contains the subaerial traces of the MAR which are the volcanically active rift zones. From the south, the Reykjanes Ridge (RR) continues on land as the Western Volcanic Zone (WVZ). In the north, the Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ) traces into the sea where it offset from the Kolbeinsey Ridge (KR) by the Tjornnes Fracture Zone (TVZ). We report the results of petrologic comparison of the WVZ, the EVZ, and the NVZ of Iceland and the adjacent portions of the MAR - the RR and the KR. The EVZ, WVZ, and NVZ have been shown to have similar crustal structures with ~20 km thick crust thickening toward the hotspot in central Iceland with magma chambers located at the base of the crust and at some depth in the upper crust. Likewise, the KR and RR have melt chambers at the base of and within the crust. Melt compositions have been compared using a filtered database of 588 glass analyses from 29 localities throughout the rift zones, 57 glass analyses from the KR, and 521 glass analyses from the RR. This is the first such study carried out with such an extensive data set. Compositions are similar between the NVZ and WVZ with SiO2 wt.% of 49.0, and 48.6, MgO wt.% of 7.9, and 7.5, and FeOT wt.% of 10.9, and 11.7 respectively. The EVZ which is considered to be a propagating rift is a bit different with SiO2 wt.% of 49.4, MgO wt.% of 5.9, and FeOT wt.% of 13.8. The NVZ and WVZ have also been compared with their respectively adjacent ridge segments, the KR (SiO2 50.3 wt.%, MgO 6.9 wt.%, and FeOT 12.0 wt.%), and the RR (SiO2 50.8 wt.%, MgO 6.9 wt.%, and FeOT 12.3 wt.%). Mg#s for the NVZ and the WVZ are 0.56, and .053 respectively while the Mg# for both the KR and RR is 0.50. For further comparison, a database of 9035 glass analyses from mid-ocean ridge basalts worldwide

  15. Hydrothermal circulation within the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. Paul; Tivey, Maurice A.; Bjorklund, Tor A.; Salmi, Marie S.

    2010-05-01

    Areas of the seafloor at mid-ocean ridges where hydrothermal vents discharge are easily recognized by the dramatic biological, physical, and chemical processes that characterize such sites. Locations where seawater flows into the seafloor to recharge hydrothermal cells within the crustal reservoir are by contrast almost invisible but can be indirectly identified by a systematic grid of conductive heat flow measurements. An array of conductive heat flow stations in the Endeavour axial valley of the Juan de Fuca Ridge has identified recharge zones that appear to represent a nested system of fluid circulation paths. At the scale of an axial rift valley, conductive heat flow data indicate a general cross-valley fluid flow, where seawater enters the shallow subsurface crustal reservoir at the eastern wall of the Endeavour axial valley and undergoes a kilometer of horizontal transit beneath the valley floor, finally exiting as warm hydrothermal fluid discharge on the western valley bounding wall. Recharge zones also have been identified as located within an annular ring of very cold seafloor around the large Main Endeavour Hydrothermal Field, with seawater inflow occurring within faults that surround the fluid discharge sites. These conductive heat flow data are consistent with previous models where high-temperature fluid circulation cells beneath large hydrothermal vent fields may be composed of narrow vertical cylinders. Subsurface fluid circulation on the Endeavour Segment occurs at various crustal depths in three distinct modes: (1) general east to west flow across the entire valley floor, (2) in narrow cylinders that penetrate deeply to high-temperature heat sources, and (3) supplying low-temperature diffuse vents where seawater is entrained into the shallow uppermost crust by the adjacent high-temperature cylindrical systems. The systematic array of conductive heat flow measurements over the axial valley floor averaged ˜150 mW/m2, suggesting that only about 3% of

  16. The formation and linking of mid-segment detachment faults at the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, H.; Smith, D. K.; Dick, H. J.; Escartin, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Mid-Atlantic Ridge axis at 16.5N has a remarkably high rate of teleseismic and hydrophone-recorded seismicity, and we have identified it as a region of active detachment faulting. Limited multibeam bathymetry data on the west side of the median valley show two parallel, linear ridges: 50-km-long West Ridge at 15 km west of the volcanic axis, and 10-km-long East Ridge at only 6 km from the axis. The ridges are interpreted to be the tops of rotated detachment fault scarps (breakaways), indicating significant fault rotation (> 25 degrees). A striated surface, characteristic of a core complex, is associated with West Ridge. This region stands out because it presents a dramatic demonstration of a new detachment fault forming nearer to the axis (East Ridge) and interrupting the overall development of what we interpret to be a longer, older and still active detachment fault that has its breakaway at the older West Ridge. We hypothesize that the section of the West Ridge detachment behind the East Ridge detachment was deactivated when East Ridge formed and furthermore, that the East Ridge detachment has linked into the West Ridge detachment to form a single detachment fault. This area represents an opportunity to address the initiation and cessation of mid-segment detachment faulting as well as how the faults link along the axis. Sampling of the detachment footwall will allow us to relate the subcrustal architecture of the segment to the local magmatic budget, and how this influences the initiation and geometry of the faulting. A broad, well-developed neovolcanic zone at the adjacent spreading axis suggests abundant volcanism. The greater depth of the local off-axis morphology, though, indicates that East Ridge may have formed in a relatively amagmatic corridor. Massifs at the western limit of the multibeam bathymetry data suggest asymmetric spreading through detachment faulting has dominated this region for at least the last several million years and perhaps much

  17. Alkalic Basalt in Ridge Axis of 53˚E Amagmatic Segment Center, Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Wang, J.; Liu, Y.; Ji, F.; Dick, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) is key tracer of composition and process in the mantle. It is interesting to notice that some alkalic basalts occur in amagmatic spreading center of ultraslow spreading ridges, for examples, 9-16˚E of the Southwest Indian ridge (Standish et al., 2008) and Lena Trough of Arctic Ocean (Snow et al., 2011). The latter is interpreted as the result of the pre-existence of continental transform fault or the especially cold thermal structure of ancient continental lithosphere. 53˚E segment, east of the Gallieni transform fault, was discovered as an amagmatic segment (Zhou and Dick, 2013). On both sides of the ridge axis, peridotites with a little gabbro are exposed in an area more than 3200 km2. Basalts exist in the southern portion of 53˚E segment, indicating the transformation from magmatic to amagmatic spreading about 9.4 million years ago. In April of 2014, Leg 4 of the RV Dayang Yihao cruise 30, basaltic glasses was dredged at one location (3500 m water depth) in the ridge axis of 53˚E segment center. It is shown by electric probe analysis that the samples have extremely high sodium content (4.0-4.49 wt% Na­2O ), relative higher potassium content (0.27-0.32 wt% K2O) and silica (50.67-51.87 wt% SiO2), and lower MgO content (5.9-6.4 wt% MgO). Mg-number is 0.55-0.59. It is distinctly different from the N-MORB (2.42-2.68 wt% Na2O, 0.03-0.06 wt% K2O, 48.6-49.6 wt% Si2O, 8.8-9.0 wt% MgO, Mg-numbers 0.63) distributed in the 560-km-long supersegment, west of the Gallieni transform fault, where the active Dragon Flag hydrothermal field was discovered at 49.6˚E in 2007. The reasons for the alkalic basalt in the ridge axis of 53˚E amagmatic segment center, either by low melting degree of garnet stability field, by melting from an ancient subcontinental lithospheric mantle, or by sodium-metasomatism or even other mantle processes or their combination in the deep mantle, are under further studies.

  18. Groups of adjacent contour segments for object detection.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, V; Fevrier, L; Jurie, F; Schmid, C

    2008-01-01

    We present a family of scale-invariant local shape features formed by chains of k connected, roughly straight contour segments (kAS), and their use for object class detection. kAS are able to cleanly encode pure fragments of an object boundary, without including nearby clutter. Moreover, they offer an attractive compromise between information content and repeatability, and encompass a wide variety of local shape structures. We also define a translation and scale invariant descriptor encoding the geometric configuration of the segments within a kAS, making kAS easy to reuse in other frameworks, for example as a replacement or addition to interest points. Software for detecting and describing kAS is released on lear.inrialpes.fr/software. We demonstrate the high performance of kAS within a simple but powerful sliding-window object detection scheme. Through extensive evaluations, involving eight diverse object classes and more than 1400 images, we 1) study the evolution of performance as the degree of feature complexity k varies and determine the best degree; 2) show that kAS substantially outperform interest points for detecting shape-based classes; 3) compare our object detector to the recent, state-of-the-art system by Dalal and Triggs [4]. PMID:18000323

  19. Segmentation and a nontransform ridge offset of the Reykjanes Ridge near 58 deg N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, R. C.; Field, P. R.; Owens, R. B.

    1994-12-01

    Multibeam bathymetry, deep-towed side scan sonar, gravity, and magnetic data over a 50 km square area all suggest the presence of a second-order, nontransform offset on the obliquely spreading Reykjanes Ridge (North Atlantic ocean) near 58 deg N latitude. It is the first such offset to be recognized on the Reykjanes Ridge. This region is characterized by a shallow median valley containing en echelon axial volcanic ridges (AVRs) similar to those found on more northerly parts of the Reykjanes Ridge. The side scan sonar shows that all the AVRs are constructional in nature. The one immediately south of the offset basin backscatters strongly, is unmarked by faulting, and so appears extremely young. Other AVRs appear older, having lower backscatter and, off axis, being cut by faults and fissures. At 57 deg 55 min N the progression of AVRs is interrupted by a 600-m-deep, 20 km x 10 km basin. Residual mantle Bouguer anomalies, corrected for two-dimensional lithospheric cooling, display a high of at least 8 mGal over the basin. Two small, off axis basins occur roughly along the flow line from this basin and are also characterized by gravity highs. The basins are interpreted as regions of crustal thinning and are believed to represent the discontinuous trace of the ridge offset, which has thus been in existence for at least 2 m.y. and has been slowly propagating south. Inversion of the magnetic field shows a very low magnetization (approximately 3-4 A/m) associated with the offset basin, which is interpreted as indicating a reduced magnetic layer thickness due to poor magma supply to the offset area. The Brunhes-Matuyama reversal boundary and Anomaly 2 traces are offset about 3 km dextrally across the proposed offset trace. The AVR immediately north of the offset displays high amplitudes of magnetization which steadily increase southward toward its tip adjacent to the offset, suggesting the presence of increasingly highly fractionated basalts toward the AVR tip. Polarity

  20. Sacroiliac Joint Fusion Minimally Affects Adjacent Lumbar Segment Motion: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Kiapour, Ali; Yerby, Scott A.; Goel, Vijay K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adjacent segment disease is a recognized consequence of fusion in the spinal column. Fusion of the sacroiliac joint is an effective method of pain reduction. Although effective, the consequences of sacroiliac joint fusion and the potential for adjacent segment disease for the adjacent lumbar spinal levels is unknown. The objective of this study was to quantify the change in range of motion of the sacroiliac joint and the adjacent lumbar spinal motion segments due to sacroiliac joint fusion and compare these changes to previous literature to assess the potential for adjacent segment disease in the lumbar spine. Methods An experimentally validated finite element model of the lumbar spine and pelvis was used to simulate a fusion of the sacroiliac joint using three laterally placed triangular implants (iFuse Implant System, SI-BONE, Inc., San Jose, CA). The range of motion of the sacroiliac joint and the adjacent lumbar spinal motion segments were calculated using a hybrid loading protocol and compared with the intact range of motion in flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Results The range of motions of the treated sacroiliac joints were reduced in flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, by 56.6%, 59.5%, 27.8%, and 53.3%, respectively when compared with the intact condition. The stiffening of the sacroiliac joint resulted in increases at the adjacent lumbar motion segment (L5-S1) for flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, of 3.0%, 3.7%, 1.1%, and 4.6%, respectively. Conclusions Fusion of the sacroiliac joint resulted in substantial (> 50%) reductions in flexion, extension, and axial rotation of the sacroiliac joint with minimal (< 5%) increases in range of motion in the lumbar spine. Although the predicted increases in lumbar range of motion are minimal after sacroiliac joint fusion, the long-term clinical results remain to be investigated. PMID:26767156

  1. Spondylosis deformans and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (dish) resulting in adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Maria; Gonçalves, Rita; Haley, Allison; Wessmann, Annette; Penderis, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Spondylosis deformans and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) are usually incidental findings and in most dogs are either asymptomatic or associated with mild clinical signs. Severe spondylosis deformans and DISH can result in complete bony fusion of consecutive vertebral segments. One of the recognised complications following vertebral fusion in human patients is the development of adjacent segment disease, which is defined as degenerative changes, most commonly degenerative intervertebral disc disease, in the mobile vertebral segment neighboring a region of complete vertebral fusion. A similar syndrome following cervical fusion in dogs has been termed the domino effect. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the hypothesis that vertebral fusion occurring secondary to spondylosis deformans or DISH in dogs would protect fused intervertebral disc spaces from undergoing degeneration, but result in adjacent segment disease at neighbouring unfused intervertebral disc spaces. Eight dogs with clinical signs of thoracolumbar myelopathy, magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracolumbar vertebral column, and spondylosis deformans or DISH producing fusion of > or = 2 consecutive intervertebral disc spaces were evaluated. Vertebral fusion of > or = 2 consecutive intervertebral disc spaces was correlated (P = 0.0017) with adjacent segment disease at the neighbouring unfused intervertebral disc space. Vertebral fusion appeared to protect fused intervertebral disc spaces from undergoing degeneration (P < 0.0001). Adjacent segment disease should be considered in dogs with severe spondylosis deformans or DISH occurring in conjunction with a thoracolumbar myelopathy. PMID:22734148

  2. Load Rate of Facet Joints at the Adjacent Segment Increased After Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Pei, Bao-Qing; Yang, Jin-Cai; Hai, Yong; Li, De-Yu; Wu, Shu-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The cause of the adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after fusion remains unknown. It is reported that adjacent facet joint stresses increase after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. This increase of stress rate may lead to tissue injury. Thus far, the load rate of the adjacent segment facet joint after fusion remains unclear. Methods: Six C2–C7 cadaveric spine specimens were loaded under four motion modes: Flexion, extension, rotation, and lateral bending, with a pure moment using a 6° robot arm combined with an optical motion analysis system. The Tecscan pressure test system was used for testing facet joint pressure. Results: The contact mode of the facet joints and distributions of the force center during different motions were recorded. The adjacent segment facet joint forces increased faster after fusion, compared with intact conditions. While the magnitude of pressures increased, there was no difference in distribution modes before and after fusion. No pressures were detected during flexion. The average growth velocity during extension was the fastest and was significantly faster than lateral bending. Conclusions: One of the reasons for cartilage injury was the increasing stress rate of loading. This implies that ASD after fusion may be related to habitual movement before and after fusion. More and faster extension is disadvantageous for the facet joints and should be reduced as much as possible. PMID:25881597

  3. Best Merge Region Growing Segmentation with Integrated Non-Adjacent Region Object Aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; Tarabalka, Yuliya; Montesano, Paul M.; Gofman, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    Best merge region growing normally produces segmentations with closed connected region objects. Recognizing that spectrally similar objects often appear in spatially separate locations, we present an approach for tightly integrating best merge region growing with non-adjacent region object aggregation, which we call Hierarchical Segmentation or HSeg. However, the original implementation of non-adjacent region object aggregation in HSeg required excessive computing time even for moderately sized images because of the required intercomparison of each region with all other regions. This problem was previously addressed by a recursive approximation of HSeg, called RHSeg. In this paper we introduce a refined implementation of non-adjacent region object aggregation in HSeg that reduces the computational requirements of HSeg without resorting to the recursive approximation. In this refinement, HSeg s region inter-comparisons among non-adjacent regions are limited to regions of a dynamically determined minimum size. We show that this refined version of HSeg can process moderately sized images in about the same amount of time as RHSeg incorporating the original HSeg. Nonetheless, RHSeg is still required for processing very large images due to its lower computer memory requirements and amenability to parallel processing. We then note a limitation of RHSeg with the original HSeg for high spatial resolution images, and show how incorporating the refined HSeg into RHSeg overcomes this limitation. The quality of the image segmentations produced by the refined HSeg is then compared with other available best merge segmentation approaches. Finally, we comment on the unique nature of the hierarchical segmentations produced by HSeg.

  4. Hydrothermal Activity Along Multiple Ridge Segments of the Northern Central Indian Ridge, 8°-17°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, J.; Kim, J.; Pak, S.; Son, S.; Moon, J.; Baker, E. T.

    2012-12-01

    We report the first systematic hydrothermal plume surveys conducted on the northern Central Indian Ridge (CIR, 8°-17°S), a slow spreading ridge with rates between ~35 and 40 mm/yr, during the CIR research program of KORDI between 2009 and 2011. Using a combined CTD/Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorder (MAPR) package we occupied 208 vertical casts and 82 tows along seven segments of the CIR totaling ~700 km of ridge length to estimate the frequency of hydrothermal activity on this slow-spreading ridge. Evidence for hydrothermal activity was found on each of the seven segments, with most plumes found between 3000 and 3500 m. Using only stations within the rift valley, the estimated value of plume incidence (ph=0.19) coincides with the global trend between the spatial density of hydrothermal plumes and full-spreading rate (an indicator of magmatic budget). However, there are also indications of possible discharge from hydrothermal activity or serpentinization from the ridge flanks (possible ocean core complexes), as has been observed along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. For example, some sites show methane anomalies unaccompanied by any optical anomaly. Our preliminary results support the increasing role of tectonic control on hydrothermal activity as spreading rates decrease. Further examination of the plume signals, combined with chemical composition of sampled water and geological data, will provide valuable insights into hydrothermal activity on slow spreading ridges.

  5. Upper Crustal Seismic Velocity Structure of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, R. T.; Wilcock, W. S.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wells, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    We report preliminary results from an active-source seismic tomography experiment that was conducted along the intermediate-spreading Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in 2009. The overarching objective of the experiment is to test competing hypotheses for what governs the scale and intensity of magmatic and hydrothermal processes at mid-ocean ridges. Previous models of crustal accretion inferred that ridge-basin topography observed at the Endeavour results from alternating periods of enhanced or reduced magma supply from the mantle. Alternatively, a recent seismic reflection study has imaged a crustal magma chamber underlying the central portion of the Endeavour, which may indicate that variations in seafloor topography instead result from dike-induced faulting that occurs within the upper crust, adjacent to the axial magma chamber. The first model predicts a thicker high-porosity eruptive layer and lower velocities beneath topographic highs, while the second model is compatible with a uniform pattern of volcanic accretion. The experiment used 68 four-component ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) at 64 sites to record 5,567 airgun shots from the 6600 in3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. Three nested shooting grids were collected to image the three-dimensional crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the segment at multiple spatial scales. We use first-arriving crustal phases (Pg) recorded by the two grids with the densest shot-receiver spacing, the 24 x 8 km2 vent field grid and the 60 x 20 km2 crustal grid, to image the fine-scale (< 1 km) three-dimensional velocity structure of the upper few kilometers of crust at the segment scale. We employ a non-linear tomographic method that utilizes a shortest-path ray-tracing algorithm with columns of nodes sheared vertically to include effects of seafloor topography. To date, we have manually picked 13,000 Pg phases located within 10 km of 17 OBSs. The full analysis will include ~40,000 Pg travel

  6. Simultaneous segmentation and generalisation of non-adjacent dependencies from continuous speech.

    PubMed

    Frost, Rebecca L A; Monaghan, Padraic

    2016-02-01

    Language learning requires mastering multiple tasks, including segmenting speech to identify words, and learning the syntactic role of these words within sentences. A key question in language acquisition research is the extent to which these tasks are sequential or successive, and consequently whether they may be driven by distinct or similar computations. We explored a classic artificial language learning paradigm, where the language structure is defined in terms of non-adjacent dependencies. We show that participants are able to use the same statistical information at the same time to segment continuous speech to both identify words and to generalise over the structure, when the generalisations were over novel speech that the participants had not previously experienced. We suggest that, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, the most economical explanation for the effects is that speech segmentation and grammatical generalisation are dependent on similar statistical processing mechanisms. PMID:26638049

  7. Repeated adjacent segment diseases and fractures in osteoporotic patients: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yao; Chen, Chiu-Liang; Chen, Wei-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background Pedicle screw instrumentation for treating spinal disorder is becoming increasingly widespread. Many studies have advocated its use to facilitate rigid fixation for spine; however, adjacent segmental disease is a known complication. Instrumented fusion for osteoporotic spines remains a significant challenge for spine surgeons. Prophylactic vertebroplasty for adjacent vertebra has been reported to reduce the complications of junctional compression fractures but has raised a new problem of vertebral subluxation. This case report is a rare and an extreme example with many surgical complications caused by repeated instrumented fusion for osteoporotic spine in a single patient. This patient had various complications including adjacent segmental disease, vertebral subluxation, and junctional fractures on radiographs and magnetic resonance images. Case presentation An 81-year-old Taiwanese woman underwent decompression and instrumented fusion of L4-L5 in Taiwan 10 years ago. Due to degenerative spinal stenosis of L3-L4 and L2-L3, she had decompression with instrumented fusion from L5 to L1 at the previous hospital. However, catastrophic vertebral subluxations with severe neurologic compromise occurred, and she underwent salvage surgeries twice with prolonged instrumented fusion from L5 to T2. The surgeries did not resolve her problems of spinal instability and neurologic complications. Eventually, the patient remained with a Frankel Grade C spinal cord injury. Conclusion Adjacent segmental disease, junctional fracture, and vertebral subluxation are familiar complications following instrumented spinal fusion surgeries for osteoporotic spines. Neurologic injuries following long instrumentation are often serious and difficult to address with surgery alone. Conservative treatments should always be contemplated as an alternative method for patients with poor bone stock. PMID:27555778

  8. Segmentation of mid-ocean ridges attributed to oblique mantle divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbeek, Brandon P.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Wilcock, William S. D.

    2016-08-01

    The origin of mid-ocean ridge segmentation--the systematic along-axis variation in tectonic and magmatic processes--remains controversial. It is commonly assumed that mantle flow is a passive response to plate divergence and that between transform faults magma supply controls segmentation. Using seismic tomography, we constrain the geometry of mantle flow and the distribution of mantle melt beneath the intermediate-spreading Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Our results, in combination with prior studies, establish a systematic skew between the mantle-divergence and plate-spreading directions. In all three cases studied, mantle divergence is advanced with respect to recent changes in the plate-spreading direction and the extent to which the flow field is advanced increases with decreasing spreading rate. Furthermore, seismic images show that large-offset, non-transform discontinuities are regions of enhanced mantle melt retention. We propose that oblique mantle flow beneath mid-ocean ridges is a driving force for the reorientation of spreading segments and the formation of ridge-axis discontinuities. The resulting tectonic discontinuities decrease the efficiency of upward melt transport, thus defining segment-scale variations in magmatic processes. We predict that across spreading rates mid-ocean ridge segmentation is controlled by evolving patterns in asthenospheric flow and the dynamics of lithospheric rifting.

  9. Adjacent segment disc pressures following two-level cervical disc replacement versus simulated anterior cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Laxer, Eric B; Darden, Bruce V; Murrey, Daniel B; Milam, R Alden; Rhyne, Alfred L; Claytor, Brian; Nussman, Donna S; Powers, Timothy W; Davies, Matthew A; Bryant, S Chad; Larsen, Scott P; Bhatt, Meghal; Brodziak, John; Polic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion (ACF) has been shown to alter the biomechanics of adjacent segments of the cervical spine. The goal of total disc replacement is to address pathology at a given disc with minimal disruption of the operated or adjacent segments. This study compares the pressure within discs adjacent to either a two-level simulated ACDF or a two-level total disc replacement with the ProDisc-C. A special automated motion testing apparatus was constructed. Four fresh cadaveric cervical spine specimens were affixed to the test stand and tested in flexion and extension under specific loads. Intradiscal, miniature strain-gauge-based transducers were placed in the discs above and below the "treated" levels. The specimens were then tested in flexion and extension. Pressure and overall angular displacement were measured. In the most extreme and highest quality specimen the difference at C3/C4 registered 800 kPa and the difference at C6/C7 registered 50 kPa. This same quality specimen treated with the ProDisc reached a flexion angle at much lower moments, 24.3 degrees at 5 N-m, when compared to the the SACF 12.2 degrees at 8.6 N-m. Therefore, the moment needed to achieve 15 degrees of flexion with the SACF treatment was 5.5 N-m and the ProDisc treatment was only 2.9 N-m. This initial data would indicate that adjacent level discs experience substantially lower pressure after two-level disc replacement when compared to two-level SACF. Additional testing to further support these observations is ongoing. PMID:17108473

  10. The RAMESSES experiment-V. Crustal accretion at axial volcanic ridge segments-a gravity study at 57°45'N on the slow spreading Reykjanes Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirce, Christine; Navin, Debbie A.

    2002-04-01

    Presented in this paper are the results of a two-stage analysis of gravity data acquired during a multidisciplinary geophysical survey of a magmatically active axial volcanic ridge (AVR) segment located at 57°45'N on the Reykjanes Ridge, part of the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge south of Iceland. Modelling of the free-air anomaly in 2-D shows that, across-axis, the observed anomaly results largely from density and layer thickness variation in the mid-lower crust. Although seismic control on crustal thickness along-axis is limited, modelling also suggests that both crustal density and thickness also vary towards AVR tips. Using the 2-D modelling results as crustal reference, the residual mantle Bouguer anomaly (RMBA) is calculated to assess whether magma-related density anomalies are present in the mantle and to investigate the structure of, and relationship between, adjacent AVRs along-axis. RMBA lows are associated with both an along-ridge trend encompassing a number of adjacent AVRs and with individual, more topographically robust AVRs. Modelling of the RMBA low associated with the 57°45'N AVR further suggests that along-axis density variation is confined to the central region of this AVR and that the anomaly can largely be accounted for by density variation within Layer 3 and a degree of crustal thinning towards AVR tips. The nature of the along-axis variation in crustal density further suggests that it may result from repeated phases of magma supply to the crustal system from the mantle. Within the resolution of the RMBA, modelling does not confirm or preclude the presence of a subcrustal density anomaly associated with retention of a small percentage of melt in the mantle. However, a melt-free model for at least the top 40 km of the mantle is preferred as this is consistent with the results of modelling a coincident magnetotelluric data set. The ridge-trend characteristics of the RMBA also suggest that magma delivery may take place along this trend, and

  11. Clinical Experiences of Non-fusion Dynamic Stabilization Surgery for Adjacent Segmental Pathology after Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2016-01-01

    Background As an alternative to spinal fusion, non-fusion dynamic stabilization surgery has been developed, showing good clinical outcomes. In the present study, we introduce our surgical series, which involves non-fusion dynamic stabilization surgery for adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after lumbar fusion surgery. Methods Fifteen patients (13 female and 2 male, mean age of 62.1 years) who underwent dynamic stabilization surgery for symptomatic ASP were included and medical records, magnetic resonance images (MRI), and plain radiographs were retrospectively evaluated. Results Twelve of the 15 patients had the fusion segment at L4-5, and the most common segment affected by ASP was L3-4. The time interval between prior fusion and later non-fusion surgery was mean 67.0 months. The Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index showed values of 7.4 and 58.5% before the non-fusion surgery and these values respectively declined to 4.2 and 41.3% postoperatively at 36 months (p=0.027 and p=0.018, respectively). During the mean 44.8 months of follow-up, medication of analgesics was also significantly reduced. The MRI grade for disc and central stenosis identified significant degeneration at L3-4, and similar disc degeneration from lateral radiographs was determined at L3-4 between before the prior fusion surgery and the later non-fusion surgery. After the non-fusion surgery, the L3-4 segment and the proximal segment of L2-3 were preserved in the disc, stenosis and facet joint whereas L1-2 showed disc degeneration on the last MRI (p=0.032). Five instances of radiologic ASP were identified, showing characteristic disc-space narrowing at the proximal segments of L1-2 and L2-3. However, no patient underwent additional surgery for ASP after non-fusion dynamic stabilization surgery. Conclusion The proposed non-fusion dynamic stabilization system could be an effective surgical treatment for elderly patients with symptomatic ASP after lumbar fusion. PMID:27162710

  12. Reduction in adjacent-segment degeneration after multilevel posterior lumbar interbody fusion with proximal DIAM implantation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kang; Liliang, Po-Chou; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Liang, Cheng-Loong; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Chen, Tai-Been; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Chen, Han-Jung

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Multilevel long-segment lumbar fusion poses a high risk for future development of adjacent-segment degeneration (ASD). Creating a dynamic transition zone with an interspinous process device (IPD) proximal to the fusion has recently been applied as a method to reduce the occurrence of ASD. The authors report their experience with the Device for Intervertebral Assisted Motion (DIAM) implanted proximal to multilevel posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) in reducing the development of proximal ASD. METHODS This retrospective study reviewed 91 cases involving patients who underwent 2-level (L4-S1), 3-level (L3-S1), or 4-level (L2-S1) PLIF. In Group A (42 cases), the patients received PLIF only, while in Group B (49 cases), an interspinous process device, a DIAM implant, was put at the adjacent level proximal to the PLIF construct. Bone resection at the uppermost segment of the PLIF was equally limited in the 2 groups, with preservation of the upper portion of the spinous process/lamina and the attached supraspinous ligament. Outcome measures included a visual analog scale (VAS) for low-back pain and leg pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) for functional impairment. Anteroposterior and lateral flexion/extension radiographs were used to evaluate the fusion status, presence and patterns of ASD, and mobility of the DIAM-implanted segment. RESULTS Solid interbody fusion without implant failure was observed in all cases. Radiographic ASD occurred in 20 (48%) of Group A cases and 3 (6%) of Group B cases (p < 0.001). Among the patients in whom ASD was identified, 9 in Group A and 3 in Group B were symptomatic; of these patients, 3 in Group A and 1 in Group B underwent a second surgery for severe symptomatic ASD. At 24 months after surgery, Group A patients fared worse than Group B, showing higher mean VAS and ODI scores due to symptoms related to ASD. At the final follow-up evaluations, as reoperations had been performed to treat symptomatic ASD in some

  13. New Classification for Clinically Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Pathology in Cervical Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) is common after cervical disc surgery. A critical examination of 320 patients operated for cervical disc prolapse revealed that CASP can also occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of cervical spine. This has not been studied in depth and there is a need for a practically applicable classification of CASP. Purpose To develop a new classification scheme of CASP. Overview of Literature A review of the literature did not reveal a practically applicable classification incorporating the occurrence of CASP in congenital and degenerative fusion cases. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 320 patients operated (509 disc spaces) on for cervical disc prolapse. Cases (n=316) were followed-up for 3-11 years. Random sampling of 220 patients with postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 165 cases was analyzed. Results Six symptomatic CASP cases required resurgery (1.9%), eight cases involved MRI proven CASP with axial neck pain only and 13 patients were asymptomatic with radiological adjacent segment pathology (RASP). The frequency rate was 8.5% (27/316). Four cases of congenital or degenerative fusion of vertebra developed CASP requiring surgery. CASP is classified as primary or secondary follows. Primary A1 was congenital fusion of vertebra and primary A2 was degenerative fusion of the vertebra. Secondary, which was after cervical disc surgery, comprised B1 (RASP in asymptomatic patients), B2 (CASP in patients with axial neck pain), and B3 (CASP with myeloradiculopathy). B3 was subdivided into single-level CASP (B3a) and multiple-level CASP (B3b). Conclusions Symptomatic CASP requiring resurgery is infrequent. CASP can occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of the cervical spine. A new classification for CASP along with treatment strategy is proposed. Patients in Primary CASP and B3 CASP require resurgery while others require only observation. PMID:26712514

  14. Biomechanical Analysis of Fusion Segment Rigidity Upon Stress at Both the Fusion and Adjacent Segments: A Comparison between Unilateral and Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Kim, Jang-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of unilateral pedicle screw fixation on the fusion segment and the superior adjacent segment after one segment lumbar fusion using validated finite element models. Materials and Methods Four L3-4 fusion models were simulated according to the extent of decompression and the method of pedicle screws fixation in L3-4 lumbar fusion. These models included hemi-laminectomy with bilateral pedicle screw fixation in the L3-4 segment (BF-HL model), total laminectomy with bilateral pedicle screw fixation (BF-TL model), hemi-laminectomy with unilateral pedicle screw fixation (UF-HL model), and total laminectomy with unilateral pedicle screw fixation (UF-TL model). In each scenario, intradiscal pressures, annulus stress, and range of motion at the L2-3 and L3-4 segments were analyzed under flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsional moments. Results Under four pure moments, the unilateral fixation leads to a reduction in increment of range of motion at the adjacent segment, but larger motions were noted at the fusion segment (L3-4) in the unilateral fixation (UF-HL and UF-TL) models when compared to bilateral fixation. The maximal von Mises stress showed similar patterns to range of motion at both superior adjacent L2-3 segments and fusion segment. Conclusion The current study suggests that unilateral pedicle screw fixation seems to be unable to afford sufficient biomechanical stability in case of bilateral total laminectomy. Conversely, in the case of hemi-laminectomy, unilateral fixation could be an alternative option, which also has potential benefit to reduce the stress of the adjacent segment. PMID:25048501

  15. Older literature review of increased risk of adjacent segment degeneration with instrumented lumbar fusions

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) following lumbar spine surgery occurs in up to 30% of cases, and descriptions of such changes are not new. Here, we review some of the older literature concerning the rate of ASD, typically more severe cephalad than caudad, and highly correlated with instrumented fusions. Therefore, for degenerative lumbar disease without frank instability, ASD would be markedly reduced by avoiding instrumented fusions. Methods: In a prior review, the newer literature regarding the frequency of ASD following lumbar instrumented fusions (e.g., transforaminal or posterior lumbar interbody fusions [TLIF/PLIF] fusions or occasionally, posterolateral fusions [PLFs]) was presented. Some studies cited an up to an 18.5% incidence of ASD following instrumented versus noninstrumented fusions/decompressions alone (5.6%). A review of the older literature similarly documents a higher rate of ASD following instrumented fusions performed for degenerative lumbar disease alone. Results: More frequent and more severe ASD follows instrumented lumbar fusions performed for degenerative lumbar disease without instability. Alternatively, this entity should be treated with decompressions alone or with noninstrumented fusions, without the addition of instrumentation. Conclusions: Too many studies assume that TLIF, PLIF, and even PLF instrumented fusions are the “gold standard of care” for dealing with degenerative disease of the lumbar spine without documented instability. It is time to correct that assumption, and reassess the older literature along with the new to confirm that decompression alone and noninstrumented fusion avoid significant morbidity and even potentially mortality attributed to unnecessary instrumentation. PMID:26904370

  16. Interaction of a mantle plume and a segmented mid-ocean ridge: Results from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgen, Jennifer E.

    2014-04-01

    Previous investigations have proposed that changes in lithospheric thickness across a transform fault, due to the juxtaposition of seafloor of different ages, can impede lateral dispersion of an on-ridge mantle plume. The application of this “transform damming” mechanism has been considered for several plume-ridge systems, including the Reunion hotspot and the Central Indian Ridge, the Amsterdam-St. Paul hotspot and the Southeast Indian Ridge, the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Iceland hotspot and the Kolbeinsey Ridge, the Afar plume and the ridges of the Gulf of Aden, and the Marion/Crozet hotspot and the Southwest Indian Ridge. This study explores the geodynamics of the transform damming mechanism using a three-dimensional finite element numerical model. The model solves the coupled steady-state equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, including thermal buoyancy and viscosity that is dependent on pressure and temperature. The plume is introduced as a circular thermal anomaly on the bottom boundary of the numerical domain. The center of the plume conduit is located directly beneath a spreading segment, at a distance of 200 km (measured in the along-axis direction) from a transform offset with length 100 km. Half-spreading rate is 0.5 cm/yr. In a series of numerical experiments, the buoyancy flux of the modeled plume is progressively increased to investigate the effects on the temperature and velocity structure of the upper mantle in the vicinity of the transform. Unlike earlier studies, which suggest that a transform always acts to decrease the along-axis extent of plume signature, these models imply that the effect of a transform on plume dispersion may be complex. Under certain ranges of plume flux modeled in this study, the region of the upper mantle undergoing along-axis flow directed away from the plume could be enhanced by the three-dimensional velocity and temperature structure associated with ridge-transform-ridge

  17. Seismic Structure of the Shallow Mantle Beneath the Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderBeek, B. P.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Soule, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present tomographic images of the seismic structure of the shallow mantle beneath the intermediate-spreading Endeavor segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge. Our results provide insight into the relationship between magma supply from the mantle and overlying ridge crest processes. We use seismic energy refracted below the Moho (Pn), as recorded by the Endeavor tomography (ETOMO) experiment, to image the anisotropic and isotropic P wave velocity structure. The ETOMO experiment was an active source seismic study conducted in August 2009 as part of the RIDGE2000 science program. The experimental area extends 100 km along- and 60 km across-axis and encompasses active hydrothermal vent fields near the segment center, the eastern end of the Heck seamount chain, and two overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at either end of the segment. Previous tomographic analyses of seismic arrivals refracted through the crust (Pg), and reflected off the Moho (PmP), constrain a three-dimensional starting model of crustal velocity and thickness. These Pg and PmP arrivals are incorporated in our inversion of Pn travel-time data to further constrain the isotropic and anisotropic mantle velocity structure. Preliminary results reveal three distinct mantle low-velocity zones, inferred as regions of mantle melt delivery to the base of the crust, that are located: (i) off-axis near the segment center, (ii) beneath the Endeavor-West Valley OSC, and (iii) beneath the Cobb OSC near Split Seamount. The mantle anomalies are located at intervals of ~30 to 40 km along-axis and the low velocity anomalies beneath the OSCs are comparable in magnitude to the one located near the segment center. The direction of shallow mantle flow is inferred from azimuthal variations in Pn travel-time residuals relative to a homogeneous isotropic mantle. Continuing analysis will focus on constraining spatial variations in the orientation of azimuthal anisotropy. On the basis of our results, we will discuss the transport of

  18. Breaking into the Plate: Seismic and Hydroacoustic Analysis of a 7.6 Mw Oceanic Fracture Zone Earthquake Adjacent to the Central Indian Ridge Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Chapp, E.

    2003-12-01

    Where oceanic spreading segments are offset laterally from one another, the differential motion of the plates is accommodated by strike-slip motion along ridge-perpendicular transform faults. Off-axis from the ridge-transform intersection, no differential motion is require, and the fracture zone trace is thought to be inactive except where reactivated by intra-plate stresses. On 15 July 2003, an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.6 Mw occurred near the northern Central Indian Ridge (CIR), the divergent boundary separating the Somalian plate from the Indian and Australian plates. The size of this event places it within the 99th quantile of magnitude for shallow (< 40 km depth) strike-slip events (null axis plunge >45 deg) within the global Harvard CMT catalog. The earthquake's epicenter is near 2.5 deg S, 68.33 deg E, where the CIR is marked by a series of short (<100 km long) right-stepping transforms that offset the northwest trending spreading segments (20 mm/yr). Seismic signals associated with the mainshock and its largest aftershocks were recorded well by land-based seismic networks. Regional seismic phases (Pn, Sn), as well oceanic T-waves, where also recorded at an IMS hydroacoustic station to the north of the Diego Garcia atoll. T-wave signals recorded at Diego Garcia were cross correlated to determine accurate travel time differences. These traveltime differences were used in a plane wave fitting inversion to determine the horizontal slowness components and estimate the back azimuth to the epicenter. Aftershock locations are derived using the azimuthal information and Pn-T traveltime differences. Together, the seismically- and hydroacoustically-derived epicenters show a linear band of aftershocks extending more than 200 km along the off-axis trace of a right stepping transform. We interpret these aftershock events as delineating the length of the mainshock rupture. As the well-constrain hypocenter of the mainshock lies near the western edge of this

  19. Do ridge segments with asymmetric and symmetric spreading have distinctive geochemical signatures? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmuir, C. H.; Hamelin, C.; Chen, Z.; Escartin, J.; Laubier, M.; Jagoutz, O. E.; Looney, J.

    2013-12-01

    The MARPEX expedition in summer 2012 intensively sampled 650km of the mid-Atlantic ridge between the Kane and Atlantis transform faults. Between Kane and Atlantis there are no additional transform faults, but 14 second order ridge segments of various types. Some segments (e.g. Broken Spur near 29'N) are symmetric with well-defined axial volcanic ridges and a strike perpendicular to the spreading direction. Some (e.g. TAG) are highly asymmetric with a well developed detachment fault on one side. Others (e.g. immediately south of Atlantis) have a detachment fault at one end, but become more symmetric in the middle of the segment. In other regions the apparent locus of spreading is not perpendicular to spreading direction, but rough terrain with no clearly defined neo-volcanic zone has an oblique orientation. In the south there is 70 km of oblique spreading with abyssal hills rotated 40 degrees relative to spreading direction. This region shows the simple plate tectonic paradigm of ridge segments and transform faults does not strictly apply to slow spreading ridges. The sampling campaign led to 180 new stations in this region, that have been combined with existing data from some 90 other stations to provide an unprecedented sample set from a long, normal section of slow-spreading ridge distant from hot spots. Sampling density is 2-3km along the entire length of ridge. All the samples are depleted MORB with no evidence of enriched basalts. The depletion is such that every sample has less Ba than the globally averaged N-MORB of Gale et al. (2013), and mean K2O at 8% MgO is only 0.1. These data show that small heterogeneities of enriched material are not ubiquitous. Within this depletion there is substantial diversity, with Zr/Y and La/Sm both varying by a factor of more than two, and a long wavelength signal of heterogeneity with maximum depletion in terms of both trace elements and isotopes occurring approximately mid-way between the two transform faults. The region

  20. Segmentation and Enhancement of Latent Fingerprints: A Coarse to Fine Ridge Structure Dictionary.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kai; Liu, Eryun; Jain, Anil K

    2014-09-01

    Latent fingerprint matching has played a critical role in identifying suspects and criminals. However, compared to rolled and plain fingerprint matching, latent identification accuracy is significantly lower due to complex background noise, poor ridge quality and overlapping structured noise in latent images. Accordingly, manual markup of various features (e.g., region of interest, singular points and minutiae) is typically necessary to extract reliable features from latents. To reduce this markup cost and to improve the consistency in feature markup, fully automatic and highly accurate ("lights-out" capability) latent matching algorithms are needed. In this paper, a dictionary-based approach is proposed for automatic latent segmentation and enhancement towards the goal of achieving "lights-out" latent identification systems. Given a latent fingerprint image, a total variation (TV) decomposition model with L1 fidelity regularization is used to remove piecewise-smooth background noise. The texture component image obtained from the decomposition of latent image is divided into overlapping patches. Ridge structure dictionary, which is learnt from a set of high quality ridge patches, is then used to restore ridge structure in these latent patches. The ridge quality of a patch, which is used for latent segmentation, is defined as the structural similarity between the patch and its reconstruction. Orientation and frequency fields, which are used for latent enhancement, are then extracted from the reconstructed patch. To balance robustness and accuracy, a coarse to fine strategy is proposed. Experimental results on two latent fingerprint databases (i.e., NIST SD27 and WVU DB) show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art segmentation and enhancement algorithms and boosts the performance of a state-of-the-art commercial latent matcher. PMID:26352236

  1. Near-axis crustal structure and thickness of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soule, Dax; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Weekly, Robert T.

    2016-06-01

    A model of crustal thickness and lower crustal velocities is obtained for crustal ages of 0.1-1.2 Ma on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge by inverting travel times of crustal paths and non-ridge-crossing wide-angle Moho reflections obtained from a three-dimensional tomographic experiment. The crust is thicker by 0.5-1 km beneath a 200 m high plateau that extends across the segment center. This feature is consistent with the influence of the proposed Heckle melt anomaly on the spreading center. The history of ridge propagation on the Cobb overlapping spreading center may also have influenced the formation of the plateau. The sharp boundaries of the plateau and crustal thickness anomaly suggest that melt transport is predominantly upward in the crust. Lower crustal velocities are lower at the ends of the segment, likely due to increased hydrothermal alteration in regions influenced by overlapping spreading centers, and possibly increased magmatic differentiation.

  2. Outcomes of surgery for unstable odontoid fractures combined with instability of adjacent segments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background At present, traumatic atlantoaxial dislocation or C2-3 instability complicating odontoid fractures remains rarely reported. The aim of this study was to further investigate the surgical treatment strategies and curative effects for odontoid fractures combined with instability of adjacent segments. Methods This is a retrospective study of 12 patients (5 females and 7 males; age, 21–65 years) who underwent internal fixation for odontoid fractures (type II and shallow type III) and atlantoaxial instability in 6 cases, C2-3 instability in 4 cases, simultaneous C1-2 and C2-3 instability in 2 cases between January 2005 and June 2012. Accordingly, individualized surgeries were performed. Fracture healing and bone fusion were determined on X-ray scan. Upper limbs, lower limbs and sphincter functions were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score. Frankel grading system was used for the evaluation of neurological situation. Results Mean follow-up time of all 12 cases was 16.4 months (range, 12 to 48 months). Odontoid fracture healing was obtained in all patients within 9 months, and graft fusion was achieved within 6 months. JOA score was significantly improved from 6.3 ± 3.1 preoperatively to 11.1 ± 4.6 at 12 months after operation (P = 0.007), with 50.5 ± 25.7% recovery rate and 66.7% excellent and good rate. Except one patient still had Frankel grade B neurological injury at 12 months after surgery, the other patients improved their neurological situation (at 1 grade in Frankel scale). One patient developed wound fat liquefaction which resolved by changing the dressing. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in three patients, which resolved after the continuous drainage for 2 days. Conclusions According to the characteristics of odontoid fractures, the individualized operative procedure should be performed, resulting in high fracture healing rate, function recovery rate, and less, transient complications. PMID:25164238

  3. Seismic structure and crustal accretion along an intermediate-rate mid-ocean ridge segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, Robert Todd

    Epicenters and magnitudes for 36,523 earthquakes recorded along the Endeavour segment between August 2003 and October 2006 are automatically determined using a local ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) network. The catalog is dominated by two swarm sequences in January and February 2005 in the vicinity of the Endeavour overlapping spreading center, which included earthquakes in West Valley, the northern portion of the Endeavour segment, southwest Endeavour Valley and the Endeavour vent fields. These swarms are attributed to volcanism including a dike intrusion on the northern Endeavour in February 2005 and smaller diking events on the propagating tip of the West Valley segment in both swarms. The dike on the northern Endeavour propagated to the south, which is inconsistent with magma sourced from the axial magma chamber beneath the elevated central portion of the segment. Following the swarms, seismic activity on the Endeavour segment decreased on average to ˜15% of pre-swarm values and almost ceased at the segment ends. I infer that a six-year non-eruptive event that started with a swarm in 1999 and finished with the 2005 swarms ruptured the entire segment and relieved plate-spreading stresses. The inferred coupling between the 1999 and 2005 events, the observation of extensive precursory activity prior to the 2005 swarms, and the interaction between seismically active regions during the swarms is consistent with static triggering with delays influenced by viscoelastic relaxation, hydraulic diffusion and magma withdrawal and replenishment. The isotropic and anisotropic P-wave velocity structure of the upper oceanic crust on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is studied using refracted travel time data collected by an active-source, three-dimensional tomography experiment. The isotropic velocity structure is characterized by low crustal velocities in the overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at the ends of the segment. These low velocities are indicative of

  4. Apparatus and methods for impingement cooling of an undercut region adjacent a side wall of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2001-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The inturned flange has a plurality of apertures for directing cooling steam to cool the side wall between adjacent nozzle segments.

  5. Linking Microearthquakes and Seismic Tomography on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for Hydrothermal Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Kim, E.

    2013-12-01

    We report on a remarkable correlation between the patterns of microearthquakes and three-dimensional upper crustal velocity anomalies on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Microearthquakes were monitored from 2003-2006 by a small seismic network deployed on the central part of the segment. The velocity model was obtained from a tomography experiment comprising over 5500 shots from a large airgun array that were recorded by ocean bottom seismometers deployed at 64 sites along the Endeavour segment and the adjacent overlapping spreading centers (OSCs). On the segment scale, upper crustal velocities are low in the OSCs indicating that the crust is highly fractured. These low velocities persist off-axis and record the history of ridge propagation. In 2005, two swarm sequences that were interpreted in terms of magmatic intrusions on the limbs of the Endeavour-West Valley OSC were accompanied by extensive seismicity within the overlap basin. Throughout the microearthquake experiment earthquakes were concentrated in a region surrounding the southern tip of the West Valley propagator that coincides closely with the southern limit of the low velocities imaged around the OSC. Beneath the hydrothermal vent fields in the center of the Endeavour segment, the earthquakes were mostly located in a 500-m-thick band immediately above the axial magma chamber. There was a close correlation between the rates of seismicity beneath each vent field and their thermal output. The highest rates of seismicity were observed beneath the High Rise and Main Endeavour fields that each have power outputs of several hundred megawatts. Seismic velocities are generally high beneath the vent fields relative to velocities along the ridge axis immediately to the north and south. However, the High Rise and Main Endeavour fields are underlain by a low velocity region at 2 km depth that coincides with the seismically active region. This is consistent with a region of increased fracturing and

  6. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P. M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. The Lucky Strike segment hosts three active hydrothermal fields: Capelinhos, Ewan, and the known Main Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Field (MLSHF). Capelinhos is located 1.3 km E of the axis and the MLSHF, and consists of a ~20 m sulfide mound with black smoker vents. Ewan is located ~1.8 km south from the MLSHF along the axial graben, and displays only diffuse flow along and around scarps of collapse structures associated with fault scarps. At the MLSHF we have identified an inactive site, thus broadening the extent of this field. Heat flux estimates from these new sites are relatively low and correspond to ~10% of the heat flux estimated for the Main field, with an integrated heatflux of 200-1200 MW. Overall, most of the flux (up to 80-90%) is associated with diffuse outflow, with the Ewan site showing solely diffuse flow and Capelinhos mostly focused flow. Microbathymetry also reveals a large, off-axis (~2.4 km) hydrothermal field, similar to the TAG mound in size, on the flanks of a rifted volcano. The association of these fields to a central volcano, and the absence of indicators of hydrothermal activity along the ridge segment, suggest that sustained hydrothermal activity is maintained by the enhanced melt supply and the associated magma chamber(s) required to build central volcanoes. Hydrothermal outflow zones at the seafloor are systematically controlled by faults, indicating that hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust exploits permeable fault zones. Central volcanoes are thus associated with long-lived hydrothermal activity, and these sites may play a major role in the distribution and biogeography of vent communities.

  7. Segmenting time-lapse phase contrast images of adjacent NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Chalfoun, J; Kociolek, M; Dima, A; Halter, M; Cardone, A; Peskin, A; Bajcsy, P; Brady, M

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for segmenting phase contrast images of NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells that is accurate even when cells are physically in contact with each other. The problem of segmentation, when cells are in contact, poses a challenge to the accurate automation of cell counting, tracking and lineage modelling in cell biology. The segmentation method presented in this paper consists of (1) background reconstruction to obtain noise-free foreground pixels and (2) incorporation of biological insight about dividing and nondividing cells into the segmentation process to achieve reliable separation of foreground pixels defined as pixels associated with individual cells. The segmentation results for a time-lapse image stack were compared against 238 manually segmented images (8219 cells) provided by experts, which we consider as reference data. We chose two metrics to measure the accuracy of segmentation: the 'Adjusted Rand Index' which compares similarities at a pixel level between masks resulting from manual and automated segmentation, and the 'Number of Cells per Field' (NCF) which compares the number of cells identified in the field by manual versus automated analysis. Our results show that the automated segmentation compared to manual segmentation has an average adjusted rand index of 0.96 (1 being a perfect match), with a standard deviation of 0.03, and an average difference of the two numbers of cells per field equal to 5.39% with a standard deviation of 4.6%. PMID:23126432

  8. Analysis and simulation of ground-water flow in Lake Wales Ridge and adjacent areas of central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yobbi, Dann K.

    1996-01-01

    The Lake Wales Ridge is an uplands recharge area in central Florida that contains many sinkhole lakes. Below-normal rainfall and increased pumping of ground water have resulted in declines both in ground-water levels and in the water levels of many of the ridge lakes. A digital flow model was developed for a 3,526 square-mile area to help understand the current (1990) ground-water flow system and its response to future ground-water withdrawals. The ground-water flow system in the Lake Wales Ridge and adjacent area of central Florida consists of a sequence of sedimentary aquifers and confining units. The uppermost water-bearing unit of the study area is the surficial aquifer. This aquifer is generally unconfined and is composed primarily of clastic deposits. The surficial aquifer is underlain by the confined intermediate aquifer and confining units which consists of up to three water-bearing units composed of interbedded clastics and carbonate rocks. The lowermost unit of the ground- water flow system, the confined Upper Floridan aquifer, consists of a thick, hydraulically connected sequence of carbonate rocks. The Upper Floridan aquifer is about 1,200 to 1,400 feet thick and is the primary source for ground-water withdrawals in the study area. The generalized ground-water flow system of the Lake Wales Ridge is that water moves downward from the surficial aquifer to the intermediate aquifer and the Upper Floridan aquifer in the central area, primarily under the ridges, with minor amounts of water flow under the flatlands. The water flows laterally away fromn the central area, downgradient to discharge areas to the west, east, and south, and locally along valleys of major streams. Upward leakage occurs along valleys of major streams. The model was initially calibrated to the steady-state conditions representing September 1989. The resulting calibrated hydrologic parameters were then tested by simulating transient conditions for the period October 1989 through 1990. A

  9. Long-Term Effects of Segmental Lumbar Spinal Fusion on Adjacent Healthy Discs: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Gunti Ranga; Deb, Anindya; Kurnool, Goutham

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Experimental study. Purpose The aim of the study was to develop a finite element (FE) model to study the long-term effects of various types of lumbar spinal interventions on the discs adjacent to the fused segment. Overview of Literature Earlier FE studies have been limited to one particular type of fusion and comparative quantification of the adjacent disc stresses for different types of surgical interventions has not been reported. Methods A computer aided engineering (CAE) based approach using implicit FE analysis assessed the stresses in the lumbar discs adjacent to the fused segment following anterior and posterior lumbar spine fusions at one, two and three levels (with and without instrumentation). Results It was found that instrumentation and length of fusion were the most significant factors in increasing adjacent level stresses in the lumbar discs. Conclusions In the present study, a calibrated FE model that examined spinal interventions under similar loading and boundary conditions was used to provide quantitative data which would be useful for clinicians to understand the probable long-term effect of their choice of surgical intervention. PMID:27114758

  10. Precordial ST segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction: early thallium-201 scintigraphic evidence of adjacent posterolateral or inferoseptal involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, A.S.; Weiss, A.T.; Shah, P.K.; Maddahi, J.; Peter, T.; Ganz, W.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1985-02-01

    To investigate the myocardial perfusion correlates of precordial ST segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction, a rest thallium-201 scintigram and a closely timed 12 lead electrocardiogram were obtained within 6 hours of the onset of infarction in 44 patients admitted with their first acute inferior myocardial infarction. Thirty-six patients demonstrated precordial ST segment depression (group 1) and eight did not (group 2). A perfusion defect involving the inferior wall was present in all 44 patients. Additional perfusion defects of the adjacent posterolateral wall (n . 20), the ventricular septum (n . 9) or both (n . 6) were present in 35 of 36 patients from group 1 compared with only 1 of 8 patients from group 2 (p less than 0.001). There was no significant difference in the frequency of multivessel coronary artery disease or disease of the left anterior descending artery between group 1 and group 2 or between patients with and those without a thallium-201 perfusion defect involving the ventricular septum. Thus, precordial ST segment depression during an acute inferior myocardial infarction is associated with thallium-201 scintigraphic evidence of more extensive involvement of the adjacent posterolateral or inferoseptal myocardial segments, which probably reflects the extent and pattern of distribution of the artery of infarction, rather than the presence of coexistent multivessel coronary artery disease or disease of the left anterior descending artery.

  11. Volcanic accretion, tectonic extension and the second-order segmentation of slow and ultraslow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannat, M.; Sauter, D.; Escartin, J.

    2011-12-01

    In this presentation we compare the segmentation and seafloor geology record of slow and ultraslow ridges with variable volcanic input. The easternmost Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), where long stretches of the axis lack volcanism is our volcanism-poor end-member, which we contrast with volcanically more active parts of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Keeping the differences of spreading rates in perspective, we use this comparison to analyze and discuss the respective roles of tectonic extension, which ultimately leads to the exhumation of deeply-derived rocks (ultramafics and gabbros), and of volcanic accretion, in shaping the geometry of the plate boundary. Second-order segments at slow and ultraslow ridges are typically 30 to 100 km-long, and separated by transform, or so-called "non-transform" discontinuities. Segment centers typically have a thicker crust, and in most cases have a thinner axial lithosphere, than segment ends. Although we do not resolve the controversy of whether these characteristics are produced by discrete melt and/or mantle diapirs in the subaxial asthenosphere (eg Lin et al. 1990), or by melt channeling toward regions of thinner axial lithosphere (eg Magde and Sparks, 1997), we show that melt supply and volcanism are needed to initiate second-order ridge segmentation. Axial valley bounding faults in our SWIR volcanism-poor end-member go un-segmented for up to 170 km along-axis.

  12. Segment-scale volcanic episodicity: Evidence from the North Kolbeinsey Ridge, Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, I. A.; Devey, C. W.,; LeBas, T. P.; Augustin, N.; Steinführer, A.

    2016-04-01

    The upper oceanic crust is produced by magmatism at mid-ocean ridges, a process thought to be characterized by cyclic bouts of intense magmatic activity, separated by periods when faulting accommodates most or even all of the plate motion. It is not known whether there is a distinct periodicity to such magmatic-tectonic cycles. Here we present high-resolution sidescan sonar data from the neovolcanic zone of the North Kolbeinsey Ridge, a shallow slow-spreading ridge where high glacial and steady post-glacial sedimentation rates allow relative flow ages to be determined with a resolution of around 2 kyr using backscatter amplitude as a proxy for sediment thickness and hence age. We identify 18 lava flow fields covering 40% of the area surveyed. A group of 7 flow fields showing the highest (and similar) backscatter intensity are scattered along 75 km of axial valley surveyed, suggesting that at least this length of the segment was magmatically active within a 1.2 kyr time window. Based on conservative age estimates for all datable flows and estimated eruption volumes, the post-glacial volcanic activity imaged is insufficient to maintain crustal thickness, implying that episode(s) of enhanced activity must have preceded the volcanism we image.

  13. Distribution of Seismicity and thermal structure at Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Segment of Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, A.; Singh, S. C.; Crawford, W. C.; Escartin, J.; Cannat, M.; Seher, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Lucky-strike segment (37.2 deg. N), located at the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) south of the Azores hot-spot, is characterized by a large hydrothermal field underlain by a 3-km deep magma chamber. To study the seismic activity in the Lucky-strike segment, four short-period and one broad-band ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) were deployed in a diamond shape at an spacing of 4.5 km, and centered at the hydrothermal field. These five OBSs recorded two horizontal, one vertical and one pressure channels, over a period of 13 months (06/08-08/09) as a part of the BBMOMAR experiment. All the five equipments have recorded large number of micro-earthquakes, earthquake swarms and teleseismic earthquakes. Here, we present the preliminary analysis of distribution of micro-seismicity in and around the Lucky-strike segment. We have detected about 6000 earthquakes to date. Out of these, we have located about 800 earthquakes which have been recorded by at-least four equipments with clear P- and S- arrivals. The distribution of earthquakes show a concentration of events at both inside corners North and South of the Lucky Strike segment, reaching maximum depths of more than 10 km, and a relative low number of events at the segment center, below the central volcano, with maximum depths reaching only 6 km. We have also identified several swarm activity in the region. This study will be extended to include the new data of 8/08-9/09 time period, after recovery and redeployment of instruments during the BATHYLUCK09 cruise. These additional data will thus provide the best constraints to date on the thermal structure throughout the segment and around the magma chamber at its center, and intern on the links between hydrothermal activity and deformation of the oceanic lithosphere at this site.

  14. Failure of cervical arthroplasty in a patient with adjacent segment disease associated with Klippel-Feil syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Papanastassiou, Ioannis D; Baaj, Ali A; Dakwar, Elias; Eleraky, Mohammad; Vrionis, Frank D

    2011-01-01

    Cervical arthroplasty may be justified in patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) in order to preserve cervical motion. The aim of this paper is to report an arthroplasty failure in a patient with KFS. A 36-year-old woman with KFS underwent two-level arthroplasty for adjacent segment disc degeneration. Anterior migration of the cranial prosthesis was encountered 5 months postoperatively and was successfully revised with anterior cervical fusion. Cervical arthroplasty in an extensively stiff and fused neck is challenging and may lead to catastrophic failure. Although motion preservation is desirable in KFS, the special biomechanical features may hinder arthroplasty. Fusion or hybrid constructs may represent more reasonable options, especially when multiple fused segments are present. PMID:21430874

  15. 2010 M=7.0 Haiti Earthquake Calculated to Increase Failure Stress on Adjacent Segments of the Enriquillo Fault and Adjacent Thrust Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Stein, Ross S.; Sevilgen, Volkan; Toda, Shinji

    2010-05-01

    We calculate that the Haiti earthquake increased the failure stress on the adjacent segments of the Enriquillo Fault and other thrust faults. Of particular concern is the segment on the Enriquillo Fault immediately to the east of the 12 January rupture. This fault section, which comes within 5 km of Port-au-Prince, is calculated to have been brought about 2-5 bars closer to failure. The inference of stress increase on this eastern section is relatively robust regardless of the specific source models used from available seismic and geodetic inversions. The next most loaded section on the Enriquillo Fault lies to the west of the 12 January rupture, where stress is calculated to have been brought about 1 bar closer to failure. The calculated stress increases on this western section, however, are more sensitive to the source models used in the calculation. Thus far we have tested several teleseismic and InSAR-based models, all of which assume slip occurred on a single north-dipping planar surface. If significant coseismic slip took place on a reverse fault at the western end of the 12 January rupture, these models will need further revision. Previous GPS measurements have shown tectonic loading of 7 ± 2 mm/yr on the Enriquillo Fault, yielding about 1.7 m of accumulated loading since large quakes last struck this region in 1751 and 1770. One or both of these appear to be coupled events separated by days to months, but it is unclear if these struck on the Enriquillo Fault. Thus, there is at least a possibility of future large quakes on these segments of the Enriquillo Fault. We also calculate stress increase of about 0.1-0.5 bars on some surrounding thrust faults, as well as a small increase of 0.05 bars on the Septentrional Fault between Port-de-Paix and Cap-Haitien, which lie 155 km north of the 12 January rupture. Preliminary models are available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2010/1019/.

  16. Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, Integrated Studies Site (ISS) Update and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, D.; Ridge Community

    2003-12-01

    The Ridge 2000 (R2K) Integrated Studies bull's eye on the Juan de Fuca Ridge is focused on the Main Endeavour hydrothermal field, located on the central portion of the Endeavour Segment. This vent field is one of the most vigorously venting systems along the global mid-ocean ridge spreading network, hosting at least 18 large sulfide structures that contains more than100 smokers. Prior to a magmatic event in 2000 some of the edifices had been venting 380C, volatile-rich fluids with extremely low chlorinities for a decade. In addition to the Main Endeavour Field there are four other known high temperature vent fields spaced approximately 2 kilometers apart along the segment (with hints of more) and abundant areas of diffuse flow, both nearby and distal to the high temperature venting. Diffuse flow from the structures and from a variety of basaltic-hosted sites provides rich habitats abundant with microbial and macrofaunal communities. There are well-developed gradients in volatile concentrations along axis that may reflect influence from a sedimentary source to the north, and high chlorinity fluids vent from the most southern (Mothra) and northern fields (Sasquatch). Twenty years of research have laid a firm base for the 5-year plans of R2K at this site, which include examining the response of this segment to perturbations induced by tectonic and magmatic events, identification of the reservoirs, fluxes, and feedbacks of mass and energy at this site, and predictive modeling coupled with field observations. Since designation as an IS site, high-resolution bathymetric mapping (EM300) and an extensive multi-channel seismic survey have been conducted along the entire segment. Smaller focused areas have also been mapped at meter resolution by SM2000 sonar. Intense field programs in 2003 established the first in-situ seismic array along a mid-ocean ridge, which includes installation of a buried broadband seismometer and 7 short-period seismometers emplaced within basaltic

  17. Hydrothermal sulfide accumulation along the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Clague, D. A.; Hannington, M. D.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide deposits that form on the seafloor are often located by the detection of hydrothermal plumes in the water column, followed by exploration with deep-towed cameras, side-scan sonar imaging, and finally by visual surveys using remotely-operated vehicle or occupied submersible. Hydrothermal plume detection, however, is ineffective for finding hydrothermally-inactive sulfide deposits, which may represent a significant amount of the total sulfide accumulation on the seafloor, even in hydrothermally active settings. Here, we present results from recent high-resolution, autonomous underwater vehicle-based mapping of the hydrothermally-active Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Analysis of the ridge bathymetry resulted in the location of 581 individual sulfide deposits along 24 km of ridge length. Hydrothermal deposits were distinguished from volcanic and tectonic features based on the characteristics of their surface morphology, such as shape and slope angles. Volume calculations for each deposit results in a total volume of 372,500 m3 of hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate-silica material, for an equivalent mass of ∼1.2 Mt of hydrothermal material on the seafloor within the ridge's axial valley, assuming a density of 3.1 g/cm3. Much of this total volume is from previously undocumented inactive deposits outside the main active vent fields. Based on minimum ages of sulfide deposition, the deposits accumulated at a maximum rate of ∼400 t/yr, with a depositional efficiency (proportion of hydrothermal material that accumulates on the seafloor to the total amount hydrothermally mobilized and transported to the seafloor) of ∼5%. The calculated sulfide tonnage represents a four-fold increase over previous sulfide estimates for the Endeavour Segment that were based largely on accumulations from within the active fields. These results suggest that recent global seafloor sulfide resource estimates, which were based mostly

  18. Role of random thermal perturbations in the magmatic segmentation of mid-oceanic ridges: Insights from numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Shamik; Baruah, Amiya; Dutta, Urmi; Mandal, Nibir

    2014-12-01

    Using a random thermal perturbation (RTP) model this study investigates the process of magmatic segmentation along mid-oceanic ridge (MOR) axes as a function of the upwelling dynamics, controlled by coupled solidification-melting processes. The RTP model suggests that the variation in along-axis velocity (VL) fields constitutes the underlying mechanism of segmentation in natural MORs, showing temperature variations within a steady-state range, irrespective of large initial thermal perturbations imposed at the model base. The VL patterns are initially transient, characterized by multi-order segments, but attain a stable configuration with dominantly large segments (average size ~ 100 km) within a time scale of 2.3 Ma. Buoyant-melt driven thermal convection explains this transient segmentation. Small scale convection cells are found to be progressively consumed by larger cells, resulting in a stable convection structure over a similar time scale. Slow- and fast-spreading ridges (SSR and FSR) undergo upwelling with contrasting melt flow patterns. SSRs involve melt feeding into the ridge axis by horizontal flows from segment centers, trailing into large-scale conduits at an early stage. With time, vertical upwelling occurs throughout the segment. In the case of FSRs, both melt supply avenues prevail throughout their development. We also evaluate the variation of the across-axis flow velocity (VT) to investigate the mode of geometric evolution of MORs. Time series VT maps suggest that a ridge structure develops through localization of discrete axes (VT = 0) with offsets varying up to 15 km, which coalesce with one another to form a single axis. The matured ridge, however, retains higher-order offsets (up to 9 km).

  19. Controls on segmentation and morphology along the back-arc Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, Jonathan D.; Martinez, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    Back-arc spreading centers increasingly depart from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) characteristics with proximity to the arc volcanic front. The close association of these departures with slab-derived materials in erupted lavas suggests that subduction-related chemical effects are their primary cause. The Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) are type examples of this process. Together they constitute a first-order spreading center in the Lau back-arc basin that progressively converges on the Tofua arc volcanic front from north to south. Here we use ship multibeam and deep-towed side-scan sonar data to examine variations in axial morphology and volcanism at the second- and third-order segment scale along these ridges and develop a model for the processes that control them. Closest to the arc, VFR, and the southern segment of the ELSC shoal toward second-order segment ends, in contrast to MORs. Northward and beyond ~70 km from the arc, the axis becomes abruptly deeper and flatter and no longer shoals toward second-order segment ends. At VFR, along-axis topographic highs correlate with the location of arc volcanoes along slab flow lines. These correlations are weaker along the southernmost ELSC segment and absent along ELSC segments farther north. The observations show a modulation of back-arc segmentation with arc proximity that rapidly diminishes with distance. They support a model of the mantle wedge with a strongly hydrous domain within ~70 km of the arc within which the arc and ridge interact and a much less hydrous domain farther from the arc without evident arc-ridge interactions.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging on disc degeneration changes after implantation of an interspinous spacer and fusion of the adjacent segment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaokang; Liu, Yingjie; Lian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the changes of the lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the implantation of interspinous device and the fusion of the adjacent segment. A total of 62 consecutive patients suffering L5/S1 lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with concomitant disc space narrowing or low-grade instability up to 5 mm translational slip in L5/S1 level were treated with lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) via posterior approach. Thirty-four of these patients (Coflex group) received an additional implantation of the interspinous spacer device (Coflex™) in the level L4/L5, while the rest of 28 patients (fusion group) underwent the fusion surgery alone. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at pre- and postoperative visits to compare the clinical outcomes and the changes of the L4/L5 vertebral disc degeneration on MRI in both Coflex and fusion group. Although both Coflex and fusion group showed improvements of the clinical outcomes assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) after surgery, patients in Coflex group had more significant amelioration (P < 0.05) compared to fusion group. During follow up, the postoperative disc degeneration changes in Coflex group assessed by the relative signal intensity (RSI) differed from those in fusion group (P < 0.05). The supplemental implantation of Coflex™ after the fusion surgery could delay the disc degeneration of the adjacent segment. PMID:26131210

  1. Combined use of alveolar distraction osteogenesis and segmental osteotomy in anterior vertical ridge augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Öncü, Elif; Isik, Kubilay; Alaaddinoğlu, E. Emine; Uçkan, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vertical defects of the anterioral veolar ridge are challenging cases in implant dentistry. Various techniques, such as onlay bone grafting, segmental osteotomy (SO) oral veolar distraction osteogenesis (ADO), have been suggested to manage those situations. ADO has an advantage of being capable of enhancing both hard and soft tissue simultaneously. Presentation of case One of the possible complications of ADO is rotation ortilting the transport segment (TS). In this report, we present a 30-year old woman who had a severe anterior vertical deficiency. ADO was started to manage the case, but advancement of the TS lagged on the left side and the segment rotated. A SO was planned and the lagged side was corrected. Two years after the surgery, hard and soft tissue gains were found to be preserved. Discussion Vertical alveolar bone deficiencies are challenging cases for dental implantology. Alveolar DO promotes soft tissue along with hard tissue, and the bone regeneration process and shows lower infection rates and greater stability over the long term. However, the technique has some disadvantages and can lead to complications, such as breaking of the distraction device, nerve injury or paresthesia, fracture of transport bone, hematoma, wound dehiscence, severe bleeding, and even jaw fractures. Deviation of the TS from the distraction path is another undesired situation. The rigidity of the device, the width of the mucosa, the volume of the transport and anchor segments, and the amount of augmentation can affect vector deviation. Conclusion We suggest that SO can be used in similar cases in which TS could not be distracted on a straight vector line. PMID:25661636

  2. Pulmonary lobe segmentation based on ridge surface sampling and shape model fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, James C.; Kindlmann, Gordon L.; Okajima, Yuka; Hatabu, Hiroto; Díaz, Alejandro A.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Washko, George R.; Dy, Jennifer; Estépar, Raúl San José

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Performing lobe-based quantitative analysis of the lung in computed tomography (CT) scans can assist in efforts to better characterize complex diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). While airways and vessels can help to indicate the location of lobe boundaries, segmentations of these structures are not always available, so methods to define the lobes in the absence of these structures are desirable. Methods: The authors present a fully automatic lung lobe segmentation algorithm that is effective in volumetric inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography (CT) datasets. The authors rely on ridge surface image features indicating fissure locations and a novel approach to modeling shape variation in the surfaces defining the lobe boundaries. The authors employ a particle system that efficiently samples ridge surfaces in the image domain and provides a set of candidate fissure locations based on the Hessian matrix. Following this, lobe boundary shape models generated from principal component analysis (PCA) are fit to the particles data to discriminate between fissure and nonfissure candidates. The resulting set of particle points are used to fit thin plate spline (TPS) interpolating surfaces to form the final boundaries between the lung lobes. Results: The authors tested algorithm performance on 50 inspiratory and 50 expiratory CT scans taken from the COPDGene study. Results indicate that the authors' algorithm performs comparably to pulmonologist-generated lung lobe segmentations and can produce good results in cases with accessory fissures, incomplete fissures, advanced emphysema, and low dose acquisition protocols. Dice scores indicate that only 29 out of 500 (5.85%) lobes showed Dice scores lower than 0.9. Two different approaches for evaluating lobe boundary surface discrepancies were applied and indicate that algorithm boundary identification is most accurate in the vicinity of fissures detectable on CT. Conclusions: The proposed

  3. Local Seismicity of the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic ridge: median valley earthquakes shallow towards segment ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann, F.; Planert, L.; Flueh, E.; Reston, T.; Weinrebe, W.

    2003-04-01

    Slow spreading mid-ocean ridges are characterized by along-axis segmentation where crustal composition and structure varies significantly within a segment and across transform faults and other ridge axis discontinuities. In May 2000, the GERSHWIN experiment (Geophysical Experiments to investigate Ridge Segmentation HoW INside and outside corners forms) investigated the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 5oS during cruise M47/2 of RV Meteor. The work program included seismic refraction profiling, bathymetric mapping, dredging, and a passive seismological survey, the results of which we are reporting here. In the study area, two spreading segments of the MAR are separated by a 70 km offset transform fault. This segment of the ridge is unusual in that the inside corner high has been split by a change in location of active seafloor spreading. (Reston et al., 2002). Just south of the 5oS transform fault, a network of up to 15 ocean bottom stations (13 hydrophones and 2 seismometers), recorded micro-earthquake activity for a duration of altogether 10 days (because of instrument failures and early recovery instrument numbers vary throughout this period, though). Approximately, 150 earthquakes produced clear arrivals on three or more stations. Approximately half of these events have five or more picks and a azimuthal gap less than 300o, so can be considered well located; 49 events have good depth control. Earthquake activity is concentrated along a narrow zone along the median valley. A few events occur along the transform fault, and in diffuse regions within the Inside Corner High and the bounding massif near the centre of the segment. Event depths vary between 5 and 13 km below sea level (approx. 1-9 km below the seafloor), with most occurring at 7-9 km depth below seafloor. Earthquake depths within the median valley shallow towards the segment end, however, there is no significant seismicity within the immediate neighbourhood of the fracture zone or beneath the volcanic ridge

  4. Biomechanical Analysis of the Proximal Adjacent Segment after Multilevel Instrumentation of the Thoracic Spine: Do Hooks Ease the Transition?

    PubMed

    Metzger, Melodie F; Robinson, Samuel T; Svet, Mark T; Liu, John C; Acosta, Frank L

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Biomechanical cadaveric study. Objective Clinical studies indicate that using less-rigid fixation techniques in place of the standard all-pedicle screw construct when correcting for scoliosis may reduce the incidence of proximal junctional kyphosis and improve patient outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether there is a biomechanical advantage to using supralaminar hooks in place of pedicle screws at the upper-instrumented vertebrae in a multilevel thoracic construct. Methods T7-T12 spines were biomechanically tested: (1) intact; (2) following a two-level pedicles screw fusion from T9 to T11; and after proximal extension of the fusion to T8-T9 with (3) bilateral supra-laminar hooks, (4) a unilateral hook + unilateral screw hybrid, or (5) bilateral pedicle screws. Specimens were nondestructively loaded while three-dimensional kinematics and intradiscal pressure at the supra-adjacent level were recorded. Results Supra-adjacent hypermobility was reduced when bilateral hooks were used in place of pedicle screws at the upper-instrumented level, with statistically significant differences in lateral bending and torsion (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). Disk pressures in the supra-adjacent segment were not statistically different among top-off techniques. Conclusions The use of supralaminar hooks at the top of a multilevel posterior fusion construct reduces the stress at the proximal uninstrumented motion segment. Although further data is needed to provide a definitive link to the clinical occurrence of PJK, this in vitro study demonstrates the potential benefit of "easing" the transition between the stiff instrumented spine and the flexible native spine and is the first to demonstrate these results with laminar hooks. PMID:27190735

  5. Heat Flux From the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, W. J.; McDuff, R. E.; Stahr, F. R.; Yoerger, D. R.; Jakuba, M.

    2005-12-01

    The very essence of a hydrothermal system is transfer of heat by a convecting fluid, yet the flux of heat remains a poorly known quantity. Past studies of heat flux consisted primarily of point measurements of temperature and fluid flow at individual vent sites and inventories of the neutrally buoyant plume above the field. In 2000 the Flow Mow project used the Autonomous Benthic Explorer (ABE) to determine heat flux from Main Endeavour Field (MEF) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge by intersecting the stems of rising buoyant plumes. ABE carries instruments to measure conductivity, temperature and depth, and a MAVS current meter to determine the vertical velocity of the fluid, after correcting for vehicle motion. Complementary work on horizontal fluxes suggests that the vertical flux measured by ABE includes both the primary high buoyancy focused "smoker" sources and also entrained diffuse flow. In 2004, ABE was again used to determine heat flux not only from MEF, but also from the other four fields in the Endeavour Segment RIDGE 2000 Integrated Study Site. In this four year interval the flux of heat from MEF has declined by approximately a factor of two. The High Rise vent field has the greatest heat flux, followed by MEF, then Mothra, Salty Dawg and Sasquatch (of order 500, 300, 100, 50 MW respectively; heat flux at Sasquatch was below detection).

  6. Apparatus for impingement cooling a side wall adjacent an undercut region of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and vanes therebetween. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. Slots are formed through the inturned flange along the nozzle side wall. A plate having through-apertures extending between opposite edges thereof is disposed in each slot, the slots and plates being angled such that the cooling medium exiting the apertures in the second cavity lie close to the side wall for focusing and targeting cooling medium onto the side wall.

  7. Risk of adjacent-segment disease requiring surgery after short lumbar fusion: results of the French Spine Surgery Society Series.

    PubMed

    Scemama, Caroline; Magrino, Baptiste; Gillet, Philippe; Guigui, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-segment disease (ASD) is an increasingly problematic complication following lumbar fusion surgery. The purpose of the current study was to determine the risk of ASD requiring surgical treatment after short lumbar or lumbosacral fusion. Primary spinal disease and surgical factors associated with an increased risk of revision were also investigated. METHODS This was a retrospective cohort study using the French Spine Surgery Society clinical data that included 3338 patients, with an average follow-up duration of 7 years (range 4-10 years). Clinical ASD requiring surgery was the principal judgment criterion; the length of follow-up time and initial spinal disease were also recorded. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed. The correlation between primary spinal disease and surgery with an increased risk of revision was investigated. RESULTS During the follow-up period, 186 patients required revision surgery for ASD (5.6%). The predicted risk of ASD requiring revision surgery was 1.7% (95% CI 1.3%-2.2%) at 2 years, 3.8% (95% CI 4.9%-6.7%) at 4 years, 5.7% (95% CI 4.9%-6.7%) at 6 years, and 9% (95% CI 8.7%-10.6%) at 8 years. Initial spinal disease affected the risk of ASD requiring surgery (p = 0.0003). The highest risk was observed for degenerative spondylolisthesis. CONCLUSIONS ASD requiring revision surgery was predicted in 5.6% of patients 7 years after index short lumbar spinal fusion in the French Spine Surgery Society retrospective series. An increased risk of ASD requiring revision surgery associated with initial spinal disease showed the significance of the influence of natural degenerative history on adjacent-segment pathology. PMID:26967992

  8. Intra-segment Variations in Geologic Characteristics Along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, J. D.; Martinez, F.

    2012-12-01

    Backarc spreading centers located within ~150 km of the arc volcanic front display systematic departures from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) characteristics. The close association of these departures with slab-derived materials in erupted lavas suggests that subduction-related chemical effects are their primary cause. We examine variations in geologic characteristics at the second- and third-order scale along six segments of the arc-proximal Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the Lau backarc basin, southwest Pacific, using ship multibeam and deep-towed side-scan sonars. Together, the ELSC and VFR constitute a first-order spreading center which progressively approaches the Tofua arc volcanic front southward from ~100-30 km as spreading rates decrease from ~97-39 mm/yr. Second-order segments within VFR (VFR1/VFR2), ~30-50 km from the arc, have axial high morphologies indicative of excess magmatism compared to MOR's spreading at similar rates and erupt increasingly hydrous, vesicular and silicic lavas as the axis approaches the arc. Along-axis topographic highs indicative of locally increased magma supply are located at second-order segment ends, in contrast to the classic MOR model. Along VFR, third-order segments are defined by constructional volcanic ridges, following the classic model of increasing depth toward segment ends, and along VFR2 appear to erupt volcaniclastics at segment centers and lava flows near the ends. Along the southernmost second-order segment of the ELSC (ELSC4), located ~50-60 km from the arc, axial morphology becomes lower relief and much more variable, but still follows the general VFR pattern, where segment ends are shallower and higher relief than the center. Third-order segments form both volcanic ridges that deepen toward the ends, and tectonic grabens that shoal toward the ends, opposite of the MOR model. Beyond ~70 km from the arc, second-order segments become abruptly deeper, erupt less vesicular basaltic lavas, and

  9. Surficial permeability of the axial valley seafloor: Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, Casey K.; Homola, Kira L.; Johnson, H. Paul

    2013-09-01

    Hydrothermal systems at mid-ocean spreading centers play a fundamental role in Earth's geothermal budget. One underexamined facet of marine hydrothermal systems is the role that permeability of the uppermost seafloor veneer plays in the distribution of hydrothermal fluid. As both the initial and final vertical gateway for subsurface fluid circulation, uppermost seafloor permeability may influence the local spatial distribution of hydrothermal flow. A method of deriving a photomosaic from seafloor video was developed and utilized to estimate relative surface permeability in an active hydrothermal area on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The mosaic resolves seafloor geology of the axial valley seafloor at submeter resolution over an area greater than 1 km2. Results indicate that the valley walls and basal talus slope are topographically rugged and unsedimented, providing minimal resistance to fluid transmission. Elsewhere, the axial valley floor is capped by an unbroken blanket of low-permeability sediment, resisting fluid exchange with the subsurface reservoir. Active fluid emission sites were restricted to the high-permeability zone at the base of the western wall. A series of inactive fossil hydrothermal structures form a linear trend along the western bounding wall, oriented orthogonal to the spreading axis. High-temperature vent locations appear to have migrated over 100 m along-ridge-strike over the decade between surveys. While initially an expression of subsurface faulting, this spatial pattern suggests that increases in seafloor permeability from sedimentation may be at least a secondary contributing factor in regulating fluid flow across the seafloor interface.

  10. Along-axis variations within the plate boundary zone of the southern segment of the Endeavour Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Angela M.; Ryan, William B. F.

    1988-07-01

    The width of and along-axis variations within the plate boundary zone of the southern segment of the Endeavour Ridge of the Juan de Fuca Ridge System have been quantified using Sea MARC I side-looking sonar imagery. The sonar imagery was calibrated with video and photographic surveying to provide visual corroboration of the activity, spacing, and offset of faults and fissures. This ridge segment contains an axial high bisected along its length by a summit depression whose width, relief of its rims, depth of its floor, and spacing of faults and fissures vary systematically away from the mid-point of the ridge segment toward its tips. The axial high and its summit depression are likened to an elongated shield volcano that is being disrupted by collapse of its crest into a widening linear caldera. The observed distribution of faults and fissures could be produced by mechanisms which stretch young ocean crust which is characterized by rheological properties which vary with distance from the center of the elongated volcano.

  11. Axial magnetic anomalies over slow-spreading ridge segments: insights from numerical 3-D thermal and physical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gac, Sébastien; Dyment, Jérôme; Tisseau, Chantal; Goslin, Jean

    2003-09-01

    The axial magnetic anomaly amplitude along Mid-Atlantic Ridge segments is systematically twice as high at segment ends compared with segment centres. Various processes have been proposed to account for such observations, either directly or indirectly related to the thermal structure of the segments: (1) shallower Curie isotherm at segment centres, (2) higher Fe-Ti content at segment ends, (3) serpentinized peridotites at segment ends or (4) a combination of these processes. In this paper the contribution of each of these processes to the axial magnetic anomaly amplitude is quantitatively evaluated by achieving a 3-D numerical modelling of the magnetization distribution and a magnetic anomaly over a medium-sized, 50 km long segment. The magnetization distribution depends on the thermal structure and thermal evolution of the lithosphere. The thermal structure is calculated considering the presence of a permanent hot zone beneath the segment centre. The `best-fitting' thermal structure is determined by adjusting the parameters (shape, size, depth, etc.) of this hot zone, to fit the modelled geophysical outputs (Mantle Bouguer anomaly, maximum earthquake depths and crustal thickness) to the observations. Both the thermoremanent magnetization, acquired during the thermal evolution, and the induced magnetization, which depends on the present thermal structure, are modelled. The resulting magnetic anomalies are then computed and compared with the observed ones. This modelling exercise suggests that, in the case of aligned and slightly offset segments, a combination of higher Fe-Ti content and the presence of serpentinized peridotites at segment ends will produce the observed higher axial magnetic anomaly amplitudes over the segment ends. In the case of greater offsets, the presence of serpentinized peridotites at segment ends is sufficient to account for the observations.

  12. Upper crustal seismic structure of the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge from traveltime tomography: Implications for oceanic crustal accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, Robert T.; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-04-01

    isotropic and anisotropic P wave velocity structure of the upper oceanic crust on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is studied using refracted traveltime data collected by an active-source, three-dimensional tomography experiment. The isotropic velocity structure is characterized by low crustal velocities in the overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at the segment ends. These low velocities are indicative of pervasive tectonic fracturing and persist off axis, recording the history of ridge propagation. Near the segment center, velocities within the upper 1 km show ridge-parallel bands with low velocities on the outer flanks of topographic highs. These features are consistent with localized thickening of the volcanic extrusive layer from eruptions extending outside of the axial valley that flow down the fault-tilted blocks that form the abyssal hill topography. On-axis velocities are generally relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields likely due to the infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed beneath the most vigorous vent fields in a seismically active region above the axial magma chamber and may reflect increased fracturing and higher temperatures. Seismic anisotropy is high on-axis but decreases substantially off axis over 5-10 km (0.2-0.4 Ma). This decrease coincides with an increase in seismic velocities resolved at depths ≥1 km and is attributed to the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation. The orientation of the fast-axis of anisotropy is ridge-parallel near the segment center but curves near the segment ends reflecting the tectonic fabric within the OSCs.

  13. A hydrographic transient above the Salty Dawg hydrothermal field, Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, J. P.; McDuff, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    During systematic repeat hydrography cruises to the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the summers of 2004, 2005, and 2006, we encountered a transient increase in the water column heat content above the Salty Dawg hydrothermal field. First observed in July 2005 and mapped in greater detail in August 2005, this feature was not a typical event or megaplume since potential temperature anomalies were continuously elevated from the plume top to the seafloor. During the summer of 2005, the heat content in the waters above Salty Dawg was elevated ˜30 TJ, and the plume top was over 150 m higher in the water column than the other years measured. Based on scaling analyses, an order of magnitude increase in the volume flux from Salty Dawg would be required to generate a neutrally buoyant plume of this size. This observation was unexpected because no substantial earthquakes were detected in the time frame of this increased heat flux. The duration of the transient suggests possible forcing mechanisms: advancement of a cracking front, a small-scale dike intrusion, aseismic crustal movement, fracture of a flow constriction to a previously unaccessible reservoir, an increase of heat in an underlying magma chamber, or movement of melt within the axial magma chamber. The transient disappeared before returning in August 2006, likely due to thermal expansion of shallow host rock, decreasing the permeability. Should such increases in seafloor heat flux prove to be common, the rate of hydrothermal cooling could be faster than previously thought.

  14. Testing Models of Magmatic and Hydrothermal Segmentation: A Three-Dimensional Seismic Tomography Experiment at the Endeavour Ridge (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E.; Weekly, R. T.; Wells, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    Competing models for what controls the segmentation and intensity of ridge crest processes are at odds on the scale of mantle and crustal magmatic segmentation, the distribution of hydrothermal venting with respect to a volcanic segment and the properties of the thermal boundary layer that transports energy between the magmatic and hydrothermal systems. The presence of an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector beneath the central portion of the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge, as well as systematic along axis changes in seafloor depth, ridge crest morphology and hydrothermal venting provide an ideal target for testing conflicting hypotheses. In late summer 2009, we conducted an active source seismic experiment on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. A total of 5,567 airgun shots from the 36-gun, 6,600 in3 airgun array of the R/V Marcus G. Langseth were recorded by 68 short-period ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed at 64 sites. The experimental geometry utilized 3 nested scales and was designed to image (1) crustal thickness variations within 25 km of the axial high (0 to 900 kyr); (2) the map view heterogeneity and anisotropy of the topmost mantle beneath the spreading axis; (3) the three-dimensional structure of the crustal magmatic system and (4) the detailed three-dimensional, shallow crustal thermal structure beneath the Endeavour vent fields. At the segment scale, six 100-km-long ridge-parallel shot lines were obtained at distances of 16, 23 and 30 km to both sides of the ridge axis with OBSs on all but the outer lines. At the along-axis scale of the AMC reflector, shot lines are spaced 1 km apart and OBSs 8 km apart within a 60 x 20 km2 region. At the vent field scale, shots were obtained on a 500 x 500 m2 grid and OBSs spaced 5 km apart within a 20 x 10 km2 region. All the shooting lines were collected with a 9 m source depth to obtain impulsive arrivals at shorter ranges but the outer lines were also shot with a 15 m source depth

  15. Magma system along fast-spreading centers controlled by ridge segmentation: Evidence from the northern Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Sumio; Adachi, Yoshiko

    2013-04-01

    Mid-ocean ridges are segmented at various scales with a hierarchy, from the biggest 1st- order to the smallest 4th-order segments. These segment structures control magmatic processes beneath the mid-ocean ridges such as mantle upwelling, partial melting of the upper mantle, and magma delivery system to form the oceanic crust (Macdonald, 1998). However, systematic studies on the segment control for magmatic processes are rare at modern mid-ocean ridges due to the difficulty of obtaining in-situ samples from different crustal-lithospheric depths. Sampling at ocean floors is generally exclusively limited only to the surface (i.e. the seafloor). Furthermore, the samples obtained from the surface of the ocean floor may likely represent the products of off-axis magmatism (Kusano et al., 2012). Therefore, studies of ocean ridge segmentation in ophiolites provide important constraints for the magmatic processes beneath seafloor spreading centers, because the precise 3-D architecture of the upper mantle and the crust (all the way to the uppermost extrusive layer) and their lateral variations could be observed and investigated in ophiolites. We have studied the northern Oman ophiolite where a complete succession from the upper mantle peridotites to the uppermost extrusive rocks is well exposed. Miyashita et al. (2003), Adachi and Miyashita (2003) and Umino et al. (2003) proposed a segment structure in the northern Oman ophiolite; the Wadi Fizh area is regarded as a northward propagating tip of a mid-ocean ridge based on geological evidence (Adachi and Miyashita. 2003). On the other hand, the Wadi Thuqbah area, about 25 km south of Wadi Fizh, is regarded as a segment center based on the thickest Moho transition zone, well developed EW-trending lineations in the MTZ and layered gabbro, and the comparatively primitive compositions of the layered gabbros. Furthermore, the southern margin of the Hilti block (Salahi block), about 40 km south of Wadi Thuqbah, is inferred to be the

  16. Vent Field Distribution and Evolution Along the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Lilley, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    Five major vent fields have now been discovered along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. From the north to the south they include Sasquatch, Salty Dawg, High Rise, Main Endeavour, and Mothra. Spacing between the distinct, high-temperature fields increases from the north to the south. For example Sasquatch is located 1.6 km north of Salty Dawg and Mothra is 2.7 km south of the Main Endeavour Field. In addition to changes in spacing of the vent fields along axis there are also dramatic changes in the style, intensity, and thermal-chemical characteristics of venting. The newly discovered Sasquatch field extends for >200 m in length, and venting is limited to a few isolated, small structures that reach 284° C. Active venting is confined to the northern portion of the field. In contrast, extinct, massive sulfide edifices and oxidized sulfide talus can be followed continuously for over 200 m along a 25-30 m wide, 020 trending ridge indicating that this field was very active in the past. In contrast to the delicate active structures, older extinct structures reach at least 25 m in height and the aspect ratios are similar to active pillars in the Mothra Field 7.5 km, to the south. It is unclear if venting at this site represents rejuvenation of the field, or whether it is in a waning stage. Within Salty Dawg, vent fluid temperatures reach 296° C and vigorous venting is constrained to a few, multi-flanged edifices that reach 25 m in height and 25 m in length. The field hosts over 25 structures, oxidized sulfide is abundant, and diffuse flow is dominant. Fluid compositions and temperatures are consistent with Salty Dawg being in a waning stage of evolution. Venting intensity and incidence of venting increase dramatically at High Rise where numerous multi-flanged structures are active; temperatures reach 343° C. The most intense and active of the fields is the Main Endeavour, with at least 21 actively venting, multi-flanged edifices that contain at least 100

  17. Compressional and Shear Wave Structure of the Upper Crust Beneath the Endeavour Segment, Juan De Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Weekly, R. T.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We present tomographic images of the compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocity structure of the upper crust beneath the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This ridge segment is bounded by the Endeavour and Cobb overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) to the north and south, respectively. Near the segment center an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector underlies 5 hydrothermal vent fields. Our analysis uses data from the Endeavour tomography (ETOMO) experiment. A prior study of the Vp structure indicates that the shallow crust of the Endeavour segment is strongly heterogeneous [Weekly et al., 2014]. Beneath the OSCs Vp is anomalously low, indicating tectonic fracturing. Near the segment center, upper crustal Vp is relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields, likely due to infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed immediately above the AMC, reflecting increased fracturing or higher temperatures. Anisotropic tomography reveals large amplitude ridge-parallel seismic anisotropy on-axis (>10%), but decreases in the off-axis direction over 5-10 km. Here we use crustal S-wave phases (Sg) — generated by P-to-S conversions near the seafloor — to better constrain crustal properties. Over half the OBSs in the ETOMO experiment recorded horizontal data on two channels that are of sufficiently high quality that we can orient the geophones using the polarizations of water waves from shots within 12 km. For these OBSs, crustal Sg phases are commonly visible out to ranges of ~20-25 km. We invert the Sg data separately for Vs structure, and also jointly invert Pg and Sg data to constrain the Vp/Vs ratio. Preliminary inversions indicate that Vs and Vp/Vs varies both laterally and vertically. These results imply strong lateral variations in both the physical (e.g., crack density and aspect ratio) and chemical (e.g., hydration) properties of oceanic crust.

  18. Heat flux from black smokers on the Endeavour and Cleft segments, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginster, Ursula; Mottl, Michael J.; von Herzen, Richard P.

    1994-03-01

    We have estimated the heat flux from black smoker vents on the Juan de Fuca Ridge to evaluate their importance for heat transfer from young oceanic crust. The velocity and temperature of smoker effluent were measured from the manned submersible Alvin within a few centimeters of vent orifices, using a turbine flowmeter with an attached temperature probe. Exit velocity was calculated from a simple plume model, and vent orifices were measured in photographs and video records. The estimated power output from smokers alone is 49 plus or minus 13 MW for the Plume site, Vent 1 and Vent 3 on the southern Cleft segment near 45 deg N; 364 plus or minus 73 MW for the main vent field on the Endeavour Segment near 48 deg N; and 122 plus or minus 61 MW for the Tubeworm field 2 km north. The estimates for the Cleft and Tubeworm fields could be too low because of undiscovered vents. These values constitute only 4% to 14% of the total advective heat flux estimated for these vent fields from measurements in the nonbuoyant plume and of diffuse flow at the seafloor, indicating that most of the heat advected at these hydrothermal vent sites is carried by diffuse rather than focused flow. Values for individual smokers vary from 0.1 to 94 MW, with an average of 6.2 MW at the Endeavour field and 3.1 MW at the Cleft field. Our estimates agree well at all scales with those of Bemis et al. (1993) based on measurements made during the same dives, in some cases simultaneously, up to 50 m high in the buoyant plume. The good agreement between the two techniques implies that little diffuse flow at either high or low temperature is incorporated into the buoyant plumes generated by smokers at these sites. Velocity-temperature measurements at vents excavated by Alvin could not be modeled successfully, suggesting that vent structures may grow in equilibrium with the force of the exiting water such that orifice size is determined by volume flux. At the Endeavour field the heat flux is focused by

  19. Sulfide geochronology along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, John W.; Hannington, Mark D.; Clague, David A.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Delaney, John R.; Holden, James F.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Kimpe, Linda E.

    2013-07-01

    Forty-nine hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate rock samples from the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeastern Pacific Ocean, were dated by measuring the decay of 226Ra (half-life of 1600 years) in hydrothermal barite to provide a history of hydrothermal venting at the site over the past 6000 years. This dating method is effective for samples ranging in age from ˜200 to 20,000 years old and effectively bridges an age gap between shorter- and longer-lived U-series dating techniques for hydrothermal deposits. Results show that hydrothermal venting at the active High Rise, Sasquatch, and Main Endeavour fields began at least 850, 1450, and 2300 years ago, respectively. Barite ages of other inactive deposits on the axial valley floor are between ˜1200 and ˜2200 years old, indicating past widespread hydrothermal venting outside of the currently active vent fields. Samples from the half-graben on the eastern slope of the axial valley range in age from ˜1700 to ˜2925 years, and a single sample from outside the axial valley, near the westernmost valley fault scarp is ˜5850 ± 205 years old. The spatial relationship between hydrothermal venting and normal faulting suggests a temporal relationship, with progressive younging of sulfide deposits from the edges of the axial valley toward the center of the rift. These relationships are consistent with the inward migration of normal faulting toward the center of the valley over time and a minimum age of onset of hydrothermal activity in this region of 5850 years.

  20. Volcanism, jump and propagation on the Sheba ridge, eastern Gulf of Aden: segmentation evolution and implications for oceanic accretion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acremont, Elia; Leroy, Sylvie; Maia, Marcia; Gente, Pascal; Autin, Julia

    2010-02-01

    The rifting between Arabia and Somalia, which started around 35 Ma, was followed by oceanic accretion from at least 17.6 Ma leading to the formation of the present-day Gulf of Aden. Bathymetric, gravity and magnetic data from the Encens-Sheba cruise are used to constrain the structure and segmentation of the oceanic basin separating the conjugate continental margins in the eastern part of the Gulf of Aden between 51°E and 55.5°E. Data analysis reveals that the oceanic domain along this ridge section is divided into two distinct areas. The Eastern area is characterized by a shorter wavelength variation of the axial segmentation and an extremely thin oceanic crust. In the western segment, a thicker oceanic crust suggests a high melt supply. This supply is probably due to an off-axis melting anomaly located below the southern flank of the Sheba ridge, 75 km east of the major Alula-Fartak transform fault. This suggests that the axial morphology is produced by a combination of factors, including spreading rate, melt supply and the edge effect of the Alula-Fartak transform fault, as well as the proximity of the continental margin. The oceanic domains have undergone two distinct phases of accretion since the onset of seafloor spreading, with a shift around 11 Ma. At that time, the ridge jumped southwards, in response to the melting anomaly. Propagating ridges were triggered by the melting activity, and propagated both eastward and westward. The influence of the melting anomaly on the ridges decreased, stopping their propagation since less than 9 Ma. From that time up to the present, the N025°E-trending Socotra transform fault developed in association with the formation of the N115°E-trending segment #2. In recent times, a counter-clockwise rotation of the stress field associated with kinematic changes could explain the structural morphology of the Alula-Fartak and Socotra-Hadbeen fracture zones.

  1. Fault structure and detailed evolution of a slow spreading ridge segment: the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 29°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, R. C.; Cowie, P. A.; Mitchell, N. C.; Allerton, S.; MacLeod, C. J.; Escartin, J.; Russell, S. M.; Slootweg, P. A.; Tanaka, T.

    1998-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a detailed near-bottom study of the morphology and tectonics of the 29°N "Broken Spur" segment on the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge, using principally the TOBI deep-towed instrument. The survey covered two-thirds of the segment length, including all of its southern non-transform boundary, and extended off-axis of 40 km (3.3 Ma) on either side. We obtained nearly complete near-bottom sidescan sonar coverage and deep-towed three-component magnetic observations along 2-km-spaced E-W tracks. Sidescan data reveal new details of fault structure and evolution. Faults grow by along-axis linkage. In the inside corner, they also link in the axis-normal direction by curving to meet the next outer (older) fault; this leads to wider-spaced faults compared to segment centre or outside corner. Outward facing faults exist but are rare. The non-transform offset is characterised by faults that are highly oblique, not parallel, to the spreading direction, and show cross-cutting relations with ridge-parallel faults to the north, suggesting along-axis migration of the offset. Almost all volcanic activity occurs within 5 km of the axis. Most fault growth is complete within 15 km of the axis (1.2 Ma), though large scarps continue to be degraded by mass-wasting beyond there. Crustal magnetisation is strongly three-dimensional. The current neovolcanic zone is slightly oblique to earlier reversal boundaries, and its magnetisation rises to a maximum of 30 A m -1 near its southern tip. The central magnetisation high tapers southwards and is asymmetric, with a sharp western but gradual eastern boundary. We infer a highly asymmetric accretion of layer 2 near the segment end. Older magnetic anomalies are kinked and sometimes missing. We interpret these observations as evidence of a rapid, 18 km southward migration of the segment boundary during the past 1.8 Ma, and present a series of reconstructions illustrating this tectonic history.

  2. Fault structure and detailed evolution of a slow spreading ridge segment: the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 29°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Slootweg, P. A.; Russell, S. M.; Escartin, J.; MacLeod, C. J.; Allerton, S.; Mitchell, N. C.; Cowie, P. A.; Searle, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a detailed near-bottom study of the morphology and tectonics of the 29°N ``Broken Spur'' segment on the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge, using principally the TOBI deep-towed instrument. The survey covered two-thirds of the segment length, including all of its southern non-transform boundary, and extended off-axis of 40 km (3.3 Ma) on either side. We obtained nearly complete near-bottom sidescan sonar coverage and deep-towed three-component magnetic observations along 2-km-spaced E-W tracks. Sidescan data reveal new details of fault structure and evolution. Faults grow by along-axis linkage. In the inside corner, they also link in the axis-normal direction by curving to meet the next outer (older) fault; this leads to wider-spaced faults compared to segment centre or outside corner. Outward facing faults exist but are rare. The non-transform offset is characterised by faults that are highly oblique, not parallel, to the spreading direction, and show cross-cutting relations with ridge-parallel faults to the north, suggesting along-axis migration of the offset. Almost all volcanic activity occurs within 5 km of the axis. Most fault growth is complete within 15 km of the axis (1.2 Ma), though large scarps continue to be degraded by mass-wasting beyond there. Crustal magnetisation is strongly three-dimensional. The current neovolcanic zone is slightly oblique to earlier reversal boundaries, and its magnetisation rises to a maximum of 30 A m-1 near its southern tip. The central magnetisation high tapers southwards and is asymmetric, with a sharp western but gradual eastern boundary. We infer a highly asymmetric accretion of layer 2 near the segment end. Older magnetic anomalies are kinked and sometimes missing. We interpret these observations as evidence of a rapid, 18 km southward migration of the segment boundary during the past 1.8 Ma, and present a series of reconstructions illustrating this tectonic history.

  3. Causes of long-term landscape evolution of "passive" margins and adjacent continental segments at the South Atlantic Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton; Hackspacher, Peter C.

    2013-04-01

    During the last 10 years research efforts have been devoted to understand the coupling between tectonic and surface processes in the formation of recent topography. Quantification of the rate at which landforms adapt to a changing tectonic, heat flow, and climate environment in the long term has become an important research object and uses intensively data revealed by low-temperature thermochronology, terrigenous cosmogenic nuclides, and geomorphological analyses. The influence of endogenic forces such as mantle processes as one of the causes for "Dynamic Topography Evolution" have been explored in a few studies, recently. In addition, the increased understanding how change in surface topography, and change in the amount of downward moving cold surface water caused by climate change affects warping isotherms in the uppermost crust allows further interpretation of low-temperature thermochronological data. "Passive" continental margins and adjacent continental segments especially at the South Atlantic ocean are perfect locations to quantify exhumation and uplift rates, model the long-term landscape evolution, and provide information on the influence of mantle processes on a longer time scale. This climate-continental margin-mantle process-response system is caused by the interaction between endogenic and exogenic forces that are related to the mantle-process driven rift - drift - "passive" continental margin evolution of the South Atlantic, and the climate change since the Early/Late Cretaceous climate maximum. Furthermore, the influence of major transform faults (also called: transfer zones, Fracture Zones (FZ)) on the long-term evolution of "passive" continental margins is still very much in debate. The presentation will provide insight in possible causes for the differentiated long-term landscape evolution along the South Atlantic Ocean.

  4. Neogene structural evolution of Gold Mountain, Slate Ridge and adjacent areas, Esmeralda and Nye counties, SW Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, D.C.; Weiss, S.I.; Worthington, J.E. . Mackay School of Mines); McKee, E.H. )

    1993-04-01

    The onset of crustal instability in the Gold Mountain-Slate Ridge (GMSR) area took place prior to middle Miocene time, as shown by the irregular topography upon which the 16.8 Ma tuff of Mount Dunfee was deposited. Local wedges of fanglomerate and conglomerate between four overlying ash-flow sheets and complex patterns of thinning and thickening, nondeposition, and erosion show that normal faulting took place more-or-less continuously between 16.8 and 11.5 Ma. More intense listric( ) faulting, tilting, uplift, erosion and deposition of wedges of fanglomerate and conglomerate occurred between emplacement of the 11.5 Ma Timber Mountain Tuff (TMT) and the 7.5 Ma Stonewall Flat Tuff (SFT). The present topography west of long. 117[degree]W developed mostly after 7.5 Ma following deposition of the widespread SFT, which thickens westward with increasing elevation on the east end of Slate Ridge. major uplifted blocks include the GMSR area, Magruder Mountain, and Palmetto Mountain, where erosional remnants of the SFT are found at elevations as high as 8,200 ft. Uplift was accommodated by high-angle faulting with little tilting and by warping. In the GMSR area pre-7.5 Ma tilting was mainly to the south-southeast reflecting movement along N-dipping listric( ) faults, indicating northwest-directed extension. In contrast, southeast of Gold Mountain and in the northeastern part of the Grapevine Mountains post-11.5 Ma tilting resulted from movement on normal faults that dip to the SSE beneath Sarcobatus Flat and toward the WNW-vergent Boundary Canyon-Original Bullfrog detachment fault system further south; this implies SE-directed extensional strain within a general region of NW-directed extension. Slate Ridge also acted as a barrier to the 11.5 Ma TMT. These relations suggest that certain areas within this section of the Walker Lane belt tended to remain high from middle Miocene time until the present, with a major exception being the time of deposition of the SFT.

  5. Hydrothermal activity along the slow-spreading Lucky Strike ridge segment (Mid-Atlantic Ridge): Distribution, heatflux, and geological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Barreyre, T.; Cannat, M.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Deschamps, A.; Salocchi, A.; Sarradin, P.-M.; Ballu, V.

    2015-12-01

    We have reviewed available visual information from the seafloor, and recently acquired microbathymetry for several traverses across the Lucky Strike segment, to evaluate the distribution of hydrothermal activity. We have identified a new on-axis site with diffuse flow, Ewan, and an active vent structure ∼1.2 km from the axis, Capelinhos. These sites are minor relative to the Main field, and our total heatflux estimate for all active sites (200-1200 MW) is only slightly higher than previously published estimates. We also identify fossil sites W of the main Lucky Strike field. A circular feature ∼200 m in diameter located on the flanks of a rifted off-axis central volcano is likely a large and inactive hydrothermal edifice, named Grunnus. We find no indicator of focused hydrothermal activity elsewhere along the segment, suggesting that the enhanced melt supply and the associated melt lenses, required to form central volcanoes, also sustain hydrothermal circulation to form and maintain large and long-lived hydrothermal fields. Hydrothermal discharge to the seafloor occurs along fault traces, suggesting focusing of hydrothermal circulation in the shallow crust along permeable fault zones.

  6. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  7. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-Yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  8. Radiologic Findings and Risk Factors of Adjacent Segment Degeneration after Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion : A Retrospective Matched Cohort Study with 3-Year Follow-Up Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    So, Wan-Soo; Ku, Min-Geun; Kim, Sang-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Won; Lee, Byung-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to figure out the radiologic findings and risk factors related to adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using 3-year follow-up radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance image (MRI). Methods A retrospective matched comparative study was performed for 64 patients who underwent single-level ACDF with a cage and plate. Radiologic parameters, including upper segment range of motion (USROM), lower segment range of motion (LSROM), upper segment disc height (UDH), and lower segment disc height (LDH), clinical outcomes assessed with neck and arm visual analogue scale (VAS), and risk factors were analyzed. Results Patients were categorized into the ASD (32 patients) and non-ASD (32 patients) group. The decrease of UDH was significantly greater in the ASD group at each follow-up visit. At 36 months postoperatively, the difference for USROM value from the preoperative one significantly increased in the ASD group than non-ASD group. Preoperative other segment degeneration was significantly associated with the increased incidence of ASD at 36 months. However, pain intensity for the neck and arm was not significantly different between groups at any post-operative follow-up visit. Conclusion The main factor affecting ASD is preoperative other segment degeneration out of the adjacent segment. In addition, patients over the age of 50 are at higher risk of developing ASD. Although there was definite radiologic degeneration in the ASD group, no significant difference was observed between the ASD and non-ASD groups in terms of the incidence of symptomatic disease. PMID:26962418

  9. Melt extraction and mantle source at a Southwest Indian Ridge Dragon Bone amagmatic segment on the Marion Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changgui; Dick, Henry J. B.; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Huaiyang

    2016-03-01

    This paper works on the trace and major element compositions of spatially associated basalts and peridotites from the Dragon Bone amagmatic ridge segment at the eastern flank of the Marion Platform on the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. The rare earth element compositions of basalts do not match the pre-alteration Dragon Bone peridotite compositions, but can be modeled by about 5 to 10% non-modal batch equilibrium melting from a DMM source. The Dragon Bone peridotites are clinopyroxene-poor harzburgite with average spinel Cr# ~ 27.7. The spinel Cr# indicates a moderate degree of melting. However, CaO and Al2O3 of the peridotites are lower than other abyssal peridotites at the same Mg# and extent of melting. This requires a pyroxene-poor initial mantle source composition compared to either hypothetical primitive upper mantle or depleted MORB mantle sources. We suggest a hydrous melting of the initial Dragon Bone mantle source, as wet melting depletes pyroxene faster than dry. According to the rare earth element patterns, the Dragon Bone peridotites are divided into two groups. Heavy REE in Group 1 are extremely fractionated from middle REE, which can be modeled by ~ 7% fractional melting in the garnet stability field and another ~ 12.5 to 13.5% in the spinel stability field from depleted and primitive upper mantle sources, respectively. Heavy REE in Group 2 are slightly fractionated from middle REE, which can be modeled by ~ 15 to 20% fractional melting in the spinel stability field from a depleted mantle source. Both groups show similar melting degree to other abyssal peridotites. If all the melt extraction occurred at the middle oceanic ridge where the peridotites were dredged, a normal ~ 6 km thick oceanic crust is expected at the Dragon Bone segment. However, the Dragon Bone peridotites are exposed in an amagmatic ridge segment where only scattered pillow basalts lie on a partially serpentinized mantle pavement. Thus their depletion requires an

  10. Monitoring Change on Hydrothermal Edifices by Photogrammetric Time Series: Case Studies from the Endeavour Segment (Juan de Fuca Ridge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesemann, M.; Kwasnitschka, T.; Kelley, D. S.; Mihaly, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution photogrammetric surveys derived from ROV or AUV imagery yield seafloor geometry at centimeter resolution with full color texture while modeling overhangs and crevasses, generating vastly more detailed terrain models compared to most acoustic methods. The models furthermore serve as geographic reference frames for localized studies. Repetitive surveys consequently facilitate the precise, quantitative study of edifice buildup and erosion as well as the development of the biological habitat. We compare data gathered by the Ocean Networks Canada maintenance cruises with earlier surveys at two sites (Mothra, Main Endeavour Field) along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  11. Crustal architecture and deep structure of the Namibian continental shelf and adjacent oceanic basins around the landfall of Walvis Ridge from wide-angle seismic and marine magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planert, L.; Behrmann, J.; Jegen, M.; Heincke, B.; Jokat, W.; Bialas, J.; Marti, A.

    2012-12-01

    The opening of the South Atlantic ocean basin resulted in voluminous magmatism on the conjugate continental margins of Africa and South America, including the formation of the Parana and Entendeka large igneous provinces (LIPs), the formation of up to 100 km wide volcanic wedges characterized by seaward dipping reflector sequences (SDRs), as well as the formation of paired hotspot tracks on the rifted African and South American plates, the Walvis Ridge and the Rio Grande Rise. Hence, the passive margins bordering the South Atlantic are today considered as type examples for models involving hotspot related continental break-up. However, the presence of volcanic features (SDRs, LIPs) appears to be limited south of the hotspot trails. The resulting segmentation of the margins offers a prime opportunity to study the magmatic signal in space and time, and investigate the interrelation with rift-related deformation. A globally significant question to be adressed here is whether magmatism is the driving force for continental break-up, or whether even rifting with abundant hotspot related magmatism is in principle in response to crustal and lithospheric stretching. In 2010/11, a combination of on-/offshore wide-angle seismic, marine magnetotelluric and on-/offshore seismological data were acquired around the landfall of Walvis Ridge at the Namibian passive continental margin. The set of experiments was designed to provide crustal velocity and conductivity information and to investigate the structure of the upper mantle. In particular, we aimed at identifying deep fault zones and variations in Moho depth, the presence of interleaved sediment layers in SDR sequences as well as magmatic intrusions and underplated material near the continent-ocean transition. The sedimentary portions down to the igneous basement were additionally constrained by coincident single-channel reflection seismic data. Here, we present preliminary results for two wide-angle seismic transects and first

  12. Eruptive and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, based on AUV mapping data and lava flow ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, David. A.; Dreyer, Brian M.; Paduan, Jennifer B.; Martin, Julie F.; Caress, David W.; Gill, James B.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Thomas, Hans; Portner, Ryan A.; Delaney, John R.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McGann, Mary L.

    2014-08-01

    bathymetric surveys from autonomous underwater vehicles ABE and D. Allan B. were merged to create a coregistered map of 71.7 km2 of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Radiocarbon dating of foraminifera in cores from three dives of remotely operated vehicle Doc Ricketts provide minimum eruption ages for 40 lava flows that are combined with the bathymetric data to outline the eruptive and tectonic history. The ages range from Modern to 10,700 marine-calibrated years before present (yr BP). During a robust magmatic phase from >10,700 yr BP to ˜4300 yr BP, flows erupted from an axial high and many flowed >5 km down the flanks; some partly buried adjacent valleys. Axial magma chambers (AMCs) may have been wider than today to supply dike intrusions over a 2 km wide axial zone. Summit Seamount formed by ˜4770 yr BP and was subsequently dismembered during a period of extension with little volcanism starting ˜4300 yr BP. This tectonic phase with only rare volcanic eruptions lasted until ˜2300 yr BP and may have resulted in near-solidification of the AMCs. The axial graben formed by crustal extension during this period of low magmatic activity. Infrequent eruptions occurred on the flanks between 2620-1760 yr BP and within the axial graben since ˜1750 yr BP. This most recent phase of limited volcanic and intense hydrothermal activity that began ˜2300 yr BP defines a hydrothermal phase of ridge development that coincides with the present-day 1 km wide AMCs and overlying hydrothermal vent fields.

  13. Eruptive and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge, based on AUV mapping data and lava flow ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, David A.; Dreyer, Brian M; Paduan, Jennifer B; Martin, Julie F; Caress, David W; Gillespie, James B.; Kelley, Deborah S; Thomas, Hans; Portner, Ryan A; Delaney, John R; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McGann, Mary L.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution bathymetric surveys from autonomous underwater vehicles ABE and D. Allan B. were merged to create a coregistered map of 71.7 km2 of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Radiocarbon dating of foraminifera in cores from three dives of remotely operated vehicle Doc Ricketts provide minimum eruption ages for 40 lava flows that are combined with the bathymetric data to outline the eruptive and tectonic history. The ages range from Modern to 10,700 marine-calibrated years before present (yr BP). During a robust magmatic phase from >10,700 yr BP to ~4300 yr BP, flows erupted from an axial high and many flowed >5 km down the flanks; some partly buried adjacent valleys. Axial magma chambers (AMCs) may have been wider than today to supply dike intrusions over a 2 km wide axial zone. Summit Seamount formed by ~4770 yr BP and was subsequently dismembered during a period of extension with little volcanism starting ~4300 yr BP. This tectonic phase with only rare volcanic eruptions lasted until ~2300 yr BP and may have resulted in near-solidification of the AMCs. The axial graben formed by crustal extension during this period of low magmatic activity. Infrequent eruptions occurred on the flanks between 2620–1760 yr BP and within the axial graben since ~1750 yr BP. This most recent phase of limited volcanic and intense hydrothermal activity that began ~2300 yr BP defines a hydrothermal phase of ridge development that coincides with the present-day 1 km wide AMCs and overlying hydrothermal vent fields.

  14. Crustal Structure of the Northern and Southern Jan Mayen Ridge Segments, Norwegian Sea, Based on Ocean Bottom Seismometer Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, A. J.; Mjelde, R.; Shimamura, H.; Murai, Y.; Nishimura, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The Jan Mayen Ridge (JMR) is a submarine ridge trending south from the volcanic Jan Mayen island in the Norwegian Sea, towards Iceland. In the north, it is a distinct, single ridge, but in the south it is divided into several smaller ridges. JMR is interpreted as a micro-continent, being part of Greenland during the volcanically active rifting off Norway in the latest Paleocene. In the late Oligocene, JMR was rifted off Greenland when seafloor spreading shifted from the now extinct Aegir Ridge, to the presently active Kolbeinsey Ridge. The southern termination of the micro-continent is uncertain, though it may extend into the Icelandic shelf. Earlier studies of the northern ridge found extrusive volcanism, and an asymmetrical crustal root, displaced to the east. Two OBS profiles were shot across the northern and southern part in year 2000. The northern ( ˜69° N) terminates in the Jan Mayen Fracture Zone, and the southern ( ˜66.5° N) crosses the Aegir Ridge. The vertical and horizontal components were modeled by ray-tracing into two-dimensional velocity transects. In the north, a maximum crustal thickness of 16 km was found in a narrow root below the eastern part of the ridge. The P-wave velocity at the bottom of the eastern part of the root (7-7.2 km/s) indicates igneous rocks, while the western part (6.8 km/s) is typical for continental rocks, with a 40 km wide transition zone between. The supposed extrusive basalts do not stand out in the data, but may have a low velocity contrast to underlying pre-breakup sedimentary strata. The top oceanic basement is very rough near the Jan Mayen Fracture Zone, with upper basement P-wave velocity of 3.5-4 km/s. A slight increase in the Vp/Vs ratios indicates an increase in fracturing of the deep crust here. Adjacent to the JMR, the top oceanic basement becomes very smooth, and the velocity increases to 5.5 km/s. Average oceanic crustal thickness is 5.3 km. For the southern profile, the average thickness is 5.2 km around

  15. Geophysical signatures over and around the northern segment of the 85°E Ridge, Mahanadi offshore, Eastern Continental Margin of India: Tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desa, Maria Ana; Ramana, M. V.; Ramprasad, T.; Anuradha, M.; Lall, M. V.; Kumar, B. J. P.

    2013-09-01

    The nature and origin of the subsurface 85°E Ridge in the Bay of Bengal has remained enigmatic till date despite several theories proposed by earlier researchers. We reinterpreted the recently acquired high quality multichannel seismic reflection data over the northern segment of the ridge that traverses through the Mahanadi offshore, Eastern Continental Margin of India and mapped the ridge boundary and its northward continuity. The ridge is characterized by complex topography, multilayer composition, intrusive bodies and discrete nature of underlying crust. The ridge is associated with large amplitude negative magnetic and gravity anomalies. The negative gravity response across the ridge is probably due to emplacement of relatively low density material as well as ∼2-3 km flexure of the Moho. The observed broad shelf margin basin gravity anomaly in the northern Mahanadi offshore is due to the amalgamation of the 85°E Ridge material with that of continental and oceanic crust. The negative magnetic anomaly signature over the ridge indicates its evolution in the southern hemisphere when the Earth's magnetic field was normally polarized. The presence of ∼5 s TWT thick sediments over the acoustic basement west of the ridge indicates that the underlying crust is relatively old, Early Cretaceous age. The present study indicates that the probable palaeo-location of Elan Bank is not between the Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi offshores, but north of Mahanadi. Further, the study suggests that the northern segment of the 85°E Ridge may have emplaced along a pseudo fault during the Mid Cretaceous due to Kerguelen mantle plume activity. The shallow basement east of the ridge may have formed due to the later movement of the microcontinents Elan Bank and Southern Kerguelen Plateau along with the Antarctica plate.

  16. Structure and segmentation of the eastern Gulf of Aden basin and the Sheba ridge from gravity, bathymetric and magnetic anomalies: implications for accretion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Acremont, E.; Leroy, S.; Maia, M.; Gente, P.; Autin, J.

    2007-12-01

    The eastern Gulf of Aden is a key place for investigating seafloor spreading processes and the evolution in space and time of the margin and ridge segmentation. The rifting of the Gulf that separated Arabia from Somalia started around 35 Ma ago followed by oceanic accretion from at least17.6 Ma. Bathymetric, gravity and magnetic data from the Encens-Sheba cruise are used to study the structure and segmentation of the eastern part of the basin and ridge, which have strong implications for accretion processes. The segmentation of the first oceanic spreading centre, which is dated at least 17.6 Ma by the magnetic anomaly (A5d) identification, seems to be directly related to the structural geometry of the margins. Then, magmatic processes governed the evolution of the segmentation. The segmentation of the oceanic crust evolved, by eastward propagation of the western segment, from three segments (from an5d to an5) to two segments (from an5). At 6 Ma (an3a) a third segment appeared by duplication of the Socotra transform fault, maybe due to a regional kinematics change. The Encens-Sheba oceanic domain is divided in two distinct areas trending NE-SW perpendicular to the Sheba ridge. (1) The Eastern area is characterized by a shorter wavelength variation of the axial segmentation with two spreading segments 30 to 40 km long, and by a thin crust particularly on the northern and southern ends of its flanks. (2) The Western zone, whose axial segment is more than 120 km long, is characterized by a thick crust and/or a hot mantle and no axial rift valley. This abnormal volcanic activity for a slow spreading ridge is emphasized by bathymetric highs with 5-10 km wide volcanic edifices, and by a negative anomaly of the MBA. These different results support the presence of an off-axis thermal anomaly located below the southern flank of the Sheba ridge. The magnetic anomalies and spreading asymmetry reveal that the location of this thermal anomaly might be relatively recent (~ 10 Ma

  17. Age, Episodicity and Migration of Hydrothermal Activity within the Axial Valley, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Kelley, D. S.; Clague, D. A.; Holden, J. F.; Tivey, M. K.; Delaney, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrothermal sulfide deposits record the history of high-temperature venting along the Endeavour Segment. Active venting is currently located within five discreet vent fields, with minor diffuse venting occurring between the fields. However, inactive and/or extinct sulfide structures are found throughout the entire axial valley of the ridge segment, suggesting that hydrothermal activity has been more vigorous in the past or focused venting has migrated with time. Here, we present age constraints from U-series dating of 44 sulfide samples collected by manned submersible from between the Mothra Field in the south to Sasquatch in the north. Samples are dated using 226Ra/Ba ratios from hydrothermal barite that precipitates along with the sulfide minerals. Most samples have been collected from within or near the active vent fields. Fifteen samples from the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) show a spectrum of ages from present to 2,430 years old, indicating that this field has been continuously active for at least ~2,400 years. MEF appears to be oldest currently active field. This minimum value for the age of hydrothermal activity also provides a minimum age of the axial valley itself. Ages from thirteen samples from the High-Rise Field indicate continuous venting for at least the past ~1,250 years. These age data are used in conjunction with age constraints of the volcanic flows to develop an integrated volcanic, hydrothermal and tectonic history of the Endeavour Segment. The total volume of hydrothermal sulfide within the axial valley, determined from high-resolution bathymetry, is used in conjunction with the age constraints of the sulfide material to determine the mass accumulation rates of sulfide along the Endeavour Segment. These data can be used to calibrate the efficiency of sulfide deposition from the hydrothermal vents, and provide a time-integrated history of heat, fluid and chemical fluxes at the ridge-segment scale. The comparison of time-integrated rates with

  18. Preliminary digital geologic map of the Appalachian Piedmont and Blue Ridge, South Carolina segment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, J. Wright, Jr.; Dicken, Connie L.

    2001-01-01

    A preliminary geology coverage of the Piedmont and Blue Ridge in South Carolina has been compiled at 1:5000,000 scale and digitized as part of a patchwork of coverages for the analysis of regional and national geochemical patterns that may have environmental and resource implications. It was produced from other compilations that incorporate more detailed geologic maps as well as additional sources. The compilation is designed to meet short-term needs until better coverage of the regional geology is available.

  19. Estimates of crustal permeability on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, William S. D.; McNabb, Alex

    1996-02-01

    Observational studies of hydrothermal venting on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge place strong constraints on the spacing and area of vent fields, the depth of circulation, and the hydrothermal heat flux. A method is described to estimate a uniform crustal permeability from these parameters under the assumptions that upflow is confined to a narrow plume underlying each vent field and downflow can be described by potential flow into a point sink at the base of each plume. For a reasonable range of parameter values, the isotropic permeability of the Endeavour lies in the range 6 × 10 -13 to 6 × 10 -12 m 2. A significant elongation of vent fields along-axis suggests that the permeability structure is strongly anisotropic, with the across-axis permeability about an order of magnitude lower than the permeability in orthogonal directions.

  20. Temporal and spatial cyclicity of accretion at slow-spreading ridges-evidence from the Reykjanes Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirce, Christine; Gardiner, Alex; Sinha, Martin

    2005-10-01

    A unifying model of oceanic crustal development at slow spreading rates is presented in which accretion follows a cyclic pattern of magmatic construction and tectonic destruction, controlled by along-axis variation in melt supply and coupled to along-axis variation in spreading rate and across-axis asymmetry in spreading. This study focuses on the Reykjanes Ridge, Mid-Atlantic Ridge south of Iceland, which is divided along its entire length into numerous axial volcanic ridges (AVR). Five adjacent AVRs have been analysed, located between 57°30'N and 58°30'N and south of any strong Iceland hotspot influence. The seabed morphology of each AVR is investigated using sidescan sonar data to determine relative age and eruptive history. Along-axis gravity profiles for each AVR are modelled relative to a seismically derived crustal reference model, to reveal the underlying crustal thickness and density structure. Correlating these models with seabed features, crustal structure, ridge segment morphology and relative ages, a model of cyclic ridge segmentation is developed in which accretion results in adjacent AVRs with a range of crustal features which, when viewed collectively, reveal that second-order segments on the Reykjanes Ridge have an along-axis length of ~70 km and comprise several adjacent AVRs which, in turn, reflect the pattern of third-order segmentation. Tectono-magmatic accretion is shown to operate on the scale of individual AVRs, as well as on the scale of the second-order segment as a whole.

  1. Temporal Changes in the Strength of Tidal Triggering Linked to Volcanic Swarms on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S.; Weekly, R. T.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    A number of studies on mid-ocean ridges have documented a clear tidal triggering signal for volcanic/hydrothermal microearthquakes with earthquake rates increasing during intervals when the volumetric tidal stresses are least compressive. Tidal triggering has been demonstrated for the Endeavour segment in 1995, Axial Volcano in 1994, and the East Pacific Rise near 9°50’N in 2003-4. The results from the East Pacific Rise show a particularly strong tidal triggering signal that was interpreted as indicating that the crust was critically stressed in the lead up to a volcanic eruption in 2005-6. Observations in several subduction zones also show an increasing tidal triggering signal prior to large earthquakes and no clear evidence for triggering immediately afterwards. We present results from a tidal triggering study on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge using a three-year catalog of seismicity for a local network deployed around the vent fields from 2003-2006. The catalog spans two complex regional swarms in January and February 2005 that we interpret as non-eruptive volcanic events on the southern extension of the West Valley propagating ridge and the northern Endeavour segment, respectively. These swarms were followed by a substantial drop in seismicity rates along the entire Endeavour segment and by a drop in b-values in the areas of the swarms. The swarms appear to mark the end of a 6-year spreading event that began with a swarm in 1999 and cumulatively ruptured the whole Endeavour segment. We analyze both the tidal phase and height at the times of earthquakes for triggering. Preliminary results show that prior to the swarms there is a strong triggering signal. For example, for earthquakes near the vent fields the rates of seismicity during times when the tidal phase is closer to low tide than high tide is 50% higher than when the phase is closer to high tide. The rate of earthquakes is 130% higher when tide heights are in the lowest tenth

  2. Geology of a vigorous hydrothermal system on the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, J.R.; Robigou, V.; McDuff, R.E. ); Tivey, M.K. )

    1992-12-10

    A high-precision, high-resolution geologic map explicitly documents relationships between tectonic features and large steep-sided, sulfide-sulfate-silica deposits in the vigorously venting Endeavour hydrothermal field near the northern end of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Location of the most massive sulfide structures appears to be controlled by intersections of ridge-parallel normal faults and other fracture-fissure sets that trend oblique to, and perpendicular to the overall structural fabric of the axial valley. As presently mapped, the field is about 200 by 400 m on a side and contains at least 15 large (> 1,000 m[sup 3]) sulfide edifices and many tens of smaller, commonly inactive, sulfide structures. The larger sulfide structures are also the most vigorously venting features in the field; they are commonly more than 30 m in diameter and up to 20 m in height. Maximum venting temperatures of 375[degrees]C are associated with the smaller structures in the northern portion of the field are consistently 20[degrees]-30[degrees]C lower. Hydrothermal output from individual active sulfide features varies from no flow in the lower third of the edifice to vigorous output from fracture-controlled black smoker activity near the top of the structures. Two types of diffuse venting in the Endeavour field include a lower temperature 8[degrees]-15[degrees]C output through colonies of large tubeworms and 25[degrees]-50[degrees]C vent fluid that seems to percolate through the tops of overhanging flanges. The large size and steep-walled nature of these structures evidently results from sustained venting in a mature hydrothermal system, coupled with dual mineral depositional mechanisms involving vertical growth by accumulation of chimney sulfide debris and lateral growth by means of flange development.

  3. Improvement in chronic low back pain in an aviation crash survivor with adjacent segment disease following flexion distraction therapy: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Dean M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the chiropractic management of chronic low back pain in a patient with adjacent segment disease. Clinical Features The patient was a 30-year-old man with a 3-year history of chronic nonspecific low back pain following a lumbar disk herniation. Two years before this incident, he had severe lumbar fractures and cauda equina injury due to an aviation accident that required multilevel lumbar fusion surgery, vertebrectomy, and cage reconstruction. Intervention and Outcome The patient received chiropractic management using Cox Flexion Distraction over a 4-week period. A complete reduction of symptoms to 0/10 on a verbal numerical rating scale was achieved within 4 weeks. At 3 months, the patient was able to work 8 to 9 hours per day in his dental practice with no pain. At 9 months, the patient continued to report a complete reduction of symptoms. Conclusions This report describes the successful management of a patient with chronic low back pain associated with adjacent segment disease using Cox Flexion Distraction protocols. PMID:23843764

  4. Modeling mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal response to earthquakes, tides, and ocean currents: a case study at the Grotto mound, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Bemis, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems feature intricate interconnections among oceanic, geological, hydrothermal, and biological processes. The advent of the NEPTUNE observatory operated by Ocean Networks Canada at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge enables scientists to study these interconnections through multidisciplinary, continuous, real-time observations. The multidisciplinary observatory instruments deployed at the Grotto Mound, a major study site of the NEPTUNE observatory, makes it a perfect place to study the response of a seafloor hydrothermal system to geological and oceanic processes. In this study, we use the multidisciplinary datasets recorded by the NEPTUNE Observatory instruments as observational tools to demonstrate two different aspects of the response of hydrothermal activity at the Grotto Mound to geological and oceanic processes. First, we investigate a recent increase in venting temperature and heat flux at Grotto observed by the Benthic and Resistivity Sensors (BARS) and the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) respectively. This event started in Mar 2014 and is still evolving by the time of writing this abstract. An initial interpretation in light of the seismic data recorded by a neighboring ocean bottom seismometer on the NEPTUNE observatory suggests the temperature and heat flux increase is probably triggered by local seismic activities. Comparison of the observations with the results of a 1-D mathematical model simulation of hydrothermal sub-seafloor circulation elucidates the potential mechanisms underlying hydrothermal response to local earthquakes. Second, we observe significant tidal oscillations in the venting temperature time series recorded by BARS and the acoustic imaging of hydrothermal plumes by COVIS, which is evidence for hydrothermal response to ocean tides and currents. We interpret the tidal oscillations of venting temperature as a result of tidal loading on a poroelastic medium. We then invoke poroelastic

  5. Fishing along the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar reservoir adjacent to the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee: behavior, knowledge and risk perception.

    PubMed

    Rouse Campbell, Kym; Dickey, Richard J; Sexton, Richard; Burger, Joanna

    2002-11-01

    Catching and eating fish is usually viewed as a fun, healthy and safe activity. However, with continuing increases in fish consumption advisories due to the contamination of our environment, anglers have to decide whether or not to eat the fish they catch. The Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir is under a fish consumption advisory because of elevated PCB concentrations in striped bass (Morone saxatilis), catfish (Ictalurus spp.) and sauger (Stizostedion canadense) due in part from contaminants released from the US Department of Energy's (USDOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in East Tennessee. To obtain information about the demographics, fishing behavior, knowledge, fish consumption and risk perception of anglers, a survey was conducted of 202 people actively fishing either on land or by boat along the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir adjacent to the ORR from Melton Hill Dam to the Poplar Creek confluence or on Poplar Creek within ORR boundaries from mid-March to early November 2001. Even though 81% of people interviewed knew about the fish consumption advisories for the study area, 48% of them thought the fish were safe to eat, while 38% ate the fish that they caught from the study area. Approximately 36% of anglers who had knowledge of the fish consumption warnings ate fish from the study area. Providing confirmation that people fish for many reasons, 35% of anglers interviewed did not eat fish at all. The majority of anglers interviewed knew about the fish consumption advisories because of the signs posted throughout the study area. However, few people knew the correct fish advisories. Significantly fewer blacks had knowledge of the fish consumption warnings than whites. Information resulting from this study could be used to design a program with the objective of reaching the people who may be most at risk from eating fish caught from the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir. PMID:12462581

  6. Oceanic Core Complexes on the Mohns Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, A. R.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Mohns Ridge, an ultra-slow spreading ridge in the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge system, is host to multiple volcanic and tectonic spreading segments. This oblique-spreading ridge is hotspot influenced at its southern terminus and is bound to the north by a curvilinear contact with the highly oblique Knipovich Ridge. This study examines EM120 multibeam bathymetry of the Mohns Ridge collected from 1999-2001 and gridded to 50 m cell size. Geomorphic interpretation of near-axis and off-axis structures reveals multiple expressions of potential oceanic core complexes (OCCs) along the 550 km long spreading axis. The OCCs form only on the western side of the spreading axis, consistent with the increased tectonic vs. volcanic morphology of the western flank of the Mohns Ridge. In the southern Mohns Ridge OCCs occur adjacent to on-axis active volcanic spreading centers. In the northern Mohns Ridge OCCs appear related to both ';V' shaped northern-propagating ridge spreading centers and spreading-parallel strings of core complexes extending at least 60 km off axis in the direction of spreading. This geomorphic interpretation should be further refined by dedicated ship-based investigations to fully describe this unique oblique-spreading Arctic Ridge system.

  7. Cervical anterior hybrid technique with bi-level Bryan artificial disc replacement and adjacent segment fusion for cervical myelopathy over three consecutive segments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang; Xu, Lin; Jia, Yu-Song; Sun, Qi; Li, Jin-Yu; Zheng, Chen-Ying; Bai, Chun-Xiao; Yu, Qin-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the preliminary clinical efficacy and feasibility of the hybrid technique for multilevel cervical myelopathy. Considering the many shortcomings of traditional treatment methods for multilevel cervical degenerative myelopathy, hybrid surgery (bi-level Bryan artificial disc [Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA] replacement and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion) should be considered. Between March 2006 and November 2012, 108 patients (68 men and 40 women, average age 45years) underwent hybrid surgery. Based on the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Odom's criteria, the clinical symptoms and neurological function before and after surgery were evaluated. Mean surgery duration was 90minutes, with average blood loss of 30mL. Mean follow-up duration was 36months. At the final follow-up, the mean JOA (± standard deviation) scores were significantly higher compared with preoperative values (15.08±1.47 versus 9.18±1.22; P<0.01); meanwhile, NDI values were markedly decreased (12.32±1.03 versus 42.68±1.83; P<0.01). Using Odom's criteria, the clinical outcomes were rated as excellent (76 patients), good (22 patients), fair (six patients), and poor (four patients). These findings indicate that the hybrid method provides an effective treatment for cervical myelopathy over three consecutive segments, ensuring a good clinical outcome. PMID:26758702

  8. Time-series measurement of hydrothermal heat flux at the Grotto mound, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangyu; Jackson, Darrell R.; Bemis, Karen G.; Rona, Peter A.

    2014-10-01

    Continuous time-series observations are key to understanding the temporal evolution of a seafloor hydrothermal system and its interplay with thermal and chemical processes in the ocean and Earth interior. In this paper, we present a 26-month time series of the heat flux driving a hydrothermal plume on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge obtained using the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS). Since 2010, COVIS has been connected to the North East Pacific Time-series Underwater Networked Experiment (NEPTUNE) observatory that provides power and real-time data transmission. The heat flux time series has a mean value of 18.10 MW and a standard deviation of 6.44 MW. The time series has no significant global trend, suggesting the hydrothermal heat source remained steady during the observation period. The steadiness of the hydrothermal heat source coincides with reduced seismic activity at Endeavour observed in the seismic data recorded by an ocean bottom seismometer from 2011 to 2013. Furthermore, first-order estimation of heat flux based on the temperature measurements made by the Benthic and Resistivity Sensors (BARS) at a neighboring vent also supports the steadiness of the hydrothermal heat source.

  9. Understanding Plume Bending at Grotto Vent on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.; Rabinowitz, J.; Rona, P. A.; Jackson, D. R.; Jones, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    Our improved understanding of black smoker plume bending derives from acoustic imaging of the plume at Grotto, a 30 m diameter vent cluster in the Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. In July 2000, the VIP2000 cruise collected 15 acoustic images over 24 hours. In September 2010, the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) was connected to the NEPTUNE Canada Endeavour Observatory and acquired a 29 day time series capturing plume bending in 479 independent images. Inclination and declination are extracted for one or more plumes from the acoustic images using 2D Gaussian fitting. The bending of the large plume above the northwest end of Grotto is consistent with a dominant tidal sloshing and secondary rift valley inflow based a spectral analysis of the COVIS time series compared with a spectral analysis of current data from 2.9 km north of Grotto. The smaller plume above the eastern end of Grotto behaves in a more complicated fashion as it sometimes bends towards the larger plume. The overall shape of the larger plume is highly variable: sometimes the plume just leans in the direction of the presumed ambient current; other times, the plume bends-over and, in a few cases, the plume bends in two or more directions (forming a sinusoidal shape). Several factors influence bending direction, magnitude and shape. First, for a fluctuating plume, the instantaneous plume centerline wiggles around within the time-averaged plume boundaries; this will certainly produce a "sinusoidal" shape and may be the best explanation for the small scale multi-directional bending observed in individual acoustic images. Second, the transition from jet to plume could produce a change in bending magnitude (but not direction); however, this is unlikely to be visible on the acoustic images as the transition from jet to plume is anticipated to occur within the first 1 m of rise. Third, the ratio of rise velocity W to cross-flow velocity U controls the magnitude and direction of bending

  10. [TREATMENT OF POST-SPONDYLODESIS, ADJACENT-SEGMENT DISEASE WITH MINIMALLY INVASIVE, ANTEROLATERAL SURGERY ON THE LUMBAR SPINE: IS THERE IS NO NEED FOR DORSAL OPERATION?].

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, Attila; Szakály, Péter; Büki, András; Dóczi, Tamás

    2015-07-30

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) occurs with a probability of 30% in the lumbar spine following spinal fusion surgery. Usually advanced degenerative changes happen cranially to the fused lumbar segment. Thus, secondary spinal instability, stenosis, spodylolisthesis, foraminal stenosis can lead to the recurrence of the pain not always amenable to conservative measures. A typical surgical solution to treat ASD consists of posterior revision surgery including decompression, change or extension of the instrumentation and fusion to the rostral level. It results in a larger operation with considerable risk of complications. We present a typical case of ASD treated surgically with a new minimally invasive method not yet performed in Hungary. We use anterolateral abdominal muscle splitting approach to reach the lumbar spine through the retroperitoneum. A discectomy is performed by retracting the psoas muscle dorsally. The intervertebral bony fusion is achieved by implanting a cage with large volume that is stuffed with autologous bone or tricalcium phosphate. A cage with large volume results in excellent annulus fibrosus tension, immediate stability and provides large surface for bony fusion. A stand-alone cage construct can be supplemented with lateral screw/rod/plate fixation. The advantage of the new technique for the treatment of ASD includes minimal blood loss, short operation time, significantly less postoperative pain and much lower complication rate. PMID:26380422

  11. CHARACTERIZATION REPORT FOR STRONTIUM TITANATE IN SWSA 7 AND ADJACENT PARCELS IN SUPPORT OF THE NATIONAL PRIORITIES LIST SITE BOUNDARY DEFINITION PROGRAM OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    David A. King

    2011-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office requested support from the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract to delineate the extent of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) contamination in and around Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 7 as part of the Oak Ridge National Priorities List Site boundary definition program. The study area is presented in Fig. 1.1 relative to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The investigation was executed according to Sampling and Analysis Plan/Quality Assurance Project Plan (SAP/QAPP) (DOE 2011) to supplement previous investigations noted below and to determine what areas, if any, have been adversely impacted by site operations.

  12. Linkages between mineralogy, fluid chemistry, and microbial communities within hydrothermal chimneys from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. J.; Ver Eecke, H. C.; Breves, E. A.; Dyar, M. D.; Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Dahle, H.; Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.; Kelley, D. S.; Lilley, M. D.; Baross, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Rock and fluid samples were collected from three hydrothermal chimneys at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge to evaluate linkages among mineralogy, fluid chemistry, and microbial community composition within the chimneys. Mössbauer, midinfrared thermal emission, and visible-near infrared spectroscopies were utilized for the first time to characterize vent mineralogy, in addition to thin-section petrography, X-ray diffraction, and elemental analyses. A 282°C venting chimney from the Bastille edifice was composed primarily of sulfide minerals such as chalcopyrite, marcasite, and sphalerite. In contrast, samples from a 300°C venting chimney from the Dante edifice and a 321°C venting chimney from the Hot Harold edifice contained a high abundance of the sulfate mineral anhydrite. Geochemical modeling of mixed vent fluids suggested the oxic-anoxic transition zone was above 100°C at all three vents, and that the thermodynamic energy available for autotrophic microbial redox reactions favored aerobic sulfide and methane oxidation. As predicted, microbes within the Dante and Hot Harold chimneys were most closely related to mesophilic and thermophilic aerobes of the Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria and sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria. However, most of the microbes within the Bastille chimney were most closely related to mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobes of the Deltaproteobacteria, especially sulfate reducers, and anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaea. The predominance of anaerobes in the Bastille chimney indicated that other environmental factors promote anoxic conditions. Possibilities include the maturity or fluid flow characteristics of the chimney, abiotic Fe2+ and S2- oxidation in the vent fluids, or O2 depletion by aerobic respiration on the chimney outer wall.

  13. Heat flux measured acoustically at Grotto Vent, a hydrothermal vent cluster on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past several decades, quantifying the heat output has been a unanimous focus of studies at hydrothermal vent fields discovered around the global ocean. Despite their importance, direct measurements of hydrothermal heat flux are very limited due to the remoteness of most vent sites and the complexity of hydrothermal venting. Moreover, almost all the heat flux measurements made to date are snapshots and provide little information on the temporal variation that is expected from the dynamic nature of a hydrothermal system. The Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS, https://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/covis/) is currently connected to the Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory network (http://www.neptunecanada.ca) to monitor the hydrothermal plumes issuing from a vent cluster (Grotto) on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. COVIS is acquiring a long-term (20-months to date) time series of the vertical flow rate and volume flux of the hydrothermal plume above Grotto through the Doppler analysis of the acoustic backscatter data (Xu et al., 2013). We then estimate the plume heat flux from vertical flow rate and volume flux using our newly developed inverse method. In this presentation, we will briefly summarize the derivation of the inverse method and present the heat-flux time series obtained consequently with uncertainty quantification. In addition, we compare our heat-flux estimates with the one estimated from the plume in-situ temperatures measured using a Remotely Operative Vehicle (ROV) in 2012. Such comparison sheds light on the uncertainty of our heat flux estimation. Xu, G., Jackson, D., Bemis, K., and Rona, P., 2013, Observations of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar, Geochemistry, Geophysics Geosystems, 2013 (in press).

  14. High-resolution near-bottom vector magnetic anomalies over Raven Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; Johnson, H. Paul; Salmi, Marie S.; Hutnak, Michael

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution, near-bottom vector magnetic data were collected by remotely operated vehicle Jason over the Raven hydrothermal vent field (47°57.3'N 129°5.75'W) located north of Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The survey was part of a comprehensive heat flow study of the Raven site using innovative thermal blanket technology to map the heat flux and crustal fluid pathways around a solitary hydrothermal vent field. Raven hydrothermal activity is presently located along the western axial valley wall, while additional inactive hydrothermal deposits are found to the NW on the upper rift valley wall. Magnetic inversion results show discrete areas of reduced magnetization associated with both active and inactive hydrothermal vent deposits that also show high conductive heat flow. Higher spatial variability in the heat flow patterns compared to the magnetization is consistent with the heat flow reflecting the currently active but ephemeral thermal environment of fluid flow, while crustal magnetization is representative of the static time-averaged effect of hydrothermal alteration. A general NW to SE trend in reduced magnetization across the Raven area correlates closely with the distribution of hydrothermal deposits and heat flux patterns and suggests that the fluid circulation system at depth is likely controlled by local crustal structure and magma chamber geometry. Magnetic gradient tensor components computed from vector magnetic data improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly source and indicate that the hydrothermally altered zone directly beneath the Raven site is approximately 15 × 106 m3 in volume.

  15. Space-time relations of hydrothermal sulfide-sulfate-silica deposits at the northern Cleft Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, R.A.; Smith, V.K. ); Embley, R.W. ); Jonasson, I.R. ); Kadko, D.C. . Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science)

    1993-04-01

    Submersible investigations along the northern Cleft Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge indicate that a newly erupted sheet flow and two recent megaplume events are spatially related to a NNE-trending fissure system that is now the locus for active hydrothermal venting and deposition of massive sulfide mounds and chimneys. Samples from active high-temperature vent sites located east and north of the sheet flow terrain include zoned Cu-sulfide-rich chimneys (Type 1), bulbous anhydrite-rich chimneys (Type 2), and columnar Zn-sulfide-rich chimneys (Type 3). Type 1 chimneys with large open channelways result from the focused discharge of fluid at temperatures between 310 and 328 C from the Monolith sulfide mound. Type 2 chimneys are constructed on the Monolith and Fountain mounds where discharge of fluid at temperatures between 293 and 315 C is diffuse and sluggish. Type 3 chimneys, characterized by twisting narrow channelways, are deposited from focused and relatively low-temperature fluid discharging directly from basalt substrate. Inactive sulfide chimneys (Type 4) located within 100 m of the fissure system have bulk compositions, mineral assemblages, colloform and bacteroidal textures, and oxygen isotope characteristics consistent with low-temperature (< 250 C ) deposition from less robust vents. Field relations and [sup 210]Pb ages (> 100 years) indicate that the Type 4 chimneys formed prior to the sheet flow eruption. The sulfide mounds and Type 1 and Type 2 chimneys at the Monolith and Fountain vents, however, are an expression of the same magmatic event that caused the sheet flow eruption and megaplume events.

  16. Adjacent segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: Incidence and clinical outcomes of patients requiring anterior versus posterior repeat cervical fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Mohamad; Xu, Risheng; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Macki, Mohamed; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy F.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Bydon, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a well-recognized long-term outcome in patients with degenerative disease of the spine. In this manuscript, we focus on the development in ASD in patients who have undergone a prior anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods: Patient data were collected via clinical notes and patient interviews. Patients were followed for an average of 92.4 ± 72.6 months after the index ACDF. Results: Of the 108 patients who underwent revision surgery due to symptomatic ASD, 77 patients underwent re-do ACDF, while 31 patients had posterior fusion surgery. Patients were more likely to be operated on posteriorly if they were older (P = 0.0115), male (P = 0.006), or had a higher number of cervical vertebral segments fused during the index ACDF (P = 0.013). These patients were statistically also more likely to exhibit myelopathic symptoms (P = 0.0053), and usually had worse neurologic function as assessed on the Nurick (P = 0.0005) and ASIA scales (P = 0.0020). Postoperatively, patients receiving anterior revision surgeries had higher rates of recurrent radiculopathy (P = 0.0425) and higher recurrence of ASD compared with patients fused posteriorly (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Patients undergoing an anterior revision surgery for ASD after ACDF have higher rates of postoperative radiculopathy and redevelopment of ASD when compared with posteriorly approached patients. Patients receiving posterior revision surgery had higher intraoperative blood loss, hospitalizations, and postoperative complications such as wound infections and discharge to rehabilitation, but had a statistically lower chance of redevelopment of ASD requiring secondary revision surgery. This may be due to the fact that posterior revision surgeries involved more levels fused. This study provides one of the longest and most comprehensive follow-ups of this challenging patient population. Prospective studies comparing surgical approaches and techniques are needed to

  17. Segments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a market taxonomy for higher education, including what it reveals about the structure of the market, the model's technical attributes, and its capacity to explain pricing behavior. Details the identification of the principle seams separating one market segment from another and how student aspirations help to organize the market, making…

  18. Double-level cervical total disc replacement for adjacent segment disease: is it a useful treatment? Description of late onset heterotopic ossification and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, G M V; Certo, F; Visocchi, M; Sciacca, G; Albanese, V

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of double-level adjacent segment disease (ASD), occurring ten years later an anterior cervical discectomy (ACD) without fusion, treated by cervical arthroplasty, highlighting the outcome at long-term follow-up and focusing on heterotopic ossification. In 1995 a 25-year-old man satisfactorily underwent ACD at C4/C5. At that time MRI also showed signs of degenerative disc disease (DDD) at C3/C4 and C5/C6. Ten years later, a new MRI scan showed a large C3/C4 and a smaller C5/C6 soft disc hernia together with spondylotic changes at the level above and below the site of the first surgery. At C4/C5 imaging revealed a kyphotic stable "pseudoarthrosis" with anterior bridging osteophyte. The patient underwent double-level arthroplasty with ProDisc-C. Clinical and radiological outcome was satisfactory. 3 and 5 years after surgery, X-rays and CT scan documented the progressive development of heterotopic ossification, with gradual reduction of range of motion. A late onset heterotopic ossification can neutralize the theoretical advantages of cervical arthroplasty, which should be considered an effective surgical option only in selected cases. ACDF and restoration of normal lordosis can be a viable alternative in cervical revision surgery, as motion preservation can not be always mantained for a long time. PMID:24825036

  19. Timescales of rhyolite formation at a mid-ocean ridge: Alarcon Rise segment of the northern East Pacific Rise.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Clague, D. A.; Portner, R. A.; Miggins, D. P.; Coble, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Alarcon Rise is a ~50km long spreading segment and the northernmost of the East Pacific Rise. A near-continuous spectrum of lava compositions from basalt to rhyolite occur in the northern section of the Rise along a ~8km fault-lineament, with a rhyolite dome (~2340 m below sea level, ~0.01 km3) near its center. Lava flow mapping with~1m resolution AUV reveals that individual flows are compositionally variable. Two distinct trends are apparent in glass major elements. The dominant trend is fractional crystallization melt evolution from basalt to rhyolite. A subordinate trend from basalt to dacite offset to lower FeOT, TiO2, S03, and P2O5is interpreted as mixing between mafic and felsic magmas. Evidence for mixing is also preserved in mineral compositions that are commonly out of equilibrium with their host melts. SHRIMP U-Th zircon ages from 4 rhyolites yielded a pooled weighted mean age of 23.4 ± 4.5 (2σ) ka and a small population at 45 ± 9ka, likely inherited. Preliminary Ar-Ar incremental heating of 4 splits of oligoclase from one rhyolite sample yielded an identical age of 23.7 ± 4.3 ka. Marine-calibrated radiocarbon ages of foraminifera collected in pushcores atop separate andesite and dacite flows west of the rhyolite dome support minimum eruption ages >11.7 ka and >2.1- 3.4 ka, and geological relationships indicate they erupted both before and after the dome. Thus, the generation of differentiated magmas was protracted and their eruptions were repeated. Pending age data on older basalts to the west and interspersed intermediate lavas will clarify the minimum timescales of basalt-to-rhyolite differentiation. Intra-flow and closely-spaced inter-flow compositional variability recorded in relatively few eruptions means that the magma reservoir was stratified, also observed in many much larger terrestrial silicic eruptions, and that an eruptive episode(s) may evacuate a significant volume that was stored in the reservoir, partially mixed with and expelled by

  20. Precipitation and growth of barite within hydrothermal vent deposits from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, John William; Hannington, Mark D.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Hansteen, Thor; Williamson, Nicole M.-B.; Stewart, Margaret; Fietzke, Jan; Butterfield, David; Frische, Matthias; Allen, Leigh; Cousens, Brian; Langer, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal vent deposits form on the seafloor as a result of cooling and mixing of hot hydrothermal fluids with cold seawater. Amongst the major sulfide and sulfate minerals that are preserved at vent sites, barite (BaSO4) is unique because it requires the direct mixing of Ba-rich hydrothermal fluid with sulfate-rich seawater in order for precipitation to occur. Because of its extremely low solubility, barite crystals preserve geochemical fingerprints associated with conditions of formation. Here, we present data from petrographic and geochemical analyses of hydrothermal barite from the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean, in order to determine the physical and chemical conditions under which barite precipitates within seafloor hydrothermal vent systems. Petrographic analyses of 22 barite-rich samples show a range of barite crystal morphologies: dendritic and acicular barite forms near the exterior vent walls, whereas larger bladed and tabular crystals occur within the interior of chimneys. A two component mixing model based on Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr of both seawater and hydrothermal fluid, combined with 87Sr/86Sr data from whole rock and laser-ablation ICP-MS analyses of barite crystals indicate that barite precipitates from mixtures containing as low as 17% and as high as 88% hydrothermal fluid component, relative to seawater. Geochemical modelling of the relationship between aqueous species concentrations and degree of fluid mixing indicates that Ba2+ availability is the dominant control on mineral saturation. Observations combined with model results support that dendritic barite forms from fluids of less than 40% hydrothermal component and with a saturation index greater than ∼0.6, whereas more euhedral crystals form at lower levels of supersaturation associated with greater contributions of hydrothermal fluid. Fluid inclusions within barite indicate formation temperatures of between ∼120 °C and 240 °C during

  1. Seismic Structure of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Correlations of Crustal Magma Chamber Properties With Seismicity, Faulting, and Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ark, E. M.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J. B.; Harding, A.; Kent, G.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Wilcock, W. S.

    2003-12-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection data collected in July 2002 at the RIDGE2000 Integrated Studies Site at the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge show a high-amplitude, mid-crustal reflector underlying all of the known hydrothermal vent fields at this segment. This reflector, which has been identified with a crustal magma body [Detrick et al., 2002], is found at a two-way travel time of 0.85-1.5 s (1.9-4.0 km) below the seafloor and extends approximately 25 km along axis although it is only 1-2 km wide on the cross-axis lines. The reflector is shallowest (2.5 km depth on the along-axis line) beneath the central, elevated part of the Endeavour segment and deepens toward the segment ends, with a maximum depth of 4 km. The cross axis lines show the mid-crustal reflector dipping from 9 to 50? to the east with the shallowest depths under the ridge axis and greater depths under the eastern flank of the ridge. The amplitude-offset behavior of this mid-crustal axial reflector is consistent with a negative impedance contrast, indicating the presence of melt or a crystallizing mush. We have constructed partial offset stacks at 2-3 km offset to examine the variation of melt-mush content of the axial magma chamber along axis. We see a decrease in P-wave amplitudes with increasing offset for the mid-crustal reflector beneath the Mothra and Main Endeavour vent fields and between the Salty Dawg and Sasquatch vent fields, indicating the presence of a melt-rich body. Beneath the High Rise, Salty Dawg, and Sasquatch vent fields P-wave amplitudes vary little with offset suggesting the presence of a more mush-rich magma chamber. Hypocenters of well-located microseismicity in this region [Wilcock et al., 2002] have been projected onto the along-axis and cross-axis seismic lines, revealing that most axial earthquakes are concentrated in a depth range of 1.5 - 2.7 km, just above the axial magma chamber. In general, seismicity is distributed diffusely within this zone indicating thermal

  2. Plutonic foundation of a slow-spreading ridge segment: Oceanic core complex at Kane Megamullion, 23°30'N, 45°20'W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Henry J. B.; Tivey, Maurice A.; Tucholke, Brian E.

    2008-05-01

    We mapped the Kane megamullion, an oceanic core complex on the west flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge exposing the plutonic foundation of a ˜50 km long, second-order ridge segment. The complex was exhumed by long-lived slip on a normal-sense detachment fault at the base of the rift valley wall from ˜3.3 to 2.1 Ma (Williams, 2007). Mantle peridotites, gabbros, and diabase dikes are exposed in the detachment footwall and in outward facing high-angle normal fault scarps and slide-scar headwalls that cut through the detachment. These rocks directly constrain crustal architecture and the pattern of melt flow from the mantle to and within the lower crust. In addition, the volcanic carapace that originally overlay the complex is preserved intact on the conjugate African plate, so the complete internal and external architecture of the paleoridge segment can be studied. Seafloor spreading during formation of the core complex was highly asymmetric, and crustal accretion occurred largely in the footwall of the detachment fault exposing the core complex. Because additions to the footwall, both magmatic and amagmatic, are nonconservative, oceanic detachment faults are plutonic growth faults. A local volcano and fissure eruptions partially cover the northwestern quarter of the complex. This volcanism is associated with outward facing normal faults and possible, intersecting transform-parallel faults that formed during exhumation of the megamullion, suggesting the volcanics erupted off-axis. We find a zone of late-stage vertical melt transport through the mantle to the crust in the southern part of the segment marked by a ˜10 km wide zone of dunites that likely fed a large gabbro and troctolite intrusion intercalated with dikes. This zone correlates with the midpoint of a lineated axial volcanic high of the same age on the conjugate African plate. In the central region of the segment, however, primitive gabbro is rare, massive depleted peridotite tectonites abundant, and dunites

  3. Subaerial Seafloor Spreading in Iceland: Segment-Scale Processes and Analogs for Fast-Spreading Mid-Ocean Ridge Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, Jeffrey; Varga, Robert; Siler, Drew; Horst, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The nature of oceanic crust and spreading center processes are derived from direct observations of surface features and geophysics at active spreading centers as well as from deep crustal drilling, tectonic windows into the upper oceanic crust, and ophiolites. Integrating active spreading processes with deeply eroded crustal structures in Iceland provides an additional perspective on subsurface processes that are likely to be important at mid-ocean ridge spreading centers. Spreading in Iceland strongly resembles second-order segment-scale processes of the fast-spreading centers. Along axis, major processes including subsidence, magmatic construction, and hydrothermal activity vary systematically over tens of kilometers from segment centers to ends. Near spreading segment centers ("central volcanoes") subsidence and crustal thickening are greatest. The intrusion of high-level sill and cone sheet complexes and small gabbroic plutons contribute substantially to upper crustal thickening. Both magma supply and tectonic movements have a very strong vertical component. In contrast, near segment ends (fissure swarms in active spreading areas) subsidence is limited, most thickening occurs in the lava units and lateral dike injection is likely to dominate. In both Iceland and fast-spread crust, where the magma supply is relatively high, subaxial subsidence is the key process that controls the construction and modification of the crust during spreading. Seafloor studies on fast-spreading ridge show lava flows fed by dike intrusion events focused along a narrow (<1 km) axial region with very limited relief. However, subsurface structures reveal that axial lavas must subside hundreds of meters immediately beneath the axis as the overlying lava pile thickens. Similar relationships occur in Iceland but over a wider region of active magmatism (neovolcanic zone tens of kilometers wide) and building a much thicker upper crust (~5 km). For both cases, in order for the lava units to

  4. Water and Streambed Sediment Quality, and Ecotoxicology of a Stream along the Blue Ridge Parkway, Adjacent to a Closed Landfill, near Roanoke, Virginia: 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebner, Donna Belval; Cherry, Donald S.; Currie, Rebecca J.

    2004-01-01

    A study was done of the effects of a closed landfill on the quality of water and streambed sediment and the benthic macroinvertebrate community of an unnamed stream and its tributary that flow through Blue Ridge Parkway lands in west-central Virginia. The primary water source for the tributary is a 4-inch polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe that protrudes from the slope at the base of the embankment bordering the landfill. An unusual expanse of precipitate was observed in the stream near the PVC pipe. Stream discharge was measured and water and streambed sediment samples were collected at a nearby reference site and at three sites downstream of the landfill in April and September 1999. Water samples were analyzed for major ions, nitrate, total and dissolved metals, total dissolved solids, total organic carbon, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, including organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Streambed sediment samples were analyzed for total metals, total organic carbon, percent moisture, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, including organochlorine pesticides and PCBs. The benthic macroinvertebrate community within the stream channel also was sampled at the four chemical sampling sites and at one additional site in April and September. Each of the five sites was assessed for physical habitat quality. Water collected periodically at the PVC pipe discharge between November 1998 and November 1999 was used to conduct 48-hour acute and 7-day chronic toxicity tests using selected laboratory test organisms. Two 10-day chronic toxicity tests of streambed sediments collected near the discharge pipe also were conducted. Analyses showed that organic and inorganic constituents in water from beneath the landfill were discharged into the sampled tributary. In April, 79 percent of inorganic constituents detected in water had their highest concentrations at the site closest to the landfill; at the same site, 59 percent of inorganic

  5. Local Earthquakes on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: First Seismic Results from the Keck Seismic/Hydrothermal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, W. S.; Barclay, A. H.; McGill, P. R.; Stakes, D. S.; Ramirez, T. M.; Toomey, D. R.; Durant, D. T.; Hooft, E. E.; Mulder, T. L.; Ristau, J. P.

    2004-12-01

    The W.M. Keck Foundation is supporting a five-year program to conduct prototype seafloor observatory experiments to monitor the relationships between episodic deformation, fluid venting and microbial productivity on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and at the intersection of the Nootka fault and the Cascadia subduction zone. At the Endeavour, the experiment is sited near the central portion of the segment in a region where the spreading axis is characterized by a 100-m-deep, 500-m-wide axial valley that hosts five high-temperature hydrothermal vent fields spaced 2-3 km apart. The objectives of the experiment are to monitor local and regional seismicity around the vent fields in conjunction with the deployment of sensors and samplers to monitor temporal variations in the physical, chemical and ultimately microbial characteristics of the hydrothermal fluids. The Endeavour seismic network was installed in the summer of 2003 with the ROV ROPOS and comprises seven GEOSense three-component short-period corehole seismometers and one buried Guralp CMG-1T broadband seismometer. Five of the seven short-period seismometers were inserted in horizontal coreholes drilled into seafloor basalts; two were deployed in concrete monuments on the ridge flanks. It is the first seismic network on a mid-ocean ridge in which the sensors are deployed with an ROV beneath the seafloor in order to ensure good coupling and minimize the effects of current-generated noise. In August 2004, we used the ROV Tiburon to service the Endeavour seismic network and recover the first year of data. In addition, we installed a second broadband and three short period seismometers on the Nootka fault and a third broadband seismometer on the Explorer plate. The Endeavour seismic network performed well with all eight instruments recording high-quality data. A preliminary inspection of the data reveals many examples of local, regional and teleseismic earthquakes. One striking characteristic of the

  6. Analysis and modeling of hydrothermal plume data acquired from the 85°E segment of the Gakkel Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranne, Christian; Sohn, Robert A.; Liljebladh, Bengt; Nakamura, Ko-Ichi

    2010-06-01

    We use data from a CTD plume-mapping campaign conducted during the Arctic Gakkel Vents (AGAVE) expedition in 2007 to constrain the nature of hydrothermal processes on the Gakkel Ridge at 85°E. Thermal and redox potential (Eh) anomalies were detected in two discrete depth intervals: 2400-2800 m (Interval 1) and 3000-3800 m (Interval 2). The spatial and temporal patterns of the signals indicate that the Interval 1 anomalies were most likely generated by a single large, high-temperature (T > 100°C) vent field located on the fault terraces that form the NE axial valley wall. In contrast, the Interval 2 anomalies appear to have been generated by up to 7 spatially distinct vent fields associated with constructional volcanic features on the floor of the axial valley, many of which may be sites of diffuse, low-temperature (T < 10°C) discharge. Numerical simulations of turbulent plumes rising in a weakly stratified Arctic Ocean water column indicate that the high-temperature field on the axial valley wall has a thermal power of ˜1.8 GW, similar to the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse and Rainbow fields in the Atlantic Ocean, whereas the sites on the axial valley floor have values ranging from 5 to 110 MW.

  7. Evolution of the western segment of Juan Fernández Ridge (Nazca Plate): plume vs. plate tectonic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Luis E.; Rodrigo, Cristián; Reyes, Javier; Orozco, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    The Juan Fernandez Ridge (Eastern Pacific, Nazca Plate) is thought to be a classic hot spot trail because of the apparent age progression observed in 40Ar-39Ar data. However, geological evidence and some thermochronological data suggest a more complex pattern with a rejuvenation stage in Robinson Crusoe Island, the most eroded of the Juan Fernandez Archipelago. In fact, a postshield stage at 900-700 ka separates the underlying shield-related pile from the post-erosional alkaline succession (Ba/Yb=38.15; La/Yb=15.66; Ba/Y=20.27; Ba/Zr=2.31). Shield volcanoes grew at high effusion rate at ca. 5-4 Ma erupting mostly tholeiitic to transitional magmas (Ba/Yb=18.07-8.32; La/Yb=4.59-9.84; Ba/Y=4.24-8.18; Ba/Zr=0.73-1.09). Taken together, shield volcanoes form a continuous plateau with a base at ca. 3900 mbsl. However, a more complex structural pattern can be inferred from geophysical data, which suggest some intracrustal magma storage and a more extended area of magma ascent. A role for the Challenger Fracture Zone is hypothesized fueling the controversy between pristine plume origin and the effect of plate tectonic processes in the origin of intraplate volcanism. This research is supported by FONDECYT Project 1110966.

  8. Seismicity Along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Automated Event Locations for an Ocean-Bottom Seismometer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, R. T.; Wilcock, W. S.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; McGill, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    From 2003-2006, the W.M. Keck Foundation supported the operation of a network of eight ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) that were deployed with a remotely operated vehicle along the central portion of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge as part of a multidisciplinary prototype NEPTUNE experiment. Data from 2003-2004 were initially analyzed during a research apprenticeship class at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories. Eight student analysts located ~13,000 earthquakes along the Endeavour Segment. Analysis of data from 2004-2005 has to date been limited to locating ~6,000 earthquakes associated with a swarm in February-March 2005 near the northern end of the Endeavour Segment. The remaining data includes several significant swarms and it is anticipated that tens of thousands of earthquakes still need to be located. In order to efficiently obtain a complete catalog of high-quality locations for the 3-year experiment, we are developing an automatic method for earthquake location. We first apply a 5-Hz high-pass filter and identify triggers when the ratio of the root-mean square (RMS) amplitudes in short- and long- term windows exceeds a specified threshold. We search for events that are characterized by triggers within a short time interval on the majority of stations and use the signal spectra to eliminate events that are the result of 20-Hz Fin and Blue whale vocalizations. An autoregressive technique is applied to a short time window centered on the trigger time to pick P-wave times on each station's vertical channel. We locate the earthquake with these picks and either attempt to repick or eliminate arrivals with unacceptable residuals. Preliminary S-wave picks are then made on the horizontal channels by applying a 5-12 Hz bandpass filter, identifying the peak RMS amplitude for a short running window, and making a pick at the time the RMS amplitude rises above 50% of this value. The picks are refined using the

  9. Seismicity Along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Automated Event Locations for an Ocean-Bottom Seismometer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekly, R. T.; Wilcock, W. S.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; McGill, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    From 2003-2006, the W.M. Keck Foundation supported the operation of a network of eight ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) that were deployed with a remotely operated vehicle along the central portion of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge as part of a multidisciplinary prototype NEPTUNE experiment. Data from 2003-2004 were initially analyzed during a research apprenticeship class at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories. Eight student analysts located ~13,000 earthquakes along the Endeavour Segment. Analysis of data from 2004-2005 has to date been limited to locating ~6,000 earthquakes associated with a swarm in February-March 2005 near the northern end of the Endeavour Segment. The remaining data includes several significant swarms and it is anticipated that tens of thousands of earthquakes still need to be located. In order to efficiently obtain a complete catalog of high-quality locations for the 3-year experiment, we are developing an automatic method for earthquake location. We first apply a 5-Hz high-pass filter and identify triggers when the ratio of the root-mean square (RMS) amplitudes in short- and long- term windows exceeds a specified threshold. We search for events that are characterized by triggers within a short time interval on the majority of stations and use the signal spectra to eliminate events that are the result of 20-Hz Fin and Blue whale vocalizations. An autoregressive technique is applied to a short time window centered on the trigger time to pick P-wave times on each station's vertical channel. We locate the earthquake with these picks and either attempt to repick or eliminate arrivals with unacceptable residuals. Preliminary S-wave picks are then made on the horizontal channels by applying a 5-12 Hz bandpass filter, identifying the peak RMS amplitude for a short running window, and making a pick at the time the RMS amplitude rises above 50% of this value. The picks are refined using the

  10. OBS records of Whale vocalizations from Lucky-strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge during 2007-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, A.; Rai, A.; Singh, S. C.; Crawford, W. C.; Escartin, J.; Cannat, M.

    2009-12-01

    Passive seismic experiments to study seismicity require a long term deployment of ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs). These instruments also record a large amount of non-seismogenic signals such as movement of large ships, air-gun shots, and marine mammal vocalizations. We report a bi-product of our passive seismic experiment (BBMOMAR) conducted around the Lucky-strike hydrothermal field of the slow-spreading mid-Atlantic ridge. Five multi-component ocean-bottom seismometers (recording two horizontal, one vertical and one pressure channel) were deployed during 2007-2008. During 13 months of deployment, abundant vocalizations of marine mammals have been recorded by all the five equipments. By analyzing the frequency content of data and their pattern of occurrence, we conclude that these low-frequency vocalizations (~20-40 Hz) typically corresponds to blue and fin-whales. These signals if not identified, could be mis-interpreted as underwater seismic/hydrothermal activity. Our data show an increase in the number of vocalizations recorded during the winter season relative to the summer. As part of the seismic monitoring of the Lucky-strike site, we anticipate to extend this study to the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 periods, after the recovery and deployment of the array during the BATHYLUCK09 cruise. Long-term and continuous records of calls of marine mammals provide valuable information that could be used to identify the species, study their seasonal behaviour and their migration paths. Our study suggestes that passive experiments such as ocean-bottom seismometers deployed at key locations, could provide useful secondary infromation about oceanic species besides recording seismicity, which is otherwise not possible without harming or interfering with their activity.

  11. Magnetite formation from ferrihydrite by hyperthermophilic archaea from Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal vent chimneys.

    PubMed

    Lin, T Jennifer; Breves, E A; Dyar, M D; Ver Eecke, H C; Jamieson, J W; Holden, J F

    2014-05-01

    Hyperthermophilic iron reducers are common in hydrothermal chimneys found along the Endeavour Segment in the northeastern Pacific Ocean based on culture-dependent estimates. However, information on the availability of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxides within these chimneys, the types of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxides utilized by the organisms, rates and environmental constraints of hyperthermophilic iron reduction, and mineral end products is needed to determine their biogeochemical significance and are addressed in this study. Thin-section petrography on the interior of a hydrothermal chimney from the Dante edifice at Endeavour showed a thin coat of Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxide associated with amorphous silica on the exposed outer surfaces of pyrrhotite, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite in pore spaces, along with anhydrite precipitation in the pores that is indicative of seawater ingress. The iron sulfide minerals were likely oxidized to Fe(III) (oxyhydr) oxide with increasing pH and Eh due to cooling and seawater exposure, providing reactants for bioreduction. Culture-dependent estimates of hyperthermophilic iron reducer abundances in this sample were 1740 and 10 cells per gram (dry weight) of material from the outer surface and the marcasite-sphalerite-rich interior, respectively. Two hyperthermophilic iron reducers, Hyperthermus sp. Ro04 and Pyrodictium sp. Su06, were isolated from other active hydrothermal chimneys on the Endeavour Segment. Strain Ro04 is a neutrophilic (pH opt 7-8) heterotroph, while strain Su06 is a mildly acidophilic (pH opt 5), hydrogenotrophic autotroph, both with optimal growth temperatures of 90-92 °C. Mössbauer spectroscopy of the iron oxides before and after growth demonstrated that both organisms form nanophase (<12 nm) magnetite [Fe3 O4 ] from laboratory-synthesized ferrihydrite [Fe10 O14 (OH)2 ] with no detectable mineral intermediates. They produced up to 40 mm Fe(2+) in a growth-dependent manner, while all abiotic and biotic controls produced <3 mm Fe

  12. Finescale parameterizations of energy dissipation in a region of strong internal tides and sheared flow, the Lucky-Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquet, Simon; Bouruet-Aubertot, Pascale; Reverdin, Gilles; Turnherr, Andreas; Laurent, Lou St.

    2016-06-01

    The relevance of finescale parameterizations of dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy is addressed using finescale and microstructure measurements collected in the Lucky Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). There, high amplitude internal tides and a strongly sheared mean flow sustain a high level of dissipation rate and turbulent mixing. Two sets of parameterizations are considered: the first ones (Gregg, 1989; Kunze et al., 2006) were derived to estimate dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy induced by internal wave breaking, while the second one aimed to estimate dissipation induced by shear instability of a strongly sheared mean flow and is a function of the Richardson number (Kunze et al., 1990; Polzin, 1996). The latter parameterization has low skill in reproducing the observed dissipation rate when shear unstable events are resolved presumably because there is no scale separation between the duration of unstable events and the inverse growth rate of unstable billows. Instead GM based parameterizations were found to be relevant although slight biases were observed. Part of these biases result from the small value of the upper vertical wavenumber integration limit in the computation of shear variance in Kunze et al. (2006) parameterization that does not take into account internal wave signal of high vertical wavenumbers. We showed that significant improvement is obtained when the upper integration limit is set using a signal to noise ratio criterion and that the spatial structure of dissipation rates is reproduced with this parameterization.

  13. Microearthquakes beneath the Hydrothermal Vent Fields on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Results from the Keck Seismic/Hydrothermal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D.; Parker, J.; Wilcock, W.; Hooft, E.; Barclay, A.; Toomey, D.; McGill, P.; Stakes, D.; Schmidt, C.; Patel, H.

    2005-12-01

    The W.M. Keck Foundation is supporting the operation of a small seismic network in the vicinity of the hydrothermal vent fields on the central portion of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This is part of a program to conduct prototype seafloor observatory experiments to monitor the relationships between episodic deformation, fluid venting and microbial productivity at oceanic plate boundaries. The Endeavour seismic network was installed in the summer of 2003 and comprises seven GEOSense three-component short-period corehole seismometers and one buried Guralp CMG-1T broadband seismometer. A preliminary analysis of the first year of data was undertaken as part of an undergraduate research apprenticeship class taught at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories and additional analysis has since been completed by two of the apprentices and by two IRIS undergraduate interns. Over 12,000 earthquakes were located along the ridge-axis of the Endeavour, of which ~3,000 occur within or near the network and appear to be associated with the hydrothermal systems. The levels of seismicity are strongly correlated with the intensity of venting with particularly high rates of seismicity beneath the Main and High Rise Fields and substantially lower rates to the north beneath the relatively inactive Salty Dawg and Sasquatch fields. We have used both HYPOINVERSE and a grid search algorithm to investigate the distribution of focal depths assuming a variety of one-dimensional velocity models. The preliminary results show that the majority of earthquakes occur within a narrow depth range and may represent an intense zone of seismicity within a reaction overlying the axial magma chamber at ~2.5 km depth. However, the mean focal depth is strongly dependent on the relative weights assigned to the S arrivals. We infer from the inspection of residuals that no combination of the P- and S-wave velocity models we have so far investigated are fully consistent with

  14. New chemical and isotopic data for basalts from the axial segment of the Mid-Atlantic ridge between the Vema and Mercury fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltenev, V. E.; Skolotnev, S. G.; Rozhdestvenskaya, I. I.

    2014-12-01

    The whole-rock geochemistry and isotopic composition of the basalts dredged from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) segment between the Mercury and Vema fracture zones during cruise 32 of the R/V Professor Logachev were studied. In addition to typical basalts with moderate petrochemical parameters, there are high-Ca and low-Na types of basalts representing higher degree melts and high-Fe varieties generated at great depths. The basalts derived by high degrees of melting exhibit a close spatial association with the central portions of three on-axis rises on the rift valley, which reach a height of 300-500 m above the floor of the valley and represent the loci of the subaxial mantle upwelling. The position of the Northern rise at the northern intersect of the Mercury transform fault is inconsistent with focused upwelling. The basalts with a more radiogenic Nd, Sr, and Pb composition are identified above the loci of the subaxial upwelling. They are compositionally similar to basalts, which have HIMU-like affinities and are interpreted to be derived under the influence of the 14° N plume between the Marathon and Cape Verde fracture zones. The relatively high isotopic ratios of these basalts anti-correlate with their low (La/Sm) n values typical of the depleted N-MORB-type basalts. The results show that enriched melts contributing to basalts from the central portions of on-axis rises are associated with one of the flows of plume material channeled from the 14° N anomaly to these rises. The partial melting of the rising plume material causes the formation of localized accumulation of magmas at structural barriers and creates new centers of upwelling, which, being enhanced by the regular upwelling, lead to increased magma production and changes in the composition of basalts.

  15. PUSCH RIDGE WILDERNESS, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Margaret E.; Ryan, George S.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, the Pusch Ridge Wilderness, located at the northern boundary of the city of Tucson, Arizona, offers little or no promise for the occurrence of energy resources. Only one area contains a probable potential for small, isolated contact-metamorphic deposits containing copper, molybdenum, tungsten, lead, and zinc. This area is located around the southwestern end of Pusch Ridge, adjacent to a residential area.

  16. Hydrothermal activity on near-arc sections of back-arc ridges: Results from the Mariana Trough and Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Edward T.; Massoth, Gary J.; Nakamura, Ko-Ichi; Embley, Robert W.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Arculus, Richard J.

    2005-09-01

    The spatial density of hydrothermal venting is strongly correlated with spreading rate on mid-ocean ridges (with the interesting exception of hot spot-affected ridges), evidently because spreading rate is a reliable proxy for the magma budget. This correlation remains untested on spreading ridges in back-arc basins, where the magma budget may be complicated by subduction-induced variations of the melt supply. To address this uncertainty, we conducted hydrothermal plume surveys along slow-spreading (40-60 mm/yr) and arc-proximal (10-60 km distant) sections of the southern Mariana Trough and the Valu Fa Ridge (Lau Basin). On both sections we found multiple plumes overlying ˜15-20% of the total length of each section, a coverage comparable to mid-ocean ridges spreading at similar rates. These conditions contrast with earlier reported results from the two nearest-arc segments of a faster spreading (60-70 mm/yr) back-arc ridge, the East Scotia Ridge, which approaches no closer than 100 km to its arc. There, hydrothermal venting is relatively scarce (˜5% plume coverage) and the ridge characteristics are distinctly slow-spreading: small central volcanic highs bookended by deep median valleys, and axial melt lenses restricted to the volcanic highs. Two factors may contribute to an unexpectedly low hydrothermal budget on these East Scotia Ridge segments: they may lie too far from the adjacent arc to benefit from near-arc sources of melt supply, and subduction-aided migration of mantle from the Bouvet hot spot may reduce hydrothermal circulation by local crustal warming and thickening, analogous to the Reykjanes Ridge. Thus the pattern among these three ridge sections appears to mirror the larger global pattern defined by mid-ocean ridges: a well-defined trend of spreading rate versus hydrothermal activity on most ridge sections, plus a subset of ridge sections where unusual melt delivery conditions diminish the expected hydrothermal activity.

  17. Development of Land Segmentation, Stream-Reach Network, and Watersheds in Support of Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF) Modeling, Chesapeake Bay Watershed, and Adjacent Parts of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martucci, Sarah K.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Raffensperger, Jeff P.; Hopkins, Katherine J.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Chesapeake Bay Program Office, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Maryland Department of the Environment, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are collaborating on the Chesapeake Bay Regional Watershed Model, using Hydrological Simulation Program - FORTRAN to simulate streamflow and concentrations and loads of nutrients and sediment to Chesapeake Bay. The model will be used to provide information for resource managers. In order to establish a framework for model simulation, digital spatial datasets were created defining the discretization of the model region (including the Chesapeake Bay watershed, as well as the adjacent parts of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia outside the watershed) into land segments, a stream-reach network, and associated watersheds. Land segmentation was based on county boundaries represented by a 1:100,000-scale digital dataset. Fifty of the 254 counties and incorporated cities in the model region were divided on the basis of physiography and topography, producing a total of 309 land segments. The stream-reach network for the Chesapeake Bay watershed part of the model region was based on the U.S. Geological Survey Chesapeake Bay SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) model stream-reach network. Because that network was created only for the Chesapeake Bay watershed, the rest of the model region uses a 1:500,000-scale stream-reach network. Streams with mean annual streamflow of less than 100 cubic feet per second were excluded based on attributes from the dataset. Additional changes were made to enhance the data and to allow for inclusion of stream reaches with monitoring data that were not part of the original network. Thirty-meter-resolution Digital Elevation Model data were used to delineate watersheds for each

  18. Microbial and Mineral Descriptions of the Interior Habitable Zones of Active Hydrothermal Chimneys from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, J. F.; Lin, T.; Ver Eecke, H. C.; Breves, E.; Dyar, M. D.; Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.; Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Actively venting hydrothermal chimneys and their associated hydrothermal fluids were collected from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge to determine the mineralogy, chemistry and microbial community composition of their interiors. To characterize the mineralogy, Mössbauer, FTIR, VNIR and thermal emission spectroscopies were used for the first time on this type of sample in addition to thin-section petrography, x-ray diffraction and elemental analyses. A chimney from the Bastille edifice was Fe-sulfide rich and composed primarily of chalcopyrite, marcasite-sphalerite, and pyrrhotite while chimneys from the Dante and Hot Harold edifices were Fe-sulfide poor and composed primarily of anhydrite. The bulk emissivity and reflectance spectroscopies corroborated well with the petrography and XRD analyses. The microbial community in the interior of Bastille was most closely related to mesophilic-to-thermophilic anaerobes of the deltaproteobacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea while those in the interiors of Dante and Hot Harold were most closely related to mesophilic-to-thermophilic aerobes of the beta-, gamma- and epsilonproteobacteria. The fluid temperatures (282-321°C) and chemistries of the three chimneys were very similar suggesting that differences in mineralogy and microbial community compositions were more dependent on fluid flow characteristics and paragenesis within the chimney. Thin-section petrography of the interior of another hydrothermal chimney collected from the Dante edifice (emitting 336°C fluid) shows a thin coat of Fe3+ oxide associated with amorphous silica on the exposed outer surfaces of pyrrhotite, sphalerite and chalcopyrite in pore spaces, along with anhydrite precipitation in the pores that is indicative of seawater ingress. The Fe-sulfide minerals were likely oxidized to ferrihydrite with increasing pH and Eh due to cooling and seawater exposure, providing reactants for bioreduction. Culture-based most-probable-number estimates of

  19. A combined basalt and peridotite perspective on 14 million years of melt generation at the Atlantis Bank segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge: Evidence for temporal changes in mantle dynamics?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coogan, L.A.; Thompson, G.M.; MacLeod, C.J.; Dick, H.J.B.; Edwards, S.J.; Hosford, Scheirer A.; Barry, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about temporal variations in melt generation and extraction at midocean ridges largely due to the paucity of sampling along flow lines. Here we present new whole-rock major and trace element data, and mineral and glass major element data, for 71 basaltic samples (lavas and dykes) and 23 peridotites from the same ridge segment (the Atlantis Bank segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge). These samples span an age range of almost 14 My and, in combination with the large amount of published data from this area, allow temporal variations in melting processes to be investigated. Basalts show systematic changes in incompatible trace element ratios with the older samples (from ???8-14 Ma) having more depleted incompatible trace element ratios than the younger ones. There is, however, no corresponding change in peridotite compositions. Peridotites come from the top of the melting column, where the extent of melting is highest, suggesting that the maximum degree of melting did not change over this interval of time. New and published Nd isotopic ratios of basalts, dykes and gabbros from this segment suggest that the average source composition has been approximately constant over this time interval. These data are most readily explained by a model in which the average source composition and temperature have not changed over the last 14 My, but the dynamics of mantle flow (active-to-passive) or melt extraction (less-to-more efficient extraction from the 'wings' of the melting column) has changed significantly. This hypothesised change in mantle dynamics occurs at roughly the same time as a change from a period of detachment faulting to 'normal' crustal accretion. We speculate that active mantle flow may impart sufficient shear stress on the base of the lithosphere to rotate the regional stress field and promote the formation of low angle normal faults. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Patterns of volcanism and tectonism at a slow-spreading segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Lucky Strike, 37N): preliminary results from near-bottom geological and geophysical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, J.; Soule, S.; Bezos, A.; Cannat, M.; Fornari, D. J.; Ballu, V.; Humphris, S.

    2006-12-01

    Patterns of volcanism and tectonism and the mechanisms that influence them are not well understood at slow- spreading plate boundaries. Is magma supply persistent or episodic? Is tectonic strain symmetric or asymmetric? Are volcanism and tectonism distributed across the rift valley or localized along narrow bands of crust? Systematic, segment-scale observations, measurements, and sampling are needed to address these questions. During a recent cruise (GRAVILUCK, Aug. 2006) we conducted near-bottom surveys across the axial valley of the Lucky Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (37°N) to determine where active volcanic and tectonic processes are occurring within the rift valley and their relationship with a recently recognized mid-crustal magma body at the segment center beneath Lucky Strike volcano [Singh et al., 2006]. Using a deep-towed digital imaging system (WHOI TowCam) and a submersible (Nautile) we collected still and video imagery, high-resolution bathymetry, magnetic data, and rock samples along 11 across-axis and 3 along-axis profiles covering ~80 km. Preliminary interpretation of the seafloor imagery shows that the majority of the most recent volcanic activity is in the form of jumbled sheet flows that are concentrated within a discontinuous narrow graben along the axis of the rift valley that bisects Lucky Strike volcano. In rare cases we observe young (i.e., less sedimented and unfaulted) pillow ridges up to 3 km from the axis of the rift valley. Recent volcanic activity appears to be more prevalent south of the volcano, and cuts across distinct geologic terrains characterized by extensive sheet flows near the segment center and axial volcanic ridges to the north and south of Lucky Strike Volcano. We will present a preliminary interpretation of the distribution and relative ages of volcanic deposits and fault characteristics across the rift valley, lava compositions, and magnetic intensities. We compare these observations with existing sidescan

  1. Seismotectonic implications of the Kyushu-Palau ridge subducting beneaththe westernmost Nankai forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.-O.; Hori, T.; Kaneda, Y.

    2009-08-01

    The Kyushu-Palau ridge, a remnant arc on the Philippine Sea Plate, subducts beneath the Eurasian Plate along the westernmost part of the Nankai Trough. A seismic reflection profile on strike line images the ˜70-km-wide Kyushu-Palau ridge where it subducts beneath the toe of the forearc accretionary wedge. The geomagnetic anomaly signature, seafloor topographic features, wide-angle refraction data, and on-land geomorphologic evidence enable us to trace the forearc extension of the subducted ridge up to the east Kyushu. The subducted Kyushu-Palau ridge with excess mass may be relatively buoyant, and thus is more likely to resist subduction upon collision with the overriding plate at depth, leading us to speculate that there is locally large tectonic stress at the contact zone between the subducted ridge and base of the overriding plate. The large stress zone is marked by historic thrust-type intermediate-class (magnitude 6 or 7) earthquakes. The flank regions of the subducted buoyant Kyushu-Palau ridge are more likely to tear and result in slab fracturing when the ridge subducts deeper. We propose that the subducted Kyushu-Palau ridge may serve not only as a seismic asperity at depth but also produce the slab fracture as a seismic barrier inhibiting the rupture propagation of the adjacent megathrust earthquakes in the Hyuga segment.

  2. Development of Relations of Stream Stage to Channel Geometry and Discharge for Stream Segments Simulated with Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF), Chesapeake Bay Watershed and Adjacent Parts of Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, Douglas; Bennett, Mark

    2007-01-01

    streamflow-gaging stations included in the areal extent of the model. These regression models were developed on the basis of data from stations in four physiographic provinces (Appalachian Plateaus, Valley and Ridge, Piedmont, and Coastal Plain) and were used to predict channel geometry for all 738 stream segments in the modeled area from associated basin drainage area. Manning's roughness coefficient for the channel and floodplain was represented in the XSECT program in two forms. First, all available field-estimated values of roughness were compiled for gaging stations in each physiographic province. The median of field-estimated values of channel and floodplain roughness for each physiographic province was applied to all respective stream segments. The second representation of Manning's roughness coefficient was to allow roughness to vary with channel depth. Roughness was estimated at each gaging station for each 1-foot depth interval. Median values of roughness were calculated for each 1-foot depth interval for all stations in each physiographic province. Channel and floodplain slope were determined for every stream segment in CBRWM using the USGS National Elevation Dataset. Function tables were generated by the XSECT program using values of channel geometry, channel and floodplain roughness, and channel and floodplain slope. The FTABLEs for each of the 290 USGS streamflow-gaging stations were evaluated by comparing observed discharge to the XSECT-derived discharge. Function table stream discharge derived using depth-varying roughness was found to be more representative of and statistically indistinguishable from values of observed stream discharge. Additionally, results of regression analysis showed that XSECT-derived discharge accounted for approximately 90 percent of the variability associated with observed discharge in each of the four physiographic provinces. The results of this study indicate that the methodology developed to generate FTABLEs for every s

  3. Relationship between ridge segmentation and Moho transition zone structure from 3D multichannel seismic data collected over the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise at 9°50'N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, O.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Canales, J.; Carton, H. D.; Carbotte, S. M.; Mutter, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    We present stack and migrated stack volumes of a fast-spreading center produced from the high-resolution 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data collected in summer of 2008 over the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°50’N during cruise MGL0812. These volumes give us new insight into the 3D structure of the lower crust and Moho Transition Zone (MTZ) along and across the ridge axis, and how this structure relates to the ridge segmentation at the spreading axis. The area of 3D coverage is between 9°38’N and 9°58’N (~1000 km2) where the documented eruptions of 1990-91 and 2005-06 occurred. This high-resolution survey has a nominal bin size of 6.25 m in cross-axis direction and 37.5 m in along-axis direction. The prestack processing sequence applied to data includes 1D and 2D filtering to remove low-frequency cable noise, offset-dependent spherical divergence correction to compensate for geometrical spreading, surface-consistent amplitude correction to balance abnormally high/low shot and channel amplitudes, trace editing, velocity analysis, normal moveout (NMO), and CMP mute of stretched far offset arrivals. The poststack processing includes seafloor multiple mute to reduce migration noise and poststack time migration. We also will apply primary multiple removal and prestack time migration to the data and compare the results to the migrated stack volume. The poststack and prestack migrated volumes will then be used to detail Moho seismic signature variations and their relationship to ridge segmentation, crustal age, bathymetry, and magmatism. We anticipate that the results will also provide insight into the mantle upwelling pattern, which is actively debated for the study area.

  4. Deep versus shallow melt stagnation in an ultra-slow / ultra-cold ridge segment: the Andrew Bain southern RTI (SWIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganelli, E.; Brunelli, D.; Seyler, M.; Bonatti, E.; Cipriani, A.; Ligi, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Andrew Bain Fracture Zone (ABFZ) represents one of the largest transform faults in the ridge system spanning 750 km in length with a characteristic lens-shape structure. The southern Ridge-Transform Intersection represents the deepest sector of the whole South West Indian Ridge system. During the Italian-Russian expedition S23-AB06, the seafloor in the Southern Ridge Transform Intersection (RTI) has been sampled recovering only ultramafic material in the majority of the dredging sites. The sampled spinel and plagioclase peridotites show hybrid textures, characterized either by deep spinel-field impregnation assemblages (sp+cpx±opx±ol) or by plagioclase-field equilibrated patches and mineral trails (pl+cpx±ol) marked by both crystallization of newly formed plagioclase-field equilibrated trails and formation of plagioclase coronas around spinel. The ones collected from ridge axis show also late gabbroic pockets and veins, variably enriched in clinopyroxene. Overall textures account for important melt percolation/stagnation events occurred in the plagioclase and spinel field. Major and trace element distribution in pyroxenes and spinels from spinel-bearing peridotites overall follow a general melting trend accompanied by a progressive re-equilibration to lower P/T facies at all scales. However, only few samples can be linked to near fractional melting, while the majority of them shows REE pattern and trace element concentrations that cannot be reproduced by fractional melting process. Open-system melting (OSM) better reproduces measured REE patterns. Modeling melting in an open system scenario requires high residual porosity to be accounted for along with generally enriched melts to influx the melting parcel at depth. Melting at high residual porosity suggests a near-batch regime in which enriched melts stagnate in the spinel field. Inhibition of melt segregation during melt/rock interaction asks for a permeability barrier to develop in the region where the

  5. Fingermark ridge drift.

    PubMed

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification. PMID:26646735

  6. The Davie Ridge: a Marginal Transform Ridge not Formed During Continental Breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phethean, J. J. J.; Van Hunen, J.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.; Davies, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The breakup of Gondwana translated Madagascar southwards relative to Africa along the Davie Fracture Zone (DFZ). This fracture zone now forms the Transform Passive Continental Margin (TPCM) from Kenya to Mozambique. The Davie Ridge (DR), a transform marginal ridge, has formed along the DFZ between 5 and 2°S and 22 and 11°S, but with little expression in-between. It has been proposed that this marginal ridge was formed by the thermal effects of a passing Mid Ocean Ridge (MOR) during the separation of Gondwana. Plate kinematic reconstructions, however, constrained by ocean magnetic anomalies, show that the MOR only passed between the north and south expressions of the DR. Therefore the positive linear gravity anomalies of the DR cannot be attributed to the effects of a passing MOR, and some other mechanism must be found to explain their formation. Interpretation of seismic reflection profiles along the DR shows that the gravity highs occur adjacent to large basin structures. In the north this correlates with a basin-bounding basement high of ~Albian age, and in the south with the rift flank uplifts of the currently active Quirimbas graben. This suggests that the northern and southern DR segments are instead shoulder uplifts resulting from two separate extensional episodes during different stress regimes. These are the Cretaceous NE-SW extension during the breakup of the south Atlantic, and the E-W extension of the Neogene-recent Afar-East Africa rift system, respectfully. The lack of deformation and DR formation along the region of the TPCM passed by the MOR suggests it has been coupled by thermal effects and/or the injection of magma.

  7. Magnetic Anomaly Amplitudes on the Gakkel Ridge: Indicators of Ridge Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Lawver, L. A.; Brozena, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    For most of its length, the Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean's Eurasia Basin is characterized by a discontinuous magnetic signature with regions of missing or low-amplitude central anomalies punctuated by short, high-amplitude segments. The ridge segment in between the Morris Jesup Rise and the Yermak Plateau has an unusually large amplitude central magnetic anomaly that is more than four times the amplitude of the flanking anomalies. This ridge segment is straight, without large offsets, for about 150 km. The difference in character between the central anomaly in this segment and the rest of Gakkel Ridge is striking. The western half of the Gakkel Ridge and the Eurasia Basin were surveyed in 1998-99 by a Naval Research Laboratory aerogeophysical campaign that measured magnetics, gravity, and sea-surface topography. The new magnetic data densify the historical US Navy aeromagnetic data and improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly field in this region. This new field highlights the variability of the Gakkel Ridge over time, showing regions of strong anomalies that are continuous along strike and anomalies that fade away or become discontinuous. In particular, anomalies 15y to 21o show regions of high amplitudes on both sides of the ridge for varying distances along strike. We suggest that these high-amplitude segments were formed at times when the Gakkel Ridge at this location had a high-amplitude central magnetic anomaly like the present day high-amplitude segment or the shorter ones distributed along the ridge. The higher central anomaly amplitudes may be associated with variations in geochemistry and/or melt delivery along the ridge. Recent dredging of zero-aged crust along the Gakkel Ridge showed a good but not perfect correlation of high-amplitude central anomalies and basalt recovery (P. Michael, personal communication). This magnetic data set in conjunction with future dredging provides an opportunity to constrain past ridge variability.

  8. Ridge 2000 Data Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; Haxby, W. F.; Ryan, W. B.; Chayes, D. N.; Lehnert, K. A.; Shank, T. M.

    2005-12-01

    Hosted at Lamont by the marine geoscience Data Management group, mgDMS, the NSF-funded Ridge 2000 electronic database, http://www.marine-geo.org/ridge2000/, is a key component of the Ridge 2000 multi-disciplinary program. The database covers each of the three Ridge 2000 Integrated Study Sites: Endeavour Segment, Lau Basin, and 8-11N Segment. It promotes the sharing of information to the broader community, facilitates integration of the suite of information collected at each study site, and enables comparisons between sites. The Ridge 2000 data system provides easy web access to a relational database that is built around a catalogue of cruise metadata. Any web browser can be used to perform a versatile text-based search which returns basic cruise and submersible dive information, sample and data inventories, navigation, and other relevant metadata such as shipboard personnel and links to NSF program awards. In addition, non-proprietary data files, images, and derived products which are hosted locally or in national repositories, as well as science and technical reports, can be freely downloaded. On the Ridge 2000 database page, our Data Link allows users to search the database using a broad range of parameters including data type, cruise ID, chief scientist, geographical location. The first Ridge 2000 field programs sailed in 2004 and, in addition to numerous data sets collected prior to the Ridge 2000 program, the database currently contains information on fifteen Ridge 2000-funded cruises and almost sixty Alvin dives. Track lines can be viewed using a recently- implemented Web Map Service button labelled Map View. The Ridge 2000 database is fully integrated with databases hosted by the mgDMS group for MARGINS and the Antarctic multibeam and seismic reflection data initiatives. Links are provided to partner databases including PetDB, SIOExplorer, and the ODP Janus system. Improved inter-operability with existing and new partner repositories continues to be

  9. Tectonics of ridge-transform intersections at the Kane fracture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J. A.; Dick, H. J. B.

    1983-03-01

    The Kane Transform offsets spreading-center segments of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge by about 150 km at 24° N latitude. In terms of its first-order morphological, geological, and geophysical characteristics it appears to be typical of long-offset (>100 km), slow-slipping (2 cm yr-1) ridge-ridge transform faults. High-resolution geological observations were made from deep-towed ANGUS photographs and the manned submersible ALVIN at the ridge-transform intersections and indicate similar relationships in these two regions. These data indicate that over a distance of about 20 km as the spreading axes approach the fracture zone, the two flanks of each ridge axis behave in very different ways. Along the flanks that intersect the active transform zone the rift valley floor deepens and the surface expression of volcanism becomes increasingly narrow and eventually absent at the intersection where only a sediment-covered ‘nodal basin’ exists. The adjacent median valley walls have structural trends that are oblique to both the ridge and the transform and have as much as 4 km of relief. These are tectonically active regions that have only a thin (<200 m), highly fractured, and discontinuous carapace of volcanic rocks overlying a variably deformed and metamorphosed assemblage of gabbroic rocks. Overprinting relationships reveal a complex history of crustal extension and rapid vertical uplift. In contrast, the opposing flanks of the ridge axes, that intersect the non-transform zones appear to be similar in many respects to those examined elsewhere along slow-spreading ridges. In general, a near-axial horst and graben terrain floored by relatively young volcanics passes laterally into median valley walls with a simple block-faulted character where only volcanic rocks have been found. Along strike toward the fracture zone, the youngest volcanics form linear constructional volcanic ridges that transect the entire width of the fracture zone valley. These volcanics are continuous with

  10. Controls on melting at spreading ridges from correlated abyssal peridotite - mid-ocean ridge basalt compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regelous, Marcel; Weinzierl, Christoph G.; Haase, Karsten M.

    2016-09-01

    Variations in the volume and major element composition of basalt erupted along the global mid-ocean ridge system have been attributed to differences in mantle potential temperature, mantle composition, or plate spreading rate and lithosphere thickness. Abyssal peridotites, the residues of mantle melting beneath mid-ocean ridges, provide additional information on the melting process, which could be used to test these hypotheses. We compiled a global database of abyssal peridotite compositions averaged over the same ridge segments defined by Gale et al. (2013). In addition, we calculated the distance of each ridge segment to the nearest hotspots. We show that Cr# in spinel in abyssal peridotites is negatively correlated with Na90 in basalts from the same ridge segments on a global scale. Ridge segments that erupt basalts apparently produced by larger degrees of mantle melting are thus underlain by peridotites from which large amounts of melt have been extracted. We find that near-ridge hotspots have a more widespread influence on mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) composition and ridge depth than previously thought. However, when these hotspot-influenced ridge segments are excluded, the remaining segments show clear relationships between MORB composition, peridotite composition, and ridge depth with spreading rate. Very slow-spreading ridges (<20 mm/yr) are deeper, erupt basalts with higher Na90, Al90, K90/Ti90, and lower Fe90, Ca90/Al90, and expose peridotites with lower Cr# than intermediate and fast-spreading ridges. We show that away from hotspots, the spreading-rate dependence of the maximum degree of mantle melting inferred from Cr# in peridotites (FM) and the bulk degree of melting inferred from Na90 in basalts (FB) from the same ridge segments is unlikely to be due to variations in mantle composition. Nor can the effects of dynamic mantle upwelling or incomplete melt extraction at low spreading rates satisfactorily explain the observed compositions of abyssal

  11. Correlated patterns in hydrothermal plume distribution and apparent magmatic budget along 2500 km of the Southeast Indian Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Edward; Christophe Hémond; Anne Briais; Marcia Maia; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Sharon L. Walker; Tingting Wang; Yongshun John Chen

    2014-01-01

    Multiple geological processes affect the distribution of hydrothermal venting along a mid-ocean ridge. Deciphering the role of a specific process is often frustrated by simultaneous changes in other influences. Here we take advantage of the almost constant spreading rate (65–71 mm/yr) along 2500 km of the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) between 77°E and 99°E to examine the spatial density of hydrothermal venting relative to regional and segment-scale changes in the apparent magmatic budget. We use 227 vertical profiles of light backscatter and (on 41 profiles) oxidation-reduction potential along 27 first and second-order ridge segments on and adjacent to the Amsterdam-St. Paul (ASP) Plateau to map ph, the fraction of casts detecting a plume. At the regional scale, venting on the five segments crossing the magma-thickened hot spot plateau is almost entirely suppressed (ph = 0.02). Conversely, the combined ph (0.34) from all other segments follows the global trend of ph versus spreading rate. Off the ASP Plateau, multisegment trends in ph track trends in the regional axial depth, high where regional depth increases and low where it decreases. At the individual segment scale, a robust correlation between ph and cross-axis inflation for first-order segments shows that different magmatic budgets among first-order segments are expressed as different levels of hydrothermal spatial density. This correlation is absent among second-order segments. Eighty-five percent of the plumes occur in eight clusters totaling ∼350 km. We hypothesize that these clusters are a minimum estimate of the length of axial melt lenses underlying this section of the SEIR.

  12. An ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Dick, Henry J B; Lin, Jian; Schouten, Hans

    2003-11-27

    New investigations of the Southwest Indian and Arctic ridges reveal an ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge that is characterized by intermittent volcanism and a lack of transform faults. We find that the mantle beneath such ridges is emplaced continuously to the seafloor over large regions. The differences between ultraslow- and slow-spreading ridges are as great as those between slow- and fast-spreading ridges. The ultraslow-spreading ridges usually form at full spreading rates less than about 12 mm yr(-1), though their characteristics are commonly found at rates up to approximately 20 mm yr(-1). The ultraslow-spreading ridges consist of linked magmatic and amagmatic accretionary ridge segments. The amagmatic segments are a previously unrecognized class of accretionary plate boundary structure and can assume any orientation, with angles relative to the spreading direction ranging from orthogonal to acute. These amagmatic segments sometimes coexist with magmatic ridge segments for millions of years to form stable plate boundaries, or may displace or be displaced by transforms and magmatic ridge segments as spreading rate, mantle thermal structure and ridge geometry change. PMID:14647373

  13. Lomonosov Ridge as a Natural Component of Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poselov, V.; Kaminsky, V. D.; Butsenko, V. V.; Grikurov, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    In geodynamic context, Lomonosov Ridge is interpreted as a rifted passive margin framing the Eurasian oceanic basin. At the same time its near-Siberian segment is intimately associated with the Russian Arctic shelf, as evidenced by morphological data and the results of “Trans-Arctic 1992” and “Arctic-2007” geotransect studies. Coring and ACEX data demonstrated the presence in the uppermost geological section of the ridge of Late Cretaceous through Cenozoic sediments and Jurassic-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks; the latter may belong to deeper levels of sedimentary cover, or may represent the Mesozoic folded basement. Coarse bottom debris contains also the fragments of Riphean-Paleozoic rocks probably derived from the local bedrock source. Structure of sedimentary cover is imaged by continuous seismic observations from the shelf of East Siberian Sea along the length of Lomonosov Ridge to 85 N. In the upper part of the section there are two sedimentary sequences separated by a regional unconformity; their seismic velocities are 2.4-3.1 km/s in the upper sequence and 3.4-4.0 km/s in the lower one, and the total thickness reaches ~ 8 km in the deepest part of New Siberian Basin. Both these sequences and the unconformity are traced from Lomonosov Ridge into Amundsen Basin on seismic reflection sections obtained by drifting ice stations North Pole 2479 and 2480. The low-velocity sediments are underlain by a metasedimetary sequence with velocities decreasing from 4.7-4.9 km/s on the shelf to 4.4-4.9 km/s beneath continental slope and 4.2-4.8 km/s on Lomonosov Ridge. The thickness of metasedimentary sequence is about 7 km on the shelf, up to 3.5 km under continental slope, and strongly variable (1-5 km) on Lomonosov Ridge. The upper layer of consolidated crust is 8-9 km thick on the shelf with velocities 6.1-6.2 km/s; on Lomonosov Ridge both its thickness and velocities increase to 10 km and 6.0-6.4 km/s, respectively. In the lower crust the velocities do not exceed 6

  14. Metopic ridge

    MedlinePlus

    ... infant is made up of bony plates. The gaps between the plates allow for growth of the skull. The places where these plates connect are called sutures or suture lines. They do not fully close until the 2nd or 3rd year of life. A metopic ridge occurs when the ...

  15. Crustal manifestations of a hot transient pulse at 60°N beneath the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell-Turner, R. E.; White, N. J.; Maclennan, J.; Henstock, T. J.; Murton, B. J.; Jones, S. M.

    2013-02-01

    Since its inception at 62 Ma, mantle convective upwelling beneath Iceland has had a significant influence on Cenozoic vertical motions, magmatism and paleoceanography in the North Atlantic Ocean. Crucially, intersection of the Reykjanes Ridge with the Icelandic Plume provides us with a useful window into the transient activity of this plume. Here, the spreading ridge acts as a linear sampler of plume activity, which is recorded as a series of time-transgressive V-shaped ridges and troughs. We present the results of a detailed study of the spreading ridge close to 60°N, where the youngest V-shaped ridge of thickened oceanic crust is forming today. A combination of multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection profiles, acquired along and across the ridge axis, is used to map the detailed pattern of volcanism and normal faulting. Along the ridge axis, the density of volcanic seamounts varies markedly, increasing by a factor of two between 59°N and 62°N. Within this zone, seismic imaging shows that there is enhanced acoustic scattering at the seabed. These observations are accompanied by a decrease in mean fault length from ∼12 km to ∼6 km. A 1960-2009 catalog of relocated teleseismic earthquake hypocenters indicates that there is a pronounced gap in seismicity between 59°N and 62°N where the cumulative moment release is two orders of magnitude smaller than that along adjacent ridge segments. A steady-state thermal model is used to show that a combination of increased melt generation and decreased hydrothermal circulation accounts for this suite of observations. The predicted decrease in the thickness of the brittle seismogenic layer is consistent with geochemical modeling of dredged basaltic samples, which require hotter asthenospheric material beneath the spreading axis. Thus, along-axis variation in melt supply caused by passage of a pulse of hot material modulates crustal accretion processes and rheological properties.

  16. Infiltration of Refractory Melts into the Sub-Oceanic Mantle: Evidence from Major and Minor Element Compositions of Minerals from the 53° E Amagmatic Segment Abyssal Peridotites at the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, C.; Dick, H. J.; Zhou, H.; Liu, Y.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated sodium and titanium in pyroxene and spinel with high TiO2 (> 0.2 wt%) are suggested as the geochemical characteristic for the MORB-like melt infiltration of peridotites. The petrological and geochemical results of melt infiltrating in mantle peridotites are controlled by not only the melt composition but also the melt/rock ratio. Large discordant dunite bodies in the mantle transition zone are the direct observation of large volume melt (high melt/rock ratio) infiltrating by channeled porous flow in the shallow mantle (1). In addition to dunites, melt infiltrating results in a large variety of vein lithologies in mantle, and the occurrence of plagioclases are considered as a petrological signal of melt-reaction at shallow depth (2, 3) with a medium melt/rock ratio. Because the lacking of obviously petrological and geochemical variation of peridotites, melt infiltration of peridotites with a low melt/rock ratio are rarely reported. Peridotites in this study are from the 53° E amagmatic segment at the Southwest Indian Ridge. These peridotites are suggested as highly depleted buoyant mantle drawn up from the asthenosphere beneath southern Africa during the breakup of Gondwanaland (4) and are residues of multi-stage melt extracting in both spinel and garnet field. We present a detailed analysis of mineral compositions by both the EMPA and LA-ICPMS. Mineral phases in 53°E peridotites have mantle major element compositions, although minerals show variations with the crystal size and the location from cores to rims (Fig.1). In conjunction with the profile analysis of large clinopyroxene crystals, our results document the melt infiltration occurred at the ultraslow-spreading environment. At least two kinds of percolation melts are distinguished. They are normally MORB-like melt and ultra-depleted melt. Reference1.P. B. Kelemen, H. J. B. Dick, Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth 100, 423 (Jan, 1995). 2.J. M. Warren, N. Shimizu, Journal of Petrology 51

  17. A relook into the crustal architecture of Laxmi Ridge, northeastern Arabian Sea from geopotential data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Nisha; Anand, S. P.; Rajaram, Mita; Rao, P. Rama

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we undertake analysis of ship-borne gravity-magnetic and satellite-derived free-air gravity (FAG) data to derive the crustal structure of Laxmi Ridge and adjacent areas. 2D and 3D crustal modelling suggests that the high resolution FAG low associated with the ridge is due to underplating and that it is of continental nature. From Energy Spectral Analysis, five-depth horizons representing interface between different layers are demarcated that match those derived from 2D models. Magnetic sources from EMAG2 data, various filtered maps and absence of underplating in the EW section suggest that the EW and NW-SE segment of the Laxmi Ridge is divided by the Girnar fracture zone and probably associated with different stages of evolution. From the derived inclination parameters, we infer that the region to the north of Laxmi Ridge, between Laxmi and Gop Basins, is composed of volcanic/basaltic flows having Deccan affinity, which might have been emplaced in an already existing crust. The calculated inclination parameters derived from the best fit 2D model suggests that the rifting in the Gop Basin preceded the emplacement of the volcanics in the region between Laxmi and Gop Basins. The emplacement of volcanic/basaltic flows may be associated with the passage of India over the Reunion hotspot.

  18. Electro-Optic Segment-Segment Sensors for Radio and Optical Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramovici, Alex

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses an electro-optic sensor that consists of a collimator, attached to one segment, and a quad diode, attached to an adjacent segment. Relative segment-segment motion causes the beam from the collimator to move across the quad diode, thus generating a measureable electric signal. This sensor type, which is relatively inexpensive, can be configured as an edge sensor, or as a remote segment-segment motion sensor.

  19. Correlation between petrological, geochemical and tectonic segmentation within the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushchevskaya, N. M.; Cherkashov, G. A.; Tamaki, K.; Belyatsky, B. V.

    2003-04-01

    The possible primary rift melt compositions and its fractionation conditions under the various regions of spreading centers were determined on the base of the detail petrological and geochemical study of quenched glasses and basalts of Mohns-Knipovich Ridge. The forming Knipovich and Gakkel ridges coincide with the coldest zones of the oceanic lithosphere and are characterized by tholeiites enriched in Na, Si and poor in Fe. According lithophile elements distribution normalized to the primitive mantle the tholeiites are weakly enriched with maximum in Nb and minimum in Th, which are characteristic not only for the basalts of Knipovich and Gakkel ridges (Muhe, 1997), but for the Mohns and Kolbeinsey and alkaline basalts of Jan Mayen bank (Haase, 1996). Sr, Nd, Pb isotope data for the melts of Mohns and Knipovich ridges form the single mixing trend of enriched and depleted sources typical for Iceland basalts and differ from the lavas of Kolbeinsey ridge adjacent to Iceland (Mertz et al., 1991). Petrological segmentation of the North Atlantic appears and subordinates to geodynamic conditions, which are the results of global processes of deep diapirs uprising that is reflected in the tectonics of the region, but geochemical features of magmatism are caused by greater number of factors. For the North Atlantic region at the early stages of rift genesis there are determined depleted and weakly enriched tholeiites and the largest anomalies are connected with the regions of nonspreading parts of continental crust (Jan Mayen region). Enriched melts of ultra-slow spreading Knipovich ridge could be formed in the result of involving the low parts of adjacent continental blocks into the melting process with the following enriched melts migration and mantle flows into the spreading zones or due to the burying the formed melts and further melting of enriched mantle during the spreading axes jumping.

  20. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Marder, Barry M.

    1996-01-01

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces.

  1. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-09-03

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces. 6 figs.

  2. Polar Ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03662 Polar Ridges

    This ridge system is located in the south polar region.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -81.7N, Longitude 296.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Geochemistry of Axial seamount lavas: Magmatic relationship between the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.M.; Morgan, C.; Lilas, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Axial seamount, located along the central portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and at the eastern end of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, is the current center of the Cobb hotspot. Lava chemistry and bathymetry indicate that Axial seamount is a discrete volcanic unit, with a more productive shallow magmatic plumbing system separate from the adjacent ridge segments. Despite this classic association of spreading center and hotspot volcanic activity, there is no evidence in the lavas for geochemical or isotopic enrichment typical of hotspot or mantle plume activity. The differences in composition between the Axial seamount lavas and the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas are attributed to melting processes rather than to any fundamental differences in their mantle source compositions. The higher magma production rates, higher Sr, and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas relative to the ridge lavas are thought to be a consequence of melt initiation at greater depths. The melting column producing the seamount lavas is thought to be initiated in the stability field of spinel peridotite, whereas the ridge lavas are produced from a melting column initiated at shallower levels, possibly within or close to the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. Implicit in this interpretation is the conclusion that the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas, and by analogy most MORB, are generated at shallow mantle levels, mostly within the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. This interpretation also requires that for the upwelling mantle to intersect the solidus at different depths, the mantle supplying Axial seamount must be hotter than the rest of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Axial seamount, therefore, reflects a thermal anomaly in the mantle, rather than a geochemically enriched ocean island basalt type mantle plume.

  4. The origin of bathymetric highs at ridge-transform intersections: A multi-disciplinary case study at the Clipperton Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, G. A.; Kastens, K. A.; Klein, E. M.

    1994-02-01

    Bathmetric highs on the old crust proximal to ridge-transform intersections (RTIs), termed “intersection highs”, are common but poorly understood features at offsets of fast to intermediate rate spreading centers. We have combined new reflection seismic, photographic, and geochemical data with previously published Seabeam, SeaMARC I, and SeaMARC II data to address the nature of the intersection highs at the Clipperton Fracture Zone. The Clipperton Intersection Highs are both topped by a carapace of young lavas at least 100 m thick. These lavas, which were erupted on the intersection highs, are chemically similar to their adjacent ridge segments and different from the surrounding older crust. At least some of the erupted magma traveled directly from the adjacent ridge at a shallow crustal level. Ridge-related magma covers and intrudes at least the upper 500 m of the transform tectonized crust at the RTI. We suspect that additional magma enters the intersection highs from directly below, without passing through the ridge. The young oceanic crust near the western Clipperton RTI is not thin by regional comparison. The 1.4 m.y. old crust near the eastern Clipperton RTI thickens approaching the transform offset. If the thermal effects of the proximal ridge were negligible, the eastern intersection high crust would appear to be in isostatic equilibrium. We believe that thermal effects are significant, and that the intersection high region stands anomalously shallow for its crustal thickness. This is attributable to increased temperature in the mantle below the ridge-proximal crust. Although ridge magma is injected into the proximal old crust, plate boundary reorganization is not taking place. Intersection high formation has been an ongoing process at both of the Clipperton RTIs for at least the past 1 m.y., during which time the plate boundary configuration has not changed appreciably. We envision a constant interplay between the intruding ridge magma and the

  5. Greenland Fracture Zone-East Greenland Ridge(s) revisited: Indications of a C22-change in plate motion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DøSsing, A.; Funck, T.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the lithospheric stress field, causing axial rift migration and reorientation of the transform, are generally proposed as an explanation for anomalously old crust and/or major aseismic valleys in oceanic ridge-transform-ridge settings. Similarly, transform migration of the Greenland Fracture Zone and separation of the 200-km-long, fracture-zone-parallel continental East Greenland Ridge from the Eurasia plate is thought to be related to a major change in relative plate motions between Greenland and Eurasia during the earliest Oligocene (Chron 13 time). This study presents a reinterpretation of the Greenland Fracture Zone - East Greenland Ridge based on new and existing geophysical data. Evidence is shown for two overstepping ridge segments (Segments A and B) of which Segment A corresponds to the already known East Greenland Ridge while Segment B was not detected previously. Interpretation of sonobuoy data and revised modeling of existing OBS data across Segment B indicate a continental composition of the segment. This interpretation is supported by magnetic anomaly data. The Segments A and B are bounded by portions of the Greenland Fracture Zone with a distinct ˜10° difference in strike. This is suggested to relate to an early episode of transform migration and reorientation of the lithospheric stress field around Chron 22 time, i.e., shortly after the Eocene breakup in the northern NE Atlantic. These findings contradict with previous interpretations of the fracture zone, which infer simple pre-C13 strike-slip kinematics.

  6. The Influence of Ridge Geometry at Ultraslow Spreading Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, H. J.; Standish, J.

    2004-12-01

    Ridges spreading at ultraslow rate less than 20 mm/yr have been identified as a unique class of ocean ridge as different from slow spreading as slow spreading are from fast 1. Ridge characteristics, such as the presence or absence of amagmatic accretionary segments, transform faults, axial valleys or axial rises, however, are not a simple function of spreading rate, and it is therefore difficult to define precisely ridge classes simply on this criterion. Ridge morphology, tectonics, and geochemistry are also largely a function of mantle thermal structure, upwelling rate, fertility, and ridge geometry. However, examination of ridge crustal structure with spreading rate clearly shows a sharp break, with seismic measurements of crustal thickness indicating highly variable, generally thin crust associated with spreading rates below 20 mm/yr. In contrast, crust formed at spreading rates greater than 20 mm/yr is generally thicker and less variable thickness, averaging between 6 and 7 km, without a clear relationship to spreading rate. The generally accepted explanation is the influence of conductive heat loss and the formation of a thick axial lithosphere due to slow mantle upwelling rates, thereby limiting melt production at ultraslow spreading rates 2. Comparatively, the influence of conductive heat loss at spreading rates greater than 20 mm/yr is likely negligible except near major large offset transforms. The latter effect is predicted by modeling to increase sharply with decreasing spreading rate below 20 mm/yr. Thus perturbations in ridge geometry that would otherwise have a negligible effect, can dramatically influence melt production and ridge tectonics at ultraslow spreading rates. Investigation of the SW Indian Ridge and along the Gakkel Ridge, for example, shows that where the effective spreading rate for mantle upwelling, which ridge obliquity, falls below ~12 mm/yr, long amagmatic accretionary ridge segments form and replace both magmatic accretionary ridge

  7. Photoclinometric analysis of wrinkle ridges on Lunae Planum, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    Wrinkle ridges are common morphologic features on Mars. Both volcanic and tectonic mechanisms were suggested to explain their origin; recent work has focused on a compressional origin. Analysis of terrestrial analogs has greatly influenced and aided the understanding of wrinkle ridge formation. An important aspect necessary to intrepret structure is topography. Topographic profiles across ridges can provide important constraints for models of internal structure and analyzing deformation associated with ridges. Topographic maps of Mars are too coarse to resolve the topography of individual ridges; therefore, monoscopic photoclinometry was used to derive topographic profiles for the ridges. Profiles spaced a few kilometers apart were obtained for each ridge, the number depended on ridge length, morphology, and albedo variation. Photoclinometry relies on pixel brightness variations which results from topography, albedo, or both. Because of the albedo variations, photoclimometric profiles can not be extended across large distances, such as between adjacent ridges (about 20 to 80 km). However, the technique is applicable to shorter distances, such as the distance across typical ridges. Profiles were measured across the ridge and extended a few kilometers on either side, including all visible components of the ridge. The results of these measurements and the use of internal structure and topographic profile models for estimating the shortening due to folding and faulting are discussed.

  8. Cervical facet dislocation adjacent to the fused motion segment

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Kunio; Kawanishi, Masahiro; Yamada, Makoto; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Ito, Yutaka; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on a case that forces re-examination of merits and demerits of anterior cervical fusion. A 79-year-old male was brought to the emergency room (ER) of our hospital after he fell and struck the occipital region of his head following excessive alcohol consumption. Four years prior, he had undergone anterior cervical discectomy and fusion of C5/6 and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 3 years after this surgery indicated that he was suffering from degeneration of C6/7 intervertebral discs. After arriving at the ER, he presented motor impairment at level C7 and lower of manual muscle testing grade 1 as well as moderate loss of physical sensation from the trunk and peripheries of both upper limbs to the peripheries of both lower limbs (Frankel B). Cervical computed tomography (CT) indicated anterior dislocation of C6/7, and MRI indicated severe spinal cord edema. We performed manipulative reduction of C6/7 with the patient under general anesthesia. Next, we performed laminectomy on C5-T1 and posterior fusion on C6/7. Postoperative CT indicated that cervical alignment had improved, and MRI indicated that the spinal cord edema observed prior to surgery had been mitigated. Three months after surgery, motor function and sensory impairment of the lower limbs had improved, and the patient was ambulatory upon discharge from the hospital (Frankel D). In the present case, although C5 and 6 were rigidly fused, degeneration of the C6/7 intervertebral disc occurred and stability was compromised. As a result, even slight trauma placed a severe dynamic burden on the facet joint of C6/7, which led to dislocation. PMID:26933361

  9. Cervical facet dislocation adjacent to the fused motion segment.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kunio; Kawanishi, Masahiro; Yamada, Makoto; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Ito, Yutaka; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on a case that forces re-examination of merits and demerits of anterior cervical fusion. A 79-year-old male was brought to the emergency room (ER) of our hospital after he fell and struck the occipital region of his head following excessive alcohol consumption. Four years prior, he had undergone anterior cervical discectomy and fusion of C5/6 and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 3 years after this surgery indicated that he was suffering from degeneration of C6/7 intervertebral discs. After arriving at the ER, he presented motor impairment at level C7 and lower of manual muscle testing grade 1 as well as moderate loss of physical sensation from the trunk and peripheries of both upper limbs to the peripheries of both lower limbs (Frankel B). Cervical computed tomography (CT) indicated anterior dislocation of C6/7, and MRI indicated severe spinal cord edema. We performed manipulative reduction of C6/7 with the patient under general anesthesia. Next, we performed laminectomy on C5-T1 and posterior fusion on C6/7. Postoperative CT indicated that cervical alignment had improved, and MRI indicated that the spinal cord edema observed prior to surgery had been mitigated. Three months after surgery, motor function and sensory impairment of the lower limbs had improved, and the patient was ambulatory upon discharge from the hospital (Frankel D). In the present case, although C5 and 6 were rigidly fused, degeneration of the C6/7 intervertebral disc occurred and stability was compromised. As a result, even slight trauma placed a severe dynamic burden on the facet joint of C6/7, which led to dislocation. PMID:26933361

  10. THE TRUSS BRIDGE SEGMENT OF THE TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE IN FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THE TRUSS BRIDGE SEGMENT OF THE TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE IN FOREGROUND AND THE HELL GATE BRIDGE IN THE BACKGROUND ADJACENT TO THE SUSPENSION SEGMENT OF THE TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE. - Triborough Bridge, Passing through Queens, Manhattan & the Bronx, Queens (subdivision), Queens County, NY

  11. Depth of Melt Extraction at Mid-Ocean Ridges and Transform Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, H.; Montesi, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    Crustal thickness variations at oceanic transform faults are closely related to melt migration and extraction processes beneath mid-ocean ridges. Gregg et al. (2007) have shown that at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges, transform faults exhibit more positive gravity anomalies than the adjacent spreading centers, indicating relatively thin crust in the transform domain, whereas at intermediate- and fast-spreading ridges, transform faults are characterized by more negative gravity anomalies than the adjacent spreading centers, indicating thick crust in the transform domain. We present numerical models reproducing these observations and infer that melt can be extracted from a depth of 30×5km at fast-slipping transforms. At mid-ocean ridges, melt is generated by decompression of the mantle that rises in response to the divergence of the plates. Subsequent extraction of melt that forms the oceanic crust may be modeled as a three-step process (Montési et al., 2011). 1) Melt moves vertically through buoyancy-driven porous flow enhanced by sub-vertical dissolution channels. 2) Melt accumulates in and travels along a decompaction channel lining a low-permeability barrier at the base of the thermal boundary layer. 3) Melt is extracted to the surface when it enters a melt extraction zone. The melt extraction zone probably reflects structural damage of the lithosphere related to tectonic activity at the plate boundary. Therefore, it may be present at both ridge and transform segments of oceanic spreading centers. This three-step melt extraction process was implemented in Matlab to predict crustal thickness variations associated with three-dimensional models of segmented mid-ocean ridges. Mantle flow and thermal structure are solved in the commercial finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics. Model results demonstrate that the lengths of offset affect the crustal thickness in the transform domain. At short (<50 km) offset, time is limited for crust to accumulate, while at

  12. Submersible observations along the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge: 1984 Alvin Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normark, William R.; Morton, Janet L.; Ross, Stephanie L.

    1987-10-01

    In September 1984, the research submersible Alvin provided direct observations of three major hydrothermal vent areas along the southernmost segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR). The submersible operations focused on specific volcanologie, structural, and hydrothermal problems that had been identified during the preceding 4 years of photographic, dredging, acoustic imaging, and geophysical studies along a 12-km-long section of the ridge. A continuously maintained (from 1981 to the present) net of seafloor-anchored acoustic transponders allowed the observations from Alvin to be directly tied to all previous U.S. Geological Survey data sets and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration water column surveys from 1984 to the present. The three vent areas studied are the largest of at least six areas identified by previous deep-towed camera surveys that lie within a deep cleft, which marks the axis of symmetry of the JFR in this region. The cleft appears to be the locus of eruption for this segment of the JFR. The vent areas, at least in part, are localized near what appear to be previous volcanic eruptive centers marked by extensive lava lake collapse features adjacent to the cleft at these sites. Each hydrothermal area has several active discharge sites, and sulfide deposits occur as clusters (15-100 m2) of small chimneys, individual large chimneys, or clusters of large branched chimneys. We review the dive program and present a brief synthesis of the geology of the vent sites together with sample and track line compilations.

  13. Abyssal Hill Segmentation: Quantitative analysis of the East Pacific Rise flanks 7°S-9°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John A.; Malinverno, Alberto; Fornari, Daniel J.; Cochran, James R.

    1993-08-01

    The recent R/V Maurice Ewing EW9105 Hydrosweep survey of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and adjacent flanks between 7°S and 9°S provides an excellent opportunity to explore the causal relationship between the ridge and the abyssal hills which form on its flanks. These data cover 100% of the flanking abyssal hills to 115 km on either side of the axis. We apply the methodology of Goff and Jordan (1988) for estimating statistical characteristics of abyssal hill morphology (rms height, characteristic lengths and widths, plan view aspect ratio, azimuthal orientation, and fractal dimension). Principal observations include the following: (1) the rms height of abyssal hill morphology is negatively correlated with the width of the 5- to 20-km-wide crestal high, consistent with the observations of Goff (1991) for northern EPR abyssal hill morphology; (2) the characteristic abyssal hill width displays no systematic variation with position relative to ridge segmentation within the EW9105 survey area, in contrast with observations of Goff (1991) for northern EPR abyssal hill morphology in which characteristic widths tend to be smallest at segment ends and largest toward the middle of segments; (3) abyssal hill rms heights and characteristic widths are very large just north of a counterclockwise rotating "nannoplate", suggesting that the overlap region is being pushed northward in response to microplate-style tectonics; and (4) within the 7°12'S-8°38'S segment, abyssal hill lineaments are generally parallel to the ridge axis, while south of this area, abyssal hill lineaments rotate with a larger "radius of curvature" than does the EPR axis approaching the EPR-Wilkes ridge-transform intersection.

  14. 1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION TOWER. WATER BRAKE TROUGH SEGMENT AT LOWER RIGHT. Looking north northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Mid-ocean ridge dynamics - Observations and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps morgan, J. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of midocean-ridge extension and its relation to melting, magmatic, deformation, and hydrothermal processes are discussed in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics examined include segmentation, along-axis crustal variations and gravity, axial crust and lithosphere structure and seismics, ophiolite studies, and the interaction of ridge and continental rift studies. Consideration is given to theoretical models of axial topography; mantle flow, melting, and melt migration; mantle rheology and flow beneath a midoceanic ridge; upwelling structure and segmentation; the role of the lithosphere in shaping ridge segmentation; thermal stress and the origin of fracture zones; and hydrothermal cooling. A comprehensive bibliography is provided.

  16. Near-axis melt anomalies and segmentation of axial melt: a common framework for the EPR and Endeavour ISS? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Perfit, M. R.; Gill, J. B.; Kelley, D.; Canales, J.; Nedimovic, M.; Carton, H. D.

    2009-12-01

    The EPR 9°50’N and Endeavour ridge segments were originally selected for focused investigation under the Ridge2000 program as contrasting fast spreading magmatic (EPR) and intermediate spreading tectonic (Endeavour) ridge systems. Recent studies reveal structural similarities on both a regional and local scale that indicate a common framework for the magmatic and hydrothermal regime at these sites. On the regional scale, both the EPR and Endeavour sites are adjacent to off-axis seamount chains and ridge-melt anomaly interaction may contribute to localization of magmatism at both sites. The Lamont seamounts are located immediately west of the EPR “bulls eye” (9°49-9°51’N). Here, the ridge axis and the underlying mid-crust magma lens are locally shallow indicating an elevated axial thermal regime, hydrothermal venting is clustered, and the lavas with highest Mg# have erupted. The two documented volcanic eruptions of 1991/92 and 2005/06 both occurred within this region sourced from the same site, with the location of hydrothermal venting persisting through the volcanic eruptions and only minor changes in lava chemistry. Similar relationships are observed at Endeavour segment where the hydrothermally and magmatically active portion of this segment coincides with the on-axis projection of the Heckle seamount chain. An axial magma lens is present for only ~20% of the segment beneath the central shallow portion where active venting is also focused. Seismic data indicate thicker crust has been accreted within this central portion of the segment for the past 0.7 Ma coincident with timing of ridge intersection with the Heckle chain. An important prediction of the ridge-melt anomaly interaction apparent at these sites is that regions of locally enhanced axial magmatism are likely to persist for long time periods (10’s- 100’s of ka) and longevity in the axial hydrothermal system is also expected. On a local scale, fourth-order segmentation of the mid

  17. Grafts for Ridge Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Jamjoom, Amal; Cohen, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome. PMID:26262646

  18. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Nanda; Ravindran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. Aim To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). Results The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Conclusion Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas. PMID:26816991

  19. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (<40 Hz) vibration modes of the primary mirror segments. Each of the six segments has three or more modes in this bandwidth, and resonant vibration excited by acoustics or small disturbances on the structure can result in phase mismatches between adjacent segments thereby degrading image quality. The damping system consists of two tuned mass dampers (TMDs) for each of the mirror segments. An adjustable TMD with passive magnetic damping was selected to minimize sensitivity to changes in temperature; both frequency and damping characteristics can be tuned for optimal vibration mitigation. Modal testing was performed with a laser vibrometry system to characterize the SMT segments with and without the TMDs. Objectives of this test were to determine operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  20. Morphology of the Knipovich Ridge Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarayskaya, Y.; Abramova, A.; Dobrolyubova, K.; Mazarovich, A.; Moroz, E.

    2014-12-01

    continues from the eastern flange through the second northern axial high to the western flange under the azimuth of 320º. It is an indication of long-term magmatic activity in this segment. Detailed bathymetry reveals small-scale features that are important for our understanding of the ridge nature.

  1. Indian Ocean ridge seismicity observed with a permanent hydroacoustic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Jeffrey A.; Bowman, J. Roger

    2005-03-01

    The distribution of earthquakes along the Indian Ocean ridge system between January 18 and October 20, 2003 is investigated using data from two hydrophone stations of the International Monitoring System's global network. Coherent array processing of earthquake-induced hydroacoustic T-waves is used to determine precise arrival times and back azimuths that allow automatic location of the earthquakes. We observed 4725 events throughout the Indian Ocean Basin. Here, we examine 1146 earthquakes from the Central and Southeast Indian Ridge. Source level estimates from the hydroacoustic signals indicate that the hydroacoustic network is at least one magnitude unit more sensitive than the seismic network for Indian Ocean ridge earthquakes. The seismicity primarily clusters at ridge transform offsets. Events are observed off the ridge axis near Boomerang and St. Pierre Seamounts, the active expression of the Amsterdam-St. Paul Hotspot. Seismic gaps are observed at several ridge segments with anomalous bathymetric highs.

  2. Topography adjacent to Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Topography adjacent to Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5, showing conditions before construction, May 28, 1943, this drawing shows the Bonita Ridge access road retaining wall and general conditions at Bonita Ridge before the construction of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  3. RAMESSES II - Mapping an Axial Melt System Beneath a Slow-Spreading Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, C. J.; Peirce, C.; Sinha, M.

    2002-12-01

    RAMESSES II is the second phase of a multi-component geophysical investigation into an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) segment at 57° 45' N 32° 35' W close to the southern tip of the slow-spreading Reykjanes Ridge. Results from the original RAMESSES experiment showed the first unequivocal evidence for the presence of a crustal melt body beneath any slow-spreading ridge using a combination of wide-angle and 4-fold multi-channel seismics (Navin et al., Geophys. J. Int. (1998) 135, 746-772) plus electromagenetic data. RAMESSES II aimed to map and further constrain the properties of the magmatic system and crustal structure along-axis between adjacent AVRs which, in turn, will result in a better understanding of the accretionary process and melt supply mechanism from the mantle source. The RAMESSES II 2-D seismic reflection data set comprises 32 across-AVR profiles spaced by 1.5 km and 5 AVR-parallel profiles at 5.0 km intervals. All profiles were acquired with a 96-channel streamer and an 84.6 l (5172 in3) 12-airgun source array, with a shot instant of 15 s (37.5 m). Here we present an approach to, and results of, data processing, where the data is significantly contaminated by reflections and seismic energy scattered by the rough seafloor typical of slow-spreading ridges. We also present a simple approach to identifying scattered energy within stacked sections enabling real sub-surface reflection events to be distinguished.

  4. Segmental neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Galhotra, Virat; Sheikh, Soheyl; Jindal, Sanjeev; Singla, Anshu

    2014-07-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis is a rare disorder, characterized by neurofibromas or cafι-au-lait macules limited to one region of the body. Its occurrence on the face is extremely rare and only few cases of segmental neurofibromatosis over the face have been described so far. We present a case of segmental neurofibromatosis involving the buccal mucosa, tongue, cheek, ear, and neck on the right side of the face. PMID:25565748

  5. First evidence for high-temperature off-axis venting of deep crustal/mantle heat: The Nibelungen hydrothermal field, southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchert, B.; Devey, C. W.; German, C. R.; Lackschewitz, K. S.; Seifert, R.; Walter, M.; Mertens, C.; Yoerger, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Paulick, H.; Nakamura, K.

    2008-10-01

    During segment-scale studies of the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), 7-12° S, we found evidence in the water column for high-temperature hydrothermal activity, off-axis, east of Ascension Island. Extensive water column and seafloor work using both standard CTD and deep submergence AUV and ROV deployments led to the discovery and sampling of the "Drachenschlund" ("Dragon Throat") black smoker vent at 8°17.87' S/13°30.45' W in 2915 m water depth. The vent is flanked by several inactive chimney structures in a field we have named "Nibelungen". The site is located 6 km south of a non-transform offset between two adjacent 2nd-order ridge-segments and 9 km east of the presently-active, northward-propagating A2 ridge-segment, on a prominent outward-facing fault scarp. Both vent-fluid compositions and host-rock analyses show this site to be an ultramafic-hosted system, the first of its kind to be found on the southern MAR. The thermal output of this single vent, based on plume rise-height information, is estimated to be 60 ± 15 MW. This value is high for a single "black smoker" vent but small for an entire field. The tectonic setting and low He content of the vent fluids imply that high-temperature off-axis venting at "Drachenschlund" is driven not by magmatic processes, as at the majority of on-axis hydrothermal systems, but by residual heat "mined" from the deeper lithosphere. Whether this heat is being extracted from high-temperature mantle peridotites or deep crustal cumulates formed at the "duelling" non-transfrom offset is unclear, in either case the Drachenschlund vent provides the first direct observations of how cooling of deeper parts of the lithosphere, at least at slow-spreading ridges, may be occurring.

  6. Strain gauge ambiguity sensor for segmented mirror active optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyman, C. L.; Howe, T. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A system is described to measure alignment between interfacing edges of mirror segments positioned to form a segmented mirror surface. It serves as a gauge having a bending beam with four piezoresistive elements coupled across the interfaces of the edges of adjacent mirror segments. The bending beam has a first position corresponding to alignment of the edges of adjacent mirror segments, and it is bendable from the first position in a direction and to a degree dependent upon the relative misalignment between the edges of adjacent mirror segments to correspondingly vary the resistance of the strain guage. A source of power and an amplifier are connected in circuit with the strain gauge whereby the output of the amplifier varies according to the misalignment of the edges of adjacent mirror segments.

  7. Segmental neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Toy, Brian

    2003-10-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis is a rare variant of neurofibromatosis in which skin lesions are confined to a circumscribed body segment. A case of a 72-year-old woman with this condition is presented. Clinical features and genetic evidence are reviewed. PMID:14594599

  8. Active Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ajay; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2009-01-01

    The human visual system observes and understands a scene/image by making a series of fixations. Every fixation point lies inside a particular region of arbitrary shape and size in the scene which can either be an object or just a part of it. We define as a basic segmentation problem the task of segmenting that region containing the fixation point. Segmenting the region containing the fixation is equivalent to finding the enclosing contour- a connected set of boundary edge fragments in the edge map of the scene - around the fixation. This enclosing contour should be a depth boundary. We present here a novel algorithm that finds this bounding contour and achieves the segmentation of one object, given the fixation. The proposed segmentation framework combines monocular cues (color/intensity/texture) with stereo and/or motion, in a cue independent manner. The semantic robots of the immediate future will be able to use this algorithm to automatically find objects in any environment. The capability of automatically segmenting objects in their visual field can bring the visual processing to the next level. Our approach is different from current approaches. While existing work attempts to segment the whole scene at once into many areas, we segment only one image region, specifically the one containing the fixation point. Experiments with real imagery collected by our active robot and from the known databases 1 demonstrate the promise of the approach. PMID:20686671

  9. Improvement in Recursive Hierarchical Segmentation of Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.

    2006-01-01

    A further modification has been made in the algorithm and implementing software reported in Modified Recursive Hierarchical Segmentation of Data (GSC- 14681-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 6 (June 2006), page 51. That software performs recursive hierarchical segmentation of data having spatial characteristics (e.g., spectral-image data). The output of a prior version of the software contained artifacts, including spurious segmentation-image regions bounded by processing-window edges. The modification for suppressing the artifacts, mentioned in the cited article, was addition of a subroutine that analyzes data in the vicinities of seams to find pairs of regions that tend to lie adjacent to each other on opposite sides of the seams. Within each such pair, pixels in one region that are more similar to pixels in the other region are reassigned to the other region. The present modification provides for a parameter ranging from 0 to 1 for controlling the relative priority of merges between spatially adjacent and spatially non-adjacent regions. At 1, spatially-adjacent-/spatially- non-adjacent-region merges have equal priority. At 0, only spatially-adjacent-region merges (no spectral clustering) are allowed. Between 0 and 1, spatially-adjacent- region merges have priority over spatially- non-adjacent ones.

  10. Tier-Adjacency Is Not a Necessary Condition for Learning Phonotactic Dependencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koo, Hahn; Callahan, Lydia

    2012-01-01

    One hypothesis raised by Newport and Aslin to explain how speakers learn dependencies between nonadjacent phonemes is that speakers track bigram probabilities between two segments that are adjacent to each other within a tier of their own. The hypothesis predicts that a dependency between segments separated from each other at the tier level cannot…

  11. The mean composition of ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Allison; Dalton, Colleen A.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Su, Yongjun; Schilling, Jean-Guy

    2013-03-01

    mean composition of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) is determined using a global data set of major elements, trace elements, and isotopes compiled from new and previously published data. A global catalog of 771 ridge segments, including their mean depth, length, and spreading rate enables calculation of average compositions for each segment. Segment averages allow weighting by segment length and spreading rate and reduce the bias introduced by uneven sampling. A bootstrapping statistical technique provides rigorous error estimates. Based on the characteristics of the data, we suggest a revised nomenclature for MORB. "ALL MORB" is the total composition of the crust apart from back-arc basins, N-MORB the most likely basalt composition encountered along the ridge >500 km from hot spots, and D-MORB the depleted end-member. ALL MORB and N-MORB are substantially more enriched than early estimates of normal ridge basalts. The mean composition of back-arc spreading centers requires higher extents of melting and greater concentrations of fluid-mobile elements, reflecting the influence of water on back-arc petrogenesis. The average data permit a re-evaluation of several problems of global geochemistry. The K/U ratio reported here (12,340 ± 840) is in accord with previous estimates, much lower than the estimate of Arevalo et al. (2009). The low Sm/Nd and 143Nd/144Nd ratio of ALL MORB and N-MORB provide constraints on the hypothesis that Earth has a non-chondritic primitive mantle. Either Earth is chondritic in Sm/Nd and the hypothesis is incorrect or MORB preferentially sample an enriched reservoir, requiring a large depleted reservoir in the deep mantle.

  12. Caught in the Act: Crustal Manifestations of a Hot Transient Pulse Beneath the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 60°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell-Turner, Ross; White, Nicky; Henstock, Tim; Murton, Bramley; Jones, Stephen; Maclennan, John

    2013-04-01

    Since its inception, mantle convective upwelling beneath Iceland has had a significant influence on the history of vertical motion, magmatism and paleoceanography in the North Atlantic Ocean. Crucially, intersection of the Reykjanes Ridge with the Icelandic plume provides us with an important window into the transient activity of the plume. The spreading ridge acts as a linear sampler of plume activity, which is recorded as a series of time-transgressive V-shaped ridges and troughs. Here, we present the results of a detailed study along the spreading ridge close to 60°N, where the youngest V-shaped ridge of thickened oceanic crust, is forming today. A combination of multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection profiles, acquired along and across the ridge axis, is used to map the detailed pattern of volcanism and normal faulting. Along the ridge axis, the density of volcanic seamounts varies markedly, increasing by a factor of two between 59° and 62°N. Within this area, seismic imaging shows that there is enhanced acoustic scattering at the seabed. These observations are accompanied by a decrease in mean fault length from ~12 km to ~6 km. A 1960-2009 catalog of relocated teleseismic earthquake hypocenters shows that there is a pronounced gap in seismicity between 59° and 62°N where the cumulative moment release is two orders of magnitude smaller than that along adjacent ridge segments. A steady-state thermal model is used to show that a combination of increased melt generation and decreased hydrothermal circulation accounts for this suite of observations. Our results suggest that the thickness of the brittle seismogenic layer is smaller where the youngest V-shaped ridge intersects the ridge axis. This decrease is consistent with geochemical modeling of dredged basaltic samples, which require horizontal flow of hotter asthenospheric material within a channel beneath the spreading axis. Thus, along-axis variation in melt supply arising from the passage of a pulse

  13. Apparatus For Laminating Segmented Core For Electric Machine

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, Robert Anthony; Stabel, Gerald R

    2003-06-17

    A segmented core for an electric machine includes segments stamped from coated electric steel. The segments each have a first end, a second end, and winding openings. A predetermined number of segments are placed end-to-end to form layers. The layers are stacked such that each of the layers is staggered from adjacent layers by a predetermined rotation angle. The winding openings of each of the layers are in vertical alignment with the winding openings of the adjacent layers. The stack of layers is secured to form the segmented core.

  14. Hydrothermal activity on the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Tectonically- and volcanically-controlled venting at 4 5°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Bennett, S. A.; Connelly, D. P.; Evans, A. J.; Murton, B. J.; Parson, L. M.; Prien, R. D.; Ramirez-Llodra, E.; Jakuba, M.; Shank, T. M.; Yoerger, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Nakamura, K.

    2008-09-01

    We report results from an investigation of the geologic processes controlling hydrothermal activity along the previously-unstudied southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (3-7°S). Our study employed the NOC (UK) deep-tow sidescan sonar instrument, TOBI, in concert with the WHOI (USA) autonomous underwater vehicle, ABE, to collect information concerning hydrothermal plume distributions in the water column co-registered with geologic investigations of the underlying seafloor. Two areas of high-temperature hydrothermal venting were identified. The first was situated in a non-transform discontinuity (NTD) between two adjacent second-order ridge-segments near 4°02'S, distant from any neovolcanic activity. This geologic setting is very similar to that of the ultramafic-hosted and tectonically-controlled Rainbow vent-site on the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The second site was located at 4°48'S at the axial-summit centre of a second-order ridge-segment. There, high-temperature venting is hosted in an ˜ 18 km 2 area of young lava flows which in some cases are observed to have flowed over and engulfed pre-existing chemosynthetic vent-fauna. In both appearance and extent, these lava flows are directly reminiscent of those emplaced in Winter 2005-06 at the East Pacific Rise, 9°50'N and reference to global seismic catalogues reveals that a swarm of large (M 4.6-5.6) seismic events was centred on the 5°S segment over a ˜ 24 h period in late June 2002, perhaps indicating the precise timing of this volcanic eruptive episode. Temperature measurements at one of the vents found directly adjacent to the fresh lava flows at 5°S MAR (Turtle Pits) have subsequently revealed vent-fluids that are actively phase separating under conditions very close to the Critical Point for seawater, at ˜ 3000 m depth and 407 °C: the hottest vent-fluids yet reported from anywhere along the global ridge crest.

  15. Storm-built sand ridges on the Maryland inner shelf: a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swift, D.J.P.; Field, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    Several aspects of the Maryland ridge field are pertinent to the problem of ridge genesis in response to Holocene sea-level rise. There is a systematic morphologic change from shoreface ridges through nearshore ridges to offshore ridges, which reflects the changing hydraulic regime. Grain size is 90?? out of phase with topography, so that the coarsest sand lies between the axis of each trough and the adjacent seaward ridge crest, while the finest sand lies between each ridge crest and the axis of the adjacent seaward trough. Finally, analysis over a 43-year period on an outer ridge reveals a systematic pattern of landward flank erosion, seaward flank deposition, and seaward crest migration. These relationships support a model which explains the ridges as consequences of the up-current shift of maximum bottom shear stress with respect to the crests of initial bottom irregularities. The oblique orientation of the ridges with respect to the beach may be at least partly due to the more rapid migration rate of the ridges' inshore ends. ?? 1981 A.M. Dowden, Inc.

  16. Ridges and scarps in the equatorial belt of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Klockenbrink, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The morphology and distribution of ridges and scarps on Mars in the ?? 30?? latitude belt were investigated. Two distinct types of ridges were recognized. The first is long and linear, resembling mare ridges on the Moon; it occurs mostly in plains areas. The other is composed of short, anastomosing segments and occurs mostly in ancient cratered terrain and intervening plateaus. Where ridges are eroded, landscape configurations suggest that they are located along regional structures. The age of ridges is uncertain, but some are as young as the latest documented volcanic activity on Mars. The origins of ridges are probably diverse-they may result from wrinkling due to compression or from buckling due to settling over subsurface structures. The similar morphologic expressions of ridge types of various origins may be related to a similar deformation mechanism caused by two main factors: (1) most ridges are developed in thick layers of competent material and (2) ridges formed under stresses near a free surface. ?? 1981 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  17. Melt Flux Around Iceland: The Kolbeinsey Ridge Seismic Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsdóttir, B.; Hooft, E. E.

    2007-12-01

    Seafloor spreading within the Iceland region has been complex since the opening of the North Atlantic in late Paleocene-early Eocene. Whereas symmetric magnetic anomalies can be traced parallel to the Reykjanes Ridge and Mohns Ridge back to chrons 23-24, anomalies within the Iceland Plateau and Aegir Ridge in the Norwegian Sea, as well as along the Greenland-Iceland-Faeroe Ridge reflect plate-boundary irregularities associated with multiple-branched crustal accretion zones, rift jumps and plate boundary segmentation (volcanic systems). We observe large variations in crustal structure along two refraction/reflection/gravity profiles, a 700 km EW-profile straddling 66.5°N between the Aegir and Kolbeinsey Ridges and a 225 km NS-profile along the southern Kolbeinsey Ridge. These profiles enable us to quantify how melt flux at the N-Atlantic spreading center has been influenced by the Iceland hotspot from the initiation of spreading to present time. The westernmost 300 km of the EW profile lies across the Iceland shelf, considered to have formed by rifting at the Kolbeinsey Ridge whereas the easternmost 400 km lie across the Iceland Plateau and Norway Basin, a region formed by rifting at the Aegir Ridge and possibly containing slivers of older crust rifted off the east Greenland margin along with the Jan Mayen Ridge. Crustal thickness varies from 4-5 km across the Aegir Ridge, 12 km just east of the Iceland shelf, and 24-28 km beneath the outer shelf, to 12-13 km near the southern tip of the Kolbeinsey Ridge and 9-10 km further north along the ridge axis. Pronounced undulations in lower crustal structure across the Iceland Plateau are most likely associated with extinct spreading centers indicating that branched crustal accretion zones existed west of the Aegir Ridge prior to the westward ridge jump forming the KR at 26 Ma. Crustal thickness at the Kolbeinsey and Reykjanes Ridges support the asymmetry in plume-ridge interaction north and south of Iceland that has been

  18. Twist to matricing: Restoration of adjacent proximal defects in a novel manner

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Naveen; Gyanani, Hitesh; Rathore, Vishnu Pratap Singh; Shah, Purnil

    2016-01-01

    The quality treatment in an efficient way is the road map to successful clinical practice. Various methods are employed to achieve goals. Refurbishment of the adequate marginal ridge, proximal contact, and contour are the prime challenges in restoring two adjacent proximal defects. This paper presents an overview of achieving satisfactory proximal restorations in a time saving innovative manner. PMID:26958530

  19. Segmentation and the coseismic behavior of Basin and Range normal faults: examples from east-central Idaho and southwestern Montana, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.; Haller, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    The range-front normal faults of the Lost River and Lemhi Ranges, and the Beaverhead and Tendoy Mountains in east-central Idaho and southwestern Montana have well-preserved fault scarps on Quaternary deposits along much of their lengths. Fault-scarp morphology, the age of deposits displaced by the faults, and the morphology of the range fronts provide a basis for dividing the faults into segments that are typically 20-25 km long. The Lost River, Lemhi and Beaverhead fault zones are 141-151 km long, and each has six segments. The 60-km-long Red Rock fault (the range-front fault of the Tendoy Mountains) has two central segments that have been active in late Quaternary time; these two segments span the central 27 km of the fault. We recognize four characteristics that help to identify segment boundaries: (1) major en e??chelon offsets or pronounced gaps in the continuity of fault scarps; (2) distinct, persistent, along-strike changes in fault-scarp morphology that indicate different ages of faulting; (3) major salients in the range front; and (4) transverse bedrock ridges where the cumulative throw is low compared to other places along the fault zone. Only features whose size is measured on the scale of kilometers are regarded as significant enough to represent a segment boundary that could inhibit or halt a propagating rupture. The ability to identify segments of faults that are likely to behave as independent structural entities will improve seismic-hazard assessment. However, one should not assume that the barriers at segment boundaries will completely stop all propagating ruptures. The topographic expression of mountain ranges is evidence that, at times during their history, all barriers fail. Some barriers apparently create 'leaky' segment boundaries that impede propagating ruptures but do not completely prevent faulting on adjacent segments. ?? 1991.

  20. Scene segmentation through region growing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latty, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    A computer algorithm to segment Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images into areas representing surface features is described. The algorithm is based on a region growing approach and uses edge elements and edge element orientation to define the limits of the surface features. Adjacent regions which are not separated by edges are linked to form larger regions. Some of the advantages of scene segmentation over conventional TM image extraction algorithms are discussed, including surface feature analysis on a pixel-by-pixel basis, and faster identification of the pixels in each region. A detailed flow diagram of region growing algorithm is provided.

  1. Segmented amplifier configurations for laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hagen, Wilhelm F.

    1979-01-01

    An amplifier system for high power lasers, the system comprising a compact array of segments which (1) preserves high, large signal gain with improved pumping efficiency and (2) allows the total amplifier length to be shortened by as much as one order of magnitude. The system uses a three dimensional array of segments, with the plane of each segment being oriented at substantially the amplifier medium Brewster angle relative to the incident laser beam and with one or more linear arrays of flashlamps positioned between adjacent rows of amplifier segments, with the plane of the linear array of flashlamps being substantially parallel to the beam propagation direction.

  2. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  3. Beach ridges as paleoseismic indicators of abrupt coastal subsidence during subduction zone earthquakes, and implications for Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone paleoseismology, southeast coast of the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Witter, Robert C.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Briggs, Richard; Nelson, Alan R.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Corbett, D. Reide

    2015-01-01

    The Kenai section of the eastern Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone straddles two areas of high slip in the 1964 great Alaska earthquake and is the least studied of the three megathrust segments (Kodiak, Kenai, Prince William Sound) that ruptured in 1964. Investigation of two coastal sites in the eastern part of the Kenai segment, on the southeast coast of the Kenai Peninsula, identified evidence for two subduction zone earthquakes that predate the 1964 earthquake. Both coastal sites provide paleoseismic data through inferred coseismic subsidence of wetlands and associated subsidence-induced erosion of beach ridges. At Verdant Cove, paleo-beach ridges record the paleoseismic history; whereas at Quicksand Cove, buried soils in drowned coastal wetlands are the primary indicators of paleoearthquake occurrence and age. The timing of submergence and death of trees mark the oldest earthquake at Verdant Cove that is consistent with the age of a well documented ∼900-year-ago subduction zone earthquake that ruptured the Prince William Sound segment of the megathrust to the east and the Kodiak segment to the west. Soils buried within the last 400–450 years mark the penultimate earthquake on the southeast coast of the Kenai Peninsula. The penultimate earthquake probably occurred before AD 1840 from its absence in Russian historical accounts. The penultimate subduction zone earthquake on the Kenai segment did not rupture in conjunction with the Prince William Sound to the northeast. Therefore the Kenai segment, which is presently creeping, can rupture independently of the adjacent Prince William Sound segment that is presently locked.

  4. Segmented Coil Fails In Steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stedman, Ronald S.

    1990-01-01

    Electromagnetic coil degrades in steps when faults occur, continues to operate at reduced level instead of failing catastrophically. Made in segments connected in series and separated by electrically insulating barriers. Fault does not damage adjacent components or create hazard. Used to control valves in such critical applications as cooling systems of power generators and chemical process equipment, where flammable liquids or gases handled. Also adapts to electrical control of motors.

  5. Structural Responses to the Chile Ridge Subduction, Southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E. E.; Russo, R. M.; Mocanu, V. I.; Gallego, A.; Murdie, R.; Comte, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Nazca-Antarctic plate boundary, the Chile spreading ridge, subducts beneath South America, forming the northward-migrating Chile Triple Junction (CTJ), now at ~46.5°S, where an actively spreading segment is currently in the Nazca trench. Ridge subduction is associated with diachronously developed variable structure and magmatism of overriding South America. To assess the effects of ridge subduction, we deployed a network of 39 broadband seismometers in southern Chile between 43 - 49°S and 71 - 76°W from Dec. 2004 - Feb. 2007, recording 102 earthquakes suitable for receiver function analyses, i.e., M > 5.9, of various backazimuths, and at epicentral distances of 30 - 90°. The network encompassed onland portions of the current triple junction and ridge subduction, areas to the south of the CTJ where ridge segments subducted during the last 6 m.y., and regions north of the CTJ not yet affected by ridge subduction, allowing the assessment of the effects of ridge subduction on crustal structure of overriding South America. We constructed 551 teleseismic receiver functions to estimate crustal thicknesses, H, and average compressional to shear wave velocity ratios, Vp/Vs = k, using the iterative time deconvolution method of Ligorria and Ammon (1999). H and k were calculated using the grid search method of Zhu and Kanamori (2000). Beneath stations closest to the trench, where the Nazca plate subducts, we found Moho depths between 28 and 55 km, thickening northward. At the locus of current ridge subduction, in the Taitao Pennisula, thinner crust ranges from 27 - 36 km. H is 36-38 km where the Antarctic plate subducts and the Chile ridge recently subducted. The direct effect of the subducting ridge on South America can be seen in H differences between forearc regions that have sustained ridge subduction versus those that have not. South American forearc crust above the subducted Nazca plate is as much as 28 km thicker than forearc crust recently affected by ridge

  6. Segmented combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halila, Ely E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A combustor liner segment includes a panel having four sidewalls forming a rectangular outer perimeter. A plurality of integral supporting lugs are disposed substantially perpendicularly to the panel and extend from respective ones of the four sidewalls. A plurality of integral bosses are disposed substantially perpendicularly to the panel and extend from respective ones of the four sidewalls, with the bosses being shorter than the lugs. In one embodiment, the lugs extend through supporting holes in an annular frame for mounting the liner segments thereto, with the bosses abutting the frame for maintaining a predetermined spacing therefrom.

  7. Improved Digitization of Lunar Mare Ridges with LROC Derived Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, J. M.; Robinson, M. S.; Watters, T. R.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Enns, A. C.; Lawrence, S.

    2011-12-01

    Lunar wrinkle ridges (mare ridges) are positive-relief structures formed from compressional stress in basin-filling flood basalt deposits [1]. Previous workers have measured wrinkle ridge orientations and lengths to investigate their spatial distribution and infer basin-localized stress fields [2,3]. Although these plots include the most prominent mare ridges and their general trends, they may not have fully captured all of the ridges, particularly the smaller-scale ridges. Using Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Wide Angle Camera (WAC) global mosaics and derived topography (100m pixel scale) [4], we systematically remapped wrinkle ridges in Mare Serenitatis. By comparing two WAC mosaics with different lighting geometry, and shaded relief maps made from a WAC digital elevation model (DEM) [5], we observed that some ridge segments and some smaller ridges are not visible in previous structure maps [2,3]. In the past, mapping efforts were limited by a fixed Sun direction [6,7]. For systematic mapping we created three shaded relief maps from the WAC DEM with solar azimuth angles of 0°, 45°, and 90°, and a fourth map was created by combining the three shaded reliefs into one, using a simple averaging scheme. Along with the original WAC mosaic and the WAC DEM, these four datasets were imported into ArcGIS, and the mare ridges of Imbrium, Serenitatis, and Tranquillitatis were digitized from each of the six maps. Since the mare ridges are often divided into many ridge segments [8], each major component was digitized separately, as opposed to the ridge as a whole. This strategy enhanced our ability to analyze the lengths, orientations, and abundances of these ridges. After the initial mapping was completed, the six products were viewed together to identify and resolve discrepancies in order to produce a final wrinkle ridge map. Comparing this new mare ridge map with past lunar tectonic maps, we found that many mare ridges were not recorded in the previous works. It was noted

  8. Linear ridge groups: Evidence for tensional cracking in the Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Mary Ann

    1999-12-01

    A new class of oceanic bathymetric feature, discovered in 1987, consists of en-echelon groups of linear ridges. There are now at least three such sets of ridges known, and their remarkable similarity supports the notion that they result from a widespread tectonic process taking place in the interior of plates. In two of these major linear ridge groups, the Crossgrain and Puka Puka ridges, numerous morphologic features indicate that they originated as tension cracks. The form of the individual volcanic structures that make up the ridges correlates with the degree of tension that formed them, and the similar orientation of all ridges in a group indicates that the stress that formed them is relatively widespread geographically and temporally. The ridges show a characteristic sequence of development, beginning with a swath of small volcanoes followed by larger domical volcanoes where the ridge will eventually develop. This paper examines proposed mechanisms of formation and concludes that no single source of tension in the lithosphere could plausibly have caused both the Crossgrain and Puka Puka ridges. The similarity of the orientations of all the groups of en-echelon linear ridges on the Pacific plate suggests that the individual ridges form normal to a least compressive stress direction that is geographically variable in the crust. Parallel ridges constrained to a narrow band then result in an en-echelon arrangement, though some closely spaced, synchronously formed sets of two or three ridge segments may have influenced each other's form.

  9. Molecular disorganization of axons adjacent to human lacunar infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Monica D.; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V.; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral microvascular disease predominantly affects brain white matter and deep grey matter, resulting in ischaemic damage that ranges from lacunar infarcts to white matter hyperintensities seen on magnetic resonance imaging. These lesions are common and result in both clinical stroke syndromes and accumulate over time, resulting in cognitive deficits and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that these lesions progress over time, accumulate adjacent to prior lesions and have a penumbral region susceptible to further injury. The pathological correlates of this adjacent injury in surviving myelinated axons have not been previously defined. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular organization of axons in tissue adjacent to lacunar infarcts and in the regions surrounding microinfarcts, by determining critical elements in axonal function: the morphology and length of node of Ranvier segments and adjacent paranodal segments. We examined post-mortem brain tissue from six patients with lacunar infarcts and tissue from two patients with autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy (previously known as hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke) who accumulate progressive white matter ischaemic lesions in the form of lacunar and microinfarcts. In axons adjacent to lacunar infarcts yet extending up to 150% of the infarct diameter away, both nodal and paranodal length increase by ∼20% and 80%, respectively, reflecting a loss of normal cell-cell adhesion and signalling between axons and oligodendrocytes. Using premorbid magnetic resonance images, brain regions from patients with retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy that harboured periventricular white matter hyperintensities were selected and the molecular organization of axons was determined within these regions. As in regions adjacent to lacunar infarcts, nodal and paranodal length in white matter of these patients is

  10. Kinematics of Mid-Ocean Ridge Relative Motions in the Indo-Atlantic Frame of Reference: Passive and Active Spreading Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, C. J.; Rowley, D. B.; Forte, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    ridge parallel (N-S) motion in the past 30 Ma. Between 80 and 30 Ma, the midpoint of the Nazca-Pacific segment of the EPR moved ~2500 km parallel with the trend of the ridge. The absence of significant longitudinal motion of the EPR extends northward to the now subducted portion beneath eastern North America. We interpret this as an actively spreading ridge segment linked directly to and driven by active mantle upwelling associated with the mantle convective system.

  11. The Galapagos Spreading Center. Galapagos Rifts Expedition--Grades 9-12. Mid-Ocean Ridges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This activity introduces students to the basic concept of seafloor spreading, the processes involved in creating new seafloor at a mid- ocean ridge, the Galapagos Spreading Center system, and the different types of plate motion associated with ridge segments and transform faults. The activity provides learning objectives, a list of needed…

  12. Ridge Regression Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The introduction of the Global Positioning System (GPS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) necessitates the development of Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) techniques. In order to guarantee a certain level of integrity, a thorough understanding of modern estimation techniques applied to navigational problems is required. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) is derived and analyzed under poor geometry conditions. It was found that the performance of the EKF is difficult to predict, since the EKF is designed for a Gaussian environment. A novel approach is implemented which incorporates ridge regression to explain the behavior of an EKF in the presence of dynamics under poor geometry conditions. The basic principles of ridge regression theory are presented, followed by the derivation of a linearized recursive ridge estimator. Computer simulations are performed to confirm the underlying theory and to provide a comparative analysis of the EKF and the recursive ridge estimator.

  13. Central Indian Ridge and Reunion Hotspot in Rodrigues Area : Another Type of Ridge - Hotspot Interaction ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DYMENT, J.; HEMOND, C.; GUILLOU, H.; MAIA, M.; BRIAIS, A.; GENTE, P.

    2001-12-01

    The Rodrigues Ridge is an E-W volcanic structure which extends at 19° S from the Mascarene Plateau (59° 30'E) to 100 km East of Rodrigues Island (64° 30'E). It is neither parallel to seafloor spreading flow-lines nor to the "absolute" motion of Africa in the hotspot reference frame. 39Ar-40Ar dating of dredged samples has shown that the whole ridge formed at 8-10 Ma, suggesting a rather rapid emplacement between the former position of the Reunion hotspot and the nearest segment of the CIR at 10-8 Ma. This rules out the hypothesis that the Rodrigues Ridge was progressively built near the CIR axis, at the end of a "channeled" asthenospheric flow originating from Reunion hotspot. Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes show gradual fading of the Reunion hotspot influence with increasing distance from the Mascarene Plateau. Signs for a more recent activity are the Rodrigues Island, dated about 1 Ma, and a set of recently discovered en-echelon volcanic ridges, the Three Magi and Gasitao Ridges. They extend the Rodrigues Ridge up to the CIR axis. These ridges display a clear sigmoid shape and align along an E-W direction at 19° 40'S. Another parallel, less prominent volcanic alignment is observed about 30 km north, at 19° 25'S. K-Ar dating (Cassignol method) provides ages of 0.4 and 1.8 Ma for the easternmost Gasitao Ridge. This second age is slightly younger than that of the underlying crust given by the magnetic anomalies. Isotopic compositions are intermediate between those measured on Rodrigues Ridge and the CIR axis. The lack of conjugate bathymetric feature and the age measured on the Gasitao Ridge demonstrate that it was built off axis, in the close vicinity of the CIR. The sigmoid morphology and en-echelon alignment of Three Magi and Gasitao Ridges suggest that they correspond to tension cracks filled by magmas resulting from decompression melting of underlying mantle. Repetition of such magmatic events results in increasing volume as ridges get older, in agreement with the

  14. Scaling Relations for the Thermal Structure of Segmented Oceanic Transform Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson-Schwehr, M.; Boettcher, M. S.; Behn, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridge-transform faults (RTFs) are a natural laboratory for studying strike-slip earthquake behavior due to their relatively simple geometry, well-constrained slip rates, and quasi-periodic seismic cycles. However, deficiencies in our understanding of the limited size of the largest RTF earthquakes are due, in part, to not considering the effect of short intra-transform spreading centers (ITSCs) on fault thermal structure. We use COMSOL Multiphysics to run a series of 3D finite element simulations of segmented RTFs with visco-plastic rheology. The models test a range of RTF segment lengths (L = 10-150 km), ITSC offset lengths (O = 1-30 km), and spreading rates (V = 2-14 cm/yr). The lithosphere and upper mantle are approximated as steady-state, incompressible flow. Coulomb failure incorporates brittle processes in the lithosphere, and a temperature-dependent flow law for dislocation creep of olivine activates ductile deformation in the mantle. ITSC offsets as small as 2 km affect the thermal structure underlying many segmented RTFs, reducing the area above the 600˚C isotherm, A600, and thus the size of the largest expected earthquakes, Mc. We develop a scaling relation for the critical ITSC offset length, OC, which significantly reduces the thermal affect of adjacent fault segments of length L1 and L2. OC is defined as the ITSC offset that results in an area loss ratio of R = (Aunbroken - Acombined)/Aunbroken - Adecoupled) = 63%, where Aunbroken = C600(L1+L2)1.5V-0.6 is A600 for an RTF of length L1 + L2; Adecoupled = C600(L11.5+L21.5)V-0.6 is the combined A600 of RTFs of lengths L1 and L2, respectively; and Acombined = Aunbroken exp(-O/ OC) + Adecoupled (1-exp(-O/ OC)). C600 is a constant. We use OC and kinematic fault parameters (L1, L2, O, and V) to develop a scaling relation for the approximate seismogenic area, Aseg, for each segment of a RTF system composed of two fault segments. Finally, we estimate the size of Mc on a fault segment based on Aseg. We

  15. Divergent Ridge Features on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, M. E.; Sautter, L.; Steele, M.

    2014-12-01

    Multibeam data collected using a Kongsberg EM122 sonar system on the NOAA ship R/V Marcus G. Langseth led by chief scientist Douglas Toomey (University of Oregon) in 2009 and with a Simrad EM302 sonar system on two NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer cruises led by chief scientists James Gardner (University of New Hampshire) and Catalina Martinez (University of Rhode Island) in 2009 show the morphology of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges, as well as the Blanco and Mendocino Fracture Zones. These ridges and fracture zones comprise the divergent plate boundary of the eastern edge of the Pacific Plate and the western edges of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Plates. Both plates are being subducted beneath the western edge of the North American Plate. CARIS HIPS 8.1 software was used to process the multibeam data and create bathymetric images. The ridge axes, located off the coast of Washington and Oregon (USA) adjacent to the Cascadia Basin, indicate obvious signs of spreading, due to the series of faults and rocky ridges aligned parallel to the plate boundaries. Fault and ridge orientations are used to compare the direction of seafloor spreading, and indicate that both the Juan de Fuca Plate and Gorda Plate are spreading in a southeastern direction. Younger ridges from the Gorda Ridge system mapped in the study run parallel to the boundary, however older ridges do not show the same orientation, indicating a change in spreading direction. The presence of hydrothermal vents along the Juan de Fuca Ridge is also evidence of the active boundary, as the vent chimneys are composed of minerals and metals precipitated from the hot water heated by magma from beneath the spreading seafloor. In this study, the data are used to compare and contrast earthquake seismicity and ridge morphologies at a depth range of approximately 762 to 2134 meters. The diverging Pacific, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda Plates along with the San Andreas Fault have potential to increase seismic and volcanic activity around

  16. Morphology and genesis of slow-spreading ridges-seabed scattering and seismic imaging within the oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirce, Christine; Sinha, Martin; Topping, Simon; Gill, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    A grid of 32 across-axis and five axis-parallel multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection profiles were acquired at an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) segment at 57° 45'N, 32° 35'W on the slow-spreading Reykjanes Ridge, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, to determine the along-axis variation and geometry of the axial magmatic system and to investigate the relationship between magma chamber structure, the along-axis continuity and segmentation of melt supply to the crust, the development of faulting and the thickness of oceanic layer 2A. Seismic reflection profiles acquired at mid-ocean ridges are prone to being swamped by high amplitude seabed scattered noise which can either mask or be mistaken for intracrustal reflection events. In this paper, we present the results of two approaches to this problem which simulate seabed scatter and which can either be used to remove or simply predict events within processed MCS profiles. The 37 MCS profiles show clear intracrustal seismic events which are related to the structure of oceanic layer 2, to the axial magmatic system and to the faults which dismember each AVR as it ages through its tectono-magmatic life cycle and which form the median valley walls. The layer 2A event can be mapped around the entirety of the survey area between 0.1 and 0.5 s two-way traveltime below the seabed, being thickest at AVR centres, and thinning both off-axis and along-axis towards AVR tips. Both AVR-parallel and ridge-parallel trends are observed, with the pattern of on-axis layer 2A thickness variation preserved beneath relict AVRs which are rafted off-axis largely intact. Each active AVR is underlain by a mid-crustal melt lens reflection extending almost along its entire length. Similar reflection events are observed beneath the offset basins between adjacent AVRs. These are interpreted as new AVRs at the start of their life cycle, developing centrally within the median valley. The east-west spacings of relict AVRs and offset basins is ~5-7 km, corresponding to

  17. Closure Report for Underground Storage Tank 2310-U at the Pine Ridge West Repeater Station

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This document represents the Closure Report for Underground Storage Tank (UST) 2310-U at the Pine Ridge West Repeater Station, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Tank 2310-U was a 200-gal gasoline UST which serviced the emergency generator at the Repeater Station. The tank was situated in a shallow tank bay adjacent to the Repeater Station along the crest of Pine Ridge. The tank failed a tightness test in October 1989 and was removed in November 1989. The purpose of this report is to document completion of soil corrective action, present supporting analytical data, and request closure for this site.

  18. Segmental overlap: foot drop in S1 radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Voermans, N C; Koetsveld, A C; Zwarts, M J

    2006-07-01

    Knowledge of segmental innervation of skeletal muscles is essential for diagnosing lumbar radiculopathy. Myotomes and dermatomes are traditionally thought to be innervated by a single spinal segment, but experimental studies have shown that this pattern of segmental innervation allows considerable overlap. This implies that muscles (or dermatomes) are innervated not only by axons of one spinal segment, but also partially by axons of adjacent spinal levels. We describe a patient in whom overlap in segmental innervation complicated adequate diagnosis of a recurrent lumbar hernia. Further, we present an outline of electrophysiological and anatomical studies on segmental innervation. PMID:16523224

  19. Magmatism at mid-ocean ridges: Constraints from volcanological and geochemical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfit, Michael R.; Chadwick, William W., Jr.

    earthquakes during shallow crustal intrusive/extrusive events. Narrow grabens have formed adjacent to some of the new lava flows, where dikes have intruded near the surface. Similar dike-induced graben faulting has also been documented on rift zones of subaerial volcanoes. Fine-scale mapping and sampling of a few neovolcanic zones and their adjacent crestal terrains, coupled with geochemical investigations and U-series radiometric dating, have provided critical information regarding the time and spatial scales of MOR magmatism. These more accurate and precise sampling and dating techniques have allowed us to better quantify rates and volumes of magmatic events and to evaluate if changes in mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) chemistry are temporally or spatially related (or both). 210Po- 210Pb systematics have been successfully used to date and confirm young eruptions (age < 2 yr). New techniques for dating young MORB by mass spectrometric measurement of 238U- 230Th, 230Th- 226Ra, and 235U- 231Pa disequilibria have been successful, but show that samples from neovolcanic zones yield ages (on the order of a few ka) that must be considered "crustal residence ages" rather than true ages of eruption. Along the 9°-10°N segment of the EPR, U-Ra dates show a regional trend consistent with axial variations in topography, axial magma chamber depth and extent of magmatic fractionation which allow constraints to be placed on crystallization rates and construction of the oceanic crust. The identification of anomalously young lavas up to 4 km off-axis on the northern EPR using U-series disequilibria data, also indicates a significant amount of magmatic activity occurs off-axis and that this volcanism can result in the observed thickening of seismic layer 2A (the layer of the oceanic crust that is assumed to be composed of extrusive lavas based on seismic wave velocities and seismic reflection profiles). The chemical diversity and non-systematic distribution of lava types and ages observed on a

  20. An ultrasonic linear motor using ridge-mode traveling waves.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Masahiko; Kaminaga, Ryuta; Friend, James R; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki

    2005-10-01

    A new type of ultrasonic linear motor is presented using traveling waves excited along a ridge atop a substrate. The ridge cross section was designed to permit only the fundamental mode to be excited during operation of the motor, with a Langevin transducer used as the source of vibration in this study. The ridge waveguide was first made of lossy media to avoid reflecting vibration energy back toward the vibration source, forming a traveling wave. A 5-mm-wide, 15-mm-tall rectangular acrylic ridge was used to move a slider placed upon it toward the vibration source, in opposition to the direction of the traveling wave transmitted along the waveguide ridge. Using a low-loss 3 x 6-mm aluminum rectangular ridge combined with a damper clamped onto the far end of the waveguide, similar results were obtained. To obtain bidirectional operation, the damper was replaced with a second Langevin transducer, giving a pair of transducers located perpendicularly to the ends of the ridge and driven with an appropriate phase difference. The moving direction of the slider was reversed by shifting this phase difference by about 180 degrees. With this simple configuration, it may soon be possible to fabricate a linear micromotor system on a silicon substrate or other semiconductor wafer adjacent to other electronic and optoelectronic devices. PMID:16382624

  1. Experimental study of structure-forming deformations in obliquely spreading ultra-slow ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, Evgeniy; Kokhan, Andrey; Grokholsky, Andrey

    2013-04-01

    -discontinued AVRs; on the other hand we received short and displaced AVRs. Higher obliquity of Reikjanes ridge results in formation of s-shaped strongly en-echeloned fractures. Mohns ridge is spreading with obliquity of 55°. Its rifting zone consists of a set of magmatic segments connected by accommodation zones lacking magmatic activity, they orient subparallel to spreading direction. Their length is 30-55 kilometers. The main peculiarity of experimental sets was a formation of pattern of stably developing slip and semi slip semi extensive segments connecting perpendicular to extension segments of the ridge. All of them had almost equal length. Knipovich Ridge obliquity varies from 33 to 63° on different parts of the ridge. It consists of short divergent magmatic segments and long transform-like amagmatic segments with unstable relation of slip and extension components. Length of amagmatic portions of the ridge varies from 40 to 150 kilometers. Experimental setting was the following. We emplaced three weak zones according to natural geometry of spreading modeling three neighboring ridges: Knipovich, Mohns, Gakkel. Short spreading segments orthogonal to direction of extension formed in area of Knipovich model zone. They were connected by subparallel to extension direction. Under increase of angle between extension direction and trend of "Knipovich" weak zone the length of slip segments gradually decreased and reached minimum under the angle of 50°. Thus, experiments let to distinguish key peculiarities of structure-forming in rifting zones of these ridges. For Kolbeynsey and Reikjanes ridge this is a system of fractures which are used as channels for eruption and subsequent formation of AVRs, their parameters depend on distance from Iceland plume and thickness of crustal brittle layer. For Knipovich ridge this is an unstable system of pull-apart basins connected by long largely slip segments. For Mohns ridge this is a system of extension basins connected by accommodation zones

  2. Investigation of turbulent flows and near-bottom hydrothermal plumes at mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Lin, J.; Jiang, H.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the characteristics of turbulent flows within near-bottom hydrothermal plumes at mid-ocean ridges through quantitative analysis of video images from manned submersibles using the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) method. High-quality video images of near-bottom hydrothermal vents were selected from the Data Library and Archives of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), consisting of multiple examples of vent fields in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Selected video segments of near-bottom hydrothermal plumes were decomposed into a series of still-image frames at a typical time interval of 1/30 second between consecutive frames. The PIV method was then used to track the motion of individual turbulent parcels, which were identified based on their relatively high concentration of optically visible particles than the surrounding water column. Finally, the velocity fields of the individual turbulent parcels, as well as the integrated fluxes of the composing hydrothermal plume, were calculated. Preliminary investigation of hydrothermal plumes at the TAG area of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge revealed significant spatial and temporal variations in the fluid dynamics of turbulent fluid parcels and near-bottom hydrothermal plumes: (1) Each rising hydrothermal plume is composed of a string of turbulent fluid parcels of variable sizes with a typical dimension of several cm. The calculated instantaneous velocities of individual turbulent parcels could reach tens of cm/s. (2) Turbulent fluid parcels within the hydrothermal plume were observed to grow rapidly through coalescing with adjacent parcels and interacting with ambient water column. (3) The cross-sectional dimensions of the near-bottom hydrothermal plumes were observed to increase several times within upwelling distance of tens of cm, indicating rapid entrainment of ambient fluids into the rising plumes. The overall vertical fluxes of the rising plumes are calculated to have changed

  3. Environmental baseline survey report for West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge and parcel 21D in the vicinity of the East Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    King, David A.

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE?s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only no-further-investigation (NFI) reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision. Based on available data West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, and West Pine Ridge are not impacted by site operations and are not subject to actions per the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). This determination is supported by visual inspections, records searches and interviews, groundwater conceptual modeling, approved NFI reports, analytical data, and risk analysis results. Parcel 21d data, however, demonstrate impacts from site

  4. [Segmental neurofibromatosis].

    PubMed

    Zulaica, A; Peteiro, C; Pereiro, M; Pereiro Ferreiros, M; Quintas, C; Toribio, J

    1989-01-01

    Four cases of segmental neurofibromatosis (SNF) are reported. It is a rare entity considered to be a localized variant of neurofibromatosis (NF)-Riccardi's type V. Two cases are male and two female. The lesions are located to the head in a patient and the other three cases in the trunk. No family history nor transmission to progeny were manifested. The rest of the organs are undamaged. PMID:2502696

  5. New observations of the magmatic segmentation of the East Pacific Rise from Siquieros to Clipperton from a multi-streamer seismic reflection imaging study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Mutter, J. C.; Canales, J. P.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Carton, H.; Xu, M.; Newman, K.; Marjanovic, M.; Aghaei, O.; Stowe, L.

    2008-12-01

    In summer 2008, we collected the first multi-streamer 3D seismic reflection dataset of the new national seismic imaging facility, the R/V Marcus G. Langseth, during cruise MGL0812. Our survey included a primary 3D grid extending from 9°57 to 9°42 centered on the EPR ISS "bulls eye" site at 9°50' and 3 parallel along axis lines extending from ~10°05' N to 9°40N. The central along-axis line was extended to encompass the entire length of the ridge from Clipperton to Siquieros fracture zones to facilitate regional studies of magmatic segmentation along the full length of this first order ridge segment. Multibeam bathymetry data were collected simultaneously with the seismic data using the 1°x1° beam EM120 available on the Langseth providing high quality bathymetry extending 30-40 km to either side of the axis north of 8°50'N. In this presentation we present preliminary results focused on axial segmentation from Siquieros to Clipperton. The data reveal fine-scale segmentation of the axial magma lens coincident with the volcanic segmentation of the ridge axis evident in the seafloor morphology. Each volcanic segment is associated with a discrete melt lens, ~5-10 km long, and, in several cases, defined by diffractions from the lens edges. Adjacent lenses differ in reflection strength, depth, and dip. At the discontinuities, lenses are offset from one another and overlap forming shingled lenses in along-axis view and multiple lenses in cross-axis view. These magma lens discontinuities correspond with offsets in the axial summit trough and changes in the volcanic morphology of the axial high, and point to a similar lifespan for these structures. The segmentation of the axial magma body observed in our new data is also apparent in early seismic reflection data collected with the R/V Conrad over 20 years ago, indicating persistent segmentation through the two volcanic eruptions that have occurred in this region since this time.

  6. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  7. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  8. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  9. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  10. Hydrothermal Activity on ultraslow Spreading Ridge: new hydrothermal fields found on the Southwest Indian ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, C.; Li, H.; Deng, X.; Lei, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, K.; Zhou, J.; Liu, W.

    2014-12-01

    Ultraslow spreading ridge makes up about 25% of global mid-ocean ridge length. Previous studies believed that hydrothermal activity is not widespread on the ultraslow spreading ridge owing to lower magma supply. Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) with the spreading rate between 1.2cm/a to 1.4cm/a, represents the ultraslow spreading ridge. In 2007, Chinese Cruise (CC) 19th discovered the Dragon Flag deposit (DFD) on the SWIR, which is the first active hydrothermal field found on the ultraslow spreading ridge. In recent years, over 10 hydrothermal fields have been found on the SWIR between Indomed and Gallieni transform faults by the Chinese team. Tao et al. (2012) implied that the segment sections with excess heat from enhanced magmatism and suitable crustal permeability along slow and ultraslow ridges might be the most promising areas for searching for hydrothermal activities. In 2014, CC 30thdiscovered five hydrothermal fields and several hydrothermal anomalies on the SWIR. Dragon Horn Area (DHA). The DHA is located on the southern of segment 27 SWIR, with an area of about 400 km2. The geophysical studies indicated that the DHA belongs to the oceanic core complex (OCC), which is widespread on the slow spreading ridges (Zhao et al., 2013). The rocks, such as gabbro, serpentinized peridotite, and consolidated carbonate were collected in the DHA, which provide the direct evidence with the existence of the OCC. However, all rock samples gathered by three TV-grab stations are basalts on the top of the OCC. A hydrothermal anomaly area, centered at 49.66°E,37.80° S with a range of several kms, is detected in the DHA. It is probably comprised of several hydrothermal fields and controlled by a NW fault. New discovery of hydrothermal fields. From January to April 2014, five hydrothermal fields were discovered on the SWIR between 48°E to 50°E during the leg 2&3 of the CC 30th, which are the Su Causeway field (48.6°E, 38.1°S), Bai Causeway field (48.8°E, 37.9 °S), Dragon

  11. Ridged Layer Outcrop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    15 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a strange ridged pattern developed in an eroding layer of material on the floor of a Labyrinthus Noctis depression in the Valles Marineris system. The ridges bear some resemblance to ripple-like dunes seen elsewhere on Mars, but they are linked to the erosion of a specific layer of material--i.e., something in the rock record of Mars. Similar ridged textures are found in eroded dark-toned mantling layers in regions as far away as northern Sinus Meridiani and Mawrth Vallis. The explanation for these landforms is as elusive as this image is evocative. The image is located near 8.2oS, 93.6oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  12. Evidence for melt channelization in Galapagos plume-ridge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, T.; Richards, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many present-day hot spots are located within ~ 1000 km of a mid-ocean ridge, either currently or in the geologic past, leading to frequent interaction between these two magmatic regimes. The consequent plume-ridge interactions provide a unique opportunity to test models for asthenosphere-lithosphere dynamics, with the plume acting as a tracer fluid in the problem, and excess magmatism reflecting otherwise unsampled sub-surface phenomena. Galapagos is an off-ridge hotspot with the mantle plume located ~150-250 km south of the plate boundary. Plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos is expressed by the formation of volcanic lineaments of islands and seamounts - e.g., the Wolf-Darwin lineament (WDL) - providing a direct probe of the plume-ridge interaction process, especially in regards to geochemical data. Although several models have been proposed to explain plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos, none adequately explain the observed characteristics, especially the WDL. In particular, predicted lithospheric fault orientations and melt density considerations appear at odds with observations, suggesting that lithospheric extension is not the primary process for formation of these islands. Other off-ridge hotspots interacting with nearby spreading ridges, such as Reunion and Louisville, also exhibit volcanic lineaments linking the plume and the ridge. Thus these lineament-type features are a common outcome of plume-ridge interaction that are indicative of the underlying physics. We propose that the lineaments are surface expressions of narrow sub-lithospheric melt channels focused towards the spreading ridge. These channels should form naturally due to the reactive infiltration instability in a two-phase flow of magma and solid mantle as demonstrated in two-phase flow simulations (e.g., Katz & Weatherley 2012). For Galapagos, we show that melt channels can persist thermodynamically over sufficient length-scales to link the plume and nearby ridge segments. We also show that

  13. Segmental neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Sobjanek, Michał; Dobosz-Kawałko, Magdalena; Michajłowski, Igor; Pęksa, Rafał; Nowicki, Roman

    2014-12-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis or type V neurofibromatosis is a rare genodermatosis characterized by neurofibromas, café-au-lait spots and neurofibromas limited to a circumscribed body region. The disease may be associated with systemic involvement and malignancies. The disorder has not been reported yet in the Polish medical literature. A 63-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a 20-year history of multiple, flesh colored, dome-shaped, soft to firm nodules situated in the right lumbar region. A histopathologic evaluation of three excised tumors revealed neurofibromas. No neurological and ophthalmologic symptoms of neurofibromatosis were diagnosed. PMID:25610358

  14. Segmental neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Adigun, Chris G; Stein, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented for evaluation and excision of non-tender, fleshy nodules that were arranged in a dermatomal distribution from the left side of the chest to the left axilla. A biopsy specimen of a nodule was consistent with a neurofibroma. Owing to the lack of other cutaneous findings, the lack of a family history of neurofibromatosis, and the dermatomal distribution of the neurofibromas, this patient met the criteria for a diagnosis of segmental neurofibromatosis (SNF) according to Riccardi's definition of SNF and classification of neurofibromatosis. Because the patient has no complications of neurofibromatosis 1 no medical treatment is required. PMID:22031651

  15. Segmental neurofibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Dobosz-Kawałko, Magdalena; Michajłowski, Igor; Pęksa, Rafał; Nowicki, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis or type V neurofibromatosis is a rare genodermatosis characterized by neurofibromas, café-au-lait spots and neurofibromas limited to a circumscribed body region. The disease may be associated with systemic involvement and malignancies. The disorder has not been reported yet in the Polish medical literature. A 63-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a 20-year history of multiple, flesh colored, dome-shaped, soft to firm nodules situated in the right lumbar region. A histopathologic evaluation of three excised tumors revealed neurofibromas. No neurological and ophthalmologic symptoms of neurofibromatosis were diagnosed. PMID:25610358

  16. Beta-branched residues adjacent to GG4 motifs promote the efficient association of glycophorin A transmembrane helices.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Fiona; Poulsen, Bradley E; Ip, Wilfred; Deber, Charles M

    2011-01-01

    Protein transmenembrane (TM) segments participating in helix-helix packing commonly contain small residue patterns (termed GG4 or "small-xxx-small" motifs) at i and i + 4 positions. Within many TM segments - such as the glycophorin A (GpA) sequence L75IxxGVxxGVxxT87- the G17y-xxx-Gly83 motif often occurs in combination with large, usually beta3-branched aliphatic residues at adjacent positions, typified here by Val30 and Val84 residues. To explore the importance of local P-branched character on GpA dimerization, we made systematic replacements to all 16 combinations of single or double Ile, Leu, and AIa residues at GpA TM Val/Val positions 80 and 84. Using the TOXCAT system to assay self-oligomerization in the Escherichia coli inner membrane--we observed that (i) combinations of Val and lie residues maintained, or improved dimerization levels; (ii) single Ala or Leu mutant combinations with Val or Ile maintained near-wild type dimerization affinities; and (iii) in the absence of beta-branching, i.e., Leu/Leu, Ala/Ala and Ala/Leu combinations, GpA dimerization was significantly diminished. An apparent capacity of lle-containing mutants to increase GpA dimerization versus WT likely arises from improved van der Waals packing (vs. Val) within the locus of helix contact, consistent with correlations we noted in lipid accessibility measurements. Examination of several synthetic peptides with sequences corresponding to selected GpA mutants (VV VI, IV II, and LL) confirmed their dimerization on sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The overall results reinforce the importance of a beta-branch-containing "ridge" residue to complement a "small-xxx-small groove" in promotion of TM-TM interactions. PMID:21072853

  17. Segmental Aortic Stiffening Contributes to Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Development

    PubMed Central

    Raaz, Uwe; Zöllner, Alexander M.; Schellinger, Isabel N.; Toh, Ryuji; Nakagami, Futoshi; Brandt, Moritz; Emrich, Fabian C.; Kayama, Yosuke; Eken, Suzanne; Adam, Matti; Maegdefessel, Lars; Hertel, Thomas; Deng, Alicia; Jagger, Ann; Buerke, Michael; Dalman, Ronald L.; Spin, Joshua M.; Kuhl, Ellen; Tsao, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stiffening of the aortic wall is a phenomenon consistently observed in age and in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). However, its role in AAA pathophysiology is largely undefined. Methods and Results Using an established murine elastase-induced AAA model, we demonstrate that segmental aortic stiffening (SAS) precedes aneurysm growth. Finite element analysis (FEA) reveals that early stiffening of the aneurysm-prone aortic segment leads to axial (longitudinal) wall stress generated by cyclic (systolic) tethering of adjacent, more compliant wall segments. Interventional stiffening of AAA-adjacent aortic segments (via external application of surgical adhesive) significantly reduces aneurysm growth. These changes correlate with reduced segmental stiffness of the AAA-prone aorta (due to equalized stiffness in adjacent segments), reduced axial wall stress, decreased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), attenuated elastin breakdown, and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines and macrophage infiltration, as well as attenuated apoptosis within the aortic wall. Cyclic pressurization of segmentally stiffened aortic segments ex vivo increases the expression of genes related to inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Finally, human ultrasound studies reveal that aging, a significant AAA risk factor, is accompanied by segmental infrarenal aortic stiffening. Conclusions The present study introduces the novel concept of segmental aortic stiffening (SAS) as an early pathomechanism generating aortic wall stress and triggering aneurysmal growth, thereby delineating potential underlying molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets. In addition, monitoring SAS may aid the identification of patients at risk for AAA. PMID:25904646

  18. Removal action report on the Building 3001 canal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a federal facility managed by Lockheed Martin C, Energy Research, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ORNL on the Oak Ridge Reservation in East Tennessee at the Anderson and Roane County lines, approximately 38 km (24 miles) west of Knoxville, Tennessee, and 18 km (11 miles) southwest of downtown Oak Ridge. The Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and its storage and transfer canal are located in Bldg. 3001 in the approximate center of Waste Area Grouping I in the ORNL main complex. 4:1 The Bldg. 3001 Storage Canal is an L-shaped, underground, reinforced-concrete structure running from the back and below the Graphite Reactor in Bldg. 3001 to a location beneath a hot cell in the adjacent Bldg. 3019. The Graphite Reactor was built in 1943 to produce small quantities of plutonium and was subsequently used to produce other isotopes for medical research before it was finally shut down in 1963. The associated canal was used to transport, under water, spent fuel slugs and other isotopes from the back of the reactor to the adjacent Bldg. 31319 hot cell for further processing. During its operation and years subsequent to operation, the canal`s concrete walls and floor became contaminated with radioisotopes from the water.This report documents the activities involved with replacing the canal water with a solid, controlled, low-strength material (CLSM) in response to a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action.

  19. Ridge from strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. A.; Pajares, C.; Vechernin, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    In the colour string picture with fusion and percolation it is shown that long-range azimuthal-rapidity correlations (ridge) can arise from the superposition of many events with exchange of clusters of different number of strings and not from a single event. Relation of the ridge with the flow harmonics coefficients is derived. By direct Monte Carlo simulations, in the technique previously used to calculate these coefficients, ridge correlations are calculated for AA, pA and pp collisions. The azimuthal anisotropy follows from the assumed quenching of the emitted particles in the strong colour fields inside string clusters. It is confirmed that in pp collisions the ridge structure only appears in rare events with abnormally high multiplicity. Comparison with the experimental data shows a good agreement. Good agreement is also found for pPb collisions. For AA collisions a reasonable agreement is found for both near-side and away-side angular correlations although it worsens at intermediate angles.

  20. Hierarchical Image Segmentation Using Correlation Clustering.

    PubMed

    Alush, Amir; Goldberger, Jacob

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we apply efficient implementations of integer linear programming to the problem of image segmentation. The image is first grouped into superpixels and then local information is extracted for each pair of spatially adjacent superpixels. Given local scores on a map of several hundred superpixels, we use correlation clustering to find the global segmentation that is most consistent with the local evidence. We show that, although correlation clustering is known to be NP-hard, finding the exact global solution is still feasible by breaking the segmentation problem down into subproblems. Each such sub-problem can be viewed as an automatically detected image part. We can further accelerate the process by using the cutting-plane method, which provides a hierarchical structure of the segmentations. The efficiency and improved performance of the proposed method is compared to several state-of-the-art methods and demonstrated on several standard segmentation data sets. PMID:26701901

  1. Young segment-scale eruption discovered on the eastern Galapagos rift during the GALREX 2011 Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; White, S. M.; Hammond, S. R.; McClinton, J. T.; Rex, C.

    2011-12-01

    New high resolution mapping with an EM302 multibeam system and seafloor observations made with the Little Hercules remotely operated vehicle (ROV) during the July 2011 GALREX expedition have discovered a very recent eruption along Segment III (Christie et al., 2005) centered at 88 deg 19.5'W on the eastern Galapagos spreading center (GSC). The site was chosen for detailed study after a water column survey using a towed CTD package identified intense particle plumes rising up to 250m above seafloor along the entire segment (see abstracts by Baker et al. and Holden et al., this meeting). The segment is characterized by ridge-and-valley terrain with the most recent neovolcanic ridge extending, respectively, 25 km west and 20 km east of a central low-relief area that is quasi-circular, ~2 km radius, less than 30 m high. The neovolcanic ridge, revealed by the EM302 bathymetry to be a generally hummocky edifice less than 1 km wide and under ~40 m high, is cut by a very small axial graben barely resolved in the EM302 bathymetry. Two areas were surveyed during five ROV dives, four on the central area near 88 deg 18.5'W and one dive at 14 km east at 88 deg 10.8'W. A third high intensity plume target near the western extremity of the segment at 88 deg 27.2'W was not investigated using the ROV. The recent lobate and pillow lava flows were emplaced in narrow grabens along and adjacent to the neovolcanic ridge. In several places, the flow was observed to fill the axial graben. It is likely that the flow thickness ranges from meters to 10's of meters, depending upon the pre-eruption graben size and local effusion variations. However, no long, channel-fed lava flows were found. Flow boundaries based on preliminary ROV navigation average less than 100 meters across-axis. The lobate lavas all had a very similar glassy appearance and negligible sediment cover, making them easy to recognize amid the surrounding, older flows. The age of these lavas appeared visually younger than the

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR WEST BLACK OAK RIDGE, EAST BLACK OAK RIDGE, MCKINNEY RIDGE, WEST PINE RIDGE, AND PARCEL 21D IN THE VICINITY OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    David A. King

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. The goal is to obtain all media no-further-investigation (NFI) determinations for the subject parcels considering existing soils. To augment the existing soils-only NFI determinations, samples of groundwater, surface water, soil, and sediment were collected to support all media NFI decisions. The only updates presented here are those that were made after the original issuance of the NFI documents. In the subject parcel where the soils NFI determination was not completed for approval (Parcel 21d), the full process has been performed to address the soils as well. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only NFI

  3. The Magilligan beach ridge plain (Northern Ireland, UK): A detailed sedimentary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Tanja; Surmann, Kirstin; Cooper, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Beach ridges are a common geological feature on prograded sandy coasts . Beach ridges and their subsurface deposits record past coastal processes and are indicators of previous shoreline position, shape and sea level. This work presents preliminary results and provides new information about the late Holocene development of the Magilligan Foreland in Northern Ireland (UK). The triangular beach-ridge plain of Magilligan was formed in the early and mid-Holocene as a consequence of land and sea level change and sediment abundance. The focus of the investigations is a detailed grain size analysis of beach ridge deposits using the settling tube method. The main aim is to distinguish the beach ridge deposits from the aeolian dune sand cover and to draw conclusions about the development and sedimentary formation of the beach ridges. A semi-continuous outcrop of the upper units of the beachridge plain is preserved along the coastline. The geological descriptions in the field show significant differences between adjacent outcrops and grain size analysis was undertaken to distinguish aeolian and swash-lain sediemnts. Buried soil layers and unconformities helped to define the palaeotopography which consist of a sequence of beach ridge crests and inter-ridge depressions. The beach ridges of the subsurface are independent of the modern dune topography. There are more beach ridges than previously thought.

  4. Lithospheric Structure, Stress, and Magmatism at the Rainbow Non-Transform Offset on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulatto, M.; Canales, J. P.; Dunn, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    New oceanic lithosphere is formed at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges by a combination of eruption and intrusion of magma and by tectonic exhumation and alteration of lower crustal and mantle rocks. We look at the relationship between these two processes and how their relative contributions vary at non-transform ridge-segment offsets (NTOs). Models of mantle upwelling predict magmatic input and heat flux to be relatively low at NTOs, yet many host high-temperature hydrothermal systems, which are difficult to explain without the presence of a crustal magmatic source. We analyzed newly acquired swath bathymetry, gravity and magnetic data from the MARINER experiment together with archived data from the Rainbow NTO (36º10' N) on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This NTO is currently experiencing both mantle exhumation and magmatic input as evidenced by the active Rainbow high-temperature hydrothermal field. We calculate mantle Bouguer gravity anomalies and crustal magnetization to constrain the lithospheric structure and tectonic evolution of the NTO during the past ~2 Myr. The swath bathymetry data are used to map faults, extrusive volcanic terrain and tectonized blocks and show that the style of crustal accretion varies along the adjacent ridge segments. Spatial changes in the style of extensional faulting are indicative of variations in the mechanical properties and the state of stress of the lithosphere. We suggest that the availability of magma to drive hydrothermal activity at Rainbow and other similar settings is controlled not only by the thermal regime and the structure of the lithosphere but also by the effect of local stress conditions on magma migration. Models of magma migration and dyking show that changes in the direction of minimum compressive stress affect the propagation of magmatic intrusions. We argue that stress rotation can explain the formation of crustal magma chambers at NTOs despite a reduced magmatic flux. These constraints help determine the role of

  5. Visual Observations and Geologic Settings of the Newly-Discovered Black Smoker Vent Sites Across the Galapagos Ridge-Hotspot Intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P.; Haymon, R.; MacDonald, K.; White, S.

    2006-12-01

    Nearly one-fifth of the global mid-ocean ridge is hotspot-affected, yet very little is known about how hotspots affect quantity and distribution of high-temperature hydrothermal vents along the ridge. During the 2005-06 GalAPAGoS expedition, acoustic and plume sensor surveys were conducted across the Galapagos ridge- hotspot intersection, lon. 94.5ºW- lon. 89.5ºW, to map fine scale geologic features and locate hydrothermal plumes emanating from the ridge crest. Where significant plumes were detected, the Medea fiber-optic camera sled was used successfully to find and image high-temperature vents on the seafloor. With Medea we discovered and imaged the first active and recently extinct black smokers known along the entire Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC), and documented the geologic setting of these vents. The Medea survey imaged numerous inactive vents as well as 3 active high-temperature vent fields along the ridge at 94º 04.5'W (Navidad Site), 91º56.2'W (Iguanas Site) and 91º54.3'W (Pinguinos Site). Two recently extinct vent fields also were identified at 91º23.4'-23.7'W and 91º13.8'W. All of the high-temperature vent sites that we identified along the GSC are found above relatively shallow AMC reflectors and are located in the middle 20% of ridge segments. Without exception the vent sites are located along fissures atop constructional axial volcanic ridges (AVR's) composed of relatively young pillow basalts. In some cases, the vents were associated with collapses adjacent to the fissures. The fissures appear to be eruptive sources of the pillow lavas comprising the AVR's. Video images of the chimneys show mature, cylindrical structures, up to 14m high; little diffuse flow; few animals; and some worm casts and dead clam shells, suggesting prior habitation. We conclude that distribution of the vents is controlled by magmatic processes, (i.e., by locations of shallow AMC magma reservoirs and eruptive fissures above dike intrusions), and that there is

  6. Heat transfer tube having internal ridges, and method of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.L.; Campbell, B.J.

    1987-04-28

    This patent describes in a metallic heat transfer tube having an integral, external superstructure which includes adjacent, generally circumferential channels formed in the superstructure and channels formed in the superstructure which interconnect adjacent pairs of the generally circumferential channels and are positioned transversely to the generally circumferential channels; the improvement wherein the inner surface of the tube is characterized by helical ridges which have a pitch of less than 0.124 inch, a ridge height of at least 0.015 inch, a ratio of ridge base width to pitch, as measured along the tube axis, which is greater than 0.45 and less than 0.90 and a helix lead angle which is between about 29 and 42 degrees, as measured from the tube axis, the first plurality of generally circumferential channels being spaced at a pitch which is less than 50% of the pitch of the helical ridges.

  7. Tectonic evolution of 200 km of Mid-Atlantic Ridge over 10 million years: Interplay of volcanism and faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cann, Johnson R.; Smith, Deborah K.; Escartin, Javier; Schouten, Hans

    2015-07-01

    We reconstruct the history of the mode of accretion of an area of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge south of the Kane fracture zone using bathymetric morphology. The area includes 200 km of the spreading axis and reaches to 10 Ma on either side. We distinguish three tectonic styles: (1) volcanic construction with eruption and intrusion of magma coupled with minor faulting, (2) extended terrain with abundant large-offset faults, (3) detachment faulting marked by extension on single long-lived faults. Over 40% of the seafloor is made of extended terrain and detachment faults. The area includes products of seven spreading segments. The spreading axis has had detachment faulting or extended terrain on one or both sides for 70% of the last 10 Ma. In some parts of the area, regions of detachment faulting and extended terrain lie close to segment boundaries. Regions of detachment faulting initiated at 10 Ma close to the adjacent fracture zones to the north and south, and then expanded away from them. We discuss the complex evidence from gravity, seismic surveys, and bathymetry for the role of magma supply in generating tectonic style. Overall, we conclude that input of magma at the spreading axis has a general control on the development of detachment faulting, but the relationship is not strong. Other factors may include a positive feedback that stabilizes detachment faulting at the expense of volcanic extension, perhaps through the lubrication of active detachment faults by the formation of low friction materials (talc, serpentine) on detachment fault surfaces.

  8. Ridge network in crumpled paper.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Christian André; Hansen, Alex; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2007-08-01

    The network formed by ridges in a straightened sheet of crumpled paper is studied using a laser profilometer. Square sheets of paper were crumpled into balls, unfolded, and their height profile measured. From these profiles the imposed ridges were extracted as networks. Nodes were defined as intersections between ridges, and links as the various ridges connecting the nodes. Many network and spatial properties have been investigated. The tail of the ridge length distribution was found to follow a power law, whereas the shorter ridges followed a log-normal distribution. The degree distribution was found to have an exponentially decaying tail, and the degree correlation was found to be disassortative. The facets created by the ridges and the Voronoi diagram formed by the nodes have also been investigated. PMID:17930105

  9. Noachian Impact Ejecta on Murray Ridge and Pre-impact Rocks on Wdowiak Ridge, Endeavour Crater, Mars: Opportunity Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Schroeder, C.; Yen, A. S.; Farrand, W. H.; Arvidson, R. E.; Franklin, B. J.; Grant, J. A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Jolliff, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring Meridiani Planum since January 2004, and has completed 4227% of its primary mission. Opportunity has been investigating the geology of the rim of 22 km diameter Endeavour crater, first on the Cape York segment and now on Cape Tribulation. The outcrops are divided York; (ii) the Shoemaker fm, impact breccias representing ejecta from the crater; into three formations: (i) the lower Matijevic fm, a pre-impact lithology on Cape and (iii) the upper Grasberg fm, a post-impact deposit that drapes the lower portions of the eroded rim segments. On the Cape Tribulation segment Opportunity has been studying the rocks on Murray Ridge, with a brief sojourn to Wdowiak Ridge west of the rim segment. team member Thomas Wdowiak, who died in 2013.) One region of Murray Ridge has distinctive CRISM spectral characteristics indicating the presence of a small concentration of aluminous smectite based on a 2.2 micron Al-OH combination band (hereafter, the Al-OH region).

  10. Ridge regression processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    Current navigation requirements depend on a geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) criterion. As long as the GDOP stays below a specific value, navigation requirements are met. The GDOP will exceed the specified value when the measurement geometry becomes too collinear. A new signal processing technique, called Ridge Regression Processing, can reduce the effects of nearly collinear measurement geometry; thereby reducing the inflation of the measurement errors. It is shown that the Ridge signal processor gives a consistently better mean squared error (MSE) in position than the Ordinary Least Mean Squares (OLS) estimator. The applicability of this technique is currently being investigated to improve the following areas: receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM), coverage requirements, availability requirements, and precision approaches.

  11. Topographically Enhanced Subinertial Currents at Endeavour Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, R. E.; Rabinovich, A. B.; Mihaly, S. F.; Veirs, S.; Stahr, F. R.; McDuff, R. E.; Subbotina, M. M.

    2001-12-01

    We use velocity records collected from moored current meters to examine the effects of seafloor topography and hydrothermal venting on near-bottom (\\~ 2000 m depth) currents flowing over the Endeavour Segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge. Focus is on the 50-m vertical resolution records collected from July-October 2000 near the main Endeavour vent field and on the 2-km lateral resolution records collected from July-October 2001 at three sites within the 100 m deep axial valley. Semidiurnal currents are found to be marginally more energetic than diurnal currents, and flow above the ridge crest is often dominated by wind-generated inertial events (periods \\~ 16 hrs at 48N) and low-frequency (O(10 day) period) clockwise rotary motions. Observations, supported by numerical modeling, reveal marked topographic amplification of subinertial motions within 100 m of the ridge crest. Motions within the diurnal, inertial, and wind-forced frequency bands undergo especially pronounced above-ridge amplification but attenuate equally rapidly within the confines of the narrow (\\~ 1 km) axial valley. Semidiurnal currents are much less affected by the ridge topography and have approximately uniform amplitudes with depth within the first 250 m of the bottom. Within a few tens of meters of the valley floor, the flow is dominated by \\~ 5 cm/s along-axis semidiurnal oscillations and a surprisingly strong (2 to 4 cm/s), persistently northward up-valley flow. The up-valley flow appears to be independent of, and generally counter to, the prevailing flow in the overlying water column. Initial findings suggest that the enhanced near-bottom flow is maintained by an along-valley pressure gradient created by turbulent entrainment of cold (\\~ 2 C) ambient water by the superheated (\\~ 350 C) hydrothermal plumes and low-temperature diffuse flow. If so, the mean-flow dynamics may be analogous to the summer sea-breeze in coastal fjords, with hydrothermal convection playing the role of summertime

  12. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...-managing agencies on adjacent lands (both public and private)....

  13. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...-managing agencies on adjacent lands (both public and private)....

  14. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of off-road vehicle use on Reclamation lands will...

  15. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...-managing agencies on adjacent lands (both public and private)....

  16. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  17. Building roof segmentation from aerial images using a lineand region-based watershed segmentation technique.

    PubMed

    El Merabet, Youssef; Meurie, Cyril; Ruichek, Yassine; Sbihi, Abderrahmane; Touahni, Raja

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel strategy for roof segmentation from aerial images (orthophotoplans) based on the cooperation of edge- and region-based segmentation methods. The proposed strategy is composed of three major steps. The first one, called the pre-processing step, consists of simplifying the acquired image with an appropriate couple of invariant and gradient, optimized for the application, in order to limit illumination changes (shadows, brightness, etc.) affecting the images. The second step is composed of two main parallel treatments: on the one hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed regions. Even if the first segmentation of this step provides good results in general, the image is often over-segmented. To alleviate this problem, an efficient region merging strategy adapted to the orthophotoplan particularities, with a 2D modeling of roof ridges technique, is applied. On the other hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed lines. The third step consists of integrating both watershed segmentation strategies into a single cooperative segmentation scheme in order to achieve satisfactory segmentation results. Tests have been performed on orthophotoplans containing 100 roofs with varying complexity, and the results are evaluated with the VINETcriterion using ground-truth image segmentation. A comparison with five popular segmentation techniques of the literature demonstrates the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach. Indeed, we obtain a good segmentation rate of 96% with the proposed method compared to 87.5% with statistical region merging (SRM), 84% with mean shift, 82% with color structure code (CSC), 80% with efficient graph-based segmentation algorithm (EGBIS) and 71% with JSEG. PMID:25648706

  18. Structure and origin of the J Anomaly Ridge, western North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucholke, Brian E.; Ludwig, William J.

    1982-11-01

    The J Anomaly Ridge is a structural ridge or step in oceanic basement that extends southwest from the eastern end of the Grand Banks. It lies beneath the J magnetic anomaly at the young end (M-4 to M-0) of the M series magnetic anomalies. Its structural counterpart beneath the J anomaly in the eastern Atlantic is the Madeira-Tore Rise, but this feature has been overprinted by post-middle Cretaceous deformation and volcanism. In order to study the origin and evolution of the J Anomaly Ridge-Madeira-Tore Rise system, we obtained seismic refraction and multichannel reflection profiles across the J Anomaly Ridge near 39°N latitude. The western ridge flank consists of a series of crustal blocks downdropped along west-dipping normal faults, but the eastern slope to younger crust is gentle and relatively unfaulted. The western flank also is subparallel to seafloor isochrons, becoming younger to the south. Anomalously smooth basement caps the ridge crest, and it locally exhibits internal, eastward-dipping reflectors similar in configuration to those within subaerially emplaced basalt flows on Iceland. When isostatically corrected for sediment load, the northern part of the J Anomaly Ridge has basement depths about 1400 m shallower than in our study area, and deep sea drilling has shown that the northern ridge was subaerially exposed during the middle Cretaceous. We suggest that most of the system originated under subaerial conditions at the time of late-stage rifting between the adjacent Grand Banks and Iberia. The excess magma required to form the ridge may have been vented from a mantle plume beneath the Grand Banks-Iberia rift zone and channelled southward beneath the rift axis of the abutting Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Resulting edifice-building volcanism constructed the ridge system between anomalies M-4 and M-0, moving southward along the ridge axis at about 50 mm/yr. About M-0 time, when true drift began between Iberia and the Grand Banks, this southward venting rapidly

  19. Initiation of Ridges and Transform Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyst, M.; Thompson, G. A.; Parsons, T.

    2004-12-01

    No clear consensus has emerged to explain initiation of the strikingly regular pattern of ocean ridges and transform faults. The question is important on the continents also, because a less regular pattern of step-overs on faults such as the San Andreas influences the sources of earthquakes. We explore the question by finite element modeling and a study of observational data on ridges and transforms. We focus on the simplest case, where ridges and transforms seem to self-organize at new plate boundaries as soon as new oceanic (magmatic) crust forms. The South Atlantic supplies a clear example. Continental South America and Africa separated along an irregular break, whose general shape is still preserved in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In detail, however, the sea floor magnetic anomalies and satellite gravity show that traces of the ridges and transforms extend to the base of the continental slope, i.e. they formed quickly in the new oceanic crust. The Gulf of California provides another clear example and is notable because of its northward transition into the continental San Andreas fault system. In continental crust, dike segments connected by transform faults provide the clearest analogues of oceanic ridges and transforms. Remarkably, the ridge-transform pattern has been simulated by pulling the crust on molten wax [Oldenburg and Brune, JGR, 80, 1975] and also observed in the crust of a molten lava lake [Duffield, JGR, 77, 1972]. In neither of these models, however, do the spatial and temporal scales permit investigation of the dikes whose repeated emplacement and inflation builds layer 3 of the ocean crust. It is well established that, under a buoyant head of magma, dikes tend to fracture and intrude the crust in planes perpendicular to the least horizontal stress, and they relieve the stress difference as they inflate [e.g. Parsons and Thompson, Science, 253, 1991]. Dikes are commonly used as stress-direction indicators analogous to artificial hydraulic fractures

  20. A comprehensive segmentation analysis of crude oil market based on time irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jianan; Shang, Pengjian; Lu, Dan; Yin, Yi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we perform a comprehensive entropic segmentation analysis of crude oil future prices from 1983 to 2014 which used the Jensen-Shannon divergence as the statistical distance between segments, and analyze the results from original series S and series begin at 1986 (marked as S∗) to find common segments which have same boundaries. Then we apply time irreversibility analysis of each segment to divide all segments into two groups according to their asymmetry degree. Based on the temporal distribution of the common segments and high asymmetry segments, we figure out that these two types of segments appear alternately and do not overlap basically in daily group, while the common portions are also high asymmetry segments in weekly group. In addition, the temporal distribution of the common segments is fairly close to the time of crises, wars or other events, because the hit from severe events to oil price makes these common segments quite different from their adjacent segments. The common segments can be confirmed in daily group series, or weekly group series due to the large divergence between common segments and their neighbors. While the identification of high asymmetry segments is helpful to know the segments which are not affected badly by the events and can recover to steady states automatically. Finally, we rearrange the segments by merging the connected common segments or high asymmetry segments into a segment, and conjoin the connected segments which are neither common nor high asymmetric.

  1. Evidence of 60 meter deep Arctic pressure-ridge keels

    SciTech Connect

    Reimnitz, E.; Barnes, P.W.; Phillips, R.L.

    1985-11-01

    Numerous efforts have been made during the last two decades to determine the ice thickness distribution in the Arctic Ocean and in particular to learn the keel depth of the largest modern pressure ridges. With the discovery of oil and gas in the arctic offshore and the trend to extend exploration into deeper water and increasing distance from shore, knowledge of the maximum ice thickness in the continental shelf is becoming increasingly important. Various approaches have been used to directly obtain keel depth data in the Arctic, but no satisfactory technique for water depths of less than 100 meters exists. For continental shelves, virtually all public data on ridge keel configuration stems from spot measurements made with horizontally held sonar transducers lowered through the ice adjacent to ridges, and from cores of ridges. Because these techniques are time-consuming, the depths of only a few ridge keels have been determined by such methods. Fixed upward-looking sonar devices have been used with limited success in several applications to record under-ice relief and movement, but any data so obtained is not public. This report is an attempt to interpret the age of deepwater gouges seen on the Alaskan Arctic shelf.

  2. Ocean core complexes within Non-transform discontinuities and hydrothermal mineralizations on the Central Indian Ridge between 17°S and 5°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, S.; Kim, H.; Kim, J.; Moon, J.; Choi, S.

    2012-12-01

    Mantle rocks exposure within basaltic basement along the mid-ocean ridge, so called, ocean core complex (OCC) have been intensively researched for their high abundances of hydrothermal activities as well as interesting oceanic crust sequences in present decade. However, most studies on OCC are limited to TAG area in slow-spreading ridge and SWIR in ultra slow-spreading ridge. Here we firstly report survey results of the Central Indian Ridge (CIR) between 17°S and 5°S and illuminate distribution patterns of ocean core complexes at non-transform discontinuities (NTD) as well as potentialities of deep-sea hydrothermal activities within OCC. CIR spreading axis between 17°S and 5°S are separated by three major transform offsets at Vema fracture zone (9°30'S), Argo fracture zone (13°30'S) and Marie Celeste fracture zone (17°S), i.e., three first-order segments. First-order segments can be subdevided by NTD and small-scale discontinuities into seven second-order segments. Four OCCs are situated on end of small-scale discontinuities and two OCCs are adjacent to NTDs. Generally, OCCs founded at 8°S (segment 1) and 11°S (segment 3) are consisted of ultramafic rock and gabbroic rock and featured by the corrugated structures. However, OCCs at 12°S and 15°30'S are founded in a typical the uplifted and elongated-shape NTDs where serpentinite and/or gabbroic rocks were recovered. OCC at 12°S shows unique bridge-shape NTD and both tips of the NTD link with other OCCs at rifting valley flanks. The northern part of OCC on 12°S is mostly comprised of gabbroic rocks whereas serpentinite was dominantly sampled in the southern part of OCC. At 15°30'S OCC displays septum structure and splits southern part of segment 6 into two parts. Gabbroic rocks and serpentinite are dominant rocks of eastern part and western part of NTD, respectively. The bridge- and septum-shape OCCs in NTDs at 12°S and 15°30'S are unusual ones because those OCCs show so elongated and narrow features

  3. Prosodic cues enhance rule learning by changing speech segmentation mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    de Diego-Balaguer, Ruth; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Prosody has been claimed to have a critical role in the acquisition of grammatical information from speech. The exact mechanisms by which prosodic cues enhance learning are fully unknown. Rules from language often require the extraction of non-adjacent dependencies (e.g., he plays, he sings, he speaks). It has been proposed that pauses enhance learning because they allow computing non-adjacent relations helping word segmentation by removing the need to compute adjacent computations. So far only indirect evidence from behavioral and electrophysiological measures comparing learning effects after exposure to speech with and without pauses support this claim. By recording event-related potentials during the acquisition process of artificial languages with and without pauses between words with embedded non-adjacent rules we provide direct evidence on how the presence of pauses modifies the way speech is processed during learning to enhance segmentation and rule generalization. The electrophysiological results indicate that pauses as short as 25 ms attenuated the N1 component irrespective of whether learning was possible or not. In addition, a P2 enhancement was present only when learning of non-adjacent dependencies was possible. The overall results support the claim that the simple presence of subtle pauses changed the segmentation mechanism used reflected in an exogenously driven N1 component attenuation and improving segmentation at the behavioral level. This effect can be dissociated from the endogenous P2 enhancement that is observed irrespective of the presence of pauses whenever non-adjacent dependencies are learned. PMID:26483731

  4. Stress Reduction in Adjacent Level Discs via Dynamic Instrumentation: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Castellvi, Antonio E.; Huang, Hao; Vestgaarden, Tov; Saigal, Sunil; Pienkowski, David

    2007-01-01

    Background Conventional (rigid) fusion instrumentation is believed to accelerate the degeneration of adjacent discs by increasing stresses caused by motion discontinuity. Fusion instrumentation that employs reduced rod stiffness and increased axial motion, or dynamic instrumentation, may partially alleviate this problem, but the effects of this instrumentation on the stresses in the adjacent disc are unknown. We used a finiteelement model to calculate and compare the stresses in the adjacent-level disc that are induced by rigid and dynamic posterior lumbar fusion instrumentation. Methods A 3-dimensional finite-element model of the lumbar spine was obtained that simulated flexion and extension. The L5–S1 segment of this model was fused, and the L4–L5 segment was fixed with rigid or dynamic instrumentation. The mechanical properties of the dynamic instrumentation were determined by laboratory testing and then used in the finite-element model. Peak stresses in the lumbar discs were calculated and compared. Results The reduced-stiffness component of the dynamic instrumentation was associated with a 1% to 2% reduction in peak compressive stresses in the adjacent-level disc (at 45° flexion), and the increased axial motion component of this instrumentation reduced peak disc stress by 8% to 9%. Areas of disc tissue exposed to 80% of peak stresses of 6.17 MPa were 47% less for discs adjacent to dynamic instrumentation than for those adjacent to rigid instrumentation. Conclusions Reduced stiffness and increased axial motion of dynamic posterior lumbar fusion instrumentation designs result in an approximately 10% cumulative stress reduction for each flexion cycle. The effect of this stress reduction over many cycles may be substantial. Clinical Relevance The cumulative effect of this reduced amplitude and distribution of peak stresses in the adjacent disc may partially alleviate the problem of adjacent-level disc degeneration. PMID:25802582

  5. Ultraslow spreading processes along the Arctic mid-ocean ridge system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlindwein, Vera

    2013-04-01

    Generation of new seafloor in the Arctic Ocean occurs along the more than 2800 km long Arctic Ridge System from the Knipovich Ridge in the south to Gakkel ridge in the northeast. The plates separate at velocities of only 6-15 mm/y making the Arctic Ridge System the most prominent representative of an ultraslow spreading mid-ocean ridge. The engine of crustal production splutters at very low spreading rates such that ultraslow spreading ridges show a unique morphology: Isolated volcanoes, capable of vigorous eruptions, pierce the seafloor at distances of several hundred kilometres; in between there are long stretches without volcanism. My work group studies at global, regional and local scale the spreading processes of the Arctic ridge system, using earthquake records of ocean bottom seismometers, seismometers on drifting ice floes and of the global seismic network. We discovered that, contrary to faster spreading ridges, amagmatic portions of the Arctic ridge system are characterised by decreased seismicity rates with few and relatively weak earthquakes, whereas magmatically robust segments display more frequent seismic events. The maximum depth of earthquake hypocentres varies markedly along axis reaching maxima of 22 km depth below sea floor. Volcanic centres are characterized by vigorous earthquake swarm activity including large earthquake swarms that are recorded teleseismically. These earthquake swarms appear to be connected to episodes of active spreading as demonstrated at the 85°E volcanic complex at eastern Gakkel ridge which experienced an unusual spreading event between 1999 and 2001. The varying patterns of seismicity along the ridge axis correlate well with the pronounced differences in ridge morphology and petrology and its magnetic and gravimetric signatures. Our results support current theories of magma production at ultraslow spreading ridges which postulate a lateral melt flow towards isolated volcanic centres.

  6. Asymmetric seafloor spreading and short ridge jumps in the Australian-Antarctic discordance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Karen M.; Stock, Joann M.

    1995-08-01

    The crenulated geometry of the Southeast Indian ridge within the Australian-Antarctic discordance is formed by numerous spreading ridge segments that are offset, alternately to the north and south, by transform faults. Suggested causes for these offsets, which largely developed since ~ 20 Ma, include asymmetric seafloor spreading, ridge jumps, and propagating rifts that have transferred seafloor from one flank of the spreading ridge to the other. Each of these processes has operated at different times in different locations of the discordance; here we document an instance where a small (~ 20 km), young (< 0.2 Ma), southward ridge jump has contributed to the observed asymmetry. When aeromagnetic anomalies from the Project Investigator-1 survey are superposed on gravity anomalies computed from Geosat GM and ERM data, we find that in segment B4 of the discordance (between 125° and 126° E), the roughly east-west-trending gravity low, correlated with the axial valley, is 20 25 km south of the ridge axis position inferred from the center of magnetic anomaly 1. Elsewhere in the discordance, the inferred locations of the ridge axis from magnetics and gravity are in excellent agreement. Ship track data confirm these observations: portions of Moana Wave track crossing the ridge in B4 show that a topographic valley correlated with the gravity anomaly low lies south of the center of magnetic anomaly 1; while other ship track data that cross the spreading ridge in segments B3 and B5 demonstrate good agreement between the axial valley, the gravity anomaly low, and the central magnetic anomaly. Based on these observations, we speculate that the ridge axis in B4 has recently jumped to the south, from a ridge location closer to the center of the young normally magnetized crust, to that of the gravity anomaly low. The position of the gravity low essentially at the edge of normally magnetized crust requires a very recent (< 0.2 Ma) arrival of the ridge in this new location. Because

  7. Contextual view of Point Bonita Ridge, showing Bonita Ridge access ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of Point Bonita Ridge, showing Bonita Ridge access road retaining wall and location of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 Transmitter Building foundation (see stake at center left), camera facing north - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  8. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  9. Preferred orientation of Ridges in Phyllosilicate Terrains, Mars: Implications for Crustal Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustard, J. F.; Saper, L.

    2012-12-01

    The nature of subsurface hydrological processes, their role in the geologic evolution of planetary bodies and implications for habitability are critically linked. Based on a synthesis of the mineralogy, stratigraphy, and chemistry of phyllosilicate deposits on Mars, Ehlmann et al [Nature, 2011] proposed that the longest-lived habitable environment on Mars was in the subsurface. Is there additional evidence for this? Small, linear ridges have been recognized on Mars and proposed to be the manifestation of breccia dikes formed during impact events [Head and Mustard, MAPS 2006]. Extending these observations, we have mapped with Context Imager (CTX) and HiRISE data, acquired by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, small linear ridges in the Nili Fossae and Nilo Syrtis regions of Mars. Ridges were defined as sharply tapered linear to curvilinear features that express positive relief and produce shadows visible at CTX resolution, and are distinct from features such as dunes and scarps. When two or more ridges overlapped, individual ridge segments were defined as features that were continuous along strike even when intersecting other ridges. Ridges that appeared to abruptly change direction were counted as two segments. Ridge orientations were calculated using a vector defined by the start and end points of each ridge segment and measured relative to 0° North. A total of 4020 individual ridge segments were mapped: average length of 533 m. Longer ridges are sometimes associated with knobs tens of meters in diameter that often occur at branch nodes. These ridges have only been identified in strongly eroded terrains and appear to be restricted to the oldest exposed stratigraphic unit, the smectite-rich Noachian crust. Ridges are not expressed in the overlying mafic cap and olivine-carbonate units and are often observed to terminate at base of the olivine-bearing unit. The stratigraphic confinement of the ridges to the phyllosilicate-bearing crust suggests the ridges were

  10. Thermal structure of the mantle beneath the equatorial Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Inferences from the spatial variation of dredged basalt glass compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, J.-G.; Ruppel, C.; Davis, A. N.; McCully, B.; Tighe, S. A.; Kingsley, R. H.; Lin, J.

    1995-06-01

    same glasses (Schilling et al., 1994) and the K2O variation reported here. The cause of the petrologically inferred cold zone and large gradient in the upper mantle south of St. Peter and Paul islets remains more speculative. On the basis of a passive mantle upwelling flow model (Phipps Morgan and Forsyth, 1988) applied to the specific geometry of the equatorial Atlantic, we reject the simplest hypothesis that the cold zone is produced by the compounding cooling effect caused by the very long and densely distributed transform fault offsets in the equatorial Atlantic. The result of this test remains paradoxical in view that good correlations exist between segment length, maximum along-ridge axis relief per segment, mean segment depth, and per segment average bulk compositions of the erupted basalts, and corresponding mean degrees of melting. Other possible causes for the gradational cold zone are briefly explored. These include the evolutionary history of the region with respect to adjacent continental mantle, lithosphere age, thickness, and temperature, and tectonic mode of opening of the Atlantic, as well as large-scale convective motion associated with continental dispersion. No definite conclusions can be reached. However, we emphasize that the petrologically inferred upper mantle thermal structure in the equatorial Atlantic is quite robust and independent of the petrologic decompression melting models considered and their underlying detailed assumptions. Large seismic S wave velocity variations are predicted over the 0-150 km depth range of the upper mantle, based on the reported correlation of Na8 with S wave velocity reported by Yan et al. (1989). Thus detailed seismic tomographic mapping could be used to test further the cold upper mantle zone hypothesis for the equatorial Atlantic.

  11. Hybrid image segmentation using watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, Kostas; Efstratiadis, Serafim N.; Maglaveras, Nicos; Pappas, Costas

    1996-02-01

    A hybrid image segmentation algorithm is proposed which combines edge- and region-based techniques through the morphological algorithm of watersheds. The algorithm consists of the following steps: (1) edge-preserving statistical noise reduction, (2) gradient approximation, (3) detection of watersheds on gradient magnitude image, and (4) hierarchical region merging (HRM) in order to get semantically meaningful segmentations. The HRM process uses the region adjacency graph (RAG) representation of the image regions. At each step, the most similar pair of regions is determined (minimum cost RAG edge), the regions are merged and the RAG is updated. Traditionally, the above is implemented by storing all the RAG edges in a priority queue (heap). We propose a significantly faster algorithm which maintains an additional graph, the most similar neighbor graph, through which the priority queue size and processing time are drastically reduced. The final segmentation is an image partition which, through the RAG, provides information that can be used by knowledge-based high level processes, i.e. recognition. In addition, this region based representation provides one-pixel wide, closed, and accurately localized contours/surfaces. Due to the small number of free parameters, the algorithm can be quite effectively used in interactive image processing. Experimental results obtained with 2D MR images are presented.

  12. Are Axial Volcanic Ridges where all the (volcanic) action is?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Although axial volcanic ridges (AVRs) are generally recognised as the main loci for lithospheric generation at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges, various recent studies have suggested that axial volcanism is not confined to them. Here I present evidence from three studies for significant amounts of off-AVR volcanism at three slow-spreading ridges. 1) Near-bottom side-scan sonar (TOBI) images of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 13°N show a complex pattern of closely-spaced, active oceanic core complexes (OCCs) where plate separation is largely a-volcanic, separated by short segments of vigorous volcanic spreading. In one such volcanic segment, the brightest sea floor and therefore inferred youngest volcanism occurs not on the topographic axis (an apparently 'old' AVR) but at the edge of a broad axial valley. 2) A similar TOBI survey of the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre reveals AVRs in the north and south flanking an OCC (Mt. Dent) and a non-volcanic ridge interpreted as tectonically extruded peridotite ('smooth' sea floor). In both AVR segments there are clear, young lava flows that have erupted from perched sources part way up the median valley walls and have partly flowed down into the valley. 3) The third case is from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 45°N, where we conducted a detailed geophysical and geological study of an AVR and surrounding median valley floor. The AVR is largely surrounded by flat sea floor composed mainly of lobate and sheet flows, whereas the AVR comprises predominantly pillow lavas. Although we have no firm dates, various indicators suggest most lavas on the AVR are around 10ka old or somewhat less. The apparently youngest (brightest acoustic returns, thinnest sediment cover) of the flat-lying lava flows appears to have a similar age from its degree of sediment cover. Contact relations between these lavas and the AVR flanks show no evidence of a clear age difference between the two, and we think both types of eruption may have occurred roughly

  13. Preeruptive flow focussing in dikes feeding historical pillow ridges on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, I. A.; Clague, D. A.; Martin, J. F.; Paduan, J. B.; Caress, D. W.

    2013-09-01

    Linear, hummocky pillow mound volcanism dominates at slow and intermediate spreading rate mid-ocean ridges. Volcanic hummocks are thought to be formed by low effusion rates or as a result of flow focussing during effusive fissure style eruptions in which the initial dike intercepts the seafloor and erupts along its entire length. In this study, high-resolution autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) bathymetry is used to accurately map the extents of four historical fissure eruptions of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda ridges: on the North Gorda, North Cleft, and CoAxial ridge segments. The four mapped eruptions take the form of pillow mounds, which are similar in both lithology and dimension to hummocks on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Pillow mounds may be isolated, or coalesce to form composite mounds, aligned as ridges or as clustered groups. In three of the four mapped sites, the eruptions were discontinuous along their lengths, with pillow mounds and composite mounds commonly separated by areas of older seafloor. This style of discontinuous eruption is inconsistent with typical en echelon fissure eruptions and is probably due to a mildly overpressured, fingering dike intersecting the seafloor along parts of its length.

  14. Hotspot-ridge interaction in the Indian Ocean: constraints from Geosat/ERM altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo

    1996-09-01

    Upper-mantle structure of Indian Ocean spreading ridges was investigated by track segments of Geosat/ERM altimeter measurements. To determine the upper-mantle structure of the Earth's gravity field, a low-degree and -order spherical harmonic representation of the geoid was removed. A test of several reference fields suggested that a degree 2-25 field with gradually rolled off coefficients (Sandwell & Renkin 1988) offers an adequate representation of the long-wavelength geoidal undulations. Filtered profiles of three individual ridge segments display a strong asymmetry in geoid versus age trends of conjugated rift flanks. The unusually low geoid slopes on one flank can perhaps best be explained as a dynamic or thermal phenomenon reflecting a flow connection between a neighbouring off-axis hotspot plume and the ridge axis, while the other flank simply cools as it spreads away from the axial zone. It seems reasonable to hypothesize that the Southwest Indian Ridge and the Southeast Indian Ridge act as sinks for plumes beneath Agulhas Plateau and Kerguelen Islands, respectively. The Carlsberg Ridge data suggest that the Réunion hotspot contaminated northwestern African lithosphere until 15 Ma. Moreover, symmetric flattening of geoid versus age trends of conjugated ridge flanks offers evidence that plume events affect geoid versus age trends

  15. Geophysical Investigation of Australian-Antarctic Ridge Using High-Resolution Gravity and Bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. S.; Lin, J.; Park, S. H.; Choi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the Australian-Antarctic Ridge (AAR) has been remained uncharted until 2011 because of its remoteness and harsh weather conditions. From 2011, the multidisciplinary ridge program initiated by the Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI) surveyed the little-explored eastern ends of the AAR to characterize the tectonics, geochemistry, and hydrothermal activity of this intermediate spreading system. In this study, we present a detailed analysis of a 300-km-long supersegment of the AAR to quantify the spatial variations in ridge morphology and axial and off-axis volcanisms as constrained by high-resolution shipboard bathymetry and gravity. The ridge axis morphology alternates between rift valleys and axial highs within relatively short ridge segments. To obtain a geological proxy for regional variations in magma supply, we calculated residual mantle Bouguer gravity anomalies (RMBA), gravity-derived crustal thickness, and residual topography for neighboring seven sub-segments. The results of the analyses revealed that the southern flank of the AAR is associated with shallower seafloor, more negative RMBA, thicker crust, and/or less dense mantle in comparison to the conjugate northern flank. Furthermore, this north-south asymmetry becomes more prominent toward the KR1 supersegment of the AAR. The axial topography of the KR1 supersegment exhibits a sharp transition from axial highs at the western end to rift valleys at the eastern end, with regions of axial highs being associated with more robust magma supply as indicated by more negative RMBA. We also compare and contrast the characteristics of the AAR supersegment with that of other ridges of intermediate spreading rates, including the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Galápagos Spreading Center, and Southeast Indian Ridge west of the Australian-Antarctic Discordance, to investigate the influence of ridge-hotspot interaction on ridge magma supply and tectonics.

  16. Hydrodynamic properties and grain-size characteristics of volcaniclastic deposits on the mid-Atlantic Ridge north of Iceland (Kolbeinsey Ridge)

    SciTech Connect

    Oehmig, R.; Wallrabe-Adams, H. )

    1993-01-01

    Surface sediments from a transect across the mid-ocean ridge north of Iceland (Kolbeinsey Ridge) have been analyzed according to their compositional, textural and hydromechanical characteristics. The results were used to reconstruct sediment formation and depositional processes. The ridge sediments are dominated by volcaniclastic particles of hyaloclastic and pyroclastic origin. These particles show a wide variety in size, shape and density. Single-grain settling velocities of the different glass types reveal the suitability of this parameter as a reflector of the particle properties of size, shape and density, which are also known to be relevant to grain transport. Observations concerning different current expositions of central ridge sediments, combined with the parameters of settling velocity distribution, grain-size distribution and sediment particle composition, were applied to distinguish between transport association with rare, easily movable glass shards and poorly sorted sediments in sheltered ponds. A bimodal settling velocity distribution of steep ridge-flank sediments probably indicates the effect of sediment admixture from poorly sorted mass flows. Alternating coarse- and fine-grained layers characterize the transition between ridge-glass sands and the ridge-adjacent plain, which is dominated by slow-settling pelagic material.

  17. Effect of ridge-ridge interactions in crumpled thin sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Shiuan-Fan; Lo, Chun-Chao; Chou, Ming-Han; Hsiao, Pai-Yi; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2014-02-01

    We study whether and how the energy scaling based on the single-ridge approximation is revised in an actual crumpled sheet, namely, in the presence of ridge-ridge interactions. Molecular dynamics simulation is employed for this purpose. In order to improve the data quality, modifications are introduced to the common protocol. As crumpling proceeds, we find that the average storing energy changes from being proportional to one-third of the ridge length to a linear relation, while the ratio of bending and stretching energies decreases from 5 to 2. The discrepancy between previous simulations and experiments on the material-dependence for the power-law exponent is resolved. We further determine the average ridge length to scale as 1/D1/3, the ridge number as D2/3, and the average storing energy per unit ridge length as D0.881 where D denotes the volume density of the crumpled ball. These results are accompanied by experimental proofs and are consistent with mean-field predictions. Finally, we extend the existent simulations to the high-pressure region and verify the existence of a scaling relation that is more general than the familiar power law at covering the whole density range.

  18. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  19. The timescales of magma evolution at mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, Philipp A.; Regelous, Marcel; Beier, Christoph; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.; Nebel, Oliver; Haase, Karsten M.

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic crust is continuously created at mid-ocean ridges by decompression melting of the upper mantle as it upwells due to plate separation. Decades of research on active spreading ridges have led to a growing understanding of the complex magmatic, tectonic and hydrothermal processes linked to the formation of new oceanic igneous crust. However, less is known about the timescales of magmatic processes at mid-ocean ridges, including melting in and melt extraction from the mantle, fractional crystallisation, crustal assimilation and/or magma mixing. In this paper, we review the timescales of magmatic processes by integrating radiometric dating, chemical and petrological observations of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) and geophysical models. These different lines of evidence suggest that melt extraction and migration, and crystallisation and mixing processes occur over timescales of 1 to 10,000 a. High-resolution geochemical stratigraphic profiles of the oceanic crust using drill-core samples further show that at fast-spreading ridges, adjacent flow units may differ in age by only a few 100 a. We use existing chemical data and new major- and trace-element analyses of fresh MORB glasses from drill-cores in ancient Atlantic and Pacific crust, together with model stratigraphic ages to investigate how lava chemistry changes over 10 to 100 ka periods, the timescale of crustal accretion at spreading ridges which is recorded in the basalt stratigraphy in drilled sections through the oceanic crust. We show that drilled MORBs have compositions that are similar to those of young MORB glasses dredged from active spreading ridges (lavas that will eventually be preserved in the lowermost part of the extrusive section covered by younger flows), showing that the dredged samples are indeed representative of the bulk oceanic crust. Model stratigraphic ages calculated for individual flows in boreholes, together with the geochemical stratigraphy of the drilled sections, show that at

  20. Learning experiences at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) of DOE has organized an Environmental Restoration Program to handle environmental cleanup activitis for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) following General Watkins' reorganization at DOE Headquarters. Based on the major facilities and locations of contamination sites, the Environmental Restoration Program is divided into five subprograms: Oak Ridge, National Laboatory (ORNL) sites, y-12 Plant sites, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) sites, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) sites and off-site areas. The Office of Risk Analysis at ORNL was established under the auspices of the Environmental Restoration Program to implement Superfun legislation in the five subprograms of DOE-ORO. Risk assessment must examine protetial human health and ecological impacts from contaminant sources that range from highly radioactive materials to toxic chemicals and mixed wastes. The remedial alternatives we are evaluating need to reach acceptable levels of risk effectively while also being cost-efficient. The purpose of this paper is to highlight areas of particular interest and concern at Oak Ridge and to discuss, where possible, solutions implemented by the Oak Ridge Environmental Restoation Program.

  1. Experimental study of structure-forming deformations in ultra-slow spreading Arctic and Polar Atlantic ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E. P.; Grokholsky, A. L.; Kokhan, A. V.

    2010-05-01

    . Ridge obliquity varies from 35 to 60° on different parts of the ridge. It consists of short divergent magmatic segments and long transform-like amagmatic segments with unstable relation of slip and extension components. Experimental setting was the following. We emplaced three weak zones according to natural geometry of spreading modeling three neighboring ridges: Knipovich, Mohns, Gakkel. Short spreading segments orthogonal to direction of extension formed in area of Knipovich model zone. They were connected by long slip segments subparallel to extension direction. Under increase of angle between extension direction and trend of "Knipovich" weak zone the length of slip segments gradually decreased and reached minimum under the angle of 50°. The Gakkel ridge is the slowest in all the system of spreading ridges. Spreading velocity is less than 13 mm/year. Spreading is orthogonal here. Areas of volcanism are separated by 100 km long segments with minimal volcanic activity. This volcanic centers form orthogonal rises which has been stable for the last 30 Myr. Also the ridge has practically no discontinuities except the smallest with amplitude less than 13 km. Experiments were held in conditions of orthogonal extension with the smallest velocity. Formation of fractures had a linear pattern. Perpendicular to the ridge lineaments were the basic feature of structure forming. They were inherited from the primary discontinuities of fracture patterns. Thus, experiments let to distinguish key peculiarities of structure-forming in rifting zones of these ridges. For Reikjanes ridge this is a system of s-shaped fractures which are used as channels for eruption and subsequent formation of AVRs. For Knipovich ridge this is an unstable system of pull-aparts. For Gakkel ridge this is a system of linear fractures and stable lineaments perpendicular to the ridge.

  2. High Tech High School Interns Develop a Mid-Ocean Ridge Database for Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, D.; Delaney, R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A. A.; Miller, S. P.

    2004-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges (MOR) represent one of the most important geographical and geological features on planet Earth. MORs are the locations where plates spread apart, they are the locations of the majority of the Earths' volcanoes that harbor some of the most extreme life forms. These concepts attract much research, but mid-ocean ridges are still effectively underrepresented in the Earth science class rooms. As two High Tech High School students, we began an internship at Scripps to develop a database for mid-ocean ridges as a resource for science and education. This Ridge Catalog will be accessible via http://earthref.org/databases/RC/ and applies a similar structure, design and data archival principle as the Seamount Catalog under EarthRef.org. Major research goals of this project include the development of (1) an archival structure for multibeam and sidescan data, standard bathymetric maps (including ODP-DSDP drill site and dredge locations) or any other arbitrary digital objects relating to MORs, and (2) to compile a global data set for some of the most defining characteristics of every ridge segment including ridge segment length, depth and azimuth and half spreading rates. One of the challenges included the need of making MOR data useful to the scientist as well as the teacher in the class room. Since the basic structure follows the design of the Seamount Catalog closely, we could move our attention to the basic data population of the database. We have pulled together multibeam data for the MOR segments from various public archives (SIOExplorer, SIO-GDC, NGDC, Lamont), and pre-processed it for public use. In particular, we have created individual bathymetric maps for each ridge segment, while merging the multibeam data with global satellite bathymetry data from Smith & Sandwell (1997). The global scale of this database will give it the ability to be used for any number of applications, from cruise planning to data

  3. Remedial investigation work plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 4 (Rogers Quarry/Lower McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant includes - 800 acres near the northeast comer of the reservation and adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge (Fig. 1-1). The plant is a manufacturing and developmental engineering facility that produced components for various nuclear weapons systems and provides engineering support to other Energy Systems facilities. More than 200 contaminated sites have been identified at the Y-12 Plant that resulted from past waste management practices. Many of the sites have operable units (OUs) based on priority and on investigative and remediation requirements. This Remedial Investigation RI work plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Chestnut Ridge OU 4 consists of Rogers Quarry and Lower McCoy Branch (MCB). Rogers Quarry, which is also known as Old Rogers Quarry or Bethel Valley Quarry was used for quarrying from the late 1940s or early 1950s until about 1960. Since that time, the quarry has been used for disposal of coal ash and materials from Y-12 production operations, including classified materials. Disposal of coal ash ended in July 1993. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern, support an Ecological Risk Assessment and a Human Health Risk Assessment, support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this work plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU 4. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the risk posed to human health and the environment by OU 4.

  4. Segment alignment control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrun, JEAN-N.; Lorell, Ken R.

    1988-01-01

    The segmented primary mirror for the LDR will require a special segment alignment control system to precisely control the orientation of each of the segments so that the resulting composite reflector behaves like a monolith. The W.M. Keck Ten Meter Telescope will utilize a primary mirror made up of 36 actively controlled segments. Thus the primary mirror and its segment alignment control system are directly analogous to the LDR. The problems of controlling the segments in the face of disturbances and control/structures interaction, as analyzed for the TMT, are virtually identical to those for the LDR. The two systems are briefly compared.

  5. Ocean Ridges and Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmuir, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The history of oxygen and the fluxes and feedbacks that lead to its evolution through time remain poorly constrained. It is not clear whether oxygen has had discrete steady state levels at different times in Earth's history, or whether oxygen evolution is more progressive, with trigger points that lead to discrete changes in markers such as mass independent sulfur isotopes. Whatever this history may have been, ocean ridges play an important and poorly recognized part in the overall mass balance of oxidants and reductants that contribute to electron mass balance and the oxygen budget. One example is the current steady state O2 in the atmosphere. The carbon isotope data suggest that the fraction of carbon has increased in the Phanerozoic, and CO2 outgassing followed by organic matter burial should continually supply more O2 to the surface reservoirs. Why is O2 not then increasing? A traditional answer to this question would relate to variations in the fraction of burial of organic matter, but this fraction appears to have been relatively high throughout the Phanerozoic. Furthermore, subduction of carbon in the 1/5 organic/carbonate proportions would contribute further to an increasingly oxidized surface. What is needed is a flux of oxidized material out of the system. One solution would be a modern oxidized flux to the mantle. The current outgassing flux of CO2 is ~3.4*1012 moles per year. If 20% of that becomes stored organic carbon, that is a flux of .68*1012 moles per year of reduced carbon. The current flux of oxidized iron in subducting ocean crust is ~2*1012 moles per year of O2 equivalents, based on the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios in old ocean crust compared to fresh basalts at the ridge axis. This flux more than accounts for the incremental oxidizing power produced by modern life. It also suggests a possible feedback through oxygenation of the ocean. A reduced deep ocean would inhibit oxidation of ocean crust, in which case there would be no subduction flux of oxidized

  6. Ridge station eases Florida's waste-disposal problems

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, R.

    1994-10-01

    Two results of Florida's continuing population growth are (1) a critical need for electricity, and (2) a solid-waste disposal crisis. During a recent winter cold snap, electric demand in one service territory surged 25% over generating capacity and 10% over net system capability. Rolling blackouts ensued. At the same time, Florida's fragile wetlands environment is suffering from years of unfettered development. Groundwater sources are contaminated, landfill space is scarce, and illegal tire dumps blight the landscape. The recently constructed Ridge generating station in Polk County, Fla. is addressing both the state's electrical and environmental needs. Ridge, which entered commercial operation in May, burns a unique mix of urban woodwaste and scrap tires to provide 45 MW of critically needed electricity while keeping large quantities of solid waste out of landfills. When pipeline construction at an adjacent landfill is completed, the facility also will burn the methane gases produced when garbage decomposes.

  7. Magnetic Interface for Segmented Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H.

    2012-01-01

    Newly developed magnetic devices are used to create an interface between adjacent mirror segments so that once assembled, aligned, and phased, the multiple segments will behave functionally equivalent to a monolithic aperture mirror. One embodiment might be a kinematic interface that is reversible so that any number of segments can be pre-assembled, aligned, and phased to facilitate fabrication operations, and then disassembled and reassembled, aligned, and phased in space for operation. The interface mechanism has sufficient stiffness, force, and stability to maintain phasing. The key to producing an interface is the correlated magnetic surface. While conventional magnets are only constrained in one direction -- the direction defined by their point of contact (they are in contact and cannot get any closer) -- correlated magnets can be designed to have constraints in multiple degrees of freedom. Additionally, correlated magnetic surfaces can be designed to have a limited range of action.

  8. A detailed study of the Cobb Offset of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Evolution of a propagating rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. Paul; Karsten, Jill L.; Delaney, John R.; Davis, Earl E.; Currie, Ralph G.; Chase, Richard L.

    1983-03-01

    The Cobb Offset on the northern portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge has been identified as the tip of a northward propagating rift [Hey and Wilson, 1982]. Map compilations of magnetic and seismic data from four new cruises define the present locus of spreading and volcanism on the two ridge segments abutting the Offset and permit detailed modeling of the recent evolution within this transform zone. The axis of recent spreading on the southern ridge segment bends from the normal ridge trend (N20°E) to a N-S trend, north of 47°15'N. The spreading axis on the northern ridge segment generally defines a N20°E trend, except at the southern terminus, where the spreading center is offset slightly to the east. The two spreading centers overlap by about 33 km in the Offset vicinity, and there is evidence of recent volcanism on both segments. Present ridge axis morphology exhibits a transitional sequence from a symmetrical, axial high along the more `normal' portions of each ridge segment to a grabenlike depression as the tip is approached. The magnetic anomaly patterns observed in the Cobb Offset vicinity are not consistent with the patterns predicted by models of continuous, northward propagation. The magnetic anomaly patterns of the Brunhes Epoch require an event of rapid northward propagation about 0.7 m.y. B.P., followed by a more gradual southward propagation in the middle Brunhes Epoch; most recently, the spreading center on the southern ridge has extended northward to its present configuration. Prior to the Brunhes Epoch, modeling of the magnetic anomaly patterns does not indicate a unique solution; however, net propagation has been northward. We present alternative models for the period beginning 1.7 m.y. B.P. In the first model, the Cobb Offset has evolved by a series of northward and southward events of propagation, with net advance to the north. In the second model, stable asymmetric spreading from overlapping ridge segments has evolved into a transform fault

  9. Min-cut segmentation of cursive handwriting in tabular documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Brian L.; Barrett, William A.; Swingle, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Handwritten tabular documents, such as census, birth, death and marriage records, contain a wealth of information vital to genealogical and related research. Much work has been done in segmenting freeform handwriting, however, segmentation of cursive handwriting in tabular documents is still an unsolved problem. Tabular documents present unique segmentation challenges caused by handwriting overlapping cell-boundaries and other words, both horizontally and vertically, as "ascenders" and "descenders" overlap into adjacent cells. This paper presents a method for segmenting handwriting in tabular documents using a min-cut/max-flow algorithm on a graph formed from a distance map and connected components of handwriting. Specifically, we focus on line, word and first letter segmentation. Additionally, we include the angles of strokes of the handwriting as a third dimension to our graph to enable the resulting segments to share pixels of overlapping letters. Word segmentation accuracy is 89.5% evaluating lines of the data set used in the ICDAR2013 Handwriting Segmentation Contest. Accuracy is 92.6% for a specific application of segmenting first and last names from noisy census records. Accuracy for segmenting lines of names from noisy census records is 80.7%. The 3D graph cutting shows promise in segmenting overlapping letters, although highly convoluted or overlapping handwriting remains an ongoing challenge.

  10. Extinct mid-ocean ridges and insights on the influence of hotspots at divergent plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Sarah; Dietmar Müller, R.; Williams, Simon; Matthews, Kara

    2016-04-01

    We review all global examples of confirmed or suspected extinct mid-ocean ridges that are preserved in present-day ocean basins. Data on their spreading rate prior to extinction, time of cessation, length of activity, bathymetric and gravity signature are analysed. This analysis identifies some differences between subgroups of extinct ridges, including microplate spreading ridges, back-arc basin ridges and large-scale mid-ocean ridges. Crustal structure of extinct ridges is evaluated using gravity inversion to seek to resolve a long-standing debate on whether the final stages of spreading leads to development of thinned or thickened crust. Most of the ridges we assess have thinner crust at their axes than their flanks, yet a small number are found to have a single segment that is overprinted by an anomalous feature such as a seamount or volcanic ridge. A more complex cessation mechanism is necessary in these cases. The location of spreading centres at their time of cessation relative to hotspots was also evaluated using a global plate reconstruction. This review provides strong evidence for the long-term interaction of spreading centres with hotspots and plate boundaries have been frequently modified within the radius of a hotspot zone of influence.

  11. SOLIDS TRANSPORT BETWEEN ADJACENT CAFB FLUIDIZED BEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an experimental investigation of a pulsed, dense-phase pneumatic transport system for controlled circulation between adjacent fluidized beds. A model was developed to predict performance. The program provides technical support for EPA's program to demo...

  12. Border separation for adjacent orthogonal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, B.L.; Khan, F.M.; Sharma, S.C.; Lee, C.K.; Kim, T.H. )

    1991-06-01

    Field border separations for adjacent orthogonal fields can be calculated geometrically, given the validity of some important assumptions such as beam alignment and field uniformity. Thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) measurements were used to investigate dose uniformity across field junctions as a function of field separation and, in particular, to review the CCSG recommendation for the treatment of medulloblastoma with separate head and spine fields.

  13. Seismological imaging of ridge-arc interaction beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center from OBS ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Yang; Webb, Spahr C.; Wei, S. Shawn; Wiens, Douglas A.; Blackman, Donna K.; Menke, William; Dunn, Robert A.; Conder, James A.

    2014-12-01

    The Lau Basin displays large along-strike variations in ridge characters with the changing proximity of the adjacent subduction zone. The mechanism governing these changes is not well understood but one hypotheses relates them to interaction between the arc and back-arc magmatic systems. We present a 3D seismic velocity model of the shallow mantle beneath the Eastern Lau back-arc Spreading Center (ELSC) and the adjacent Tofua volcanic arc obtained from ambient noise tomography of ocean bottom seismograph data. Our seismic images reveal an asymmetric upper mantle low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the ELSC. Two major trends are present as the ridge-to-arc distance increases: (1) the LVZ becomes increasingly offset from the ridge to the north, where crust is thinner and the ridge less magmatically active; (2) the LVZ becomes increasingly connected to a sub-arc low velocity zone to the south. The separation of the ridge and arc low velocity zones is spatially coincident with the abrupt transition in crustal composition and ridge morphology. Our results present the first mantle imaging confirmation of a direct connection between crustal properties and uppermost mantle processes at ELSC, and support the prediction that as ELSC migrates away from the arc, a changing mantle wedge flow pattern leads to the separation of the arc and ridge melting regions. Slab-derived water is cutoff from the ridge, resulting in abrupt changes in crustal lava composition and crustal porosity. The larger offset between mantle melt supply and the ridge along the northern ELSC may reduce melt extraction efficiency along the ridge, further decreasing the melt budget and leading to the observed flat and faulted ridge morphology, thinner crust and the lack of an axial melt lens.

  14. Sipunculans and segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Kristof, Alen; Brinkmann, Nora

    2009-01-01

    Comparative molecular, developmental and morphogenetic analyses show that the three major segmented animal groups—Lophotrochozoa, Ecdysozoa and Vertebrata—use a wide range of ontogenetic pathways to establish metameric body organization. Even in the life history of a single specimen, different mechanisms may act on the level of gene expression, cell proliferation, tissue differentiation and organ system formation in individual segments. Accordingly, in some polychaete annelids the first three pairs of segmental peripheral neurons arise synchronously, while the metameric commissures of the ventral nervous system form in anterior-posterior progression. Contrary to traditional belief, loss of segmentation may have occurred more often than commonly assumed, as exemplified in the sipunculans, which show remnants of segmentation in larval stages but are unsegmented as adults. The developmental plasticity and potential evolutionary lability of segmentation nourishes the controversy of a segmented bilaterian ancestor versus multiple independent evolution of segmentation in respective metazoan lineages. PMID:19513266

  15. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  16. [Bilateral segmental neurofibromatosis].

    PubMed

    Rose, I; Vakilzadeh, F

    1991-12-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis is a rare type of neurofibromatosis. We report a case of bilateral manifestation, review the literature on this extremely uncommon variant, and discuss the possible causative mechanisms and the genetic risk of segmental neurofibromatosis. PMID:1765491

  17. Station Tour: Russian Segment

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams concludes her tour of the International Space Station with a visit to the Russian segment, which includes Zarya, the first segment of the station launched in 1...

  18. Seismostratigraphy, tectonics and geological history of the Ninetyeast Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinova, Yulia; Levchenko, Oleg; Sborshchikov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    The Ninetyeast Ridge (NER) is a ~5000 km-long, aseismic volcanic ridge trending N-S in the Central Indian Ocean Basin. It is widely accepted that NER formed as a hotspot track created by northward migration of the Indian plate over the Kerguelen hotspot during the Late Cretaceous and Early Cenozoic. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry data and multichannel seismic profiles collected over the NER at seven sites between 5.5° N and 26.1° S during cruise KNOX06RR of RV Roger Revelle with the participation of P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology supplemented ideas about its seismostratigraphy and tectonics to clarify geological history [Sager et al.,2007]. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry data and 2D multichannel seismic data clearly show active faulting along the entire length of the NER. Bathymetry data collected in cruise show significant changes of NER's morphology varies with latitude - from large, individual seamounts in the north segment to smaller, linear, narrow seamounts and ridges in the central segment to high, nearly continuous, and often highly asymmetric with a steep eastern slope and low western slope ridge in the south. Three its distinct morphological segments are characterized also by different internal tectonic structure (faults geometry). The faults have different directions for each segment of NER - they trend to NW-SE less NE-SW in the northern segment, E-W in the central segment and NE-SW in the south. Large near E-W grabens mostly filled by intensively deformed sediments are widespread along the ridge. All three identified types of the faults are extension structures and no compression structures, predictable from the regional stress field, is not observed yet. Additional features were traced within the sedimentary cover of NER as a result of seismic stratigraphy analysis of the multichannel seismic data collected in proximity to DSDP and ODP drill holes (Sites 758, 216, 214, and 253) - eight reflectors: 0, 0A, 1, 1A, 2, 3, 4 and 5 and

  19. A geochemical anomaly contiguous with the Dorsa Geike wrinkle ridge in Mare Fecunditatis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andre, C. G.; Adler, I.; Clark, P. E.; Weidner, J. R.; Philpotts, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The orbital Al/Si X-ray fluorescence data from Apollo 15 and 16 reveal a concentration of unusually low Al/Si intensity ratios associated with a 220-km long ray along the northeast-southwest trending wrinkle ridge, Dorsa Geike, of the Mare Fecunditatis. The paper describes in detail the analysis of the Al/Si X-ray fluorescence data by which this geochemical anomaly was discovered. Correlation with other remote sensing data also indicates that the ridge area is different from the rest of the mare. It is possible that the material associated with the low Al/Si intensity ratio is of different composition than the adjacent mare regolith. Downslope transport along the ridge and arch could expose basalts which contrast chemically with surrounding regolith. The anomaly could also be due to extrusion of a volcanic rock of different composition at the fracture system represented by the wrinkle ridge.

  20. Growth of a tectonic ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R.W.; Messerich, J.A.; Johnson, A.M.

    1997-12-31

    The 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake of M 7.6 created an impressive record of surface rupture and ground deformation. Fractures extend over a length of more than 80 km including zones of right-lateral shift, steps in the fault zones, fault intersections and vertical changes. Among the vertical changes was the growth of a tectonic ridge described here. In this paper the authors describe the Emerson fault zone and the Tortoise Hill ridge including the relations between the fault zone and the ridge. They present data on the horizontal deformation at several scales associated with activity within the ridge and belt of shear zones and show the differential vertical uplifts. And, they conclude with a discussion of potential models for the observed deformation.

  1. The Mid-Ocean Ridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Kenneth C.; Fox, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    Described are concepts involved with the formation and actions of the Mid-Ocean Ridge. Sea-floor spreading, the magma supply model, discontinuities, off-axis structures, overlaps and deviation, and aquatic life are discussed. (CW)

  2. Evidence for accumulated melt beneath the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, M. C.; Navin, D. A.; MacGregor, L. M.; Constable, S.; Peirce, C.; White, A.; Heinson, G.; Inglis, M. A.

    The analysis of data from a multi-component geophysical experiment conducted on a segment of the slow-spreading (20 mm yr-1) Mid-Atlantic Ridge shows compelling evidence for a significant crustal magma body beneath the ridge axis. The role played by a crustal magma chamber beneath the axis in determining both the chemical and physical architecture of the newly formed crust is fundamental to our understanding of the accretion of oceanic lithosphere at spreading ridges, and over the last decade subsurface geophysical techniques have successfully imaged such magma chambers beneath a number of intermediate and fast spreading (60-140 mm yr-1 full rate) ridges. However, many similar geophysical studies of slow-spreading ridges have, to date, found little or no evidence for such a magma chamber beneath them. The experiment described here was carefully targeted on a magmatically active, axial volcanic ridge (AVR) segment of the Reykjanes Ridge, centred on 57 degrees 43 minutes North. It consisted of four major components: wide-angle seismic profiles using ocean bottom seismometers; seismic reflection profiles; controlled source electromagnetic sounding; and magneto-telluric sounding. Interpretation and modelling of the first three of these datasets shows that an anomalous body lies at a depth of between 2 and 3 km below the seafloor beneath the axis of the AVR. This body is characterized by anomalously low seismic P-wave velocity and electrical resistivity, and is associated with a seismic reflector. The geometry and extent of this melt body shows a number of similarities with the axial magma chambers observed beneath ridges spreading at much higher spreading rates. Magneto-telluric soundings confirm the existence of very low electrical resistivities in the crust beneath the AVR and also indicate a deeper zone of low resistivity within the upper mantle beneath the ridge.

  3. Segmentation and disruption of the East Pacific Rise in the mouth of the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Peter

    1995-08-01

    Analysis of new multibeam bathymetry and all available magnetic data shows that the 340 km-long crest of the East Pacific Rise between Rivera and Tamayo transforms contains segments of both the Pacific-Rivera and the Pacific-North America plate boundaries. Another Pacific-North America spreading segment (“Alarcon Rise”) extends 60 km further north to the Mexican continental margin. The Pacific-North America-Rivera triple junction is now of the RRR type, located on the risecrest 60 km south of Tamayo transform. Slow North America-Rivera rifting has ruptured the young lithosphere accreted to the east flank of the rise, and extends across the adjacent turbidite plain to the vicinity of the North America-Rivera Euler pole, which is located on the plate boundary. The present absolute motion of the Rivera microplate is an anticlockwise spin at 4° m.y.-1 around a pole located near its southeast corner; its motion has recently changed as the driving forces applied to its margins have changed, especially with the evolution of the southern margin from a broad shear zone between Rivera and Mathematician microplates to a long Pacific-Rivera transform. Pleistocene rotations in spreading direction, by as much as 15° on the Pacific-Rivera boundary, have segmented the East Pacific Rise into a staircase of en echelon spreading axes, which overlap at lengthening and migrating nontransform offsets. The spreading segments vary greatly in risecrest geomorphology, including the full range of structural types found on other rises with intermediate spreading rates: axial rift valleys, split shield volcanoes, and axial ridges. Most offsets between the segments have migrated southward, but within the past 1 m.y. the largest of them (with 14 27 km of lateral displacement) have shown “dueling” behavior, with short-lived reversals in migration direction. Migration involves propagation of a spreading axis into abyssal hill terrain, which is deformed and uplifted while it occupies the

  4. Petrochemical Results for Volcanic Rocks recovered from SHINKAI 6500 diving on the Bonin Ridge (27°15'N-28°25'N): submarine extension of Ogasawara forearc volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomer, S. H.; Kimura, J.; Stern, R. J.; Ohara, Y.; Ishii, T.; Ishizuka, O.; Haraguchi, S.; Machida, S.; Reagan, M.; Kelley, K.; Hargrove, U.; Wortel, M.; Li, Y. B.

    2004-12-01

    Hf concentrations. Our new data indicate that Haha-jima type depleted tholeiites may be widespread along the northern part of the escarpment west of the Bonin Ridge, whereas occurrence of boninite is limited to the region adjacent to Chichi-jima Islands. Segmentation of boninite distribution may be related to an eastward bathymetric indentation of the scarp between Chichi-jima and Muko-jima. Temporal relationships between Eocene tholeiites and boninites of the islands and those recovered by diving await the results of dating and further geological investigations.

  5. Possible and Impossible Segments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Rachel; Pullum, Geoffrey K.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the relationship between phonetic possibility and phonological permissibility of segment types. Specific focus is on whether there are any phonetically impossible segments phonologically permissible, and whether there are any phonetically possible segments phonologically impermissable. Examines the case of nasality spreading in Sudanese…

  6. Lavinia Region Ridge Belts, Plains and Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This is a Magellan full resolution radar mosaic of the Lavinia region of Venus. The mosaic is centered at 50 degrees south latitude, 345 degrees east longitude, and spans 540 kilometers (338 miles) north to south and 900 kilometers (563 miles) east to west. As with all Magellan images acquired thus far, the illumination of the radar is from the left hand side of the image. This area shows a diverse set of geologic features. The bright area running from the upper right to the lower left is interpreted as part of a belt of ridges, formed by compression and thickening of the upper layers of the planet. The areas between ridges suggest flooding by radar dark (and thus presumably) smoother lavas. The varied texture of the lavas can be seen in the mottled appearance of the plains which are cut by the ridges; brighter, rougher flows are also quite common. The particularly bright flows in the lower right corner are the northern extension of Mylitta Fluctus. The bright ridges adjacent to Mylitta Fluctus at the bottom center of the image also appear to have been affected by the volcanic activity. Some of these bright features have been interpreted as down dropped areas roughly 5 kilometers (3 miles) wide. This would imply a region of extension where the crust has been pulled apart and thus was more easily flooded by the later lava flows. The thinner fractures running from the upper left seem to end at the ridge belt in the center of this mosaic. These thinner fractures are a continuation of a pattern seen throughout much of Lavinia and suggest a pattern of compression over a very large region. At the bottom of the image, overlying the ridges, is an impact crater 10 to 15 kilometers (6 to 10 miles) in diameter. The double or overlapped crater structure and asymmetrical ejecta pattern suggests that the incoming body broke up shortly before it hit, leaving closely spaced craters. The placement of the crater on top of the ridges implies it is younger than the ridges; in fact

  7. Multi-segment detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Peter K. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A plurality of stretcher detector segments are connected in series whereby detector signals generated when a bubble passes thereby are added together. Each of the stretcher detector segments is disposed an identical propagation distance away from passive replicators wherein bubbles are replicated from a propagation path and applied, simultaneously, to the stretcher detector segments. The stretcher detector segments are arranged to include both dummy and active portions thereof which are arranged to permit the geometry of both the dummy and active portions of the segment to be substantially matched.

  8. The Tribolium castaneum ortholog of Sex combs reduced controls dorsal ridge development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In insects, the boundary between the embryonic head and thorax is formed by the dorsal ridge, a fused structure composed of portions of the maxillary and labial segments. However, the mechanisms that promote development of this unusual structure remain a mystery. In Drosophila, mutations in the Hox ...

  9. Color image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrae, Kimberley A.; Ruck, Dennis W.; Rogers, Steven K.; Oxley, Mark E.

    1994-03-01

    The most difficult stage of automated target recognition is segmentation. Current segmentation problems include faces and tactical targets; previous efforts to segment these objects have used intensity and motion cues. This paper develops a color preprocessing scheme to be used with the other segmentation techniques. A neural network is trained to identify the color of a desired object, eliminating all but that color from the scene. Gabor correlations and 2D wavelet transformations will be performed on stationary images; and 3D wavelet transforms on multispectral data will incorporate color and motion detection into the machine visual system. The paper will demonstrate that color and motion cues can enhance a computer segmentation system. Results from segmenting faces both from the AFIT data base and from video taped television are presented; results from tactical targets such as tanks and airplanes are also given. Color preprocessing is shown to greatly improve the segmentation in most cases.

  10. Asymmetric active seismicity along the ultra-slow spreading Gakkel Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, John R.; Voss, Peter H.; Lavier, Luc L.

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-slow spreading ridges are frequently characterised by spreading segments that are largely magma starved. Spreading along such segments does not occur by crustal creation/accretion processes such as intrusions, diking and volcanism, but rather by mechanical extension of the lithosphere, exposing the mantle to seafloor where it interacts with seawater to form serpentinite. Such exhumation is thought to occur along detachment faults that form concave down surfaces and produce an extensional geometry that is highly asymmetric. A consequence of all models that have been developed to simulate this type of extension is that stress and strain is focused primarily on the footwall block of the spreading system. This would predict that at any given time, only one side of the system should show active seismicity. In 2001, the Gakkel Ridge was extensively sampled by dredging during the AMORE cruise. These samples showed that the ridge is divided into distinct segments that today are either magmatically robust (only basalts recovered) or magmatically starved (dominantly serpentinised peridotite and gabbros recovered). We extracted earthquake data along the Gakkel Ridge from the global catalogs to investigate if these distinct segments exhibit any differences in active seismicity. We show that the western volcanic zone shows symmetric active seismicity, with earthquakes occurring on both sides of the ridge axis along a relatively restricted region. In contrast, the sparsely magmatic zone shows active seismicity dominantly along along the southern half of the ridge, with comparatively little seismicity to the north. These results are consistent with the proposed models for the formation of amagmatic spreading centers.

  11. Building Roof Segmentation from Aerial Images Using a Line-and Region-Based Watershed Segmentation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Merabet, Youssef El; Meurie, Cyril; Ruichek, Yassine; Sbihi, Abderrahmane; Touahni, Raja

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel strategy for roof segmentation from aerial images (orthophotoplans) based on the cooperation of edge- and region-based segmentation methods. The proposed strategy is composed of three major steps. The first one, called the pre-processing step, consists of simplifying the acquired image with an appropriate couple of invariant and gradient, optimized for the application, in order to limit illumination changes (shadows, brightness, etc.) affecting the images. The second step is composed of two main parallel treatments: on the one hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed regions. Even if the first segmentation of this step provides good results in general, the image is often over-segmented. To alleviate this problem, an efficient region merging strategy adapted to the orthophotoplan particularities, with a 2D modeling of roof ridges technique, is applied. On the other hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed lines. The third step consists of integrating both watershed segmentation strategies into a single cooperative segmentation scheme in order to achieve satisfactory segmentation results. Tests have been performed on orthophotoplans containing 100 roofs with varying complexity, and the results are evaluated with the VINETcriterion using ground-truth image segmentation. A comparison with five popular segmentation techniques of the literature demonstrates the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach. Indeed, we obtain a good segmentation rate of 96% with the proposed method compared to 87.5% with statistical region merging (SRM), 84% with mean shift, 82% with color structure code (CSC), 80% with efficient graph-based segmentation algorithm (EGBIS) and 71% with JSEG. PMID:25648706

  12. Carpenter Ridge Tuff, CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Olivier; Deering, Chad D.; Lipman, Peter W.; Plummer, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The ~1,000 km3 Carpenter Ridge Tuff (CRT), erupted at 27.55 Ma during the mid-tertiary ignimbrite flare-up in the western USA, is among the largest known strongly zoned ash-flow tuffs. It consists primarily of densely welded crystal-poor rhyolite with a pronounced, highly evolved chemical signature (high Rb/Sr, low Ba, Zr, Eu), but thickly ponded intracaldera CRT is capped by a more crystal-rich, less silicic facies. In the outflow ignimbrite, this upper zone is defined mainly by densely welded crystal-rich juvenile clasts of trachydacite composition, with higher Fe-Ti oxide temperatures, and is characterized by extremely high Ba (to 7,500 ppm), Zr, Sr, and positive Eu anomalies. Rare mafic clasts (51-53 wt% SiO2) with Ba contents to 4,000-5,000 ppm and positive Eu anomalies are also present. Much of the major and trace-element variations in the CRT juvenile clasts can be reproduced via in situ differentiation by interstitial melt extraction from a crystal-rich, upper-crustal mush zone, with the trachydacite, crystal-rich clasts representing the remobilized crystal cumulate left behind by the melt extraction process. Late recharge events, represented by the rare mafic clasts and high-Al amphiboles in some samples, mixed in with parts of the crystal cumulate and generated additional scatter in the whole-rock data. Recharge was important in thermally remobilizing the silicic crystal cumulate by partially melting the near-solidus phases, as supported by: (1) ubiquitous wormy/sieve textures and reverse zoning patterns in feldspars and biotites, (2) absence of quartz in this very silicic unit stored at depths of >4-5 km, and (3) heterogeneous melt compositions in the trachydacite fiamme and mafic clasts, particularly in Ba, indicating local enrichment of this element due mostly to sanidine and biotite melting. The injection of hot, juvenile magma into the upper-crustal cumulate also imparted the observed thermal gradient to the deposits and the mixing overprint that

  13. Probability of rupture of multiple fault segments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.; Schwerer, E.

    2000-01-01

    Fault segments identified from geologic and historic evidence have sometimes been adopted as features limiting the likely extends of earthquake ruptures. There is no doubt that individual segments can sometimes join together to produce larger earthquakes. This work is a trial of an objective method to determine the probability of multisegment ruptures. The frequency of occurrence of events on all conjectured combinations of adjacent segments in northern California is found by fitting to both geologic slip rates and to an assumed distribution of event sizes for the region as a whole. Uncertainty in the shape of the distribution near the maximum magnitude has a large effect on the solution. Frequencies of individual events cannot be determined, but it is possible to find a set of frequencies to fit a model closely. A robust conclusion for the San Francisco Bay region is that large multisegment events occur on the San Andreas and San Gregorio faults, but single-segment events predominate on the extended Hayward and Calaveras strands of segments.

  14. The SHEBA Ridge : a Particular Spreading Center or an End-member of the Slow Spreading Processes ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GENTE, P.; LEROY, S.; BLAIS, A.; d'ACREMONT, E.; PATRIAT, P.; FLEURY, J.; MAIA, M.; PERROT, J.; FOURNIER, M.

    2001-12-01

    We analyze multibeam bathymetry, acoustic imagery, magnetic and gravity data collected during the Encens-Sheba cruise of the NO Marion Dufresne. The survey covered the axis and the flanks up to the continental margins of the Sheba Ridge between 52oE and 54o30'E, at the oriental extremity of the Aden gulf. The full spreading rate in this young oceanic basin is about 2 cmy since the continental rifting. Three second-order segments, one presenting an anomalously shallow axis, characterize this part of the Sheba ridge. The new bathymetry data reveal a particular fabric on the flanks and at the axis for the long (120 km) and shallow spreading center. The flanks, like the ridge axis, are marked by large, more or less circular, volcanic domes. They are built by a few large volcanoes (5-10 km diameter) and by several smaller (1-2 km diameter) edifices. Many of these volcanoes present a well-developed caldera. These volcanic constructions are well developed in the southern part of the axis. Close to the axis, the higher reliefs culminate at a depth of 1000 m. Tectonic scarps limit a deep axial valley at the extremities of this long segment. The deformation, diffuse at the ends, becomes more focused toward the center of this segment and is arranged in an hourglass pattern. A negative mantle Bouguer anomaly elongated in the spreading direction marks this segment. The differences in MBA (~70 mgals) and in depth (more than 2 km) between the center and the ends of this segment are the largest, highest of the slow spreading ridges. Acoustic imagery, axial magnetic and mantle Bouguer anomalies generally permit to precise the location of the spreading axis. In this segment, if the axial area is clearly defined, the neovolcanic zone is more difficult to localize. This suggests a diffuse volcanism at the center of the segment at the origin of the numerous small volcanoes. The other segments of the Sheba ridge present a more typical slow spreading axial valley. The discontinuities

  15. Wrinkle ridge assemblages on the terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watters, Thomas R.

    1988-01-01

    The morphological and dimensional similarities of the structures within the wrinkle ridge assemblages observed on terrestrial planets are investigated, including structures that occur in mare basalts on the moon and in smooth plains on Mars and Mercury. These structures can be classified as either arches or ridges on the basis of morphology, and ridges can be subdivided onto first-, second-, and third-order ridges on the basis of dimensions. Using ridge structures on the Columbia Plateau (U.S.) as analogs, a basis for a structural interpretation of the wrinkle ridge assemblages on the terrestrial planets is established. It is shown that the anticlinal ridges of the Columbia Plateau are appropriate analogs to the first-order ridges, supporting tectonic interpretations for the ridges.

  16. Multiresolution segmentation technique for spine MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiyun; Yan, Chye H.; Ong, Sim Heng; Chui, Cheekong K.; Teoh, Swee H.

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a hybrid method for segmentation of spinal magnetic resonance imaging that has been developed based on the natural phenomenon of stones appearing as water recedes. The candidate segmentation region corresponds to the stones with characteristics similar to that of intensity extrema, edges, intensity ridge and grey-level blobs. The segmentation method is implemented based on a combination of wavelet multiresolution decomposition and fuzzy clustering. First thresholding is performed dynamically according to local characteristic to detect possible target areas, We then use fuzzy c-means clustering in concert with wavelet multiscale edge detection to identify the maximum likelihood anatomical and functional target areas. Fuzzy C-Means uses iterative optimization of an objective function based on a weighted similarity measure between the pixels in the image and each of c cluster centers. Local extrema of this objective function are indicative of an optimal clustering of the input data. The multiscale edges can be detected and characterized from local maxima of the modulus of the wavelet transform while the noise can be reduced to some extent by enacting thresholds. The method provides an efficient and robust algorithm for spinal image segmentation. Examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the technique on some spinal MRI images.

  17. Three-Dimensional Shear Wave Velocity Structure of the Peru Flat Slab Subduction Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies focused on flat slab subduction segments in central Chile (L. S. Wagner, 2006) and Alaska (B. R. Hacker and G. A. Aber, 2012) suggest significant differences in seismic velocity structures, and hence, composition in the mantle wedge between flat and normal "steep" subducting slabs. Instead of finding the low velocities and high Vp/Vs ratios common in normal subduction zones, these studies find low Vp, high Vs, and very low Vp/Vs above flat slabs. This may indicate the presence of dry, cold material in the mantle wedge. In order to investigate the seismic velocities of the upper mantle above the Peruvian flat segment, we have inverted for 2D Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps using data from the currently deployed 40 station PULSE seismic network and some adjacent stations from the CAUGHT seismic network. We then used the sensitivity of surface waves to shear wave velocity structure with depth to develop a 3D shear wave velocity model. This model will allow us to determine the nature of the mantle lithosphere above the flat slab, and how this may have influenced the development of local topography. For example, dry conditions (high Vs velocities) above the flat slab would imply greater strength of this material, possibly making it capable of causing further inland overthrusting, while wet conditions (low Vs) would imply weaker material. This could provide some insight into the ongoing debate over whether the Fitzcarrald arch (along the northern most flank of the Altiplano) could be a topographical response to the subducted Nazca ridge hundred kilometers away from the trench (N. Espurt, 2012, P. Baby, 2005, V. A. Ramos, 2012) or not (J. Martinod, 2005, M. Wipf, 2008, T. Gerya, 2008).

  18. Seismic evidence for hotspot-induced buoyant flow beneath the Reykjanes Ridge.

    PubMed

    Gaherty, J B

    2001-08-31

    Volcanic hotspots and mid-ocean ridge spreading centers are the surface expressions of upwelling in Earth's mantle convection system, and their interaction provides unique information on upwelling dynamics. I investigated the influence of the Iceland hotspot on the adjacent mid-Atlantic spreading center using phase-delay times of seismic surface waves, which show anomalous polarization anisotropy-a delay-time discrepancy between waves with different polarizations. This anisotropy implies that the hotspot induces buoyancy-driven upwelling in the mantle beneath the ridge. PMID:11533487

  19. Role of gas hydrates in slope failure on frontal ridge of northern Cascadia margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelisetti, S.; Spence, G.; Riedel, M.

    2011-12-01

    Although the relationship between slope failure and gas hydrate dissociation has not been confirmed yet, several studies support a potential connection. Mass failures on the frontal ridge area are of comparable size (e.g., 1-3 km3) to others that have generated large tsunamis. The main objective of the present study is to examine seismic velocity structure on a frontal ridge of the Cascadia accretionary margin using tomographic velocity models and to seek a possible connection between sedimentary slide features and the presence of gas hydrate beneath the ridge. The active-source seismic experiment was completed in July 2010 on a frontal ridge where a prominent landslide, the Slipstream slide, was located. A grid of 7 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS's) was deployed on the ridge, mostly near its crest. These recorded wide-angle reflections and refractions from a 120 cu-in airgun. The presence of gas hydrate is indicated by a prominent bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) observed on a vertical incidence reflection line beneath the ridge crest. To complement the vertical-incidence data, the sub-seafloor structure was imaged by migrating water-layer multiples from the OBS data. Preliminary results indicate an improvement in the BSR image beneath the steep slopes on a line across the ridge. Gas hydrate is also indicated from analysis of velocities from the OBS data. The BSR is observed at ~ 260-270 m depth beneath the ridge crest. The velocity structure above the BSR shows anomalous high velocities of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 90 m below the seafloor. The depth of the BSR and high velocity layer are consistent with the velocity structure determined previously in an OBS survey at an adjacent ridge, where the thickness of the high-velocity layer appeared to be about 20-30 m based on results of drilling by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. However, in the present study the glide plane is observed at a depth of 100 ± 10 m, in contrast to the adjacent ridge where

  20. Crustal Thickness on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Bull's-Eye Gravity Anomalies and Focused Accretion.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, M; Harding, A J; Orcutt, J A

    1993-10-29

    Spreading segments of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge show negative bull's-eye anomalies in the mantle Bouguer gravity field. Seismic refraction results from 33 degrees S indicate that these anomalies can be accounted for by variations in crustal thickness along a segment. The crust is thicker in the center and thinner at the end of the spreading segment, and these changes are attributable to variations in the thickness of layer 3. The results show that accretion is focused at a slow-spreading ridge, that axial valley depth reflects the thickness of the underlying crust, and that along-axis density variations should be considered in the interpretation of gravity data. PMID:17812339

  1. Comparison of Ridges on Triton and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Pappalardo, R. .

    2003-01-01

    Triton and Europa each display a variety of ridges and associated troughs. The resemblance of double ridges on these two satellites has been previously noted [R. Kirk, pers. comm.], but as yet, the similarities and differences between these feature types have not been examined in any detail. Triton s ridges, and Europa s, exhibit an evolutionary sequence ranging from isolated troughs, through doublet ridges, to complex ridge swaths [1, 2]. Comparison of ridges on Europa to those on Triton may provide insight into their formation on both satellites, and thereby have implications for the satellites' histories.

  2. Hidden tectonics at slow-spreading ridges: distinguishing magmatic from tectonic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, C. J.; Searle, R. C.; Mallows, C.; Young, E. C.

    2011-12-01

    In the fifteen years since the discovery of oceanic core complexes (OCCs) at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges our understanding of the processes of seafloor spreading has changed fundamentally. Following the 2010 Chapman Conference on Detachments in Oceanic Lithosphere there has been a general convergence of view that OCCs - the flat-topped domal massifs with spreading-direction-parallel corrugations found at intervals along slow-spreading ridges - represent the exposed, inactive portions of long-lived extensional detachment structures that exhume mantle rocks in their footwalls. Detachments appear to initiate and slip at steep angles before rolling over as a flexural response to unloading. It is recognised that detachment fault initiation, i.e. maintenance of slip on a single median valley fault, is favoured when the proportion of plate separation accommodated by magmatic accretion in the axial valley is about a third to a half of the total. Fault weakening, typically by formation of phyllosilicates such as talc as a result of deep penetration of fluids along the fault, appears also to be an essential pre-requisite for detachment fault formation. Considerably less well understood are the mechanisms of melt emplacement into the lithosphere and the nature of the interactions between tectonism and magmatism. In a recent paper on the 13°N region of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR; MacLeod et al. 2009 EPSL v.287, p.333-344) we showed that volcanism is suppressed when OCC detachment faults are active, but that renewed volcanism propagating laterally along strike from adjacent, magmatically robust segments intrudes into their footwalls and may eventually terminate them. If melt supply is insufficient to overwhelm the detachment it may instead be captured in the footwall of an OCC, decoupling the mantle melt flux from that contributing to magmatic accretion in the hanging wall and instead promoting asymmetric accretion. This model implicitly views oceanic detachments as

  3. High resolution bathymetric and sonar images of a ridge southeast of Terceira Island (Azores plateau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, N.; Miranda, J. M.; Luis, J.; Silva, I.; Goslin, J.; Ligi, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Terceira rift is a oblique ultra-slow spreading system where a transtensive regime results from differential movement between Eurasian and African plates. So far no classical ridge segmentation pattern has here been observed. The predominant morphological features are fault controlled rhombic shaped basins and volcanism related morphologies like circular seamounts and volcanic ridges. We present SIMRAD EM300 (bathymetry + backscatter) images acquired over one of these ridges located SE of Terceira Island, during the SIRENA cruise (PI J. Goslin), which complements previous TOBI mosaics performed over the same area during the AZZORRE99 cruise (PI M. Ligi). The ridge presents a NW-SE orientation, it is seismically active (a seismic crisis was documented in 1997) and corresponds to the southern branch of a V shape bathymetric feature enclosing the Terceira Island and which tip is located west of the Island near the 1998 Serreta ridge eruption site. NE of the ridge, the core of the V, corresponds to the North Hirondelle basin. All this area corresponds mainly to Brunhes magnetic epoch. The new bathymetry maps reveal a partition between tectonic processes, centred in the ridge, and volcanism present at the bottom of the North Hirondelle basin. The ridge high backscatter surface is cut by a set of sub-parallel anastomosed normal faults striking between N130º and N150º. Some faults present horse-tail terminations. Fault splays sometimes link to neighbour faults defining extensional duplexes and fault wedge basins and highs of rhombic shape. The faulting geometry suggests that a left-lateral strike slip component should be present. The top of the ridge consists on an arched demi-.horst, and it is probably a volcanic structure remnant (caldera system?), existing prior to onset of the tectonic stage in the ridge. Both ridge flanks display gullies and mass wasting fans at the base of the slope. The ridge vicinities are almost exclusively composed of a grayish homogeneous

  4. A segment interaction analysis of proximal-to-distal sequential segment motion patterns.

    PubMed

    Putnam, C A

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the motion-dependent interaction between adjacent lower extremity segments during the actions of kicking and the swing phases of running and walking. This was done to help explain the proximal-to-distal sequential pattern of segment motions typically observed in these activities and to evaluate general biomechanical principles used to explain this motion pattern. High speed film data were collected for four subjects performing each skill. Equations were derived which expressed the interaction between segments in terms of resultant joint moments at the hip and knee and several interactive moments which were functions of gravitational forces or kinematic variables. The angular motion-dependent interaction between the thigh and leg was found to play a significant role in determining the sequential segment motion patterns observed in all three activities. The general nature of this interaction was consistent across all three movements except during phases in which there were large differences in the knee angle. Support was found for the principle of summation of segment speeds, whereas no support was found for the principle of summation of force or for general statements concerning the effect of negative thigh acceleration on positive leg acceleration. The roles played by resultant joint moments in producing the observed segment motion sequences are discussed. PMID:1997807

  5. Reconstructing genome mixtures from partial adjacencies.

    PubMed

    Mahmoody, Ahmad; Kahn, Crystal L; Raphael, Benjamin J

    2012-01-01

    Many cancer genome sequencing efforts are underway with the goal of identifying the somatic mutations that drive cancer progression. A major difficulty in these studies is that tumors are typically heterogeneous, with individual cells in a tumor having different complements of somatic mutations. However, nearly all DNA sequencing technologies sequence DNA from multiple cells, thus resulting in measurement of mutations from a mixture of genomes. Genome rearrangements are a major class of somatic mutations in many tumors, and the novel adjacencies (i.e. breakpoints) resulting from these rearrangements are readily detected from DNA sequencing reads. However, the assignment of each rearrangement, or adjacency, to an individual cancer genome in the mixture is not known. Moreover, the quantity of DNA sequence reads may be insufficient to measure all rearrangements in all genomes in the tumor. Motivated by this application, we formulate the k-minimum completion problem (k-MCP). In this problem, we aim to reconstruct k genomes derived from a single reference genome, given partial information about the adjacencies present in the mixture of these genomes. We show that the 1-MCP is solvable in linear time in the cases where: (i) the measured, incomplete genome has a single circular or linear chromosome; (ii) there are no restrictions on the chromosomal content of the measured, incomplete genome. We also show that the k-MCP problem, for k ≥ 3 in general, and the 2-MCP problem with the double-cut-and-join (DCJ) distance are NP-complete, when there are no restriction on the chromosomal structure of the measured, incomplete genome. These results lay the foundation for future algorithmic studies of the k-MCP and the application of these algorithms to real cancer sequencing data. PMID:23282028

  6. Impact assisted segmented cutterhead

    DOEpatents

    Morrell, Roger J.; Larson, David A.; Ruzzi, Peter L.

    1992-01-01

    An impact assisted segmented cutterhead device is provided for cutting various surfaces from coal to granite. The device comprises a plurality of cutting bit segments deployed in side by side relationship to form a continuous cutting face and a plurality of impactors individually associated with respective cutting bit segments. An impactor rod of each impactor connects that impactor to the corresponding cutting bit segment. A plurality of shock mounts dampening the vibration from the associated impactor. Mounting brackets are used in mounting the cutterhead to a base machine.

  7. Cyclicity of Crustal Accretion at the Reykjanes Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, A.; Peirce, C.; Searle, R.; Sinha, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Reykjanes Ridge is an ideal site to study tectono-magmatic cycles due to its slow spreading rate (10 mm yr-3 half rate), oblique spreading (30° to ridge normal) and because a number of previous studies over the ridge have documented various aspects of its along-axis segmentation in detail. A multi-disciplinary approach, combining bathymetry, TOBI, gravity and magnetic data, provides evidence that crustal accretion is a cyclic process here. The study area, extending from 57°30'N to 58°30'N, covers 7 axial volcanic ridges (AVR) at various stages in the tectono-magmatic cycle. It is hypothesised that the lifecycle stage of an individual AVR will be reflected in its crustal structure either through crustal thickening and/or the presence of partial melt in the mid-crust. The long-wavelength effect of the Iceland plume on the crustal structure of the ridge is initialy examined. The along-axis free-air gravity anomaly is forward modelled in 2D, revealing an along-axis increase in crustal thickness from 7.5 km to 10.5 km and a decrease in mantle density from 3.30 to 3.23 g cm-3 between 57°30'N and 62°N. Normal oceanic crustal thickness of 7.1+/-0.8 km is achieved south of 59°N confirming that the study area is free of plume influence. Calculation of the mantle and residual mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA and RMBA) reveal short-wavelength, AVR-centred lows superimposed on a broad ridge-trending low. Along-AVR-axis modelling shows that these RMBA lows can be explained by a 200-800 m thickening of the crust and/or by the presence of 5-20% melt in the mid-crust. Magnetic anomaly data is inverted with the bathymetry to reveal magnetization intensity variations that correlate with individual AVRs and relate to the age of extrusives. The along-ridge-axis variation in AVR age, length, RMBA amplitude and magnetization intensity appears to follow a cyclic pattern. The most mature AVR, centred on 58°05'N, is also the longest at 35 km, and has a negative RMBA suggesting local

  8. The Ridge, the Glasma and Flow

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-15

    I discuss the ridge phenomena observed in heavy ion collisions at RHIC. I argue that the ridge may be due to flux tubes formed from the Color Glass Condensate in the early Glasma phase of matter produced in such collisions.

  9. Ridge Regression for Interactive Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory study of the value of ridge regression for interactive models is reported. Assuming that the linear terms in a simple interactive model are centered to eliminate non-essential multicollinearity, a variety of common models, representing both ordinal and disordinal interactions, are shown to have "orientations" that are favorable to…

  10. Oak Ridge callibration recall program

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, K.G.; Wright, W.E.; Pritchard, E.W.

    1996-12-31

    A development effort was initiated within the Oak Ridge metrology community to address the need for a more versatile and user friendly tracking database that could be used across the Oak Ridge complex. This database, which became known as the Oak Ridge Calibration Recall Program (ORCRP), needed to be diverse enough for use by all three Oak Ridge facilities, as well as the seven calibration organizations that support them. Various practical functions drove the initial design of the program: (1) accessible by any user at any site through a multi-user interface, (2) real-time database that was able to automatically generate e-mail notices of due and overdue measuring and test equipment, (3) large memory storage capacity, and (4) extremely fast data access times. In addition, the program needed to generate reports on items such as instrument turnaround time, workload projections, and laboratory efficiency. Finally, the program should allow the calibration intervals to be modified, based on historical data. The developed program meets all of the stated requirements and is accessible over a network of computers running Microsoft Windows software.

  11. Evaluation of the stress distribution change at the adjacent facet joints after lumbar fusion surgery: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianxiong; Jia, Haobo; Ma, Xinlong; Xu, Weiguo; Yu, Jingtao; Feng, Rui; Wang, Jie; Xing, Dan; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Shaowen; Yang, Yang; Chen, Yang; Ma, Baoyi

    2014-07-01

    Spinal fusion surgery has been widely applied in clinical treatment, and the spinal fusion rate has improved markedly. However, its postoperative complications, especially adjacent segment degeneration, have increasingly attracted the attention of spinal surgeons. The most common pathological condition at adjacent segments is hypertrophic degenerative arthritis of the facet joint. To study the stress distribution changes at the adjacent facet joint after lumbar fusion with pedicle screw fixation, human cadaver lumbar spines were used in the present study, and electrical resistance strain gauges were attached on L1-L4 articular processes parallel or perpendicular to the articular surface of facet joints. Subsequently, electrical resistance strain gauge data were measured using anYJ-33 static resistance strain indicator with three types of models: the intact model, the laminectomy model, and the fusion model with pedicle screw fixation. The strain changes in the measurement sites indirectly reflect the stress changes. Significant differences in strain were observed between the normal and laminectomy state at all facet joints. Significant differences in strain were observed between the normal and the pedicle screw fixation fusion state at the L1/2 and L3/4 facet joints. The increased stress on the facet joints after lumbar fusion with pedicle screw fixation may be the cause of adjacent segment degeneration. PMID:24963037

  12. Multi-segment coherent beam combining

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Tucker, S.D.; Morgan, R.; Smith, T.G.; Warren, M.E.; Gruetzner, J.K.; Rosenthal, R.R.; Bentley, A.E.

    1994-12-31

    Scaling laser systems to large sizes for power beaming and other applications can sometimes be simplified by combing a number of smaller lasers. However, to fully utilize this scaling, coherent beam combination is necessary. This requires measuring and controlling each beam`s pointing and phase relative to adjacent beams using an adaptive optical system. We have built a sub-scale brass-board to evaluate various methods for beam-combining. It includes a segmented adaptive optic and several different specialized wavefront sensors that are fabricated using diffractive optics methods. We have evaluated a number of different phasing algorithms, including hierarchical and matrix methods, and have demonstrated phasing of several elements. The system is currently extended to a large number of segments to evaluate various scaling methodologies.

  13. Coarse-clast ridge complexes of the Caribbean: A preliminary basis for distinguishing tsunami and storm-wave origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.; Richmond, B.M.; Jaffe, B.E.; Gelfenbaum, G.

    2008-01-01

    Coastal gravel-ridge complexes deposited on islands in the Caribbean Sea are recorders of past extreme-wave events that could be associated with either tsunamis or hurricanes. The ridge complexes of Bonaire, Jamaica, Puerto Rico (Isla de Mona), and Guadeloupe consist of polymodal clasts ranging in size from sand to coarse boulders that are derived from the adjacent coral reefs or subjacent rock platforms. Ridge-complex morphologies and crest elevations are largely controlled by availability of sediments, clast sizes, and heights of wave runup. The ridge complexes are internally organized, display textural sorting and a broad range of ages including historical events. Some display seaward-dipping beds and ridge-and-swale topography, and some terminate in fans or steep avalanche slopes. Together, the morphologic, sedimentologic, lithostratigraphic, and chronostratigraphic evidence indicates that shore-parallet ridge complexes composed of gravel and sand that are tens of meters wide and several meters thick are primarily storm-constructed features that have accumulated for a few centuries or millennia as a result of multiple high-frequency intense-wave events. They are not entirely the result of one or a few tsunamis as recently reported. Tsunami deposition may account for some of the lateral ridge-complex accretion or boulder fields and isolated blocks that are associated with the ridge complexes. Copyright ?? 2008, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  14. Passive microwave signatures of fractures and ridges in sea ice at 33. 6 GHz (vertical polarization) as observed in aircraft images

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, L.D.; Eppler, D.T.; Lohanick, A.W. )

    1993-03-15

    An aircraft data set of coincident K[sub a] band (33.6 GHz, vertical polarization) passive microwave images and aerial photographs acquired in the Chukchi-Beaufort Sea region in March 1983 was analyzed to evaluate radiometric signatures of deformational features that occur in sea ice. A total of 115 fractures and 197 pressure ridges were examined with respect to physical appearance (relative age, snow cover, ice type, width, orientation) as observed in photographs, and radiometric character (brightness temperature, radiometric contrast with respect to adjacent ice, radiometric profile across the feature) as measured from digital passive microwave images. Of the deformational features that were observed in aerial photographs, 82% had radiometric signatures of sufficient contrast to be observed in passive microwave images. Fractures and ridges have equal chance of detection, but fractures cannot be distinguished from pressure ridges on the basis of brightness temperature, radiometric contrast, or characteristics of radiometric profiles measured across these features. Radiometric signatures of both fractures and ridges are more likely to be radiometrically warmer (as opposed to cooler) than adjacent ice, which suggests that saline ice is a significant constituent of most deformational features. New ridges are more likely to be radiometrically warmer than old ridges, probably because brine drains from the ridge as it ages (which reduces emissivity) and snow accumulates in drifts along the ridge trend (which enhances scattering). However, brightness temperatures of snow-covered ridges extend across a range that is approximately 15 K cooler, and 10 K warmer than the range observed for snow-free ridges. Old features show higher radiometric contrast with respect to adjacent ice than new features, which increases their probability of detection. 36 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Mosaic of Europa's Ridges, Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This view of the icy surface of Jupiter's moon, Europa, is a mosaic of two pictures taken by the Solid State Imaging system on board the Galileo spacecraft during a close flyby of Europa on February 20, 1997. The pictures were taken from a distance of 2,000 kilometers (1,240 miles). The area shown is about 14 kilometers by 17 kilometers (8.7 miles by 10.6 miles), and has a resolution of 20 meters (22 yards) per pixel. Illumination is from the right (east). The picture is centered at about 14.8 north latitude, 273.8 west longitude, in Europa's trailing hemisphere.

    One of the youngest features seen in this area is the double ridge cutting across the picture from the lower left to the upper right. This double ridge is about 2.6 kilometers (1.6 miles) wide and stands some 300 meters (330 yards) high. Small craters are most easily seen in the smooth deposits along the south margin of the prominent double ridge, and in the rugged ridged terrain farther south. The complexly ridged terrain seen here shows that parts of the icy crust of Europa have been modified by intense faulting and disruption, driven by energy from the planet's interior.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at: http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  16. Image segmentation using joint spatial-intensity-shape features: application to CT lung nodule segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xujiong; Siddique, Musib; Douiri, Abdel; Beddoe, Gareth; Slabaugh, Greg

    2009-02-01

    Automatic segmentation of medical images is a challenging problem due to the complexity and variability of human anatomy, poor contrast of the object being segmented, and noise resulting from the image acquisition process. This paper presents a novel feature-guided method for the segmentation of 3D medical lesions. The proposed algorithm combines 1) a volumetric shape feature (shape index) based on high-order partial derivatives; 2) mean shift clustering in a joint spatial-intensity-shape (JSIS) feature space; and 3) a modified expectation-maximization (MEM) algorithm on the mean shift mode map to merge the neighboring regions (modes). In such a scenario, the volumetric shape feature is integrated into the process of the segmentation algorithm. The joint spatial-intensity-shape features provide rich information for the segmentation of the anatomic structures or lesions (tumors). The proposed method has been evaluated on a clinical dataset of thoracic CT scans that contains 68 nodules. A volume overlap ratio between each segmented nodule and the ground truth annotation is calculated. Using the proposed method, the mean overlap ratio over all the nodules is 0.80. On visual inspection and using a quantitative evaluation, the experimental results demonstrate the potential of the proposed method. It can properly segment a variety of nodules including juxta-vascular and juxta-pleural nodules, which are challenging for conventional methods due to the high similarity of intensities between the nodules and their adjacent tissues. This approach could also be applied to lesion segmentation in other anatomies, such as polyps in the colon.

  17. Constraints on the mantle mineralogy of an ultra-slow ridge: Hafnium isotopes in abyssal peridotites and basalts from the 9-25°E Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Soumen; Standish, Jared J.; Bizimis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We report on the Hf isotopic compositions of clinopyroxene mineral separates from eleven abyssal peridotites and Nd and Hf-isotopic compositions of twenty-seven co-located basalts from 9-25°E South West Indian Ridge (SWIR). In Nd-Hf isotope space the SWIR peridotites plot within the global MORB field (εNd = 4.5- 12.5, εHf = 9.6- 18.7), with the 15.23°E peridotites being the most radiogenic. The lack of correlation between Hf isotopes and trace or major element systematics including Lu/Hf ratios suggests that the 15.23°E peridotites were recently processed beneath the ridge and therefore participated in the production of the SWIR lavas. The Hf isotopic compositions of 15.23°E peridotites are more radiogenic than all basalts from the 9-25°E ridge, whereas the 9.98°E and 16.64°E peridotites partially overlap with the Hf isotope ratios of the spatially co-located basalts. This indicates the upwelling mantle beneath the SWIR contains material with enriched isotope signatures in addition to an isotopically depleted peridotitic mantle, which is consistent with the SWIR peridotites and basalt Nd isotope systematics from previously published studies. As the enriched isotope signatures are not observed in the peridotites we assume that they are sourced from material with lower solidus temperature than a typical peridotite. This enriched material was consumed during melting, and therefore may be mineralogically distinct (e.g. pyroxenite). Moreover, the variable spatial distribution of the enriched isotope signatures requires preferential sampling of the enriched component at distinct along-axis locations. The Hf-Nd isotope variability of the 9-25°E basalts can be entirely explained by mixing between a depleted peridotitic mantle end-member with the isotope composition of the 15.23°E peridotites and an enriched end-member with the isotope composition of the Narrowgate Segment lavas at 14.6°E. We estimate a maximum of 5% modal abundance of the enriched material in a

  18. Structure of the Ninetyeast Ridge North of the Equator, Eastern Indian Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopala Rao, D.; Sreekrishna, K.; Levchenko, O.; W. Sager, W.; Paul, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Ninetyeast Ridge in the eastern Indian Ocean is an aseismic volcanic ridge that marks the Keruguelen hotspot trace between 35°S and 17°N, depicting significant changes in morphology and crust/lithosphere structure. Age progression, younger ages in the south to older ages, 90 Ma (anomaly 34) in the north of the ridge has been reported from linear magnetic anomalies adjoining the ridge and rocks drilled from it during the DSDP/ODP cruises. The bathymetric expression of it is visible up to Lat. 10°N but seismic reflection data indicate its buried anticlinal shape beneath the Bengal Fan, extending up to about Lat.17°N. Gravity anomalies are strongly positive over the exposed segment of the ridge but are subdued over the buried portion. A prominent break in the continuity of the Sunda-trench gravity low reflects that the ridge impinges upon the island arc and seismic reflection data indicate that the ridge approaches close to the trench. The crest of the ridge consists of numerous peaks and sediment filled basins. The sediments are likely to be volcnoclastic and/or shallow water carbonates depending upon submarine to sub- aerial conditions of the parts of the ridge overlain by hemi-pelagic to turbidites of varied thickness. Seismic sequences of the sediments are < 2 km, < 6 km and > 6 km over the ridge, along the eastern flank and on the western flank respectively. The velocity structure of the sedimentary sequences, from top to bottom, consists of 1.6 to 1.9, 2.4 to 2.7, 3.2 to 3.4, 4.5 to 4,6 and 5.2 to 5.7 km/s layers along the western flank, 1.7 to 2.0, 2.3 to 3.2 and 4.6 to 5.7 km/s of Quaternary, pre-Miocene and pre-Paleocene respectively over the crest of the ridge and 2.3, 2.9 and 4.8 km/s velocity along the eastern flank of the ridge underlain by 6.4 km/s velocity oceanic layer 2. Tight folds and closely spaced faults (normal and reverse), some of them extending to the basement and deforming the crust of the ridge, have been imaged seismically. The en

  19. Dynamic Ridges and Valleys in a Strike-Slip Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvall, Alison R.; Tucker, Gregory E.

    2015-10-01

    Strike-slip faults have long been known for characteristic near-fault landforms such as offset rivers and strike-parallel valleys. In this study, we use a landscape evolution model to investigate the longer-term, catchment-wide landscape response to horizontal fault motion. Our results show that strike-slip faulting induces a persistent state of disequilibrium in the modeled landscapes brought about by river lengthening along the fault alternating with abrupt shortening due to stream capture. The models also predict that, in some cases, ridges oriented perpendicular to the fault migrate laterally in conjunction with fault motion. We find that ridge migration happens when slip rate is slow enough and/or soil creep and river incision are efficient enough that the landscape can respond to the disequilibrium brought about by strike-slip motion. Regional rock uplift relative to baselevel also plays a role, as topographic relief is required for ridge migration. In models with faster horizontal slip rates, stronger rocks, or less efficient hillslope transport, ridge mobility is limited or arrested despite the continuance of river lengthening and capture. In these cases, prominent steep, fault-facing facets form along well-developed fault valleys. Comparison of landscapes adjacent to fast-slipping (>30 mm/yr) and slower-slipping (≤1 mm/yr or less) strike-slip faults in California, USA, reveals features that are consistent with model predictions. Our results highlight a potential suite of geomorphic signatures that can be used as indicators of horizontal crustal motion and geomorphic processes in strike-slip settings even after river capture has diminished or erased apparent offset along the fault.

  20. Biomechanics of Artificial Disc Replacements Adjacent to a 2-Level Fusion in 4-Level Hybrid Constructs: An In Vitro Investigation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhenhua; Fogel, Guy R; Wei, Na; Gu, Hongsheng; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The ideal procedure for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases remains controversial. Recent studies on hybrid surgery combining anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR) for 2-level and 3-level constructs have been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study was to estimate the biomechanics of 3 kinds of 4-level hybrid constructs, which are more likely to be used clinically compared to 4-level arthrodesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Eighteen human cadaveric spines (C2-T1) were evaluated in different testing conditions: intact, with 3 kinds of 4-level hybrid constructs (hybrid C3-4 ACDR+C4-6 ACDF+C6-7ACDR; hybrid C3-5ACDF+C5-6ACDR+C6-7ACDR; hybrid C3-4ACDR+C4-5ACDR+C5-7ACDF); and 4-level fusion. RESULTS Four-level fusion resulted in significant decrease in the C3-C7 ROM compared with the intact spine. The 3 different 4-level hybrid treatment groups caused only slight change at the instrumented levels compared to intact except for flexion. At the adjacent levels, 4-level fusion resulted in significant increase of contribution of both upper and lower adjacent levels. However, for the 3 hybrid constructs, significant changes of motion increase far lower than 4P at adjacent levels were only noted in partial loading conditions. No destabilizing effect or hypermobility were observed in any 4-level hybrid construct. CONCLUSIONS Four-level fusion significantly eliminated motion within the construct and increased motion at the adjacent segments. For all 3 different 4-level hybrid constructs, ACDR normalized motion of the index segment and adjacent segments with no significant hypermobility. Compared with the 4-level ACDF condition, the artificial discs in 4-level hybrid constructs had biomechanical advantages compared to fusion in normalizing adjacent level motion. PMID:26694835

  1. Biomechanics of Artificial Disc Replacements Adjacent to a 2-Level Fusion in 4-Level Hybrid Constructs: An In Vitro Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhenhua; Fogel, Guy R.; Wei, Na; Gu, Hongsheng; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background The ideal procedure for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases remains controversial. Recent studies on hybrid surgery combining anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR) for 2-level and 3-level constructs have been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study was to estimate the biomechanics of 3 kinds of 4-level hybrid constructs, which are more likely to be used clinically compared to 4-level arthrodesis. Material/Methods Eighteen human cadaveric spines (C2–T1) were evaluated in different testing conditions: intact, with 3 kinds of 4-level hybrid constructs (hybrid C3–4 ACDR+C4–6 ACDF+C6–7ACDR; hybrid C3–5ACDF+C5–6ACDR+C6–7ACDR; hybrid C3–4ACDR+C4–5ACDR+C5–7ACDF); and 4-level fusion. Results Four-level fusion resulted in significant decrease in the C3–C7 ROM compared with the intact spine. The 3 different 4-level hybrid treatment groups caused only slight change at the instrumented levels compared to intact except for flexion. At the adjacent levels, 4-level fusion resulted in significant increase of contribution of both upper and lower adjacent levels. However, for the 3 hybrid constructs, significant changes of motion increase far lower than 4P at adjacent levels were only noted in partial loading conditions. No destabilizing effect or hypermobility were observed in any 4-level hybrid construct. Conclusions Four-level fusion significantly eliminated motion within the construct and increased motion at the adjacent segments. For all 3 different 4-level hybrid constructs, ACDR normalized motion of the index segment and adjacent segments with no significant hypermobility. Compared with the 4-level ACDF condition, the artificial discs in 4-level hybrid constructs had biomechanical advantages compared to fusion in normalizing adjacent level motion. PMID:26694835

  2. Minimal shape and intensity cost path segmentation.

    PubMed

    Seghers, Dieter; Loeckx, Dirk; Maes, Frederik; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Suetens, Paul

    2007-08-01

    A new generic model-based segmentation algorithm is presented, which can be trained from examples akin to the active shape model (ASM) approach in order to acquire knowledge about the shape to be segmented and about the gray-level appearance of the object in the image. Whereas ASM alternates between shape and intensity information during search, the proposed approach optimizes for shape and intensity characteristics simultaneously. Local gray-level appearance information at the landmark points extracted from feature images is used to automatically detect a number of plausible candidate locations for each landmark. The shape information is described by multiple landmark-specific statistical models that capture local dependencies between adjacent landmarks on the shape. The shape and intensity models are combined in a single cost function that is optimized noniteratively using dynamic programming, without the need for initialization. The algorithm was validated for segmentation of anatomical structures in chest and hand radiographs. In each experiment, the presented method had a significant higher performance when compared to the ASM schemes. As the method is highly effective, optimally suited for pathological cases and easy to implement, it is highly useful for many medical image segmentation tasks. PMID:17695131

  3. The impact of internodal segmentation in biophysical nerve fiber models.

    PubMed

    Dekker, David M T; Briaire, Jeroen J; Frijns, Johan H M

    2014-10-01

    Implementation of double cable models to simulate the behavior of myelinated peripheral nerve fibers requires defining a segmentation of the internode between successive nodes of Ranvier. The number of internodal segments is a model parameter that is not well agreed on, with values in the literature ranging from 1 to more than 500. Moreover, a lot of studies also lack a sensitivity study or a rationale behind the implementation used. In a model of a myelinated nerve fiber developed in our group, the segmentation scheme (i.e., the number of segments and their individual morphology) strongly influenced model outcomes such as action potential shape and velocity, stimulation threshold and absolute refractory period. In the present study these influences were investigated systematically in homogeneous neurons with different diameters. Uniformly segmented internodes were found to require several hundreds of segments (and associated computational power) to reach model outcomes differing by less than 1 % from the asymptotic value. In fact, in the majority of segmentation schemes the main determinant is not the number of segments, but the length λ of the internodal segments directly adjacent to the nodes of Ranvier. If λ is larger than approximately 10 μm, model outcomes for the tested fibers are almost independent of the total number of segments. Furthermore, λ can be optimized to enable models using just three segments per internode, to reach physiologically relevant model outcomes with limited computational resources. However, to study anatomical or physiological details of the internode itself, an appropriately detailed segmentation scheme is crucial. PMID:24827400

  4. Exchange coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets.

    PubMed

    Dey, H; Csaba, G; Bernstein, G H; Porod, W

    2016-09-30

    We experimentally demonstrate exchange-coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets. Our results show that two neighboring nanomagnets that are each antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled to a common ferromagnetic bottom layer can be brought into strong ferromagnetic interaction. Simulations show that interlayer exchange coupling effectively promotes ferromagnetic alignment between the two nanomagnets, as opposed to antiferromagnetic alignment due to dipole-coupling. In order to experimentally demonstrate the proposed scheme, we fabricated arrays of pairs of elongated, single-domain nanomagnets. Magnetic force microscopy measurements show that most of the pairs are ferromagnetically ordered. The results are in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. The presented scheme can achieve coupling strengths that are significantly stronger than dipole coupling, potentially enabling far-reaching applications in Nanomagnet Logic, spin-wave devices and three-dimensional storage and computing. PMID:27535227

  5. Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Panahi, Behrouz M.

    2006-03-23

    So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

  6. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  7. Variability of Southern Valu Fa Ridge Magmatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, C. I.; Christie, D. M.; Arculus, R.

    2004-12-01

    Valu Fa Ridge (VFR), which encompasses the southernmost segments of the East Lau Spreading Center (ELSC), is an important end-member in the spectrum of back-arc spreading centers because it is strongly affected in all aspects of the spreading process by inputs from the nearby active Tofua (Tonga) volcanic arc, and because its magma systems are rapidly evolving as the VFR propagates to the south. New lava samples collected by the TELVE Expedition of the R/V Southern Surveyor (Australia) from the four southernmost VFR segments have greatly increased the number and spatial distribution of fresh volcanic glass samples, quadrupling the availability of "primitive" (MgO > 6 wt.%) glass samples and encompassing significant along- and across-axis geochemical variability. These new data provide an opportunity to evaluate both the evolution of crustal magmatic processes relative to southward rift propagation and variability in mantle source inputs relative to the active volcanic arc. The four sampled segments of VFR are separated by left-stepping overlapping offsets that differ from their mid-ocean ridge counterparts in their longer, more parallel overlapping limbs and in the absence of an overlap basin. The TELVE glasses display considerable major element variability and the VFR is unusual among well-developed spreading centers in its strongly bimodal volcanism, in the abundance of evolved lavas and in the coexistence of two distinct liquid lines of descent. Dacites and rhyolites (SiO2 ~67-75 wt.%) are relatively abundant close to segment ends or discontinuities along the southernmost three ridge segments, but rare from the northernmost sampled segment and from off-axis seamounts. A "Daly Gap" from ~60-67 wt.% SiO2 and 1.75-0.75 wt.% MgO is present along the northern segments but absent near the southern propagating rift tip. Primitive (MgO > 6wt.%) glasses were recovered from all VFR segments and on 5 of the 9 sampled seamounts. Both high-silica glasses and FeTi basalt

  8. Advanced Seismic Studies of the Endeavour Ridge: Understanding the Interplay among Magmatic, Hydrothermal, and Tectonic Processes at Mid-Ocean Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoux, G. M.; VanderBeek, B. P.; Morgan, J. V.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Warner, M.

    2014-12-01

    At mid-ocean ridges magmatic, hydrothermal, and tectonic processes are linked. Understanding their interactions requires mapping magmatic systems and tectonic structures, as well as their relationship to hydrothermal circulation. Three-dimensional seismic images of the crust can be used to infer the size, shape, and location of magma reservoirs, in addition to the structure of the thermal boundary layer that connects magmatic and hydrothermal processes. Travel time tomography has often been used to study these processes, however, the spatial resolution of travel time tomography is limited. Three-dimensional full waveform inversion (FWI) is a state-of-the art seismic method developed for use in the oil industry to obtain high-resolution models of the velocity structure. The primary advantage of FWI is that it has the potential to resolve subsurface structures on the order of half the seismic wavelength—a significant improvement on conventional travel time tomography. Here, we apply anisotropic FWI to data collected on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Starting models for anisotropic P-wave velocity were obtained by travel time tomography [Weekly et al., 2014]. During FWI, the isotropic velocity model is updated and anisotropy is held constant. We have recovered low-velocity zones approximately 2-3 km beneath the ridge axis that likely correspond to a segmented magma-rich body and are in concert with those previously resolved using multi-channel seismic reflection methods. The segmented crustal magma body underlies all five known high-temperature hydrothermal vent fields along the Endeavour segment. A high-velocity zone, shallower than the observed low-velocity zones, underlies the southernmost hydrothermal vent field. This may be indicative of waning hydrothermal activity in which minerals are crystallizing beneath the vent field. Our FWI study of the Endeavour Ridge will provide the most detailed three-dimensional images of the crustal structure to

  9. Shallow axial magma chamber at the slow-spreading Erta Ale Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagli, Carolina; Wright, Tim J.; Ebinger, Cynthia J.; Yun, Sang-Ho; Cann, Johnson R.; Barnie, Talfan; Ayele, Atalay

    2012-04-01

    The existence of elongated, shallow magma chambers beneath the axes of fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges is well established. Yet, at slow-spreading ridges such shallow and elongated magma chambers are much less evident. Simple thermal models therefore predict that spreading velocity and magma supply may provide the main controls on magma-chamber depth and morphology. Here we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar data to investigate the dynamics of the magma chamber beneath the slow-spreading Erta Ale segment of the Ethiopian Rift. We show that an eruption from Alu-Dalafilla in November 2008 was sourced from a shallow, 1km deep, elongated magma chamber that is divided into two segments. The eruption was probably triggered by a small influx of magma into the northern segment. Both segments of the magma chamber fed the main eruption through a connecting dyke and both segments have been refilling rapidly since the eruption ended. Our results support the presence of independent sources of magma supply to segmented chambers located along the axes of spreading centres. However, the existence of a shallow, elongated axial chamber at Erta Ale indicates that spreading rate and magma supply may not be the only controls on magma-chamber characteristics.

  10. Middle Tertiary volcanism during ridge-trench interactions in western California

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.B.; Basu, A.R. )

    1992-10-01

    Bimodal volcanism in the Santa Maria Province of west-central California occurred when segments of the East Pacific Rise interacted with a subduction zone along the California margin during the Early Miocene (about 17 million years ago). Isotopic compositions of neodymium and strontium as well as trace-element data indicate that these volcanic rocks were derived from a depleted-mantle (mid-ocean ridge basalt) source. After ridge-trench interactions, the depleted-mantle reservoir was juxtaposed beneath the continental margin and was erupted to form basalts. It also assimilated and partially melted local Jurassic-Cretaceous sedimentary and metasedimentary basement rocks to form rhyolites and dacites. 28 refs.

  11. New data about small-magnitude earthquakes of the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Alexey N.; Vaganova, Natalya V.; Ivanova, Ekaterina V.; Konechnaya, Yana V.; Fedorenko, Irina V.; Mikhaylova, Yana A.

    2016-01-01

    At the present time there is available detailed bathymetry, gravimetric, magnetometer, petrological, and seismic (mb > 4) data for the Gakkel Ridge. However, so far not enough information has been obtained on the distribution of small-magnitude earthquakes (or microearthquakes) within the ridge area due to the absence of a suitable observation system. With the ZFI seismic station (80.8° N, 47.7° E), operating since 2011 at the Frantz Josef Land Archipelago, we can now register small-magnitude earthquakes down to 1.5 ML within the Gakkel Ridge area. This article elaborates on the results and analysis of the ZFI station seismic monitoring obtained for the period from December 2011 to January 2015. In order to improve the accuracy of the earthquakes epicenter locations, velocity models and regional seismic phase travel-times for spreading ridges in areas within the Euro-Arctic Region have been calculated. The Gakkel Ridge is seismically active, regardless of having the lowest spreading velocity among global mid-ocean ridges. Quiet periods alternate with periods of higher seismic activity. Earthquakes epicenters are unevenly spread across the area. Most of the epicenters are assigned to the Sparsely Magmatic Zone, more specifically, to the area between 1.5° E and 19.0° E. We hypothesize that assignment of most earthquakes to the SMZ segment can be explained by the amagmatic character of the spreading of this segment. The structuring of this part of the ridge is characterized by the prevalence of tectonic processes, not magmatic or metamorphic ones.

  12. Hydrothermal plumes at the Rodriguez triple junction, Indian ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamo, Toshitaka; Nakayama, Eiichiro; Shitashima, Kiminori; Isshiki, Kenji; Obata, Hajime; Okamura, Kei; Kanayama, Shinji; Oomori, Tamotsu; Koizumi, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Hasumoto, Hiroshi

    1996-07-01

    Water column anomalies of light transmission, Mn, Fe, Al and CH 4 concentrations were searched in the central, southeastern and southwestern Indian Ridge segments centered on the Rodriguez Triple Junction (RTJ) (˜25°32'S, ˜70°02'E), for the purpose of locating hydrothermally active areas, in July to August 1993. We found an active zone in the central Indian Ridge segment (25°18-20'S) approximately 12 miles north of the RTJ, where significant hydrothermal plumes were observed at 2,200-2,400 m depth. Intensive tow-yo observations using a CTD rosette multi-sampling system equipped with a transmissometer revealed that the plumes show temporal as well as spatial variations. Discrete water samples within the plumes were enriched in Mn, Fe, and CH 4, with maximum concentrations of 9.8 n M, 40.2 n M and 3.3 n M, respectively. Judging from the spatial and chemical characteristics of the plumes, especially from transmission anomalies and C/H 4Mn ratios, we speculate that the hydrothermal venting site might be not in the rift valley but on the eastern off-axis zone, several miles distant from the rift valley.

  13. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  14. 30 CFR 56.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 56.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  15. 30 CFR 57.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 57.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  16. 30 CFR 56.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 56.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  17. 30 CFR 57.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 57.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  18. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  3. Three-dimensional admittance analysis of lithospheric elastic thickness over the Louisville Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Minzhang; Li, Hui; Shen, Chongyang; Xing, Lelin; Hao, Hongtao

    2016-04-01

    Using bathymetry and altimetric gravity anomalies, a 1° × 1° lithospheric effective elastic thickness ( T e) model over the Louisville Ridge and its adjacent regions is calculated using the moving window admittance technique. For comparison, three bathymetry models are used: general bathymetric charts of the oceans, SIO V15.1, and BAT_VGG. The results show that BAT_VGG is more suitable for calculating T e than the other two models. T e along the Louisville Ridge was re-evaluated. The southeast of the ridge has a medium T e of 10-20 km, while T e increases dramatically seaward of the Tonga-Kermadec trench as a result of the collision of the Pacific and Indo-Australian plates.

  4. Miocene to Recent Volcanism in NE Baja California and its Correlation to Adjacent Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J. M.

    2007-05-01

    location (an accommodation zone in the rift system). The ca 3 Ma pulse of volcanism has been related to a "ridge jump" type event (relocation of the plate boundary from the Lower Tiburon basin to the Lower Delfin Basin, within a single spreading segment of the Pacific-North America rift). Both the 6 Ma pulse and the 3 Ma pulse thus seem to be controlled by local processes rather than by regional events. The ca. 12.5 Ma Tuff of San Felipe erupted before the Gulf opened, when Baja California and Sonora were adjacent; the likely vent location is on the modern Sonoran coast north of Bahia de Kino. Work by Oskin (2002), and ongoing studies, allow outcrops of this unit to be correlated over a modern distance of at least 430 km from NE Baja California to east of Hermosillo, Sonora. It has been included by Vidal-Solano and others (2005) as part of a significant episode of post-subduction peralkaline volcanism in Sonora, attributed to regional extension and lithospheric thinning.

  5. Controls on Crustal Accretion Along the Back-Arc East Scotia Ridge: Constraints From Bathymetry and Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, B. L.; Georgen, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Similar to regions such as the Lau Basin, the eastern Scotia Sea is a geologically complex area that involves multiple plate boundary types. The East Scotia Ridge (ESR), the focus of this investigation, is an intermediate-rate back-arc spreading center. The north-south striking ESR is divided into ten segments separated by non-transform offsets, and spreading along the ridge is estimated to have begun approximately 20 Ma. The ESR is presently located approximately 2000 km to the east of Bouvet Island, near the triple junction of the Mid-Atlantic, American-Antarctic, and Southwest Indian ridges. Earlier studies suggested that the northernmost and southernmost ESR segments erupt basalt with Bouvet plume geochemical affinity. To constrain controls on ESR crustal production processes, this investigation calculates mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) using satellite-derived and shipboard data sources. Along the ridge axis, the MBA profile is dominated by a long-wavelength gradient in which values decrease by roughly 90 mGal from north to south. De-trended MBA (MBAdet) was determined by removing a residual plane from a regional MBA map, and ΔMBAdet was defined as the maximum along-segment change in MBAdet, usually between segment center and segment ends. Relative ΔMBAdet highs exist at most ESR segment centers, with magnitudes up to 50-60 mGal. This pattern is different from that observed along most mid-ocean ridges, although it is similar to that found along the back-arc Lau spreading centers (e.g., Martinez and Taylor, Nature 2002). Values of Na8, Fe8, and 87Sr/86Sr for the ESR were obtained from the published literature (e.g., Leat et al., J. Petrol 2000; Fretzdorff et al., J. Petrol 2002). Segment-averaged values of Na8, Fe8, and 87Sr/86Sr, as well as ΔMBAdet, are significantly correlated with the distance from each segment center to the nearest subducting slab end (R-squared > 0.485). However, correlations of each of these four variables with both segment spreading rate

  6. Europa Ridges, Hills and Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This moderate-resolution view of the surface of one of Jupiter's moons, Europa, shows the complex icy crust that has been extensively modified by fracturing and the formation of ridges. The ridge systems superficially resemble highway networks with overpasses, interchanges and junctions. From the relative position of the overlaps, it is possible to determine the age sequence for the ridge sets. For example, while the 8-kilometer-wide (5-mile) ridge set in the lower left corner is younger than most of the terrain seen in this picture, a narrow band cuts across the set toward the bottom of the picture, indicating that the band formed later. In turn, this band is cut by the narrow 2- kilometer-wide (1.2-mile) double ridge running from the lower right to upper left corner of the picture. Also visible are numerous clusters of hills and low domes as large as 9 kilometers (5.5 miles) across, many with associated dark patches of non-ice material. The ridges, hills and domes are considered to be ice-rich material derived from the subsurface. These are some of the youngest features seen on the surface of Europa and could represent geologically young eruptions.

    This area covers about 140 kilometers by 130 kilometers (87 miles by 81 miles) and is centered at 12.3 degrees north latitude, 268 degrees west longitude. Illumination is from the east (right side of picture). The resolution is about 180 meters (200 yards) per pixel, meaning that the smallest feature visible is about a city block in size. The picture was taken by the Solid State Imaging system on board the Galileo spacecraft on February 20, 1997, from a distance of 17,700 kilometers (11,000 miles) during its sixth orbit around Jupiter.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  7. Segmented ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for large-area, high-power ion engines comprise dividing a single engine into a combination of smaller discharge chambers (or segments) configured to operate as a single large-area engine. This segmented ion thruster (SIT) approach enables the development of 100-kW class argon ion engines for operation at a specific impulse of 10,000 s. A combination of six 30-cm diameter ion chambers operating as a single engine can process over 100 kW. Such a segmented ion engine can be operated from a single power processor unit.

  8. The Nature of Plume-Ridge Interaction on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge south of the Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, A.; Laubier, M.; Escrig, S.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    Classical work in the 1970s established a gradient in ridge depth and chemical composition southwards from the Azores hot spot. Proximal basalts were enriched in highly incompatible elements and 87Sr/86Sr, and this enrichment decreased southwards until depleted MORB were encountered south of the Hayes fracture zone. This was explained through mantle source mixing, with the proportion of plume mantle decreasing with distance from the plume. Detailed maps of ocean ridges, however, show that ocean ridges consist of a series of segments that are shallow in their centers and deeper at their ends, so the "regional gradient" in depth actually consists of a series of undulations at various scales. The question then arises how the regional gradient in geochemistry is influenced by this segmentation. Detailed major element, trace element (TE) and isotopic study of over 200 samples from four segments south of the Azores platform allows a better assessment of the detailed characteristics of the geochemical gradient, with implications for plume-ridge interaction. All basalts from the KP-5 ("Menez Gwen"), PO-1 ("Lucky Strike"), PO-2 and PO-3 ("FAMOUS") segments (in order from north to south) are enriched relative to depleted MORB. While this enrichment is related to the Azores plume, as confirmed by the trends in isotope diagrams, there is much complexity in detail regarding how the enriched signature is imparted to the lavas. The KP-5 and PO-1 segments contain two groups of chemically distinct basalts. Moderately enriched basalts are found throughout the segments. At the segment centers highly enriched basalts with high concentrations of incompatible elements and an enriched isotopic signature predominate. Remarkably, incompatible element ratios (e.g. Ba/La, Nb/Zr) of these basalts are higher than basalts from the center of the Azores platform, while their isotopic values are less enriched. This dichotomy between TE ratios and isotopes of the highly enriched samples can be

  9. Object segmentation based on guided layering from video image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guangfeng; Zhu, Hong; Fan, Caixia; Zhang, Erhu

    2011-09-01

    When the object is similar to the background, it is difficult to segment the completed human body object from video images. To solve the problem, this paper proposes an object segmentation algorithm based on guided layering from video images. This algorithm adopts the structure of advance by degrees, including three parts altogether. Each part constructs the different energy function in terms of the spatiotemporal information to maximize the posterior probability of segmentation label. In part one, the energy functions are established, respectively, with the frame difference information in the first layer and second layer. By optimization, the initial segmentation is solved in the first layer, and then the amended segmentation is obtained in the second layer. In part two, the energy function is built in the interframe with the shape feature as the prior guiding to eliminate the interframe difference of the segmentation result. In art three, the segmentation results in the previous two parts are fused to suppress or inhibit the over-repairing segmentation and the object shape variations in the adjacent two-frame. The results from the compared experiment indicate that this algorithm can obtain the completed human body object in the case of the video image with similarity between object and background.

  10. Variations in mid-ocean ridge CO2 emissions driven by glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burley, Jonathan M. A.; Katz, Richard F.

    2015-09-01

    The geological record documents links between glacial cycles and volcanic productivity, both subaerially and, tentatively, at mid-ocean ridges. Sea-level-driven pressure changes could also affect chemical properties of mid-ocean ridge volcanism. We consider how changing sea-level could alter the CO2 emissions rate from mid-ocean ridges on both the segment and global scale. We develop a simplified transport model for a highly incompatible trace element moving through a homogeneous mantle; variations in the concentration and the emission rate of the element are the result of changes in the depth of first silicate melting. The model predicts an average global mid-ocean ridge CO2 emissions rate of 53 Mt/yr or 91 Mt/yr for an average source mantle CO2 concentration of 125 or 215 ppm by weight, in line with other estimates. We show that falling sea level would cause an increase in ridge CO2 emissions about 100 kyrs after the causative sea level change. The lag and amplitude of the response are sensitive to mantle permeability and plate spreading rate. For a reconstructed sea-level time series of the past million years, we predict variations of up to 12% in global mid-ocean ridge CO2 emissions.

  11. Magmatic and amagmatic seafloor generation at the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Michael, P J; Langmuir, C H; Dick, H J B; Snow, J E; Goldstein, S L; Graham, D W; Lehnert, K; Kurras, G; Jokat, W; Mühe, R; Edmonds, H N

    2003-06-26

    A high-resolution mapping and sampling study of the Gakkel ridge was accomplished during an international ice-breaker expedition to the high Arctic and North Pole in summer 2001. For this slowest-spreading endmember of the global mid-ocean-ridge system, predictions were that magmatism should progressively diminish as the spreading rate decreases along the ridge, and that hydrothermal activity should be rare. Instead, it was found that magmatic variations are irregular, and that hydrothermal activity is abundant. A 300-kilometre-long central amagmatic zone, where mantle peridotites are emplaced directly in the ridge axis, lies between abundant, continuous volcanism in the west, and large, widely spaced volcanic centres in the east. These observations demonstrate that the extent of mantle melting is not a simple function of spreading rate: mantle temperatures at depth or mantle chemistry (or both) must vary significantly along-axis. Highly punctuated volcanism in the absence of ridge offsets suggests that first-order ridge segmentation is controlled by mantle processes of melting and melt segregation. The strong focusing of magmatic activity coupled with faulting may account for the unexpectedly high levels of hydrothermal activity observed. PMID:12827193

  12. Mineralogy of the mid-ocean-ridge basalt source from neodymium isotopic composition of abyssal peridotites.

    PubMed

    Salters, Vincent J M; Dick, Henry J B

    2002-07-01

    Inferring the melting process at mid-ocean ridges, and the physical conditions under which melting takes place, usually relies on the assumption of compositional similarity between all mid-ocean-ridge basalt sources. Models of mantle melting therefore tend to be restricted to those that consider the presence of only one lithology in the mantle, peridotite. Evidence from xenoliths and peridotite massifs show that after peridotite, pyroxenite and eclogite are the most abundant rock types in the mantle. But at mid-ocean ridges, where most of the melting takes place, and in ophiolites, pyroxenite is rarely found. Here we present neodymium isotopic compositions of abyssal peridotites to investigate whether peridotite can indeed be the sole source for mid-ocean-ridge basalts. By comparing the isotopic compositions of basalts and peridotites at two segments of the southwest Indian ridge, we show that a component other than peridotite is required to explain the low end of the (143)Nd/(144)Nd variations of the basalts. This component is likely to have a lower melting temperature than peridotite, such as pyroxenite or eclogite, which could explain why it is not observed at mid-ocean ridges. PMID:12097907

  13. Magdalena Ridge Observatory Project Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubscher, Bryan E.; Buscher, David F.; Chang, Mark J.; Cobb, Michael L.; Haniff, Chris A.; Horton, Richard F.; Jorgensen, Anders M.; Klinglesmith, Dan; Loos, Gary; Nemzek, Robert J.

    The Magdalena Ridge Observatory (MRO) is a project with the goal of building a state of the art observatory on Magdalena Ridge west of Socorro New Mexico. This observatory will be sited above 3700 meters and will consist of a 10-element 400-meter baseline optical/infrared imaging interferometer and a separate 2.4-meter telescope with fast response capability. The MRO consortium members include New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology University of Puerto Rico Mew Mexico Highlands University New Mexico State University and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The University of Cambridge is a joint participant in the current design phase of the interferometer and expects to join the consortium. We will present an overview of the optical interferometer and single telescope designs and review their instrumentation and science programs

  14. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Noninfiltrating Adenocarcinoma of the Lung Causing ST-Segment Elevation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shenil; Padaliya, Bimal; Mohan, Sri Krishna Madan

    2015-08-01

    ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction is a leading cause of cardiovascular morbidity and death. We describe the case of a 51-year-old woman with advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung who presented with ST-segment elevation in the presence of an extracardiac lung mass but no objective evidence of myocardial ischemia or pericardial involvement. After the patient died of hypoxic respiratory failure, autopsy findings confirmed normal-appearing pericardium and myocardium, and mild-to-moderate atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries. A 4.5 × 4-cm extracardiac left hilar lung mass was confirmed to be poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung adjacent to the myocardium. The persistent current of injury that had been detected electrocardiographically was thought to occur from direct myocardial compression. ST-segment elevations secondary to direct mass contact on the myocardium should be considered in patients who have a malignancy and ST-segment elevation. PMID:26413024

  16. Image segmentation survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The methodologies and capabilities of image segmentation techniques are reviewed. Single linkage schemes, hybrid linkage schemes, centroid linkage schemes, histogram mode seeking, spatial clustering, and split and merge schemes are addressed.

  17. Segmentation of SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of image speckle are reviewed. Existing segmentation techniques that have been used for speckle filtering, edge detection, and texture extraction are sumamrized. The relative effectiveness of each technique is briefly discussed.

  18. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, C.; Pearce, J.; Zucker, A.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of the following programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The effects of pollution and climate change on forests; automation to improve the safety and efficiency of rearming battle tanks; new technologies for DNA sequencing; ORNL probes the human genome; ORNL as a supercomputer research center; paving the way to superconcrete made with polystyrene; a new look at supercritical water used in waste treatment; and small mammals as environmental monitors.

  19. Seismicity and active accretion processes at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest and intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridges from hydroacoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, Eve; Royer, Jean-Yves; Perrot, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Volcanic and tectonic events are the main processes involved in the generation of the oceanic crust and responsible for the seismicity associated with seafloor spreading. To monitor this activity, usually not or poorly detected by land-based seismological stations, we deployed from February 2012 to February 2013 a network of autonomous hydrophones to compare the behaviour of the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) with that of the intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridge (SEIR). The rate of seismicity is similar for both ridges, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. The along-axis distribution of the seismic events, however, does differ, reflecting the rate dependence of accretion modes. Earthquakes are sparse and regularly spaced and scattered along the SWIR, reflecting prevailing tectonic processes. By contrast, along the SEIR, events are irregularly distributed and focus at ridge-segment ends and transforms faults, reflecting the ridge segmentation; only two swarms occurred at a segment centre and are probably caused by a magmatic event. This seismicity distribution thus looks controlled by segment-scale crustal heterogeneities along the SEIR and by regional-scale contrasting accretion processes along the SWIR, probably driven by different lithospheric and asthenospheric dynamics on either side of the Melville fracture zone. The comparison of hydroacoustic and teleseismic catalogues shows that, along these spreading ridges, the background seismicity observed in 1 yr by a hydroacoustic network is representative of the seismicity observed over two decades by land-based networks.

  20. Segmentation for handwritten characters overlapping a tabular formed slip by global interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoi, Satoshi; Hotta, Yoshinobu; Yabuki, Maki; Asakawa, Atuko

    1994-09-01

    The global interpolation we proposed evaluates segment pattern continuity and connectedness to produce characters with smooth edges while interrupting blank or missing segments, e.g., in extracting a handwritten character overlapping one box border, correctly. In this paper, we expand our method to be able to separate handwritten characters overlapped a tabular formed slip. We solve two problems to realize it: (1) precise matching among blank segments of adjacent characters for interpolation, and (2) reinterpolation area decision when adjacent character strings are close to each other. Precise matching can be done by finding exact terminal points of blank segments or missing segments. We make efficient use of removed image in a border. The contour of the character segment in removed border image is tracked from the intersection of the character and the border toward the center of the border. Reinterpolation area is adaptively decided by not using one box border size, but, estimating a character size in each character string after removing borders of a tabular formed slip. When adjacent character strings are close to each other, their strings cannot be separated by calculating their horizontal projection value. We calculate the weighted horizontal projection value whose weight is approximated by a convex function, that is, the peak is in proportion to each labeled segment size and is set to the center of gravity of the labeled segment. Some experimental results show the effectiveness of our method.

  1. Segmented pyroelector detector

    DOEpatents

    Stotlar, S.C.; McLellan, E.J.

    1981-01-21

    A pyroelectric detector is described which has increased voltage output and improved responsivity over equivalent size detectors. The device comprises a plurality of edge-type pyroelectric detectors which have a length which is much greater than the width of the segments between the edge-type electrodes. External circuitry connects the pyroelectric detector segments in parallel to provide a single output which maintains 50 ohm impedance characteristics.

  2. Squaring a Circular Segment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Consider a circular segment (the smaller portion of a circle cut off by one of its chords) with chord length c and height h (the greatest distance from a point on the arc of the circle to the chord). Is there a simple formula involving c and h that can be used to closely approximate the area of this circular segment? Ancient Chinese and Egyptian…

  3. Prominent Doublet Ridges on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of Jupiter's satellite Europa was obtained from a range of 7364 miles (11851 km) by the Galileo spacecraft during its fourth orbit around Jupiter and its first close pass of Europa. The image spans 30 miles by 57 miles (48 km x 91 km) and shows features as small as 800 feet (240 meters) across, a resolution more than 150 times better than the best Voyager coverage of this area. The sun illuminates the scene from the right. The large circular feature in the upper left of the image could be the scar of a large meteorite impact. Clusters of small craters seen in the right of the image may mark sites where debris thrown from this impact fell back to the surface. Prominent doublet ridges over a mile (1.6 km) wide cross the plains in the right part of the image; younger ridges overlap older ones, allowing the sequence of formation to be determined. Gaps in ridges indicate areas where emplacement of new surface material has obliterated pre-existing terrain.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  4. Hedgehog signaling pathway function conserved in Tribolium segmentation.

    PubMed

    Farzana, Laila; Brown, Susan J

    2008-04-01

    In Drosophila, maintenance of parasegmental boundaries and formation of segmental grooves depend on interactions between segment polarity genes. Wingless and Engrailed appear to have similar roles in both short and long germ segmentation, but relatively little is known about the extent to which Hedgehog signaling is conserved. In a companion study to the Tribolium genome project, we analyzed the expression and function of hedgehog, smoothened, patched, and cubitus interruptus orthologs during segmentation in Tribolium. Their expression was largely conserved between Drosophila and Tribolium. Parental RNAi analysis of positive regulators of the pathway (Tc-hh, Tc-smo, or Tc-ci) resulted in small spherical cuticles with little or no evidence of segmental grooves. Segmental Engrailed expression in these embryos was initiated but not maintained. Wingless-independent Engrailed expression in the CNS was maintained and became highly compacted during germ band retraction, providing evidence that derivatives from every segment were present in these small spherical embryos. On the other hand, RNAi analysis of a negative regulator (Tc-ptc) resulted in embryos with ectopic segmental grooves visible during germband elongation but not discernible in the first instar larval cuticles. These transient grooves formed adjacent to Engrailed expressing cells that encircled wider than normal wg domains in the Tc-ptc RNAi embryos. These results suggest that the en-wg-hh gene circuit is functionally conserved in the maintenance of segmental boundaries during germ band retraction and groove formation in Tribolium and that the segment polarity genes form a robust genetic regulatory module in the segmentation of this short germ insect. PMID:18392879

  5. Hydrothermal Exploration of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 5-10°S, using the AUV ABE and the ROV Quest a brief overview of RV Meteor Cruise M68/1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koschinsky, A.; Devey, C.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; German, C.; Yoerger, D.; Shank, T.

    2006-12-01

    We report a brief overview of results from a recent expedition to the first vent sites ever located on the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These results are part of an on-going study by the German Ridge program, in collaboration with NOAA-OE in the USA and with NERC in the UK. During the M68/1 Cruise (April 27-June 2, 2006), we targeted three specific areas:- the 5°S area where hydrothermal fields had previously been located (German et al., EOS, 2005; Haase et al., EOS, 2005); the Nibelungen area near 8°S where strong hydrothermal plume signals had been determined (Devey et al., EOS, 2005) and the 9°S area where the shallow ridge-crest hosts diffuse hydrothermal venting (Devey et al., EOS, 2005). At 5°S, we confirmed the temperature of the hottest known hydrothermal vents issuing fluids at 407°C at 3000m water depth, corresponding directly to the critical point for seawater at these depths. In addition to revisiting the "Turtle Pits" vents and the previously discovered "Red Lion" sites we also located new high-temperature and low-temperature vents with ABE which we were able to return to and sample with Quest during a single dive day. At 8°S, we used the ABE AUV to pinpoint and photograph a new tectonically-hosted vent site situated within a non-transform discontinuity between two adjacent ridge segments similar to, for example, the Rainbow hydrothermal field on the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This vent, when revisited by Quest was too vigorous to allow end-member fluid-sampling: it was extremely vigorous and situated in a crater most closely resembling those observed at the Logatchev vent-field (MAR 15°N). The atypical absence of vent-fauna at this "Drachenschlund" (Dragon's throat) vent site is currently under investigation. Finally, at 9°S we detected evidence for numerous additional low-temperature sites similar to the already known Lilliput site and all intimately associated with collapse pits in extensive lava-flows.

  6. Segmental neurofibromatosis and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Dang, Julie D; Cohen, Philip R

    2010-01-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis is an uncommon variant of neurofibromatosis type I characterized by neurofibromas and/or café-au-lait macules localized to one sector of the body. Although patients with neurofibromatosis type I have an associated increased risk of certain malignancies, malignancy has only occasionally been reported in patients with segmental neurofibromatosis. The published reports of patients with segmental neurofibromatosis who developed malignancy were reviewed and the characteristics of these patients and their cancers were summarized. Ten individuals (6 women and 4 men) with segmental neurofibromatosis and malignancy have been reported. The malignancies include malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (3), malignant melanoma (2), breast cancer (1), colon cancer (1), gastric cancer (1), lung cancer (1), and Hodgkin lymphoma (1). The most common malignancies in patients with segmental neurofibromatosis are derived from neural crest cells: malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and malignant melanoma. The incidence of malignancy in patients with segmental neurofibromatosis may approach that of patients with neurofibromatosis type I. PMID:21137621

  7. Agulhas Ridge, South Atlantic: the peculiar structure of a transform fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenzelmann-Neben, G.; Gohl, K.

    2003-04-01

    Transform faults constitute conservative plate boundaries, where adjacent plates are in tangential contact. Transform faults in the ocean are marked by fracture zones, which are long, linear, bathymetric depressions. One of the largest transform offsets on Earth can be found in the South Atlantic. The 1200 km long Agulhas Falkland Fracture Zone (AFFZ), form by this, developed during the Early Cretaceous break-up of West Gondwana. Between approx. 41°S, 16°E and 43°S, 9°E the Agulhas Falkland Fracture Zone is characterised by a pronounced topographic anomaly, the Agulhas Ridge. The Agulhas Ridge rises more than 2 km above the surrounding seafloor. The only equivalent to this kind of topographic high, as part of the AFFZ, is found in form of marginal ridges along the continental parts of the fracture zone, namely the Falkland Escarpment at the South American continent and the Diaz Ridge adjacent to South Africa. But the Agulhas Ridge differs from both the Falkland Escarpment and the Diaz Ridge in the facts (1) that it was not formed during the early rift-drift phase, and (2) that it separates oceanic crust of different age and not continental from oceanic crust. A set of high-resolution seismic reflection data (total length 2000 km) and a seismic refraction line across the Agulhas Ridge give new information on the crustal and basement structure of this tectonic feature. We have observed that within the Cape Basin, to the North, the basement and sedimentary layers are in parts strongly deformed. We observe basement highs, which point towards intrusions. Both the basement and the sedimentary sequence show strong faulting. This points towards a combined tectono-magmatic activity, which led to the formation of basement ridges parallel to the Agulhas Ridge. Since at least the pre-Oligocene parts and, locally, the whole sedimentary column are affected we infer that the renewed activity began in the Middle Oligocene and may have lasted into the Quaternary. As an origin

  8. Interaction between adjacent lightning discharges in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanhui; Zhang, Guangshu; Zhang, Tong; Li, Yajun; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Tinglong

    2013-07-01

    Using a 3D lightning radiation source locating system (LLS), three pairs of associated lightning discharges (two or more adjacent lightning discharges following an arbitrary rule that their space-gap was less than 10 km and their time-gap was less than 800 ms) were observed, and the interaction between associated lightning discharges was analyzed. All these three pairs of associated lightning discharges were found to involve three or more charge regions (the ground was considered as a special charge region). Moreover, at least one charge region involved two lightning discharges per pair of associated lightning discharges. Identified from electric field changes, the subsequent lightning discharges were suppressed by the prior lightning discharges. However, it is possible that the prior lightning discharge provided a remaining discharge channel to facilitate the subsequent lightning discharge. The third case provided evidence of this possibility. Together, the results suggested that, if the charges in the main negative charge region can be consumed using artificial lightning above the main negative charge regions, lightning accidents on the ground could be greatly reduced, on the condition that the height of the main negative charge region and the charge intensity of the lower positive charge region are suitable.

  9. Evidence from gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite for lateral magma transport along a slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Abelson, M; Baer, G; Agnon, A

    2001-01-01

    The lateral flow of magma and ductile deformation of the lower crust along oceanic spreading axes has been thought to play a significant role in suppressing both mid-ocean ridge segmentation and variations in crustal thickness. Direct investigation of such flow patterns is hampered by the kilometres of water that cover the oceanic crust, but such studies can be made on ophiolites (fragments of oceanic crust accreted to a continent). In the Oman ophiolite, small-scale radial patterns of flow have been mapped along what is thought to be the relict of a fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge. Here we present evidence for broad-scale along-axis flow that has been frozen into the gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite in Cyprus (thought to be representative of a slow-spreading ridge axis). The gabbro suite of Troodos spans nearly 20 km of a segment of a fossil spreading axis, near a ridge-transform intersection. We mapped the pattern of magma flow by analysing the rocks' magnetic fabric at 20 sites widely distributed in the gabbro suite, and by examining the petrographic fabric at 9 sites. We infer an along-axis magma flow for much of the gabbro suite, which indicates that redistribution of melt occurred towards the segment edge in a large depth range of the oceanic crust. Our results support the magma plumbing structure that has been inferred indirectly from a seismic tomography experiment on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge. PMID:11343114

  10. Formation of the insect head involves lateral contribution of the intercalary segment, which depends on Tc-labial function.

    PubMed

    Posnien, Nico; Bucher, Gregor

    2010-02-01

    The insect head is composed of several segments. During embryonic development, the segments fuse to form a rigid head capsule where obvious segmental boundaries are lacking. Hence, the assignment of regions of the insect head to specific segments is hampered, especially with respect to dorsal (vertex) and lateral (gena) parts. We show that upon Tribolium labial (Tc-lab) knock down, the intercalary segment is deleted but not transformed. Furthermore, we find that the intercalary segment contributes to lateral parts of the head cuticle in Tribolium. Based on several additional mutant and RNAi phenotypes that interfere with gnathal segment development, we show that these segments do not contribute to the dorsal head capsule apart from the dorsal ridge. Opposing the classical view but in line with findings in the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster and the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus, we propose a "bend and zipper" model for insect head capsule formation. PMID:19913530

  11. Seasonal trends in environmental tritium concentrations in a small forest adjacent to a radioactive waste storage area

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Hikaru ); Garten, C.T. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Tritium (HTO) concentrations were studied for an entire year in a floodplain forest adjacent to a low-level radioactive solid waste storage area (SWSA No. 5) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. Tritium in soil was the principal source of HTO to the deciduous forest. Evaporation from the surface soil along with transpiration from trees leaves both contributed to HTO in the forest atmosphere. During the growing season, transpiration was the principal contributor of HTO to the forest atmosphere, while during the dormant season, the main source of atmospheric HTO was evaporation from the surface soil. Seasonal changes and the characteristics of vegetation will influence the relative importance of evaporation and transpiration as sources of atmospheric HTO near the ground in temperate deciduous forests. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Seasonal trends in environmental tritium concentrations in a small forest adjacent to a radioactive waste storage area

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, H. ); Garten, C.T. Jr. . Environmental Sciences Div.)

    1992-03-01

    Tritium (HTO) concentrations were studied for an entire year in a floodplain forest adjacent to a low-level radioactive solid waste storage areas (SWSA No. 5) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. Tritium in soil was the principal source of HTO to the deciduous forest. Evaporation from the surface soil along with transpiration from tree leaves both contributed to HTO in the forest atmosphere. During the growing season, transpiration was the principal contributor of HTO to the forest atmosphere, while during he dormant season, the main source of atmospheric HTO was evaporation from the surface soil. This paper discovers seasonal changes and the characteristics of vegetation which will influence the relative importance of evaporation and transpiration as sources of atmospheric HTO near the ground in temperate deciduous forests.

  13. Gas hydrate distribution and hydrocarbon maturation north of the Knipovich Ridge, western Svalbard margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumke, Ines; Burwicz, Ewa B.; Berndt, Christian; Klaeschen, Dirk; Feseker, Tomas; Geissler, Wolfram H.; Sarkar, Sudipta

    2016-03-01

    A bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) occurs west of Svalbard in water depths exceeding 600 m, indicating that gas hydrate occurrence in marine sediments is more widespread in this region than anywhere else on the eastern North Atlantic margin. Regional BSR mapping shows the presence of hydrate and free gas in several areas, with the largest area located north of the Knipovich Ridge, a slow spreading ridge segment of the Mid Atlantic Ridge system. Here heat flow is high (up to 330 mW m-2), increasing toward the ridge axis. The coinciding maxima in across-margin BSR width and heat flow suggest that the Knipovich Ridge influenced methane generation in this area. This is supported by recent finds of thermogenic methane at cold seeps north of the ridge termination. To evaluate the source rock potential on the western Svalbard margin, we applied 1-D petroleum system modeling at three sites. The modeling shows that temperature and burial conditions near the ridge were sufficient to produce hydrocarbons. The bulk petroleum mass produced since the Eocene is at least 5 kt and could be as high as ~0.2 Mt. Most likely, source rocks are Miocene organic-rich sediments and a potential Eocene source rock that may exist in the area if early rifting created sufficiently deep depocenters. Thermogenic methane production could thus explain the more widespread presence of gas hydrates north of the Knipovich Ridge. The presence of microbial methane on the upper continental slope and shelf indicates that the origin of methane on the Svalbard margin varies spatially.

  14. Geology of Oak Ridge uplift, Ventura and Los Angeles Counties, California

    SciTech Connect

    Dibblee, T.W. Jr.; Yeats, R.S.

    1988-03-01

    The low mountain range south of the Santa Clara River valley, that includes, from east to west, the Santa Susana and Oak Ridge Mountains and South Mountain, is herein referred to as the Oak Ridge uplift. It is a continuous east-trending range about 36 mi (58 km) long. This uplift is separated from the east-west-trending San Gabriel Mountains by the Newhall Pass area. The Oak Ridge uplift is one of the youngest features of the Transverse Ranges. It evolved during Quaternary time from compressive anticlinal uplift of the Cenozoic sediments on the south flank of the Ventura basin along the Oak Ridge and Santa Susana faults. Terrestrial and marine Pliocene-Pleistocene detrital sediments are exposed on the flanks along most of the Oak Ridge and Santa Susana faults. Terrestrial and marine Pliocene-Pleistocene detrital sediments are exposed on the flanks along most of the Oak Ridge uplift. This series is extremely thick on the north flank but very thin on the south flank. Miocene marine formations, the Oligocene nonmarine Sespe Formation, and Paleogene to Upper Cretaceous strata form the core of this uplift. The Miocene units include siliceous shale of the Monterey (Modelo) Formation that forms its grassy crest. The Sespe Formation is underlain by the marine Llajas Formation (middle Eocene), which together with the underlying Paleocene and Upper Cretaceous marine units crop out along the Simi Hills uplift. The anticlinal Oak Ridge uplift, composed of several domed segments, apparently evolved from an elongate seamount that developed during the Pliocene, south of the deep Ventura basin depositional trough. The western part of the uplift was thrust northward along the Oak Ridge fault against the elongate east-west-trending depocenter. The eastern part was thrust southward along the Santa Susana fault, in part against the preexisting Simi Hills uplift.

  15. Changing characteristics of arctic pressure ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhams, Peter; Toberg, Nick

    2012-04-01

    The advent of multibeam sonar permits us to obtain full three-dimensional maps of the underside of sea ice. In particular this enables us to distinguish the morphological characteristics of first-year (FY) and multi-year (MY) pressure ridges in a statistically valid way, whereas in the past only a small number of ridges could be mapped laboriously by drilling. In this study pressure ridge distributions from two parts of the Arctic Ocean are compared, in both the cases using mainly data collected by the submarine “Tireless” in March 2007 during two specific grid surveys, in the Beaufort Sea at about 75° N, 140° W (N of Prudhoe Bay), and north of Ellesmere Island at about 83° 20‧ N, 64° W. In the Beaufort Sea the ice was mainly FY, and later melted or broke up as this area became ice-free during the subsequent summer. N of Ellesmere Island the ice was mainly MY. Ridge depth and spacing distributions were derived for each region using the boat's upward looking sonar, combined with distributions of shapes of the ridges encountered, using the Kongsberg EM3002 multibeam sonar. The differing shapes of FY and MY ridges are consistent with two later high-resolution multibeam studies of specific ridges by AUV. FY ridges are found to fit the normal triangular shape template in cross-section (with a range of slope angles averaging 27°) with a relatively constant along-crest depth, and often a structure of small ice blocks can be distinguished. MY ridges, however, are often split into a number of independent solid, smooth blocks of large size, giving an irregular ridge profile which may be seemingly without linearity. Our hypothesis for this difference is that during its long lifetime an MY ridge is subjected to several episodes of crack opening; new cracks in the Arctic pack often run in straight lines across the ridges and undeformed ice alike. Such a crack will open somewhat before refreezing, interpolating a stretch of thin ice into the structure, and breaking up

  16. Widespread active detachment faulting and core complex formation near 13 degrees N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Smith, Deborah K; Cann, Johnson R; Escartín, Javier

    2006-07-27

    Oceanic core complexes are massifs in which lower-crustal and upper-mantle rocks are exposed at the sea floor. They form at mid-ocean ridges through slip on detachment faults rooted below the spreading axis. To date, most studies of core complexes have been based on isolated inactive massifs that have spread away from ridge axes. Here we present a survey of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 13 degrees N containing a segment in which a number of linked detachment faults extend for 75 km along one flank of the spreading axis. The detachment faults are apparently all currently active and at various stages of development. A field of extinct core complexes extends away from the axis for at least 100 km. Our observations reveal the topographic characteristics of actively forming core complexes and their evolution from initiation within the axial valley floor to maturity and eventual inactivity. Within the surrounding region there is a strong correlation between detachment fault morphology at the ridge axis and high rates of hydroacoustically recorded earthquake seismicity. Preliminary examination of seismicity and seafloor morphology farther north along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggests that active detachment faulting is occurring in many segments and that detachment faulting is more important in the generation of ocean crust at this slow-spreading ridge than previously suspected. PMID:16871215

  17. Fast and intuitive segmentation of gyri of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Florian; Hahn, Horst K.

    2015-03-01

    The cortical surface of the human brain consists of a large number of folds forming valleys and ridges, the gyri and sulci. Often, it is desirable to perform a segmentation of a brain image into these underlying structures in order to assess parameters relative to these functional components. Typical examples for this include measurements of cortical thickness for individual functional areas, or the correlation of functional areas derived from fMRI data to corresponding anatomical areas seen in structural imaging. In this paper, we present a novel interactive technique, that allows for fast and intuitive segmentation of these functional areas from T1-weighted MR images of the brain. Our segmentation approach is based exclusively on morphological image processing operations, eliminating the requirement for explicit reconstruction of the brains surface.

  18. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek remedial action project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has three major operating facilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee: the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the K-25 Site, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed by Lockheed Martin Environmental Research Corporation. All facilities are managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (Energy Systems) for the DOE. The Y-12 Plant is adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge and is also upstream from Oak Ridge along East Fork Poplar Creek. The portion of the creek downstream from the Y-12 Plant is Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC). This project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the LEFPC floodplain, transport the soils to Industrial Landfill V (ILF-V), and restore any affected areas. This project contains areas that were designated in 1989 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site. The site includes DOE property and portions of commercial, residential, agricultural, and miscellaneous areas within the city of Oak Ridge.

  19. Rediscovering market segmentation.

    PubMed

    Yankelovich, Daniel; Meer, David

    2006-02-01

    In 1964, Daniel Yankelovich introduced in the pages of HBR the concept of nondemographic segmentation, by which he meant the classification of consumers according to criteria other than age, residence, income, and such. The predictive power of marketing studies based on demographics was no longer strong enough to serve as a basis for marketing strategy, he argued. Buying patterns had become far better guides to consumers' future purchases. In addition, properly constructed nondemographic segmentations could help companies determine which products to develop, which distribution channels to sell them in, how much to charge for them, and how to advertise them. But more than 40 years later, nondemographic segmentation has become just as unenlightening as demographic segmentation had been. Today, the technique is used almost exclusively to fulfill the needs of advertising, which it serves mainly by populating commercials with characters that viewers can identify with. It is true that psychographic types like "High-Tech Harry" and "Joe Six-Pack" may capture some truth about real people's lifestyles, attitudes, self-image, and aspirations. But they are no better than demographics at predicting purchase behavior. Thus they give corporate decision makers very little idea of how to keep customers or capture new ones. Now, Daniel Yankelovich returns to these pages, with consultant David Meer, to argue the case for a broad view of nondemographic segmentation. They describe the elements of a smart segmentation strategy, explaining how segmentations meant to strengthen brand identity differ from those capable of telling a company which markets it should enter and what goods to make. And they introduce their "gravity of decision spectrum", a tool that focuses on the form of consumer behavior that should be of the greatest interest to marketers--the importance that consumers place on a product or product category. PMID:16485810

  20. Fault rupture segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Kenneth Michael

    A critical foundation to earthquake study and hazard assessment is the understanding of controls on fault rupture, including segmentation. Key challenges to understanding fault rupture segmentation include, but are not limited to: What determines if a fault segment will rupture in a single great event or multiple moderate events? How is slip along a fault partitioned between seismic and seismic components? How does the seismicity of a fault segment evolve over time? How representative are past events for assessing future seismic hazards? In order to address the difficult questions regarding fault rupture segmentation, new methods must be developed that utilize the information available. Much of the research presented in this study focuses on the development of new methods for attacking the challenges of understanding fault rupture segmentation. Not only do these methods exploit a broader band of information within the waveform than has traditionally been used, but they also lend themselves to the inclusion of even more seismic phases providing deeper understandings. Additionally, these methods are designed to be fast and efficient with large datasets, allowing them to utilize the enormous volume of data available. Key findings from this body of work include demonstration that focus on fundamental earthquake properties on regional scales can provide general understanding of fault rupture segmentation. We present a more modern, waveform-based method that locates events using cross-correlation of the Rayleigh waves. Additionally, cross-correlation values can also be used to calculate precise earthquake magnitudes. Finally, insight regarding earthquake rupture directivity can be easily and quickly exploited using cross-correlation of surface waves.

  1. Geometry and Kinematics of Wrinkle Ridges on Lunae and Solis Plana, Mars: Implications for Fault/Fold Growth History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tate, A.; Mueller, K. J.; Golombek, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    The three dimensional geometry of wrinkle ridges on Lunae and Solis Plana suggest they form by rapid lateral propagation and linkage of fault-propagation fold segments above reactivated blind thrust faults. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Seismic anisotropy of the shallow crust at the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almendros, J.; Barclay, A.H.; Wilcock, W.S.D.; Purdy, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    Microearthquake data recorded on four ocean bottom seismometers are used to study shear-wave splitting on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The covariance matrix decomposition method is used to determine the sensor orientation from explosive shot data and to estimate the anisotropy parameters for 238 earthquake records. At three of the four sites, the results show a remarkably consistent fast direction parallel to the ridge axis. The time delays between the fast and the slow waves range from 40 to 200 ms, with an average of 90 ms. They are not clearly related to earthquake range, focal depth or source-receiver azimuth. The splitting of the shear waves is interpreted as an effect of structural anisotropy due to the presence of ridge-parallel cracks in the shallow crust. If we assume that anisotropy is concentrated in the upper 1-2 km, the splitting times require a high crack density of ~0.1.

  3. Petroleum basins of Sakhalin and adjacent shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Mavrinski, Y.; Koblov, E. )

    1993-09-01

    Sixty-seven oil and gas fields have been discovered on Sakhalin and the adjacent shelf but the distribution of fields is uneven in north Sakhalin, south Sakhalin, and the Tatar basins. The sedimentary cover is composed of sandy, clayey, and siliceous rocks, with volcanogenic and coal-bearing deposits of Upper Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neogene 8-12 km thick. Marine clayey and siliceous oil source rocks are regionally developed in the section at different stratigraphic levels; the organic matter is of mixed type and the content varies from 0.5 to 1.5%. The upper Oligocene and middle-upper Miocene source rocks in the north Sakhalin basin are typical, and the organic carbon content ranges from 1 to 5%. The level of organic matter catagenesis and conversion into hydrocarbons is high because of the high differential geothermal gradient in the basins, 30-50[degrees]C per km. Porous sandstones in the Miocene form the reservoirs in all fields with the exception of Okruzhnoye, where the pay zone is a siliceous claystone. Growth-fault rollovers and anticlines form the main traps ranging in area from 5 to 300 km[sup 2], with amplitudes between 100 and 600 m. both stratigraphic and structural traps have been identified. Considerable volumes of reserves are associated with the Miocene deposits of north Sakhalin, which are characterized by an optimum combination of oil source rocks, focused migration paths, and thick sequences of reservoirs and cap rocks. Six large fields have been discovered in the past 15 yr. Oil and condensate reserves stand at over 300 million MT, and gas reserves are about 900 billion m[sup 3].

  4. Recent hydrofracture operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weeren, H.O.; McDaniel, E.W.; Lasher, L.C.

    1985-01-01

    The hydrofracture process is currently being used at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the permanent disposal of locally generated radioactive waste solutions and slurries. In this process, the waste solution or slurry is mixed with a blend of cement and other solid additives; the resulting grout is then injected into an impermeable shale formation at a depth of 200 to 300 m (700 to 1000 ft). The grout sets a few hours after completion of the injection, fixing the radioactive waste in the shale formation. A new facility was built in 1980-1982 at a site adjacent to the original facility. Between June 1982 and January 1984, more than eight million liters (2.2 million gal) of waste containing over 750,000 Ci were mixed with a blend of solids and injected. Various operating problems were experienced and solved. 6 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  5. Bootstrapping structured page segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Huanfeng; Doermann, David S.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach to the bootstrap learning of a page segmentation model. The idea evolves from attempts to segment dictionaries that often have a consistent page structure, and is extended to the segmentation of more general structured documents. In cases of highly regular structure, the layout can be learned from examples of only a few pages. The system is first trained using a small number of samples, and a larger test set is processed based on the training result. After making corrections to a selected subset of the test set, these corrected samples are combined with the original training samples to generate bootstrap samples. The newly created samples are used to retrain the system, refine the learned features and resegment the test samples. This procedure is applied iteratively until the learned parameters are stable. Using this approach, we do not need to initially provide a large set of training samples. We have applied this segmentation to many structured documents such as dictionaries, phone books, spoken language transcripts, and obtained satisfying segmentation performance.

  6. Scorpion image segmentation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, E.; Aibinu, A. M.; Sadiq, B. A.; Bello Salau, H.; Salami, M. J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Death as a result of scorpion sting has been a major public health problem in developing countries. Despite the high rate of death as a result of scorpion sting, little report exists in literature of intelligent device and system for automatic detection of scorpion. This paper proposed a digital image processing approach based on the floresencing characteristics of Scorpion under Ultra-violet (UV) light for automatic detection and identification of scorpion. The acquired UV-based images undergo pre-processing to equalize uneven illumination and colour space channel separation. The extracted channels are then segmented into two non-overlapping classes. It has been observed that simple thresholding of the green channel of the acquired RGB UV-based image is sufficient for segmenting Scorpion from other background components in the acquired image. Two approaches to image segmentation have also been proposed in this work, namely, the simple average segmentation technique and K-means image segmentation. The proposed algorithm has been tested on over 40 UV scorpion images obtained from different part of the world and results obtained show an average accuracy of 97.7% in correctly classifying the pixel into two non-overlapping clusters. The proposed 1system will eliminate the problem associated with some of the existing manual approaches presently in use for scorpion detection.

  7. Hippocampus segmentation using locally weighted prior based level set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achuthan, Anusha; Rajeswari, Mandava

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation of hippocampus in the brain is one of a major challenge in medical image segmentation due to its' imaging characteristics, with almost similar intensity between another adjacent gray matter structure, such as amygdala. The intensity similarity has causes the hippocampus to have weak or fuzzy boundaries. With this main challenge being demonstrated by hippocampus, a segmentation method that relies on image information alone may not produce accurate segmentation results. Therefore, it is needed an assimilation of prior information such as shape and spatial information into existing segmentation method to produce the expected segmentation. Previous studies has widely integrated prior information into segmentation methods. However, the prior information has been utilized through a global manner integration, and this does not reflect the real scenario during clinical delineation. Therefore, in this paper, a locally integrated prior information into a level set model is presented. This work utilizes a mean shape model to provide automatic initialization for level set evolution, and has been integrated as prior information into the level set model. The local integration of edge based information and prior information has been implemented through an edge weighting map that decides at voxel level which information need to be observed during a level set evolution. The edge weighting map shows which corresponding voxels having sufficient edge information. Experiments shows that the proposed integration of prior information locally into a conventional edge-based level set model, known as geodesic active contour has shown improvement of 9% in averaged Dice coefficient.

  8. Segmented saddle-shaped passive stabilization conductors for toroidal plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Leuer, James A.

    1990-05-01

    A large toroidal vacuum chamber for plasma generation and confinement is lined with a toroidal blanket for shielding using modules segmented in the toroidal direction. To provide passive stabilization in the same manner as a conductive vacuum chamber wall, saddle-shaped conductor loops are provided on blanket modules centered on a midplane of the toroidal chamber with horizontal conductive bars above and below the midplane, and vertical conductive legs on opposite sides of each module to provide return current paths between the upper and lower horizontal conductive bars. The close proximity of the vertical legs provided on adjacent modules without making physical contact cancel the electromagnetic field of adjacent vertical legs. The conductive bars spaced equally above and below the midplane simulate toroidal conductive loops or hoops that are continuous, for vertical stabilization of the plasma even though they are actually segmented.

  9. Segmented saddle-shaped passive stabilization conductors for toroidal plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Leuer, J.A.

    1990-05-01

    A large toroidal vacuum chamber for plasma generation and confinement is lined with a toroidal blanket for shielding using modules segmented in the toroidal direction. To provide passive stabilization in the same manner as a conductive vacuum chamber wall, saddle-shaped conductor loops are provided on blanket modules centered on a midplane of the toroidal chamber with horizontal conductive bars above and below the midplane, and vertical conductive legs on opposite sides of each module to provide return current paths between the upper and lower horizontal conductive bars. The close proximity of the vertical legs provided on adjacent modules without making physical contact cancel the electromagnetic field of adjacent vertical legs. The conductive bars spaced equally above and below the midplane simulate toroidal conductive loops or hoops that are continuous, for vertical stabilization of the plasma even though they are actually segmented. 5 figs.

  10. Cooperative processes in image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. S.

    1982-01-01

    Research into the role of cooperative, or relaxation, processes in image segmentation is surveyed. Cooperative processes can be employed at several levels of the segmentation process as a preprocessing enhancement step, during supervised or unsupervised pixel classification and, finally, for the interpretation of image segments based on segment properties and relations.

  11. First hydrothermal discoveries on the Australian-Antarctic Ridge: Discharge sites, plume chemistry, and vent organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, Doshik; Baker, Edward T.; Siek Rhee, Tae; Won, Yong-Jin; Resing, Joseph A.; Lupton, John E.; Lee, Won-Kyung; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Sung-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    The Australian-Antarctic Ridge (AAR) is one of the largest unexplored regions of the global mid-ocean ridge system. Here, we report a multiyear effort to locate and characterize hydrothermal activity on two first-order segments of the AAR: KR1 and KR2. To locate vent sites on each segment, we used profiles collected by Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorders on rock corers during R/V Araon cruises in March and December of 2011. Optical and oxidation-reduction-potential anomalies indicate multiple active sites on both segments. Seven profiles on KR2 found 3 sites, each separated by ˜25 km. Forty profiles on KR1 identified 17 sites, some within a few kilometer of each other. The spatial density of hydrothermal activity along KR1 and KR2 (plume incidence of 0.34) is consistent with the global trend for a spreading rate of ˜70 mm/yr. The densest area of hydrothermal activity, named "Mujin," occurred along the 20 km-long inflated section near the segment center of KR1. Continuous plume surveys conducted in January-February of 2013 on R/V Araon found CH4/3He (1 - 15 × 106) and CH4/Mn (0.01-0.5) ratios in the plume samples, consistent with a basaltic-hosted system and typical of ridges with intermediate spreading rates. Additionally, some of the plume samples exhibited slightly higher ratios of H2/3He and Fe/Mn than others, suggesting that those plumes are supported by a younger hydrothermal system that may have experienced a recent eruption. The Mujin-field was populated by Kiwa crabs and seven-armed Paulasterias starfish previously recorded on the East Scotia Ridge, raising the possibility of circum-Antarctic biogeographic connections of vent fauna.

  12. Gulf of California analogue for origin of Late Paleozoic ocean basins adjacent to western North America

    SciTech Connect

    Murchey, B.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Ocean crust accreted to the western margin of North America following the Late Devonian to earliest Missippian Antler orogeny is not older than Devonian. Therefore, ocean crust all along the margin of western North America may have been very young following the Antler event. This situation can be compared to the present-day margin of North America which lies adjacent to young ocean crust as a result of the subduction of the Farallon plate and arrival of the East Pacific spreading ridge. Syn- and post-Antler rifting that occurred along the North American margin may well be analogous to the formation of the Gulf of California by the propagation of the East Pacific spreading ridge. Black-arc rifting associated with the subduction of very old ocean crust seems a less likely mechanism for the early stages of ocean basin formation along the late Paleozoic margin of western North America because of the apparent absence of old ocean crust to the west of the arc terranes. The eastern Pacific basins were as long-lived as any truly oceanic basins and may have constituted, by the earliest Permian, a single wedge-shaped basin separated from the western Pacific by rifted fragments of North American arc-terranes. In the Permian, the rifted arcs were once again sites of active magmatism and the eastern Pacific basins began to close, from south (Golconda terrane) to north. Final closure of the northernmost eastern Pacific basin (Angayucham in Alaska) did not occur until the Jurassic.

  13. Phasing a segmented telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paykin, Irina; Yacobi, Lee; Adler, Joan; Ribak, Erez N.

    2015-02-01

    A crucial part of segmented or multiple-aperture systems is control of the optical path difference between the segments or subapertures. In order to achieve optimal performance we have to phase subapertures to within a fraction of the wavelength, and this requires high accuracy of positioning for each subaperture. We present simulations and hardware realization of a simulated annealing algorithm in an active optical system with sparse segments. In order to align the optical system we applied the optimization algorithm to the image itself. The main advantage of this method over traditional correction methods is that wave-front-sensing hardware and software are no longer required, making the optical and mechanical system much simpler. The results of simulations and laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of this optimization algorithm to correct both piston and tip-tilt errors.

  14. Segmented annular combustor

    DOEpatents

    Reider, Samuel B.

    1979-01-01

    An industrial gas turbine engine includes an inclined annular combustor made up of a plurality of support segments each including inner and outer walls of trapezoidally configured planar configuration extents and including side flanges thereon interconnected by means of air cooled connector bolt assemblies to form a continuous annular combustion chamber therebetween and wherein an air fuel mixing chamber is formed at one end of the support segments including means for directing and mixing fuel within a plenum and a perforated header plate for directing streams of air and fuel mixture into the combustion chamber; each of the outer and inner walls of each of the support segments having a ribbed lattice with tracks slidably supporting porous laminated replaceable panels and including pores therein for distributing combustion air into the combustion chamber while cooling the inner surface of each of the panels by transpiration cooling thereof.

  15. Phasing a segmented telescope.

    PubMed

    Paykin, Irina; Yacobi, Lee; Adler, Joan; Ribak, Erez N

    2015-02-01

    A crucial part of segmented or multiple-aperture systems is control of the optical path difference between the segments or subapertures. In order to achieve optimal performance we have to phase subapertures to within a fraction of the wavelength, and this requires high accuracy of positioning for each subaperture. We present simulations and hardware realization of a simulated annealing algorithm in an active optical system with sparse segments. In order to align the optical system we applied the optimization algorithm to the image itself. The main advantage of this method over traditional correction methods is that wave-front-sensing hardware and software are no longer required, making the optical and mechanical system much simpler. The results of simulations and laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of this optimization algorithm to correct both piston and tip-tilt errors. PMID:25768631

  16. Head segmentation in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Schilling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Classic theories of vertebrate head segmentation clearly exemplify the idealistic nature of comparative embryology prior to the 20th century. Comparative embryology aimed at recognizing the basic, primary structure that is shared by all vertebrates, either as an archetype or an ancestral developmental pattern. Modern evolutionary developmental (Evo-Devo) studies are also based on comparison, and therefore have a tendency to reduce complex embryonic anatomy into overly simplified patterns. Here again, a basic segmental plan for the head has been sought among chordates. We convened a symposium that brought together leading researchers dealing with this problem, in a number of different evolutionary and developmental contexts. Here we give an overview of the outcome and the status of the field in this modern era of Evo-Devo. We emphasize the fact that the head segmentation problem is not fully resolved, and we discuss new directions in the search for hints for a way out of this maze. PMID:20607135

  17. The Mid-Ocean Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, K.C. ); Fox, P.J. )

    1990-06-01

    The Mid-Ocean Ridge girdles the earth like the seam of a baseball. For more than 75,000 kilometers, this submerged range of razorback mountains--many higher than the greatest peaks on land--marks the restless boundary between continental plates. An analysis of this huge structure reveals a fascinating picture of how it is created by magma welling up as the plates pull apart. The paper discusses sea-floor spreading, the magma supply model, types of discontinuities, off-axis structures, small overlaps and DEVALs (slight DEViations in Axial Linearity), and aquatic life.

  18. Ridge effect and alignment phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Lokhtin, I. P. Managadze, A. K. Snigirev, A. M.

    2013-05-15

    It is assumed that the ridge effect observed by the CMS Collaboration in proton-proton collisions at the LHC and the phenomenon observed by the Pamir Collaboration in emulsion experiments with cosmic rays and characterized by the alignment of spots on a film is a manifestation of the same as-yet-unknown mechanism of the emergence of a coplanar structure of events. A large coplanar effect at the LHC in the region of forward rapidities is predicted on the basis of this hypothesis and an analysis of experimental data.

  19. Terrestrial Analogs for Planetary Wrinkle Ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.; Golombek, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    Wrinkle ridges are common physiographic features on the terrestrial planets. Their origin has remained enigmatic, although two different types of models, volcanic and tectonic, have been proposed. The major impediment to deciphering the origin of wrinkle ridges has been the lack of a terrestrial analog. Seven terrestrial analogs were discussed, two in detail. Their implications for the origin for planetary wrinkle ridges were considered. All of the terrestrial analogs were formed in compressional environments and are the surface breaks of thrust faults.

  20. Quality Assurance Plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, G.P.; Miller, D.E. )

    1992-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 Site Investigation (SI)includes the lower portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) drainage and enbayment, and associated floodplain and subsurface environment. The ORNL main plant and the major waste storage and disposal facilities at ORNL are located in the WOC watershed and are drained by the WOC system to the Clinch River, located off-site. Environmental media are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from hydrologically upgradient WAGS. WAG 2 is important as a conduit from upgradient areas to the Clinch River. The general objectives of the WAG 2 SI Project are to conduct a multimedia monitoring and characterization program to define and monitor the input of contaminants from adjacent WAGS, monitor and gather sufficient information for processes controlling or driving contaminant fluxes to construct an appropriate conceptual model for WAG 2, and prepare for the eventual remediation of WAG 2.

  1. Automatic retinal vessel segmentation based on active contours method in Doppler spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenzhong; Liu, Tan; Song, Wei; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Hao F.

    2013-01-01

    We achieved fast and automatic retinal vessel segmentation by employing the active contours method in Doppler spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). In a typical OCT B-scan image, we first extracted the phase variations between adjacent A-lines and removed bulk motion. Then we set the initial contour as the boundary of the whole image and iterated until all of the segmented vessel contours became stabilized. Using a typical office computer, the whole segmentation took no more than 50 s, making real-time retinal vessel segmentation possible. We tested the active contours method segmentation in both controlled phantom and in vivo rodent eye images.

  2. Depth and Morphology of Wrinkle Ridge Detachments at Solis Planum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, S. L.; Ferrill, D. A.; Smart, K. J.

    2005-12-01

    Wrinkle ridges -- long, linear to sinuous anticlines separated by relatively broad, flat synclinal valleys -- are a fundamental component of Martian geomorphology. The anticlinal crests show variable morphologies, but are often characterized by weak to strong asymmetry with variable vergence directions between adjacent ridges and along strike for any given ridge. Although wrinkle ridges are typically interpreted as contractional features, there is ongoing debate about their underlying structure and whether thrust faults penetrate to tens of kilometers of depth ("thick-skinned shortening") or sole into a detachment in the upper few kilometers of the Martian crust ("thin-skinned shortening"). Previous workers have estimated depth to the detachment horizon using a variety of methods including gravity inversion, geometry of crater-ridge intersections, mechanical modeling, and geometric modeling. Here we use a well-established terrestrial technique to calculate depth to the detachment horizon for wrinkle ridges in the Solis Planum region of Mars. We interpolate topographic profiles perpendicular to the regional trend of wrinkle ridges from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Mission Experiment Gridded Data Record (MEGDR) altimetry data, set vertical reference lines on both sides of the ridge that define the limits of our measurement range, estimate the topographic surface prior to wrinkle ridge formation, and calculate the area uplifted above the original topographic surface. Dividing this excess area by the amount of shortening (the topographic profile length minus the length prior to deformation), provides depth to detachment. We calibrate the results with profiles from the less spatially-extensive but greater along-track density MOLA Precision Experiment Data Record (PEDR). Additional topographic and structural interpretation and analysis of wrinkle ridge morphology are conducted with Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and High

  3. Pressures of Partial Crystallization of Magmas from the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for Crustal Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. L.; Barton, M.

    2010-12-01

    Plate spreading at the mid-ocean ridges is accompanied by intrusion of dikes and eruption of lava along the ridge axis. It has been suggested that the depth of magma chambers that feed the flows and dikes is related to the rate of spreading. As part of a larger effort to examine this hypothesis, we determined the depths of magma chambers beneath the intermediate spreading Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdF) which extends from the Blanco fracture zone at about 44.5 degrees North to the Triple junction of the JdF, Nootka Fault, and the Socanco fracture zone at 48.7 degrees North. Pressures of partial crystallization were determined by comparing the compositions of natural liquids (glasses) with those of experimental liquids in equilibrium with olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene at different pressures and temperatures using the method described by Kelley and Barton (2008). Chemical analyses mid-ocean ridge basalts glasses sampled from along the JdF were used as liquid compositions. Samples with anomalous chemical compositions and samples that yielded pressures associated with unrealistically large uncertainties were filtered out of the database. The calculated pressures for the remaining 533 samples were used to calculate the depths of partial crystallization and to identify the likely location of magma chambers. Preliminary results indicate that the pressure of partial crystallization decreases from 2 to 1±0.5 kbars from the Blanco fracture zone to the north along the Cleft segment of the ridge. Calculated pressures remain approximately constant at 0.87±0.53 kbars along ridge segments to the north of the Cleft. These low pressures for the remaining segments of the ridge are interpreted to indicate magma chambers at depths of 1.3-4.9 km and agree reasonably well with the depths of seismically imaged tops of axial magma chambers (2-3 km) (Canales et al 2009). The higher pressures obtained for lavas erupted along the Cleft segment of the JdF agree very well with recent

  4. Phase 1 report on the Bear Creek Valley treatability study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Bear Creek Valley (BCV) is located within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation and encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes associated with past operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The BCV Remedial Investigation determined that disposal of wastes at the S-3 Site, Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) has caused contamination of both deep and shallow groundwater. The primary contaminants include uranium, nitrate, and VOCs, although other metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and cadmium persist. The BCV feasibility study will describe several remedial options for this area, including both in situ and ex situ treatment of groundwater. This Treatability Study Phase 1 Report describes the results of preliminary screening of treatment technologies that may be applied within BCV. Four activities were undertaken in Phase 1: field characterization, laboratory screening of potential sorbents, laboratory testing of zero valent iron products, and field screening of three biological treatment systems. Each of these activities is described fully in technical memos attached in Appendices A through G.

  5. Automatic brain tumor segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Matthew C.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Velthuizen, Robert P.; Murtaugh, F. R.; Silbiger, Martin L.

    1998-06-01

    A system that automatically segments and labels complete glioblastoma-multiform tumor volumes in magnetic resonance images of the human brain is presented. The magnetic resonance images consist of three feature images (T1- weighted, proton density, T2-weighted) and are processed by a system which integrates knowledge-based techniques with multispectral analysis and is independent of a particular magnetic resonance scanning protocol. Initial segmentation is performed by an unsupervised clustering algorithm. The segmented image, along with cluster centers for each class are provided to a rule-based expert system which extracts the intra-cranial region. Multispectral histogram analysis separates suspected tumor from the rest of the intra-cranial region, with region analysis used in performing the final tumor labeling. This system has been trained on eleven volume data sets and tested on twenty-two unseen volume data sets acquired from a single magnetic resonance imaging system. The knowledge-based tumor segmentation was compared with radiologist-verified `ground truth' tumor volumes and results generated by a supervised fuzzy clustering algorithm. The results of this system generally correspond well to ground truth, both on a per slice basis and more importantly in tracking total tumor volume during treatment over time.

  6. [Toxic anterior segment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cornut, P-L; Chiquet, C

    2011-01-01

    Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS) is a general term used to describe acute, sterile postoperative inflammation due to a non-infectious substance that accidentally enters the anterior segment at the time of surgery and mimics infectious endophthalmitis. TASS most commonly occurs acutely following anterior segment surgery, typically 12-72h after cataract extraction. Anterior segment inflammation is usually quite severe with hypopyon. Endothelial cell damage is common, resulting in diffuse corneal edema. No bacterium is isolated from ocular samples. The causes of TASS are numerous and difficult to isolate. Any device or substance used during the surgery or in the immediate postoperative period may be implicated. The major known causes include: preservatives in ophthalmic solutions, denatured ophthalmic viscosurgical devices, bacterial endotoxin, and intraocular lens-induced inflammation. Clinical features of infectious and non-infectious inflammation are initially indistinguishable and TASS is usually diagnosed and treated as acute endophthalmitis. It usually improves with local steroid treatment but may result in chronic elevation of intraocular pressure or irreversible corneal edema due to permanent damage of trabecular meshwork or endothelial cells. PMID:21176994

  7. Spatial and temporal distribution of the seismicity along two mid-oceanic ridges with contrasted spreading rates in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, E.; Perrot, J.; Royer, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The seismicity of the ultra-slow spreading Southwest (14 mm/y) and intermediate spreading Southeast (60 mm/y) Indian ridges was monitored from February 2012 to March 2013 by the OHASISBIO array of 7 autonomous hydrophones. A total of 1471 events were located with 4 instruments or more, inside the array, with a median location uncertainty < 5 km and a completeness magnitude of mb = 3. Both ridges display similar average rates of seismicity, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. Accretion modes do differ, however, by the along-axis distribution of the seismic events. Along the ultra-slow Southwest Indian Ridge, events are sparse but regularly spaced and scattered up to 50 km off-axis. Along the fast Southeast Indian Ridge, events are irregularly distributed, focusing in narrow regions near the ridge axis at segment ends and along transform faults, whereas ridge-segment centers generally appear as seismic gaps (at the level of completeness of the array). Only two clusters, 6 months apart, are identified in a segment-center at 29°S. From the temporal distribution of the clustered events and comparisons with observations in similar mid-oceanic ridge setting, both clusters seem to have a volcanic origin and to be related to a dike emplacement or a possible eruption on the seafloor. Their onset time and migration rate are comparable to volcanic swarms recorded along the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Overall, the rate of seismicity along the two Indian spreading ridges correlates with the large-scale variations in the bathymetry and shear-wave velocity anomaly in the upper mantle, suggesting that the distribution of the low-magnitude seismicity is mainly controlled by along-axis variations in the lithosphere rheology and temperature.

  8. Anatomy of an Axial Volcanic Ridge: The Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 45°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achenbach, K. L.; Searle, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    Study of a single axial volcanic ridge in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge median valley at 45°N has enabled us to construct a detailed volcano-stratigraphic model and thrown new light on the structure and development of AVRs. Data sets include 50 m resolution multibeam bathymetry, comprehensive 3 m resolution deep-towed sidescan sonar, a grid of twenty-two 1.4 km-spaced lines of deep-towed magnetic field measurements, continuous video observations and 270 rock samples from eleven ROV dives, and two approximately 8 km2 areas of very-high-resolution bathymetry and magnetics. A continuous topographic ridge extends ~35 km along the segment, and strikes 010°, ~5-10° CCW of the regional ridge trend. The northernmost 10 km appears older, as attested by lower topographic relief, acoustic backscatter and crustal magnetisation and greater degree of faulting. The rest, which we infer to be most recently constructed, is 25 km long, ~ 4 km wide and ~500 m high. It has a sharp crest, and lateral spurs trending NE that we attribute to tectonic control from the right-stepping MAR axis. The recent AVR is covered by approximately 3000 small (<450 m diameter, 200 m high) circular volcanoes ranging from steep-sided (45°) cones to more rounded domes. They tend to align in rows parallel to the AVR axis, to its NE-trending spurs, or, on its lower flanks, sub-normal to the AVR trend. These latter lineaments, which are spaced 1-2 km apart, comprise short (1-2 km) rows of single cones. We infer that their emplacement is controlled by down-flank magma transport. The AVR itself contains only one volcano >450 m diameter, though about ten, all flat-topped and up to 1.2 km diameter, occur elsewhere on the median valley floor. The high-resolution surveys show all cones >70 m high suffered significant flank collapse, often with near-vertical collapse scars. The active AVR is partly flanked by hummocky volcanic terrain similar to the AVR but of lower acoustic backscatter, which we infer to be older, and

  9. Ius Chasma Tributary Valleys and Adjacent Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image covers valley tributaries of Ius Chasma, as well as the plains adjacent to the valleys. Ius Chasma is one of several canyons that make up the Valles Marineris canyon system. Valles Marineris likely formed by extension associated with the growth of the large volcanoes and topographic high of Tharsis to the northwest. As the ground was pulled apart, large and deep gaps resulted in the valleys seen in the top and bottom of this HiRISE image. Ice that was once in the ground could have also melted to create additional removal of material in the formation of the valleys. HiRISE is able to see the rocks along the walls of both these valleys and also impact craters in the image. Rock layers that appear lower down in elevation appear rougher and are shedding boulders. Near the top of the walls and also seen in patches along the smooth plains are brighter layers. These brighter layers are not shedding boulders so they must represent a different kind of rock formed in a different kind of environment than those further down the walls. Because they are highest in elevation, the bright layers are youngest in age. HiRISE is able to see dozens of the bright layers, which are perhaps only a meter in thickness. Darker sand dunes and ripples cover most of the plains and fill the floors of impact craters.

    Image PSP_001351_1715 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 9, 2006. The complete image is centered at -8.3 degrees latitude, 275.4 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 254.3 km (158.9 miles). At this distance the image scale ranges from 25.4 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) to 101.8 cm/pixel (with 4 x 4 binning). The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 3:32 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 59 degrees, thus the sun was about

  10. Emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Skipper, M.N.

    1990-03-01

    Emergency preparedness for industry was commonly believed to be an essential responsibility on the part of management. Therefore, this study was conducted to research and accumulate information and data on emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to conduct a thorough evaluation of emergency preparedness knowledge among employees to determine if they were properly informed or if they needed more training. Also, this study was conducted to provide insight to management as to what their responsibility was concerning this training. To assess employee emergency preparedness knowledge, a questionnaire was developed and administered to 100 employees at ORNL. The data was analyzed using frequencies and percentages of response and was displayed through the use of graphs within the report. 22 refs., 22 figs.

  11. Rediscovery and Exploration of Magic Mountain, Explorer Ridge, NE Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.

    2002-12-01

    A two-part exploration program at Explorer Ridge, the northernmost spreading segment of the NE Pacific spreading centers, was conducted in two phases during June to August of 2002. A robust hydrothermal system (Magic Mountain) was found in this area in the early 1980s by the Canadian PISCES IV submersible, but its dimensions and geologic relationships were not well determined due to limited dives and poor navigation. The first part of the 2002 exploration program utilized an EM300 multibeam sonar on T. G. Thompson, the autonomous vehicle ABE, and a CTD/rosette system to map the seafloor and conduct hydrothermal plume surveys. While ABE conducted detailed surveys in the area where the most intense hydrothermal plume was found on the initial CTD survey, the T. G. Thompson conducted additional multibeam surveys, CTD casts and CTD tow-yos on the other second order segments up to 60 km away. This increased the efficiency of the expedition by at least 30%. After 12 days on site, a multibeam map was completed of the entire segment, the spatial distribution and character of the hydrothermal plumes were mapped out and a section of seafloor measuring 2 x 5.5 km was mapped in detail with ABE. The ABE used two sonar systems, a previously proven Imagenex pencil beam sonar, and, for the first time, a multibeam sonar (SM2000). In addition to the high-resolution bathymetry (1 m grid-cell size resolution for the SM2000), ABE collected temperature, optical backscatter, eH redox potential, and magnetic field data. Using the CTD and ABE data, a major hydrothermal system was easily located on the seafloor during the second part of the exploration program using the ROPOS remotely operated vehicle. The Magic Mountain hydrothermal system is located almost entirely on the eastern constructional shoulder of the ridge eastward of the rim of the eastern boundary fault of the axial valley. This is in contrast to most other hydrothermal systems on intermediate rate spreading ridges, which are

  12. Ground Water Atlas of the United States: Segment 10, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lloyd, Orville B.; Lyke, William L.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a summary of ground-water conditions and problems in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, and Tennessee, which compose Segment 10 of the Ground Water Atlas of the United States, an area of about 217,000 square miles. The definition, distribution, thickness, water-yielding, and water-quality characteristics of the principal aquifers in the segment are the primary topics of this chapter. Ground-water source, occurrence, movement, use, and problems also are discussed where appropriate. Segment 10 consists of parts of seven physiographic provinces (fig. 1)- the Coastal Plain, Blue Ridge, Valley and Ridge, Appalachian Plateaus, Interior Low Plateaus, Central Lowland, and Ozark Plateaus. The provinces have unique hydrogeologic characteristics that make it convenient to describe the principal aquifers in each province.

  13. The deep hydrogeologic flow system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Nativ, R.; Hunley, A.E.

    1993-07-01

    The deep hydrogeologic system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation contains some areas contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, nitrates, and organic compounds. The groundwater at that depth is saline and has previously been considered stagnant. On the basis of existing and newly collected data, the nature of flow of the saline groundwater and its potential discharge into shallow, freshwater systems was assessed. Data used for this purpose included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the deep system, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) spatial temperature variations, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline groundwater. In addition, chemical analyses of brine in adjacent areas in Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia were compared with the deep water underlying the reservation to help assess the origin of the brine. Preliminary conclusions suggest that the saline water contained at depth is old but not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and freshwater-bearing units. The confined water (along with dissolved solutes) moves along open fractures (or man-made shortcuts) at relatively high velocity into adjacent, more permeable units. Groundwater volumes involved in this flow probably are small.

  14. Seismicity and active accretion processes at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest and intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridges from hydroacoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang-Hin-Sun, Eve; Royer, Jean-Yves; Perrot, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic and tectonic events are the main processes involved in the generation of the oceanic crust and responsible for the seismicity associated with seafloor spreading. To monitor this activity, usually not or poorly detected by land-based seismological stations, we deployed from February 2012 to February 2013 a network of autonomous hydrophones to compare the behaviour of the ultraslow-spreading Southwest (SWIR) with that of the intermediate-spreading Southeast Indian ridges (SEIR). The rate of seismicity is similar for both ridges, suggesting that there is no systematic relationship between seismicity and spreading rates. The along-axis distribution of the seismic events, however, does differ, reflecting the rate-dependence of accretion modes. Earthquakes are sparse and regularly spaced and scattered along the SWIR, reflecting prevailing tectonic processes. By contrast, along the SEIR, events are irregularly distributed and focus at ridge-segment ends and transforms faults, reflecting the ridge segmentation; only two swarms occurred at a segment centre and are probably caused by a magmatic event. This seismicity distribution thus looks controlled by segment-scale crustal heterogeneities along the SEIR and by regional-scale contrasting accretion processes along the SWIR, probably driven by different lithospheric and asthenospheric dynamics on either side of the Melville FZ. The comparison of hydroacoustic and teleseismic catalogues shows that, along these spreading ridges, the background seismicity observed in one year by a hydroacoustic network is representative of the seismicity observed over two decades by land-based networks.

  15. View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, bottom cut off by fringed buildings, view facing south-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. Learning Non-Adjacent Regularities at Age 0 ; 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F.

    2013-01-01

    One important mechanism suggested to underlie the acquisition of grammar is rule learning. Indeed, infants aged 0 ; 7 are able to learn rules based on simple identity relations (adjacent repetitions, ABB: "wo fe fe" and non-adjacent repetitions, ABA: "wo fe wo", respectively; Marcus et al., 1999). One unexplored issue is…

  17. Delayed Acquisition of Non-Adjacent Vocalic Distributional Regularities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compute non-adjacent regularities is key in the acquisition of a new language. In the domain of phonology/phonotactics, sensitivity to non-adjacent regularities between consonants has been found to appear between 7 and 10 months. The present study focuses on the emergence of a posterior-anterior (PA) bias, a regularity involving two…

  18. Lead Isotopic Compositions of the Endeavour Sulfides, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labonte, F.; Hannington, M. D.; Cousens, B. L.; Blenkinsop, J.; Gill, J. B.; Kelley, D. S.; Lilley, M. D.; Delaney, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    32 sulfide samples from the main structures of the Endeavour vent field, Juan de Fuca Ridge, were analyzed for their Pb isotope composition. The samples were collected from 6 main vent fields between 1985 and 2005 and encompass a strike length of more than 15 km along the ridge crest. The sulfides are typical of black smoker deposits on sediment-starved mid-ocean ridges. Pb isotope compositions of the massive sulfides within the six hydrothermal fields vary within narrow ranges, with 206Pb/204Pb = 18.58 18.75, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.45 15.53 and 208Pb/204Pb = 37.84 38.10. A geographic trend is observed, with the lower Pb ratios restricted mostly to the northern part of the segment (Salty Dawg, Sasquatch and High Rise fields), and the higher Pb ratios restricted mostly to the southern part of the segment (Main Endeavour, Clam Bed and Mothra fields). Variations within individual fields are much smaller than those between fields, and variation within individual sulfide structures is within the uncertainty of the measurements. Therefore, it is unlikely that the ranges of Pb isotope compositions along the length of the segment reflect remobilization, replacement, and recrystallization of sulfides, as suggested for the observed Pb isotope variability in some large seafloor sulfide deposits. Instead, the differences in isotopic compositions from north to south are interpreted to reflect differences in the source rocks exposed to hydrothermal circulation of fluids below the seafloor. Possible sources of the somewhat more radiogenic Pb may be small amounts of buried sediment, either from turbidites or from hemipelagic sediment. This possibility is supported by high concentrations of CH4 and NHC4 found in the high-temperature vent fluids at the Main Endeavour Field, which are interpreted to reflect subseafloor interaction between hydrothermal fluids and organic material in buried sediments. However, the majority of the samples fall below and are approximately parallel to the

  19. Ridges and tidal stress on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bart, G.D.; Turtle, E.P.; Jaeger, W.L.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Greenberg, R.

    2004-01-01

    Sets of ridges of uncertain origin are seen in twenty-nine high-resolution Galileo images, which sample seven locales on Io. These ridges are on the order of a few kilometers in length with a spacing of about a kilometer. Within each locale, the ridges have a consistent orientation, but the orientations vary from place to place. We investigate whether these ridges could be a result of tidal flexing of Io by comparing their orientations with the peak tidal stress orientations at the same locations. We find that ridges grouped near the equator are aligned either north-south or east-west, as are the predicted principal stress orientations there. It is not clear why particular groups run north-south and others east-west. The one set of ridges observed far from the equator (52?? S) has an oblique azimuth, as do the tidal stresses at those latitudes. Therefore, all observed ridges have similar orientations to the tidal stress in their region. This correlation is consistent with the hypothesis that tidal flexing of Io plays an important role in ridge formation. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cedar Ridge Camp: Using the Local Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Grayson

    2007-01-01

    In 2007 Cedar Ridge Camp opened for its first season as a traditional co-ed summer camp and year-round outdoor education and recreation centre. The mission would centre on creating a program that would encourage personal development and growth through a shared outdoor experience. Cedar Ridge's main goals were to promote the formation of close…

  1. Earthquakes and beach ridges on Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, J.; Ortuno, M.; Thibault, C.; Higman, B.; Pinegina, T.

    2003-04-01

    There are several proposed origins for beach ridges, or berms, with the majority of studies focused on Atlantic-type margins. Primary factors invoked for beach-ridge formation include changes in sea-level, in wave climate, and in sediment supply. On subduction-zone margins, co-seismic deformation can force any of these three factors. For example, subsidence of the shoreline (local sea level rise) will generally lead to coastal erosion, whereas shoreline uplift (subduing local wave climate) will strand beach ridges. Earthquake-triggered landslides may significantly increase sediment supply. Some authors working on Pacific margins have correlated either beach ridges (e.g., A. Kurbatov on Kamchatka; P. Saltonstall and G. Carver on Kodiak), or buried erosional scarps (e.g. R.A. Meyers et al., Washington State) with subduction-zone earthquakes and the seismic cycle. Our work on Kamchatka provides examples where buried scarps and beach ridges are superimposed, each pair of which we interpret to be the result of a single seismic cycle, apparently consistent with some other data and interpretations (Kodiak, particularly). That is, in a setting where the shoreline subsides during an earthquake and recovers thereafter, beach ridges overlie buried scarps. In one case on Kamchatka, in southern Vestnik Bay, there is a spectacular outcrop illustrating this relationship. This model by no means explains all beach ridges, so identifying earthquake-forced beach ridges remains a challenge.

  2. Student Health Services at Orchard Ridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Don D.

    This paper provides a synoptic review of student health services at the community college level while giving a more detailed description of the nature of health services at Orchard Ridge, a campus of Oakland Community College. The present College Health Service program provides for a part-time (24 hrs./wk.) nurse at Orchard Ridge. A variety of…

  3. 27 CFR 9.158 - Mendocino Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mendocino Ridge. 9.158 Section 9.158 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.158 Mendocino Ridge. (a) Name. The name of...

  4. a Segment-Based Approach for DTM Derivation of Airborne LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dejin; Zhou, Xiaoming; Jiang, Jie; Li, Caiping

    2016-06-01

    With the characteristics of LIDAR system, raw point clouds represent both terrain and non-terrain surface. In order to generate DTM, the paper introduces one improved filtering method based on the segment-based algorithms. The method generates segments by clustering points based on surface fitting and uses topological and geometric properties for classification. In the process, three major steps are involved. First, the whole datasets is split into several small overlapping tiles. For each tile, by removing wall and vegetation points, accurate segments are found. The segments from all tiles are assigned unique segment number. In the following step, topological descriptions for the segment distribution pattern and height jump between adjacent segments are identified in each tile. Based on the topology and geometry, segment-based filtering algorithm is performed for classification in each tile. Then, based on the spatial location of the segment in one tile, two confidence levels are assigned to the classified segments. The segments with low confidence level are because of losing geometric or topological information in one tile. Thus, a combination algorithm is generated to detect corresponding parts of incomplete segment from multiple tiles. Then another classification algorithm is performed for these segments. The result of these segments will have high confidence level. After that, all the segments in one tile have high confidence level of classification result. The final DTM will add all the terrain segments and avoid duplicate points. At the last of the paper, the experiment show the filtering result and be compared with the other classical filtering methods, the analysis proves the method has advantage in the precision of DTM. But because of the complicated algorithms, the processing speed is little slower, that is the future improvement which should been researched.

  5. Experimental verification of dispersed fringe sensing as a segment phasing technique using the Keck telescope.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fang; Chanan, Gary; Ohara, Catherine; Troy, Mitchell; Redding, David C

    2004-08-10

    Dispersed fringe sensing (DFS) is an efficient and robust method for coarse phasing of segmented primary mirrors (from one quarter of a wavelength to as much as the depth of focus of a single segment, typically several tens of microns). Unlike phasing techniques currently used for ground-based segmented telescopes, DFS does not require the use of edge sensors in order to sense changes in the relative heights of adjacent segments; this makes it particularly well suited for phasing of space-borne segmented telescopes, such as the James Webb Space Telescope. We validate DFS by using it to measure the piston errors of the segments of one of the Keck telescopes. The results agree with those of the Shack-Hartmann-based phasing scheme currently in use at Keck to within 2% over a range of initial piston errors of +/-16 microm. PMID:15376423

  6. Ridge Subduction Beneath the Americas: Synthesis and New Research on Anomalous Tectonism and Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorkelson, D. J.; Madsen, J. K.; Breitsprecher, K.; Groome, W. G.; Sluggett, C.

    2006-12-01

    The west coast of the Americas has been repeatedly affected by ridge-trench interactions from Mesozoic to Recent time. Beneath North America, subduction of the Kula-Farallon, Kula-Resurrection and Farallon- Resurrection spreading ridges resulted in anomalous and time-transgressive forearc to backarc magmatism and related tectonism from the Late Cretaceous to the Eocene. Following consumption and redistribution of the Kula and Resurrection plates, the Neogene Farallon-Pacific ridge system intersected the North American trench in two locations - western Canada and northwestern Mexico / southwestern United States - causing pronounced magmatic and tectonic effects that continue to the present. Beneath Central America, divergent subduction of the Nazca and Cocos plates led to development of a slab window, with a present location beneath Panama and a probable pre-Pliocene position beneath Columbia or Ecuador. Patagonia has been the site of localized ridge subduction from the Eocene to the Recent, with the Phoenix-Farallon ridge subducting from the Eocene to the early Miocene, and the Nazca-Antarctic ridge from the Miocene to the present. Antarctica experienced diverging Antarctic-Phoenix plate subduction from the Eocene to the Pliocene. In all cases, normal arc magmatism was interrupted or eliminated by anomalous igneous activity ranging in signature from adakitic to intraplate. Our current research involves geochemical, tectonic, and thermal modeling of slab window environments. A new geochemical analysis on the effects of Miocene to Recent subduction of the northern segment of the Farallon (Juan de Fuca)-Pacific ridge is underway. A symmetrical arc-intraplate-arc geochemical pattern is evident in a transect from the northern Cascade Arc, through the volcanic fields of British Columbia, Yukon and eastern Alaska, and into the Aleutian Arc. This pattern can be explained by Neogene displacement of the arc-metasomatized mantle wedge caused by upwelling oceanic

  7. 3D Model Segmentation and Representation with Implicit Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bo; Takamatsu, Jun; Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    When large-scale and complex 3D objects are obtained by range finders, it is often necessary to represent them by algebraic surfaces for such purposes as data compression, multi-resolution, noise elimination, and 3D recognition. Representing the 3D data with algebraic surfaces of an implicit polynomial (IP) has proved to offer the advantages that IP representation is capable of encoding geometric properties easily with desired smoothness, few parameters, algebraic/geometric invariants, and robustness to noise and missing data. Unfortunately, generating a high-degree IP surface for a whole complex 3D shape is impossible because of high computational cost and numerical instability. In this paper we propose a 3D segmentation method based on a cut-and-merge approach. Two cutting procedures adopt low-degree IPs to divide and fit the surface segments simultaneously, while avoiding generating high-curved segments. A merging procedure merges the similar adjacent segments to avoid over-segmentation. To prove the effectiveness of this segmentation method, we open up some new vistas for 3D applications such as 3D matching, recognition, and registration.

  8. An Adaptive Ridge Procedure for L0 Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Frommlet, Florian; Nuel, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Penalized selection criteria like AIC or BIC are among the most popular methods for variable selection. Their theoretical properties have been studied intensively and are well understood, but making use of them in case of high-dimensional data is difficult due to the non-convex optimization problem induced by L0 penalties. In this paper we introduce an adaptive ridge procedure (AR), where iteratively weighted ridge problems are solved whose weights are updated in such a way that the procedure converges towards selection with L0 penalties. After introducing AR its specific shrinkage properties are studied in the particular case of orthogonal linear regression. Based on extensive simulations for the non-orthogonal case as well as for Poisson regression the performance of AR is studied and compared with SCAD and adaptive LASSO. Furthermore an efficient implementation of AR in the context of least-squares segmentation is presented. The paper ends with an illustrative example of applying AR to analyze GWAS data. PMID:26849123

  9. Manastash Ridge Observatory Autoguider Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozo, Jason; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Armstrong, John; Davila, Adrian; Johnson, Courtney; McMaster, Alex; Olinger, Kyle

    2016-06-01

    The Astronomy Undergraduate Engineering Group (AUEG) at the University of Washington has designed and manufactured a novel autoguider system for the 0.8-meter telescope at the Manastash Ridge Observatory in Ellensburg, Washington. The system uses a pickoff mirror placed in the unused optical path, directing the outer field to the guide camera via a system of axi-symmetrically rotating relay mirrors (periscope). This allows the guider to sample nearly 7 times the area that would be possible with the same fixed detector. This system adds closed loop optical feedback to the tracking capabilities of the telescope. When tuned the telescope will be capable of acheiving 0.5 arcsecond tracking or better. Dynamic focusing of the primary optical path will also be an included feature of this system. This unique guider will be a much needed upgrade to the telescope allowing for increased scientific capability.

  10. Hydroforming Applications at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    bird, e.l.; ludtka, g.m.

    1999-03-10

    Hydroforming technology is a robust forming process that produces components with high precision and complexity. The goal of this paper is to present a brief description of the sheet hydroforming process with respect to the authors' experience and capabilities. Following the authors' discussion of the sheet-metal forming application, the tubular hydroforming process is described in the context of one of our technology development programs with an automotive industrial partner. After that is a summary of the tubular hydroforming advisor (expert system) development activity, which was a significant part of this overall program based on previous experience in developing a design and manufacturing support hydroforming advisor for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's weapons-component manufacturing needs. Therefore, this paper is divided into three sections: (1) Hydroforming of Stainless Steel Parts, (2) Tubular Hydroforming, and (3) Components of a Tubular Hydroforming Advisor.

  11. Segmentation of stereo terrain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Debra A.; Privitera, Claudio M.; Blackmon, Theodore T.; Zbinden, Eric; Stark, Lawrence W.

    2000-06-01

    We have studied four approaches to segmentation of images: three automatic ones using image processing algorithms and a fourth approach, human manual segmentation. We were motivated toward helping with an important NASA Mars rover mission task -- replacing laborious manual path planning with automatic navigation of the rover on the Mars terrain. The goal of the automatic segmentations was to identify an obstacle map on the Mars terrain to enable automatic path planning for the rover. The automatic segmentation was first explored with two different segmentation methods: one based on pixel luminance, and the other based on pixel altitude generated through stereo image processing. The third automatic segmentation was achieved by combining these two types of image segmentation. Human manual segmentation of Martian terrain images was used for evaluating the effectiveness of the combined automatic segmentation as well as for determining how different humans segment the same images. Comparisons between two different segmentations, manual or automatic, were measured using a similarity metric, SAB. Based on this metric, the combined automatic segmentation did fairly well in agreeing with the manual segmentation. This was a demonstration of a positive step towards automatically creating the accurate obstacle maps necessary for automatic path planning and rover navigation.

  12. Insect segmentation: Genes, stripes and segments in "Hoppers".

    PubMed

    French, V

    2001-11-13

    Recent work has revealed that orthologues of several segmentation genes are expressed in the grasshopper embryo, in patterns resembling those shown in Drosophila. This suggests that, despite great differences between the embryos, a hierarchy of gap/pair-rule/segment polarity gene function may be a shared and ancestral feature of insect segmentation. PMID:11719236

  13. The effect of fault-bend folding on seismic velocity in the marginal ridge of accretionary prisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cai, Y.; Wang, Chun-Yong; Hwang, W.-t.; Cochrane, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluid venting in accretionary prisms, which feeds chemosynthetic biological communities, occurs mostly on the marginal thrust ridge. New seismic data for the marginal ridge of the Cascadia prism show significantly lower velocity than that in the adjacent oceanic basin and place important constraints on the interpretations of why fluid venting occurs mostly on the marginal ridge. We employed a finite-element method to analyze a typical fault-bend folding model to explain the phenomenon. The fault in the model is simulated by contact elements. The elements are characterized not only by finite sliding along a slide line, but also by elastoplastic deformation. We present the results of a stress analysis which show that the marginal ridge is under subhorizontal extension and the frontal thrust is under compression. This state of stress favors the growth of tensile cracks in the marginal ridge, facilitates fluid flow and reduces seismic velocities therein; on the other hand, it may close fluid pathways along the frontal thrust and divert fluid flow to the marginal ridge. ?? 1995 Birkha??user Verlag.

  14. Kidney segmentation in CT sequences using SKFCM and improved GrowCut algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Organ segmentation is an important step in computer-aided diagnosis and pathology detection. Accurate kidney segmentation in abdominal computed tomography (CT) sequences is an essential and crucial task for surgical planning and navigation in kidney tumor ablation. However, kidney segmentation in CT is a substantially challenging work because the intensity values of kidney parenchyma are similar to those of adjacent structures. Results In this paper, a coarse-to-fine method was applied to segment kidney from CT images, which consists two stages including rough segmentation and refined segmentation. The rough segmentation is based on a kernel fuzzy C-means algorithm with spatial information (SKFCM) algorithm and the refined segmentation is implemented with improved GrowCut (IGC) algorithm. The SKFCM algorithm introduces a kernel function and spatial constraint into fuzzy c-means clustering (FCM) algorithm. The IGC algorithm makes good use of the continuity of CT sequences in space which can automatically generate the seed labels and improve the efficiency of segmentation. The experimental results performed on the whole dataset of abdominal CT images have shown that the proposed method is accurate and efficient. The method provides a sensitivity of 95.46% with specificity of 99.82% and performs better than other related methods. Conclusions Our method achieves high accuracy in kidney segmentation and considerably reduces the time and labor required for contour delineation. In addition, the method can be expanded to 3D segmentation directly without modification. PMID:26356850

  15. The East Greenland Ridge - a continental sliver along the Greenland Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlings, Joanna; Funck, Thomas; Castro, Carlos F.; Hopper, John R.

    2014-05-01

    The East Greenland Ridge (EGR), situated along the Greenland Fracture Zone in the northern part of the Greenland-Norwegian Sea, is a NW-SE trending 250-km-long and up to 50-km-wide bathymetric high that separates the Greenland Basin in the south from the Boreas Basin in the north. Previous seismic work established that the EGR is primarily continental in nature. Detailed swath bathymetric data revealed a complex internal structure of the ridge with two main overstepping ridge segments. These segments were not adequately covered by the GEUS2002NEG seismic survey as the detailed structure was not known at that time. The crustal affinity of the northwestern, landward-most ridge segment, and how it is attached to the Northeast Greenland continental shelf, remained unclear. The GEUS-EAGER2011 survey was designed to address these issues and to provide further constraints on the structural development of the EGR. During the GEUS-EAGER2011 survey, additional seismic refraction and reflection data were acquired on the EGR and the Northeast Greenland shelf. The data set consists of two strike lines covering the seaward-most part of the Northeast Greenland shelf and the landward-most part of the EGR, and one cross line extending from the Boreas Basin, across the ridge and into the Greenland Basin. A total of 15 ocean bottom seismometers and 46 sonobuoys were deployed along the three seismic refraction lines. P-wave velocity models for the crust and upper mantle were derived by forward and inverse modelling of the travel times of the observed seismic phases using the raytracing algorithm RAYINVR. Seismic reflection data, coinciding with the seismic refraction data were used to guide the modelling of the sedimentary layers down to basement. The velocity models confirm that the crust has a continental nature along both ridge segments with a velocity structure that significantly differs from that of normal oceanic crust. The models also show that the crust of the EGR is linked to

  16. Globus pallidus internal segment.

    PubMed

    Nambu, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    The internal segment of the globus pallidus (GP(i)) gathers many bits of information including movement-related activity from the striatum, external segment of the globus pallidus (GP(e)), and subthalamic nucleus (STN), and integrates them. The GP(i) receives rich GABAergic inputs from the striatum and GP(e), and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors are distributed in the GP(i) in a specific manner. Thus, inputs from the striatum and GP(e) may control GP(i) activity in a different way. The GP(i) finally conveys processed information outside the basal ganglia. Changes in GABAergic neurotransmission have been reported in movement disorders and suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of the symptoms. PMID:17499112

  17. Segmented vortex flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Segmented vortex flaps were suggested as a means of delaying the vortex spill-over causing thrust loss over the outboard region of single-panel flaps. Also proposed was hinge-line setback for exploiting leading-edge suction in conjunction with vortex flaps to improve the overall thrust per unit flap area. These two concepts in combination were tested on a 60-deg cropped delta wing model. Significant improvement in flap efficiency was indicated by a reduction of the flap/wing area from 11.4% of single-panel flap to 6.3% of a two segment delta flap design, with no lift/drag penalty at lift coefficients between 0.5 and 0.7. The more efficient vortex flap arrangement of this study should benefit the performance attainable with flaps of given area on wings of moderate leading-edge sweep.

  18. Segmented Thermal Barrier Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The article has a macro-segmented thermal barrier coating due to the presence of a pattern of three-dimensional features. The features may be a series of raised ribs formed on the substrate surface and being spaced from 0.05 inches to 0.30 apart. The ribs have a width ranging from 0.005 inches to 0.02 inches, and a height ranging from 25% to 100% of the thickness of the barrier coating. Alternately, the features may be a similar pattern of grooves formed in the surface of the substrate. Other embodiments provide segmentation by grooves or ribs in the bond coat or alternately grooves formed in the thermal barrier layer.

  19. Boundary-constrained multi-scale segmentation method for remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueliang; Xiao, Pengfeng; Song, Xiaoqun; She, Jiangfeng

    2013-04-01

    Image segmentation is the key step of Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) in remote sensing. This paper proposes a Boundary-Constrained Multi-Scale Segmentation (BCMS) method. Firstly, adjacent pixels are aggregated to generate initial segmentation according to the local best region growing strategy. Then, the Region Adjacency Graph (RAG) is built based on initial segmentation. Finally, the local mutual best region merging strategy is applied on RAG to produce multi-scale segmentation results. During the region merging process, a Step-Wise Scale Parameter (SWSP) strategy is proposed to produce boundary-constrained multi-scale segmentation results. Moreover, in order to improve the accuracy of object boundaries, the property of edge strength is introduced as a merging criterion. A set of high spatial resolution remote sensing images is used in the experiment, e.g., QuickBird, WorldView, and aerial image, to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The segmentation results of BCMS are compared with those of the commercial image analysis software eCognition. The experiment shows that BCMS can produce nested multi-scale segmentations with accurate and smooth boundaries, which proves the robustness of the proposed method.

  20. Laser ablation of persistent twist cells in Drosophila: muscle precursor fate is not segmentally restricted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, E. R.; Keshishian, H.

    1999-01-01

    In Drosophila the precursors of the adult musculature arise during embryogenesis. These precursor cells have been termed Persistent Twist Cells (PTCs), as they continue to express the transcription factor Twist after that gene ceases expression elsewhere in the mesoderm. In the larval abdomen, the PTCs are associated with peripheral nerves in stereotypic ventral, dorsal, and lateral clusters, which give rise, respectively, to the ventral, dorsal, and lateral muscle fiber groups of the adult. We tested the developmental potential of the PTCs by using a microbeam laser to ablate specific clusters in larvae. We found that the ablation of a single segmental PTC cluster does not usually result in the deletion of the corresponding adult fibers of that segment. Instead, normal or near normal numbers of adult fibers can form after the ablation. Examination of pupae following ablation showed that migrating PTCs from adjacent segments are able to invade the affected segment, replenishing the ablated cells. However, the ablation of homologous PTCs in multiple segments does result in the deletion of the corresponding adult muscle fibers. These data indicate that the PTCs in an abdominal segment can contribute to the formation of muscle fibers in adjacent abdominal segments, and thus are not inherently restricted to the formation of muscle fibers within their segment of origin.

  1. Leech segmental repeats develop normally in the absence of signals from either anterior or posterior segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaver, E. C.; Shankland, M.

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated whether the development of segmental repeats is autonomous in the embryo of the leech Helobdella robusta. The segmental tissues of the germinal band arise from progeny of five stem cells called teloblasts. Asymmetric divisions of the teloblasts form chains of segment founder cells (called primary blast cells) that divide in a stereotypical manner to produce differentiated descendants. Using two distinct techniques, we have looked for potential interactions between neighboring blast cell clones along the anterior-posterior axis. In one technique, we prevented the birth of primary blast cells by injection of DNase I into the teloblast, thereby depriving the last blast cell produced before the ablation of its normal posterior neighbors. We also ablated single blast cells with a laser microbeam, which allowed us to assess potential signals acting on either more anterior or more posterior primary blast cell clones. Our results suggest that interactions along the anterior-posterior axis between neighboring primary blast cell clones are not required for development of normal segmental organization within the blast cell clone. We also examined the possibility that blast cells receive redundant signals from both anterior and posterior neighboring clones and that either is sufficient for normal development. Using double blast cell laser ablations to isolate a primary blast cell clone by removal of both its anterior and its posterior neighbor, we found that the isolated clone still develops normally. These results reveal that the fundamental segmental repeat in the leech embryo, the primary blast cell clone, can develop normally in the apparent absence of signals from adjacent repeats along the anterior-posterior axis.

  2. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  3. Cretaceous magmatism in the High Canadian Arctic: Implications for the nature and age of Alpha Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Richard; Tarduno, John; Singer, Brad

    2013-04-01

    Cretaceous magmatism in the High Arctic, best expressed on Axel Heiberg and Ellesmere Island, can provide clues to the nature and age of the adjacent Alpha Ridge, which is in turn a key to understanding the tectonic evolution of the Arctic Ocean. Although the incorporation of some continental crust cannot be excluded, the prevailing view is that Alpha Ridge is dominantly thickened oceanic crust, analogous to oceanic plateaus of the Pacific and Indian Ocean. Together with the on-land volcanic exposures, Alpha Ridge composes the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (LIP), but the physical processes responsible for the magmatism remain unclear. Here we focus on two volcanic formations found on the Canadian Arctic margin. The Strand Fiord Formation is composed of a series of classic continental flood basalt flows, and represents the most voluminous expression of volcanism that has survived erosion. These basalts yield a 40Ar/39Ar age of ~95 Ma (Tarduno et al., Science, 1998) but this comes from the distant edge of the flood basalt exposures. The Hansen Point Volcanics consist of felsic and mafic rocks; previous age assignments range from the Maastrichtian (on the basis of palynomorphs, Falcon-Lang et al., Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 2004) to 80 Ma (Rb/Sr isochron, Estrada and Henjes-Kunst, Z. dt. Geol. Ges, 2004). Here we report new 40Ar/39Ar radioisotopic and paleomagnetic data from the Hansen Point Volcanics. In contrast to the latest Cretaceous/Paleogene dates, we find ages of ~95 Ma and 88-90 Ma. Because of the proximity of the landward extension of Alpha Ridge to Hansen Point, these new ages suggest that volcanism that contributed to the construction of Alpha Ridge may have extended over at least a 7 million interval (although it could have occurred in pulses). We will discuss the implications of these new data for candidate mantle processes that could have been responsible for the emplacement of Alpha Ridge and the High Arctic LIP.

  4. 1996 structural integrity assessments for the Category C Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This document provides a report of the efforts made to satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement for the structural integrity certification of ten Category C Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) tank systems on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Within this document, each Category C tank system is described including the associated pipeline segments evaluated as a part of those tank systems. A separate structural integrity assessment was conducted for each of the LLLW Tank Systems, four of which are located in Melton Valley, and six of which are located in Bethel Valley. The results of the structural integrity assessments are reported herein. The assessments are based on (1) a review of available tank design drawings, (2) a qualitative assessment of corrosion on the tank and pipelines, and primarily (3) leak testing program results.

  5. Ridge-parallel-shearing and localized vertical melt migration during spreading: A phenomenon underestimate