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Sample records for adjacent riparian zone

  1. Abundance, diversity and functional gene expression of denitrifier communities in adjacent riparian and agricultural zones.

    PubMed

    Dandie, Catherine E; Wertz, Sophie; Leclair, Caissie L; Goyer, Claudia; Burton, David L; Patten, Cheryl L; Zebarth, Bernie J; Trevors, Jack T

    2011-07-01

    Lands under riparian and agricultural management differ in soil properties, water content, plant species and nutrient content and are therefore expected to influence denitrifier communities, denitrification and nitrous oxide (N(2) O) emissions. Denitrifier community abundance, denitrifier community structure, denitrification gene expression and activity were quantified on three dates in a maize field and adjacent riparian zone. N(2) O emissions were greater in the agricultural zone, whereas complete denitrification to N(2) was greater in the riparian zone. In general, the targeted denitrifier community abundance did not change between agricultural and riparian zones. However, nosZ gene expression was greater in the riparian zone than the agricultural zone. The community structure of nirS-gene-bearing denitrifiers differed in June only, whereas the nirK-gene-bearing community structure differed significantly between the riparian and the agricultural zones at all dates. The nirK-gene-bearing community structure was correlated with soil pH, while no significant correlations were found between nirS-gene-bearing community structure and soil environmental variables or N(2) O emissions, denitrification or denitrifier enzyme activity. The results suggested for the nirK and nirS-gene-bearing communities different factors control abundance vs. community structure. The nirK-gene-bearing community structure was also more responsive than the nirS-gene-bearing community structure to change between the two ecosystems.

  2. PLANT INVASIONS IN RHODE ISLAND RIPARIAN ZONES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vegetation in riparian zones provides valuable wildlife habitat while enhancing instream habitat and water quality. Forest fragmentation, sunlit edges, and nutrient additions from adjacent development may be sources of stress on riparian zones. Landscape plants may include no...

  3. Changes In Tree Species In Riparian Zones Of Urban Streams May Have Effects On Restoration And Storm Water Control Efforts

    EPA Science Inventory

    A riparian zone is the land and vegetation within and directly adjacent to surface water ecosystems, such as lakes and streams. The vegetation in riparian zones provides ecosystem services (such as reducing flooding and bank erosion and reducing levels of pollutants in streams) ...

  4. Small mammal habitat use within restored riparian habitats adjacent to channelized streams in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian zones of channelized agricultural streams in northwestern Mississippi typically consist of narrow vegetative corridors low in habitat diversity and lacking riparian wetlands. Land clearing practices and stream channelization has led to the development of gully erosion and further fragmenta...

  5. Groundwater-surface water interaction in the riparian zone of an incised channel, Walnut Creek, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Li, Z.; Zhang, Y.-K.

    2006-01-01

    Riparian zones of many incised channels in agricultural regions are cropped to the channel edge leaving them unvegetated for large portions of the year. In this study we evaluated surface and groundwater interaction in the riparian zone of an incised stream during a spring high flow period using detailed stream stage and hydraulic head data from six wells, and water quality sampling to determine whether the riparian zone can be a source of nitrate pollution to streams. Study results indicated that bank storage of stream water from Walnut Creek during a large storm water runoff event was limited to a narrow 1.6 m zone immediately adjacent to the channel. Nitrate concentrations in riparian groundwater were highest near the incised stream where the unsaturated zone was thickest. Nitrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations and nitrate-chloride ratios increased during a spring recharge period then decreased in the latter portion of the study. We used MODFLOW and MT3DMS to evaluate dilution and denitrification processes that would contribute to decreasing nitrate concentrations in riparian groundwater over time. MT3DMS model simulations were improved with a denitrification rate of 0.02 1/d assigned to the floodplain sediments implying that denitrification plays an important role in reducing nitrate concentrations in groundwater. We conclude that riparian zones of incised channels can potentially be a source of nitrate to streams during spring recharge periods when the near-stream riparian zone is largely unvegetated. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Soil nitrogen cycle processes in urban riparian zones.

    PubMed

    Groffman, Peter M; Boulware, Natalie J; Zipperer, Wayne C; Pouyat, Richard V; Band, Lawrence E; Colosimo, Mark F

    2002-11-01

    Riparian zones have been found to function as "sinks" for nitrate (NO3-), the most common groundwater pollutant in the U. S., in many areas. The vast majority of riparian research, however, has focused on agricultural watersheds. There has been little analysis of riparian zones in urban watersheds, despite the fact that urban areas are important sources of NO3- to nitrogen (N)-sensitive coastal waters in many locations. In this study, we measured stream incision, water table depths, and pools, production (mineralization, nitrification), and consumption (denitrification) of NO3- in urban soils. Samples were taken from soil profiles (0-100 cm) of three forested urban and suburban zones and one forested reference riparian zone in the Baltimore, Maryland metropolitan area. Our objectives were to determine (1) if stream incision associated with urbanization results in lower riparian water tables, and (2) if pools, production, and consumption of NO3- vary systematically with stream incision and riparian water table levels. Two of the three urban and suburban streams were more incised and all three had lower water tables in their riparian zones than the forested reference stream. Urban and suburban riparian zones had higher NO3- pools and nitrification rates than the forested reference riparian zone, which was likely due to more aerobic soil profiles, lower levels of available soil carbon, and greater N enrichment in the urban and suburban sites. At all sites, denitrification potential decreased markedly with depth in the soil profile. Lower water tables in the urban and suburban riparian zones thus inhibit interaction of groundwater-borne NO3- with near surface soils that have the highest denitrification potential. These results suggest that urban hydrologic factors can increase the production and reduce the consumption of NO3- in riparian zones, reducing their ability to function as sinks for NO3- in the landscape.

  7. Influence of Gully Erosion Control on Amphibian and Reptile Communities within Riparian Zones of Channelized Streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian zones of streams in northwestern Mississippi have been impacted by agriculture, channelization, channel incision, and gully erosion. Riparian gully formation has resulted in the fragmentation of remnant riparian zones within agricultural watersheds. One widely used conservation practice for...

  8. The Role of Legacy Effects and Reactive Amendments on Phosphorus Retention Within Riparian Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surridge, B.; Habibiandehkordi, R.; Quinton, J.

    2014-12-01

    Undisturbed riparian zones, including river floodplains and field buffer strips, can significantly reduce phosphorus (P) export associated with agricultural production. However, riparian zones are frequently disturbed, including through conversion to agricultural land. Restoring disturbed riparian zones is promoted widely within agri-environment schemes. However, restoration presents significant challenges, two of which are considered in this paper: understanding the impacts of restoration on legacy P within riparian zone soils; and maximising the efficacy of riparian zones for removal of all P fractions, including the more immediately bioavailable soluble P fractions. Firstly, we examine changes in porewater soluble P concentration following re-wetting of a river floodplain in Norfolk, UK, using laboratory mesocosms and in-situ field monitoring. Substantial release of P from sediment to porewater was observed following re-wetting (porewater soluble P concentration exceeded 6.5 mg P L-1), probably associated with reductive-dissolution of iron-bound P within floodplain sediments. Export of soluble P from porewater into adjacent receiving waters was observed following both natural hydrological events and management of the hydrological regime within the floodplain. Secondly, we examine how retention of soluble P with grass buffer strips can be enhanced through application of reactive industrial by-products, focussing on ochre and aluminium-based water treatment residuals. Application of these by-products to buffer strips increased removal of soluble P from surface runoff by over 50% compared to non-amended buffer strips. The long-term effectiveness of reactive amendments is also considered, using repeated runoff events under field conditions. Taken together, the research offers new insights into riparian zone P biogeochemistry within agricultural landscapes.

  9. Breeding bird response to partially harvested riparian management zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, Christopher J.; Peterson, Anna; Hanowski, JoAnn; Blinn, Charles R.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Niemi, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    We compared avian communities among three timber harvesting treatments in 45-m wide even-age riparian management zones (RMZs) placed between upland clearcuts and along one side of first- or second-order streams in northern Minnesota, USA. The RMZs had three treatments: (1) unharvested, (2) intermediate residual basal area (RBA) (targeted goal 11.5 m2/ha, realized 16.0 m2/ha), and (3) low RBA (targeted goal 5.7 m2/ha, realized 8.7 m2/ha). Surveys were conducted one year pre-harvest and three consecutive years post-harvest. There was no change in species richness, diversity, or total abundance associated with harvest but there were shifts in the types of birds within the community. In particular, White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) and Chestnut-sided Warblers (Dendroica pensylvanica) increased while Ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapilla) and Red-eyed Vireos (Vireo olivaceus) decreased. The decline of avian species associated with mature forest in the partially harvested treatments relative to controls indicates that maintaining an unharvested RMZ adjacent to an upland harvest may aid in maintaining avian species associated mature forest in Minnesota for at least three years post-harvest. However, our observations do not reflect reproductive success, which is an area for future research.

  10. Nitrate removal in a restored riparian groundwater system: functioning and importance of individual riparian zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, S.; Rechsteiner, R.; Lehmann, M. F.; Brankatschk, R.; Vogt, T.; Diem, S.; Wehrli, B.; Tockner, K.; Durisch-Kaiser, E.

    2012-06-01

    For the design and the assessment of river restoration projects, it is important to know to what extent the elimination of reactive nitrogen (N) can be improved in the riparian groundwater. We investigated the effectiveness of different riparian zones, characterized by a riparian vegetation succession, on nitrate (NO3-) removal from infiltrating river water in a restored and a still channelized section of the River Thur, Switzerland. Functional genes of denitrification (nirS and nosZ) were relatively abundant in groundwater from willow bush and mixed forest dominated zones, where oxygen concentrations remained low compared to the main channel and other riparian zones. After flood events, a substantial decline in NO3- concentration (>50 %) was observed in the willow bush zone, but not in the other riparian zones closer to the river. In addition, the characteristic enrichment of 15N and 18O in the residual NO3- pool (by up to 22 ‰ for δ15N and up to 12 ‰ for δ18O) provides qualitative evidence that the willow bush and forest zones were sites of active denitrification and, to a lesser extent, NO3- removal by plant uptake. Particularly in the willow bush zone, during a period of water table elevation after a flooding event, substantial input of organic carbon into the groundwater occurred, thereby fostering post-flood denitrification activity that reduced NO3- concentration with a rate of ~21 μmol N l-1 d-1. Nitrogen removal in the forest zone was not sensitive to flood pluses, and overall NO3- removal rates were lower (~6 μmol l-1 d-1). Hence, discharge-modulated vegetation-soil-groundwater coupling was found to be a~key driver for riparian NO3- removal. We estimated that, despite higher rates in the fairly constrained willow bush hot spot, total NO3- removal from the groundwater is lower than in the extended forest area. Overall, the aquifer in the restored section was more effective and removed ~20 % more NO3- than the channelized section.

  11. Nitrate removal in a restored riparian groundwater system: functioning and importance of individual riparian zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, S.; Rechsteiner, R.; Lehmann, M. F.; Brankatschk, R.; Vogt, T.; Diem, S.; Wehrli, B.; Tockner, K.; Durisch-Kaiser, E.

    2012-11-01

    For the design and the assessment of river restoration projects, it is important to know to what extent the elimination of reactive nitrogen (N) can be improved in the riparian groundwater. We investigated the effectiveness of different riparian zones, characterized by a riparian vegetation succession, for nitrate (NO3-) removal from infiltrating river water in a restored and a still channelized section of the river Thur, Switzerland. Functional genes of denitrification (nirS and nosZ) were relatively abundant in groundwater from willow bush and mixed forest dominated zones, where oxygen concentrations remained low compared to the main channel and other riparian zones. After flood events, a substantial decline in NO3- concentration (> 50%) was observed in the willow bush zone but not in the other riparian zones closer to the river. In addition, the characteristic enrichment of 15N and 18O in the residual NO3- pool (by up to 22‰ for δ15N and up to 12‰ for δ18O) provides qualitative evidence that the willow bush and forest zones were sites of active denitrification and, to a lesser extent, NO3- removal by plant uptake. Particularly in the willow bush zone during a period of water table elevation after a flooding event, substantial input of organic carbon into the groundwater occurred, thereby fostering post-flood denitrification activity that reduced NO3- concentration with a rate of ~21 μmol N l-1 d-1. Nitrogen removal in the forest zone was not sensitive to flood pulses, and overall NO3- removal rates were lower (~6 μmol l-1 d-1). Hence, discharge-modulated vegetation-soil-groundwater coupling was found to be a key driver for riparian NO3- removal. We estimated that, despite higher rates in the fairly constrained willow bush hot spot, total NO3- removal from the groundwater is lower than in the extended forest area. Overall, the aquifer in the restored section was more effective and removed ~20% more NO3- than the channelized section.

  12. Ecological functions of riparian zones in Oregon hydrological landscapes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecological functions of streams and associated riparian zones are strongly influenced by the hydrological attributes of watersheds and landscapes in which they occur. Oregon hydrologic landscape regions (HLRs) have been defined based on four types of GIS data: 1) climate, 2) ...

  13. Cost of riparian buffer zones: A comparison of hydrologically adapted site-specific riparian buffers with traditional fixed widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, T.; Lundström, J.; Kuglerová, L.; Laudon, H.; Öhman, K.; Ågren, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Traditional approaches aiming at protecting surface waters from the negative impacts of forestry often focus on retaining fixed width buffer zones around waterways. While this method is relatively simple to design and implement, it has been criticized for ignoring the spatial heterogeneity of biogeochemical processes and biodiversity in the riparian zone. Alternatively, a variable width buffer zone adapted to site-specific hydrological conditions has been suggested to improve the protection of biogeochemical and ecological functions of the riparian zone. However, little is known about the monetary value of maintaining hydrologically adapted buffer zones compared to the traditionally used fixed width ones. In this study, we created a hydrologically adapted buffer zone by identifying wet areas and groundwater discharge hotspots in the riparian zone. The opportunity cost of the hydrologically adapted riparian buffer zones was then compared to that of the fixed width zones in a meso-scale boreal catchment to determine the most economical option of designing riparian buffers. The results show that hydrologically adapted buffer zones were cheaper per hectare than the fixed width ones when comparing the total cost. This was because the hydrologically adapted buffers included more wetlands and low productive forest areas than the fixed widths. As such, the hydrologically adapted buffer zones allows more effective protection of the parts of the riparian zones that are ecologically and biogeochemically important and more sensitive to disturbances without forest landowners incurring any additional cost than fixed width buffers.

  14. Nitrous oxide emission from cropland and adjacent riparian buffers in contrasting hydrogeomorphic settings.

    PubMed

    Fisher, K; Jacinthe, P A; Vidon, P; Liu, X; Baker, M E

    2014-01-01

    Riparian buffers are important nitrate (NO) sinks in agricultural watersheds, but limited information is available regarding the intensity and control of nitrous oxide (NO) emission from these buffers. This study monitored (December 2009-May 2011) NO fluxes at two agricultural riparian buffers in the White River watershed in Indiana to assess the impact of land use and hydrogeomorphologic (HGM) attributes on emission. The study sites included a riparian forest in a glacial outwash/alluvium setting (White River [WR]) and a grassed riparian buffer in tile-drained till plains (Leary Weber Ditch [LWD]). Adjacent corn ( L.) fields were monitored for land use assessment. Analysis of variance identified season, land use (riparian buffer vs. crop field), and site geomorphology as major drivers of NO fluxes. Strong relationships between N mineralization and NO fluxes were found at both sites, but relationships with other nutrient cycling indicators (C/N ratio, dissolved organic C, microbial biomass C) were detected only at LWD. Nitrous oxide emission showed strong seasonal variability; the largest NO peaks occurred in late spring/early summer as a result of flooding at the WR riparian buffer (up to 27.8 mg NO-N m d) and N fertilizer application to crop fields. Annual NO emission (kg NO-N ha) was higher in the crop fields (WR: 7.82; LWD: 6.37) than in the riparian areas. A significant difference ( < 0.02) in annual NO emission between the riparian buffers was detected (4.32 vs. 1.03 kg NO-N ha at WR and LWD, respectively), and this difference was attributed to site geomorphology and flooding (WR is flood prone; no flooding occurred at tile-drained LWD). The study results demonstrate the significance of landscape geomorphology and land-stream connection (i.e., flood potential) as drivers of NO emission in riparian buffers and therefore argue that an HGM-based approach should be especially suitable for determination of regional NO budget in riparian ecosystems.

  15. IDENTIFICATION EFFICIENCY IN GROUNDWATER ADJACENT TO DITCHES WITHIN CONSTRUCTED RIPARIAN WETLANDS: KANKAKEE WATERSHED, ILLINOIS-INDIANA, U.S.A.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dual isotope evaluations of NO3 in groundwater adjacent to ditches within constructed riparian wetlands across the Kankakee water-shed may assist the determination of denitrification efficiency. Groundwater sampling indicates the NO3 -N exceeded 10 mg 1-1 in constructed riparian ...

  16. Perchlorate natural attenuation in a riparian zone.

    PubMed

    Borden, Robert C; Knox, Sheri L; Lieberman, M Tony; Ogles, Dora

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence were used to document the natural attenuation of perchlorate in a shallow alluvial aquifer. In the upgradient, aerobic portion of the aquifer, perchlorate did not biodegrade. However, natural flushing by groundwater flow is reducing perchlorate concentrations in the aquifer over time. Perchlorate concentrations in the source area are expected to meet cleanup criteria in 11 to 27 years without active remedial measures. At the distal end of the plume, perchlorate is rapidly degraded as it migrates upward through organic rich littoral zone sediments. Apparent first-order degradation rates in groundwater were about 0.20 d(-1) and are consistent with laboratory macrocosm rates (0.12 d(-1)). qPCR results show a distinct region of the littoral zone where perchlorate degraders are elevated. The Eh within this zone varies from +0.1 to +0.3 V indicating perchlorate degraders can thrive in moderately oxidizing conditions. The study has shown that (i) there was no apparent perchlorate biodegradation in aerobic aquifer; (ii) perchlorate declines over time in aerobic aquifer due to flushing; (iii) there was a rapid perchlorate attenuation in organic rich littoral zone; and, (iv) qPCR results show large increases in perchlorate degraders in the littoral zone.

  17. Ground water nitrate removal in subsoil of forested and mowed riparian buffer zones

    SciTech Connect

    Addy, K.L.; Gold, A.J.; Groffman, P.M.; Jacinthe, P.A.

    1999-05-01

    The authors studied two similar riparian sites in southern New England and examined ground water nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N) removal in the subsurface of mowed (i.e., herbaceous) vs. forested (i.e., woody) vegetation. Each site consisted of poorly drained, fine to medium sands and contained adjacent areas of mowed and forested vegetation. They dosed mesocosms with bromide and {sup 15}N labeled NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N amended ground water to simulate the shallow ground water NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N dynamics of riparian buffers zones. Mesocosms were composed of undisturbed, horizontal soil cores extracted from seasonally saturated subsoil. The authors observed substantial ground water NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N removal and denitrification at all locations. Ground water NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N removal rates were significantly correlated with carbon-enriched patches of organic matter. This correlation supports previous work that patches function as hotspots of microbial activity in the subsoil. Within each site, they found no significant difference in ground water NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N removal rates in the subsoil of forested and mowed areas and they noted tree roots throughout the subsoil of the mowed areas. They found that ground water NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N removal rates differed significantly between similar sites. They caution against ascribing specific ground water NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N removal rates to different riparian aboveground vegetation types without recognizing the importance of site differences, e.g., water table dynamics, land use legacy and adjacent vegetation. Riparian zones composed of a mix of forested and mowed vegetation, common in agroforestry and suburban land uses, may remove substantial amounts of ground water NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N.

  18. Water quality dynamics and hydrology in nitrate loaded riparian zones in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Hefting, Mariet; Beltman, Boudewijn; Karssenberg, Derek; Rebel, Karin; van Riessen, Mirjam; Spijker, Maarten

    2006-01-01

    Riparian zones are known to function as buffers, reducing non-point source pollution from agricultural land to streams. In the Netherlands, riparian zones are subject to high nitrogen inputs. We combined hydrological, chemical and soil profile data with groundwater modelling to evaluate whether chronically N loaded riparian zones were still mitigating diffuse nitrate fluxes. Hydraulic parameters and water quality were monitored over 2 years in 50 piezometres in a forested and grassland riparian zone. Average nitrate loadings were high in the forested zone with 87 g NO(3)(-)-N m(-2) y(-1) and significantly lower in the grassland zone with 15 g NO(3)(-)-N m(-2) y(-1). Groundwater from a second aquifer diluted the nitrate loaded agricultural runoff. Biological N removal however occurred in both riparian zones, the grassland zone removed about 63% of the incoming nitrate load, whereas in the forested zone clear symptoms of saturation were visible and only 38% of the nitrate load was removed.

  19. Relation between fish communities and riparian zone conditions at two spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, K.E.; Goldstein, R.M.; Hanson, P.E.

    2001-01-01

     The relation offish community composition to riparian cover at two spatial scales was compared at 18 streams in the agricultural Minnesota River Basin. The two spatial scales were: (1) local riparian zone (a 200 meter wide buffer extending 2 to 3 kilometers upstream of the sampling reach); and (2) the upstream riparian zone (a 200 m wide buffer on the mainstem and all perennial tributaries upstream of the sampling reach). Analysis of variance indicated that streams with wooded-local riparian zones had greater fish species richness (means = 20 and 15, respectively) and Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) scores (means = 40 and 26, respectively) than streams with open-local riparian zones. Streams with wooded-upstream riparian zones tended (were not statistically significant) to have greater numbers of species (means = 19 and 15, respectively) and IBI scores (means = 33 and 28, respectively) than streams with open-upstream riparian zones. There was no significant interaction between the riparian zone conditions at the two scales. This study suggests that maintenance of wooded riparian cover along streams could be effective in maintaining or improving fish community composition in streams draining heavily agricultural areas.

  20. Holding onto the Green Zone: A Youth Program for the Study and Stewardship of Community Riparian Areas. Action Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of the Interior, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Scientists call the land along the edges of a river, stream, or lake a riparian zone. In this guide, riparian zone will be called the Green Zone. Riparian zones make up only a small part of land in the United States. But they are very important. They protect water quality and quantity, supply food and shelter for fish and wildlife, and provide…

  1. Hydrogeologic and Biogeochemical Controls on the Fate and Transport of Nitrate and Pesticides in the Riparian Zone of Cow Castle Creek, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, L. J.; Hughes, W. B.

    2001-12-01

    Riparian zones often contain large amounts of organic carbon and small concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) resulting in reducing conditions that favor removal of nitrate through denitrification, and in some cases pesticides. We investigated the transport and fate of nitrate, several commonly used pesticides, and selected metabolites at a farm in South Carolina adjacent to Cow Castle Creek. Sixteen shallow water-table wells were installed to map the water table and ground water was sampled using 7 multi-port wells installed at depths ranging from 0.5 to 10 m along a 1-km flow system bracketing several types of land use including a cornfield, pine forest, hay field, riparian forest, and the discharge area at Cow Castle Creek. Ground-water recharge dates, based on CFC age dating, were from the mid-to-late 1970s below the riparian zone and Cow Castle Creek indicating a maximum residence time of approximately 23-years. Organic carbon under the riparian zone was as high as 0.97 percent. DO concentrations were variable with the smallest values immediately under the riparian zone. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations varied over the site from about 28 mg/L immediately down gradient of the cornfield to below detection (<0.05 mg/L) under the hayfield. Large decreases in nitrate-nitrogen were detected at the edge of the riparian zone and immediately below it. Nitrate concentrations initially increased with depth below the riparian zone then decreased again in deeper samples while beneath Cow Castle Creek they varied from 2.8 to 4.7 mg/L. Excess nitrogen gas concentrations, presumably derived from denitrification, varied from 1.4 to 4.1 mg/L under the riparian zone. Atrazine, metolachlor and their metabolites were the most commonly detected pesticides and were generally restricted to samples collected under and adjacent to the cornfield however, there were a few detections of atrazine, simazine, chlorpyrifos, and deethyl atrazine under and adjacent to the riparian zone. Flow

  2. Influence of gully erosion control on amphibian and reptile communities within riparian zones of channelized streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian zones of streams in northern Mississippi have been impacted by agriculture, channelization, channel incision, and gully erosion. Gully erosion is the most severe form of erosion and has resulted in the fragmentation of remnant riparian zones within agricultural watersheds. One widely used c...

  3. Influence of Gully Erosion Control on Amphibian and Reptile Communities Within Riparian Zones of Channelized Streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian zones of streams in northern Mississippi have been impacted by agriculture, channelization, channel incision, and gully erosion. Gully erosion is the most severe form of erosion and has resulted in the fragmentation of remnant riparian zones within agricultural watersheds. One widely used c...

  4. Nitrogen fate across topographic gradients, from headwaters to riparian zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, E. M.; Fuka, D. R.; Easton, Z. M.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying where nitrogen transforming microbial process occur within the landscape is critical to understanding nitrogen dynamics on a regional to global scale. Although the connection between topography and the activity of soil nitrifiers and denitrifiers has been studied at the landscape scale, hillslope scale relationships are needed as a predictive tool to incorporate process-based nitrogen flux, as N2 and N2O emissions, into variable source hydrologic models, for predicting stream nutrient concentrations and ultimately catchment export. This study examines denitrification and N2O emission along topographic gradients, determined from direct measurement of dissolved N2 and N2O in soil water samples and measured from soil cores in situ. Additionally, denitrifying enzyme activity and microbial respiration, taken as the evolution of CO2, are recorded as indicators of potential microbial activity. Three transects are monitored from a hummocky pasture downslope through a riparian zone, where soil moisture conditions are dynamic, allowing the quantification of topographic controls under different soil moisture regimes. Previous studies have shown that topographic controls increase denitrification downslope because of enhanced down gradient nutrient supply via hydrologic flow paths. In addition, we incorporate the supply of soil moisture and/or nutrients during overbank flow as a driver of denitrification resulting from elevated discharge rather than the topographic gradient. Predicted stream flow and nitrogen concentration, based on models of variable source area hydrology, is then used to predict riparian denitrification in response to storm flow, modifying catchment export.

  5. Relationship of wooded riparian zones and runoff potential to fish community composition in agricultural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stauffer, J.C.; Goldstein, R.M.; Newman, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    The relationship of fish community composition to riparian cover and runoff potential was investigated in 20 streams in the agricultural Minnesota River Basin during the summer of 1997. Analysis of variance indicated significant differences in fish community composition due to both riparian cover (wooded versus open) and runoff potential (high or low). Streams with wooded riparian zones had higher index of biological integrity (IBI) scores, species richness, diversity, and percentages of benthic insectivores and herbivores than streams with open riparian zones. Streams with low runoff potential had higher IBI scores and species richness than streams with high runoff potential. The riparian cover and runoff potential interaction was marginally significant with respect to IBI scores and species richness, suggesting a weak interaction between the two factors. Although both factors were important, riparian cover influenced fish community composition more than runoff potential in these streams, indicating that local factors (close to the stream) dominated landscape- or basin-level factors.

  6. Hot spots and hot moments in riparian zones: potential for improved water quality management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite considerable heterogeneity over space and time, biogeochemical and hydrological processes in riparian zones regulate contaminant movement to receiving waters and often mitigate the impact of upland sources of contaminants on water quality. Recently, these heterogeneous processes have been co...

  7. Modeling and classifying variable width riparian zones utilizing digital elevation models, flood height data, digital soil data and National Wetlands Inventory: A new approach for riparian zone delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abood, Sinan A.

    Riparian zones are dynamic, transitional ecosystems between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems with well defined vegetation and soil characteristics. Development of an all-encompassing definition for riparian ecotones, because of their high variability, is challenging. However, there are two primary factors that all riparian ecotones are dependent on: the watercourse and its associated floodplain. Previous approaches to riparian boundary delineation have utilized fixed width buffers, but this methodology has proven to be inadequate as it only takes the watercourse into consideration and ignores critical geomorphology, associated vegetation and soil characteristics. Our approach offers advantages over other previously used methods by utilizing: the geospatial modeling capabilities of ArcMap GIS; a better sampling technique along the water course that can distinguish the 50-year flood plain, which is the optimal hydrologic descriptor of riparian ecotones; the Soil Survey Database (SSURGO) and National Wetland Inventory (NWI) databases to distinguish contiguous areas beyond the 50-year plain; and land use/cover characteristics associated with the delineated riparian zones. The model utilizes spatial data readily available from Federal and State agencies and geospatial clearinghouses. An accuracy assessment was performed to assess the impact of varying the 50-year flood height, changing the DEM spatial resolution (1, 3, 5 and 10m), and positional inaccuracies with the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) streams layer on the boundary placement of the delineated variable width riparian ecotones area. The result of this study is a robust and automated GIS based model attached to ESRI ArcMap software to delineate and classify variable-width riparian ecotones.

  8. Groundwater Nitrate Removal Capacity of Riparian Zones: Linking Site Attributes to the Watershed Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, A. J.; Groffman, P. M.; Addy, K.; Kellogg, D. Q.; Rosenblatt, A. E.

    2001-05-01

    Inherent site factors can generate substantial variation in the groundwater nitrate removal capacity of riparian zones. Our research in the glaciated Northeast related variability in groundwater nitrate removal to site attributes depicted in readily available spatial databases, such as the Soil Survey Geographic database (SSURGO). Linking site-specific studies of riparian groundwater nitrate removal to spatial data can help target high-value riparian locations for restoration or protection and improve the modeling of watershed nitrogen flux. Site attributes, such as hydric soil status (soil wetness) and geomorphology, affect the interaction of nitrate-enriched groundwater with portions of the soil ecosystem possessing elevated biogeochemical transformation rates (i.e., biologically active zones). Through a series of mesocosm studies and field studies relying on intensive well networks to track changes in injected plumes of nitrate and conservative tracers, we found high groundwater nitrate-N removal rates were restricted to hydric soils at our riparian sites. Through a field survey of 100 randomly selected forested riparian locations on lower order streams, we determined that geomorphology can provide insights into groundwater flowpaths. Riparian sites located on outwash and alluvial deposits have high potential for nitrate-enriched groundwater to interact with biologically active zones. In till deposits, groundwater nitrate removal potential was limited by the high occurrence of surface seeps that markedly reduce the time available for biological transformations to occur within the riparian zone. To fully realize the value of riparian zones for nitrate retention, landscape controls of riparian nitrate removal in different climatic and physiographic regions must be determined and translated into available spatial databases.

  9. Multiple geochemical and isotopic approaches for assessing ground water NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} elimination in a riparian zone

    SciTech Connect

    Mengis, M.; Schiff, S.L.; Aravena, R.; Elgood, R.J.; Harris, M.; English, M.C.; MacLean, A.

    1999-05-01

    During the last 40 years, nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) has become one of the most common ground water contaminants. Stream riparian zones are considered important ecological ecotones that decrease the NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} load of ground water discharging into streams. This study uses NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/Cl{sup {minus}} ratios, natural abundances of {sup 15}N and {sup 18}O in NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and an in situ {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} tracer experiment to evaluate NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} reducing processes occurring in ground water within a narrow grassed buffer strip bordering a stream in an agricultural watershed. The NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/Cl{sup {minus}} ratios indicate that both NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} consuming processes and mixing of two ground water flow regimes with different NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} loads contribute to the drop observed in ground water NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} concentrations within the riparian zone. {delta}{sup 15}N and {delta}{sup 18}O of the ground water NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} within the riparian zone were enriched compared to the ground water below the adjacent cultivated field. A significant linear relationship between ground water {delta}{sup 15}N and {delta}{sup 18}O in NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} was found, which is consistent with NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} consumption by microbial denitrification. The estimated enrichment factors for {sup 15}N are a factor of 1.5 higher than for {sup 18}O. The in situ {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} tracer experiment conclusively confirmed that denitrification is occurring within the ground water of the riparian zone and demonstrates that denitrification rates can be directly measured in situ.

  10. Riparian zone flowpath dynamics during snowmelt in a small headwater catchment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGlynn, B.L.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Shanley, J.B.; Kendall, C.

    1999-01-01

    The hydrology of the near-stream riparian zone in upland humid catchments is poorly understood. We examined the spatial and temporal aspects of riparian flowpaths during snowmelt in a headwater catchment within the Sleepers River catchment in northern Vermont. A transect of 15 piezometers was sampled for Ca, Si, DOC, other major cations, and ??18O. Daily piezometric head values reflected variations in the stream hydrograph induced by melt and rainfall. The riparian zone exhibited strong upward discharge gradients. An impeding layer was identified between the till and surficial organic soil. Water solute concentrations increased toward the stream throughout the melt. Ca concentrations increased with depth and DOC concentrations decreased with depth. The concentrations of Ca in all piezometers were lower during active snowmelt than during post-melt low flow. Ca data suggest snowmelt infiltration to depth; however, only upslope piezometers exhibited snowmelt infiltration and consequent low ??18O values, while ??18O values varied less than 0.5% in the deep riparian piezometers throughout the study period. Ca and ??18O values in upslope piezometers during low streamflow were comparable to Ca and ??18O in riparian piezometers during high streamflow. The upland water Ca and ??18O may explain the deep riparian Ca dilution and consistent ??18O composition. The temporal pattern in Ca and ??18O indicate that upland water moves to the stream via a lateral displacement mechanism that is enhanced by the presence of distinct soil/textural layers. Snowmelt thus initiates the flux of pre-melt, low Ca upland water to depth in the riparian zone, but itself does not appear at depth in the riparian zone during spring melt. This is despite the coincident response of upland groundwater and stream discharge.The hydrology of the near-stream riparian zone in upland humid catchments is poorly understood. We examined the spatial and temporal aspects of riparian flowpaths during snowmelt in a

  11. Behavior and distribution of cattle grazing riparian zones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research is to study cattle site use and behavior in riparian pastures so that the nature of use by livestock can be determined and potential ecosystem impacts can be scientifically evaluated. Through the course of this study, we will employ high resolution GPS trackers to exam...

  12. Riparian buffer zones as pesticide filters of no-till crops.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Terencio R; Bortolozo, F R; Hansel, F A; Rasera, K; Ferreira, M T

    2015-07-01

    Several studies have pointed to the potential benefits of riparian vegetation as buffer zones for agricultural and industrial pollutants harmful to aquatic ecosystems. However, other studies have called into question its use as an ecological filter, questioning the widths and conditions for which they are effective as a filter. In this work, we have investigated the buffering capacity of the riparian one to retain pesticides in the water-saturated zone, on 27 sites composed by riparian buffer zones with different vegetation structure (woody, shrubs, or grass vegetation) and width (12, 36, and 60 m). Five pesticides were analyzed. The effectiveness of the filtering was largely influenced by the width and vegetation type of the buffer zone. In general, decreasing pesticide removal followed in this order wood > shrubs > grass. The 60 m woody buffer zone was the most effective in the removal of all the pesticides. Only atrazine was detected in this case (0.3 μg L(-1)). Furthermore, a linear correlation (R (2) > 0.97) was observed in their removal for all compounds and buffer zones studied. Thus, preserving the woody vegetation in the riparian zone is important for watershed management and groundwater quality in the no-tillage system in temperate climate.

  13. Stream-upland connectivity through the riparian zone: lessons learned and future research needs (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidon, P.

    2013-12-01

    Riparian zones act both as a conduit and a buffer for water and solutes as they transit from the upland environment to the stream. However, the traditional view of riparian hydrological functioning whereby the flow of water and solutes is generally from upland to stream has recently been challenged in some settings. For instance, in large outwash floodplains of the US Midwest, streams and rivers can have a dominant influence on riparian water table dynamics and associated biogeochemistry (nitrogen, phosphorus, carbon, mercury). In glacial till settings of the US Northeast, stream meander curvature has been shown to have a large impact on near stream zone hydrology and biogeochemistry. In the US southeast, stream restoration practices have far reaching impacts in the near stream zone. This talk will provide a framework to conceptualize riparian function as a function of stream channel morphology and landscape hydrogeomorphic characteristics. The implications of this work on riparian zone hydrology and biogeochemistry within the context of stream restoration and watershed management will be discussed along with key research needs for years to come.

  14. Ground Water Redox Zonation near La Pine, Oregon: Relation to River Position within the Aquifer-Riparian Zone Continuum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Stephen R.; Morgan, David S.; Orzol, Leonard L.; Polette, Danial J.

    2007-01-01

    peripheral zones, whereas older, typically more reduced ground water tends to discharge closer to the center of the river corridor. Such distributions of redox state reflect ground-water movement and geochemical evolution at the aquifer-scale. Redox state of ground water undergoes additional modification as ground water nears discharge points in or adjacent to rivers, where riparian zone processes can be important. Lateral erosion of river systems away from the center of the flood plain can decrease or even eliminate interactions between ground water and reducing riparian zone sediments. Thus, ground water redox patterns in near-river sediments appear to reflect the position of a river within the riparian zone/aquifer continuum. Spatial heterogeneity of redox conditions near the river/aquifer boundary (that is, near the riverbed) makes it difficult to extrapolate transect-scale findings to a precise delineation of the oxic-suboxic boundary in the near-river environment of the entire study area. However, the understanding of relations between near-river redox state and proximity to riparian zone edges provides a basis for applying these results to the study-area scale, and could help guide management efforts such as nitrogen-reduction actions or establishment of Total Maximum Daily Load criteria. Coupling the ground-water redox-based understanding of river vulnerability with ground-water particle-tracking-based characterization of connections between upgradient recharge areas and receiving rivers demonstrates one means of linking effects of potential nitrate loads at the beginning of ground-water flow paths with river vulnerability.

  15. Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Hult, Erin L.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Price, Phillip N.

    2012-09-01

    Air leakage between adjacent zones of a building can lead to indoor air quality and energy efficiency concerns, however there is no existing standard for measuring inter-zonal leakage. In this study, synthesized data and field measurements are analyzed in order to explore the uncertainty associated with different methods for collecting and analyzing fan pressurization measurements to calculate interzone leakage.

  16. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF RIPARIAN ZONE RESTORATION IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIANS BY ASSESSING SOIL MICROBIAL POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial biomass, nitrifiers and denitrifiers in surface soil (0?10 cm) were quantified in a riparian zone restoration project at Coweeta, North Carolina, USA. Four treatments are included in this study: (1) a degraded (+N) riparian zone with continued compaction, vegetation rem...

  17. [Characteristics of soil denitrifying enzyme activity in riparian zones with different land use types in Chongming Island, Shanghai of China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang-Liang; Li, Jian-Hua; Yang, Chang-Ming

    2013-10-01

    By using acetylene inhibition method, this paper studied the soil denitrifying enzyme activity (DEA) and its affecting factors in the riparian zone with different land use types (cropland riparian, forested riparian, and grassy riparian zones) in Chongming Island, Shanghai of China. The riparian soil DEA was (0.69 +/- 0.11)--(134.93 +/- 33.72) microg N x kg(-1) x h(-1), which differed obviously among different land types, with a decreasing trend of forested riparian zone > cropland riparian zone > grassy riparian zone. The soil DEA was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in 0-10 cm in 10-30, 30-50, and 50-70 cm layers. There were significant positive relationships between soil DEA and soil TOC, TN, and NO(3-)-N (P < 0.01). Land use change mainly altered the soil natural structure and soil physical and chemical properties, decreased the accumulation of soil organic carbon, and affected the soil nitrogen transformation, and thus, inhibited the occurrence of riparian soil denitrification.

  18. Influence of riparian seepage zones on nitrate variability in two agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian seepage zones are one of the primary pathways of groundwater transport to headwater streams. While seeps have been recognized for their contributions to streamflow, there is little information on how seeps affect stream water quality. The objective of this study was to examine the influence...

  19. Implications of hydrologic connectivity between hillslopes and riparian zones on streamflow composition.

    PubMed

    von Freyberg, Jana; Radny, Dirk; Gall, Heather E; Schirmer, Mario

    2014-11-15

    Hydrological responses in mountainous headwater catchments are often highly non-linear with a distinct threshold-related behavior, which is associated to steep hillslopes, shallow soils and strong climatic variability. A holistic understanding of the dominant physical processes that control streamflow generation and non-linearity is required in order to assess potential negative effects of agricultural land use and water management in those areas. Therefore, streamflow generation in a small pre-Alpine headwater catchment (Upper Rietholzbach (URHB), ~1km(2)) was analyzed over a 2-year period by means of rainfall-response analysis and water quality data under explicit consideration of the joint behaviors of climate forcing and shallow groundwater dynamics. The runoff coefficients indicate that only a small fraction of the total catchment area (1-26%) generates streamflow during rainfall events. Hereby, the valley bottom areas (riparian zones) were the most important event-water source whereas only the lower parts of the hillslopes became hydrologically connected to the river network with higher antecedent moisture conditions. However, a distinct threshold-like behavior could not be observed, suggesting a more continuous shift from a riparian-zone to a more hillslope-dominated streamflow hydrograph. Regular manure application on the hillslopes in combinations with lateral hillslope groundwater flux and long groundwater residence times in the riparian zones resulted in a higher mineralization (e.g., total phosphorous) and significant denitrification in the valley bottom area. Despite the important role of the riparian zones for event-flow generation in the URHB, their nutrient buffer capacity is expected to be small due to the low permeability of the local subsurface material. The findings of this integrated analysis are summarized in a conceptual framework describing the hydrological functioning of hillslopes and riparian zones in the URHB.

  20. The role of near-stream riparian zones in the hydrology of steep upland catchments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonnell, Jeffery J.; McGlynn, B.L.; Kendall, K.; Shanley, J.; Kendall, C.

    1998-01-01

    Surface and subsurface waters were monitored and sampled at various topographic positions in a 40.5-ha headwater catchment to test several hypotheses of runoff generation and stream chemical and isotopic evolution during snowmelt. Transmissivity feedback was observed on the hillslopes during the melt period. Groundwater levels and stream DOC were highly correlated with stream discharge. Hysteresis in the groundwater-streamflow relation suggests that localized water flux from the riparian areas controlled the rising limb and main peak response of the melt hydrograph, whilst hillslope drainage controlled the timing and volume of the falling limb. Lateral flow from upslope positions was detected in the riparian zone.

  1. Riparian zones as havens for exotic plant species in the central grasslands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Bull, K.A.; Otsuki, Y.; Villa, C.A.; Lee, M.

    1998-01-01

    In the Central Grasslands of the United States, we hypothesized that riparian zones high in soil fertility would contain more exotic plant species than upland areas of low soil fertility. Our alternate hypothesis was that riparian zones high in native plant species richness and cover would monopolize available resources and resist invasion by exotic species. We gathered nested-scale vegetation data from 40 1 m2subplots (nested in four 1000 m2 plots) in both riparian and upland sites at four study areas in Colorado, Wyoming, and South Dakota (a total of 320 1 m2subplots and 32 1000 m2 plots). At the 1 m2 scale, mean foliar cover of native species was significantly greater (P < 0.001) in riparian zones (36.6% ?? 1.7%) compared to upland sites (28.7% ?? 1.5%), but at this small scale there were no consistent patterns of native and exotic species richness among the four management areas. Mean exotic species cover was slightly higher in upland sites compared to riparian sites (9.0% ?? 3.8% versus 8.2% ?? 3.0% cover). However, mean exotic species richness and cover were greater in the riparian zones than upland sites in three of four management areas. At the 1000 m2 scale, mean exotic species richness was also significantly greater (P < 0.05) in riparian zones (7.8 ?? 1.0 species) compared to upland sites (4.8 ?? 1.0 species) despite the heavy invasion of one upland site. For all 32 plots combined, 21% of the variance in exotic species richness was explained by positive relationships with soil % silt (t = 1.7, P = 0.09) and total foliar cover (t = 2.4, P = 0.02). Likewise, 26% of the variance in exotic species cover (log10 cover) was explained by positive relationships with soil % silt (t = 2.3, P = 0.03) and total plant species richness (t = 2.4, P = 0.02). At landscape scales (four 1000 m2 plots per type combined), total foliar cover was significantly and positively correlated with exotic species richness (r = 0.73, P < 0.05) and cover (r = 0.74, P < 0.05). Exotic

  2. Holding onto the Green Zone: A Youth Program for the Study and Stewardship of Community Riparian Areas. Leader Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Kate; Wooster, Betsy

    2008-01-01

    Riparian ecosystems are an exciting and dynamic subject for study. These areas are valuable lands and important wildlife habitats, and they contribute greatly to the environmental health of an area. Definitions for the term "riparian" vary, but in this curriculum, the land called the "Green Zone" lies between flowing water and upland ecosystems.…

  3. Groundwater Dynamics and Evapotranspiration Processes from Gobi Desert to Riparian Zone in Water-Limited Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Pozdniakov, S. P.; Grinevsky, S. O.; Niu, G. Y.; Yu, J.; Du, C.

    2014-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) including evaporation from soil surfaces and transpiration through plants' stomata exerts dominant controls on shallow groundwater dynamics under hyper-arid climates. Our analyses of diurnal and seasonal groundwater dynamics at desert sites in northwestern China for the period 2010-2014 showed that different patterns of groundwater dynamics in a Gobi-desert and riparian zones are highly related to ET processes. To quantify ET in the hyper-arid climates, we developed diagnostic indicators of the groundwater-ET relationship and a methodology based on seasonal groundwater level fluctuation approach. Under similar climates and depth to the water table (2-2.5 m), ET in the riparian zones as a result of direct root water uptake (RWU) through riparian shrubs (0.63-0.73 mm/d at the Tamarix ramosissima site and 1.89-2.33 mm/d at the Populus euphratica site) is much greater than that in a Gobi-desert site (0.12-0.27 mm/d). Numerical simulations using a one-dimensional land surface model with a RWU model that explicitly describes root-groundwater interactions indicate that direct RWU at the riparian sites is primarily dependent on the root dynamics that interacts with groundwater dynamics.

  4. The hydraulics of exchange flow between adjacent confined building zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Saleh; Flynn, Morris

    2012-11-01

    Buoyancy-driven flow between two finite zones containing fluid of slightly different density is investigated. The two zones are connected through a common opening that spans the channel width so that a two layer exchange flow develops once it is removed. In the zone that initially contained dense fluid, a buoyant plume of light fluid mixes with the dense fluid leading, over time, to the development of a nontrivial ambient density stratification. Meanwhile, dense fluid flows as a gravity current into the zone that initially contained light fluid. This gravity current reflects from the end wall and propagates back toward the opening in the form of an internal bore. When the bore reaches the opening, the dynamics of the exchange flow (and consequently the source conditions of the buoyant plume) are substantially altered. Such dynamics are modeled by combining elements of gravity current, internal bore, plume and exchange flow theory; model predictions, such as that the density jump across the first front steadily decreases once the exchange flow becomes transient, are corroborated by salt-bath laboratory experiments. Substantially different predictions arise when either or both of the adjacent zones are assumed to be well-mixed so that no vertical gradient of density is allowed.

  5. Groundwater flow path dynamics and nitrogen transport potential in the riparian zone of an agricultural headwater catchment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stream riparian zones are often thought of as areas that provide natural remediation for groundwater contaminants, especially agricultural nitrogen (N). While denitrification and vegetative uptake tend to be efficient N removal processes in slow moving shallow groundwater, these mechanisms decrease ...

  6. Extent And Distribution Of Montane Riparian Zone Vegetation And Representation In Protected Areas In The Sky Island Region Of The Southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Nicole H.

    The Sky Island region of the southwestern United States hosts some of the richest biodiversity anywhere in the world. In the mountain ranges of the Sky Islands, most vertebrate biodiversity is dependent on riparian areas for all or some of their life cycles. Riparian vegetation is threatened by human impacts and climate change. Though riparian vegetation along rivers and major perennial streams is already mapped in this region, vegetation in ephemeral and intermittent riparian areas, arguably equally important for biodiversity in the mountain ranges, has not been quantified. I developed a Random Forest classification model of riparian vegetation for all three types of riparian areas, mapped this vegetation for each of the 25 mountain ranges, described the spatial distribution and connectivity of the vegetation among and between mountain ranges, and demonstrated enhancement of regional riparian land cover classes with the new model of riparian zone vegetation. The resulting map indicates a much broader distribution of riparian zone vegetation than previous land cover mapping efforts indicate, likely due to inclusion of ephemeral and intermittent riparian types. The spatial distribution and connectivity of riparian zone vegetation varied widely within and between mountain ranges, possibly as a result of variability in environmental factors affecting aridity, temperature, water availability, landscape position, and disturbances. The model can be used with other information to augment understanding of the integrity, connectivity, and vulnerability of riparian zone vegetation in this unique and important region. To analyze the conservation status of riparian zone vegetation, I quantified its representation in protected areas. I then compared the representation relative to the overall amount of riparian zone vegetation in each mountain range. The relationships between representation of riparian zone vegetation in protected areas, degree of mountain range protection, and

  7. Biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus stocks in hybrid poplar buffers, herbaceous buffers and natural woodlots in the riparian zone on agricultural land.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Julien; Truax, Benoit; Gagnon, Daniel; Lambert, France

    2015-05-01

    In many temperate agricultural areas, riparian forests have been converted to cultivated land, and only narrow strips of herbaceous vegetation now buffer many farm streams. The afforestation of these riparian zones has the potential to increase carbon (C) storage in agricultural landscapes by creating a new biomass sink for atmospheric CO2. Occurring at the same time, the storage of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in plant biomass, is an important water quality function that may greatly vary with types of riparian vegetation. The objectives of this study were (1) to compare C, N and P storage in aboveground, belowground and detrital biomass for three types of riparian vegetation cover (9-year-old hybrid poplar buffers, herbaceous buffers and natural woodlots) across four agricultural sites and (2) to determine potential vegetation cover effects on soil nutrient supply rate in the riparian zone. Site level comparisons suggest that 9-year-old poplar buffers have stored 9-31 times more biomass C, 4-10 times more biomass N, and 3-7 times more biomass P than adjacent non managed herbaceous buffers, with the largest differences observed on the more fertile sites. The conversion of these herbaceous buffers to poplar buffers could respectively increase C, N and P storage in biomass by 3.2-11.9 t/ha/yr, 32-124 kg/ha/yr and 3.2-15.6 kg/ha/yr, over 9 years. Soil NO3 and P supply rates during the summer were respectively 57% and 66% lower in poplar buffers than in adjacent herbaceous buffers, potentially reflecting differences in nutrient storage and cycling between the two buffer types. Biomass C ranged 49-160 t/ha in woodlots, 33-110 t/ha in poplar buffers and 3-4 t/ha in herbaceous buffers. Similar biomass C stocks were found in the most productive poplar buffer and three of the four woodlots studied. Given their large and varied biomass C stocks, conservation of older riparian woodlots is equally important for C balance management in farmland. In addition, the

  8. Riparian zone hydrology and biogeochemistry as a function of stream evolution stage in glaciated landscapes of the US Northeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rook, S. P.; Vidon, P.; Walter, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    The management of riparian buffer strips is often regarded as one of the most economical and sustainable methods of managing non-point source pollution and water quality. However, current riparian management often follows a 'one size fits all' design, which fails to recognize the complexity of the many biogeochemical processes that regulate pollutant transformation and retention in these systems. This study addresses two critical gaps in knowledge: (1) How carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and iron cycles interact with one another (rather than individually). (2) How stream channel geometry and evolution regulate these nutrient cycles and greenhouse gas (GHG) dynamics in the near stream zone. This project specifically explores the hydrological and biogeochemical functioning of riparian zones across a gradient of stream meander evolution stages, with the primary goal of understanding and predicting potential interactions between nutrient dynamics in these systems. Key research questions include: (1) How does stream meander curvature affect riparian zone hydrology? (2) How does stream meander curvature influence riparian zone biogeochemistry? (3) What relationships exist among N, P, Fe, and GHG dynamics? We instrumented three riparian sites near Ithaca, NY, with a dense network of wells, piezometers, and static chambers. These sites represent three riparian zones along three evolution stages of stream meanders: an inner meander, a straight stream section, and an outer bend of the stream with an oxbow lake formation. In spring through fall 2011, water samples and gas samples were collected at a tri-weekly bases at each of the three sites. Water samples were analyzed for oxidation-reduction potential, dissolved oxygen, temperature, FeII/FeIII, nutrients (NO3-, NH4+, PO43-) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). GHG fluxes at the soil-atmosphere interface were measured for N2O, CO2, and CH4 gases. We predict that stream curvature will significantly affect groundwater flow

  9. Fate of Herbicides and Their Degradation Products Entering a Forested Riparian Buffer Following Herbicides Application to an Adjacent Corn Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate of two herbicides, atrazine and metolachlor, were followed as they entered and moved through a forested riparian wetland located in the mid-Atlantic coastal plain of Maryland. The herbicides were applied as pre-emergent treatments to a 20-ha corn field directly upgradient of the riparian w...

  10. Occupancy patterns of mammals and lentic amphibians in the Elwha River riparian zone before dam removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Kurt J.; Chelgren, Nathan; Sager-Fradkin, K.A.; Happe, P.J.; Adams, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The downstream transport of sediments and organics and upstream migration of anadromous fishes are key ecological processes in unregulated riverine ecosystems of the North Pacific coast, but their influence on wildlife habitats and populations is poorly documented. Removal of two large hydroelectric dams in Washington’s Elwha Valley provides an unprecedented opportunity to study long-term responses of wildlife populations to dam removal and restoration of these key ecological processes. We compared pre-dam removal patterns in the relative abundance and occupancy of mesocarnivores, small mammals and lentic amphibians of the Elwha River riparian zone above, between and below the dams. Occupancy of riparian habitats by three mesocarnivore species diminished upriver but did not appear to be closely linked with the absence of salmon in the upper river. Although the importance of salmon in the lower river cannot be discounted, other gradients in food resources also likely contributed to observed distribution patterns of mesocarnivores. Abundance and occupancy patterns within congeneric pairs of new world mice (Peromyscus spp.) and shrews (Sorex spp.) indicated that closely related species were negatively associated with each other and responded to habitat gradients in the riparian zone. The availability of lentic habitats of amphibians was highly variable, and occupancy was low as a result of rapidly changing flows during the larval development period. We speculate that long-term changes in habitat conditions and salmon availability following dam removal will elicit long-term changes in distribution of mesocarnivores, small mammals and amphibians. Long-term monitoring will enhance understanding of the role of fish and restored ecosystem processes on wildlife communities along salmon-bearing rivers in the region.

  11. A Comprehensive Monitoring Plan for the Fourmile Branch Riparian Zone at the Savannah River Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, D. L.

    2002-05-01

    Since the late 1960's, numerous environmental investigations have been conducted along the Fourmile Branch riparian zone, which is down-gradient from the General Separations Area (GSA). The GSA is a complex of nuclear defense facilities consisting of F & H Areas, the Burial Grounds, and the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. Because of differences in objectives and sampling designs, some of the resulting historical information has been fragmented, duplicative, and inadequate to comprehensively understand contaminant plume migration, risk to human health and the environment, and effectiveness of remedial action. A new monitoring plan defines a strategy to critically evaluate past and existing sampling approaches and to develop a holistic approach that is comprehensive, cost-effective, and commensurate with the remediation goals set forth in existing permits and agreements with the regulatory agencies. Specifically, the objectives of the monitoring plan are to: (1) review historical sampling programs and identify baseline and operational data bases, (2) consolidate and characterize historic sampling locations, (3) based on the most recent modeling and plume delineations, identify sampling locations that will comprehensively characterize groundwater and surface water plume migrations. The riparian zone of interest will include the wetlands and seeplines down-gradient from the GSA. The media of concern will include the surface waters associated with the seeplines and Fourmile Branch plus the groundwaters of the upper and lower aquifers. Sampling will be conducted using automated surface water samplers and depth-discrete multilevel monitoring wells.

  12. Role of the riparian zone in controlling the distribution and fate of agricultural nitrogen near a small stream in southern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cey, Edwin E.; Rudolph, David L.; Aravena, Ramon; Parkin, Gary

    1999-04-01

    Uncultivated riparian areas can play an important role in reducing nutrient loading to streams in agricultural watersheds. Groundwater flow and geochemistry were monitored in the riparian zone of a small agricultural watershed in southern Ontario. Hydraulic and geochemical measurements were taken along a transect of monitoring wells extending across the riparian area into an agricultural field. Chloride and nitrate concentrations in groundwater samples collected from the agricultural field were much higher than in samples from the riparian area. A sharp decline in both nitrate and chloride concentrations was observed near the field-riparian zone boundary. It appears that increased recharge within the riparian zone, as compared to the artificially drained field, caused nitrate-rich groundwater from the field to be diverted downward beneath the riparian zone, thus limiting the input of agrochemicals to the riparian area and consequently protecting the stream from potential contamination. Geochemical data also indicated that nitrate was attenuated in the downward moving groundwater. Patterns of dissolved oxygen concentrations and redox potential in the subsurface coincided with the pattern defined by groundwater nitrate. These patterns indicated that conditions within the riparian zone and at depth near the field-riparian zone boundary were conducive to denitrification. A linear relation between the δ 15N and δ 18O values of nitrate from the monitored transect also supported denitrification as the primary nitrate removal mechanism. This study provides a new conceptual model of how riparian zones may prevent nitrate contamination of streams, and highlights the need for a complete understanding of both groundwater flow and geochemistry in riparian environments.

  13. Riparian zones attenuate nitrogen loss following bark beetle-induced lodgepole pine mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biederman, Joel A.; Meixner, Thomas; Harpold, Adrian A.; Reed, David E.; Gutmann, Ethan D.; Gaun, Janelle A.; Brooks, Paul D.

    2016-03-01

    A North American bark beetle infestation has killed billions of trees, increasing soil nitrogen and raising concern for N loss impacts on downstream ecosystems and water resources. There is surprisingly little evidence of stream N response in large basins, which may result from surviving vegetation uptake, gaseous loss, or dilution by streamflow from unimpacted stands. Observations are lacking along hydrologic flow paths connecting soils with streams, challenging our ability to determine where and how attenuation occurs. Here we quantified biogeochemical concentrations and fluxes at a lodgepole pine-dominated site where bark beetle infestation killed 50-60% of trees. We used nested observations along hydrologic flow paths connecting hillslope soils to streams of up to third order. We found soil water NO3 concentrations increased 100-fold compared to prior research at this and nearby southeast Wyoming sites. Nitrogen was lost below the major rooting zone to hillslope groundwater, where dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) increased by 3-10 times (mean 1.65 mg L-1) and NO3-N increased more than 100-fold (3.68 mg L-1) compared to preinfestation concentrations. Most of this N was removed as hillslope groundwater drained through riparian soils, and NO3 remained low in streams. DON entering the stream decreased 50% within 5 km downstream, to concentrations typical of unimpacted subalpine streams (~0.3 mg L-1). Although beetle outbreak caused hillslope N losses similar to other disturbances, up to 5.5 kg ha-1y-1, riparian and in-stream removal limited headwater catchment export to <1 kg ha-1y-1. These observations suggest riparian removal was the dominant mechanism preventing hillslope N loss from impacting streams.

  14. Establishment and growth of two willow species in a riparian zone impacted by mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Bourret, Melody M; Brummer, Joe E; Leininger, Wayne C

    2009-01-01

    A field study was initiated to determine survival, growth characteristics, and metal uptake of two montane riparian willow species, Geyer (Salix geyeriana Andersson) and mountain (S. monticola Bebb) willow, grown in amended fluvial mine tailing deposits. Revegetation was done with staked and previously rooted cuttings to determine if planting method had an effect on successful establishment of willows. A second planting was done the following growing season which tested cuttings of different ages. The addition of lime increased the soil pH from 5.0 to 6.5 and effectively reduced bioavailability of most heavy metals below phytotoxic levels. However, both willow species, regardless of planting method, concentrated Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn in their leaf tissue above levels considered toxic to agronomic plants. Over the course of four growing seasons, prerooted mountain willows had a consistently higher survival rate compared to staked willows. At the end of the fourth growing season, mountain willow had a higher survival rate and produced greater aboveground growth for both planting methods, irrespective of year planted, compared with Geyer willow. Based on growth characteristics, the use of prerooted mountain willows would be recommended for successful revegetation of amended fluvial mine tailing deposits in riparian zones. However, because of the high Cd uptake into aboveground tissues, care should be taken in restoration efforts where wildlife and domestic livestock are likely to browse on the willows.

  15. Investigating the Influence of Riparian Zone Geology on Stream Water Chemistry in the Scottish Highlands Using a GIS Framework.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulsby, C.; Smart, R.; Cresser, M.; Wade, A.

    2001-12-01

    The glaciated watersheds of the Scottish highlands are characterized by high precipitation, resistant geologies, steep hillslopes and thin acidic soils. Streams draining these watersheds are often prone to "acid-episodes" during frequent high flow events which can result in damage to salmon fisheries, particularly in areas subject to forest management. Traditional hydrological studies assumed that such watersheds are dominated by rapid, near-surface hydrological pathways and have limited groundwater influence. However, recent hydrometric and tracer-based process investigations in experimental watersheds have shown that groundwater makes a significant contribution to streamflow generation even during hydrological events. Moreover, it exerts a strong influence on stream water chemistry throughout the storm hydrograph, often buffering the effects of acid soil waters. The riparian zones of watersheds in these areas are usually distinct topographic features in the landscape. They are clearly differentiated from surrounding hillslopes in terms of drift geology, soils and vegetation. This differentiation is usually apparent in the riparian zones of streams draining watersheds that vary in size from ca. 1km2 to ca. 2000km2. Thus, at a range of spatial scales, hillslope waters appear to be hydraulically de-coupled from the channel network and must pass through the riparian zone, usually via subsurface flow paths, on route to streams. To examine more extensively the influence of riparian zones on stream hydrochemistry, a GIS was used to combine geospatial data sets and simple hydrological models at a range of scales within a large Scottish watershed. The study, based in the 2300km2 Dee catchment in NE Scotland, found that digitized geological maps and associated weathering indices provided a suitable framework for predicting water quality parameters associated with weathering and acid sensitivity (alkalinity, Ca and other base cations). In particular, it was found that the

  16. Seasonal change detection of riparian zones with remote sensing images and genetic programming in a semi-arid watershed.

    PubMed

    Makkeasorn, Ammarin; Chang, Ni-Bin; Li, Jiahong

    2009-02-01

    Riparian zones are deemed significant due to their interception capability of non-point source impacts and the maintenance of ecosystem integrity region wide. To improve classification and change detection of riparian buffers, this paper developed an evolutionary computational, supervised classification method--the RIparian Classification Algorithm (RICAL)--to conduct the seasonal change detection of riparian zones in a vast semi-arid watershed, South Texas. RICAL uniquely demonstrates an integrative effort to incorporate both vegetation indices and soil moisture images derived from LANDSAT 5 TM and RADARSAT-1 satellite images, respectively. First, an estimation of soil moisture based on RADARSAT-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images was conducted via the first-stage genetic programming (GP) practice. Second, for the statistical analyses and image classification, eight vegetation indices were prepared based on reflectance factors that were calculated as the response of the instrument on LANDSAT. These spectral vegetation indices were then independently used for discriminate analysis along with soil moisture images to classify the riparian zones via the second-stage GP practice. The practical implementation was assessed by a case study in the Choke Canyon Reservoir Watershed (CCRW), South Texas, which is mostly agricultural and range land in a semi-arid coastal environment. To enhance the application potential, a combination of Iterative Self-Organizing Data Analysis Techniques (ISODATA) and maximum likelihood supervised classification was also performed for spectral discrimination and classification of riparian varieties comparatively. Research findings show that the RICAL algorithm may yield around 90% accuracy based on the unseen ground data. But using different vegetation indices would not significantly improve the final quality of the spectral discrimination and classification. Such practices may lead to the formulation of more effective management strategies

  17. Mercury contamination in the riparian zones along the East Fork Poplar Creek at Oak Ridge.

    PubMed

    Pant, P; Allen, M; Tansel, B

    2011-03-01

    Oak Ridge (Tennessee, USA) has a history of mercury (Hg) contamination in its aquatic and soil environment associated with past nuclear-weapons production activities at its Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Three different riparian zones along the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek were investigated in order to study Hg distribution and transformation in surface soils. The surface soil samples collected from these areas showed higher total Hg on an average (129.08 mg/kg) and higher total organic carbon (5.50%) in the upstream soils compared to the other two downstream locations that contained only 31.78 and 19.98 mg/kg total Hg and 2.88% and 1.65% of TOC on average, respectively. Further, methyl Hg concentrations were also comparatively higher in case of the upstream soils (30.10 μg/kg) than that of the downstream sites (5.69 and 4.05 μg/kg). The study showed a plume-like dispersion of Hg in the terrestrial environment along the creek, with decreasing Hg concentrations with distance from the Hg source zone. Also, the transformation of Hg in the soils was found to have been influenced by the soil TOC contents.

  18. 33 CFR 334.70 - Buzzards Bay, and adjacent waters, Mass.; danger zones for naval operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS § 334.70 Buzzards Bay, and adjacent waters, Mass.; danger zones for naval operations. (a) Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of No Mans Land—(1) The area. The waters surrounding No Mans Land within an...

  19. Coupled biogeochemical cycles in riparian zones with contrasting hydrogeomorphic characteristics in the US Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we aims to understand what drives the fate and transport of multiple contaminants sensitive to soil redox condition across hydrogeomorphic (HGM) gradient and evaluate overall biogeochemical functions of riparian zones regarding those contaminants. We conducted monthly field work for 19 consecutive months from November 2009 to May 2011 at three study sites representative for main HGM types at the US Midwest. We collected the parameters from different sources which include field parameters, such as topography, water table depth, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and dissolved oxygen (DO), and groundwater chemistry, such as NH4+, NO3-, PO43-, SO42-, CI- , and Hg and MeHg. Our results demonstrated that seasonal water table fluctuations and groundwater flows characteristics at three sites are strongly affected by their HGM setting. Specifically, the convergence of quick rise of water table, high ORP and sharp decrease in concentrations of NO3- and SO42 from field edge to stream edge (60-90% at LWD and 90% at WR) in spring after snowmelt and early May, which could be explained by that snow melt and early summer rainfall are major drivers of fluctuations of water table, variations of ORP and transport and transformation of contaminants. Riparian zones removed NO3- and SO42- during high water table but released Mercury in summer at both LWD and WR, and sulfate reduction, ammonia production and MeHg production all occurred when ORP and water tables were low in summer. These results might reflect the strong ORP control on these processes at landscape scale. These findings supported our hypothesis. Other findings however contrast to our hypothesis. For instances, unusual high concentrations of nitrate and Hg at WR suggest that the transport and fate of multiple contaminants relate not only to HGM settings but geographic location and land use. Negligible variations of P concentration in groundwater indicate that the transformation of P is not sensitive to soil

  20. Evaluation of soil nitrogen emissions from riparian zones coupling simple process-oriented models with remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelei; Mannaerts, C M; Yang, Shengtian; Gao, Yunfei; Zheng, Donghai

    2010-07-15

    Riparian ecosystems have critical impacts on controlling the non-point source pollution and maintaining the health of aquatic ecosystems. In this study, a process oriented soil denitrification model was extended with algorithms from a simple nitrogen (N) cycle model and coupled to land surface remote sensing data to enhance its performance in spatial and temporal prediction of gaseous N emissions from soils in the riparian buffer zone surrounding the Guanting reservoir (China). The N emission model is based on chemical and physical relationships that govern the heat budget, soil moisture variations and nitrogen movement in soils. Besides soil water and heat processes, it includes nitrification, denitrification and ammonia (NH(3)) volatilization. SPOT-5 and Landsat-5 TM satellite data were used to derive spatial land surface information and the temporal variation in land cover parameters was also used to drive the model. A laboratory-scale anaerobic incubation experiment was used to estimate the soil denitrification model parameters for the different soil types. An in situ field-scale experiment was conducted to calibrate and validate the soil temperature, moisture and nitrogen sub-models. An indirect method was used to verify simulated N emissions, resulting in a coefficient of determination of R(2)=0.83 between simulated and observed values. Then the model was applied to the whole riparian buffer zone catchment, using the spatial resolution (10m) of the SPOT-5 image. Model sensitivity analysis showed that soil moisture was the most sensitive parameter for gaseous N emissions and soil denitrification was the main process affecting N losses to the atmosphere in the riparian area. From the aspect of land use management around the Guanting reservoir, the spatial structure and distribution of land cover and land use types in the riparian area should be adapted, to enhance faster ecological restoration of the wetland ecological system surrounding this strategically

  1. The importance of the riparian zone and in-stream processes in nitrate attenuation in undisturbed and agricultural watersheds – a review of the scientific literature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ranalli, Anthony J.; Macalady, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed published studies from primarily glaciated regions in the United States, Canada, and Europe of the (1) transport of nitrate from terrestrial ecosystems to aquatic ecosystems, (2) attenuation of nitrate in the riparian zone of undisturbed and agricultural watersheds, (3) processes contributing to nitrate attenuation in riparian zones, (4) variation in the attenuation of nitrate in the riparian zone, and (5) importance of in-stream and hyporheic processes for nitrate attenuation in the stream channel. Our objectives were to synthesize the results of these studies and suggest methodologies to (1) monitor regional trends in nitrate concentration in undisturbed 1st order watersheds and (2) reduce nitrate loads in streams draining agricultural watersheds. Our review reveals that undisturbed headwater watersheds have been shown to be very retentive of nitrogen, but the importance of biogeochemical and hydrological riparian zone processes in retaining nitrogen in these watersheds has not been demonstrated as it has for agricultural watersheds. An understanding of the role of the riparian zone in nitrate attenuation in undisturbed watersheds is crucial because these watersheds are increasingly subject to stressors, such as changes in land use and climate, wildfire, and increases in atmospheric nitrogen deposition. In general, understanding processes controlling the concentration and flux of nitrate is critical to identifying and mapping the vulnerability of watersheds to water quality changes due to a variety of stressors. In undisturbed and agricultural watersheds we propose that understanding the importance of riparian zone processes in 2nd order and larger watersheds is critical. Research is needed that addresses the relative importance of how the following sources of nitrate along any given stream reach might change as watersheds increase in size and with flow: (1) inputs upstream from the reach, (2) tributary inflow, (3) water derived from the riparian zone

  2. The importance of the riparian zone and in-stream processes in nitrate attenuation in undisturbed and agricultural watersheds - A review of the scientific literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranalli, Anthony J.; Macalady, Donald L.

    2010-08-01

    SummaryWe reviewed published studies from primarily glaciated regions in the United States, Canada, and Europe of the (1) transport of nitrate from terrestrial ecosystems to aquatic ecosystems, (2) attenuation of nitrate in the riparian zone of undisturbed and agricultural watersheds, (3) processes contributing to nitrate attenuation in riparian zones, (4) variation in the attenuation of nitrate in the riparian zone, and (5) importance of in-stream and hyporheic processes for nitrate attenuation in the stream channel. Our objectives were to synthesize the results of these studies and suggest methodologies to (1) monitor regional trends in nitrate concentration in undisturbed 1st order watersheds and (2) reduce nitrate loads in streams draining agricultural watersheds. Our review reveals that undisturbed headwater watersheds have been shown to be very retentive of nitrogen, but the importance of biogeochemical and hydrological riparian zone processes in retaining nitrogen in these watersheds has not been demonstrated as it has for agricultural watersheds. An understanding of the role of the riparian zone in nitrate attenuation in undisturbed watersheds is crucial because these watersheds are increasingly subject to stressors, such as changes in land use and climate, wildfire, and increases in atmospheric nitrogen deposition. In general, understanding processes controlling the concentration and flux of nitrate is critical to identifying and mapping the vulnerability of watersheds to water quality changes due to a variety of stressors. In undisturbed and agricultural watersheds we propose that understanding the importance of riparian zone processes in 2nd order and larger watersheds is critical. Research is needed that addresses the relative importance of how the following sources of nitrate along any given stream reach might change as watersheds increase in size and with flow: (1) inputs upstream from the reach, (2) tributary inflow, (3) water derived from the

  3. Recharge processes in an alluvial aquifer riparian zone, Norman Landfill, Norman, Oklahoma, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, Martha; Christenson, Scott; Cozzarelli, Isabelle; Ferree, Dale; Jaeshke, Jeanne

    2005-01-01

    Analyses of stable isotope profiles (d2H and d18O) in the saturated zone, combined with water-table fluctuations, gave a comprehensive picture of recharge processes in an alluvial aquifer riparian zone. At the Norman Landfill U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology research site in Norman, Oklahoma, recharge to the aquifer appears to drive biodegradation, contributing fresh supplies of electron acceptors for the attenuation of leachate compounds from the landfill. Quantifying recharge is a first step in studying this process in detail. Both chemical and physical methods were used to estimate recharge. Chemical methods included measuring the increase in recharge water in the saturated zone, as defined by isotopic signature, specific conductance or chloride measurements; and infiltration rate estimates using storm event isotopic signatures. Physical methods included measurement of water-table rise after individual rain events and on an approximately monthly time scale. Evapotranspiration rates were estimated using diurnal watertable fluctuations; outflux of water from the alluvial aquifer during the growing season had a large effect on net recharge at the site. Evaporation and methanogenesis gave unique isotopic signatures to different sources of water at the site, allowing the distinction of recharge using the offset of the isotopic signature from the local meteoric water line. The downward movement of water from large, isotopically depleted rain events in the saturated zone yielded recharge rate estimates (2.2 - 3.3 mm/day), and rates also were determined by observing changes in thickness of the layer of infiltrated recharge water at the top of the saturated zone (1.5 - 1.6 mm/day). Recharge measured over 2 years (1998-2000) in two locations at the site averaged 37 percent of rainfall, however, part of this water had only a short residence time in the aquifer. Isotopes showed recharge water entering the ground-water system in winter and spring, then being

  4. Dynamic evaluation of ecosystem service value of the riparian zone based on remote sensing from 1986 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, B. L.; Li, Y.; Zhang, B.; Yin, B. S.; Zhu, H. L.; Xing, Z. F.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we calculated comparable and dynamic ecosystem service value per unit area in the riparian zone of Second Songhua River; then we also estimated changes in the value of ecosystem services resulting from land use changes; finally, we continuously evaluated the riparian ecosystem service value based on 520 basic evaluation units (BEUs) and explored the trend of the riparian ecosystem service value from 1986 to 2012. The results indicated that comparable economic values of per unit area food production of farmland ecosystems in 2012 almost increased three times more than that in 1986 from 154.83 to 382.45 ha-1; the people's willingness to pay for farmland ecosystem services increased from 0.24 in 1986 to 0.48 in 2012; the land areas supporting the environment and society generally declined, whereas areas of farmland significantly increased from 1986 to 2012; the riparian total ecosystem service value increased from 42.30 million in 1986 to 119.67 million in 2012, with an average increase rate of 4.06 % yr-1; the ecosystem service value of four reaches all have seen a sharp increase from 1986 to 2012; the average ecosystem service value of a reach was the smallest one in the four reaches, and the value of c and d reach was significantly more than other two reaches.

  5. Anammox bacteria community and nitrogen removal in a strip-like wetland in the riparian zone.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yuansheng; Wang, Jun; Wang, Ziyuan; Tian, Binghui

    2011-01-01

    A strip-like wetland was constructed in the riparian zone for investigation of ammonium nitrogen (NH(3)-N) removal in the Peach River. An inner zeolite layer was set in the wetland to adsorb NH(3)-N and further to remove total nitrogen (TN). An oxygen-deficient condition with dissolved oxygen of 0.87-1.60 mg L(-1) was observed in the zeolite layer, which benefits anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria survival. The community structure of anammox bacteria was analyzed in the zeolite layer. The analysis shows that the anammox bacterial sequences are grouped into three known distinct clusters: Candidatus Brocadia fulgida, Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans and Candidatus Jettenia asiatica. The intensified test driven by artificial pumping shows that average removal rates of NH(3)-N and TN are 41.6 mg m(-3)d(-1) and 63.2 mg m(-3)d(-1), respectively. The normal test driven by natural hydrodynamics also verifies that NH(3)-N removal mainly happens in the zeolite layer. Microbial mechanism of TN removal in the wetland involves both the autotrophic and heterotrophic process. These results suggest that the strip-like RW can be a cost-effective approach for NH(3)-N removal and can potentially be extended to similar rivers as no extra energy is required to maintain the wetland operation.

  6. Riparian buffer zones on selected rivers in Lower Silesia - an important conservation practice and the management strategy in urban planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamska, Maryna

    2013-09-01

    Buffer zones are narrow strips of land lying along the surface water, covered with appropriately selected vegetation. They separate aquatic ecosystems from the direct impact of agricultural land and reduce the movement of nutrients in the environment. In 2008 the European Commission established requirements for the implementation of buffer strips along water courses. Poland committed to the enforcement of these requirements until 1 January 2012. This was one of the reasons of this study. The subject of the analysis included the following rivers in Lower Silesia: Smortawa, Krynka, Czarna Woda and the selected transects of Ślęza and Nysa Łużycka. Detailed studies were designed to estimate the buffer zones occurring on these watercourses and assess these zones’ structure. This will be used to develop clear criteria for the selection of the width of these zones based on land use land management. It can be used in the implementation of executive acts at different levels of space management. Field research consisted of inventory the extent of riparian buffer strips on selected water courses and photographic documentation. Species composition of the vegetation forming a buffer zone was identified by using Braun-Blanquet method. There was lack of continuity of the riparian buffer zones on investigated rivers. Buffer zones should have carefully formulated definition and width because they are element of the significant ecological value, they perform important environmental protective functions and they are also the subject of Community law.

  7. Spatial and temporal variability in nitrous oxide and methane emissions in urban riparian zones of the Pearl River Delta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Taiping; Huang, Xinyu; Yang, Yue; Li, Yuelin; Dahlgren, Randy A

    2016-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variability in nitrous oxide and methane emissions were quantified in three seasons using closed chambers in three riparian zone locations of three branches of the Pearl River, Guangzhou, China. The sampling sites were selected in a rapidly developing urban area of Guangzhou and represented a pollution gradient. The results show that urban riparian landscapes can be large source areas for CH4 and N2O, with fluxes of -0.035∼32.30 mg m(-2) h(-1) and -5.49∼37.31 μg m(-2) h(-1), respectively. River water quality, sediment texture, and NH4-N and NO3-N concentrations correlated with N2O and CH4 emission rates. The riparian zones of the more seriously polluted tributaries showed higher greenhouse gas fluxes than that of the less polluted main stem of the Pearl River. Rain events increased emissions of CH4 by 6.5∼21.3 times and N2O by 2.2∼5.7 times. The lower concentrations of heavy metals increased the activity of denitrifying enzymes while inhibited the methane producing pathways. This work demonstrates that rapidly developing urban areas are an important source of greenhouse gas emissions, which is conditioned by various environmental factors.

  8. The role of habitat factors in successful invasion of alien plant Acer negundo in riparian zones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikorski, Piotr; Sikorska, Daria

    2016-04-01

    Ash-leaved maple (Acer negundo) is one of the most invasive species occurring in riparian zones. The invasion is especially effective in disturbed areas, as the plant favours anthropogenic sites. The plant was also observed to be able to penetrate into sandy bars, also those separated from the land, inaccessible to people. It's removal is time-consuming and laborious, often involves damage done to sensitive vegetation and the results are doubtful, as the plant quickly regenerates. The invasion patterns and establishment of ash-leaved maple in natural ecosystems are poorly investigated. The aim of this study was to test how habitat factors such as: light availability, soil characteristics and competition contribute to ash-leaved maple effective colonization of natural sand bars free from anthropogenic pressure. In 2014 sand bars located in Vistula River Valley in Warsaw were inventoried and classified basing on their development stage as 1 - initial, 2 - unstable, 3 - stable. Apart from the occurrence of the invasive ash-leaved maple the plants competing with it were recognized and the percentage of the shoots of shrubs and herbaceous plants was estimated. PAR was measured at ground level and 1 meter above ground, the thickness of organic layer formed on the top of the sand was also measured as the indicator of sand bar development stage. The maple's survival in extremely difficult conditions resembles the strategy of willows and poplars naturally occurring in the riparian zones, which are well adapted to this environment. The success of invasion strongly depends on the plants establishment during sand bars initial stage of development. The seedlings growth correlates with the age of the sand bar (r1=0,41, r2=0,42 i r3=0,57). The colonization lasts for 4-6 years and the individuals start to cluster in bigger parches. After that period the maple turns into the phase of competition for space. Habitat factors such as shading (r2=0,41 i r3=0,51) and organic layer

  9. Influences of the unsaturated, saturated, and riparian zones on the transport of nitrate near the Merced River, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagalski, Joseph L.; Phillips, Steven P.; Bayless, E. Randall; Zamora, Celia; Kendall, Carol; Wildman, Richard A.; Hering, Janet G.

    2008-06-01

    Transport and transformation of nitrate was evaluated along a 1-km groundwater transect from an almond orchard to the Merced River, California, USA, within an irrigated agricultural setting. As indicated by measurements of pore-water nitrate and modeling using the root zone water quality model, about 63% of the applied nitrogen was transported through a 6.5-m unsaturated zone. Transport times from recharge locations to the edge of a riparian zone ranged from approximately 6 months to greater than 100 years. This allowed for partial denitrification in horizons having mildly reducing conditions, and essentially no denitrification in horizons with oxidizing conditions. Transport times across a 50-100-m-wide riparian zone of less than a year to over 6 years and more strongly reducing conditions resulted in greater rates of denitrification. Isotopic measurements and concentrations of excess N2 in water were indicative of denitrification with the highest rates below the Merced River. Discharge of water and nitrate into the river was dependent on gradients driven by irrigation or river stage. The results suggest that the assimilative capacity for nitrate of the groundwater system, and particularly the riverbed, is limiting the nitrate load to the Merced River in the study area.

  10. Influences of the unsaturated, saturated, and riparian zones on the transport of nitrate near the Merced River, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, J.L.; Phillips, S.P.; Bayless, E.R.; Zamora, C.; Kendall, C.; Wildman, R.A.; Hering, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Transport and transformation of nitrate was evaluated along a 1-km groundwater transect from an almond orchard to the Merced River, California, USA, within an irrigated agricultural setting. As indicated by measurements of pore-water nitrate and modeling using the root zone water quality model, about 63% of the applied nitrogen was transported through a 6.5-m unsaturated zone. Transport times from recharge locations to the edge of a riparian zone ranged from approximately 6 months to greater than 100 years. This allowed for partial denitrification in horizons having mildly reducing conditions, and essentially no denitrification in horizons with oxidizing conditions. Transport times across a 50-100-m-wide riparian zone of less than a year to over 6 years and more strongly reducing conditions resulted in greater rates of denitrification. Isotopic measurements and concentrations of excess N2 in water were indicative of denitrification with the highest rates below the Merced River. Discharge of water and nitrate into the river was dependent on gradients driven by irrigation or river stage. The results suggest that the assimilative capacity for nitrate of the groundwater system, and particularly the riverbed, is limiting the nitrate load to the Merced River in the study area. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  11. Hydrogeologic controls on the transport and fate of nitrate in ground water beneath riparian buffer zones: Results from thirteen studies across the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puckett, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    During the last two decades there has been growing interest in the capacity of riparian buffer zones to remove nitrate from ground waters moving through them. Riparian zone sediments often contain organic carbon, which favors formation of reducing conditions that can lead to removal of nitrate through denitrification. Over the past decade the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program has investigated the transport and fate of nitrate in ground and surface waters in study areas across the United States. In these studies riparian zone efficiency in removing nitrate varied widely as a result of variations in hydrogeologic factors. These factors include (1) denitrification in the up-gradient aquifer due to the presence of organic carbon or other electron donors, (2) long residence times (>50 years) along ground-water flow paths allowing even slow reactions to completely remove nitrate, (3) dilution of nitrate enriched waters with older water having little nitrate, (4) bypassing of riparian zones due to extensive use of drains and ditches, and (5) movement of ground water along deep flow paths below reducing zones. By developing a better understanding of the hydrogeologic settings in which riparian buffer zones are likely to be inefficient we can develop improved nutrient management plans. ?? US Government 2004.

  12. [Transportation and risk assessment of heavy metal pollution in water-soil from the Riparian Zone of Daye Lake, China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-quan; Li, Xiu; Zhang, Quan-fa; Li, Qiong; Xiao, Wen-sheng; Wang, Yong-kui; Zhang, Jian-chun; Gai, Xi-guang

    2015-01-01

    Each 20 water samples and soil samples (0-10 cm, 10-20 cm) were collected from the riparian zone of Daye Lake in dry season during March 2013. Heavy metals (Cu, Ph, Cd, Zn) have been detected by flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS). The results showed that the average concentrations of Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn in the water were 7.14, 25.94, 15.72 and 37.58 microg x L(-1), respectively. The concentration of Cu was higher than the five degree of the surface water environment quality standard. The average concentrations of Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn in soil(0-10 cm) were 108.38, 53.92, 3.55, 139.26 mg x kg(-1) in soil (10-20 cm) were 93.00, 51.72, 2.08, 171.00 mg x kg(-1), respectively. The Cd concentrations were higher than the three grade value of the national soil environment quality standard. The transportation of Pb from soil to water was relatively stable, and Zn was greatly influenced by soil property and the surrounding environment from soil to water. The transformation of heavy metal in west riparian zone was higher than that of east riparian zone. The potential environmental risk was relatively high. Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn were dominated by residue fraction of the modified BCR sequential extraction method. The overall migration order of heavy metal element was: Pb > Cu > Cd > Zn. There were stronger transformation and higher environmental pollution risk of Cu, Pb. The index of assessment and potential ecological risk coefficient indicated that heavy metal pollution in soil (0-10 cm) was higher than the soil (10-20 cm), Cd was particularly serious.

  13. Combining SAR with LANDSAT for Change Detection of Riparian Buffer Zone in a Semi-arid River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, N.

    2006-12-01

    A combination of RADARSAT-1 and Landsat 5 TM satellite images linking the soil moisture variation with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) measurements were used to accomplish remotely sensed change detection of riparian buffer zone in the Choke Canyon Reservoir Watershed (CCRW), South Texas. The CCRW was selected as the study area contributing to the reservoir, which is mostly agricultural and range land in a semi-arid coastal environment. This makes the study significant due to the interception capability of non-point source impact within the riparian buffer zone and the maintenance of ecosystem integrity region wide. First of all, an estimation of soil moisture using RADARSAT-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite imagery was conducted. With its all-weather capability, the RADARSAT-1 is a promising tool for measuring the surface soil moisture over seasons. The time constraint is almost negligible since the RADARSAT-1 is able to capture surface soil moisture over a large area in a matter of seconds, if the area is within its swath. RADARSAT-1 images presented at here were captured in two acquisitions, including April and September 2004. With the aid of five corner reflectors deployed by Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF), essential radiometric and geometric calibrations were performed to improve the accuracy of the SAR imagery. The horizontal errors were reduced from initially 560 meter down to less than 5 meter at the best try. Then two Landsat 5 TM satellite images were summarized based on its NDVI. The combination of and NDVI and SAR data obviously show that soil moisture and vegetation biomass wholly varies in space and time in the CCRW leading to identify the riparian buffer zone evolution over seasons. It is found that the seasonal soil moisture variation is highly tied with the NDVI values and the change detection of buffer zone is technically feasible. It will contribute to develop more effective management strategies for non-point source

  14. Spatial behavior and distribution of cattle grazing riparian zones in northeastern Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research is to document and quantify the spatial movement of cattle grazing riparian pastures so that accurate assessment of use and ecological interaction can be made. Track logs with 1 second data collection intervals indicate that cows spent about 63% of their time stationar...

  15. Host plant shifts and transitions into new adaptive zones in leafhoppers:
    the example of Macropsinae (Homoptera: Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadellidae)
    of Russia and adjacent countries.

    PubMed

    Tishechkin, Dmitri Yu

    2016-06-08

    The modes of diversification of Palaearctic Macropsinae (Homoptera: Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadellidae) are reconstructed based on data on their host plants and distribution in Russia and the adjacent territories. Macropsinae (Homoptera: Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadellidae) is originally an Oriental group, which penetrated into the Palaearctic from Southeast Asia. The genus Pediopsoides and species of the genus Macropsis that feed on East Asian oaks have not dispersed beyond broadleaf forests of the Eastern Palaearctic. Apparently, Pediopsis and elm-feeding species of Macropsis initially dispersed throughout the entire broadleaf forest zone. Division of this zone into two widely separated parts in temperate areas of Europe and East Asia (nemoral disjunction), produced closely related vicariant pairs of sister species. The genus Oncopsis and species of Macropsis feeding on Salicaceae dispersed throughout the entire Palaearctic following their host plants. Both lineages penetrated into riparian forests of the foothills and midlands of Central Asia, where they produced endemic species. The Central Asian Macropsis lineage shifted from Salicaceae to trees and shrubs of unrelated families (wild roses, barberry, oleaster, and sea-buckthorn) growing in the same biotopes. Subsequent diversification on those plants produced several separate host-associated species-groups, some of which penetrated following their hosts from riparian forests into arid habitats. One such lineage apparently shifted from shrubs to wormwood species (Artemisia spp.) and thus gave rise to the genus Macropsidius. This genus underwent adaptive radiation on wormwood species in the plains of South Kazakhstan and Central Asia; advancing westward, it formed secondary centres of diversity in Transcaucasia and the Mediterranean. Finally, some lineage of Macropsidius (or its sister-group) switched from feeding on Artemisia to polyphagy, yielding the ancestral form of the genus Hephathus. In general, the evolution of

  16. Noise-driven cooperative dynamics between vegetation and topography in riparian zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesipa, R.; Camporeale, C.; Ridolfi, L.

    2015-10-01

    Riparian ecosystems exhibit complex biotic and abiotic dynamics, where the triad vegetation-sediments-stream determines the ecogeomorphological features of the river landscape. Random fluctuations of the water stage are a key trait of this triad, and a number of behaviors of the fluvial environment can be understood only taking into consideration the role of noise. In order to elucidate how randomness shape riparian transects, a stochastic model that takes into account the main links between vegetation, sediments, and the stream is adopted, emphasizing the capability of vegetation to alter the plot topography. A minimalistic approach is pursued, and the probability density function of vegetation biomass is analytically evaluated in any transect plot. This probability density function strongly depends on the vegetation-topography feedback. We demonstrate how the vegetation-induced modifications of the bed topography create more suitable conditions for the survival of vegetation in a stochastically dominated environment.

  17. [Relationship between groundwater quality index of nutrition element and organic matter in riparian zone and water quality in river].

    PubMed

    Hua-Shan, Xu; Tong-Qian, Zhao; Hong-Q, Meng; Zong-Xue, Xu; Chao-Hon, Ma

    2011-04-01

    Riparian zone hydrology is dominated by shallow groundwater with complex interactions between groundwater and surface water. There are obvious relations of discharge and recharge between groundwater and surface water. Flood is an important hydrological incident that affects groundwater quality in riparian zone. By observing variations of physical and chemical groundwater indicators in riparian zone at the Kouma section of the Yellow River Wetland, especially those took place in the period of regulation for water and sediment at the Xiaolangdi Reservoir, relationship between the groundwater quality in riparian zone and the flood water quality in the river is studied. Results show that there will be great risk of nitrogen, phosphorus, nitrate nitrogen and organic matter permeating into the groundwater if floodplain changes into farmland. As the special control unit of nitrogen pollution between rivers and artificial wetlands, dry fanning areas near the river play a very important role in nitrogen migration between river and groundwater. Farm manure as base fertilizer may he an important source of phosphorus leak and loss at the artificial wetlands. Phosphorus leaks into the groundwater and is transferred along the hydraulic gradient, especially during the period of regulation for water and sediment at the Xiaolangdi Reservoir. The land use types and farming systems of the riparian floodplain have a major impact on the nitrate nitrogen contents of the groundwater. Nitrogen can infiltrate and accumulate quickly at anaerobic conditions in the fish pond area, and the annual nitrogen achieves a relatively balanced state in lotus area. In those areas, the soil is flooded and at anaerobic condition in spring and summer, nitrogen infiltrates and denitrification significantly, but soil is not flooded and at aerobic condition in the autumn and winter, and during these time, a significant nitrogen nitrification process occurs. In the area between 50 m and 200 m from the river

  18. River food web response to large-scale riparian zone manipulations.

    PubMed

    Wootton, J Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Conservation programs often focus on select species, leading to management plans based on the autecology of the focal species, but multiple ecosystem components can be affected both by the environmental factors impacting, and the management targeting, focal species. These broader effects can have indirect impacts on target species through the web of interactions within ecosystems. For example, human activity can strongly alter riparian vegetation, potentially impacting both economically-important salmonids and their associated river food web. In an Olympic Peninsula river, Washington state, USA, replicated large-scale riparian vegetation manipulations implemented with the long-term (>40 yr) goal of improving salmon habitat did not affect water temperature, nutrient limitation or habitat characteristics, but reduced canopy cover, causing reduced energy input via leaf litter, increased incident solar radiation (UV and PAR) and increased algal production compared to controls. In response, benthic algae, most insect taxa, and juvenile salmonids increased in manipulated areas. Stable isotope analysis revealed a predominant contribution of algal-derived energy to salmonid diets in manipulated reaches. The experiment demonstrates that riparian management targeting salmonids strongly affects river food webs via changes in the energy base, illustrates how species-based management strategies can have unanticipated indirect effects on the target species via the associated food web, and supports ecosystem-based management approaches for restoring depleted salmonid stocks.

  19. River Food Web Response to Large-Scale Riparian Zone Manipulations

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, J. Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Conservation programs often focus on select species, leading to management plans based on the autecology of the focal species, but multiple ecosystem components can be affected both by the environmental factors impacting, and the management targeting, focal species. These broader effects can have indirect impacts on target species through the web of interactions within ecosystems. For example, human activity can strongly alter riparian vegetation, potentially impacting both economically-important salmonids and their associated river food web. In an Olympic Peninsula river, Washington state, USA, replicated large-scale riparian vegetation manipulations implemented with the long-term (>40 yr) goal of improving salmon habitat did not affect water temperature, nutrient limitation or habitat characteristics, but reduced canopy cover, causing reduced energy input via leaf litter, increased incident solar radiation (UV and PAR) and increased algal production compared to controls. In response, benthic algae, most insect taxa, and juvenile salmonids increased in manipulated areas. Stable isotope analysis revealed a predominant contribution of algal-derived energy to salmonid diets in manipulated reaches. The experiment demonstrates that riparian management targeting salmonids strongly affects river food webs via changes in the energy base, illustrates how species-based management strategies can have unanticipated indirect effects on the target species via the associated food web, and supports ecosystem-based management approaches for restoring depleted salmonid stocks. PMID:23284786

  20. Influence of Organic Amendment and Compaction on Nutrient Dynamics in a Saturated Saline-Sodic Soil from the Riparian Zone.

    PubMed

    Miller, J J; Bremer, E; Curtis, T

    2016-07-01

    Cattle grazing in wet riparian pastures may influence nutrient dynamics due to nutrient deposition in feces and urine, soil compaction, and vegetation loss. We conducted a lab incubation study with a saline-sodic riparian soil to study nutrient (N, P, S, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn) dynamics in soil pore water using Plant Root Simulator (PRS) probes and release of nutrients into the overlying ponded water during flooding. The treatment factors were organic amendment (manure, roots, and unamended control), compaction (compacted, uncompacted), and burial time (3, 7, and 14 d). Amendment treatment had the greatest impact on nutrient dynamics, followed by burial time, whereas compaction had little impact. The findings generally supported our hypothesis that organic amendments should first increase nitrate loss, then increase Mn mobility, then Fe mobility and associated release of P, and finally increase sulfate loss. Declines in nitrate due to amendment addition were small because nitrate was at low levels in all treatments due to high denitrification potential instead of being released to soil pore water or overlying water. Addition of organic amendment strongly increased Mn and Fe concentrations in overlying water and of adsorbed Fe on PRS probes but only increased Mn on PRS probes on Day 3 due to subsequent displacement from ion exchange membranes. Transport of P to overlying water was increased by organic amendment addition but less so for manure than roots despite higher P on PRS probes. The findings showed that saline-sodic soils in riparian zones are generally a nutrient source for P and are a nutrient sink for N as measured using PRS probes after 3 to 7 d of flooding.

  1. Using chemical, hydrologic, and age dating analysis to delineate redox processes and flow paths in the riparian zone of a glacial outwash aquifer-stream system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puckett, L.J.; Cowdery, T.K.; McMahon, P.B.; Tornes, L.H.; Stoner, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    A combination of chemical and dissolved gas analyses, chlorofluorocarbon age dating, and hydrologic measurements were used to determine the degree to which biogeochemical processes in a riparian wetland were responsible for removing NO3- from groundwaters discharging to the Otter Tail River in west central Minnesota. An analysis of river chemistry and flow data revealed that NO3- concentrations in the river increased in the lower half of the 8.3 km study reach as the result of groundwater discharge to the river. Groundwater head measurements along a study transect through the riparian wetland revealed a zone of groundwater discharge extending out under the river. On the basis of combined chemical, dissolved gas, age date, and hydrologic results, it was determined that water chemistry under the riparian wetland was controlled largely by upgradient groundwaters that followed flow paths up to 16 m deep and discharged under the wetland, creating a pattern of progressively older, more chemically reduced, low NO3- water the farther one progressed from the edge of the wetland toward the river. These findings pose challenges for researchers investigating biogeochemical processes in riparian buffer zones because the progressively older groundwaters entered the aquifer in earlier years when less NO3- fertilizer was being used. NO3- concentrations originally present in the groundwater had also decreased in the upgradient aquifer as a result of denitrification and progressively stronger reducing conditions there. The resulting pattern of decreasing NO3- concentrations across the riparian zone may be incorrectly interpreted as evidence of denitrification losses there instead of in the upgradient aquifer. Consequently, it is important to understand the hydrogeologic setting and age structure of the groundwaters being sampled in order to avgid misinterpreting biogeochemical processes in riparian zones.

  2. Do beavers promote the invasion of non-native Tamarix in the Grand Canyon riparian zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mortenson, S.G.; Weisberg, P.J.; Ralston, B.E.

    2008-01-01

    Beavers (Castor canadensis Kuhl) can influence the competitive dynamics of plant species through selective foraging, collection of materials for dam creation, and alteration of hydrologic conditions. In the Grand Canyon National Park, the native Salix gooddingii C.R.Ball (Goodding's willow) and Salix exigua Nutt. (coyote willow) are a staple food of beavers. Because Salix competes with the invasive Tamarix ramosissima Ledeb., land mangers are concerned that beavers may cause an increase in Tamarix through selective foraging of Salix. A spatial analysis was conducted to assess whether the presence of beavers correlates with the relative abundance of Salix and Tamarix. These methods were designed to detect a system-wide effect of selective beaver foraging in this large study area (367 linear km of riparian habitat). Beavers, Salix, and Tamarix co-occurred at the broadest scales because they occupied similar riparian habitat, particularly geomorphic reaches of low and moderate resistivity. Once the affinity of Salix for particular reach types was accounted for, the presence of Salix was independent of beaver distribution. However, there was a weak positive association between beaver presence and Salix cover. Salix was limited to geomorphic settings with greater sinuosity and distinct terraces, while Tamarix occurred in sinuous and straighter sections of river channel (cliffs, channel margins) where it dominated the woody species composition. After accounting for covariates representing river geomorphology, the proportion of riparian surfaces covered by Tamarix was significantly greater for sites where beavers were present. This indicates that either Tamarix and beavers co-occur in similar habitats, beavers prefer habitats that have high Tamarix cover, or beavers contribute to Tamarix dominance through selective use of its native woody competitors. The hypothesis that beaver herbivory contributes to Tamarix dominance should be considered further through more

  3. Riparian Vegetation Mapping Along the Hanford Reach

    SciTech Connect

    FOGWELL, T.W.

    2003-07-11

    During the biological survey and inventory of the Hanford Site conducted in the mid-1990s (1995 and 1996), preliminary surveys of the riparian vegetation were conducted along the Hanford Reach. These preliminary data were reported to The Nature Conservancy (TNC), but were not included in any TNC reports to DOE or stakeholders. During the latter part of FY2001, PNNL contracted with SEE Botanical, the parties that performed the original surveys in the mid 1990s, to complete the data summaries and mapping associated with the earlier survey data. Those data sets were delivered to PNNL and the riparian mapping by vegetation type for the Hanford Reach is being digitized during the first quarter of FY2002. These mapping efforts provide the information necessary to create subsequent spatial data layers to describe the riparian zone according to plant functional types (trees, shrubs, grasses, sedges, forbs). Quantification of the riparian zone by vegetation types is important to a number of DOE'S priority issues including modeling contaminant transport and uptake in the near-riverine environment and the determination of ecological risk. This work included the identification of vegetative zones along the Reach by changes in dominant plant species covering the shoreline from just to the north of the 300 Area to China Bar near Vernita. Dominant and indicator species included Agropyron dasytachyudA. smithii, Apocynum cannabinum, Aristida longiseta, Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var scouleriana, Artemisa dracunculus, Artemisia lindleyana, Artemisia tridentata, Bromus tectorum, Chrysothamnus nauseosus, Coreopsis atkinsoniana. Eleocharis palustris, Elymus cinereus, Equisetum hyemale, Eriogonum compositum, Juniperus trichocarpa, Phalaris arundinacea, Poa compressa. Salk exigua, Scirpus acutus, Solidago occidentalis, Sporobolus asper,and Sporobolus cryptandrus. This letter report documents the data received, the processing by PNNL staff, and additional data gathered in FY2002

  4. The distance that contaminated aquatic subsidies extend into lake riparian zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raikow, D.F.; Walters, D.M.; Fritz, K.M.; Mills, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Consumption of emergent aquatic insects by terrestrial invertebrates is a poorly resolved, but potentially important, mechanism of contaminant flux across ecosystem borders leading to contaminant exposure in terrestrial invertivores. We characterized the spatial extent and magnitude of contaminant transfer from aquatic sediments to terrestrial invertebrate predators by examining riparian araneid spiders, terrestrial insects, and emergent aquatic insects for stable isotopes and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, sum of 141 congeners) at Lake Hartwell, (Clemson, South Carolina, USA). PCB concentrations in aquatic insects were orders of magnitude higher than in terrestrial insects. Aquatic insect consumption by spiders (as indicated by ??13C and ??15N), PCB concentrations in spiders, and aquatic prey availability were greatest at the shoreline and declined inland, while terrestrial prey availability was invariant with distance. These patterns indicate PCB transfer to spiders through consumption of emergent aquatic insects extending to a distance of ???5 m inland. Measurable, but much lower, PCBs were present in insect predators dominated by social wasps up to 30 m inland. These results illustrate the importance of emergent insects as vectors of contaminant transfer from lake sediments to riparian food webs, and that spiders are key predators in this process. ?? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America.

  5. The influence of abiotic stress and phenotypic plasticity on the distribution of invasive Alternanthera philoxeroides along a riparian zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Geng, Yupeng; Zhang, Wenju; Li, Bo; Chen, Jiakuan

    2006-11-01

    Relatively few studies have compared invasibility and species invasiveness among microhabitats within communities, synchronously. We surveyed the abundance and performance of non-native Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb. (alligator weed), its co-occurring native congener, Alternanthera sessilis (L.) DC. (sessile joyweed), and other species in a wetland community along a riparian zone in southeast China to test the hypotheses that: i) degree of invasion differs between different types of microhabitats within the community; and ii) microhabitat types that differ in invasibility also differ in soil resource availability or in sediment characteristics likely to affect resource availability; iii) phenotypic plasticity of A. philoxeroides may play a key role in its adaptation to diverse habitats as can be concluded from its extremely low genetic diversity in China. The study riparian zone comprises different types of microhabitats including wet abandoned field, swamp, marsh dunes and gravel dunes. Consistent with these hypotheses, cover of A. philoxeroides was high in abandoned fields (73 ± 2.9%) and swamps (94 ± 1.3%), which had high soil nutrients and water availability. On the contrary, cover of native A. sessilis was relatively high in marsh dunes and grave dunes, which had coarse gravel surfaces, low soil nutrients and low water availability. A. philoxeroides showed greater morphological plasticity in response to habitat variation. In abiotically harsh habitats, stems had limited growth, and were prostrate with weak adventitious roots at nodes, forming thin, scattered patches. In the two richer habitats, the highly branched plants spread over the water or soil surface, supporting dense stronger leaf-bearing stems which grew vertically. The growth pattern of A. sessilis among microhabitats did not exhibit significant variations. These results suggest that morphological plasticity and microhabitat types with high soil resources may facilitate invasions of A

  6. Methane Emission in a Specific Riparian-Zone Sediment Decreased with Bioelectrochemical Manipulation and Corresponded to the Microbial Community Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Elliot S.; McPhillips, Lauren E.; Werner, Jeffrey J.; Poole, Angela C.; Ley, Ruth E.; Walter, M. Todd; Angenent, Largus T.

    2016-01-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria are widespread in terrestrial ecosystems, especially in anaerobic soils and sediments. Thermodynamically, dissimilatory metal reduction is more favorable than sulfate reduction and methanogenesis but less favorable than denitrification and aerobic respiration. It is critical to understand the complex relationships, including the absence or presence of terminal electron acceptors, that govern microbial competition and coexistence in anaerobic soils and sediments, because subsurface microbial processes can effect greenhouse gas emissions from soils, possibly resulting in impacts at the global scale. Here, we elucidated the effect of an inexhaustible, ferrous-iron and humic-substance mimicking terminal electron acceptor by deploying potentiostatically poised electrodes in the sediment of a very specific stream riparian zone in Upstate New York state. At two sites within the same stream riparian zone during the course of 6 weeks in the spring of 2013, we measured CH4 and N2/N2O emissions from soil chambers containing either poised or unpoised electrodes, and we harvested biofilms from the electrodes to quantify microbial community dynamics. At the upstream site, which had a lower vegetation cover and highest soil temperatures, the poised electrodes inhibited CH4 emissions by ∼45% (when normalized to remove temporal effects). CH4 emissions were not significantly impacted at the downstream site. N2/N2O emissions were generally low at both sites and were not impacted by poised electrodes. We did not find a direct link between bioelectrochemical treatment and microbial community membership; however, we did find a correspondence between environment/function and microbial community dynamics. PMID:26793170

  7. Riparian zone influence on stream water chemistry at different spatial scales: a GIS-based modelling approach, an example for the Dee, NE Scotland.

    PubMed

    Smart, R P; Soulsby, C; Cresser, M S; Wade, A J; Townend, J; Billett, M F; Langan, S

    2001-12-03

    A geographical information system (GIS-ARC/INFO) was used to collate existing spatial data sets on catchment characteristics to predict stream water quality using simple empirical models. The study, based on the river Dee catchment in NE Scotland, found that geological maps and associated geochemical information provided a suitable framework for predicting chemical parameters associated with acidification sensitivity (including alkalinity and base cation concentrations). In particular, it was found that in relatively undisturbed catchments, the parent material and geochemistry of the riparian zone, when combined with a simple hydrological flow path model, could be used to accurately predict stream water chemistry at a range of flows (Q95 to > Q5) and spatial scales (1-1000 km2). This probably reflects the importance of the riparian zone as an area where hydrological inputs to stream systems occur via flow paths in the soil and groundwater zones. Thus, evolution of drainage water chemistry appears to retain the geochemical characteristics of the riparian area as it enters the channel network. In more intensively managed catchments, riparian land use is a further influential factor, which can be incorporated into models to improve predictions for certain base cations. The utility in providing simple hydrochemical models, based on readily available data sets, to assist environmental managers in planning land use in catchment systems is discussed.

  8. Emission of greenhouse gases from constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment and from riparian buffer zones.

    PubMed

    Mander, U; Teiter, S; Augustin, J

    2005-01-01

    We measured N2O, CH4 and CO2 fluxes in horizontal and vertical flow constructed wetlands (CW) and in a riparian alder stand in southern Estonia using the closed chamber method in the period from October 2001 to November 2003. The average rates of N20, CH4 and CO2 emission from the riparian gray alder stand were from -0.4 to 58 microg N2O-N m(-2) h(-1) and 0.1-265 microg CH4-C m(-2) h(-1), 55-61 mg CO2-C m(-2) h(-1), respectively. The average N2O-N emission from the microsites above the inflow pipes of horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) CWs was 6.4-31 microg N2O-N m(-2) h(-1), whereas the outflow microsites emitted 2.4-8 microg N2O-N m(-2) h(-1). In vertical subsurface flow (VSSF) beds the same value was 35.6-44.7 microg N2O-N m(-2) h(-1). The average CH4 emission from the inflow and outflow microsites in the HSSF CWs differed significantly ranging from 640 to 9715 and from 30 to 770 microg CH4-C m(-2) h(-1), respectively. The average CO2 emission was somewhat higher in VSSF beds (140-291 mg CO2-C m(-2) h(-1)) and at inflow microsites of HSSF beds (61-140 mg CO2-C m(-2) h(-1)). The global warming potential (GWP) from N2O and CH4 was comparatively high in both types of CWs (4.8 +/- 9.8 and 6.8 +/- 16.2 t CO2 eq ha(-1) a(-1) in the HSSF CW 6.5 +/- 13.0 and 5.3 +/- 24.7 t CO2 eq ha(-1) a(-1) in the hybrid CW, respectively). The GWP of riparian alder forest from both N2O and CH4 was relatively low (0.4 +/- 1.0 and 0.1 +/- 0.30 t CO2 eq ha(-1) a(-1), respectively), whereas the CO2-C flux was remarkable (3.5 +/- 3.7 t ha(-1) a(-1). The global influence of CWs is not significant. Even if all the global domestic wastewater were treated by wetlands, their share in the trace gas emission budget would be less than 1%.

  9. 33 CFR 334.420 - Pamlico Sound and adjacent waters, N.C.; danger zones for Marine Corps operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pamlico Sound and adjacent waters... REGULATIONS § 334.420 Pamlico Sound and adjacent waters, N.C.; danger zones for Marine Corps operations. (a) Bombing and rocket firing area in Pamlico Sound in vicinity of Brant Island—(1) The area. The...

  10. 33 CFR 334.420 - Pamlico Sound and adjacent waters, N.C.; danger zones for Marine Corps operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pamlico Sound and adjacent waters... REGULATIONS § 334.420 Pamlico Sound and adjacent waters, N.C.; danger zones for Marine Corps operations. (a) Bombing and rocket firing area in Pamlico Sound in vicinity of Brant Island—(1) The area. The...

  11. 33 CFR 334.420 - Pamlico Sound and adjacent waters, N.C.; danger zones for Marine Corps operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., N.C.; danger zones for Marine Corps operations. 334.420 Section 334.420 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.420 Pamlico Sound and adjacent waters, N.C.; danger zones for Marine Corps operations. (a... date. Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point will have a call-in number for public use to...

  12. Denitrification controls in urban riparian soils: implications for reducing urban nonpoint source nitrogen pollution.

    PubMed

    Li, Yangjie; Chen, Zhenlou; Lou, Huanjie; Wang, Dongqi; Deng, Huanguang; Wang, Chu

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to thoroughly analyze the influences of environmental factors on denitrification processes in urban riparian soils. Besides, the study was also carried out to identify whether the denitrification processes in urban riparian soils could control nonpoint source nitrogen pollution in urban areas. The denitrification rates (DR) over 1 year were measured using an acetylene inhibition technique during the incubation of intact soil cores from six urban riparian sites, which could be divided into three types according to their vegetation. The soil samples were analyzed to determine the soil organic carbon (SOC), soil total nitrogen (STN), C/N ratio, extractable NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N, pH value, soil water content (SWC), and the soil nitrification potential to evaluate which of these factors determined the final outcome of denitrification. A nitrate amendment experiment further indicated that the riparian DR was responsive to added nitrate. Although the DRs were very low (0.099 ~ 33.23 ng N2O-N g(-1) h(-1)) due to the small amount of nitrogen moving into the urban riparian zone, the spatial and temporal patterns of denitrification differed significantly. The extractable NO3 (-)-N proved to be the dominant factor influencing the spatial distribution of denitrification, whereas the soil temperature was a determinant of the seasonal DR variation. The six riparian sites could also be divided into two types (a nitrate-abundant and a nitrate-stressed riparian system) according to the soil NO3 (-)-N concentration. The DR in nitrate-abundant riparian systems was significantly higher than that in the nitrate-stressed riparian systems. The DR in riparian zones that were covered with bushes and had adjacent cropland was higher than in grass-covered riparian sites. Furthermore, the riparian DR decreased with soil depth, which was mainly attributed to the concentrated nitrate in surface soils. The DR was not associated with the SOC, STN, C/N ratio, and

  13. Denitrification in sediments from the hyporheic zone adjacent to a small forested stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duff, J.H.; Triska, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    Denitrifying potentials increased with increasing distance from the stream channel. Dissolved oxygen was 100% of the concentration expected in equilibrium with the atmosphere in water obtained from monitoring wells immediately adjacent to the stream but was as low as 7% of the expected value in water 11.4 m inland. Both nitrate and dissolved organic carbon decreased over summer in wells at the base of the alder-forested slope. A 48-h injection of nitrate-amended stream water into hyporheic water 8.4 m inland stimulated nitrous oxide production in the presence of acetylene. Nitrous oxide was generated as nitrate and acetylene were co-transported to a well 13 m down-gradient. Acetylene-block experiments coupled with the chemistry data suggest that denitrification can modify the chemistry of water during passage through the hyporheic zone. -from Authors

  14. Distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls in an urban riparian zone affected by wastewater treatment plant effluent and the transfer to terrestrial compartment by invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junchao; Wang, Thanh; Han, Shanlong; Wang, Pu; Zhang, Qinghua; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in a riparian zone affected by the effluent from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). River water, sediment, aquatic invertebrates and samples from the surrounding terrestrial compartment such as soil, reed plants and several land based invertebrates were collected. A relatively narrow range of δ(13)C values was found among most invertebrates (except butterflies, grasshoppers), indicating a similar energy source. The highest concentration of total PCBs was observed in zooplankton (151.1 ng/g lipid weight), and soil dwelling invertebrates showed higher concentrations than phytophagous insects at the riparian zone. The endobenthic oligochaete Tubifex tubifex (54.28 ng/g lw) might be a useful bioindicator of WWTP derived PCBs contamination. High bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were observed in collected aquatic invertebrates, although the biota-sediment/soil accumulation factors (BSAF) remained relatively low. Emerging aquatic insects such as chironomids could carry waterborne PCBs to the terrestrial compartment via their lifecycles. The estimated annual flux of PCBs for chironomids ranged from 0.66 to 265 ng⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1). Although a high prevalence of PCB-11 and PCB-28 was found for most aquatic based samples in this riparian zone, the mid-chlorinated congeners (e.g. PCB-153 and PCB-138) became predominant among chironomids and dragonflies as well as soil dwelling invertebrates, which might suggest a selective biodriven transfer of different PCB congeners.

  15. Alteration-weakening leading to localized deformation in a damage aureole adjacent to a dormant shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, Nils R.; Rowe, Christie D.; Barshi, Naomi

    2016-09-01

    Deformation adjacent to faults and shear zones is traditionally thought to correlate with slip. Inherited structures may control damage geometry, localizing fluid flow and deformation in a damage aureole around structures, even after displacement has ceased. In this paper we document a post-shearing anastomosing foliation and fracture network that developed to one side of the Mesoarchean Marmion Shear Zone. This fracture network hosts the low-grade, disseminated Hammond Reef gold deposit. The shear zone juxtaposed a greenstone belt against tonalite gneiss and was locked by an intrusion that was emplaced during the final stages of suturing. After cessation of activity, fluids channeled along fault- and intrusion-related fractures led to the pervasive sericitization of feldspars. Foliated zones resulted from flattening in the weaker sericite-rich tonalite during progressive alteration without any change in the regional NW-SE shortening direction. The anastomosing pattern may have been inherited from an earlier ductile fabric, but sericite alteration and flattening fabrics all formed post-shearing. Thus, the apparent foliated fracture network adjacent to the Marmion Shear Zone is a second-order effect of shear-related damage, distinct in time from shear activity, adjacent to an effectively dormant shear zone. This phenomenon has implications for understanding the relative timing of fault zone activity, alteration and (in this case) gold mineralization related to long-term fault zone permeability.

  16. Does soil water saturation mobilize metals from riparian soils to adjacent surface water? A field monitoring study in a metal contaminated region.

    PubMed

    Van Laer, Liesbeth; Smolders, Erik

    2013-06-01

    In the Noorderkempen (NW Belgium), a large area (about 280 km(2)) is contaminated with cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) due to historical pollution by the Zn smelters. Direct aquatic emissions of metals have diminished over time, however the surface water metal concentration largely exceeds quality standards, mainly during winter periods. Monitoring data were analyzed to reveal whether these fluctuations are related to seasonal redox reactions in associated contaminated riparian soils that drain into the rivers. A field survey was set up with soil pore-water and groundwater monitored for three years in transects of soil monitoring points perpendicular to rivers at contaminated and non-contaminated sites. Site averaged surface water concentrations of a 15 year dataset exceeded local quality standards 4 to 200-fold. Winter averaged metal concentrations significantly exceeded the corresponding summer values 1.3-1.8 (Zn) and 1.5-2.4 fold (Cd). Zinc and Cd concentrations in water were positively related to Fe and Mn but not to Ca, K or Na suggesting that redox reactions and not dilution processes are involved. In ground- and pore-water of the associated riparian soils, the concentrations of Zn fluctuate by the same order of magnitude as in surface water but were generally smaller than in the corresponding contaminated rivers. In addition, correlations of dissolved Zn with Fe and Mn were lacking. This analysis suggests that redox reactions in streams, and not in riparian soils, explain the seasonal trends of Zn and Cd in surface water. Hence, river sediments and not riparian soils may be the cause of the winter peaks of Zn and Cd in these rivers.

  17. [Floristic composition and distribution of the Andean subtropical riparian forests of Lules River, Tucuman, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Sirombra, Martín G; Mesa, Leticia M

    2010-03-01

    We studied the floristic composition and distribution of the riparian forest of two hydrographical systems in a subtropical Andean region. Using uni and multivariate techniques, we tested the hypotheses that a differentiable riparian forest exists, composed by native vegetation typical of the Yungas phytogeographical province, and that the distribution of vegetation varied significantly with geomorphologic characteristics. Parallel transects along the water courses were used to collect presence-absence data of vegetation in eleven sites. Detrended Correspondence Analysis defined a group of common riparian species for the studied area (Solanum riparium, Phenax laevigatus, Tipuana tipu, Cestrum parqui, Carica quercifolia, Acacia macracantha, Celtis iguanaea, Juglans australis, Pisoniella arborescens, Baccharis salicifolia, Cinnamomum porphyrium and Eugenia uniflora) and identified two reference sites. The distribution of the riparian vegetation varied significantly with the geomorphic characteristics along the studied sites. Riparian habitats were composed by native and exotic species. A distinct riparian flora, different in structure and function from adjacent terrestrial vegetation, could not be identified. Riparian species were similar to the adjacent terrestrial strata. These species would not be limited by the proximity to the river. Anthropogenic impacts were important factors regulating the introduction and increase of exotic vegetation. The lack of regulation of some activities in the zone could cause serious problems in the integrity of this ecosystem.

  18. The influence of partial timber harvest in riparian management zones on macroinvertebrate and fish communities on first- and second-order streams in northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, Christopher J.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Blinn, Charles R.; Newman, Raymond M.; Atuke, Dickson M.; Fredricks, Keith; Hemstad, Nathaniel A.; Merten, Eric; Schlesser, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Relatively few evaluations of aquatic macroinvertebrate and fish communities have been published in peer-reviewed literature detailing the effect of varying residual basal area (RBA) after timber harvesting in riparian buffers. Our analysis investigated the effects of partial harvesting within riparian buffers on aquatic macroinvertebrate and fish communities in small streams from two experiments in northern Minnesota northern hardwood-aspen forests. Each experiment evaluated partial harvesting within riparian buffers. In both experiments, benthic macroinvertebrates and fish were collected 1 year prior to harvest and in each of 3 years after harvest. We observed interannual variation for the macroinvertebrate abundance, diversity and taxon richness in the single-basin study and abundance and diversity in the multiple-basin study, but few effects related to harvest treatments in either study. However, interannual variation was not evident in the fish communities and we detected no significant changes in the stream fish communities associated with partially harvested riparian buffers in either study. This would suggest that timber harvesting in riparian management zones along reaches ≤200 m in length on both sides of the stream that retains RBA ≥ 12.4 ± 1.3 m2 ha−1 or on a single side of the stream that retains RBA ≥ 8.7 ± 1.6 m2 ha−1 may be adequate to protect macroinvertebrate and fish communities in our Minnesota study systems given these specific timber harvesting techniques.

  19. Tritium Plume Dynamics in the Shallow Unsaturated Zone Adjacent to an Arid Waste Disposal Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maples, S.; Andraski, B. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Cooper, C. A.; Michel, R. L.; Pohll, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies at the U.S. Geological Survey's Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in southern Nevada have documented two plumes of tritiated water-vapor (3HHOg) adjacent to a closed, commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Wastes were disposed on-site from 1962-92. Tritium has moved long distances (> 400 m) through a shallow (1-2-m depth) dry gravelly layer—orders of magnitude further than anticipated by standard transport models. Geostatistical methods, spatial moment analyses and tritium flux calculations were applied to assess shallow plume dynamics. A grid-based plant-water sampling method was utilized to infer detailed, field-scale 3HHOg concentrations at 5-yr intervals during 2001-11. Results indicate that gravel-layer 3HHOg mass diminished faster than would be expected from radioactive decay (~70% in 10 yr). Both plumes exhibited center-of-mass stability, suggesting that bulk-plume movement is minimal during the period of study. Nonetheless, evidence of localized lateral advancement along some margins, combined with increases in the spatial covariance of concentration distribution, indicates intra-plume mass redistribution is ongoing. Previous studies have recognized that vertical movement of tritiated water from sub-root-zone gravel into the root-zone contributes to atmospheric release via evapotranspiration. Estimates of lateral and vertical tritium fluxes during the study period indicate (1) vertical tritiated water fluxes were dominated by diffusive-vapor fluxes (> 90%), and (2) vertical diffusive-vapor fluxes were roughly an order of magnitude greater than lateral diffusive-vapor fluxes. This behavior highlights the importance of the atmosphere as a tritium sink. Estimates of cumulative vertical diffusive-vapor flux and radioactive decay with time were comparable to observed declines in total shallow plume mass with time. This suggests observed changes in plume mass may (1) be attributed, in considerable part, to these removal

  20. Transport and fate of nitrate and pesticides: hydrogeology and riparian zone processes.

    PubMed

    Puckett, Larry J; Hughes, W Brian

    2005-01-01

    There is continuing concern over potential impacts of widespread application of nutrients and pesticides on ground- and surface-water quality. Transport and fate of nitrate and pesticides were investigated in a shallow aquifer and adjacent stream, Cow Castle Creek, in Orangeburg County, South Carolina. Pesticide and pesticide degradate concentrations were detected in ground water with greatest frequency and largest concentrations directly beneath and downgradient from the corn (Zea mays L.) field where they were applied. In almost all samples in which they were detected, concentrations of pesticide degradates greatly exceeded those of parent compounds, and were still present in ground waters that were recharged during the previous 18 yr. The absence of both parent and degradate compounds in samples collected from deeper in the aquifer suggests that this persistence is limited or that the ground water had recharged before use of the pesticide. Concentrations of NO(-)(3) in ground water decreased with increasing depth and age, but denitrification was not a dominant controlling factor. Hydrologic and chemical data indicated that ground water discharges to the creek and chemical exchange takes place within the upper 0.7 m of the streambed. Ground water had its greatest influence on surface-water chemistry during low-flow periods, causing a decrease in concentrations of Cl(-), NO(-)(3), pesticides, and pesticide degradates. Conversely, shallow subsurface drainage dominates stream chemistry during high-flow periods, increasing stream concentrations of Cl(-), NO(-)(3), pesticides, and pesticide degradates. These results point out the importance of understanding the hydrogeologic setting when investigating transport and fate of contaminants in ground water and surface water.

  1. Transport and fate of nitrate and pesticides: Hydrogeology and riparian zone processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puckett, L.J.; Hughes, W.B.

    2005-01-01

    There is continuing concern over potential impacts of widespread application of nutrients and pesticides on ground- and surface-water quality. Transport and fate of nitrate and pesticides were investigated in a shallow aquifer and adjacent stream, Cow Castle Creek, in Orangeburg County, South Carolina. Pesticide and pesticide degradate concentrations were detected in ground water with greatest frequency and largest concentrations directly beneath and downgradient from the corn (Zea mays L.) field where they were applied. In almost all samples in which they were detected, concentrations of pesticide degradates greatly exceeded those of parent compounds, and were still present in ground waters that were recharged during the previous 18 yr. The absence of both parent and degradate compounds in samples collected from deeper in the aquifer suggests that this persistence is limited or that the ground water had recharged before use of the pesticide. Concentrations of NO3- in ground water decreased with increasing depth and age, but denitrification was not a dominant controlling factor. Hydrologic and chemical data indicated that ground water discharges to the creek and chemical exchange takes place within the upper 0.7 m of the streambed. Ground water had its greatest influence on surface-water chemistry during low-flow periods, causing a decrease in concentrations of Cl-, NO3-, pesticides, and pesticide degradates. Conversely, shallow subsurface drainage dominates stream chemistry during high-flow periods, increasing stream concentrations of Cl-, NO3-, pesticides, and pesticide degradates. These results point out the importance of understanding the hydrogeologic setting when investigating transport and fate of contaminants in ground water and surface water. ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  2. Using biodiversity of diatoms to identify hydrological connectivity in the hillslope-riparian zone-stream system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, C. E.; Martínez-Carreras, N.; Ector, L.; Hlubikova, D.; Frentress, J.; McDonnell, J. J.; Hoffmann, L.; Pfister, L.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, there have been increasingly calls for new eco-hydrological approaches to answer questions on water source and connectivity in the landscape. Diatoms are one of the most common and diverse algal groups, and offer the potential for the identification of reproducible flow patterns and a link to underlying watershed behaviour. Our preliminary investigations on the potential for terrestrial diatoms to detect the onset/cessation of surface runoff suggested that diatoms can contribute to confirm or reject the existence of a surface runoff component in total runoff, thereby helping to constrain assumptions made on a potential surface runoff component in a conventional tracer based hydrograph separation. Our investigations currently focus on the Attert River basin (Luxembourg, Europe) and the HJ Andrews experimental forest (Oregon, USA). Here we show results from the schistose Weierbach experimental catchment (0.45 km2), located in the Attert River basin. Ordination analysis revealed a clear distinction between communities belonging to the river bed substrate and the riparian zone. Drift samples corresponding to stream water show a mixed composition of diatoms stemming from the river bed substrate and the riparian zone. Ongoing investigations focus on the composition of hillslope communities. In winter, long-lasting low intensity rainfall events generate a two-tailed hydrograph response of the Weierbach, consisting in an immediate reaction to precipitation, followed by a delayed and much more significant rise of the hydrograph. For these events, mixing diagrams (SiO2 & Absorbance) suggest a substantial contribution of the soil water component to total runoff, with groundwater and especially overland flow remaining insignificant. Terrestrial diatom abundance appeared to be very sensitive to incident precipitation (rising to +/- 15% of the total diatom population), suggesting a rapid connectivity between the soil surface and the stream. In summer, short and

  3. Project Work Plan 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Phytoremediation Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, Calvin C.

    2006-04-30

    The 100-N Area Innovative Treatment and Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) identified phyto¬remediation as a potential technology both for the removal of 90Sr from the soil of the riparian zone and as a filter for groundwater along the Columbia River. Recent greenhouse and growth chamber studies have demonstrated the viability of phytoextraction to remove 90Sr from this area’s soil/water; in conjunction with monitored natural attenuation and an apatite barrier the process would make an effective treatment for remediation of the 100-N Area 90Sr plume. All activities associated with the 100-NR-1 and 100-NR-2 Operable Units of the Hanford 100-N Area have had, and continue to have, significant regulatory and stakeholder participation. Beginning in 1998 with the ITRD process, presentations to the ITRD TAG were heavily attended by EPA, Washington State Department of Ecology, and stakeholders. In addition, three workshops have been held to receive regulatory and stakeholder feedback on monitored natural attenuation, the apatite barrier, and phytoremediation; these were held in Richland in August 2003, December 2004, and August 2005. The apatite injection treatability test plan (DOE 2005) describes phytoremediation as a technology to be evaluated during the March 2008 evaluation milestone as described in the Tri-Party Agreement change request (M-16-06-01 Change Control Form). If, during this evaluation milestone, phytoremediation is favorably evaluated it would be incorporated into the treatability test plan. The phytoremediation treatability test described in this proposal is strongly supported by the Washington State Department of Ecology.

  4. Impact of riparian zone protection from cattle on nutrient, bacteria, F-coliphage, and loading of an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, M D; Topp, E; Wilkes, G; Gottschall, N; Neumann, N; Ruecker, N; Jones, T H; Edge, T A; Marti, R; Lapen, D R

    2012-01-01

    This 5-yr study compared, via an upstream-downstream experimental design, nutrient and microbial water quality of an intermittent stream running through a small pasture (∼2.5 animals ha) where cattle are restricted from the riparian zone (restricted cattle access [RCA]) and where cattle have unrestricted access to the stream (unrestricted cattle access [URCA]). Fencing in the RCA excluded pasturing cattle to within ∼3 to 5 m of the stream. Approximately 88% (26/32) of all comparisons of mean contaminant load reduction for lower, higher, and all stream flow conditions during the 5-yr study indicated net contaminant load reductions in the RCA; for the URCA, this percentage was 38% (12/32). For all flow conditions, mean percent load reductions in the RCA for nutrients and bacteria plus F-coliphage were 24 and 23%, respectively. These respective percentages for the URCA were -9 and -57% (positive values are reductions; negative values are increases). However, potentially as a result of protected wildlife habitat in the RCA, the mean percent load reduction for for "all flow" was -321% for the RCA and 60% for the URCA; for , these respective percentages were -209% (RCA) and 73% (URCA). For "all flow" situations, mean load reductions for the RCA were significantly greater ( < 0.1) than those from the URCA for NH-N, dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP), total coliform, , and . For "high flow" situations, mean load reductions were significantly greater for the RCA for DRP, total coliform, and . For "low flow" conditions, significantly greater mean load reductions were in favor of the RCA for DRP, total P, total coliforms, fecal coliforms, , and . In no case were mean pollutant loads in the URCA significantly higher than RCA pollutant loads. Restricting pasturing livestock to within 3 to 5 m of intermittent streams can improve water quality; however, water quality impairment can occur if livestock have unrestricted access to a stream.

  5. Pelagic ciliate communities within the Amundsen Sea polynya and adjacent sea ice zone, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yong; Liu, Qian; Yang, Eun Jin; Wang, Min; Kim, Tae Wan; Cho, Kyoung-Ho; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    Polynyas, areas of open water surrounded by sea ice, are sites of intense primary production and ecological hotspots in the Antarctic Ocean. This study determined the spatial variation in communities of pelagic ciliates in an Amundsen Sea polynya (ASP) and adjacent sea ice zones (SIZ) during austral summer from February to March 2012, and the results were compared with biotic and abiotic environmental factors. The species number, abundance and biomass were higher in the ASP than SIZ. Canonical analysis indicated that the communities in the ASP were distinct from those under the sea ice. The pelagic ciliate community structure was closely correlated with environmental variability. Several primary environmental variables, both alone and in combination, were found to affect community spatial patterns. The ciliate biomasses in the ASP and SIZ areas were both significantly correlated with total and nano-Chl a. This analysis of the ciliated microzooplankton communities associated with high primary production provides new insights into the roles of ciliates in biogeochemical cycles in high-latitude polynyas. Additionally, our findings provide detailed data on the composition, distribution, and structure of polynya ciliate communities in the Amundsen Sea.

  6. 33 CFR 334.410 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, and adjacent waters, NC; danger zones for naval aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.410 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, and adjacent waters, NC; danger zones for naval aircraft operations. (a) Target areas—(1) North Landing River (Currituck...

  7. 33 CFR 334.410 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, and adjacent waters, NC; danger zones for naval aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.410 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, and adjacent waters, NC; danger zones for naval aircraft operations. (a) Target areas—(1) North Landing River (Currituck...

  8. 33 CFR 334.410 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, and adjacent waters, NC; danger zones for naval aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.410 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, and adjacent waters, NC; danger zones for naval aircraft operations. (a) Target areas—(1) North Landing River (Currituck...

  9. 33 CFR 334.410 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, and adjacent waters, NC; danger zones for naval aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.410 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, and adjacent waters, NC; danger zones for naval aircraft operations. (a) Target areas—(1) North Landing River (Currituck...

  10. 33 CFR 334.410 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, and adjacent waters, NC; danger zones for naval aircraft operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.410 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, and adjacent waters, NC; danger zones for naval aircraft operations. (a) Target areas—(1) North Landing River (Currituck...

  11. Geospatial database of the study boundary, sampled sites, watersheds, and riparian zones developed for the U.S. Geological Survey Midwest Stream Quality Assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakagaki, Naomi; Qi, Sharon L.; Frey, Jeffrey W.; Button, Daniel T.; Baker, Nancy T.; Burley, Thomas E.; VanMetre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the first of several Regional Stream Quality Assessments (RSQA) was done in the Midwest United States. The Midwest Stream Quality Assessment (MSQA) was a collaborative study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA), the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Rivers and Streams Assessment (NRSA). One of the objectives of the RSQA, and thus the MSQA, is to characterize the relationships between water-quality stressors and stream ecology and to determine the relative effects of these stressors on aquatic biota within the streams (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012). To meet this objective, a framework of fundamental geospatial data was required to develop physical and anthropogenic characteristics of the study region, sampled sites and corresponding watersheds, and riparian zones. This dataset is composed of the four fundamental geospatial data layers that were developed for the Midwest study: 1) study boundary, 2) sampled sites, 3) watershed boundaries, and 4) riparian-zone boundaries.References cited:Nakagaki, N., Qi, S.L., and Baker, N.T., 2016, Selected environmental characteristics of sampled sites, watersheds, and riparian zones for the U.S. Geological Survey Midwest Stream Quality Assessment: U.S. Geological Survey data release, http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F77W699S.U.S. Geological Survey, 2012, The Midwest stream quality assessment: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2012-3124, 2 p.

  12. Evaluation of Linkages Between Carbon Cycling and Denitrification in Groundwater in Riparian Zones: a Case Study at the Guelph Lake Wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barahona, M.; Aravena, R.; Wassenaar, L.; Elgood, R.

    2004-05-01

    One of the key factors that control denitrification in riparian zones is the availability of electron donors, specifically dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This study evaluates the linkage between carbon cycling and denitrification at a riparian wetland impacted by a high nitrate plume originated in agricultural upland areas. The site was monitored using 12 sets of piezometer nests installed at different depths along two transects. Samples were collected in order to examine the geochemical and isotopic changes of the groundwater along the flow path and evaluate the relationship between the carbon and nitrogen cycles. Nitrate concentration (~10 ppm) in the upstream areas is reduced to almost zero along the flow system in the riparian zone. This pattern is accompanied by a decrease in oxygen concentration and an enrichment in the δ 18O of the dissolved oxygen due to isotopic fractionation caused by oxygen consumption in the riparian zone. The nitrate pattern is also accompanied by an increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and DOC concentrations. The DIC in the high nitrate area is characterized by δ 13C values between -10.4 and -12.2 \\permil changing to -12.6 and -15.3 \\permil in the denitrification area. The increase in DIC concentration is attributed to a carbon input coming from DOC that is acting as an electron donor for nitrate reduction. The main sources of DOC in the study area are the soil zone in the agricultural areas and the wetland sediments. The DOC in the upstream areas is characterized by δ 13C values between -17.6 and -22.1 \\permil attributed to a mixture of corn (C4 plants) and alfalfa (C3 plants) carbon. The δ 13C-DOC change to more depleted values as low as -28.4 \\permil in the denitrification areas. These changes are attributed to an input of DOC from the wetlands sediments, which are characterized, by high organic carbon and a δ 13C value around -29 \\permil. These results indicated the wetlands sediments play a major role as a

  13. Assessing the Utility of Green LiDAR for Characterizing Forest Canopy Structure and Stream Bathymetry in Riparian Zones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskal, L. M.; Richardson, J.

    2014-12-01

    Forested riparian zones serve many ecosystem functions from species habitat through stream shading and large woody debris recruitment, to improvements in water quality. Moreover, stream depth and bathymetry in forested environments is difficult and costly to measure in the field, but critically important for stream-dwelling organisms. Green (bathymetric) LiDAR (G-L) can be used to characterize stream bathymetry, but little is known of its ability to accurately characterize stream bathymetry in narrow (width less than 5 m), heavily forested streams. Canopy characterization with green LiDAR is also poorly understood. We compared canopy and digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from green and near-infrared LiDAR (NIR-L) to field measurements in a narrow, forested stream in Oregon, USA, as well as comparing the two canopy models and DEMs to each other along the length of the stream and to estimates of leaf area index. We observed that the canopy models from the G-L are lower in accuracy compared to NIR-L canopy models. Canopy height models from the G-L were up to 26% less accurate in dense stands, compared to the NIR-L accuracy of 94%. We attribute these errors in part to the lower quality of DEMs generated from the G-L as compared to the NIR-L DEMs. As for bathymetry, the G-L DEM was 0.05 cm higher in elevation than the field measured stream elevation, while the NIR-L ground model was 0.17mm higher. The elevation difference tended to increase with stream depth for both types of LiDAR-derived DEMs, but stream depth only explained a small portion of the variability (coefficient of determination equals 0.09 for NIR-L DEM and 0.05 for G-L DEM). Our results suggest that G-L may be limited in accurately characterizing the bathymetry of narrow streams in heavily forested environments due to difficulty penetrating canopy and interactions with complex topography.

  14. The ecology of riparian habitats of the southern California coastal region: A community profile

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, P.M.; Keller, E.; Sands, A.; Massey, B.M. , Mill Valley, CA; Keller , Santa Barbara, CA; Sands , Mill Valley, CA; Massey , Long Beach, CA )

    1989-09-01

    In the 200 years since California's settlement by Europeans, almost every river in southern California has been channelized or dammed to allow development on the floodplains, causing the loss of a highly productive ecosystem. The riparian zone occurs along streambanks where soils are fertile and water is abundant; amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals all move back and forth across the riparian zone from streams into adjacent wetland and upland areas. Irreversible alterations of the riparian ecosystem result from the diversion or loss of transported water to the system through diking, damming, channelization, levee building, or road construction. Clearing for crops, grazing, or golf courses is potentially reversible as long as the water supply remains unaltered. Successful restoration work requires early agreement on project goals, site-specific restoration design, correct project implementation, enforcement of permit conditions, a maintenance and management program, and long-range monitoring. 288 refs., 54 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. Atrazine transport within a coastal zone in Southeastern Puerto Rico: a sensitivity analysis of an agricultural field model and riparian zone management model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water quality models are used to predict effects of conservation practices to mitigate the transport of herbicides to water bodies. We used two models - the Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender (APEX) and the Riparian Ecosystem Management Model (REMM) to predict the movement of atrazine from ...

  16. 76 FR 30023 - Pamlico Sound and Adjacent Waters, NC; Danger Zones for Marine Corps Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Subjects in 33 CFR Part 334 Danger zones, Marine safety, Navigation (water), Restricted areas, Waterways... current military training mission requires enhanced public safety and protection of vessels that operate.... Establishment of this additional danger zone will allow the Marine Corps to minimize the public safety...

  17. Climatic Factors Drive Population Divergence and Demography: Insights Based on the Phylogeography of a Riparian Plant Species Endemic to the Hengduan Mountains and Adjacent Regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Shao-Tian; Nie, Ze-Long; Zhang, Jian-Wen; Zhou, Zhuo; Deng, Tao; Sun, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary climatic factors have played a significant role in population divergence and demography. Here we investigated the phylogeography of Osteomeles schwerinae, a dominant riparian plant species of the hot/warm-dry river valleys of the Hengduan Mountains (HDM), Qinling Mountains (QLM) and Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau (YGP). Three chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) regions (trnD-trnT, psbD-trnT, petL-psbE), one single copy nuclear gene (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase; G3pdh), and climatic data during the Last Interglacial (LIG; c. 120–140 ka), Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; c. 21 ka), and Current (c. 1950–2000) periods were used in this study. Six cpDNA haplotypes and 15 nuclear DNA (nDNA) haplotypes were identified in the 40 populations of O. schwerinae. Spatial Analysis of Molecular Variance, median-joining networks, and Bayesian phylogenetic trees based on the cpDNA and nDNA datasets, all suggested population divergence between the QLM and HDM-YGP regions. Our climatic analysis identified significant heterogeneity of the climatic factors in the QLM and HDM-YGP regions during the aforementioned three periods. The divergence times based on cpDNA and nDNA haplotypes were estimated to be 466.4–159.4 ka and 315.8–160.3 ka, respectively, which coincide with the time of the weakening of the Asian monsoons in these regions. In addition, unimodal pairwise mismatch distribution curves, expansion times, and Ecological Niche Modeling suggested a history of population expansion (rather than contraction) during the last glaciation. Interestingly, the expansion times were found being well consistent with the intensification of the Asian monsoons during this period. We inferred that the divergence between the two main lineages is probably caused by disruption of more continuous distribution because of weakening of monsoons/less precipitation, whilst subsequent intensification of the Asian monsoons during the last glaciation facilitated the expansion of O. schwerinae

  18. Changes in concentrations of a TCE plume in near- stream zones of a DNAPL contaminated area adjacent to a stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Hyun, Y.; Lee, K.

    2012-12-01

    A field investigation of a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume originating at an industrial complex and its discharges to a stream nearby showed that apparent plume attenuation occurred in the near-stream zone of a DNAPL contaminated area adjacent to a stream prior to discharging to the stream. The concentrations of TCE and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) in groundwater, hyporheic water, stream water and streambed, and hydrogeology were characterized using mini-piezometers, monitoring wells, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys, and soil coring. In the near stream zones temporal and spatial TCE plume concentration changes and mass fluxes were investigated along the flowpath of groundwater discharging to the stream. It is evident that observed concentrations of contaminants (TCE and cis-DCE) were reduced in the near-stream zone, resulting that TCE and cis-DCE were not detected in the streambed and stream water. Ground GPR surveys done in the near stream zone found that wire and water treatment pipe conduits were buried under the ground next to the stream, which could lead groundwater flow field distortion in this zone. At streambed, the GPR survey and soil coring indicated the presence of low permeable zones consisting of rotten material deposits at the top of 0.3 m ~ 0.8 m underlain by silty sands. These hydrogeological features can also attribute to no detection of contaminants in the streambed and stream water because low permeable zone is an obstacle to effective interactions between groundwater and stream water. More investigations will be carried out for comprehensive understanding of hydrological and biogeochemical processes associated with TCE plume attenuation in near stream zones and streambed in the site.

  19. Disturbance and California riparian tree establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendix, J.; Cowell, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    As is the case in many ecosystems, tree establishment in riparian corridors is often episodic, following disturbance events that clear colonization sites. In many riparian settings, flooding is the most obvious, and relevant disturbance agent. However, in Mediterranean-climate regions, fire is an equally important disturbance agent. In California, the frequency and severity of both floods and fire are expected to change with projected climate change, making an understanding of their roles key to understanding future ecological processes in California riparian environments. In this paper, we use tree-ring data from the Transverse Ranges of Southern California to explore the relative importance of fire and flood in the establishment of riparian gallery forest. We examined 42 cores of Alnus rhombifolia, Populus fremontii and Quercus agrifolia from the riparian zone adjacent to Piedra Blanca and Potrero John Creeks in California’s Transverse Ranges, and compared their establishment dates with records of fire and floods, to see how establishment related to disturbance history. Our results show some evidence for major fire having an impact, as all of the largest stems dated to the few years following the 1932 Matilija fire, which had burned all of the sites in our sample. The remainder of the record is less straightforward, although there is an establishment peak in the 1970s, which may be related to a 1975 fire that burned part of the Potrero John watershed. Of note, the establishment chronology shows no relationship to the flood record, as years of major floods do not relate to either prolific or sparse years in the tree-ring record. This record suggests that large fires may serve as a trigger for tree establishment in California riparian settings, but that they are hardly a prerequisite, as many stems germinated between fires. Indeed, ongoing regeneration is apparently independent of disturbance, given the apparent irrelevance of flooding in this regard. The result

  20. Determining the locus of a processing zone in an in situ oil shale retort through a well in the formation adjacent the retort

    SciTech Connect

    Ridley, R.D.

    1982-08-17

    The locus of a processing zone advancing through a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale is determined by monitoring in a well extending through unfragmented formation adjacent the retort, for condition in the retort affected by the advancement of such a processing zone through the retort. Monitoring can be effected by placing means for monitoring such a condition in such a well extending through unfragmented formation adjacent the retort.

  1. 75 FR 65278 - Pamlico Sound and Adjacent Waters, NC; Danger Zones for Marine Corps Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... interference with existing waterway traffic. This proposed rule will have no significant economic impact on... proposed rule will not have a significant impact to the quality of the human environment and, ] therefore... its regulations to establish one new danger zone in Pamlico Sound near Marine Corps Air Station...

  2. 33 CFR 334.70 - Buzzards Bay, and adjacent waters, Mass.; danger zones for naval operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA... Ocean in vicinity of No Mans Land—(1) The area. The waters surrounding No Mans Land within an area... 41°15′30″, longitude 70°51′30″; thence northeasterly to latitude 41°17′30″, longitude...

  3. 33 CFR 334.70 - Buzzards Bay, and adjacent waters, Mass.; danger zones for naval operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA... Ocean in vicinity of No Mans Land—(1) The area. The waters surrounding No Mans Land within an area... 41°15′30″, longitude 70°51′30″; thence northeasterly to latitude 41°17′30″, longitude...

  4. Fish assemblage structure in the hypoxic zone in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary and its adjacent waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Xiujuan; Jin, Xianshi; Yuan, Wei

    2010-05-01

    Fish assemblage structure in the hypoxic zone in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary and its adjacent waters were analyzed based on data from bottom trawl surveys conducted on the R/V Beidou in June, August and October 2006. Four fish assemblages were identified in each survey using two-way indicator species analysis (TWIA). High fish biomass was found in the northern part, central part and coastal waters of the survey area; in contrast, high fish diversity was found in the southern part of the survey area and the Changjiang estuary outer waters. Therefore, it is difficult to maintain high fishery production when high fish diversity is evenly distributed in the fish community. Fish became smaller and fish size spectra tended to be narrower because of fish species variations and differences in growth characteristics. Fish diversity increased, the age to maturity was reduced and some migrant species were not collected in the surveys. Fish with low economic value, small size, simple age structure and low tropic level were predominant in fish assemblages in the Changjiang estuary and its adjacent waters. The lowest hypoxic value decreased in the Changjiang estuary and its adjacent waters.

  5. Trace Element Mobility in Water and Sediments in a Hyporheic Zone Adjacent to an Abandoned Uranium Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldan, C.; Blake, J.; Cerrato, J.; Ali, A.; Cabaniss, S.

    2015-12-01

    The legacy of abandoned uranium mines lead to community concerns about environmental and health effects. This study focuses on a cross section of the Rio Paguate, adjacent to the Jackpile Mine on the Laguna Reservation, west-central New Mexico. Often, the geochemical interactions that occur in the hyporheic zone adjacent to these abandoned mines play an important role in trace element mobility. In order to understand the mobility of uranium (U), arsenic (As), and vanadium (V) in the Rio Paguate; surface water, hyporheic zone water, and core sediment samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). All water samples were filtered through 0.45μm and 0.22μm filters and analyzed. The results show that there is no major difference in concentrations of U (378-496μg/L), As (0.872-6.78μg/L), and V (2.94-5.01μg/L) between the filter sizes or with depth (8cm and 15cm) in the hyporheic zone. The unfiltered hyporheic zone water samples were analyzed after acid digestion to assess the particulate fraction. These results show a decrease in U concentration (153-202μg/L) and an increase in As (33.2-219μg/L) and V (169-1130μg/L) concentrations compared to the filtered waters. Surface water concentrations of U(171-184μg/L) are lower than the filtered hyporheic zone waters while As(1.32-8.68μg/L) and V(1.75-2.38μg/L) are significantly lower than the hyporheic zone waters and particulates combined. Concentrations of As in the sediment core samples are higher in the first 15cm below the water-sediment interface (14.3-3.82μg/L) and decrease (0.382μg/L) with depth. Uranium concentrations are consistent (0.047-0.050μg/L) at all depths. The over all data suggest that U is mobile in the dissolved phase and both As and V are mobile in the particular phase as they travel through the system.

  6. Effect of emergent aquatic insects on bat foraging in a riparian forest.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Dai; Murakami, Masashi; Nakano, Shigeru; Aoi, Toshiki

    2006-11-01

    1. Riparian zones serve several ecological functions for bats. They provide a source of prey and likely provide favourable structural habitats and shelter from predators. Many studies have shown that bats use the space above streams, ponds or riparian vegetation as feeding habitat. These studies, however, have never distinguished between the effects of habitat structure and prey availability on the foraging activities of bats. Such effects can only be distinguished by an experimental approach. We predicted that bat activity along a stream is influenced by the number of emerged aquatic insects. 2. We evaluated the response of terrestrial consumers, insectivorous bats, to changes in the abundance of emergent aquatic insects by conducting a manipulative field experiment. In a deciduous riparian forest in Japan, aquatic insect flux from the stream to the riparian zone was controlled with an insect-proof cover over a 1.2 km stream reach. 3. We estimated the abundance of emergent aquatic and flying terrestrial arthropods near the treatment and control reaches using Malaise traps. The foraging activity of bats was evaluated in both treatment and control reaches using ultrasonic detectors. 4. The insect-proof cover effectively reduced the flux of emergent aquatic insects to the riparian zone adjacent to the treatment reach. Adjacent to the control reach, adult aquatic insect biomass was highest in spring, and then decreased gradually. Terrestrial insect biomass increased gradually during the summer at both treatment and control reaches. 5. Foraging activity of bats was correlated with insect abundance. In spring, foraging activity of bats at the control reach was significantly greater than at the treatment reach, and increased at both sites with increasing terrestrial insect abundance. 6. Our result suggests that the flux of aquatic insects emerging from streams is one of the most important factors affecting the distribution of riparian-foraging bats. As is the case with

  7. Timing and causes of gully erosion in the riparian zone of the semi-arid tropical Victoria River, Australia: Management implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, G. L.; Wasson, R. J.; Boggs, G. S.; Douglas, M.

    2016-08-01

    Gully erosion in the seasonally wet tropics of Australia is a major source of sediment in rivers. Stabilization of gullies to reduce impacts on aquatic ecosystems and water storages is a focus for management. However, the cause of the gully erosion is poorly understood and so a critical context for soil conservation is missing. It is uncertain if they are the result of post-European cattle grazing or are they much older and related to non-human factors. The causes of riparian gully erosion along a reach of the Victoria River in the semi-arid tropics of Australia were investigated using several methods. Gully complexes were described and characterised by two major components: a Flood Drainage Channel (FDC) and upslope of this an Outer Erosion Feature (OEF) characterised by badlands set within an amphitheatre. The OEF is likely to be a major source of sediment that appears to be of recent origin. A review of historical records, combined with Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating, showed that the FDCs were well established prior to the introduction of domestic stock. It also showed that the badlands began to develop about 90 years ago; that is, about 40 years after the arrival of domestic stock. In addition, an analysis of aerial photos coupled with an on-ground survey and analysis of fallout radionuclides revealed that erosion processes are still active within the gully complexes. While the FDCs are natural drainage channels, cattle grazing probably triggered the badland formation, with the expansion aided by increased rainfall in the past 40 years. Therefore, the OEFs are of human origin and protection from grazing of the riparian zone should slow badland erosion and reduce sediment input to the river.

  8. In-Situ Determination of Specific Yield Using Soil Moisture and Water Level Changes in the Riparian Zone of the Arkansas River, Kansas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, S. E.; Kluitenberg, G. J.; Butler, J. J.; Zhan, X.; Aufman, M. S.; Brauchler, R.

    2004-12-01

    Specific yield (Sy - drainable porosity) is an important parameter for numerous hydrogeologic investigations, but few reliable methods for its in-situ determination exist. Sy is commonly estimated by saturating and draining soil cores, using soil water characteristics in parametric models, or from pumping tests. However, these methods can introduce large uncertainties due to core disturbance, inappropriate models, and the impact of heterogeneity, respectively. At a site in the riparian zone of the Arkansas River in south-central Kansas, the amount and variability of groundwater consumption by phreatophytes is being assessed using water-table fluctuations. Sy is an important control on the magnitude of these fluctuations, so estimates of its value and its variability in time and space are needed. An in-situ method based on soil-moisture and water-level changes (Skaggs et al., 1978) was used for this purpose because it can provide information at the scale appropriate for such an investigation. Neutron access tubes (0 - 1.82 m in depth) were installed at four locations in the riparian zone to periodically gather soil moisture information. Water level data in the shallow alluvial aquifer were collected every 15 minutes in six wells using pressure transducers calibrated with manual measurements. The method of Skaggs et al. assumes that conditions in the unsaturated zone are at equilibrium, i.e. soil moisture changes are only a product of the rise or fall of the water table. One period for which this assumption appears reasonable was in September and October of 2003 when the water table dropped more than 0.61 m in four weeks. The Sy estimates for this period displayed relatively little variability between sites (0.19-0.21). Total porosity for the depth intervals through which the water table fell varied from 0.28-0.36, so the Sy estimates appear reasonable. Sy estimates from a pumping test, however, displayed much greater variability (0.15-0.31), which is most likely a

  9. Climate regulation, energy provisioning and water purification: Quantifying ecosystem service delivery of bioenergy willow grown on riparian buffer zones using life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Styles, David; Börjesson, Pål; D'Hertefeldt, Tina; Birkhofer, Klaus; Dauber, Jens; Adams, Paul; Patil, Sopan; Pagella, Tim; Pettersson, Lars B; Peck, Philip; Vaneeckhaute, Céline; Rosenqvist, Håkan

    2016-12-01

    Whilst life cycle assessment (LCA) boundaries are expanded to account for negative indirect consequences of bioenergy such as indirect land use change (ILUC), ecosystem services such as water purification sometimes delivered by perennial bioenergy crops are typically neglected in LCA studies. Consequential LCA was applied to evaluate the significance of nutrient interception and retention on the environmental balance of unfertilised energy willow planted on 50-m riparian buffer strips and drainage filtration zones in the Skåne region of Sweden. Excluding possible ILUC effects and considering oil heat substitution, strategically planted filter willow can achieve net global warming potential (GWP) and eutrophication potential (EP) savings of up to 11.9 Mg CO2e and 47 kg PO4e ha(-1) year(-1), respectively, compared with a GWP saving of 14.8 Mg CO2e ha(-1) year(-1) and an EP increase of 7 kg PO4e ha(-1) year(-1) for fertilised willow. Planting willow on appropriate buffer and filter zones throughout Skåne could avoid 626 Mg year(-1) PO4e nutrient loading to waters.

  10. Mulberry trees conserved soil and protected water quality in the riparian zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Willison, J H Martin; Wan, Pan; Xiong, Xing-Zheng; Ou, Yang; Huang, Xiao-Hui; Wu, Jingchun; Zhou, Hao; Xu, Qiao; Chen, Guohui; Xili, Yuanzi; Nie, Jiasheng

    2016-03-01

    China's Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) was designed to restore perennial plant cover on sloping land in western China, in part to protect the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR). In this study, we examined use of white mulberry (Morus alba L.) in the SLCP to protect water quality and conserve soil. We established nine runoff monitoring plots divided among three categories (vegetable farming, fallow control, and mulberry plantation) on a bank of the Liangtan River situated at the western margin of the TGR. The land had been used previously by farmers for growing vegetables. We found that soil loss and surface water runoff were lowest in the mulberry plots and highest in the vegetable plots. We used inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) to assess the concentration of selected heavy metal pollution indicators (Zn, Hg, As, Ni, Pb, Cr, Cd, and Cu) in the monitoring plot soils at the beginning of the experiment in May 2009. The heavy metals were assessed again at the end of the experiment in October 2012, and we found that the concentrations of these pollutants had been reduced in all fallow and mulberry plots, and to the greatest extent in the mulberry plots. We found that levels of Hg, Pb, and Cu increased in the vegetable plots. For these reasons, we conclude that riparian mulberry plantations are useful for reducing rapid runoff of storm water, conserving soil, and sequestering heavy metal pollutants in the TGR region.

  11. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Food Chain Transfer Studies for Phytoremediation Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.

    2009-04-01

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water standards for groundwater (8 picocuries/L) by as much as a factor of 1000 at several locations within the Hanford 100-N Area and along the 100-N Area Columbia River shoreline). Phytoextraction, a managed remediation technology in which plants or integrated plant/rhizosphere systems are employed to phytoextract and/or sequester 90Sr, is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River as part of a treatment train that includes an apatite barrier to immobilize groundwater transport of 90Sr. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua) to extract 90Sr from the vadose zone soil and aquifer sediments (phytoextraction) and filter 90Sr (rhizofiltration) from the shallow groundwater along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. The stem and foliage of coyote willows accumulating 90Sr may present not only a mechanism to remove the contaminant but also can be viewed as a source of nutrition for natural herbivores, therefore becoming a potential pathway for the isotope to enter the riparian food chain. Engineered barriers such as large and small animal fencing constructed around the field plot will control the intrusion of deer, rodents, birds, and humans. These efforts, however, will have limited effect on mobile phytophagous insects. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the potential for food chain transfer by insects prior to placement of the remediation technology at 100-N. Insect types include direct consumers of the sap or liquid content of the plants vascular system (xylem and phloem) by aphids as well as those that would directly consume the plant foliage such as the larvae (caterpillars) of Lepidoptera species. Heavy infestations of aphids feeding on the stems and leaves of willows growing in 90Sr-contaminated soil can accumulate a small amount (~0.15 ± 0.06%) of the total label removed from the soil by

  12. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Phytoextraction Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone – Field Treatability Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.

    2010-01-11

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) is present both in the aquifer near the river and in the vadose and riparian zones of the river’s shore at 100-NR-2. Phytoextraction of 90Sr is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua). Past studies have shown that willow roots share uptake mechanisms for Sr with Ca, a plant macronutrient as well as no discrimination between Sr and 90Sr. Willow 90Sr concentration ratios [CR’s; (pCi 90Sr/g dry wt. of new growth tissue)/(pCi 90Sr/g soil porewater)] were consistently greater than 65 with three-quarters of the assimilated label partitioned into the above ground shoot. Insect herbivore experiments also demonstrated no significant potential for bioaccumulation or food chain transfer from their natural activities. The objectives of this field study were three-fold: (1) to demonstrate that a viable, “managed” plot of coyote willows can be established on the shoreline of the Columbia River that would survive the same microenvironment to be encountered at the 100-NR-2 shoreline; (2) to show through engineered barriers that large and small animal herbivores can be prevented from feeding on these plants; and (3) to show that once established, the plants will provide sufficient biomass annually to support the phytoextraction technology. A field treatability demonstration plot was established on the Columbia River shoreline alongside the 100-K West water intake at the end of January 2007. The plot was delimited by a 3.05 m high chain-link fence and was approximately 10 x 25 m in size. A layer of fine mesh metal small animal screening was placed around the plot at the base of the fencing to a depth of 45 cm. A total of sixty plants were placed in six slightly staggered rows with 1-m spacing between plants. The actual plot size was 0.00461 hectare (ha). At the time of planting (March 12, 2007), the plot was located about 10 m from the

  13. Shear Wave Splitting Beneath the New Madrid Seismic Zone and Adjacent Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moidaki, M.; Liu, K. H.; Gao, S. S.; Hogan, J. P.; Abdelsalam, M. G.

    2007-12-01

    Teleseismic shear-wave splitting parameters are determined at 15 permanent and portable broadband stations within and around the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) in order to map the direction and strength of mantle fabrics and to explore the origin of seismic anisotropy. Both the splitting times and fast polarization directions of the fast shear-wave show significant spatial variations. The observed splitting times range from 0.7 to 1.7s with a mean value of 1.0s which is the same as the global average. The resulting fast directions range from 34 to 118 degrees from north with a mean of 65 degrees which is consistent with the motion direction of the North American plate in a hot-spot frame. Fast directions with ray-piercing points in the NMSZ are oblique to the rift axis. In the vicinity of the Ozarks Plateau, the split times range from 0.7s to 1.1s with a mean of 0.9s. The observed fast directions show a striking clockwise rotating pattern in which these change systematically from nearly N-S in the St. Francois Mountains to approximately NE-SW further north to be concordant to that of North American Craton. The area with anomalous fast directions has recently been suggested to be a downward asthenospheric flow as a result of the sinking of the Farallon slab in the lower mantle (Forte et al 2007). The observed anisotropy will be discussed in relation to the lower mantle flow, and the recently-proposed two-layer model of Marone and Romanowicz (2007).

  14. Adjacent positioning of cellular structures enabled by a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein-mediated zone of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zongtian; Gao, Xiang-Dong; Howell, Audrey S; Bose, Indrani; Lew, Daniel J; Bi, Erfei

    2007-12-31

    Cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are born carrying localized transmembrane landmark proteins that guide the subsequent establishment of a polarity axis and hence polarized growth to form a bud in the next cell cycle. In haploid cells, the relevant landmark proteins are concentrated at the site of the preceding cell division, to which they recruit Cdc24, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the conserved polarity regulator Cdc42. However, instead of polarizing at the division site, the new polarity axis is directed next to but not overlapping that site. Here, we show that the Cdc42 guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) Rga1 establishes an exclusion zone at the division site that blocks subsequent polarization within that site. In the absence of localized Rga1 GAP activity, new buds do in fact form within the old division site. Thus, Cdc42 activators and GAPs establish concentric zones of action such that polarization is directed to occur adjacent to but not within the previous cell division site.

  15. Analyzing riparian forest cover changes along the Firniz River in the Mediterranean City of Kahramanmaras in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Akay, Abdullah E; Sivrikaya, Fatih; Gulci, Sercan

    2014-05-01

    Riparian forests adjacent to surface water are important transitional zones which maintain and enrich biodiversity and ensure the sustainability in a forest ecosystem. Also, riparian forests maintain water quality, reduce sediment delivery, enhance habitat areas for aquatic life and wildlife, and provide ecological corridors between the upland and the downstream. However, the riparian ecosystems have been degraded mainly due to human development, forest operations, and agricultural activities. In order to evaluate the impacts of these factors on riparian forests, it is necessary to estimate trends in forest cover changes. This study aims to analyze riparian forest cover changes along the Firniz River located in Mediterranean city of Kahramanmaras in Turkey. Changes in riparian forest cover from 1989 to 2010 have been determined by implementing supervised classification method on a series of Landsat TM imagery of the study area. The results indicated that the classification process applied on 1989 and 2010 images provided overall accuracy of 80.08 and 75 %, respectively. It was found that the most common land use class within the riparian zone was productive forest, followed by degraded forest, agricultural areas, and other land use classes. The results also indicated that the areas of degraded forest and forest openings increased, while productive forest and agricultural areas decreased between the years of 1989 and 2010. The amount of agricultural areas decreased due to the reduction in the population of rural people. According to these results, it can be concluded that special forest management and operation techniques should be implemented to restore the forest ecosystem in riparian areas.

  16. Selected environmental characteristics of sampled sites, watersheds, and riparian zones for the U.S. Geological Survey Midwest Stream Quality Assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakagaki, Naomi; Qi, Sharon L.; Baker, Nancy T.

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the first of several Regional Stream Quality Assessments (RSQA) was done in the Midwest United States. The Midwest Stream Quality Assessment (MSQA) was a collaborative study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA), the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Rivers and Streams Assessment (NRSA). One of the objectives of the RSQA, and thus the MSQA, is to characterize the relationships between water-quality stressors and stream ecology and to determine the relative effects of these stressors on aquatic biota within the streams (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012). To meet this objective, a framework of fundamental geospatial data was required to develop physical and anthropogenic characteristics of the study region, sampled sites and corresponding watersheds, and sampled ecological reaches. This dataset comprises of 139 selected environmental characteristics for the 100 sites sampled for the Midwest study.Nakagaki, N., Qi, S.L., Frey, J.W., Button, D.T., Baker, N.T., Burley, T.E., and Van Metre, P.C., 2016, Geospatial database of the study boundary, sampled sites, watersheds, and riparian zones for the U.S. Geological Survey Midwest Stream Quality Assessment: U.S. Geological Survey data release, http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7CN7202U.S. Geological Survey, 2012, The Midwest stream quality assessment: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2012-3124, 2 p.

  17. Determining Crustal Structure beneath the New Madrid Seismic Zone and Adjacent Areas: Application of a Reverberation-removal Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Gao, S. S.; Liu, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) and some of the adjacent areas are covered by a low-velocity sedimentary sequence, giving rise to strong reverberations in the P-to-S receiver functions (RFs) and making it difficult to reliably determine crustal thickness and Poisson's ratio using the conventional H-k stacking technique. Here we apply a newly developed technique (Yu et al., 2015; doi: 10.1002/2014JB011610) to effectively remove or reduce the reverberations from the sedimentary layer to obtain more reliable results. Stacking of a total of 38528 radial RFs recorded by 343 stations in the study area shows systematic spatial variations in crustal thickness (H), Vp/Vs ratio and amplitude (R; relative to the direction P) of the converted Moho phases. Our results indicate that the upper Mississippi Embayment (ME), a broad southwest-plunging trough with the thickest sedimentary layer in the study area, is characterized by a thin crustal thickness (~32 km), while adjacent areas have relatively thicker crust (>40 km). This area also possesses relatively large Vp/Vs (>1.85) values, suggesting possible intrusion of mantle-derived mafic rocks. Most part of the Ozark Uplift is characterized by relatively small Vp/Vs (<1.79) values which indicate an overall felsic crust. In contrast to the NMSZ which is part of the Reelfoot rift, the southern Illinois Basin, which is an intracontinental sag basin, is characterized by a crust of about 45 km which is a few km thicker than the surrounding areas, and a normal Vp/Vs, suggesting sharp differences in crustal structure between rift and sag basins.

  18. The mantle transition zone beneath the Afar Depression and adjacent regions: implications for mantle plumes and hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, C. A.; Gao, S. S.; Liu, K. H.; Yu, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The Afar Depression and its adjacent areas are underlain by an upper mantle marked by some of the world's largest negative velocity anomalies, which are frequently attributed to the thermal influences of a lower-mantle plume. In spite of numerous studies, however, the existence of a plume beneath the area remains enigmatic, partially due to inadequate quantities of broad-band seismic data and the limited vertical resolution at the mantle transition zone (MTZ) depth of the techniques employed by previous investigations. In this study, we use an unprecedented quantity (over 14 500) of P-to-S receiver functions (RFs) recorded by 139 stations from 12 networks to image the 410 and 660 km discontinuities and map the spatial variation of the thickness of the MTZ. Non-linear stacking of the RFs under a 1-D velocity model shows robust P-to-S conversions from both discontinuities, and their apparent depths indicate the presence of an upper-mantle low-velocity zone beneath the entire study area. The Afar Depression and the northern Main Ethiopian Rift are characterized by an apparent 40-60 km depression of both MTZ discontinuities and a normal MTZ thickness. The simplest and most probable interpretation of these observations is that the apparent depressions are solely caused by velocity perturbations in the upper mantle and not by deeper processes causing temperature or hydration anomalies within the MTZ. Thickening of the MTZ on the order of 15 km beneath the southern Arabian Plate, southern Red Sea and western Gulf of Aden, which comprise the southward extension of the Afro-Arabian Dome, could reflect long-term hydration of the MTZ. A 20 km thinning of the MTZ beneath the western Ethiopian Plateau is observed and interpreted as evidence for a possible mantle plume stem originating from the lower mantle.

  19. Virio- and bacterioplankton in the estuary zone of the Ob River and adjacent regions of the Kara Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, A. I.; Sazhin, A. F.; Zabotkina, E. A.; Romanenko, A. V.; Romanova, N. D.

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of structural and functional characteristics of virioplankton in the north of the Ob River estuary and the adjacent Kara Sea shelf (between latitudes 71°44'44″ N and 73°45'24″ N) was studied with consideration of the spatial variations in the number ( N B) and productivity ( P B) of bacteria and water properties (temperature, salinity, density) by analyzing samples taken in September 2013. The number of plankton viruses ( N V), the occurrence of visible infected bacteria cells, virus-induced mortality of bacteria, and virioplankton production in the studied region varied within (214-2917) × 103 particles/mL, 0.3-5.6% of NB, 2.2-64.4% of P B, and (6-17248) × 103 particles/(mL day), respectively. These parameters were the highest in water layers with a temperature of +7.3-7.5°C, salinity of 3.75-5.41 psu, and conventional density (στ) of 2.846-4.144. The number of bacterioplankton was (614-822) × 103 cells/mL, and the N V/ N B ratio was 1.1-4.5. A large amount of virus particles were attached to bacterial cells and suspended matter. The data testify to the considerable role of viruses in controlling the number and production of heterotrophic bacterioplankton in the interaction zone of river and sea waters.

  20. RESEARCH SHOWS IMPORTANCE OF RIPARIAN BUFFERS FOR AQUATIC HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Issue: Excess nitrogen from fertilizer, septic tanks, animal feedlots, and runoff from pavement can threaten aquatic ecosystem health. Riparian buffers -- the vegetated region adjacent to streams and wetlands -- are thought to be effective at intercepting and controlling excess ...

  1. 33 CFR 165.1317 - Security and Safety Zone; Large Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. 165.1317 Section 165.1317... Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension... be enforced only upon notice by the Captain of the Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget...

  2. 33 CFR 165.1317 - Security and Safety Zone; Large Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. 165.1317 Section 165.1317... Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension... be enforced only upon notice by the Captain of the Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget...

  3. 33 CFR 165.1317 - Security and Safety Zone; Large Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. 165.1317 Section 165.1317... Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension... be enforced only upon notice by the Captain of the Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget...

  4. 33 CFR 165.1313 - Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington 165.1313 Section 165.1313 Navigation and... Sound and adjacent waters, Washington (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension of enforcement. The tank... Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget Sound will cause notice of the enforcement of the tank...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1313 - Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington 165.1313 Section 165.1313 Navigation and... Sound and adjacent waters, Washington (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension of enforcement. The tank... Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget Sound will cause notice of the enforcement of the tank...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1313 - Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington 165.1313 Section 165.1313 Navigation and... Sound and adjacent waters, Washington (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension of enforcement. The tank... Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget Sound will cause notice of the enforcement of the tank...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1317 - Security and Safety Zone; Large Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. 165.1317 Section 165.1317... Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension... be enforced only upon notice by the Captain of the Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1313 - Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget Sound will cause notice of the enforcement of the tank ship... ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington 165.1313 Section 165.1313 Navigation and... Sound and adjacent waters, Washington (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension of enforcement. The...

  9. Riparian Wetlands: Mapping

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian wetlands are critical systems that perform functions and provide services disproportionate to their extent in the landscape. Mapping wetlands allows for better planning, management, and modeling, but riparian wetlands present several challenges to effective mapping due t...

  10. Riparian evapotranspiration in Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Brent M.; Rus, David L.

    2013-01-01

    With increasing demands being placed on the water resources of Nebraska, characterizing evapotranspiration (ET) from riparian vegetation has gained importance to water users and managers. This report summarizes and compares the results from several studies of the ET from cottonwood-dominated riparian forests, riparian grasslands, and common reed, Phragmites australis, in Nebraska. Reported results show that the highest seasonal ET amounts were associated with Phragmites australis, followed by riparian forests, with riparian grasslands experiencing the lowest total ET of the studied vegetation communities.

  11. Legal mechanisms for protecting riparian resource values

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, Berton L.; Lord, Eric

    1992-01-01

    Riparian resources include the borders of rivers, lakes, ponds, and potholes. These border areas are very important for a number of reasons, including stream channel maintenance, flood control, aesthetics, erosion control, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water quality maintenance. These diverse functions are not well protected by law or policy. We reviewed law and policies regarding endangered species habitat designation, land use planning, grazing management, water allocation, takings, and federal permits and licenses, along with the roles of federal, state, and local governments. We discuss the politics of implementing these policies, focusing on the difficulties in changing entrenched water and land use practices. Our review indicates a lack of direct attention to riparian ecosystem issues in almost all environmental and land use programs at every level of government. Protection of riparian resource values requires a means to integrate existing programs to focus on riparian zones.

  12. Tritium Fluxes through the Shallow Unsaturated Zone adjacent to a Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in an Arid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maples, S.; Andraski, B. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Cooper, C. A.; Pohll, G.

    2011-12-01

    Studies at the U.S. Geological Survey's Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in southern Nevada have documented long-distance (>400-m) tritium (3H) transport adjacent to a commercial, low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Transport at this scale is orders of magnitude greater than anticipated; however, lateral 3H fluxes through the shallow unsaturated zone (UZ) have not been investigated in detail. The objective of this study is to estimate and compare lateral and vertical tritiated water-vapor (3HHOg) fluxes in the shallow UZ and their relation to the observed plume migration. Previous studies have recognized two distinct plumes of 3H emanating from the facility. Shallow (0.5 and 1.5-m depth) soil-water vapor samples were collected yearly along 400-m long transects through both plumes from 2003-09. Within the south plume, 3H concentrations at 1.5-m depth have decreased by 44 ± 0.3% during this period, and plume advancement there has effectively ceased (i.e., rate of advance equals rate of decay). During the same period, the west plume showed a net decrease in concentration of 34 ± 0.9% within 100-m of the facility; however, plume advancement is observed at the leading edge of the plume, and concentrations 200-300-m from the facility show an increase in 3H concentration of 64 ± 28.4%. Lateral and vertical diffusive fluxes within both plumes were calculated using 3HHOg concentrations from 2006. Lateral 3HHOg diffusive fluxes within both plumes have been estimated 25-300-m from the facility at 1.5-m depth. Mean lateral 3HHOg diffusive fluxes are 10-14 g m-2 yr-1 within the south plume, and 10-13 g m-2 yr-1 within the west plume. Mean lateral fluxes in the south plume are an order of magnitude lower than in the west plume. This behavior corresponds with the observed relative immobility of the south plume, while the elevated west plume fluxes agree with the plume advancement seen there. Shallow, upward directed, mean vertical 3HHOg fluxes 25-300-m from the

  13. Riparian Ficus Tree Communities: The Distribution and Abundance of Riparian Fig Trees in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Pothasin, Pornwiwan; Compton, Stephen G.; Wangpakapattanawong, Prasit

    2014-01-01

    Fig trees (Ficus) are often ecologically significant keystone species because they sustain populations of the many seed-dispersing animals that feed on their fruits. They are prominent components of riparian zones where they may also contribute to bank stability as well as supporting associated animals. The diversity and distributions of riparian fig trees in deciduous and evergreen forests in Chiang Mai Province, Northern Thailand were investigated in 2010–2012. To record the diversity and abundance of riparian fig trees, we (1) calculated stem density, species richness, and diversity indices in 20×50 m randomly selected quadrats along four streams and (2) measured the distances of individual trees from four streams to determine if species exhibit distinct distribution patterns within riparian zones. A total of 1169 individuals (from c. 4 ha) were recorded in the quadrats, representing 33 Ficus species (13 monoecious and 20 dioecious) from six sub-genera and about 70% of all the species recorded from northern Thailand. All 33 species had at least some stems in close proximity to the streams, but they varied in their typical proximity, with F. squamosa Roxb. and F. ischnopoda Miq the most strictly stream-side species. The riparian forests in Northern Thailand support a rich diversity and high density of Ficus species and our results emphasise the importance of fig tree within the broader priorities of riparian area conservation. Plans to maintain or restore properly functioning riparian forests need to take into account their significance. PMID:25310189

  14. Riparian Ficus tree communities: the distribution and abundance of riparian fig trees in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pothasin, Pornwiwan; Compton, Stephen G; Wangpakapattanawong, Prasit

    2014-01-01

    Fig trees (Ficus) are often ecologically significant keystone species because they sustain populations of the many seed-dispersing animals that feed on their fruits. They are prominent components of riparian zones where they may also contribute to bank stability as well as supporting associated animals. The diversity and distributions of riparian fig trees in deciduous and evergreen forests in Chiang Mai Province, Northern Thailand were investigated in 2010-2012. To record the diversity and abundance of riparian fig trees, we (1) calculated stem density, species richness, and diversity indices in 20×50 m randomly selected quadrats along four streams and (2) measured the distances of individual trees from four streams to determine if species exhibit distinct distribution patterns within riparian zones. A total of 1169 individuals (from c. 4 ha) were recorded in the quadrats, representing 33 Ficus species (13 monoecious and 20 dioecious) from six sub-genera and about 70% of all the species recorded from northern Thailand. All 33 species had at least some stems in close proximity to the streams, but they varied in their typical proximity, with F. squamosa Roxb. and F. ischnopoda Miq the most strictly stream-side species. The riparian forests in Northern Thailand support a rich diversity and high density of Ficus species and our results emphasise the importance of fig tree within the broader priorities of riparian area conservation. Plans to maintain or restore properly functioning riparian forests need to take into account their significance.

  15. Riparian habitat on the Humboldt River, Deeth to Elko, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, K. P.; Ridd, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    A map inventory of the major habitat types existing along the Humbolt River riparian zone in Nevada is described. Through aerialphotography, 16 riparian habitats are mapped that describe the ecological relationships between soil and vegetation types, flooding and soil erosion, and the various management practices employed to date. The specific land and water management techniques and their impact on the environment are considered.

  16. An unusual triangle zone in the external northern Alpine foreland (Switzerland): Structural inheritance, kinematics and implications for the development of the adjacent Jura fold-and-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malz, Alexander; Madritsch, Herfried; Meier, Beat; Kley, Jonas

    2016-02-01

    Triangle zones represent typical structural elements of thin-skinned foreland fold-and-thrust belts. Here, we report the results of an in-depth structural analysis of a rather unusual triangle zone at the front of the easternmost Jura fold-and-thrust belt in the otherwise only very mildly deformed Alpine foreland of Northern Switzerland. The investigation is based on the interpretation of recently reprocessed and depth-migrated 2D reflection seismic sections. Classical bed-length and area cross-section balancing methods were used to validate the interpretation and unravel the tectonic evolution of the triangle zone. According to our interpretation the analyzed triangle zone formed along the Baden-Irchel-Herdern-Lineament (BIH-Lineament), a regional Paleozoic normal fault that shows evidence of Cenozoic reactivation. The triangle zone is composed of one major foreland-directed thrust rooting in Triassic evaporites and a back-thrust splaying from it in the Middle Jurassic Opalinus Clay, pointing to the importance of secondary detachments. Steeply dipping secondary reverse faults next to the triangle zone suggest reactivation of pre-existing normal faults. The formation of the thrust triangle is considered to relate to thin-skinned foreland deformation in Late Miocene time. Strain estimations of the thrust triangle along-strike show a laterally very uniform amount of shortening, which is in contrast to the southward adjacent Jura fold-and-thrust belt. We interpret this constant shortening to represent the maximum contractional strain attainable by the specific geometry of the BIH triangle zone. At this point, the complex structure became mechanically ineffective and further shortening led to the formation of new contractional structures in its hinterland. This kinematic hypothesis suggests an early-stage formation of the BIH triangle zone followed by back stepping of the deformation front. As such, it challenges the classical view of a purely forward-breaking sequence

  17. Clinical evaluation of expanded mesh connective tissue graft in the treatment for multiple adjacent gingival recessions in the esthetic zone

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, M.; Shivakumar, B.; Meenapriya, B.; Anitha, V.; Ashwath, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple approaches have been used to replace lost, damaged or diseased gingival tissues. The connective tissue graft (CTG) procedure is the golden standard method for root coverage. Although multiple sites often need grafting, the palatal mucosa supplies only a limited area of grafting material. To overcome this limitation, expanded mesh graft provides a method whereby a graft can be stretched to cover a large area. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and the predictability of expanded mesh CTG (e-MCTG) in the treatment of adjacent multiple gingival recessions. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients aged 20–50 years contributed to 55 sites, each site falling into at least three adjacent Miller's Class 1 or Class 2 gingival recession. The CTG obtained from the palatal mucosa was expanded to cover the recipient bed, which was 1.5 times larger than the graft. Clinical measurements were recorded at baseline and 3 months, 12 months postoperatively. Results: A mean coverage of 1.96 mm ± 0.66 mm and 2.22 mm ± 0.68 mm was obtained at the end of 3rd and 12th month, respectively. Twelve months after surgery a statistically significant increase in CAL (2.2 mm ± 0.68 mm, P < 0.001) and increasing WKT (1.75 ± 0.78, P < 0.001) were obtained. In 80% of the treated sites, 100% root coverage was achieved (mean 93.5%). Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrated that multiple adjacent recessions were treated by using e-MCTG technique can be applied and highly predictable root coverage can be achieved. PMID:26321829

  18. Metamorphic conditions in the Nilgiri Granulite Terrane and the adjacent Moyar and Bhavani Shear Zones: A reevaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raith, M.; Hengst, C.; Nagel, B.; Bhattacharya, A.; Srikantappa, C.

    1988-01-01

    Data were presented on pressure and temperature determinations from the Nilgiri Hills. About 70 samples were analyzed by probe and several calibrations of garnet-pyroxene thermometry and barometry applied. Most calibrations gave considerable scatter; however, a new calibration by Bhattacharya, Raith, Lal, and others, accounting for nonideality in both garnet and orthopyroxene, gave consistent results of 754 + or - 52 C and 9.2 + or - 0.7 kbar. On the regional scale, a pressure increase of 6.5 to 7 kbar in the SW to 11 kbar in the NE was related to block tilting. A continuous pressure gradient into the Moyar shear zone suggests that the zone is not a suture juxtaposing unrelated blocks.

  19. Modelling hydropeaking effects on the riparian aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siviglia, Annunziato; Zanol, Marco; Bellin, Alberto; Stecca, Guglielmo; Zolezzi, Guido

    2010-05-01

    Hydropower operations result in sharp water level and temperature fluctuations downstream the river section where water is released intermittently according to the pattern of hydropower generation. It has been widely recognized that these peaking flows cause severe degradation of the affected river reaches, but their biological effects and hydraulic behaviour have been studied mainly referring to the main channel. Field evidence (Sawyer et al., 2009, Loheide & Lundqvist, 2009) demonstrate that surface water level oscillations are associated with significant mass exchanges between the stream and its riparian aquifer that may have relevant, still largely unexplored, biogeochemical implications. The purpose of this study is to develop a simplified modelling approach to predict the effects of hydropeaking on subsurface flow into the riparian region. We propose a simplified model for surface - subsurface flow exchange where instream hydropeaking is assigned as boundary condition and that solves the unsteady, dimensionless 1D Boussinesq equations for the saturated zone of the riparian aquifer. This allows to quantify the lateral extent of the riparian region affected by hydropeaking oscillations. In particular, with this model we analyzed the temporal variations in the daily mass and thermal exchanges between the channel and the riparian aquifer, and identified the controlling factors. The role of longitudinal variations in channel morphology as well as of seasonal aquifer variations and land cover can also be examined through the proposed modelling framework. Sawyer, A.H., Cardenas, M.B., Bomar, A., and Mackey, M. 2009. Impact of dam operations on hyporheic exchange in the riparian zone of a regulated river. Hydrol. Process, DOI: 10.1002/hyp.7324 Loheide, S. P., II, and J. D. Lundquist (2009), Snowmelt-induced diel fluxes through the hyporheic zone, Water Resour. Res., 45, W07404, doi:10.1029/2008WR007329.

  20. Occurrence, Distribution and Frequency of Riparian Fire in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendix, J.; Commons, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing attention to the role of fire as a disturbance agent in riparian ecosystems. That role seems to be quite variable, as fire has been shown to profoundly affect some riparian plant communities and their hydrogeomorphic settings, while in other instances its impact has been described as negligible. Our knowledge thus far is based on scattered field studies in a variety of locations; a systematic evaluation of the actual extent and frequency of riparian fire is lacking. In this paper, we use data from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS), LANDFIRE and Fire and Resource Assessment Program (FRAP) databases to characterize the occurrence of riparian fire in California. We used the MTBS and LANDFIRE data to identify fires that had burned at varying levels of severity in areas classified as having riparian vegetation, and matched those fires with the FRAP data to obtain additional information regarding each fire (such as date of occurrence). We analyzed 21 years of data (1990-2010). During this period, an average of 1197 ha of riparian vegetation burned per year, approximately 0.12% of the total area mapped as riparian vegetation in the state. This compares to 125750 ha/year of upland vegetation, thus riparian fire accounts for 0.94% of the area burned annually in California. Statewide, the extrapolated return interval for riparian fire is 843 years, compared to 318 years for upland fire. The statewide totals are misleading, however, because there is substantial geographic variance in the occurrence of riparian (as well as upland) fire. Analysis of fire in different ecoregions of the state reveals how dramatic that variance is. In southern California ecoregions, between .82% and 1.35% of the riparian vegetation burns each year, contrasting with the Cascades and Basin and Range ecoregions, where < .05% of the riparian zone burns annually. There is also considerable regional variation in the season of burning. Overall, the

  1. Records of bulk organic matter and plant pigments in sediment of the "red-tide zone" adjacent to the Changjiang River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhenjun; Yu, Rencheng; Kong, Fanzhou; Wang, Yunfeng; Gao, Yan; Chen, Jianhua; Guo, Wei; Zhou, Mingjiang

    2016-09-01

    Cultural eutrophication caused by nutrient over-enrichment in coastal waters will lead to a cascading set of ecosystem changes and deleterious ecological consequences, such as harmful algal blooms (HABs) and hypoxia. During the past two decades since the late 1990s, recurrent large-scale HABs (red tides) and an extensive hypoxic zone have been reported in the coastal waters adjacent to the Changjiang River estuary. To retrieve the history of eutrophication and its associated ecosystem changes, a sediment core was collected from the "red-tide zone" adjacent to the Changjiang River estuary. The core was dated using the 210Pb radioisotope and examined for multiple proxies, including organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), stable isotopes of C and N, and plant pigments. An apparent up-core increase of OC content was observed after the 1970s, accompanied by a rapid increase of TN. The concurrent enrichment of δ13C and increase of the C/N ratio suggested the accumulation of organic matter derived from marine primary production during this stage. The accumulation of OC after the 1970s well reflected the significant increase of primary production in the red-tide zone and probably the intensification of hypoxia as well. Plant pigments, including chlorophyll a, β-carotene, and diatoxanthin, showed similar patterns of variation to OC throughout the core, which further confirmed the important contribution of microalgae, particularly diatoms, to the deposited organic matter. Based on the variant profiles of the pigments representative of different microalgal groups, the potential changes of the phytoplankton community since the 1970s were discussed.

  2. Structure and tectonic evolution of the Tornquist Zone and adjacent sedimentary basins in Scania and the southern Baltic Sea area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlström, M.; Thomas, S. A.; Deeks, N.; Sivhed, U.

    1997-04-01

    Southernmost Sweden, Bornholm and the surrounding Baltic Sea region are located on a large-scale releasing bend in the dextral strike-slip system of the Tornquist Zone, with its resulting pull-apart basins. The well constrained geology of Scania and Bornholm has been combined with detailed on- and offshore borehole data and three proprietary marine seismic surveys. This in conjunction with supplementary BABEL deep seismic reflection findings allows a combined 3D interpretation of sediment/structure interactions. As a result, a regional interpretation has emerged which gives a new understanding of the interplay between structural movement on a complex strike-slip fault system (Tornquist Zone) and its intrazonal depressions (Vomb Trough and Colonus Shale Trough) as well as the sedimentation history of associated areas of sediment accumulation (Rønne and Arnager Grabens, Höllviken Halfgraben, Hanö Bay Basin and Skurup Platform). Detailed sequential litho- and seismo-stratigraphic descriptions have been possible by combination of the various data sets. This resulted in the clarification or recognition of previously unknown structural limits to sub-basins and highs in the study area. A 3D chronological (4D) model for the development of the region is proposed. This model takes into account the long-lived structural history combining elements of strike-slip, extension and inversion tectonics. The deep-seated faulting controlling these structures is integrated with the deep structure as revealed by the BABEL line in this area.

  3. Simulation of Soil Quality with Riparian Forests and Cultivated with Sugarcane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Luiz Gabriel; Colato, Alexandre; Casagrande, José Carlos; Soares, Marcio Roberto; Perissatto Meneghin, Silvana

    2013-04-01

    Riparian forests are entrusted with important hydrological functions, such as riparian zone protection, filtering sediments and nutrients and mitigation of the amount of nutrients and xenobiotic molecules from the surrounding agro ecosystems. The soil was sampled in the depths of 0-0,2 and 0.2-0.4 m and its chemical (nutrient content and organic matter, cationic exchange capacity - CEC, sum of bases-SB, bases saturation, V%, and aluminum saturation, m%); physical (particle size distribution, density and porosity) and microbiological attributes (basal respiration and microbial biomass) were determined. This work aimed to study the liner method of combining data, figures of merit (FoM), weighing process and the scoring functions developed by Wymore and asses the quality of the soil (SQI) by means of chemical, physical and microbiological soil attributes, employing the additive pondered model for two areas of riparian forest at different stages of ecological succession and an adjacent area cultivated with sugar cane, located on the dam shores of Sugar Mill Saint Lucia-Araras/SP. Some hierarchical functions containing FoMs and their parameters were constructed, and from them weights were assigned to each FoM and parameter, in a way that cluster of structures with the same FoMs and parameters with different weights were formed. These clusters were used to calculate the SQI for all vegetal formations considering two types of soil (Oxisol and Podzol), in that way, the SQI was calculated for each combination of vegetation and soil. The SQIs values were usually higher in the oldest riparian forest, while the recent riparian forest showed the smallest SQI values, for both types of soil. The variation of values within a combination vegetation/soil was also different between all combinations, being that the set of values from the oldest riparian forest presented the lowest amplitude. It was also observed that the Oxisols, regardless of the vegetation, presented higher SQIs

  4. Baseline assessment of instream and riparian-zone biological resources on the Rio Grande in and near Big Bend National Park, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, James Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Five study sites, and a sampling reach within each site, were established on the Rio Grande in and near Big Bend National Park in 1999 to provide the National Park Service with data and information on the status of stream habitat, fish communities, and benthic macroinvertebrates. Differences in stream-habitat conditions and riparian vegetation reflect differences in surface geology among the five sampling reaches. In the most upstream reach, Colorado Canyon, where igneous rock predominates, streambed material is larger; and riparian vegetation is less diverse and not as dense as in the four other, mostly limestone reaches. Eighteen species of fish and a total of 474 individuals were collected among the five reaches; 348 of the 474 were minnows. The most fish species (15) were collected at the Santa Elena reach and the fewest species (9) at the Colorado Canyon and Johnson Ranch reaches. The fish community at Colorado Canyon was least like the fish communities at the four other reaches. Fish trophic structure reflected fish-community structure among the five reaches. Invertivores made up at least 60 percent of the trophic structure at all reaches except Colorado Canyon. Piscivores dominated the trophic structure at Colorado Canyon. At the four other reaches, piscivores were the smallest trophic group. Eighty percent of the benthic macroinvertebrate taxa collected were aquatic insects. Two species of blackfly were the most frequently collected invertebrate taxon. Net-spinning caddisflies were common at all reaches except Santa Elena. The aquatic-insect community at the Boquillas reach was least similar to the aquatic-insect community at the other reaches.

  5. GLORIA sidescan-sonar imagery for parts of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone and adjacent areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paskevich, Valerie F.; Wong, Florence L.; O'Malley, John J.; Stevenson, Andrew J.; Gutmacher, Christina E.

    2011-01-01

    In 1983, President Ronald Reagan signed a Proclamation establishing the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the United States extending its territory 200 nautical miles from the coasts of the United States, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, and other U.S. territories and possessions. The charter of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) places the primary responsibility for mapping the territories of the United States within the USGS. Upon declaration of the EEZ, the territory of the United States was enlarged by more than 13 million square kilometers, all of which are under water. The USGS EEZ-SCAN program to systematically map the EEZ began in 1984 and continued through 1991. This digital publication contains all the GLORIA sidescan imagery of the deep-water (greater than 200 meters) portion of the EEZ mapped during those 8 years of data collection. For each EEZ area, we describe the data collection surveys and provide downloads of the GLORIA data and metadata.

  6. Approaches to characterizing biogeochemistry effects of groundwater and surface water interaction at the riparian interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groundwater-surface water interaction (GSI) in riparian ecosystems strongly influences biological activity that controls nutrient flux and processes. Shallow groundwater in riparian zones is a hot spot for nitrogen removal processes, a storage zone for solutes, and a target for ...

  7. Riparian Land-Use and Rehabilitation: Impact on Organic Matter Input and Soil Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelbermann, Maren; Raimbault, Beverly A.

    2015-02-01

    Rehabilitated riparian zones in agricultural landscapes enhance environmental integrity and provide environmental services such as carbon (C) sequestration. This study quantified differences in organic matter input, soil biochemical characteristics, and soil respiration in a 25-year-old rehabilitated (RH), grass (GRS), and undisturbed natural forest (UNF) riparian zone. Input from herbaceous vegetation was significantly greater ( P < 0.05) in the GRS riparian zone, whereas autumnal litterfall was significantly greater ( P < 0.05) in the RH riparian zone. Soil bulk density was significantly greater ( P < 0.05) in the RH riparian zone, but its soil chemical characteristics were significantly lower. Soil respiration rates were lowest ( P < 0.05) in the UNF (106 C m-2 h-1), followed by the RH (169 mg C m-2 h-1) and GRS (194 C m-2 h-1) riparian zones. Soil respiration rates were significantly different ( P < 0.05) among seasons, and were significantly correlated with soil moisture ( P < 0.05) and soil temperature ( P < 0.05) in all riparian zones. Soil potential microbial activity indicated a significantly different ( P < 0.05) response of the microbial metabolic diversity in the RH compared to the GRS and UNF riparian zones, and principle component analysis showed a distinct difference in microbial activity among the riparian land-use systems. Rehabilitating degraded riparian zones with trees rather than GRS is a more effective approach to the long-term mitigation of CO2. Therefore, the protection of existing natural/undisturbed riparian forests in agricultural landscapes is equally important as their rehabilitation with trees, given their higher levels of soil organic C and lower soil respiration rates.

  8. Supra-subduction zone extensional magmatism in Vermont and adjacent Quebec: Implications for early Paleozoic Appalachian tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, J.; Coish, R.; Evans, M.; Dick, G.

    2003-01-01

    Metadiabasic intrusions of the Mount Norris Intrusive Suite occur in fault-bounded lithotectonic packages containing Stowe, Moretown, and Cram Hill Formation lithologies in the northern Vermont Rowe-Hawley belt, a proposed Ordovician arc-trench gap above an east-dipping subduction zone. Rocks of the Mount Norris Intrusive Suite are characteristically massive and weakly foliated, have chilled margins, contain xenoliths, and have sharp contacts that both crosscut and are parallel to early structural fabrics in the host metasedimentary rocks. Although the mineral assemblage of the Mount Norris Intrusive Suite is albite + actinolite + epidote + chlorite + calcite + quartz, intergrowths of albite + actinolite are probably pseudomorphs after plagioclase + clinopyroxene. The metadiabases are subalkaline, tholeiitic, hypabyssal basalts with preserved ophitic texture. A backarc-basin tectonic setting for the intrusive suite is suggested by its LREE (light rare earth element) enrichment, negative Nb-Ta anomalies, and Ta/Yb vs. Th/Yb trends. Although no direct isotopic age data are available, the intrusions are broadly Ordovician because their contacts are clearly folded by the earliest Acadian (Silurian-Devonian) folds. Field evidence and geochemical data suggest compelling along-strike correlations with the Coburn Hill Volcanics of northern Vermont and the Bolton Igneous Group of southern Quebec. Isotopic and stratigraphic age constraints for the Bolton Igneous Group bracket these backarc magmas to the 477-458 Ma interval. A tectonic model that begins with east-dipping subduction and progresses to outboard west-dipping subduction after a syncollisional polarity reversal best explains the intrusion of deformed metamorphosed metasedimentary rocks by backarc magmas.

  9. Use of standardized visual assessments of riparian and stream condition to manage riparian bird habitat in eastern Oregon.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Hilary A; Zack, Steve

    2009-07-01

    The importance of riparian vegetation to support stream function and provide riparian bird habitat in semiarid landscapes suggests that standardized assessment tools that include vegetation criteria to evaluate stream health could also be used to assess habitat conditions for riparian-dependent birds. We first evaluated the ability of two visual assessments of woody vegetation in the riparian zone (corridor width and height) to describe variation in the obligate riparian bird ensemble along 19 streams in eastern Oregon. Overall species richness and the abundances of three species all correlated significantly with both, but width was more important than height. We then examined the utility of the riparian zone criteria in three standardized and commonly used rapid visual riparian assessment protocols--the USDI BLM Proper Functioning Condition (PFC) assessment, the USDA NRCS Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), and the U.S. EPA Habitat Assessment Field Data Sheet (HAFDS)--to assess potential riparian bird habitat. Based on the degree of correlation of bird species richness with assessment ratings, we found that PFC does not assess obligate riparian bird habitat condition, SVAP provides a coarse estimate, and HAFDS provides the best assessment. We recommend quantitative measures of woody vegetation for all assessments and that all protocols incorporate woody vegetation height. Given that rapid assessments may be the only source of information for thousands of kilometers of streams in the western United States, incorporating simple vegetation measurements is a critical step in evaluating the status of riparian bird habitat and provides a tool for tracking changes in vegetation condition resulting from management decisions.

  10. The influence of riparian evapotranspiration on stream hydrology and nitrogen retention in a subhumid Mediterranean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupon, Anna; Bernal, Susana; Poblador, Sílvia; Martí, Eugènia; Sabater, Francesc

    2016-09-01

    Riparian evapotranspiration (ET) can influence stream hydrology at catchment scale by promoting the net loss of water from the stream towards the riparian zone (i.e., stream hydrological retention). However, the consequences of stream hydrological retention on nitrogen dynamics are not well understood. To fill this gap of knowledge, we investigated changes in riparian ET, stream discharge, and nutrient chemistry in two contiguous reaches (headwater and valley) with contrasted riparian forest size in a small forested Mediterranean catchment. Additionally, riparian groundwater level (hgw) was measured at the valley reach. The temporal pattern of riparian ET was similar between reaches, and was positively correlated with hgw (ρ = 0.60) and negatively correlated with net riparian groundwater inputs (ρ < -0.55). During the vegetative period, stream hydrological retention occurred mostly at the valley reach (59 % of the time), and was accompanied by in-stream nitrate release and ammonium uptake. During the dormant period, when the stream gained water from riparian groundwater, results showed small influences of riparian ET on stream hydrology and nitrogen concentrations. Despite being a small component of annual water budgets (4.5 %), our results highlight that riparian ET drives stream and groundwater hydrology in this Mediterranean catchment and, furthermore, question the potential of the riparian zone as a natural filter of nitrogen loads.

  11. Denitrification during vertical upwelling at an alluvium-diluvium interface below the upland perimeter of a riparian paddy.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Sadao; Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Yabusaki, Shiho; Kasuya, Masahiro; Shibayama, Hiroko; Tsunekawa, Ayumi; Imai, Katsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Denitrification hotspots in riparian aquifers often develop in a relatively narrow zone at the upland-riparian interface, where nitrate-rich ground water of upland origin interacts with available soil organic carbon. In riparian paddy fields, denitrification in the aquifer has received less attention than that in the surface water and soil. This study aimed to determine the in situ activity of the denitrification hotspot formed at the vertical interface between the organic alluvial and the nitrate-rich diluvial aquifers around the depth of 2.0 m below the upland perimeter of riparian paddy, where vertical upwelling dominates the ground water recharge. The mass balances of water and solutes were approximately calculated from the one-dimensional vertical pressure head and water quality profiles with help of the stable isotopes analyses of water. The confined ground water of adjacent diluvial upland origin, with a high nitrate concentration of 1.72+/-0.42 mmol L(-1), mixed with the nitrate-deficient unconfined ground water at the alluvium-diluvium interface, and 63% of nitrate was removed by denitrification at a rate of 33 mg N m(-2) d(-1) and a nitrogen isotope fractionation factor of 0.988. The increase in bicarbonate concentration with the decrease in nitrate concentration suggested a heterotrophic denitrification with a stoichiometry of C:N=5:4. These results are the first to demonstrate the quantitative importance of denitrification in the aquifer below a riparian paddy in the removal of nitrate from the ground water of upland origin and emphasize the necessity of including this process in models for predicting watershed-scale surface water and ground water qualities.

  12. Impacts of an Invasive Snail (Tarebia granifera) on Nutrient Cycling in Tropical Streams: The Role of Riparian Deforestation in Trinidad, West Indies

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Jennifer M.; Snider, Sunny B.; MacNeill, Keeley; Gilliam, James F.; Flecker, Alexander S.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species and habitat degradation are two major catalysts of environmental change and often occur simultaneously. In freshwater systems, degradation of adjacent terrestrial vegetation may facilitate introduced species by altering resource availability. Here we examine how the presence of intact riparian cover influences the impact of an invasive herbivorous snail, Tarebia granifera, on nitrogen (N) cycling in aquatic systems on the island of Trinidad. We quantified snail biomass, growth, and N excretion in locations where riparian vegetation was present or removed to determine how snail demographics and excretion were related to the condition of the riparian zone. In three Neotropical streams, we measured snail biomass and N excretion in open and closed canopy habitats to generate estimates of mass- and area-specific N excretion rates. Snail biomass was 2 to 8 times greater and areal N excretion rates ranged from 3 to 9 times greater in open canopy habitats. Snails foraging in open canopy habitat also had access to more abundant food resources and exhibited greater growth and mass-specific N excretion rates. Estimates of ecosystem N demand indicated that snail N excretion in fully closed, partially closed, and open canopy habitats supplied 2%, 11%, and 16% of integrated ecosystem N demand, respectively. We conclude that human-mediated riparian canopy loss can generate hotspots of snail biomass, growth, and N excretion along tropical stream networks, altering the impacts of an invasive snail on the biogeochemical cycling of N. PMID:22761706

  13. Breaking into the Plate: Seismic and Hydroacoustic Analysis of a 7.6 Mw Oceanic Fracture Zone Earthquake Adjacent to the Central Indian Ridge Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Chapp, E.

    2003-12-01

    aftershock zone and the centroid location lies within its eastern portion, the rupture appears to have propagated from the plate boundary, breaking into the Indian plate along the fracture zone. The moment tensor solution for the mainshock event indicates dominantly right-lateral slip with a near vertical nodal plane striking parallel to the trend of the aftershocks. The right-lateral sense of slip opposes the left-lateral slip along the adjacent active transform and is consistent with reactivation due to north-south extension in association with a diffuse plate boundary that separates the Indian and Australian Plates. Coulomb failure modeling indicates that the right-lateral mainshock should promote left-lateral slip on the active portions of neighboring transforms. Consistent with this prediction, the largest aftershock, a 5.6 Mw left-lateral earthquake, is located on the active portion of a transform approximately 150 km northwest of the mainshock rupture. These models also show that left-lateral slip on the adjacent active transform, extending southwest from mainshock rupture, should be inhibited. No aftershock activity is observed along this active transform. Static stress changes will tend to reduce ridge-normal compressive stresses along the portion of the CIR axis to the north of the mainshock, with an increase in ridge-normal compression to the south. This will promote and impede axis-parallel diking events within these respective regions.

  14. Nitrate retention in riparian ground water at natural and elevated nitrate levels in north central Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Duff, John H; Jackman, Alan P; Triska, Frank J; Sheibley, Richard W; Avanzino, Ronald J

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between local ground water flows and NO(3)(-) transport to the channel was examined in three well transects from a natural, wooded riparian zone adjacent to the Shingobee River, MN. The hillslope ground water originated as recharge from intermittently grazed pasture up slope of the site. In the hillslope transect perpendicular to the stream, ground water NO(3)(-) concentrations decreased from approximately 3 mg N L(-1) beneath the ridge (80 m from the channel) to 0.01 to 1.0 mg N L(-1) at wells 1 to 3 m from the channel. The Cl(-) concentrations and NO(3)/Cl ratios decreased toward the channel indicating NO(3)(-) dilution and biotic retention. In the bankside well transect parallel to the stream, two distinct ground water environments were observed: an alluvial environment upstream of a relict beaver dam influenced by stream water and a hillslope environment downstream of the relict beaver dam. Nitrate was elevated to levels representative of agricultural runoff in a third well transect located approximately 5 m from the stream to assess the effectiveness of the riparian zone as a NO(3)(-) sink. Subsurface NO(3)(-) injections revealed transport of up to 15 mg N L(-1) was nearly conservative in the alluvial riparian environment. Addition of glucose stimulated dissolved oxygen uptake and promoted NO(3)(-) retention under both background and elevated NO(3)(-) levels in summer and winter. Disappearance of added NO(3)(-) was followed by transient NO(2)(-) formation and, in the presence of C(2)H(2), by N(2)O formation, demonstrating potential denitrification. Under current land use, most NO(3)(-) associated with local ground water is biotically retained or diluted before reaching the channel. However, elevating NO(3)(-) levels through agricultural cultivation would likely result in increased NO(3)(-) transport to the channel.

  15. Nitrate retention in riparian ground water at natural and elevated nitrate levels in North Central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duff, J.H.; Jackman, A.P.; Triska, F.J.; Sheibley, R.W.; Avanzino, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between local ground water flows and NO3- transport to the channel was examined in three well transects from a natural, wooded riparian zone adjacent to the Shingobee River, MN. The hillslope ground water originated as recharge from intermittently grazed pasture up slope of the site. In the hillslope transect perpendicular to the stream, ground water NO3- concentrations decreased from ???3 mg N L-1 beneath the ridge (80 m from the channel) to 0.01 to 1.0 mg N L-1 at wells 1 to 3 m from the channel. The Cl- concentrations and NO3/Cl ratios decreased toward the channel indicating NO3- dilution and biotic retention. In the bankside well transect parallel to the stream, two distinct ground water environments were observed: an alluvial environment upstream of a relict beaver dam influenced by stream water and a hillslope environment downstream of the relict beaver dam. Nitrate was elevated to levels representative of agricultural runoff in a third well transect looted ???5 m from the stream to assess the effectiveness of the riparian zone as a NO3- sink. Subsurface NO3- injections revealed transport of up to 15 mg N L-1 was nearly conservative in the alluvial riparian environment. Addition of glucose stimulated dissolved oxygen uptake and promoted NO3- retention under both background and elevated NO 3- levels in summer and winter. Disappearance of added NO3- was followed by transient NO2- formation and, in the presence of C2H2, by N2O formation, demonstrating potential denitrification. Under current land use, most NO3- associated with local ground water is biotically retained or diluted before reaching the channel. However, elevating NO 3- levels through agricultural cultivation would likely result in increased NO3- transport to the channel. ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  16. Looking at catchments in colors: combining thermal IR imagery with geochemical and isotopic tracers to document spatio-temporal dynamics of water source and flowpaths in the hillslope-riparian zone-stream system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, L.; Martínez-Carreras, N.; Wetzel, C.; Ector, L.; Hissler, C.; Hoffmann, L.; Frentress, J. J.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    , we have combined thermal IR imagery with grab sampling of water inside the hillslope-riparian zone-stream system. While relying on IR thermography, we also used simultaneous optical image capture to aid in classifying the incoming IR signal and differentiating between substances of different temperature. The distinction between flowing water, saturated zones, soil, wooden branches, pebbles or leaves is extremely difficult when observing the optical image alone. The IR thermography interprets the heat signal from the same source and provides a much better view for identifying both areas where water is flowing and areas where water is either seeping from the soil, flowing as surface runoff or accumulating temporarily in micro-depressions during a rainfall event. This approach has revealed how crucial the location of the grab sampling can be within extremely small geographical zones (a few square meters) due to incomplete mixing, as well as it has helped to map the dynamics of geochemical and isotopic signatures in the area of interest. To date, our investigations have revealed: (a) the potential for infrared thermography to identify, discriminate and observe the spatio-temporal dynamics of hydrological processes, namely infiltration excess overland flow, saturation excess overland flow and subsurface return flow; and (b) the complementarity of information gained from conventional tracers (geochemicals and stable isotopes) and remote sensing (infrared thermography). Our next step will consist in assessing the individual and combined potential of these techniques for reducing uncertainties in hydrological process identification and quantification (especially with respect to hydrograph separation).

  17. Habitat selection by juvenile Swainson’s thrushes (Catharus ustulatus) in headwater riparian areas, northwestern Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Stephanie R.; Betts, Matthew G.; Huso, Manuela M.; Hagar, Joan C.

    2013-01-01

    Lower order, non-fish-bearing streams, often termed “headwater streams”, have received minimal research effort and protection priority, especially in mesic forests where distinction between riparian and upland vegetation can be subtle. Though it is generally thought that breeding bird abundance is higher in riparian zones, little is known about species distributions when birds are in their juvenile stage – a critical period in terms of population viability. Using radio telemetry, we examined factors affecting habitat selection by juvenile Swainson’s thrushes during the post-breeding period in headwater basins in the Coast Range of Oregon, USA. We tested models containing variables expected to influence the amount of food and cover (i.e., deciduous cover, coarse wood volume, and proximity to stream) as well as models containing variables that are frequently measured and manipulated in forest management (i.e., deciduous and coniferous trees separated into size classes). Juvenile Swainson’s thrushes were more likely to select locations with at least 25% cover of deciduous, mid-story vegetation and more than 2.0 m3/ha of coarse wood within 40 m of headwater streams. We conclude that despite their small and intermittent nature, headwater streams and adjacent riparian areas are selected over upland areas by Swainson’s thrush during the postfledging period in the Oregon Coast Range.

  18. Influence of multi-scale hydrologic controls on river network connectivity and riparian function

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecological functions of rivers and streams and their associated riparian zones are strongly influenced by surface and subsurface hydrologic routing of water within river basins and river networks. Hydrologic attributes of the riparian area for a given stream reach are typica...

  19. NITRATE REMOVAL EFFECTIVENESS OF A RIPARIAN BUFFER ALONG A SMALL AGRICULTURAL STREAM IN WESTERN OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We established two study sites with similar soils and hydrology but contrasting riparian vegetation along Lake Creek, an intermittent stream that drains perennial ryegrass fields in the Willamette Valley of western Oregon. One site had a non-cultivated riparian zone with a plant...

  20. Dynamic river networks as the context for evaluating riparian influence on river basin solute export

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many studies have examined the influence of riparian areas on nitrogen as water drains from hillslopes and through riparian zones at the stream reach scale. Most of these studies have been conducted along relatively small streams. However, water quality concerns typically deal wi...

  1. Characterization of terrestrial organic matter transported through the Lena River Delta (NE Siberia) to its adjacent nearshore zone using lignin phenols, δ13C and ∆14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterfeld, M.; Goni, M. A.; Just, J.; Hefter, J.; Han, P.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial organic matter (OMterr) from its southernmost reaches near Lake Baikal to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea and the Arctic Ocean. Permafrost soils from its vast catchment area store huge amounts of pre-aged OM, which is expected to be remobilized due to climate warming. To characterize the composition and vegetation sources of OM discharged by the Lena River, we analyzed the lignin phenol and carbon isotopic composition (δ13C and ∆14C) in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface waters collected in spring and summer, surface sediments from the Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta. A simple linear mixing model based on the lignin phenol distributions indicates OM in TSM samples from the delta and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments contains comparable contributions from gymnosperm sources, which are primarily from the taiga forests south of the delta, and angiosperm material typical for tundra vegetation. Considering the small area covered by tundra (~12% of total catchment), the input of tundra-derived OM input is substantial and likely to increase in a warming Arctic. Radiocarbon compositions (∆14C) of bulk OM in TSM samples varied from -55 to -391‰, i.e. 14C ages of 395 to 3920 yrs BP. Using δ13C compositions to estimate the fraction of phytoplankton-derived OM and assuming that this material has a modern 14C signature, we inferred the ∆14C compositions of OMterr in TSM exported by the Lena River to range between -190 and -700‰. Such variability in the ages of OMTERR (i.e. 1640 to 9720 14C yrs BP) reflects the heterogeneous composition and residence time of OM in the Lena River catchment soils (Holocene to Pleistocene ages). Lignin phenol and ∆14C compositions of surface sediments from the adjacent Buor Khaya Bay suggest that OMTERR deposited there is older and more degraded than materials present in river particles and catchment soils. Stronger

  2. Imaging Hydrological Processes in Headwater Riparian Seeps with Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark R; Buda, Anthony R; Singha, Kamini; Folmar, Gordon J; Elliott, Herschel A; Schmidt, John P

    2017-01-01

    Delineating hydrologic and pedogenic factors influencing groundwater flow in riparian zones is central in understanding pathways of water and nutrient transport. In this study, we combined two-dimensional time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) (depth of investigation approximately 2 m) with hydrometric monitoring to examine hydrological processes in the riparian area of FD-36, a small (0.4 km(2) ) agricultural headwater basin in the Valley and Ridge region of east-central Pennsylvania. We selected two contrasting study sites, including a seep with groundwater discharge and an adjacent area lacking such seepage. Both sites were underlain by a fragipan at 0.6 m. We then monitored changes in electrical resistivity, shallow groundwater, and nitrate-N concentrations as a series of storms transitioned the landscape from dry to wet conditions. Time-lapse ERI revealed different resistivity patterns between seep and non-seep areas during the study period. Notably, the seep displayed strong resistivity reductions (∼60%) along a vertically aligned region of the soil profile, which coincided with strong upward hydraulic gradients recorded in a grid of nested piezometers (0.2- and 0.6-m depth). These patterns suggested a hydraulic connection between the seep and the nitrate-rich shallow groundwater system below the fragipan, which enabled groundwater and associated nitrate-N to discharge through the fragipan to the surface. In contrast, time-lapse ERI indicated no such connections in the non-seep area, with infiltrated rainwater presumably perched above the fragipan. Results highlight the value of pairing time-lapse ERI with hydrometric and water quality monitoring to illuminate possible groundwater and nutrient flow pathways to seeps in headwater riparian areas.

  3. Ecophysiological Competence of Populus alba L., Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl., and Crataegus monogyna Jacq. Used in Plantations for the Recovery of Riparian Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzanera, Jose A.; Martínez-Chacón, Maria F.

    2007-12-01

    In many semi-arid environments of Mediterranean ecosystems, white poplar ( Populus alba L.) is the dominant riparian tree and has been used to recover degraded areas, together with other native species, such as ash ( Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl.) and hawthorn ( Crataegus monogyna Jacq.). We addressed three main objectives: (1) to gain an improved understanding of some specific relationships between environmental parameters and leaf-level physiological factors in these riparian forest species, (2) to compare the leaf-level physiology of these riparian species to each other, and (3) to compare leaf-level responses within native riparian plots to adjacent restoration plots, in order to evaluate the competence of the plants used for the recovery of those degraded areas. We found significant differences in physiological performance between mature and young white poplars in the natural stand and among planted species. The net assimilation and transpiration rates, diameter, and height of white poplar plants were superior to those of ash and hawthorn. Ash and hawthorn showed higher water use efficiency than white poplar. White poplar also showed higher levels of stomatal conductance, behaving as a fast-growing, water-consuming species with a more active gas exchange and ecophysiological competence than the other species used for restoration purposes. In the restoration zones, the planted white poplars had higher rates of net assimilation and water use efficiency than the mature trees in the natural stand. We propose the use of white poplar for the rapid restoration of riparian vegetation in semi-arid Mediterranean environments. Ash and hawthorn can also play a role as accompanying species for the purpose of biodiversity.

  4. Featured collection introduction: riparian ecosystems and buffers II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian ecosystems, the interface of terrestrial and aquatic systems, are zones of high biodiversity (Naiman et al., 1993), rapid biogeochemical activity (Vidon et al., 2010), complex hydrologic activity (Mayer et al., 2010a), and offer solace that can bestow significant mental ...

  5. Innovative interdisciplinary approaches in catchment hydrology: on the potential for diatoms and thermal infrared imagery for documenting spatio-temporal dynamics and connectivity of saturated areas in the hillslope-riparian zone-stream system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, L.; Martínez-Carreras, N.; Wetzel, C.; Ector, L.; Frentress, J.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    years, our research activities have been focusing on the exploration of new research avenues for untapping new insights on inherent hydrological processes, guiding water source and flowpaths. Here, we will present the most recent results obtained to date from interdisciplinary proof-of-concept studies carried out in the Weierbach experimental watershed. New research avenues, such as the introduction of terrestrial diatom tracing in flood waves, will hopefully contribute to reduce uncertainties in the determination of the onset/cessation of surface runoff and connectivity in the hillslope-riparian zone-stream system. Likewise, thermal infrared imaging has shown considerable potential for tracing surface water flowpaths, connectivity, as well as saturated area dynamics.

  6. Rhizosphere dynamics of two riparian plant species from the water fluctuation zone of Three Gorges Reservoir, P.R. China - pH, oxygen and LMWOA monitoring during short flooding events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Christina M.; Schurr, Ulrich; Zeng, Bo; Höltkemeier, Agnes; Kuhn, Arnd J.

    2010-05-01

    Since the construction of the Three Gorges Dam at the Yangtze River in China, the reservoir management created a new 30m water fluctuation zone 45-75m above the original water level. Only species well adapted to long-time flooding (up to several months) will be able to vegetate the river banks and replace the original vegetation. To investigate how common species of the riverbanks cope with submergence, Alternanthera philoxeroides Mart. and Arundinella anomala Steud., two flooding resistant riparian species, have been examined in a rhizotron environment. Short-time (2 days waterlogging, 2 days flooding, 2 days recovery) flooding cycles in the original substrate and long time (14 days waterlogging, flooding, recovery) flooding cycles, in original substrate and sterile glass bead substrate, have been simulated in floodable two-way access rhizotrons. Oxygen- and pH-sensitive foils (planar optodes, PreSens) automatically monitored root reaction in a confined space (2cm2 each) on the backside of the rhizotron, while soil solution samples were taken 2 times a day from the other side of the rhizotron at the corresponding area through filter and steel capillaries. The samples were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis for low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA, i.e. oxalic, formic, succinic, malic, acetic, glyoxylic, lactic and citric acid). Results show diurnal rhythms of rhizospheric acidification for both species in high resolution, combined with oxygen entry into the root surrounding during waterlogged state. Flooding caused stronger acidification in the rhizosphere, that were however not accompanied by increased occurrence of LMWOA except for acetic and glyoxylic acid. First results from longer flooding periods show stable diurnal rhythms during waterlogging, but no strongly increased activity during the flooding event. Performance of the two species is not hampered by being waterlogged, and they follow a silencing strategy during a longer phase of anoxia without

  7. Rapid riparian buffer width and quality analysis using lidar in South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akturk, Emre

    The importance of protecting water quality and aquatic resources are increasing because of harmful human impacts within and around waterways. Establishing or restoring functional riparian areas protect water quality and are a good mechanism to conserve aquatic systems, plants, and wildlife. Laser-based remote sensing technology offers a high resolution approach to both characterize and document changes in riparian buffer zones (RBZs). The objectives of this study were to build a model to calculate riparian buffer width on both sides of a stream using a LiDAR-derived slope variable, to classify riparian buffers and determine their quality, and to evaluate the appropriateness of using LiDAR in riparian buffer assessment. For this purpose, RBZs were delineated for Hunnicutt and King Creek, which are located in Oconee and Pickens counties, in South Carolina. Results show that LiDAR was effective in delineating required riparian buffer widths based on the topography slope of upstream areas, and to calculate the ratio of tree cover in those riparian buffer zones to qualify them. Furthermore, the riparian buffer assessment model that was created in this research has potential for use in different sites and different studies.

  8. Water sources and mixing in riparian wetlands revealed by tracers and geospatial analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Birkel, Christian; Dick, Jonathan; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mixing of waters within riparian zones has been identified as an important influence on runoff generation and water quality. Improved understanding of the controls on the spatial and temporal variability of water sources and how they mix in riparian zones is therefore of both fundamental and applied interest. In this study, we have combined topographic indices derived from a high‐resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with repeated spatially high‐resolution synoptic sampling of multiple tracers to investigate such dynamics of source water mixing. We use geostatistics to estimate concentrations of three different tracers (deuterium, alkalinity, and dissolved organic carbon) across an extended riparian zone in a headwater catchment in NE Scotland, to identify spatial and temporal influences on mixing of source waters. The various biogeochemical tracers and stable isotopes helped constrain the sources of runoff and their temporal dynamics. Results show that spatial variability in all three tracers was evident in all sampling campaigns, but more pronounced in warmer dryer periods. The extent of mixing areas within the riparian area reflected strong hydroclimatic controls and showed large degrees of expansion and contraction that was not strongly related to topographic indices. The integrated approach of using multiple tracers, geospatial statistics, and topographic analysis allowed us to classify three main riparian source areas and mixing zones. This study underlines the importance of the riparian zones for mixing soil water and groundwater and introduces a novel approach how this mixing can be quantified and the effect on the downstream chemistry be assessed. PMID:27478256

  9. Water sources and mixing in riparian wetlands revealed by tracers and geospatial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessels, Jason S.; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Birkel, Christian; Dick, Jonathan; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Mixing of waters within riparian zones has been identified as an important influence on runoff generation and water quality. Improved understanding of the controls on the spatial and temporal variability of water sources and how they mix in riparian zones is therefore of both fundamental and applied interest. In this study, we have combined topographic indices derived from a high-resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with repeated spatially high-resolution synoptic sampling of multiple tracers to investigate such dynamics of source water mixing. We use geostatistics to estimate concentrations of three different tracers (deuterium, alkalinity, and dissolved organic carbon) across an extended riparian zone in a headwater catchment in NE Scotland, to identify spatial and temporal influences on mixing of source waters. The various biogeochemical tracers and stable isotopes helped constrain the sources of runoff and their temporal dynamics. Results show that spatial variability in all three tracers was evident in all sampling campaigns, but more pronounced in warmer dryer periods. The extent of mixing areas within the riparian area reflected strong hydroclimatic controls and showed large degrees of expansion and contraction that was not strongly related to topographic indices. The integrated approach of using multiple tracers, geospatial statistics, and topographic analysis allowed us to classify three main riparian source areas and mixing zones. This study underlines the importance of the riparian zones for mixing soil water and groundwater and introduces a novel approach how this mixing can be quantified and the effect on the downstream chemistry be assessed.

  10. Water sources and mixing in riparian wetlands revealed by tracers and geospatial analysis.

    PubMed

    Lessels, Jason S; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Birkel, Christian; Dick, Jonathan; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Mixing of waters within riparian zones has been identified as an important influence on runoff generation and water quality. Improved understanding of the controls on the spatial and temporal variability of water sources and how they mix in riparian zones is therefore of both fundamental and applied interest. In this study, we have combined topographic indices derived from a high-resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with repeated spatially high-resolution synoptic sampling of multiple tracers to investigate such dynamics of source water mixing. We use geostatistics to estimate concentrations of three different tracers (deuterium, alkalinity, and dissolved organic carbon) across an extended riparian zone in a headwater catchment in NE Scotland, to identify spatial and temporal influences on mixing of source waters. The various biogeochemical tracers and stable isotopes helped constrain the sources of runoff and their temporal dynamics. Results show that spatial variability in all three tracers was evident in all sampling campaigns, but more pronounced in warmer dryer periods. The extent of mixing areas within the riparian area reflected strong hydroclimatic controls and showed large degrees of expansion and contraction that was not strongly related to topographic indices. The integrated approach of using multiple tracers, geospatial statistics, and topographic analysis allowed us to classify three main riparian source areas and mixing zones. This study underlines the importance of the riparian zones for mixing soil water and groundwater and introduces a novel approach how this mixing can be quantified and the effect on the downstream chemistry be assessed.

  11. Riparian vegetation controls on the hydraulic geometry of streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, M.

    2010-12-01

    A synthesis of field measurements, remote observations, and numerical modeling techniques highlights the significance of riparian vegetation in determining the geometry of streams and impacting sediment transport dynamics in temperate, Piedmont regions. Specifically, forested and grassy riparian vegetation establish streams with significantly different widths and with different timescales for attaining a state of dynamic equilibrium. The interactions between riparian vegetation, channel form, and channel dynamics are scale dependent. Scale dependency arises because of variations in ratios of vegetation length scales and geomorphic scales (e.g., channel width and depth). Stream reaches with grassy vegetation experience more frequent overbank discharges, migrate more quickly, and exhibit a more classic dynamic equilibrium than forested reaches. These phenomena are relevant to current watershed management efforts that aim to reduce sediment and nutrient loads to receiving water bodies, such as the Chesapeake Bay. The reforestation of riparian buffers is a common restoration technique that intends to improve water quality, temperature regimes, and in-stream physical habitat. Passive reforestation of riparian areas along a tributary to Sleepers River in Danville, VT, USA caused an increase in channel width and cross-sectional area over a 40-year period. From a comparison of historical records and current cross-sectional dimensions, the channel widening resulted in the mobilization of approximately 85 kg/ha/yr of floodplain sediments. Long-term monitoring of suspended sediments in an adjacent watershed indicates that this sediment source may account for roughly 40 percent of the total suspended sediment load. In some instances, increased sediment loads associated with channel widening may be an unforeseen consequence that compromises riparian restoration efforts.

  12. Influence of Herbaceous Riparian Buffers on Fish and Amphibian Communities Within Channelized Headwater Streams in Central Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbaceous riparian buffers are a widely used conservation practice in the United States for reducing nutrient, pesticide, and sediment loadings in agricultural streams. The importance of forested riparian zones for headwater streams has been documented, but the ecological impacts of herbaceous ripa...

  13. Surface Water and Groundwater Nitrogen Dynamics in a Well Drained Riparian Forest within a Poorly Drained Agricultural Landscape

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effectiveness of riparian zones in mitigating nutrients in ground and surface water depends on the climate, management and hydrogeomorphology of a site. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a well-drained, mixed-deciduous riparian forest to buffer a ri...

  14. Characterization of the Hosgri Fault Zone and adjacent structures in the offshore Santa Maria Basin, south-central California: Chapter CC of Evolution of sedimentary basins/onshore oil and gas investigations - Santa Maria province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willingham, C. Richard; Rietman, Jan D.; Heck, Ronald G.; Lettis, William R.

    2013-01-01

    The Hosgri Fault Zone trends subparallel to the south-central California coast for 110 km from north of Point Estero to south of Purisima Point and forms the eastern margin of the present offshore Santa Maria Basin. Knowledge of the attributes of the Hosgri Fault Zone is important for petroleum development, seismic engineering, and environmental planning in the region. Because it lies offshore along its entire reach, our characterizations of the Hosgri Fault Zone and adjacent structures are primarily based on the analysis of over 10,000 km of common-depth-point marine seismic reflection data collected from a 5,000-km2 area of the central and eastern parts of the offshore Santa Maria Basin. We describe and illustrate the along-strike and downdip geometry of the Hosgri Fault Zone over its entire length and provide examples of interpreted seismic reflection records and a map of the structural trends of the fault zone and adjacent structures in the eastern offshore Santa Maria Basin. The seismic data are integrated with offshore well and seafloor geologic data to describe the age and seismic appearance of offshore geologic units and marker horizons. We develop a basin-wide seismic velocity model for depth conversions and map three major unconformities along the eastern offshore Santa Maria Basin. Accompanying plates include maps that are also presented as figures in the report. Appendix A provides microfossil data from selected wells and appendix B includes uninterpreted copies of the annotated seismic record sections illustrated in the chapter. Features of the Hosgri Fault Zone documented in this investigation are suggestive of both lateral and reverse slip. Characteristics indicative of lateral slip include (1) the linear to curvilinear character of the mapped trace of the fault zone, (2) changes in structural trend along and across the fault zone that diminish in magnitude toward the ends of the fault zone, (3) localized compressional and extensional structures

  15. Nitrate removal effectiveness of a riparian buffer along a small agricultural stream in western Oregon.

    PubMed

    Wigington, P J; Griffith, S M; Field, J A; Baham, J E; Horwath, W R; Owen, J; Davis, J H; Rain, S C; Steiner, J J

    2003-01-01

    The Willamette Valley of Oregon has extensive areas of poorly drained, commercial grass seed lands. Little is know about the ability of riparian areas in these settings to reduce nitrate in water draining from grass seed fields. We established two study sites with similar soils and hydrology but contrasting riparian vegetation along an intermittent stream that drains perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) fields in the Willamette Valley of western Oregon. We installed a series of nested piezometers along three transects at each site to examine NO3-N in shallow ground water in grass seed fields and riparian areas. Results showed that a noncultivated riparian zone comprised of grasses and herbaceous vegetation significantly reduced NO3-N concentrations of shallow ground water moving from grass seed fields. Darcy's law-based estimates of shallow ground water flow through riparian zone A/E horizons revealed that this water flowpath could account for only a very small percentage of the streamflow. Even though there is great potential for NO3-N to be reduced as water moves through the noncultivated riparian zone with grass-herbaceous vegetation, the potential was not fully realized because only a small proportion of the stream flow interacts with riparian zone soils. Consequently, effective NO3-N water quality management in poorly drained landscapes similar to the study watershed is primarily dependent on implementation of sound agricultural practices within grass seed fields and is less influenced by riparian zone vegetation. Wise fertilizer application rates and timing are key management tools to reduce export of NO3-N in stream waters.

  16. Amphibian and reptile abundance in riparian and upslope areas of five forest types in western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomez, D.M.; Anthony, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    We compared species composition and relative abundance of herpetofauna between riparian and upslope habitats among 5 forest types (shrub, open sapling-pole, large sawtimber and old-growth conifer forests, and deciduous forests) in Western Oregon. Riparian- and upslope- associated species were identified based on capture frequencies from pitfall trapping. Species richness was similar among forest types but slightly greater in the shrub stands. The abundances of 3 species differed among forest types. Total captures was highest in deciduous forests, intermediate in the mature conifer forests, and lowest in the 2 young coniferous forests. Species richness was similar between stream and upslope habitats; however, captures were higher in riparian than upslope habitat. Tailed frogs (Ascaphus truei), Dunn's salamanders (Plethodon dunni), roughskin newts(Tanicha granulosa), Pacific giant salamanders (Dicamptodon tenebrosus) and red-legged frogs(Rana aurora) were captured more frequently in riparian than upslope habitats. Of these species the red-legged frog and Pacific giant salamander may depend on riparian habitat for at least part of their life requirements, while tailed frogs, Dunn's salamanders and roughskin newts appear to be riparian associated species. In addition, we found Oregon salamanders (Ensatina eschscholtzi) were associated with upslope habitats. We suggest riparian management zones should be al least 75-100 m on each side of the stream and that management for upslope/and or old forest associates may be equally as important as for riparian species.

  17. Water relations of riparian plants from warm desert regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S.D.; Devitt, Dale A.; Cleverly, James R.; Busch, David E.

    1998-01-01

    Riparian plants have been classified as 'drought avoiders' due to their access to an abundant subsurface water supply. Recent water-relations research that tracks water sources of riparian plants using the stable isotopes of water suggests that many plants of the riparian zone use ground water rather than stream water, and not all riparian plants are obligate phreatophytes (dependent on ground water as a moisture source) but may occasionally be dependent of unsaturated soil moisture sources. A more thorough understanding of riparian plant-water relations must include water-source dynamics and how those dynamics vary over both space and time. Many rivers in the desert Southwest have been invaded by the exotic shrub Tamarix ramosissima (saltcedar). Our studies of Tamarix invasion into habitats formerly dominated by native riparian forests of primarily Populus and Salix have shown that Tamarix successfully invades these habitats because of its (1) greater tolerance to water stress and salinity, (2) status as a facultative, rather than obligate, phreatophyte and, therefore, its ability to recover from droughts and periods of ground-water drawdown, and (3) superior regrowth after fire. Analysis of water- loss rates indicate that Tamarix-dominated stands can have extremely high evapotranspiration rates when water tables are high but not necessarily when water tables are lower. Tamarix has leaf-level transpiration rates that are comparable to native species, whereas sap-flow rates per unit sapwood area are higher than in natives, suggesting that Tamarix maintains higher leaf area than can natives, probably due to its greater water stress tolerance. Tamarix desiccates and salinizes floodplains, due to its salt exudation and high transpiration rates, and may also accelerate fire cycles, thus predisposing these ecosystems to further loss of native taxa. Riparian species on regulated rivers can be exposed to seasonal water stress due to depression of floodplain water tables

  18. Responses to riparian restoration in the Spring Creek watershed, Central Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carline, R.F.; Walsh, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Riparian treatments, consisting of 3- to 4-m buffer strips, stream bank stabilization, and rock-lined stream crossings, were installed in two streams with livestock grazing to reduce sediment loading and stream bank erosion. Cedar Run and Slab Cabin Run, the treatment streams, and Spring Creek, an adjacent reference stream without riparian grazing, were monitored prior to (1991-1992) and 3-5 years after (2001-2003) riparian buffer installation to assess channel morphology, stream substrate composition, suspended sediments, and macroinvertebrate communities. Few changes were found in channel widths and depths, but channel-structuring flow events were rare in the drought period after restoration. Stream bank vegetation increased from 50% or less to 100% in nearly all formerly grazed riparian buffers. The proportion of fine sediments in stream substrates decreased in Cedar Run but not in Slab Cabin Run. After riparian treatments, suspended sediments during base flow and storm flow decreased 47-87% in both streams. Macroinvertebrate diversity did not improve after restoration in either treated stream. Relative to Spring Creek, macroinvertebrate densities increased in both treated streams by the end of the posttreatment sampling period. Despite drought conditions that may have altered physical and biological effects of riparian treatments, goals of the riparian restoration to minimize erosion and sedimentation were met. A relatively narrow grass buffer along 2.4 km of each stream was effective in improving water quality, stream substrates, and some biological metrics. ?? 2007 Society for Ecological Restoration International.

  19. Prescribed fires as ecological surrogates for wildfires: A stream and riparian perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arkle, R.S.; Pilliod, D.S.

    2010-01-01

    Forest managers use prescribed fire to reduce wildfire risk and to provide resource benefits, yet little information is available on whether prescribed fires can function as ecological surrogates for wildfire in fire-prone landscapes. Information on impacts and benefits of this management tool on stream and riparian ecosystems is particularly lacking. We used a beyond-BACI (Before, After, Control, Impact) design to investigate the effects of a prescribed fire on a stream ecosystem and compared these findings to similar data collected after wildfire. For 3 years after prescribed fire treatment, we found no detectable changes in periphyton, macroinvertebrates, amphibians, fish, and riparian and stream habitats compared to data collected over the same time period in four unburned reference streams. Based on changes in fuels, plant and litter cover, and tree scorching, this prescribed fire was typical of those being implemented in ponderosa pine forests throughout the western U.S. However, we found that the extent and severity of riparian vegetation burned was substantially lower after prescribed fire compared to nearby wildfires. The early-season prescribed fire did not mimic the riparian or in-stream ecological effects observed following a nearby wildfire, even in catchments with burn extents similar to the prescribed fire. Little information exists on the effects of long-term fire exclusion from riparian forests, but a "prescribed fire regime" of repeatedly burning upland forests while excluding fire in adjacent riparian forests may eliminate an important natural disturbance from riparian and stream habitats.

  20. Geomorphic and hydrologic controls on riparian vegetation in the Grand Canyon, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, D.A.; Stevens, L.E.; Kearsley, M.J.; Ayers, T.J. )

    1993-06-01

    Interactions between geomorphology and hydrology largely control the structure and composition of riparian vegetation in the Grand Canyon. Geologic structure, water table elevation, flooding and sediment deposition collectively create distinctive habitats required by major riparian assemblages in the dam-controlled Colorado River and its unregulated tributaries. Riparian assemblages in dominant geomorphic settings are associated with different combinations of substrata, inundation frequencies, and geomorphic features along this dam-regulated system. Data on recruitment, growth and water potential confirm that physical attributes of geomorphic zones are the causal force behind plant community structure. Alternative biotic hypotheses regarding community organization (e.g. competition, herbivory, dispersal) are discussed and dismissed.

  1. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in a soil profile: Model insights and application to a restored Swiss riparian area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, Alessandro; Batlle-Aguilar, Jordi; Luster, Jörg; Shrestha, Juna; Huber, Benjamin; Niklaus, Pascal; Barry, D. Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The key environmental importance of natural, healthy ecosystems has been progressively recognized and restoration of degraded lands towards their former natural state has become an area of active research worldwide. During restoration, environmental conditions (such as vegetation type and water availability) are manipulated to create ecological conditions suitable for the successful establishment of a target composition of species. Often, ecological restoration induces changes to adjacent ecosystems. This is the case of riparian ecosystems, and their restoration to their original undisturbed situation is likely to cause changes in nutrient cycles. For example, following the restoration of a riparian zone, microbial communities adapted to one set of environmental conditions have to acclimatize to another, and the subsequent changes in the composition of the biomass populations might induce changes in soil organic matter mineralization and soil respiration rates. Since the biogeochemical cycles are tightly interconnected, these changes can trigger nutrient storing or release, therefore inducing changes in nutrient cycles of adjacent ecosystems. Overall, the effects of the restoration activities on the hydrologic regime, soil properties and vegetation are still largely unknown and poorly understood. Within the RECORD project (http://www.cces.ethz.ch/projects/nature/Record), a large collaborative research effort undertaken to monitor and understand the changes in ecosystem functioning in riparian areas undergoing restoration, a numerical model has been developed to simulate the vertical transport of the mobile C and N components in a soil profile (model development discussed in the companion submitted abstract Batlle-Aguilar et al.). In the model, microbial decomposition of the soil organic matter drives biogeochemical transformations of C and N, while the activity of the soil biota is primarily controlled by the soil moisture content. The temporal evolution of the

  2. Establishing a baseline on the distribution and pattern of occurrence of Salvadora persica L. with meteorological data and assessing its adaptation in the adjacent warmed-up zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Amin U.; Sharif, Faiza; Hamza, Ali

    2016-12-01

    The natural occurrence of Salvadora persica L., stretching from the coastal area of the Arabian sea to northward along the Indus floodplains, was surveyed to document the pattern of its occurrence with the available meteorological record showing increasing trends of frost northwards. Information was compiled from various sources to generate the past and present temperature data in order to establish relationship between the changing temperature factors and the extent of the area available due to climate change over the years for introducing species beyond its range of natural distribution. In addition, the species was experimentally introduced in the warmed-up zones to monitor its performance and to evaluate its adaptability. The reconnaissance survey showed that the natural populations of thorn forest communities with S. persica, as associate, are now surviving only as degraded remnants. Its common occurrence is documented in zones where the mean winter temperatures are above the threshold level of frost, whereas it is rarely found in zones where it drops below this level for a single month, which seems to be its range edge. S. persica does not occur in zones where low temperature could persist for 2 months. Recent temperature data suggests that the month of December has warmed up above the threshold level; therefore, it was expected that correspondingly the range edge of the frost-sensitive species has potentially shifted further northwards. The response of the species introduced at the experimental sites beyond its natural occurrence suggests high survival and growth, demonstrating its adaptability to the new sites beyond its limit of distribution.

  3. Riparian erosion vulnerability model based on environmental features.

    PubMed

    Botero-Acosta, Alejandra; Chu, Maria L; Guzman, Jorge A; Starks, Patrick J; Moriasi, Daniel N

    2017-03-16

    Riparian erosion is one of the major causes of sediment and contaminant load to streams, degradation of riparian wildlife habitats, and land loss hazards. Land and soil management practices are implemented as conservation and restoration measures to mitigate the environmental problems brought about by riparian erosion. This, however, requires the identification of vulnerable areas to soil erosion. Because of the complex interactions between the different mechanisms that govern soil erosion and the inherent uncertainties involved in quantifying these processes, assessing erosion vulnerability at the watershed scale is challenging. The main objective of this study was to develop a methodology to identify areas along the riparian zone that are susceptible to erosion. The methodology was developed by integrating the physically-based watershed model MIKE-SHE, to simulate water movement, and a habitat suitability model, MaxEnt, to quantify the probability of presences of elevation changes (i.e., erosion) across the watershed. The presences of elevation changes were estimated based on two LiDAR-based elevation datasets taken in 2009 and 2012. The changes in elevation were grouped into four categories: low (0.5 - 0.7 m), medium (0.7 - 1.0 m), high (1.0 - 1.7 m) and very high (1.7 - 5.9 m), considering each category as a studied "species". The categories' locations were then used as "species location" map in MaxEnt. The environmental features used as constraints to the presence of erosion were land cover, soil, stream power index, overland flow, lateral inflow, and discharge. The modeling framework was evaluated in the Fort Cobb Reservoir Experimental watershed in southcentral Oklahoma. Results showed that the most vulnerable areas for erosion were located at the upper riparian zones of the Cobb and Lake sub-watersheds. The main waterways of these sub-watersheds were also found to be prone to streambank erosion. Approximatively 80% of the riparian zone (streambank

  4. Assessing Risks of Shallow Riparian Groundwater Quality Near an Oil Sands Tailings Pond.

    PubMed

    Roy, J W; Bickerton, G; Frank, R A; Grapentine, L; Hewitt, L M

    2016-07-01

    The potential discharge of groundwater contaminated by oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) is a concern for aquatic ecosystems near tailings ponds. Groundwater in the area, but unaffected by OSPW, may contain similar compounds, complicating the assessment of potential ecological impacts. In this study, 177 shallow groundwater samples were collected from riparian areas along the Athabasca River and tributaries proximate to oil sands developments. For "pond-site" samples (71; adjacent to study tailings pond), Canadian aquatic life guidelines were exceeded for 11 of 20 assessed compounds. However, "non-pond" samples (54; not near any tailings pond) provided similar exceedances. Statistical analyses indicate that pond-site and non-pond samples were indistinguishable for all but seven parameters assessed, including salts, many trace metals, and fluorescence profiles of aromatic naphthenic acids (ANA). This suggests that, regarding the tested parameters, groundwater adjacent to the study tailings pond generally poses no greater ecological risk than other nearby groundwaters at this time. Multivariate analyses applied to the groundwater data set separated into 11 smaller zones support this conclusion, but show some variation between zones. Geological and potential OSPW influences could not be distinguished based on major ions and metals concentrations. However, similarities in indicator parameters, namely ANA, F, Mo, Se, and Na-Cl ratio, were noted between a small subset of samples from two pond-site zones and two OSPW samples and two shallow groundwater samples documented as likely OSPW affected. This indicator-based screening suggests that OSPW-affected groundwater may be reaching Athabasca River sediments at a few locations.

  5. Neotropical migratory breeding bird communities in riparian forests of different widths along the Altamaha River, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, M.F.; Krementz, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    -We surveyed riparian forest corridors of different widths along the lower Altamaha River in Georgia in 1993 and 1994 to investigate the relationship between forest corridor width and Neotropical breeding bird community diversity and abundance. Species richness and abundance of three of six focal species increased with increasing forest corridor width. We suggest if Neotropical breeding bird communities are a target group, that land managers should consider leaving a 100 m buffer strip along riparian zones.

  6. Principles for Establishing Ecologically Successful Riparian Corridors

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Principles for establishing riparian areas. Riparian areas are three‐dimensional ecotones of interaction that include terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, that extend down into the groundwater, up above the canopy, outward across the floodplain.

  7. Groundwater discharge creates hotspots of riparian plant species richness in a boreal forest stream network.

    PubMed

    Kuglerová, Lenka; Jansson, Roland; Agren, Anneli; Laudon, Hjalmar; Malm-Renöfält, Birgitta

    2014-03-01

    Riparian vegetation research has traditionally focused on channel-related processes because riparian areas are situated on the edge of aquatic ecosystems and are therefore greatly affected by the flow regime of streams and rivers. However, due to their low topographic position in the landscape, riparian areas receive significant inputs of water and nutrients from uplands. These inputs may be important for riparian vegetation, but their role for riparian plant diversity is poorly known. We studied the relationship between the influx of groundwater (GW) from upland areas and riparian plant diversity and composition along a stream size gradient, ranging from small basins lacking permanent streams to a seventh-order river in northern Sweden. We selected riparian sites with and without GW discharge using a hydrological model describing GW flow accumulation to test the hypothesis that riparian sites with GW discharge harbor plant communities with higher species richness. We further investigated several environmental factors to detect habitat differences between sites differing in GW discharge conditions. Vascular plant species richness was between 15% and 20% higher, depending on the spatial scale sampled, at riparian sites with GW discharge in comparison to non-discharge sites, a pattern that was consistent across all stream sizes. The elevated species richness was best explained by higher soil pH and higher nitrogen availability (manifested as lower soil C/N ratio), conditions which were positively correlated with GW discharge. Base cations and possibly nitrogen transported by groundwater may therefore act as a terrestrial subsidy of riparian vegetation. The stable isotopes 15N and 13C were depleted in soils from GW discharge compared to non-discharge sites, suggesting that GW inputs might also affect nitrogen and carbon dynamics in riparian soils. Despite the fact that many flows of water and nutrients reaching streams are filtered through riparian zones, the

  8. Snowmelt induced hydrologic perturbations drive dynamic microbiological and geochemical behaviors across a shallow riparian aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danczak, Robert; Yabusaki, Steven; Williams, Kenneth; Fang, Yilin; Hobson, Chad; Wilkins, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Shallow riparian aquifers represent hotspots of biogeochemical activity in the arid western US. While these environments provide extensive ecosystem services, little is known of how natural environmental perturbations influence subsurface microbial communities and associated biogeochemical processes. Over a six-month period we tracked the annual snowmelt-driven incursion of groundwater into the vadose zone of an aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River, leading to increased dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in the normally suboxic saturated zone. Strong biogeochemical heterogeneity was measured across the site, with abiotic reactions between DO and sulfide minerals driving rapid DO consumption and mobilization of redox active species in reduced aquifer regions. Conversely, extensive DO increases were detected in less reduced sediments. 16S rRNA gene surveys tracked microbial community composition within the aquifer, revealing strong correlations between increases in putative oxygen-utilizing chemolithoautotrophs and heterotrophs and rising DO concentrations. The gradual return to suboxic aquifer conditions favored increasing abundances of 16S rRNA sequences matching members of the Microgenomates (OP11) and Parcubacteria (OD1) that have been strongly implicated in fermentative processes. Microbial community stability measurements indicated that deeper aquifer locations were relatively less affected by geochemical perturbations, while communities in shallower locations exhibited the greatest change. Reactive transport modeling of the geochemical and microbiological results supported field observations, suggesting that a predictive framework can be applied to develop a greater understanding of such environments.

  9. 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory Riparian Inventory Results

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Elizabeth J.; Hansen, Leslie A.; Hathcock, Charles D.; Keller, David C.; Zemlick, Catherine M.

    2012-03-29

    A total length of 36.7 kilometers of riparian habitat were inventoried within LANL boundaries between 2007 and 2011. The following canyons and lengths of riparian habitat were surveyed and inventoried between 2007 and 2011. Water Canyon (9,669 m), Los Alamos Canyon (7,131 m), Pajarito Canyon (6,009 m), Mortandad Canyon (3,110 m), Two-Mile Canyon (2,680 m), Sandia Canyon (2,181 m), Three-Mile Canyon (1,883 m), Canyon de Valle (1,835 m), Ancho Canyon (1,143 m), Canada del Buey (700 m), Sandia Canyon (221 m), DP Canyon (159 m) and Chaquehui Canyon (50 m). Effluent Canyon, Fence Canyon and Potrillo Canyon were surveyed but no areas of riparian habitat were found. Stretches of inventoried riparian habitat were classified for prioritization of treatment, if any was recommended. High priority sites included stretches of Mortandad Canyon, LA Canyon, Pajarito Canyon, Two-Mile Canyon, Sandia Canyon and Water Canyon. Recommended treatment for high priority sites includes placement of objects into the stream channel to encourage sediment deposition, elimination of channel incision, and to expand and slow water flow across the floodplain. Additional stretches were classified as lower priority, and, for other sites it was recommended that feral cattle and exotic plants be removed to aid in riparian habitat recovery. In June 2011 the Las Conchas Wildfire burned over 150,000 acres of land in the Jemez Mountains and surrounding areas. The watersheds above LA Canyon, Water Canyon and Pajarito Canyon were burned in the Las Conchas Wildfire and flooding and habitat alteration were observed in these canyon bottoms (Wright 2011). Post fire status of lower priority areas may change to higher priority for some of the sites surveyed prior to the Las Conchas Wildfire, due to changes in vegetation cover in the adjacent upland watershed.

  10. Nitrogen uptake and turnover in riparian woody vegetation.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Chris; Marshall, John D; Danehy, Robert J

    2004-06-01

    The nutrient balance of streams and adjacent riparian ecosystems may be modified by the elimination of anadromous fish runs and perhaps by forest fertilization. To better understand nitrogen (N) dynamics within stream and riparian ecosystems we fertilized two streams and their adjacent riparian corridors in central Idaho. On each stream two nitrogen doses were applied to a swathe approximately 35 m wide centered on the stream. The fertilizer N was enriched in 15N to 18 per thousand. This enrichment is light relative to many previous labeling studies, yet sufficient to yield a traceable signal in riparian and stream biota. This paper reports pre-treatment differences in delta15N and the first-year N response to fertilizer within the riparian woody plant community. Future papers will describe the transfer of allochthonous litter N to the stream and its subsequent processing by stream biota. Pre-treatment delta15N differed between the two creeks (P=0.0002), possibly due to residual salmon nitrogen in one of the creeks. Pre-treatment delta15N of current-year needles was enriched compared to leaf litter, which was in turn enriched compared to needles aged 4 years and older. We conclude that fractionation due to retranslocation occurs in at least two phases. The first phase, which optimizes allocation of N in younger needle age classes, is distinctly different from the second, which conserves N prior to abscission. The delta15N difference between creeks was eliminated by the fertilization (P=0.42). In the two dominant conifer species, Abies lasiocarpa and Picea engelmannii, most fertilizer N was found in the current-year foliage; little was found in older needles and none was detected in litter (P=0.53). The only N-fixing shrub species, Alnus incana, took up only a small amount of fertilizer N [mean percent N derived from fertilizer (%Ndff) 5.0+/-1.6% (SE)]. Far more fertilizer N was taken up by other deciduous shrubs (mean %Ndff=33.9+/-4.5%). Fertilizer N made up 25

  11. Characterizing Controls of Riparian Width for Mountain Streams in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polvi, L. E.; Wohl, E. E.

    2007-12-01

    High variability of mountain streams causes riparian width to vary greatly from changes in drainage, valley and channel characteristics. GIS- based models for predicting flood-prone width, valley bottoms, or riparian zones may not accurately reflect processes at the reach scale, therefore field verification and reach-specific studies are needed. Management of riparian areas often designates a generalized width, which may under- or over-estimate the true riparian width. This study examines correlations between potential control variables and riparian zone width in the Colorado Front Range. Results from this study will be used to predict the riparian zone as a proxy for flood-prone width in the semi-arid Colorado Front Range. We hypothesize that local controls interact with large- scale controls to determine floodplain processes. Large-scale controls identified are elevation, which reflects hydroclimatology and glacial history, gradient and drainage area. Local controls are entrenchment, the ratio of the valley width to channel width, connectedness, defined as the distance from the channel to valley edge, presence of colluvium, and vegetation type, affecting roughness during flooding and bank stability. We chose twenty reaches based on elevation, connectedness, gradient and drainage area using a GIS base map in anthropogenically undisturbed areas of the Colorado Front Range, which included the Cache la Poudre and North St. Vrain drainages. Riparian width was defined using a three-tiered approach: evidence of fluvial processes and presence of riparian vegetation, compared with the Q100 stage. A longitudinal and two valley and channel cross-section surveys were completed at each stream reach to determine valley and channel geometry and bed gradient. Preliminary results show significant positive correlations between drainage area, entrenchment, and connectedness and riparian width, and negative correlations between gradient and riparian width, supporting the hypothesis

  12. Geologic map of the Bartlett Springs Fault Zone in the vicinity of Lake Pillsbury and adjacent areas of Mendocino, Lake, and Glenn Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ohlin, Henry N.; McLaughlin, Robert J.; Moring, Barry C.; Sawyer, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    The Lake Pillsbury area lies in the eastern part of the northern California Coast Ranges, along the east side of the transform boundary between the Pacific and North American plates (fig. 1). The Bartlett Springs Fault Zone is a northwest-trending zone of faulting associated with this eastern part of the transform boundary. It is presently active, based on surface creep (Svarc and others, 2008), geomorphic expression, offset of Holocene units (Lienkaemper and Brown, 2009), and microseismicity (Bolt and Oakeshott, 1982; Dehlinger and Bolt, 1984; DePolo and Ohlin, 1984). Faults associated with the Bartlett Springs Fault Zone at Lake Pillsbury are steeply dipping and offset older low to steeply dipping faults separating folded and imbricated Mesozoic terranes of the Franciscan Complex and interleaved rocks of the Coast Range Ophiolite and Great Valley Sequence. Parts of this area were mapped in the late 1970s and 1980s by several investigators who were focused on structural relations in the Franciscan Complex (Lehman, 1978; Jordan, 1975; Layman, 1977; Etter, 1979). In the 1980s the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) mapped a large part of the area as part of a mineral resource appraisal of two U.S. Forest Service Roadless areas. For evaluating mineral resource potential, the USGS mapping was published at a scale of 1:62,500 as a generalized geologic summary map without a topographic base (Ohlin and others, 1983; Ohlin and Spear, 1984). The previously unpublished mapping with topographic base is presented here at a scale of 1:30,000, compiled with other mapping in the vicinity of Lake Pillsbury. The mapping provides a geologic framework for ongoing investigations to evaluate potential earthquake hazards and structure of the Bartlett Springs Fault Zone. This geologic map includes part of Mendocino National Forest (the Elk Creek Roadless Area) in Mendocino, Glenn, and Lake Counties and is traversed by several U.S. Forest Service Routes, including M1 and M6 (fig. 2). The study

  13. Development and Evaluation of a Riparian Buffer Mapping Tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milheim, Lesley E.; Claggett, Peter R.

    2008-01-01

    Land use and land cover within riparian areas greatly affect the conditions of adjacent water features. In particular, riparian forests provide many environmental benefits, including nutrient uptake, bank stabilization, steam shading, sediment trapping, aquatic and terrestrial habitat, and stream organic matter. In contrast, residential and commercial development and associated transportation infrastructure increase pollutant and nutrient loading and change the hydrologic characteristics of the landscape, thereby affecting both water quality and habitat. Restoring riparian areas is a popular and cost effective restoration technique to improve and protect water quality. Recognizing this, the Chesapeake Executive Council committed to restoring 10,000 miles of riparian forest buffers throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed by the year 2010. In 2006, the Chesapeake Executive Council further committed to 'using the best available...tools to identify areas where retention and expansion of forests is most needed to protect water quality'. The Chesapeake Bay watershed encompasses 64,000 square miles, including portions of six States and Washington, D.C. Therefore, the interpretation of remotely sensed imagery provides the only effective technique for comprehensively evaluating riparian forest protection and restoration opportunities throughout the watershed. Although 30-meter-resolution land use and land cover data have proved useful on a regional scale, they have not been equally successful at providing the detail required for local-scale assessment of riparian area characteristics. Use of high-resolution imagery (HRI) provides sufficient detail for local-scale assessments, although at greater cost owing to the cost of the imagery and the skill and time required to process the data. To facilitate the use of HRI for monitoring the extent of riparian forest buffers, the U.S. Forest Service and the U.S. Geological Survey Eastern Geographic Science Center funded the

  14. Riparian seed dispersal: transport and depositional processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunnings, A.; Johnson, E. A.; Martin, Y. E.

    2012-04-01

    Riparian tree population dynamics are linked to the physical processes controlled by the hydrogeomorphic setting. In particular, fluvial seed dispersal is influenced by a combination of factors including the hydrology, fluvial geomorphology, and seed dispersal traits. This study examines the influence of stream flow patterns on the transportation and deposition of buoyant seeds by applying a one dimensional transport model. Conceptually, the model separates the stream into two components: the main channel and transient storage /deposition zones. The hydrologic processes are governed by an advection-dispersion equation and numerically solved using the Crank-Nicolson method. Additional terms in the equation allow for model variation in the flow regime (lateral inflow and outflow) and the incorporation of a transient storage/deposition component where seeds may be detained. The model parameters are based on a bedrock-gravel bed river with pool-riffle morphology where we conducted field experimentation in Coastal Northern California. The riparian zone of the study reach is inhabited by White Alder (Alnus rhombifolia) which disperses buoyant seeds in late winter/early spring coinciding with the latter part of the wet, Mediterranean climate. Artificial seeds with similar characteristic traits of buoyancy, density and Bond Number to White Alder seeds were used to quantify transport times and identify storage areas. The model output captures a greater number of seeds during a receding hydrograph due to the increase in transient storage. Typically, this is found in shallow stream margins where the flow is divergent such as areas with back-eddies. In the field, this is associated with the ends of gravel bars or riffles where flow expansion causes secondary flows. The results demonstrate the importance of transient storage for seed transport and depositional processes and emphasize the need for improved measurement techniques, in lieu of empirical coefficients, to advance the

  15. Drowned, buried and carried away: effects of plant traits on the distribution of native and alien species in riparian ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Catford, Jane A; Jansson, Roland

    2014-10-01

    Riparian vegetation is exposed to stress from inundation and hydraulic disturbance, and is often rich in native and alien plant species. We describe 35 traits that enable plants to cope with riparian conditions. These include traits for tolerating or avoiding anoxia and enabling underwater photosynthesis, traits that confer resistance and resilience to hydraulic disturbance, and attributes that facilitate dispersal, such as floating propagules. This diversity of life-history strategies illustrates that there are many ways of sustaining life in riparian zones, which helps to explain high riparian biodiversity. Using community assembly theory, we examine how adaptations to inundation, disturbance and dispersal shape plant community composition along key environmental gradients, and how human actions have modified communities. Dispersal-related processes seem to explain many patterns, highlighting the influence of regional processes on local species assemblages. Using alien plant invasions like an (uncontrolled) experiment in community assembly, we use an Australian and a global dataset to examine possible causes of high degrees of riparian invasion. We found that high proportions of alien species in the regional species pools have invaded riparian zones, despite not being riparian specialists, and that riparian invaders disperse in more ways, including by water and humans, than species invading other ecosystems.

  16. Effects of habitat disturbance from residential development on breeding bird communities in riparian corridors.

    PubMed

    Lussier, Suzanne M; Enser, Richard W; Dasilva, Sara N; Charpentier, Michael

    2006-09-01

    This study assessed the relationship among land use, riparian vegetation,and avian populations at two spatial scales. Our objective was to compare the vegetated habitat in riparian corridors with breeding bird guilds in eight Rhode Island subwatersheds along a range of increasing residential land use. Riparian habitats were characterized with fine-scale techniques (used field transects to measure riparian vegetation structure and plant species richness) at the reach spatial scale,and with coarse-scale landscape techniques (a Geographic Information System to document land-cover attributes) at the subwatershed scale. Bird surveys were conducted in the riparian zone,and the observed bird species were separated into guilds based on tolerance to human disturbance,habitat preference,foraging type, and diet preference. Bird guilds were correlated with riparian vegetation metrics,percent impervious surface,and percent residential land use,revealing patterns of breeding bird distribution. The number of intolerant species predominated below 12%residential development and 3% impervious surface,whereas tolerant species predominated above these levels.Habitat guilds of edge,forest, and wetland bird species correlated with riparian vegetation. This study showed that the application of avian guilds at both stream reach and subwatershed scales offers a comprehensive assessment of effects from disturbed habitat,but that the subwatershed scale is a more efficient method of evaluation for environmental management.

  17. Herbivore-induced "deshrubification" alters the biogeochemistry of subarctic riparian ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smis, Adriaan; Ravolainen, Virve; Bråthen, Kari Anne; Ims, Rolf; Meire, Patrick; Struyf, Eric

    2013-04-01

    In the European subarctic, river valleys and other moist zones are dominated by tall shrub tundra, dominated by willows. Although climate warming is generally hypothesized to result in an expansion of this shrub zone, intensive reindeer husbandry in Finnmark (Northern Fennoscandia) during the last three decades seems to have resulted in a "deshrubification": riparian tall willow dominated shrub zones evolved to open meadows, dominated by grasses. These changes in land cover may have major biogeochemical consequences for both the terrestrial and aquatic environment. We investigated the relation between this "deshrubification" and the biogeochemical cycling of silicon (Si), nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P), essential nutrients for aquatic primary production. This study was conducted along a climatic gradient from the moist and warm southwest towards the drier and colder northeast of Finnmark. Along the contrast of Finnmarks typical reindeer husbandry system, with intensively grazed summer pastures and extensively grazed spring/autumn pastures, we quantified the difference in vegetation composition and the associated differences in terrestrial pools of Si, N, P and soil organic carbon. Intensive reindeer grazing consistently excludes the presence of willow shrubs in the studied riparian zone and the transition from willow dominated tall shrub tundra towards open meadows dominated by grasses is associated with a clear silicification of the vegetation: all dominating grasses in the open meadow-state show 10 to 30 times higher Si concentrations compared to the dominating willow and forb species of the tall shrub vegetation, but also original tall shrub species show increased Si-concentrations under the intensive grazing regime. Silicon is a known defence component against herbivory, especially in grasses. Opposite, a transition to more N- and P-poor species occurs under intensive reindeer grazing: the continuum between tall willow dominated shrubs and open meadows is

  18. Riparian invasive alters stream nitrogen dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineau, M.; Baxter, C.; Marcarelli, A.; Minshall, G.

    2008-12-01

    Invasive species may be most likely to have strong effects on the ecosystem they invade when they contribute a new function such as nitrogen (N) fixation. Russian olive (Eleagnus angustifolia) is a non-native invasive tree which is rapidly spreading along riparian corridors in the American West. Russian olive is a nitrogen fixing plant due to a symbiotic relationship with Actinomycetes and is invading systems that frequently lack a strong native N fixer. The contribution of reactive N by these invasive riparian plants to soils may also be altering N cycling and processing in the adjacent streams. We measured nutrient limitation via periphyton growth on nutrient diffusing substrates and nitrate uptake using short term nitrate additions in Deep Creek, ID. Measurements were made in three reaches along a Russian olive invasion gradient, with an upstream reference reach that has no Russian olive and two downstream invaded reaches, one with moderate density and one with high density. Periphyton growth in Deep Creek was significantly N limited in the reference reach while the moderately invaded reach showed no significant limitation and the highly invaded reach was significantly P limited. The nitrate uptake velocity (Vf) for both of the invaded reaches was an order of magnitude less than the reference reach, implying that biological demand for nitrate is significantly less in the invaded reaches than the reference. Considering the current extent of Russian olive invasion and its continued rapid spread, possible alteration of N cycling in waterways may have important implications for the management of both this invasive species and management of nutrient pollution in waters of the western U.S.

  19. Phytoplankton and nutrient distributions in a front-eddy area adjacent to the coastal upwelling zone off Concepcion (Chile): implications for ecosystem productivity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Carmen; Anabalón, Valeria; Hormazábal, Samuel; Cornejo, Marcela; Bento, Joaquim; Silva, Nelson

    2016-04-01

    The impact that sub-mesoscale (1-10 km) to mesocale (50-100 km) oceanographic variability has on plankton and nutrient distributions (horizontal and vertical) in the coastal upwelling and transition zones off Concepcion was the focus of this study. Satellite time-series data (wind, sea-surface temperature (SST), and altimetry) were used to understand the dynamic context of in situ data derived from a short-term front survey (3 d) during the upwelling period (3-6 February, 2014). The survey included two transects perpendicular to the coast, covering the shelf and shelf-break areas just north of Punta Lavapie, a main upwelling center (˜37° S). Wind and SST time-series data indicated that the survey was undertaken just after a moderate upwelling event (end of January) which lead to a relaxation phase during early February. A submesoscale thermal front was detected previous to and during the survey and results from an eddy tracking algorithm based on altimetry data indicated that this front (F1) was flanked on its oceanic side by an anticyclonic, mesoscale eddy (M1), which was ˜25 d old at the sampling time. M1 strengthened the thermal gradient of F1 by bringing warmer oceanic water nearer to the colder coastal upwelling zone. The distributions of hydrographic variables and nutrients in the water column (<300 m depth) also denoted these two features. Phytoplankton biomass (Chl-a) and diatom abundance were highest in the surface layer (<20 m depth) between the coast and F1, with primary maxima in the latter, whereas they were highest at the subsurface (20-40 m depth) towards M1 and associated with secondary maxima. The distribution of dominant diatoms in the top layer (<100 m depth) indicated that both coastal and oceanic species were aggregated at F1 and in M1. These results suggest that the front-eddy interaction creates a complex field of submesoscale processes in the top layer, including vertical nutrient injections and lateral stirring, which contributes to the

  20. Factors affecting songbird nest survival in riparian forests in a Midwestern agricultural landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peak, R.G.; Thompson, F. R.; Shaffer, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting nest success of songbirds in riparian forest and buffers in northeastern Missouri. We used an information-theoretic approach to determine support for hypotheses concerning effects of nest-site, habitat-patch, edge, and temporal factors on nest success of songbirds in three narrow (55DS95 m) and three wide (400DS530 m) riparian forests with adjacent grasslandDSshrub buffer strips and in three narrow and three wide riparian forests without adjacent grasslandDSshrub buffer strips. We predicted that temporal effects would have the most support and that habitat-patch and edge effects would have little support, because nest predation would be great across all sites in the highly fragmented, predominantly agricultural landscape. Interval nest success was 0.404, 0.227, 0.070, and 0.186, respectively, for Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea), and forest interior species pooled (Acadian Flycatcher [Empidonax virescens], Wood Thrush [Hylocichla mustelina], Ovenbird [Seiurus aurocapillus], and Kentucky Warbler [Oporornis formosus]). The effect of nest stage on nest success had the most support; daily nest success for Gray Catbird and Indigo Bunting were lowest in the laying stage. We found strong support for greater nest success of Gray Catbird in riparian forests with adjacent buffer strips than in riparian forests without adjacent buffer strips. Patch width also occurred in the most supported model for Gray Catbird, but with very limited support. The null model received the most support for Northern Cardinal. Riparian forests provided breeding habitat for areas sensitive forest species and grassland-shrub nesting species. Buffer strips provided additional breeding habitat for grassland-shrub nesting species. Interval nest success for Indigo Bunting and area-sensitive forest species pooled, however, fell well below the level that is likely necessary to balance

  1. Factors affecting songbird nest survival in riparian forests in a midwestern agricultural landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peak, R.G.; Thompson, F. R.; Shaffer, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting nest success of songbirds in riparian forest and buffers in northeastern Missouri. We used an information-theoretic approach to determine support for hypotheses concerning effects of nest-site, habitat-patch, edge, and temporal factors on nest success of songbirds in three narrow (55-95 m) and three wide (400-530 m) riparian forests with adjacent grassland-shrub buffer strips and in three narrow and three wide riparian forests without adjacent grassland-shrub buffer strips. We predicted that temporal effects would have the most support and that habitat-patch and edge effects would have little support, because nest predation would be great across all sites in the highly fragmented, predominantly agricultural landscape. Interval nest success was 0.404, 0.227, 0.070, and 0.186, respectively, for Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea), and forest interior species pooled (Acadian Flycatcher [Empidonax virescens], Wood Thrush [Hylocichla mustelina], Ovenbird [Seiurus aurocapillus], and Kentucky Warbler [Oporornis formosus]). The effect of nest stage on nest success had the most support; daily nest success for Gray Catbird and Indigo Bunting were lowest in the laying stage. We found strong support for greater nest success of Gray Catbird in riparian forests with adjacent buffer strips than in riparian forests without adjacent buffer strips. Patch width also occurred in the most-supported model for Gray Catbird, but with very limited support. The null model received the most support for Northern Cardinal. Riparian forests provided breeding habitat for area-sensitive forest species and grassland-shrub nesting species. Buffer strips provided additional breeding habitat for grassland-shrub nesting species. Interval nest success for Indigo Bunting and area-sensitive forest species pooled, however, fell well below the level that is likely necessary to balance juvenile

  2. Riparian responses to extreme climate and land-use change scenarios.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Maria Rosário; Segurado, Pedro; Jauch, Eduardo; Ferreira, Maria Teresa

    2016-11-01

    Climate change will induce alterations in the hydrological and landscape patterns with effects on riparian ecotones. In this study we assess the combined effect of an extreme climate and land-use change scenario on riparian woody structure and how this will translate into a future risk of riparian functionality loss. The study was conducted in the Tâmega catchment of the Douro basin. Boosted Regression Trees (BRTs) were used to model two riparian landscape indicators related with the degree of connectivity (Mean Width) and complexity (Area Weighted Mean Patch Fractal Dimension). Riparian data were extracted by planimetric analysis of high spatial-resolution Word Imagery Layer (ESRI). Hydrological, climatic and land-use variables were obtained from available datasets and generated with process-based modeling using current climate data (2008-2014), while also considering the high-end RCP8.5 climate-change and "Icarus" socio-economic scenarios for the 2046-2065 time slice. Our results show that hydrological and land-use changes strongly influence future projections of riparian connectivity and complexity, albeit to diverse degrees and with differing effects. A harsh reduction in average flows may impair riparian zones while an increase in extreme rain events may benefit connectivity by promoting hydrologic dynamics with the surrounding floodplains. The expected increase in broad-leaved woodlands and mixed forests may enhance the riparian galleries by reducing the agricultural pressure on the area in the vicinity of the river. According to our results, 63% of river segments in the Tâmega basin exhibited a moderate risk of functionality loss, 16% a high risk, and 21% no risk. Weaknesses and strengths of the method are highlighted and results are discussed based on a resilience perspective with regard to riparian ecosystems.

  3. Arthropod prey for riparian associated birds in headwater forests of the Oregon Coast Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, Joan C.; Li, Judith; Sobota, Janel; Jenkins, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Headwater riparian areas occupy a large proportion of the land base in Pacific Northwest forests, and thus are ecologically and economically important. Although a primary goal of management along small headwater streams is the protection of aquatic resources, streamside habitat also is important for many terrestrial wildlife species. However, mechanisms underlying the riparian associations of some terrestrial species have not been well studied, particularly for headwater drainages. We investigated the diets of and food availability for four bird species associated with riparian habitats in montane coastal forests of western Oregon, USA. We examined variation in the availability of arthropod prey as a function of distance from stream. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that (1) emergent aquatic insects were a food source for insectivorous birds in headwater riparian areas, and (2) the abundances of aquatic and terrestrial arthropod prey did not differ between streamside and upland areas during the bird breeding season. We found that although adult aquatic insects were available for consumption throughout the study period, they represented a relatively small proportion of available prey abundance and biomass and were present in only 1% of the diet samples from only one of the four riparian-associated bird species. Nonetheless, arthropod prey, comprised primarily of insects of terrestrial origin, was more abundant in streamside than upland samples. We conclude that food resources for birds in headwater riparian areas are primarily associated with terrestrial vegetation, and that bird distributions along the gradient from streamside to upland may be related to variation in arthropod prey availability. Because distinct vegetation may distinguish riparian from upland habitats for riparian-associated birds and their terrestrial arthropod prey, we suggest that understory communities be considered when defining management zones for riparian habitat.

  4. Nitrogen and Sediment Inputs to the San Pedro River Riparian Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, M.; Huth, A. K.; Hamblen, J.; Villinski, J.; Grimm, N.; Lewis, D.; Schade, J.

    2002-05-01

    The San Pedro River in southern Arizona is the last undammed major river in the Western U.S. The riparian habitat along the upper San Pedro is under pressure due to competing water use by nearby agriculture and municipal demands. Numerous nongovernmental organizations and government agencies are cooperating to investigate the functioning of the riparian area, including water and nutrient cycling. The multi-institutional NSF Science and Technology Center for Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA) is using two 500-m study sites along the upper San Pedro River (one gaining and one losing-intermittent) to investigate nutrient and sediment fluxes. Sampling of over 80 shallow piezometers installed in the stream, in gravel bars and in riparian terraces (among cottonwoods and willows) showed nitrate levels were highest in the riparian terrace and gravel bars throughout the year. Nitrate levels in shallow stream piezometers were lower and more variable. Seasonal algal blooms were correlated with decreases in nitrate and organic nitrogen in the stream channel. Intensive sampling during a 300 cfs flood (July 17-18, 2001) in the intermittant-losing reach showed significant increases in nitrate levels during the storm, apparently from the gravel bars and riparian terrace. Hydrograph separation indicated a substantial fraction of the water in the river had been in contact with the river banks. During storm events, substantial sediment transport occurs, as well as scour and fill. As much of the nitrogen cycling in microbially controlled, sediment scour and fill is being monitored concomitantly with respiration measurements in a meander point bar in the losing-intermittant reach. By focusing on key processes in the shallow stream sediments, gravel bars and riparian terraces, we are establishing linkages between the different zones of the riparian area in order to characterize nitrogen uptake capacity of the riparian system.

  5. Characterization of particulate organic matter in the Lena River Delta and adjacent nearshore zone, NE Siberia - Part 1: Lignin-derived phenol compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterfeld, M.; Goñi, M. A.; Just, J.; Hefter, J.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2014-10-01

    The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial organic matter (OM) from its vast catchment area to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea and the Arctic Ocean. The permafrost soils of its far south stretching catchment, which store huge amounts of OM, will most likely respond differently to climate warming and remobilize previously frozen OM with distinct properties specific for the source vegetation and soil. To characterize the material discharged by the Lena River, we analyzed the lignin phenol composition in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface water collected in spring and summer, surface sediments from the Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta's first (Holocene) and third terraces (Pleistocene ice complex), and plant samples. Our results show that lignin-derived cinnamyl:vanillyl (C/V) and syringyl:vanillyl (S/V) ratios are >0.14 and 0.25, respectively, in TSM and surface sediments, whereas in delta soils they are >0.16 and >0.51, respectively. These lignin compositions are consistent with significant inputs of organic matter from non-woody angiosperm sources mixed with organic matter derived from woody gymnosperm sources. We applied a simple linear mixing model based on the C/V and S/V ratios and the results indicate the organic matter in delta TSM samples and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments contain comparable contributions from gymnosperm material, which is primarily derived from the taiga forests south of the delta, and angiosperm material typical for tundra vegetation. Considering the small catchment area covered by tundra (∼12%), the input is substantial and tundra-derived OM input is likely to increase in a warming Arctic. The similar and high acid to aldehyde ratios of vanillyl and syringyl (Ad/AlV, S) in Lena Delta summer TSM (>0.7 and >0.5, respectively) and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments (>1.0 and >0.9, respectively) suggest that the OM is highly degraded and Lena River summer TSM could

  6. Characterization of particulate organic matter in the Lena River delta and adjacent nearshore zone, NE Siberia - Part 2: Lignin-derived phenol compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterfeld, M.; Goñi, M. A.; Just, J.; Hefter, J.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2015-04-01

    The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial organic matter (OM) from its vast catchment area to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea and the Arctic Ocean. The permafrost soils of its far south-stretching catchment, which store huge amounts of OM, will most likely respond differently to climate warming and remobilize previously frozen OM with distinct properties specific for the source vegetation and soil. To characterize the material discharged by the Lena River, we analyzed the lignin phenol composition in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface water collected in spring and summer, surface sediments from Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta's first (Holocene) and third terraces (Pleistocene ice complex), and plant samples. Our results show that lignin-derived cinnamyl : vanillyl (C / V) and syringyl : vanillyl (S / V) ratios are > 0.14 and 0.25, respectively, in TSM and surface sediments, whereas in delta soils they are > 0.16 and > 0.51, respectively. These lignin compositions are consistent with significant inputs of organic matter from non-woody angiosperm sources mixed with organic matter derived from woody gymnosperm sources. We applied a simple linear mixing model based on the C / V and S / V ratios, and the results indicate the organic matter in delta TSM samples and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments contain comparable contributions from gymnosperm material, which is primarily derived from the taiga forests south of the delta, and angiosperm material typical for tundra vegetation. Considering the small catchment area covered by tundra (~ 12%), the input is substantial and tundra-derived OM input is likely to increase in a warming Arctic. The similar and high acid to aldehyde ratios of vanillyl and syringyl (Ad / AlV, S) in Lena Delta summer TSM (> 0.7 and > 0.5, respectively) and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments (> 1.0 and > 0.9, respectively) suggest that the OM is highly degraded and Lena River

  7. Responses of riparian reptile communities to damming and urbanization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Stephanie D.; Guzy, Jacquelyn C.; Price, Steven J.; Halstead, Brian J.; Eskew, Evan A.; Dorcas, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Various anthropogenic pressures, including habitat loss, threaten reptile populations worldwide. Riparian zones are critical habitat for many reptile species, but these habitats are also frequently modified by anthropogenic activities. Our study investigated the effects of two riparian habitat modifications-damming and urbanization-on overall and species-specific reptile occupancy patterns. We used time-constrained search techniques to compile encounter histories for 28 reptile species at 21 different sites along the Broad and Pacolet Rivers of South Carolina. Using a hierarchical Bayesian analysis, we modeled reptile occupancy responses to a site's distance upstream from dam, distance downstream from dam, and percent urban land use. The mean occupancy response by the reptile community indicated that reptile occupancy and species richness were maximized when sites were farther upstream from dams. Species-specific occupancy estimates showed a similar trend of lower occupancy immediately upstream from dams. Although the mean occupancy response of the reptile community was positively related to distance downstream from dams, the occupancy response to distance downstream varied among species. Percent urban land use had little effect on the occupancy response of the reptile community or individual species. Our results indicate that the conditions of impoundments and subsequent degradation of the riparian zones upstream from dams may not provide suitable habitat for a number of reptile species.

  8. Groundwater nitrate following installation of a vegetated riparian buffer.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Toshiro; Logsdon, Sally D; Tomer, Mark D; Burkart, Michael R

    2007-10-15

    Substantial questions remain about the time required for groundwater nitrate to be reduced below 10 mg L(-1) following establishment of vegetated riparian buffers. The objective of this study was to document changes in groundwater nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations that occurred within a few years of planting a riparian buffer. In 2000 and 2001 a buffer was planted adjacent to a first-order stream in the deep loess region of western Iowa with strips of walnut and cottonwood trees, alfalfa and brome grass, and switch grass. Non-parametric statistics showed significant declines in NO3-N concentrations in shallow groundwater following buffer establishment, especially mid 2003 and later. The dissolved oxygen generally was >5 mg L(-1) beneath the buffer, and neither NO3-N nor DO changed significantly under a non-buffered control area. These short-term changes in groundwater NO3-N provide evidence that vegetated riparian buffers may yield local water-quality benefits within a few years of planting.

  9. Germination timing and rate of locally collected western wheatgrass and smooth brome grass: the role of collection site and light sensitivity along a riparian corridor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ecological integrity of riparian areas is reduced by biological plant invaders like smooth brome grass (Bromus inermis). Smooth brome actively invades recently disturbed riparian zones by its high seed production and fast seedling establishment. Restoring native perennial grasses to these regio...

  10. Riparian vegetation dynamics and evapotranspiration in the riparian corridor in the delta of the Colorado River, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagler, P.L.; Glenn, E.P.; Hinojosa-Huerta, O.; Zamora, F.; Howard, K. J.

    2008-01-01

    Like other great desert rivers, the Colorado River in the United States and Mexico is highly regulated to provide water for human use. No water is officially allotted to support the natural ecosystems in the delta of the river in Mexico. However, precipitation is inherently variable in this watershed, and from 1981-2004, 15% of the mean annual flow of the Lower Colorado River has entered the riparian corridor below the last diversion point for water in Mexico. These flows include flood releases from US dams and much smaller administrative spills released back to the river from irrigators in the US and Mexico. These flows have germinated new cohorts of native cottonwood and willow trees and have established an active aquatic ecosystem in the riparian corridor in Mexico. We used ground and remote-sensing methods to determine the composition and fractional cover of the vegetation in the riparian corridor, its annual water consumption, and the sources of water that support the ecosystem. The study covered the period 2000-2004, a flood year followed by 4 dry years. The riparian corridor occupies 30,000 ha between flood control levees in Mexico. Annual evapotranspiration (ET), estimated by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) satellite imagery calibrated against moisture flux tower data, was about 1.1 m yr-1 and was fairly constant throughout the study period despite a paucity of surface flows 2001-2004. Total ET averaged 3.4??108 m3 yr-1, about 15% of Colorado River water entering Mexico from the US Surface flows could have played only a small part in supporting these high ET losses. We conclude that the riparian ET is supported mainly by the shallow regional aquifer, derived from agricultural return flows, that approaches the surface in the riparian zone. Nevertheless, surface flows are important in germinating cohorts of native trees, in washing salts from the soil and aquifer, and in providing aquatic habitat, thereby enriching the habitat value of the

  11. Riparian vegetation dynamics and evapotranspiration in the riparian corridor in the delta of the Colorado River, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Pamela L; Glenn, Edward P; Hinojosa-Huerta, Osvel; Zamora, Francisco; Howard, Keith

    2008-09-01

    Like other great desert rivers, the Colorado River in the United States and Mexico is highly regulated to provide water for human use. No water is officially allotted to support the natural ecosystems in the delta of the river in Mexico. However, precipitation is inherently variable in this watershed, and from 1981-2004, 15% of the mean annual flow of the Lower Colorado River has entered the riparian corridor below the last diversion point for water in Mexico. These flows include flood releases from US dams and much smaller administrative spills released back to the river from irrigators in the US and Mexico. These flows have germinated new cohorts of native cottonwood and willow trees and have established an active aquatic ecosystem in the riparian corridor in Mexico. We used ground and remote-sensing methods to determine the composition and fractional cover of the vegetation in the riparian corridor, its annual water consumption, and the sources of water that support the ecosystem. The study covered the period 2000-2004, a flood year followed by 4 dry years. The riparian corridor occupies 30,000 ha between flood control levees in Mexico. Annual evapotranspiration (ET), estimated by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) satellite imagery calibrated against moisture flux tower data, was about 1.1 m yr(-1) and was fairly constant throughout the study period despite a paucity of surface flows 2001-2004. Total ET averaged 3.4 x 10(8)m(3)yr(-1), about 15% of Colorado River water entering Mexico from the US Surface flows could have played only a small part in supporting these high ET losses. We conclude that the riparian ET is supported mainly by the shallow regional aquifer, derived from agricultural return flows, that approaches the surface in the riparian zone. Nevertheless, surface flows are important in germinating cohorts of native trees, in washing salts from the soil and aquifer, and in providing aquatic habitat, thereby enriching the habitat value of

  12. Remote sensing approach to map riparian vegetation of the Colorado River Ecosystem, Grand Canyon area, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, U.; Glenn, E.; Nagler, P. L.; Sankey, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Riparian zones in the southwestern U.S. are usually a mosaic of vegetation types at varying states of succession in response to past floods or droughts. Human impacts also affect riparian vegetation patterns. Human- induced changes include introduction of exotic species, diversion of water for human use, channelization of the river to protect property, and other land use changes that can lead to deterioration of the riparian ecosystem. This study explored the use of remote sensing to map an iconic stretch of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. The pre-dam riparian zone in the Grand Canyon was affected by annual floods from spring run-off from the watersheds of Green River, the Colorado River and the San Juan River. A pixel-based vegetation map of the riparian zone in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, was produced from high-resolution aerial imagery. The map was calibrated and validated with ground survey data. A seven-step image processing and classification procedure was developed based on a suite of vegetation indices and classification subroutines available in ENVI Image Processing and Analysis software. The result was a quantitative species level vegetation map that could be more accurate than the qualitative, polygon-based maps presently used on the Lower Colorado River. The dominant woody species in the Grand Canyon are now saltcedar, arrowweed and mesquite, reflecting stress-tolerant forms adapted to alternated flow regimes associated with the river regulation.

  13. Effects of increased flooding on riparian vegetation: field experiments simulating climate change along five European lowland streams.

    PubMed

    Garssen, Annemarie G; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Riis, Tenna; Raven, Bart M; Hoffman, Carl Christian; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Soons, Merel B

    2017-03-13

    In many parts of the world, the magnitude and frequency of cold-season precipitation are expected to increase in the near future. This will result in an increased magnitude and duration of winter and spring flooding by rain-fed streams and rivers. Such climate-driven increases in flooding are likely to affect riparian plant communities, but future vegetation changes are hard to predict due to current lack of data. To fill this knowledge gap, we experimentally modified the hydrology of five streams across three countries in North-Western Europe during late winter/early spring over a period of three years. We assessed the responses in riparian plant species richness, biomass, plant-available nitrogen and phosphorus and seed deposition to increased flooding depth (+18 cm on average at the lowest positions along the riparian gradient) and prolonged flooding duration (six weeks on average). After three years of increased flooding, there was an overall decline in riparian species richness, while riparian plant biomass increased. Extractable soil nitrogen and phosphorus also increased, and are likely to have contributed to the increased biomass. Increased flooding resulted in the arrival of more seeds of additional species to the riparian zone, thereby potentially facilitating the shifts in riparian plant species composition we observed. The results of our concerted experimental effort demonstrate that changes in stream riparian plant communities can occur rapidly following increased winter flooding, leading to strong reductions in plant species diversity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Integrated riparian evaluation guide: Intermountain region

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Riparian areas consist of riparian ecosystems, aquatic ecosystems, and wetlands. They may be associated with lakes, reservoirs, estuaries, potholes, marshes, springs, bogs, wet meadows, and intermittent or perennial streams where free and unbound water is available. Though riparian areas constitute only a fraction of the total land area, they are more productive in terms of both plant and animal species diversity and biomass per unit area than the remainder of the land base. The guide provides an integrated approach for: Stratifying and classifying riparian areas according to their natural inherent characteristics, and their respective existing or conditions; Data collection; Evaluation of riparian areas; Future development and linkage of a riparian data base; and Preparation of a written narrative to interpret the data and suggest management applications.

  15. Influence of riparian and watershed alterations on sandbars in a Great Plains river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, Jeffrey M.; Paukert, Craig P.; Daniels, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic alterations have caused sandbar habitats in rivers and the biota dependent on them to decline. Restoring large river sandbars may be needed as these habitats are important components of river ecosystems and provide essential habitat to terrestrial and aquatic organisms. We quantified factors within the riparian zone of the Kansas River, USA, and within its tributaries that influenced sandbar size and density using aerial photographs and land use/land cover (LULC) data. We developed, a priori, 16 linear regression models focused on LULC at the local, adjacent upstream river bend, and the segment (18–44 km upstream) scales and used an information theoretic approach to determine what alterations best predicted the size and density of sandbars. Variation in sandbar density was best explained by the LULC within contributing tributaries at the segment scale, which indicated reduced sandbar density with increased forest cover within tributary watersheds. Similarly, LULC within contributing tributary watersheds at the segment scale best explained variation in sandbar size. These models indicated that sandbar size increased with agriculture and forest and decreased with urban cover within tributary watersheds. Our findings suggest that sediment supply and delivery from upstream tributary watersheds may be influential on sandbars within the Kansas River and that preserving natural grassland and reducing woody encroachment within tributary watersheds in Great Plains rivers may help improve sediment delivery to help restore natural river function.

  16. Role of riparian shade on the fish assemblage of a reservoir littoral

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, C. D.; Miranda, Leandro E.

    2016-01-01

    Research into the effects of shade on reservoir fish assemblages is lacking, with most investigations focused on streams. Unlike many streams, the canopy in a reservoir shades only a narrow fringe of water adjacent to the shoreline, and may not have the influential effect on the aquatic environment reported in streams. We compared fish assemblages between shaded and unshaded sites in a shallow reservoir. Overall species richness (gamma diversity) was higher in shaded sites, and fish assemblage composition differed between shaded and unshaded sites. Average light intensity was 66 % lower in shaded sites, and differences in average temperature and dissolved oxygen were small. Unlike streams where shade can have large effects on water physicochemistry, in reservoirs shade-related differences in fish assemblages seemed to be linked principally to differences in light intensity. Diversity in light intensity in shaded and unshaded sites in reservoirs can create various mosaics of light-based habitats that enable diversity of species assemblages. Managing to promote the habitat diversity provided by shade may require coping with the artificial nature of reservoir riparian zones and water level fluctuations.

  17. Linking channel hydrology with riparian wetland accretion in tidal rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensign, Scott H.; Noe, Gregory B.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2014-01-01

    hydrologic processes by which tide affects river channel and riparian morphology within the tidal freshwater zone are poorly understood yet are fundamental to predicting the fate of coastal rivers and wetlands as sea level rises. We investigated patterns of sediment accretion in riparian wetlands along the nontidal through oligohaline portion of two coastal plain rivers in Maryland, U.S., and how flow velocity, water level, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in the channel may have contributed to those patterns. Sediment accretion was measured over a 1 year period using artificial marker horizons, channel hydrology was measured over a 1 month period using acoustic Doppler current profilers, and SSC was predicted from acoustic backscatter. Riparian sediment accretion was lowest at the nontidal sites (mean and standard deviation = 8 ± 8 mm yr-1), highest at the upstream tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFW) (33 ± 28 mm yr-1), low at the midstream TFFW (12 ± 9 mm yr-1), and high at the oligohaline (fresh-to-brackish) marshes (19 ± 8 mm yr-1). Channel maximum flood and ebb velocity was twofold faster at the oligohaline than tidal freshwater zone on both tidal rivers, corresponding with the differences in in-channel SSC: The oligohaline zone's SSC was more than double the tidal freshwater zone's and was greater than historical SSC at the nontidal gages. The tidal wave characteristics differed between rivers, leading to significantly greater in-channel SSC during floodplain inundation in the weakly convergent than the strongly convergent tidal river. High sediment accretion at the upstream TFFW was likely due to high river discharge following a hurricane.

  18. Linking channel hydrology with riparian wetland accretion in tidal rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ensign, Scott H.; Noe, Gregory B.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrologic processes by which tide affects river channel and riparian morphology within the tidal freshwater zone are poorly understood, yet are fundamental to predicting the fate of coastal rivers and wetlands as sea level rises. We investigated patterns of sediment accretion in riparian wetlands along the non-tidal through oligohaline portion of two coastal plain rivers in Maryland, U.S.A., and how flow velocity, water level, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in the channel may have contributed to those patterns. Sediment accretion was measured over a one year period using artificial marker horizons, channel hydrology was measured over a one month period using acoustic Doppler current profilers, and SSC was predicted from acoustic backscatter. Riparian sediment accretion was lowest at the non-tidal sites (mean and standard deviation = 8 ± 8 mm yr-1), highest at the upstream tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFW) (33 ± 28 mm yr-1), low at the midstream TFFW (12 ± 9 mm yr-1), and high at the oligohaline (fresh-to-brackish) marshes (19 ± 8 mm yr-1). Channel maximum flood and ebb velocity was 2-fold faster at the oligohaline than tidal freshwater zone on both tidal rivers, corresponding with the differences in in-channel SSC: the oligohaline zone's SSC was more than double the tidal freshwater zone's, and was greater than historical SSC at the non-tidal gages. The tidal wave characteristics differed between rivers, leading to significantly greater in-channel SSC during floodplain inundation in the weakly convergent than the strongly convergent tidal river. Overall sediment accretion was higher in the embayed river likely due to a single storm discharge and associated sedimentation.

  19. Groundwater management institutions to protect riparian habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Patricia; Colby, Bonnie

    2004-12-01

    Groundwater pumping affects riparian habitat when it causes the water table to drop beyond the reach of riparian plants. Riparian habitat provides services that are not directly traded in markets, as is the case with many environmental amenities. There is no direct market where one may buy or sell the mix of services provided by a riparian corridor. The objective of this article is to review groundwater management mechanisms and assess their strengths and weaknesses for preserving the ecological integrity of riparian areas threatened by groundwater pumping. Policy instruments available to those concerned with the effects of groundwater pumping on riparian areas fall into three broad categories: (1) command and control (CAC), (2) incentive-based economic instruments, and (3) cooperative/suasive strategies. The case of the San Pedro River illustrates multiple and overlapping strategies applied in an ongoing attempt to reverse accumulating damage to a riparian ecosystem. Policy makers in the United States can choose among a broad menu of policy options to protect riparian habitat from groundwater pumping. They can capitalize on the clarity of command-and-control strategies, the flexibility and less obtrusive nature of incentive-based economic strategies, and the benefits that collaborative efforts can bring in the form of mutual consideration. While collaborative problem solving and market-based instruments are important policy tools, experience indicates that a well-formulated regulatory structure to limit regional groundwater pumping is an essential component of an effective riparian protection strategy.

  20. The soil bacterial communities of South African fynbos riparian ecosystems invaded by Australian Acacia species.

    PubMed

    Slabbert, Etienne; Jacobs, Shayne Martin; Jacobs, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Riparian ecosystem along rivers and streams are characterised by lateral and longitudinal ecological gradients and, as a result, harbour unique biodiversity. Riparian ecosystems in the fynbos of the Western Cape, South Africa, are characterised by seasonal dynamics, with summer droughts followed by high flows during winter. The unique hydrology and geomorphology of riparian ecosystems play an important role in shaping these ecosystems. The riparian vegetation in the Western Cape has, however, largely been degraded due to the invasion of non-indigenous plants, in particular Acacia mearnsii, A. saligna and A. dealbata. This study investigated the effect of hydrology and invasion on the bacterial communities associated with fynbos riparian ecosystems. Bacterial communities were characterised with automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and 454 16S rDNA pyrosequencing. Chemical and physical properties of soil within sites were also determined and correlated with community data. Sectioning across the lateral zones revealed significant differences in community composition, and the specific bacterial taxa influenced. Results also showed that the bacterial community structure could be linked to Acacia invasion. The presence of invasive Acacia was correlated with specific bacterial phyla. However, high similarity between cleared and pristine sites suggests that the effect of Acacia on the soil bacterial community structure may not be permanent. This study demonstrates how soil bacterial communities are influenced by hydrological gradients associated with riparian ecosystems and the impact of Acacia invasion on these communities.

  1. Bioavailability and diagenetic state of dissolved organic matter in riparian groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Simone; Shen, Yuan; Kaiser, Karl; Benner, Ronald; Durisch-Kaiser, Edith

    2012-12-01

    Riparian groundwater can exhibit considerable patchiness in the concentration and reactivity of dissolved organic matter (DOM), which ultimately shapes subsurface biogeochemical transformations. Free and combined amino acids are bioavailable constituents of DOM, and their concentration and composition can provide valuable information about the diagenetic state of DOM. Based on riparian groundwater samples and relevant DOM end-member samples, we adapted the amino-acid-based marine DOM degradation index (DI) to groundwater. The groundwater DI was applied to evaluate the spatial and temporal variability in the bioavailability and diagenetic state of riparian DOM in a restored and a channelized section of the River Thur, Switzerland. Among different indicators for DOM diagenetic state (total hydrolysable amino acid concentrations, C-normalized yields, and the contribution of nonprotein amino acids), the groundwater DI correlated best with the activity of the enzyme leucine-aminopeptidase and bacterial secondary production in riparian groundwater. The "freshest" DOM was consistently found in the channel and during high-flow conditions in the groundwater of the restored riparian section and was spatially constrained to a zone inhabited by a dense willow population. The use of amino acid data and the newly developed DI for DOM in groundwater is a promising approach for characterizing the spatial and temporal dynamics of DOM reactivity and diagenesis within riparian groundwater.

  2. The Soil Bacterial Communities of South African Fynbos Riparian Ecosystems Invaded by Australian Acacia Species

    PubMed Central

    Slabbert, Etienne; Jacobs, Shayne Martin; Jacobs, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Riparian ecosystem along rivers and streams are characterised by lateral and longitudinal ecological gradients and, as a result, harbour unique biodiversity. Riparian ecosystems in the fynbos of the Western Cape, South Africa, are characterised by seasonal dynamics, with summer droughts followed by high flows during winter. The unique hydrology and geomorphology of riparian ecosystems play an important role in shaping these ecosystems. The riparian vegetation in the Western Cape has, however, largely been degraded due to the invasion of non-indigenous plants, in particular Acacia mearnsii, A. saligna and A. dealbata. This study investigated the effect of hydrology and invasion on the bacterial communities associated with fynbos riparian ecosystems. Bacterial communities were characterised with automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and 454 16S rDNA pyrosequencing. Chemical and physical properties of soil within sites were also determined and correlated with community data. Sectioning across the lateral zones revealed significant differences in community composition, and the specific bacterial taxa influenced. Results also showed that the bacterial community structure could be linked to Acacia invasion. The presence of invasive Acacia was correlated with specific bacterial phyla. However, high similarity between cleared and pristine sites suggests that the effect of Acacia on the soil bacterial community structure may not be permanent. This study demonstrates how soil bacterial communities are influenced by hydrological gradients associated with riparian ecosystems and the impact of Acacia invasion on these communities. PMID:24475145

  3. Nutrient vectors and riparian nutrient processing in African semiarid savanna ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobs, Shayne M.; Bechtold, J.S.; Biggs, Harry C.; Grimm, N. B.; McClain, M.E.; Naiman, R.J.; Perakis, Steven S.; Pinay, G.; Scholes, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    This review article describes vectors for nitrogen and phosphorus delivery to riparian zones in semiarid African savannas, the processing of nutrients in the riparian zone and the effect of disturbance on these processes. Semiarid savannas exhibit sharp seasonality, complex hillslope hydrology and high spatial heterogeneity, all of which ultimately impact nutrient fluxes between riparian, upland and aquatic environments. Our review shows that strong environmental drivers such as fire and herbivory enhance nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment transport to lower slope positions by shaping vegetative patterns. These vectors differ significantly from other arid and semiarid ecosystems, and from mesic ecosystems where the impact of fire and herbivory are less pronounced and less predictable. Also unique is the presence of sodic soils in certain hillslopes, which substantially alters hydrological flowpaths and may act as a trap where nitrogen is immobilized while sediment and phosphorus transport is enhanced. Nutrients and sediments are also deposited in the riparian zone during seasonal, intermittent floods while, during the dry season, subsurface movement of water from the stream into riparian soils and vegetation further enrich riparian zones with nutrients. As is found in mesic ecosystems, nutrients are immobilized in semiarid riparian corridors through microbial and plant uptake, whereas dissimilatory processes such as denitrification may be important where labile nitrogen and carbon are in adequate supply and physical conditions are suitablea??such as in seeps, wallows created by animals, ephemeral wetlands and stream edges. Interaction between temporal hydrologic connectivity and spatial heterogeneity are disrupted by disturbances such as large floods and extended droughts, which may convert certain riparian patches from sinks to sources for nitrogen and phosphorus. In the face of increasing anthropogenic pressure, the scientific challenges are to provide a basic

  4. Fire and grazing influences on rates of riparian woody plant expansion along grassland streams.

    PubMed

    Veach, Allison M; Dodds, Walter K; Skibbe, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Grasslands are threatened globally due to the expansion of woody plants. The few remaining headwater streams within tallgrass prairies are becoming more like typical forested streams due to rapid conversion of riparian zones from grassy to wooded. Forestation can alter stream hydrology and biogeochemistry. We estimated the rate of riparian woody plant expansion within a 30 m buffer zone surrounding the stream bed across whole watersheds at Konza Prairie Biological Station over 25 years from aerial photographs. Watersheds varied with respect to experimentally-controlled fire and bison grazing. Fire frequency, presence or absence of grazing bison, and the historical presence of woody vegetation prior to the study time period (a proxy for proximity of propagule sources) were used as independent variables to predict the rate of riparian woody plant expansion between 1985 and 2010. Water yield was estimated across these years for a subset of watersheds. Riparian woody encroachment rates increased as burning became less frequent than every two years. However, a higher fire frequency (1-2 years) did not reverse riparian woody encroachment regardless of whether woody vegetation was present or not before burning regimes were initiated. Although riparian woody vegetation cover increased over time, annual total precipitation and average annual temperature were variable. So, water yield over 4 watersheds under differing burn frequencies was quite variable and with no statistically significant detected temporal trends. Overall, burning regimes with a frequency of every 1-2 years will slow the conversion of tallgrass prairie stream ecosystems to forested ones, yet over long time periods, riparian woody plant encroachment may not be prevented by fire alone, regardless of fire frequency.

  5. Favorable fragmentation: river reservoirs can impede downstream expansion of riparian weeds.

    PubMed

    Rood, Stewart B; Braatne, Jeffrey H; Goater, Lori A

    2010-09-01

    River valleys represent biologically rich corridors characterized by natural disturbances that create moist and barren sites suitable for colonization by native riparian plants, and also by weeds. Dams and reservoirs interrupt the longitudinal corridors and we hypothesized that this could restrict downstream weed expansion. To consider this "reservoir impediment" hypothesis we assessed the occurrences and abundances of weeds along a 315-km river valley corridor that commenced with an unimpounded reach of the Snake River and extended through Brownlee, Oxbow, and Hells Canyon reservoirs and dams, and downstream along the Snake River. Sampling along 206 belt transects with 3610 quadrats revealed 16 noxious and four invasive weed species. Ten weeds were upland plants, with Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense) restricted to the upstream reaches, where field morning glory (Convolvulus arvensis) was also more common. In contrast, St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) was more abundant below the dams, and medusahead wildrye (Taeniatherum caput-medusae) occurred primarily along the reservoirs. All seven riparian species were abundant in the upstream zones but sparse or absent below the dams. This pattern was observed for the facultative riparian species, poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) and perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium), the obligate riparian, yellow nut sedge (Cyperus esculentus), the invasive perennial, reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), and three invasive riparian trees, Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), false indigo (Amorpha fruticosa), and tamarisk (Tamarix spp.). The hydrophyte purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) was also restricted to the upstream zone. These longitudinal patterns indicate that the reservoirs have impeded the downstream expansion of riparian weeds, and this may especially result from the repetitive draw-down and refilling of Brownlee Reservoir that imposes a lethal combination of drought and flood stress. The dams and

  6. Fire and Grazing Influences on Rates of Riparian Woody Plant Expansion along Grassland Streams

    PubMed Central

    Veach, Allison M.; Dodds, Walter K.; Skibbe, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Grasslands are threatened globally due to the expansion of woody plants. The few remaining headwater streams within tallgrass prairies are becoming more like typical forested streams due to rapid conversion of riparian zones from grassy to wooded. Forestation can alter stream hydrology and biogeochemistry. We estimated the rate of riparian woody plant expansion within a 30 m buffer zone surrounding the stream bed across whole watersheds at Konza Prairie Biological Station over 25 years from aerial photographs. Watersheds varied with respect to experimentally-controlled fire and bison grazing. Fire frequency, presence or absence of grazing bison, and the historical presence of woody vegetation prior to the study time period (a proxy for proximity of propagule sources) were used as independent variables to predict the rate of riparian woody plant expansion between 1985 and 2010. Water yield was estimated across these years for a subset of watersheds. Riparian woody encroachment rates increased as burning became less frequent than every two years. However, a higher fire frequency (1–2 years) did not reverse riparian woody encroachment regardless of whether woody vegetation was present or not before burning regimes were initiated. Although riparian woody vegetation cover increased over time, annual total precipitation and average annual temperature were variable. So, water yield over 4 watersheds under differing burn frequencies was quite variable and with no statistically significant detected temporal trends. Overall, burning regimes with a frequency of every 1–2 years will slow the conversion of tallgrass prairie stream ecosystems to forested ones, yet over long time periods, riparian woody plant encroachment may not be prevented by fire alone, regardless of fire frequency. PMID:25192194

  7. Riparian vegetation structure under desertification scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosário Fernandes, M.; Segurado, Pedro; Jauch, Eduardo; Ferreira, M. Teresa

    2015-04-01

    Riparian areas are responsible for many ecological and ecosystems services, including the filtering function, that are considered crucial to the preservation of water quality and social benefits. The main goal of this study is to quantify and understand the riparian variability under desertification scenario(s) and identify the optimal riparian indicators for water scarcity and droughts (WS&D), henceforth improving river basin management. This study was performed in the Iberian Tâmega basin, using riparian woody patches, mapped by visual interpretation on Google Earth imagery, along 130 Sampling Units of 250 m long river stretches. Eight riparian structural indicators, related with lateral dimension, weighted area and shape complexity of riparian patches were calculated using Patch Analyst extension for ArcGis 10. A set of 29 hydrological, climatic, and hydrogeomorphological variables were computed, by a water modelling system (MOHID), using monthly meteorological data between 2008 and 2014. Land-use classes were also calculated, in a 250m-buffer surrounding each sampling unit, using a classification based system on Corine Land Cover. Boosted Regression Trees identified Mean-width (MW) as the optimal riparian indicator for water scarcity and drought, followed by the Weighted Class Area (WCA) (classification accuracy =0.79 and 0.69 respectively). Average Flow and Strahler number were consistently selected, by all boosted models, as the most important explanatory variables. However, a combined effect of hidrogeomorphology and land-use can explain the high variability found in the riparian width mainly in Tâmega tributaries. Riparian patches are larger towards Tâmega river mouth although with lower shape complexity, probably related with more continuous and almost monospecific stands. Climatic, hydrological and land use scenarios, singly and combined, were used to quantify the riparian variability responding to these changes, and to assess the loss of riparian

  8. Sediment dynamics in restored riparian forest with different widths and agricultural surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucchi Boschi, Raquel; Simões da Silva, Laura; Ribeiro Rodrigues, Ricardo; Cooper, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The riparian forests are essential to maintaining the quality of water resources, aquifer recharge and biodiversity. Due to the ecological services provided by riparian forests, these areas are considered by the law as Permanent Preservation Areas, being mandatory maintenance and restoration. However, the obligation of restoration and the extent of the Permanent Preservation Areas as defined by the Brazilian Forest Code, based on water body width, elucidates the lack of accurate scientific data on the influence of the size of the riparian forest in maintaining their ecological functions, particularly regarding the retention of sediments. Studies that evaluate the ideal width of riparian forests to guarantee their ecological functions are scarce and not conclusive, especially when we consider newly restored forests, located in agricultural areas. In this study, we investigate the dynamics of erosion and sedimentation in restored riparian forests with different widths situated in agricultural areas. The two study areas are located in a Semideciduous Tropical Forest inserted in sugarcane landscapes of São Paulo state, Brazil. The installed plots had 60 and 100 m in length and the riparian forest has a width of 15, 30 and 50 m. The characteristics of the sediments inside the plots were evaluated by detailed morphological and micromorphological studies as well as physical characterization. The dynamics of deposition and the amount of deposited sediments have been assessed with graded metal stakes partially buried inside the plots. The intensity, frequency and distribution of rainfall, as well as the occurrence of extreme events, have been evaluated by data collected from rain gauges installed in the areas. We expect that smaller widths are not able to retain sediments originated from the adjacent sugarcane areas. We also believe that extreme events are responsible for generating most of the sediments. The results will be important to support the discussion about an

  9. Generalizing riparian hydrologic function in a heterogeneous landscape, Western Boreal Plain, Alberta, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devito, K.; Brown, S.; Hairabedian, M.; Landhäusser, S. M.; Mendoza, C. A.; Petrone, R.; Redding, R.; Riddell, J.; Silins, U.; Smerdon, B.; Snedden, J.

    2009-05-01

    The Western Boreal Plain (WBP) eco-region of western Canada is experiencing unprecedented development for forest, oil and gas resources stressing the need to assess the role and relative effectiveness of riparian areas in mitigating the impacts of land use changes on water quantity and quality. We compare findings from local scale transect studies across differing surficial geology at the Utikuma Region Study Area (URSA) to characterize the variability in hydrological and biogeochemical processes of riparian areas located on major landforms and landscape positions typical of the WBP. Within the study region, the recurring role of riparian areas on hydrological linkages from uplands to aquatic systems was removal of soil water and groundwater by vegetation and translocation of water to adjacent hillslopes regardless of groundwater function. Water table depressions at the base of hillslopes were commonly observed. The sub-humid climate and deep and heterogeneous surficial deposits result in minimal upland runoff and complex surface -groundwater interactions. Aquatic-riparian flow reversals and losing conditions (water table gradients from aquatic to upland regions) were common and perched stream, pond and wetland systems were observed in areas of contrasting soil texture. The type and seasonality of flow path and variability in riparian function were related to interactions between sub-humid climate, surficial geologic landforms (texture) and topographic position within these landforms. Riparian functions were highly variable in coarse textured outwash landforms and influenced by regional-scale flow system and seasonal freezing. Riparian interactions on fined grained lacustrine plain landscapes were largely restricted to near surface discharge and recharge flow through. In contrast, on poorly drained and mixed textured moraine landforms, riparian systems were often isolated or interacted with recharge or perched flow systems. Our findings not only point to the need

  10. Vertical distribution of total carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in riparian soils of Walnut Creek, southern Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Palmer, J.A.; Bettis, E. Arthur; Jacobson, P.; Schultz, R.C.; Isenhart, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Subsurface lithology plays an important role in many riparian zone processes, but few studies have examined how sediment nutrient concentrations vary with depth. In this study, we evaluated concentrations of nutrients (N, C and P) with depth in a riparian zone of the glaciated Midwest. A total of 146 sediment samples were collected from 24 cores that extended to a maximum depth of 3.6??m at eight sites in the riparian zone of Walnut Creek. Subsurface deposits were predominantly silt loam, becoming coarser and more variable with depth. Nitrogen and carbon content ranged from < 0.01 to 0.42% and < 0.01 to 7.08%, respectively, and exhibited a strong trend of decreasing nutrient content with depth. In contrast, P concentrations averaged 574??mg/kg and did not vary systematically. Systematic variations in texture and nutrient content with depth largely corresponded to stratigraphic differentiation among the Camp Creek, Roberts Creek and Gunder members of the regionally recognized Holocene-age DeForest Formation. Variations in subsurface nutrient content were not found to be significantly related to present land cover, but land cover may have influenced nutrient content at the time of original sediment accumulation. Subsurface lithology and stratigraphy should be considered an important component in riparian zone studies where nutrient losses to streams via streambank erosion or groundwater discharge are assessed. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. DECISION TOOL FOR RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM MANAGMENT IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Canaan Valley Highlands of the Mid-Atlantic, riparian zone restoration has been identified as a critical watershed management practice not only for the ecosystem services provided but also for the potential socioeconomic growth from environmental investment and job creatio...

  12. Water table fluctuations under three riparian land covers, Iowa (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.

    2007-01-01

    Water table depth is known to play an important role in nitrogen cycling in riparian zones, but little detailed monitoring of water table fluctuations has been reported. In this study, results of high-resolution water table monitoring under three common riparian land covers (forest, cool season grass, corn) were analysed to gain a better understanding of the relation of vegetation cover to water table depth. Three riparian wells located at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Jasper County, Iowa, were instrumented with data loggers to record hourly water table behaviour from July to December 2004. Water table depth under the forest showed a diurnal pattern of rising and falling water levels, whereas the grass and corn exhibited a stepped pattern of greater drawdown during the day and less drainage at night. Clear daytime and night-time water table signals were related to daily plant water demands and lateral groundwater flow. Using two estimates of specific yield, hourly and daily ET rates were estimated to be higher under the forest cover than the grass and corn, with peak ET rates in July ranging from 5.02 to 6.32 mm day-1 for forest and from 1.81 to 4.13 mm day-1 for corn and grass. Following plant senescence in October, water table declines were associated with lateral flow to Walnut Creek. The results from this study suggest that consideration should be given to monitoring water table behaviour more frequently to capture daily and seasonal patterns related to riparian vegetation type. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Riparian buffer transpiration and watershed scale impacts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forested riparian buffers are prevalent throughout the Southeastern Coastal Plain Region of the United States (US). Because they make up a significant portion of the regional landscape, transpiration within these riparian buffers is believed to have an important impact on the hydrologic budget of r...

  14. RESEARCH NEEDS IN RIPARIAN BUFFER RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian buffer restorations are used as management tools to produce favorable water quality impacts; moreover, the basis for riparian buffers as an instrument of water quality restoration rests on a relatively firm foundation. However, the extent to which buffers can restore rip...

  15. Influence of planting grass filter strips on the structure and function of riparian habitats of agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grass filter strips are strips of cool or warm season grasses planted adjacent to agricultural streams to reduce nutrient, pesticide, and sediment input. This conservation practice is the most frequently planted riparian buffer type in the United States. Previous studies have not evaluated how gra...

  16. Snowmelt Induced Hydrologic Perturbations Drive Dynamic Microbiological and Geochemical Behaviors across a Shallow Riparian Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Danczak, Robert E.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Fang, Yilin; Hobson, Chad; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2016-05-11

    Shallow riparian aquifers represent hotspots of biogeochemical activity in the arid western US. While these environments provide extensive ecosystem services, little is known of how natural environmental perturbations influence subsurface microbial communities and associated biogeochemical processes. Over a six-month period we tracked the annual snowmelt-driven incursion of groundwater into the vadose zone of an aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River, leading to increased dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in the normally suboxic saturated zone. Strong biogeochemical heterogeneity was measured across the site, with abiotic reactions between DO and sulfide minerals driving rapid DO consumption and mobilization of redox active species in reduced aquifer regions. Conversely, extensive DO increases were detected in less reduced sediments. 16S rRNA gene surveys tracked microbial community composition within the aquifer, revealing strong correlations between increases in putative oxygen-utilizing chemolithoautotrophs and heterotrophs and rising DO concentrations. The gradual return to suboxic aquifer conditions favored increasing abundances of 16S rRNA sequences matching members of the Microgenomates (OP11) and Parcubacteria (OD1) that have been strongly implicated in fermentative processes. Microbial community stability measurements indicated that deeper aquifer locations were relatively less affected by geochemical perturbations, while communities in shallower locations exhibited the greatest change. Reactive transport modeling of the geochemical and microbiological results supported field observations, suggesting that a predictive framework can be applied to develop a greater understanding of such environments. Frontiers in Earth Science Journal Impact & Description - ResearchGate - Impact Rankings ( 2015 and 2016 ). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/journal/2296-6463_Frontiers_in_Earth_Science [accessed Jul 25, 2016].

  17. Dairy farm impacts of fencing riparian land: pasture production and farm productivity.

    PubMed

    Aarons, Sharon R; Melland, Alice R; Dorling, Lianne

    2013-11-30

    Dairy farmers are encouraged to restrict stock access by fencing riparian zones to reduce stream pollution and improve biodiversity. Many farmers are reluctant to create fenced riparian zones because of the perceived loss of productive pasture. Anecdotal reports indicate that pasture production in fenced areas is especially valued during summer months when water stress is likely to limit pasture growth in other areas of the farm. We measured pasture production, botanical composition, soil moisture, and fertility in Riparian (within 20 m of the riverbank), Flat (greater than 20 but less than 50 m from the riverbank), and Hill (elevated) areas on three commercial dairy farms from October 2006 to November 2007 in south eastern Australia. Riparian and Flat areas produced significantly more pasture, with on average approximately 25% more dry matter per ha grown in these areas compared with Hill paddocks. Percentage ryegrass was 14% lower on Hill slopes compared with Riparian and Flat areas and was compensated for by only a 5% increase in other grass species. Significant seasonal effects were observed with the difference in pasture production between Hill, and Riparian and Flat areas most pronounced in summer, due to soil moisture limitations on Hill paddocks. To examine potential productivity impacts of this lost pasture, we used a questionnaire-based survey to interview the farmers regarding their farm and riparian management activities. The additional pasture that would have been available if the riverbanks were not fenced to their current widths ranged from 6.2 to 27.2 t DM for the 2006/2007 year and would have been grown on 0.4-3.4% of their milking area. If this pasture was harvested instead of grazed, the farmers could have saved between $2000 and $8000 of their purchased fodder costs in that year. By fencing their riparian areas to 20 m for biodiversity benefits, between 2.2% and 9.8% of their milking area would be out of production amounting to about $16

  18. Effects of drought on birds and riparian vegetation in the Colorado River Delta, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinojosa-Huerta, Osvel; Nagler, Pamela L.; Carrillo-Guererro, Yamilett K.; Glenn, Edward P.

    2013-01-01

    The riparian corridor in the delta of the Colorado River in Mexico supports internationally important bird habitat. The vegetation is maintained by surface flows from the U.S. and Mexico and by a high, non-saline aquifer into which the dominant phreatophytic shrubs and trees are rooted. We studied the effects of a regional drought on riparian vegetation and avian abundance and diversity from 2002 to 2007, during which time surface flows were markedly reduced compared to the period from 1995 to 2002. Reduced surface flows led to a reduction in native tree cover but an increase in shrub cover, mostly due to an increase in Tamarix spp., an introduced halophytic shrub, and a reduction in Populus fremontii and Salix gooddingii trees. However, overall vegetation cover was unchanged at about 70%. Overall bird density and diversity were also unchanged, but riparian-obligate species tended to decrease in abundance, and generalist species increased. Although reduction in surface flows reduced habitat value and negatively impacted riparian-obligate bird species, portions of the riparian zone exhibited resilience. Surface flows are required to reduce soil salt levels and germinate new cohorts of native trees, but the main source of water supporting this ecosystem is the aquifer, derived from underflows from irrigated fields in the U.S. and Mexico. The long-term prospects for delta riparian habitats are uncertain due to expected reduced flows of river water from climate change, and land use practices that will reduce underflows to the riparian aquifer and increase salinity levels. Active restoration programs would be needed if these habitats are to be preserved for the future.

  19. Spatial processes structuring riparian plant communities in agroecosystems: implications for restoration.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Bérenger; González, Eduardo; Vanasse, Anne; Aubin, Isabelle; Poulin, Monique

    2016-10-01

    The disruption of hydrological connectivity by human activities such as flood regulation or land-use changes strongly impacts riparian plant communities. However, landscape-scale processes have generally been neglected in riparian restoration projects as opposed to local conditions, even though such processes might largely influence community recovery. We surveyed plant composition of field edges and riverbanks in 51 riparian zones restored by tree planting (565 1-m(2) plots) within two agricultural watersheds in southeastern Québec, Canada. Once the effects of environmental variables (hydrology, soil, agriculture, landscape, restoration) were partialled out, three models of spatial autocorrelation based on Moran's eigenvector maps and asymmetric eigenvector maps were compared to quantify the pathways and direction of the spatial processes structuring riparian communities. The ecological mechanisms underlying predominant spatial processes were then assessed by regression trees linking species response to spatial gradients to seed and morphological traits. The structure of riparian communities was predominantly related to unidirectional spatial gradients from upstream to downstream along watercourses, which contributed more to species composition than bidirectional gradients along watercourses or overland. Plant traits selected by regression trees explained 22% of species response to unidirectional upstream-downstream gradients in field edges and 24% in riverbanks, and predominantly corresponded to seed traits rather than morphological traits of the adult plants. Our study showed that even in agriculturally open landscapes, water flow remains a major force structuring spatially riparian plant communities by filtering species according to their seed traits, thereby suggesting long-distance dispersal as a predominant process. Preserving hydrological connectivity at the watershed-scale and restoring riparian plant communities from upstream to downstream should be

  20. Riparian vegetation and its water use during 1995 along the Mojave River, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lines, Gregory C.; Bilhorn, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    The extent and areal density of riparian vegetation, including both phreatophytes and hydrophytes, were mapped along the 100-mile main stem of the Mojave River during 1995. Mapping was aided by vertical false-color infrared and low-level oblique photographs. However, positive identification of plant species and plant physiological stress required field examination. The consumptive use of ground water and surface water by different areal densities of riparian plant communities along the main stem of the Mojave River was estimated using water-use data from a select group of studies in the southwestern United States. In the Alto subarea of the Mojave basin management area, consumptive water use during 1995 by riparian vegetation was estimated to be about 5,000 acre-feet upstream from the Lower Narrows and about 6,000 acre-feet downstream in the transition zone. In the Centro and Baja subareas, consumptive water use was estimated to be about 3,000 acre-feet and 2,000 acre-feet, respectively, during 1995. Consumptive water use by riparian vegetation in the Afton area, downstream from the Baja subarea, was estimated to be about 600 acre-feet during 1995. Consumptive water use by riparian vegetation during 1995 is considered representative of "normal" hydrologic conditions along the Mojave River. Barring major changes in the areal extent and density of riparian vegetation, the 1995 consumptive-use estimates should be fairly representative of riparian vegetation water use during most years. Annual consumptive use, however, could vary from the 1995 estimates as much as plus or minus 50 percent because of extreme hydrologic conditions (periods of high water table following extraordinarily large runoff in the Mojave River or periods of extended drought).

  1. Grande Ronde Model Watershed Project; Dark Canyon Riparian Exclosure, Completion Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuck, Todd

    2003-03-01

    The Baker Field Office, Vale District Bureau of Land Management (BLM) submitted a project proposal for funding in 2002 through the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (GRMWP). The project consisted of constructing two riparian exclosures to prevent livestock grazing in the riparian areas of Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek. The BLM completed the NEPA documentation and supplied the fencing materials. Funding from BPA through the GRMWP was used to complete the construction of the two exclosures. This project was completed in the fall of 2002. The project area is located in Union County, Oregon on BLM managed land adjacent to Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek, T. 3. S., R. 35 E., Section 24 and 25. Section 24 is along Dark Canyon Creek and section 25 is along Meadow Creek. Approximately 0.4 miles of stream would be protected from grazing with the construction of the two exclosures. A two person crew was hired to construct a four-strand barbed wire fence. The fence enclosed the riparian area on both sides of each creek so that no grazing would occur within the riparian area on BLM managed land. Total fence length is approximately 1.25 miles. Materials consisted of metal fence posts, barbed wire, rockjacks, fence stays, and 2 x 4's. The fence was constructed in the fall of 2002. The riparian area is effectively excluded from livestock grazing at this time. The construction of the exclosures should enhance riparian vegetation, increase bank stability, and improve riparian and in-stream habitat by exclusion of livestock in the riparian areas. Monitoring will ensure that the exclosures continues to be effective. Annual monitoring will include photo-points and compliance checks during the grazing season by BLM personnel. The BLM will submit a monitoring report, which includes the results of the annual monitoring, to the GRMWP in years 2005 and 2007. The exclosures do cross the creeks so maintenance may be needed on occasion, especially after high flow events in the creeks. Material

  2. Riparian vegetation in South-western Europe: drivers of change across space and time (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, F. C.; Ferriera, M.

    2010-12-01

    Riparian ecosystems of Mediterranean Europe have been largely disturbed for millennia due to human-driven alterations. Land-use, deforestation, water diversion and river regulation have been the major causes of change of riparian and freshwater ecosystems. Riparian vegetation in this region has particular features due to a large climatic and environmental variation; from the climatic harshness and the flash-flow hydrological regime of southern rivers to high-altitude permanent rivers of the north regions. Riparia is a fundamental element of the Mediterranean landscape by a number of ecological values, and economic and societal benefits, and they are usually seen as “linear oasis” embedded in the complex landscape matrix. We face a huge challenge in understanding the distribution trends of the riparian species assemblages in those diverse biogeographic regions and the varying effects of the multi-scaled drivers of change. I will review the main studies that have explored the patterns of variation of riparian plant assemblages across space and time in South-Western Europe, including its longitudinal and lateral dimension. Structural community features and plant functional traits, that can be described and quantified, are ecological expressions of both natural and human disturbances, and comparatively less understood than floral composition patterns, and many studies suggest that they are more reactive to disturbance. Linkages of taxonomic and functional trait variation will also be addressed, focusing in the influence of environment at various scale levels. Effects of human disturbances, particularly the alien plant invasions and the losses of biodiversity and connectivity will be tackled. These studies provided evidence of shifts in species composition and in structural complexity, as well as in individual and community responses to wetting and drying due to regulation and to physical disturbances of riverbanks. The intensive agriculture in adjacent lands is a

  3. Management of riparian habitat for mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. Appendix C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knutson, M.G.; Ribic, C.; Hohman, William

    1999-01-01

    Melinda Knutson (USGS Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center) and Christine Ribic (USGS Wisconsin Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit) contributed to a recent report published by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. The report summarizes a workshop held 8 December 1999 in Chicago, IL. Highlights of the report include resources and land management recommendations for riparian zones in the Midwest. The full report will soon be available at the USDA NRCS Wildlife Habitat Management Institute website: http://www.ms.nrcs.usda.gov/whmi/habitat.htm Knutson, M., and C. Ribic. 2000. Management of riparian habitat for mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. Pages 22-24, Appendix C in W. Hohman, ed. NRCS Management and Restoration of Midwestern Riparian Systems Workshop Report. USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Chicago, IL.

  4. Pesticide and Nitrate-N Behavior in Groundwater Within a Riparian Wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, C. P.; Bialek, K.; Angier, J. T.; McCarty, G. W.

    2002-05-01

    Information regarding the behavior and fate of agrochemicals in groundwater within riparian ecosystems is essential in order to assess the overall function of riparian systems at contaminant removal. This study included analysis of pesticides and nutrients in groundwater from a first-order riparian wetland that borders a conventionally farmed cornfield. Vertical depth profiles of groundwater were analyzed for agricultural chemicals. Samples were obtained from piezometers nested at various depths in different locations throughout the riparian wetland. Some of the nests were in areas with little or no visible groundwater seepage to the surface, others were placed in zones of active groundwater emergence (upwelling) onto the land surface (within zones of continuous surface saturation). In those profiles where upwelling was low, there was a clear demarcation in nitrate-N and oxygen contents at depth (between 135 and 175 cm) within the piezometer nests. This same horizon also coincided with the region where atrazine and atrazine degradate (desethyl- and desisopropyl-atrazine) concentrations substantially diminished. Another herbicide, metolachlor, and degradates (metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid and metolachlor oxanilic acid), showed only a slight reduction in concentrations over this zone and maintained a fairly uniform concentration over the vertical profile. Vertical depth profiles in areas where upwelling was high did not show significant variations in herbicide residues; e.g., the concentrations throughout the profile were similar to the levels measured at the deepest zone within the underlying aquifer. Processes leading to these differences were preferential degradation and sorption. This spatial disparity was reflected in the surface water, with implications for the overall contaminant-mitigating properties of the riparian system.

  5. RIPGIS-NET: a GIS tool for riparian groundwater evapotranspiration in MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Ajami, Hoori; Maddock, Thomas; Meixner, Thomas; Hogan, James F; Guertin, D Phillip

    2012-01-01

    RIPGIS-NET, an Environmental System Research Institute (ESRI's) ArcGIS 9.2/9.3 custom application, was developed to derive parameters and visualize results of spatially explicit riparian groundwater evapotranspiration (ETg), evapotranspiration from saturated zone, in groundwater flow models for ecohydrology, riparian ecosystem management, and stream restoration. Specifically RIPGIS-NET works with riparian evapotranspiration (RIP-ET), a modeling package that works with the MODFLOW groundwater flow model. RIP-ET improves ETg simulations by using a set of eco-physiologically based ETg curves for plant functional subgroups (PFSGs), and separates ground evaporation and plant transpiration processes from the water table. The RIPGIS-NET program was developed in Visual Basic 2005, .NET framework 2.0, and runs in ArcMap 9.2 and 9.3 applications. RIPGIS-NET, a pre- and post-processor for RIP-ET, incorporates spatial variability of riparian vegetation and land surface elevation into ETg estimation in MODFLOW groundwater models. RIPGIS-NET derives RIP-ET input parameters including PFSG evapotranspiration curve parameters, fractional coverage areas of each PFSG in a MODFLOW cell, and average surface elevation per riparian vegetation polygon using a digital elevation model. RIPGIS-NET also provides visualization tools for modelers to create head maps, depth to water table (DTWT) maps, and plot DTWT for a PFSG in a polygon in the Geographic Information System based on MODFLOW simulation results.

  6. Recovery times of riparian vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesipa, Riccardo; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Riparian vegetation is a key element in a number of processes that determine the eco-geomorphological features of the river landscape. Depending on the river water stage fluctuations, vegetation biomass randomly switches between growth and decay phases, and its biomass exhibits relevant temporal variations. A full understanding of vegetation dynamics is therefore only possible if the hydrological stochastic forcing is considered. In this vein, we focus on the recovery time of vegetation, namely the typical time taken by vegetation to recover a health state starting from a low biomass value (induced, for instance, by an intense flood). The minimalistic stochastic modeling approach is used for describing vegetation dynamics (i.e., the noise-driven alternation of growth and decay phases). The recovery time of biomass is then evaluated according to the theory of the mean first passage time in systems driven by dichotomous noise. The effect of the main hydrological and biological parameters on the vegetation recovery was studied, and the dynamics along the riparian transect was described in details. The effect of climate change and human interventions (e.g., river damming) was also investigated. We found that: (i) the oscillations of the river stage delay the recovery process (up to one order of magnitude, with respect to undisturbed conditions); (ii) hydrological/biological alterations (due to climate change, damming, exotic species invasion) modify the timescales of the recovery. The result provided can be a useful tool for the management of the river. They open the way to the estimation of: (i) the recovery time of vegetation after devastating floods, clear cutting or fires and; (ii) the timescale of the vegetation response to hydrological and biological alterations.

  7. Time for recovery of riparian plants in restored northern Swedish streams: a chronosequence study.

    PubMed

    Hasselquist, Maher; Nilsson, Christer; Häxltén, Joakim; Jørgensen, Dolly; Lind, Lovisa; Polvi, Lina E

    2015-07-01

    A lack of ecological responses in stream restoration projects has been prevalent throughout recent literature with many studies reporting insufficient time for recovery. We assessed the relative importance of time, site variables, and landscape setting for understanding how plant species richness and understory productivity recover over time in riparian zones of northern Swedish streams. We used a space-for-time substitution consisting of 13 stream reaches restored 5-25 years ago, as well as five unrestored channelized reference reaches. We inventoried the riparian zone for all vascular plant species along 60-m study reaches and quantified cover and biomass in plots. We found that while species richness increased with time, understory biomass decreased. Forbs made up the majority of the species added, while the biomass of graminoids decreased the most over time, suggesting that the reduced dominance of graminoids favored less productive forbs. Species richness and density patterns could be attributed to dispersal limitation, with anemochorous species being more associated with time after restoration than hydrochorous, zoochorous, or vegetatively reproducing species. Using multiple linear regression, we found that time along with riparian slope and riparian buffer width (e.g., distance to logging activities) explained the most variability in species richness, but that variability in total understory biomass was explained primarily by time. The plant community composition of restored reaches differed from that of channelized references, but the difference did not increase over time. Rather, different time categories had different successional trajectories that seemed to converge on a unique climax community for that time period. Given our results, timelines for achieving species richness objectives should be extended to 25 years or longer if recovery is defined as a saturation of the accumulation of species over time. Other recommendations include making riparian

  8. Do riparian reserves support dung beetle biodiversity and ecosystem services in oil palm-dominated tropical landscapes?

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Claudia L; Slade, Eleanor M; Mann, Darren J; Lewis, Owen T

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural expansion and intensification are major threats to global biodiversity, ecological functions, and ecosystem services. The rapid expansion of oil palm in forested tropical landscapes is of particular concern given their high biodiversity. Identifying management approaches that maintain native species and associated ecological processes within oil palm plantations is therefore a priority. Riparian reserves are strips of forest retained alongside rivers in cultivated areas, primarily for their positive hydrological impact. However, they can also support a range of forest-dependent species or ecosystem services. We surveyed communities of dung beetles and measured dung removal activity in an oil palm-dominated landscape in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. The species richness, diversity, and functional group richness of dung beetles in riparian reserves were significantly higher than in oil palm, but lower than in adjacent logged forests. The community composition of the riparian reserves was more similar to logged forest than oil palm. Despite the pronounced differences in biodiversity, we did not find significant differences in dung removal rates among land uses. We also found no evidence that riparian reserves enhance dung removal rates within surrounding oil palm. These results contrast previous studies showing positive relationships between dung beetle species richness and dung removal in tropical forests. We found weak but significant positive relationships between riparian reserve width and dung beetle diversity, and between reserve vegetation complexity and dung beetle abundance, suggesting that these features may increase the conservation value of riparian reserves. Synthesis and applications: The similarity between riparian reserves and logged forest demonstrates that retaining riparian reserves increases biodiversity within oil palm landscapes. However, the lack of correlation between dung beetle community characteristics and dung removal highlights the

  9. Do riparian reserves support dung beetle biodiversity and ecosystem services in oil palm-dominated tropical landscapes?

    PubMed

    Gray, Claudia L; Slade, Eleanor M; Mann, Darren J; Lewis, Owen T

    2014-04-01

    Agricultural expansion and intensification are major threats to global biodiversity, ecological functions, and ecosystem services. The rapid expansion of oil palm in forested tropical landscapes is of particular concern given their high biodiversity. Identifying management approaches that maintain native species and associated ecological processes within oil palm plantations is therefore a priority. Riparian reserves are strips of forest retained alongside rivers in cultivated areas, primarily for their positive hydrological impact. However, they can also support a range of forest-dependent species or ecosystem services. We surveyed communities of dung beetles and measured dung removal activity in an oil palm-dominated landscape in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. The species richness, diversity, and functional group richness of dung beetles in riparian reserves were significantly higher than in oil palm, but lower than in adjacent logged forests. The community composition of the riparian reserves was more similar to logged forest than oil palm. Despite the pronounced differences in biodiversity, we did not find significant differences in dung removal rates among land uses. We also found no evidence that riparian reserves enhance dung removal rates within surrounding oil palm. These results contrast previous studies showing positive relationships between dung beetle species richness and dung removal in tropical forests. We found weak but significant positive relationships between riparian reserve width and dung beetle diversity, and between reserve vegetation complexity and dung beetle abundance, suggesting that these features may increase the conservation value of riparian reserves. Synthesis and applications: The similarity between riparian reserves and logged forest demonstrates that retaining riparian reserves increases biodiversity within oil palm landscapes. However, the lack of correlation between dung beetle community characteristics and dung removal highlights the

  10. Assessing Anthropogenic Influence and Edge Effect Influence on Forested Riparian Buffer Spatial Configuration and Structure: An Example Using Lidar Remote Sensing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasser, L. A.; Chasmer, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    Forested riparian buffers (FRB) perform numerous critical ecosystem services. However, globally, FRB spatial configuration and structure have been modified by anthropogenic development resulting in widespread ecological degradation as seen in the Gulf of Mexico and the Chesapeake Bay. Riparian corridors within developed areas are particularly vulnerable to disturbance given two edges - the naturally occurring stream edge and the matrix edge. Increased edge length predisposes riparian vegetation to "edge effects", characterized by modified physical and environmental conditions at the interface between the forested buffer and the adjacent landuse, or matrix and forest fragment degradation. The magnitude and distance of edge influence may be further influenced by adjacent landuse type and the width of the buffer corridor at any given location. There is a need to quantify riparian buffer spatial configuration and structure over broad geographic extents and within multiple riparian systems in support of ecologically sound management and landuse decisions. This study thus assesses the influence of varying landuse types (agriculture, suburban development and undeveloped) on forested riparian buffer 3-dimensional structure and spatial configuration using high resolution Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data collected within a headwater watershed. Few studies have assessed riparian buffer structure and width contiguously for an entire watershed, an integral component of watershed planning and restoration efforts such as those conducted throughout the Chesapeake Bay. The objectives of the study are to 1) quantify differences in vegetation structure at the stream and matrix influenced riparian buffer edges, compared to the forested interior and 2) assess continuous patterns of changes in vegetation structure throughout the buffer corridor beginning at the matrix edge and ending at the stream within buffers a) of varying width and b) that are adjacent to varying landuse

  11. Indicators: Lakeshore Habitat/Riparian Vegetative Cover

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Riparian and lakeshore vegetative cover consist of the vegetation corridor alongside streams, rivers, and lakes. Vegetative cover refers to overhanging or submerged tree limbs, shrubs, and other plants growing along the shore of the waterbody.

  12. Linking CZO, LTER, and NEON- Putting Biology into the Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    With the advent of the Critical Zone Observatory Network, new opportunities are emerging to link the geological and ecological aspects of environmental science. Interactions between the CZO Network and the 30-year old Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network can provide the opportunity to interpret long-term ecological research in the context of the geologic forces that have shaped both the form and function of the landscape. Using four examples from the Luquillo Mountains in tropical Puerto Rico, I highlight the ways in which ecological patterns and processes are driven by the underlying geologic template. The distribution of stream biota in the Luquillo Mountains is striking, with predatory fish below large geomorphic breaks; above these waterfalls, fish are absent, and shrimp dominate the biota. The critical zone thus structures aquatic communities. A second example is provided by the role of soil texture and structure in driving rates of greenhouse gas production. In the moderately well drained soils of the Luquillo Mountains, water-filled pore space is a key driver of methane production. Critical zone characteristics thus shape biotic function and ecosystem carbon balance. A third example is the effect of riparian zone structure on watershed-scale nitrogen losses. Due to differences in the geomorphology of the riparian zone on volcaniclastic and intrusive bedrock, adjacent watersheds have remarkably different patterns in stream nitrate following hurricanes. Nitrogen losses from these watersheds are driven by interactions between biology and lithology that affect riparian zone function. Finally, in the deep critical zone (5 m) bacterial growth is dominated by autotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria, with implications for weathering, the development of flow pathways, and solute transport. In this case, biota may be driving the formation of the critical zone through biotic effects on weathering. In each example, our ability to understand the importance of

  13. Marine Riparian Vegetation Communities of Puget Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    important wildlife habitats and improvements in water quality. The importance of marine riparian areas typically falls into two categories...qualities. These values overlap. For example, if good water quality were not valued by society, it would likely not be considered an important func...addition to living vegetation, large woody debris (LWD), often derived from riparian forests, is an important part of estuarine and oceanic habitats

  14. Environmental tolerance of an invasive riparian tree and its potential for continued spread in the southwestern US

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, L.V.; Cooper, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Questions: Exotic plant invasion may be aided by facilitation and broad tolerance of environmental conditions, yet these processes are poorly understood in species-rich ecosystems such as riparian zones. In the southwestern United States (US) two plant species have invaded riparian zones: tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima, T. chinensis, and their hybrids) and Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia). We addressed the following questions: (1) is Russian olive able to tolerate drier and shadier conditions than cottonwood and tamarisk? (2) Can tamarisk and cottonwood facilitate Russian olive invasion? Location: Arid riparian zones, southwestern US. Methods: We analyzed riparian tree seedling requirements in a controlled experiment, performed empirical field studies, and analyzed stable oxygen isotopes to determine the water sources used by Russian olive. Results: Russian olive survival was significantly higher in dense shade and low moisture conditions than tamarisk and cottonwood. Field observations indicated Russian olive established where flooding cannot occur, and under dense canopies of tamarisk, cottonwood, and Russian olive. Tamarisk and native riparian plant species seedlings cannot establish in these dry, shaded habitats. Russian olive can rely on upper soil water until 15 years of age, before utilizing groundwater. Conclusions: We demonstrate that even though there is little evidence of facilitation by cottonwood and tamarisk, Russian olive is able to tolerate dense shade and low moisture conditions better than tamarisk and cottonwood. There is great potential for continued spread of Russian olive throughout the southwestern US because large areas of suitable habitat exist that are not yet inhabited by this species. ?? 2010 International Association for Vegetation Science.

  15. Urbanization and nutrient retention in freshwater riparian wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hogan, D.M.; Walbridge, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    Urbanization can degrade water quality and alter watershed hydrology, with profound effects on the structure and function of both riparian wetlands (RWs) and aquatic ecosystems downstream. We used freshwater RWs in Fairfax County, Virginia, USA, as a model system to examine: (1) the effects of increasing urbanization (indexed by the percentage of impervious surface cover [%ISC] in the surrounding watershed) on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations in surface soils and plant tissues, soil P saturation, and soil iron (Fe) chemistry; and (2) relationships between RW soil and plant nutrient chemistries vs. the physical and biotic integrity of adjacent streams. Soil total P and NaOH-extractable P (representing P bound to aluminum [Al] and Fe hydrous oxides) varied significantly but nonlinearly with %ISC (r2 = 0.69 and 0.57, respectively); a similar pattern was found for soil P saturation but not for soil total N. Relationships were best described by second-order polynomial equations. Riparian wetlands appear to receive greater P loads in moderately (8.6-13.3% ISC) than in highly (25.1-29.1% ISC) urbanized watersheds. These observations are consistent with alterations in watershed hydrology that occur with increasing urbanization, directing water and nutrient flows away from natural RWs. Significant increases in total and crystalline soil Fe (r 2 = 0.57 and 0.53, respectively) and decreases in relative soil Fe crystallinity with increasing %ISC suggest the mobilization and deposition of terrestrial sediments in RWs, likely due to construction activities in the surrounding watershed. Increases in RW plant tissue nutrient concentrations and %ISC in the surrounding watershed were negatively correlated with standard indices of the physical and biotic integrity of adjacent streams. In combination, these data suggest that nutrient and sediment inputs associated with urbanization and storm-water management are important variables that affect wetland ecosystem services

  16. Riparian Vegetation Influence on Stream Channel Dimensions: Key Driving Mechanisms and Their Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, M.; Hession, W.; Rizzo, D. M.; Thompson, D. M.

    2006-05-01

    Combined results from field-based investigations and flume experiments demonstrated key mechanisms driving channel widening following the reforestation of riparian zones in small streams. Riparian reforestation is a common occurrence either due to restoration efforts, intended to improve water quality, temperature regimes, and in-stream physical habitat or due to passive reforestation that is common when agricultural land uses decline. Previous studies have documented the influence of riparian vegetation on channel size, but driving mechanisms and the timescales at which they operate have not been evaluated. Field-based investigations were conducted in the Sleepers River basin in northeastern Vermont to revisit streams that were previously surveyed in the 1960s. We measured channel dimensions, large woody debris (LWD), and steam velocities in reaches with non-forested and forested riparian vegetation, in reaches currently in transition between vegetation types, and reaches with no change in riparian vegetation over the last 40 years. Flume experiments were performed with a 1:5 scale, fixed-bed model of a tributary to Sleepers River. Two types of riparian vegetation scenarios were simulated: 1) forested, with rigid, wooden dowels; and 2) non-forested, with synthetic grass carpeting. Three-dimensional velocities were measured during flume runs to determine turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) during overbank flows. Results showed that stream reaches with recently reforested vegetation have widened since the mid 1960s, but are not as wide as reaches with older riparian forests. LWD was more abundant in reaches with older riparian forests than in reaches with younger forests; however, scour around LWD did not appear to be a significant driving mechanism for channel widening. Velocity and TKE measurements from the prototype stream and the flume model indicate that TKE was significantly elevated in reforested reaches. Given that bed and bank erosion can be amplified in flows

  17. Hydrological heterogeneity in agricultural riparian buffer strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Larocque, Marie; Perron, Rachel; Wiseman, Natalie; Labrecque, Michel

    2017-03-01

    Riparian buffer strips (RBS) may protect surface water and groundwater in agricultural settings, although their effectiveness, observed in field-scale studies, may not extend to a watershed scale. Hydrologically-controlled leaching plots have often shown RBS to be effective at buffering nutrients and pesticides, but uncontrolled field studies have sometimes suggested limited effectiveness. The limited RBS effectiveness may be explained by the spatiotemporal hydrological heterogeneity near non-irrigated fields. This hypothesis was tested in conventional corn and soy fields in the St. Lawrence Lowlands of southern Quebec (Canada), where spring melt brings heavy and rapid runoff, while summer months are hot and dry. One field with a mineral soil (Saint-Roch-de-l'Achigan) and another with an organic-rich soil (Boisbriand) were equipped with passive runoff collectors, suction cup lysimeters, and piezometers placed before and after a 3 m-wide RBS, and monitored from 2011 to 2014. Soil topography of the RBS was mapped to a 1 cm vertical precision and a 50 cm sampling grid. On average, surface runoff intersects the RBS perpendicularly, but is subject to substantial local heterogeneity. Groundwater saturates the root zones, but flows little at the time of snowmelt. Groundwater flow is not consistently perpendicular to the RBS, and may reverse, flowing from stream to field under low water flow regimes with stream-aquifer connectivity, thus affecting RBS effectiveness calculations. Groundwater flow direction can be influenced by stratigraphy, local soil hydraulic properties, and historical modification of the agricultural stream beds. Understanding the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of surface and groundwater flows is essential to correctly assess the effectiveness of RBS in intercepting agro-chemical pollution. The implicit assumption that water flows across vegetated RBS, from the field to the stream, should always be verified.

  18. Modeled riparian stream shading: Agreement with field measurements and sensitivity to riparian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoyuan; Jackson, C. Rhett; Kraseski, Kristin A.

    2012-03-01

    SummaryShading by riparian vegetation and streambanks reduces incident solar radiation on channels, and accurate estimation of riparian shading through the sun's daily arc is a critical aspect of water temperature and dissolved oxygen modeling. However, riparian trees exhibit complex shapes, often leaning and growing branches preferentially over channels to utilize the light resource. As a result, riparian vegetation cast complex shadows with significant variability at the scale of meters. Water quality models necessarily simplify factors affecting shading at the expense of accuracy. All models must make simplifying assumptions about tree geometry. Reach-based models must average channel azimuth and riparian conditions over each reach, and GIS models must also accept errors in the channel-riparian relationships caused by the DEM grid detail. We detail minor improvements to existing shade models and create a model (SHADE2) that calculates shading ratio (%) by riparian canopy at any time and location for given stream characteristics including stream azimuth, stream width, canopy height, canopy overhang, and height of maximum canopy overhang. Sensitivity of simulated shade to these variables is explored. We also present a new field photographic technique for quantifying shade and use this technique to provide data to test the SHADE2 algorithm. Twenty-four independent shade measurements were made in eight channels with mature hardwood riparian trees at different times of the summer and at different times of the day. Agreement between measured and modeled shade was excellent, with r2 of 0.90.

  19. Potential effects of four Flaming Gorge Dam hydropower operational scenarios on riparian vegetation of the Green River, Utah and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    LaGory, K.E.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.A.

    1995-06-01

    Four hydropower operational scenarios at Flaming Gorge Dam were evaluated to determine their potential effects on riparian vegetation along the Green River in Utah and Colorado. Data collected in June 1992 indicated that elevation above the river had the largest influence on plant distribution. A lower riparian zone occupied the area between the approximate elevations of 800 and 4,200-cfs flows--the area within the range of hydropower operational releases. The lower zone was dominated by wetland plants such as cattail, common spikerush, coyote willow, juncus, and carex. An upper riparian zone was above the elevation of historical maximum power plant releases from the dam (4,200 cfs), and it generally supported plants adapted to mesic, nonwetland conditions. Common species in the upper zone included box elder, rabbitbrush, grasses, golden aster, and scouring rush. Multispectral aerial videography of the Green River was collected in May and June 1992 to determine the relationship between flow and the areas of water and the riparian zone. From these relationships, it was estimated that the upper zone would decrease in extent by about 5% with year-round high fluctuation, seasonally adjusted high fluctuation, and seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuation, but it would increase by about 8% under seasonally adjusted steady flow. The lower zone would increase by about 13% for both year-round and seasonally adjusted high fluctuation scenarios but would decrease by about 40% and 74% for seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuation and steady flows, respectively. These changes are considered to be relatively minor and would leave pre-dam riparian vegetation unaffected. Occasional high releases above power plant capacity would be needed for long-term maintenance of this relict vegetation.

  20. Assessing water quality at large geographic scales: Relations among land use, water physicochemistry, riparian condition, and fish community structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meador, M.R.; Goldstein, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Data collected from 172 sites in 20 major river basins between 1993 and 1995 as part of the US Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program were analyzed to assess relations among basinwide land use (agriculture, forest, urban, range), water physicochemistry, riparian condition, and fish community structure. A multimetric approach was used to develop regionally referenced indices of fish community and riparian condition. Across large geographic areas, decreased riparian condition was associated with water-quality constituents indicative of nonpoint source inputs-total nitrogen and suspended sediment and basin-wide urban land use. Decreased fish community condition was associated with increases in total dissolved solids and rangeland use and decreases in riparian condition and agricultural land use. Fish community condition was relatively high even in areas where agricultural land use was relatively high (>50% of the basin). Although agricultural land use can have deleterious effects on fish communities, the results of this study suggest that other factors also may be important, including practices that regulate the delivery of nutrients, suspended sediments, and total dissolved solids into streams. Across large geographic scales, measures of water physicochemistry may be better indicators of fish community condition than basinwide land use. Whereas numerous studies have indicated that riparian restorations are successful in specific cases, this analysis suggests the universal importance of riparian zones to the maintenance and restoration of diverse fish communities in streams.

  1. Geography of spring landbird migration through riparian habitats in southwestern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skagen, S.K.; Kelly, J.F.; van Riper, Charles; Hutto, R.L.; Finch, D.M.; Krueper, D.J.; Melcher, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    Migration stopover resources, particularly riparian habitats, are critically important to landbirds migrating across the arid southwestern region of North America. To explore the effects of species biogeography and habitat affinity on spring migration patterns, we synthesized existing bird abundance and capture data collected in riparian habitats of the borderlands region of the U.S. and Mexico. We determined the importance of geographic factors (longitude and latitude) in explaining variation in abundances and capture rates of 32 long-distance and three short-distance migrant species. Abundances and capture rates of 12 and 11 species, respectively, increased with increasing longitude, and four speciesa?? abundance and capture rates decreased with increasing longitude. Riparian associates, but not nonriparian species, were more abundant in western sites. Their abundance patterns were only weakly influenced by species biogeography in contrast, biogeography did influence abundance patterns of nonriparian birds, suggesting that they choose the shortest, most direct route between wintering and breeding areas. We hypothesize that riparian obligate birds may, to some degree, adjust their migration routes to maximize time spent in high-quality riparian zones, but they are able to find suitable habitat opportunistically when crossing more hostile landscapes. In contrast, nonriparian birds adhere more closely to a hierarchical model in which the migratory route is determined by biogeographic constraints. Conservation of riparian habitats is necessary to meet future habitat stopover requirements of many western Neotropical migrant birds. We advocate a coordinated research effort to further elucidate patterns of distribution and habitat use so that conservation activities can be focused effectively.

  2. Estimating riparian and agricultural evapotranspiration by reference crop evapotranspiration and MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagler, Pamela L.; Glenn, Edward P.; Nguyen, Uyen; Scott, Russell; Doody, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Dryland river basins frequently support both irrigated agriculture and riparian vegetation and remote sensing methods are needed to monitor water use by both crops and natural vegetation in irrigation districts. We developed an algorithm for estimating actual evapotranspiration (ETa) based on the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensor on the EOS-1 Terra satellite and locally-derived measurements of reference crop ET (ETo). The algorithm was calibrated with five years of ETa data from three eddy covariance flux towers set in riparian plant associations on the upper San Pedro River, Arizona, supplemented with ETa data for alfalfa and cotton from the literature. The algorithm was based on an equation of the form ETa = ETo [a(1 − e−bEVI) − c], where the term (1 − e−bEVI) is derived from the Beer-Lambert Law to express light absorption by a canopy, with EVI replacing leaf area index as an estimate of the density of light-absorbing units. The resulting algorithm capably predicted ETa across riparian plants and crops (r2 = 0.73). It was then tested against water balance data for five irrigation districts and flux tower data for two riparian zones for which season-long or multi-year ETa data were available. Predictions were within 10% of measured results in each case, with a non-significant (P = 0.89) difference between mean measured and modeled ETa of 5.4% over all validation sites. Validation and calibration data sets were combined to present a final predictive equation for application across crops and riparian plant associations for monitoring individual irrigation districts or for conducting global water use assessments of mixed agricultural and riparian biomes.

  3. Statistical evaluation of effects of riparian buffers on nitrate and ground water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruill, T.B.

    2000-01-01

    A study was conducted to statistically evaluate the effectiveness of riparian buffers for decreasing nitrate concentrations in ground water and for affecting other chemical constituents. Values for pH, specific conductance, alkalinity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), silica, ammonium, phosphorus, iron, and manganese at 28 sites in the Contentnea Creek Basin were significantly higher (p 20 yr) discharging ground water draining areas with riparian buffers compared with areas without riparian buffers. No differences in chloride, nitrate nitrogen, calcium, sodium, and dssolved oxygen concentrations in old ground water between buffer and nonbuffer areas were detected. Comparison of samples of young (20 yr) discharging ground water draining areas with riparian buffers compared with areas without riparian buffers. No differences in chloride, nitrate nitrogen, calcium, sodium, and dissolved oxygen concentrations in old ground water between buffer and nonbuffer areas were detected. Comparison of samples of young (<20 yr) discharging ground water samples from buffer and nonbuffer areas indicated significantly higher specific conductance, calcium, chloride, and nitrate nitrogen in nonbuffer areas. Riparian buffers along streams can affect the composition of the hyporheic zone by providing a source of organic carbon to the streambed, which creates reducing geochemical conditions that consequently can affect the chemical quality of old ground water discharging through it. Buffer zones between agricultural fields and streams facilitate dilution of conservative chemical constituents in young ground water that originate from fertilizer applications and also allow denitrification in ground water by providing an adequate source of organic carbon generated by vegetation in the buffer zone. Based on the median chloride and nitrate values for young ground water in the Contentnea Creek Basin, nitrate was 95% lower in buffer areas compared with nonbuffer areas, with a 30 to 35% reduction

  4. Hydrological connectivity as indicated by transport of diatoms through the riparian-stream system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Carreras, N.; Wetzel, C. E.; Frentress, J.; Ector, L.; McDonnell, J. J.; Hoffmann, L.; Pfister, L.

    2015-02-01

    Diatoms (Bacillariophyta) are one of the most common and diverse algal groups (ca. 200 000 species, ≈10-200 μm, unicellular, eukaryotic). Here we investigate the potential of terrestrial and aerophytic diatoms (i.e. diatoms nearly exclusively occurring outside water bodies, on wet, moist or temporarily dry places) to infer surface hydrological connectivity between hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) landscape units during storm runoff events. We present data from the Weierbach catchment (0.45 km2, NW Luxembourg) that quantifies the relative abundance of terrestrial and aerophytic diatom species on hillslopes and in riparian zones (i.e. surface soils, litter, bryophytes and vegetation) and within streams (i.e. stream water, epilithon and epipelon). We tested the hypothesis that different diatom species assemblages inhabit specific moisture domains of the catchment (i.e. HRS units) and, consequently, the presence of certain species assemblages in the stream during runoff events offers the potential for recording if there was or not hydrological connectivity between these domains. We found that a higher percentage of terrestrial and aerophytic diatom species was present in samples collected from the riparian and hillslope zones than inside the stream. However, diatoms were absent on hillslopes covered by dry litter, limiting their use to infer hillslope-riparian zone connectivity in some parts of the catchment. Our results also showed that terrestrial and aerophytic diatom abundance in the stream increased systematically during all sampled events (n = 11, 2010-2011) in response to incident precipitation and increasing discharge. This transport of terrestrial and aerophytic diatoms during events suggested a rapid connectivity between the soil surface and the stream. Diatom transport data was compared to two-component hydrograph separation, and end-member mixing analysis (EMMA) using stream water chemistry and stable isotope data. This research suggests that diatoms were

  5. Hydrological connectivity inferred from diatom transport through the riparian-stream system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Carreras, N.; Wetzel, C. E.; Frentress, J.; Ector, L.; McDonnell, J. J.; Hoffmann, L.; Pfister, L.

    2015-07-01

    Diatoms (Bacillariophyta) are one of the most common and diverse algal groups (ca. 200 000 species, ≈ 10-200 μm, unicellular, eukaryotic). Here we investigate the potential of aerial diatoms (i.e. diatoms nearly exclusively occurring outside water bodies, in wet, moist or temporarily dry places) to infer surface hydrological connectivity between hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) landscape units during storm runoff events. We present data from the Weierbach catchment (0.45 km2, northwestern Luxembourg) that quantify the relative abundance of aerial diatom species on hillslopes and in riparian zones (i.e. surface soils, litter, bryophytes and vegetation) and within streams (i.e. stream water, epilithon and epipelon). We tested the hypothesis that different diatom species assemblages inhabit specific moisture domains of the catchment (i.e. HRS units) and, consequently, the presence of certain species assemblages in the stream during runoff events offers the potential for recording whether there was hydrological connectivity between these domains or not. We found that a higher percentage of aerial diatom species was present in samples collected from the riparian and hillslope zones than inside the stream. However, diatoms were absent on hillslopes covered by dry litter and the quantities of diatoms (in absolute numbers) were small in the rest of hillslope samples. This limits their use for inferring hillslope-riparian zone connectivity. Our results also showed that aerial diatom abundance in the stream increased systematically during all sampled events (n = 11, 2011-2012) in response to incident precipitation and increasing discharge. This transport of aerial diatoms during events suggested a rapid connectivity between the soil surface and the stream. Diatom transport data were compared to two-component hydrograph separation, and end-member mixing analysis (EMMA) using stream water chemistry and stable isotope data. Hillslope overland flow was insignificant during

  6. Hiawatha National Forest Riparian Inventory: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abood, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Riparian areas are dynamic, transitional ecotones between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems with well-defined vegetation and soil characteristics. Riparian areas offers wildlife habitat and stream water quality, offers bank stability and protects against erosions, provides aesthetics and recreational value, and other numerous valuable ecosystem functions. Quantifying and delineating riparian areas is an essential step in riparian monitoring, riparian management/planning and policy decisions, and in preserving its valuable ecological functions. Previous approaches to riparian areas mapping have primarily utilized fixed width buffers. However, these methodologies only take the watercourse into consideration and ignore critical geomorphology, associated vegetation and soil characteristics. Other approaches utilize remote sensing technologies such as aerial photos interpretation or satellite imagery riparian vegetation classification. Such techniques requires expert knowledge, high spatial resolution data, and expensive when mapping riparian areas on a landscape scale. The goal of this study is to develop a cost effective robust workflow to consistently map the geographic extent and composition of riparian areas within the Hiawatha National Forest boundary utilizing the Riparian Buffer Delineation Model (RBDM) v3.0 and open source geospatial data. This approach recognizes the dynamic and transitional natures of riparian areas by accounting for hydrologic, geomorphic and vegetation data as inputs into the delineation process and the results would suggests incorporating functional variable width riparian mapping within watershed management planning to improve protection and restoration of valuable riparian functionality and biodiversity.

  7. Woody riparian vegetation of Great Basin National Park. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, C.L.; Smith, S.D.; Murray, K.J.; Landau, F.H.; Sala, A.

    1994-07-01

    The community composition and population structure of the woody riparian vegetation in Great Basin National Park are described. Community analyses were accomplished by sampling 229 plots placed in a systematic random fashion along elevational gradients of 8 major stream systems (Baker, Big Wash, Lehman, Pine, Pole, Shingle, Snake, and Strawberry Creeks) in the Park using the releve method. Stand demographics were determined for the four dominant tree species in the Park, based on absolute stem counts at 15 sites along 6 major watersheds. Elevational ranges of the dominant tree and shrub species along 8 major streams were determined via transect analysis and systematic reconnaissance efforts. TWINSPAN (two-way indicator analysis) indentified 4 primary species groups and 8 stand groups in the Park. Because of the homogeneity of riparian zones, both presence and abundance of species were important parameters in determining species groups. Although species such as Populus tremuloides (aspen), Abies concolor (white fir) and Rosa woodsii (Woods rose) are very common throughout the Park, they are particularly abundant at higher, upper intermediate, and lower intermediate elevations.

  8. Stream hydrology limits recovery of riparian ecosystems after wolf reintroduction.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kristin N; Hobbs, N Thompson; Cooper, David J

    2013-04-07

    Efforts to restore ecosystems often focus on reintroducing apex predators to re-establish coevolved relationships among predators, herbivores and plants. The preponderance of evidence for indirect effects of predators on terrestrial plant communities comes from ecosystems where predators have been removed. Far less is known about the consequences of their restoration. The effects of removal and restoration are unlikely to be symmetrical because removing predators can create feedbacks that reinforce the effects of predator loss. Observational studies have suggested that the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park initiated dramatic restoration of riparian ecosystems by releasing willows from excessive browsing by elk. Here, we present results from a decade-long experiment in Yellowstone showing that moderating browsing alone was not sufficient to restore riparian zones along small streams. Instead, restoration of willow communities depended on removing browsing and restoring hydrological conditions that prevailed before the removal of wolves. The 70-year absence of predators from the ecosystem changed the disturbance regime in a way that was not reversed by predator reintroduction. We conclude that predator restoration may not quickly repair effects of predator removal in ecosystems.

  9. The impact of flood variables on riparian vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzubakova, Katarina; Molnar, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The riparian vegetation of Alpine rivers often grows in temporally dynamic riverine environments which are characterized by pronounced meteorological and hydrological fluctuations and high resource competition. Within these relatively rough conditions, riparian vegetation fulfils essential ecosystem functions such as water retention, biomass production and habitat to endangered species. The identification of relevant flood attributes impacting riparian vegetation is crucial for a better understanding of the vegetation dynamics in the riverine ecosystem. Hence, in this contribution we aim to quantify the ecological effects of flood attributes on riparian vegetation and to analyze the spatial coherence of flood-vegetation interaction patterns. We analyzed a 500 m long and 300-400 m wide study reach located on the Maggia River in southern Switzerland. Altogether five floods between 2008 and 2011 with return periods ranging from 1.4 to 20.1 years were studied. To assess the significance of the flood attributes, we compared post-flood to pre-flood vegetation vigour to flood intensity. Pre- and post-flood vegetation vigour was represented by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) which was computed from images recorded by high resolution ground-based cameras. Flood intensity was expressed in space in the study reach by six flood attributes (inundation duration, maximum depth, maximum and total velocity, maximum and total shear stress) which were simulated by the 2D hydrodynamic model BASEMENT (VAW, ETH Zurich). We considered three floodplain units separately (main bar, secondary bar, transitional zone). Based on our results, pre-flood vegetation vigour largely determined vegetation reaction to the less intense floods (R = 0.59-0.96). However for larger floods with a strong erosive effect, its contribution was significantly lower (R = 0.59-0.68). Using multivariate regression analysis we show that pre-flood vegetation vigour and maximum velocity proved to be

  10. Nitrate in groundwater and water sources used by riparian trees in an agricultural watershed: A chemical and isotopic investigation in southern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.; Magner, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluates processes that affect nitrate concentrations in groundwater beneath riparian zones in an agricultural watershed. Nitrate pathways in the upper 2 m of groundwater were investigated beneath wooded and grass-shrub riparian zones next to cultivated fields. Because trees can be important components of the overall nitrate pathway in wooded riparian zones, water sources used by riparian trees and possible effects of trees on nitrate concentrations in groundwater were also investigated. Average nitrate concentrations in shallow groundwater beneath the cultivated fields were 5.5 mg/L upgradient of the wooded riparian zone and 3.5 mg/L upgradient of the grass-shrub zone. Shallow groundwater beneath the fields passed through the riparian zones and discharged into streams that had average nitrate concentrations of 8.5 mg/L (as N). Lateral variations of ??D values in groundwater showed that mixing among different water sources occurred beneath the riparian zones. In the wooded riparian zone, nitrate concentrations in shallow groundwater were diluted by upwelling, nitrate- poor, deep groundwater. Upwelling deep groundwater contained ammonium with a ??15N of 5??? that upon nitrification and mixing with nitrate in shallow groundwater caused nitrate ??15N values in shallow groundwater to decrease by as much as 19.5???. Stream water penetrated laterally beneath the wooded riparian zone as far as 19 m from the stream's edge and beneath the grass- shrub zone as far as 27 m from the stream's edge. Nitrate concentrations in shallow groundwater immediately upgradient of where it mixed with stream water averaged 0.4 mg/L in the wooded riparian zone and 0.8 mg/L near the grass-shrub riparian zone. Nitrate concentrations increased toward the streams because of mixing with nitrate-rich stream water. Because nitrate concentrations were larger in stream water than shallow groundwater, concentrated nitrate in the streams cannot have come from shallow groundwater at these

  11. Nitrate in ground water and water sources used by riparian trees in an agricultural watershed: A chemical and isotopic investigation in southern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, Stephen C.; Magner, J.

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluates processes that affect nitrate concentrations in groundwater beneath riparian zones in an agricultural watershed. Nitrate pathways in the upper 2 m of groundwater were investigated beneath wooded and grass-shrub riparian zones next to cultivated fields. Because trees can be important components of the overall nitrate pathway in wooded riparian zones, water sources used by riparian trees and possible effects of trees on nitrate concentrations in groundwater were also investigated. Average nitrate concentrations in shallow groundwater beneath the cultivated fields were 5.5 mg/L upgradient of the wooded riparian zone and 3.5 mg/L upgradient of the grass-shrub zone. Shallow groundwater beneath the fields passed through the riparian zones and discharged into streams that had average nitrate concentrations of 8.5 mg/L (as N). Lateral variations of δD values in groundwater showed that mixing among different water sources occurred beneath the riparian zones. In the wooded riparian zone, nitrate concentrations in shallow groundwater were diluted by upwelling, nitrate-poor, deep groundwater. Upwelling deep groundwater contained ammonium with a δ15N of 5‰ that upon nitrification and mixing with nitrate in shallow groundwater caused nitrate δ15N values in shallow groundwater to decrease by as much as 19.5‰. Stream water penetrated laterally beneath the wooded riparian zone as far as 19 m from the stream's edge and beneath the grass-shrub zone as far as 27 m from the stream's edge. Nitrate concentrations in shallow groundwater immediately upgradient of where it mixed with stream water averaged 0.4 mg/L in the wooded riparian zone and 0.8 mg/L near the grass-shrub riparian zone. Nitrate concentrations increased toward the streams because of mixing with nitrate-rich stream water. Because nitrate concentrations were larger in stream water than shallow groundwater, concentrated nitrate in the streams cannot have come from shallow groundwater at these

  12. Riparian vegetation, Colorado River, and climate: Five decades of spatiotemporal dynamics in the Grand Canyon with river regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, Joel B.; Ralston, Barbara E.; Grams, Paul E.; Schmidt, John C.; Cagney, Laura E.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation of the interacting effects of river regulation and climate on riparian vegetation has typically been limited to small segments of rivers or focused on individual plant species. We examine spatiotemporal variability in riparian vegetation for the Colorado River in Grand Canyon relative to river regulation and climate, over the five decades since completion of the upstream Glen Canyon Dam in 1963. Long-term changes along this highly modified, large segment of the river provide insights for management of similar riparian ecosystems around the world. We analyze vegetation extent based on maps and imagery from eight dates between 1965 and 2009, coupled with the instantaneous hydrograph for the entire period. Analysis confirms a net increase in vegetated area since completion of the dam. Magnitude and timing of such vegetation changes are river stage-dependent. Vegetation expansion is coincident with inundation frequency changes and is unlikely to occur for time periods when inundation frequency exceeds approximately 5%. Vegetation expansion at lower zones of the riparian area is greater during the periods with lower peak and higher base flows, while vegetation at higher zones couples with precipitation patterns and decreases during drought. Short pulses of high flow, such as the controlled floods of the Colorado River in 1996, 2004, and 2008, do not keep vegetation from expanding onto bare sand habitat. Management intended to promote resilience of riparian vegetation must contend with communities that are sensitive to the interacting effects of altered flood regimes and water availability from river and precipitation.

  13. Riparian vegetation, Colorado River, and climate: five decades of spatiotemporal dynamics in the Grand Canyon with river regulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Joel B.; Ralston, Barbara; Grams, Paul E.; Schmidt, John C.; Cagney, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    Documentation of the interacting effects of river regulation and climate on riparian vegetation has typically been limited to small segments of rivers or focused on individual plant species. We examine spatiotemporal variability in riparian vegetation for the Colorado River in Grand Canyon relative to river regulation and climate, over the five decades since completion of the upstream Glen Canyon Dam in 1963. Long-term changes along this highly modified, large segment of the river provide insights for management of similar riparian ecosystems around the world. We analyze vegetation extent based on maps and imagery from eight dates between 1965 and 2009, coupled with the instantaneous hydrograph for the entire period. Analysis confirms a net increase in vegetated area since completion of the dam. Magnitude and timing of such vegetation changes are river stage-dependent. Vegetation expansion is coincident with inundation frequency changes and is unlikely to occur for time periods when inundation frequency exceeds approximately 5%. Vegetation expansion at lower zones of the riparian area is greater during the periods with lower peak and higher base flows, while vegetation at higher zones couples with precipitation patterns and decreases during drought. Short pulses of high flow, such as the controlled floods of the Colorado River in 1996, 2004, and 2008, do not keep vegetation from expanding onto bare sand habitat. Management intended to promote resilience of riparian vegetation must contend with communities that are sensitive to the interacting effects of altered flood regimes and water availability from river and precipitation.

  14. MULTISTAGE CHARACTERIZATION OF RIPARIAN PATCHES IN THE ARID SOUTHWEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some ecologically critical riparian ecosystems in the and Southwest are spatially and temporally discontinuous making their location and/or condition difficult to distinguish when studying the desert landscape. When conditions permit, riparian patches in the desert are distinct b...

  15. ASSESSING ARID RIPARIAN LANDSCAPES USING REMOTE SENSING: THE FIRST STEP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian ecosystems are of great value in the Southwest yet they are also extremely fragile and susceptible to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Riparian ecosystems establish in patterns per the hydrologic and geomorphologic processes that dictate terrestrial plant success...

  16. VEGETATION CHARACTERIZATION OF THREE CONTRASTING RIPARIAN SITES, WILLAMETTE VALLEY, OR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Much of the native riparian vegetation of the Willamette Valley, Oregon, has been replaced with agricultural crops or invasive non-native plant species. Detailed information about current Willamette Valley riparian vegetation is generally lacking. Plant species composition data...

  17. RIPARIAN RESTORATION: CURRENT STATUS AND THE REACH TO THE FUTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nine articles in the special issure of Restoration Ecology addressing the subject of site selection for riparian restoration activities were critically examined for this review. The approaches described make significant and original contributions to the field of riparian restorat...

  18. Mapping of riparian invasive species with supervised classification of Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michez, Adrien; Piégay, Hervé; Jonathan, Lisein; Claessens, Hugues; Lejeune, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Riparian zones are key landscape features, representing the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Although they have been influenced by human activities for centuries, their degradation has increased during the 20th century. Concomitant with (or as consequences of) these disturbances, the invasion of exotic species has increased throughout the world's riparian zones. In our study, we propose a easily reproducible methodological framework to map three riparian invasive taxa using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) imagery: Impatiens glandulifera Royle, Heracleum mantegazzianum Sommier and Levier, and Japanese knotweed (Fallopia sachalinensis (F. Schmidt Petrop.), Fallopia japonica (Houtt.) and hybrids). Based on visible and near-infrared UAS orthophoto, we derived simple spectral and texture image metrics computed at various scales of image segmentation (10, 30, 45, 60 using eCognition software). Supervised classification based on the random forests algorithm was used to identify the most relevant variable (or combination of variables) derived from UAS imagery for mapping riparian invasive plant species. The models were built using 20% of the dataset, the rest of the dataset being used as a test set (80%). Except for H. mantegazzianum, the best results in terms of global accuracy were achieved with the finest scale of analysis (segmentation scale parameter = 10). The best values of overall accuracies reached 72%, 68%, and 97% for I. glandulifera, Japanese knotweed, and H. mantegazzianum respectively. In terms of selected metrics, simple spectral metrics (layer mean/camera brightness) were the most used. Our results also confirm the added value of texture metrics (GLCM derivatives) for mapping riparian invasive species. The results obtained for I. glandulifera and Japanese knotweed do not reach sufficient accuracies for operational applications. However, the results achieved for H. mantegazzianum are encouraging. The high accuracies values combined to

  19. Using monitoring, LiDAR and MODFLOW to Estimate Hyporheic Fluxes for a Dynamic Large River Riparian Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    In unrevetted reaches, the Willamette River in northwest Oregon is a dynamic anastomosing system. Riparian zones are frequently divided into multiple islands during most of the wet winter season. The dividing stream channels are mostly absent during the dry summer season. This po...

  20. A TECHNIQUE FOR ESTIMATING ROOT PRODUCTION IN RIPARIAN SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Below-ground plant biomass plays a critical role in the maintenance of riparian ecosystems. Despite this importance, below-ground dynamics of riparian plant species are not commonly investigated, in part due to difficulties of sampling in a below-ground riparian environment. We investigated the fi...

  1. Riparian Areas of the Southwest: Learning from Repeat Photographs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaimes, George N.; Crimmins, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of riparian areas, as well as potential impacts from climate change, are concepts that land and water managers and stakeholders need to understand to effectively manage and protect riparian areas. Rapid population growth in the southwestern United States, and multiple-use designation of most riparian areas, makes…

  2. Nitrate and dissolved nitrous oxide in groundwater within cropped fields and riparian buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.-G.; Isenhart, T. M.; Parkin, T. B.; Schultz, R. C.; Loynachan, T. E.

    2009-01-01

    Transport and fate of dissolved nitrous oxide (N2O) in groundwater and its significance to nitrogen dynamics within agro-ecosystems are poorly known in spite of significant potential of N2O to global warming and ozone depletion. Increasing denitrification in riparian buffers may trade a reduction in nitrate (NO3-) transport to surface waters for increased N2O emissions resulting from denitrification-produced N2O dissolved in groundwater being emitted into the air when groundwater flows into a stream or a river. This study quantifies the transport and fate of NO3- and dissolved N2O moving from crop fields through riparian buffers, assesses whether groundwater exported from crop fields and riparian buffers is a significant source of dissolved N2O emissions, and evaluates the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) methodology to estimate dissolved N2O emission. We measured concentrations of NO3-; chloride (Cl-); pH; dissolved N2O, dissolved oxygen (DO), and organic carbon (DOC) in groundwater under a multi-species riparian buffer, a cool-season grass filter, and adjacent crop fields located in the Bear Creek watershed in central Iowa, USA. In both the multi-species riparian buffer and the cool-season grass filter, concentrations of dissolved N2O in the groundwater did not change as it passed through the sites, even when the concentrations of groundwater NO3- were decreased by 50% and 59%, respectively, over the same periods. The fraction of N lost to leaching and runoff (0.05) and the modified N2O emission factor, [ratio of dissolved N2O flux to N input (0.00002)] determined for the cropped fields indicate that the current IPCC methodology overestimates dissolved N2O flux in the sites. A low ratio between dissolved N2O flux and soil N2O emission (0.0003) was estimated in the cropped fields. These results suggest that the riparian buffers established adjacent to crop fields for water quality functions (enhanced denitrification) decreased NO3- and were not a

  3. Environmental services provided from riparian forests in the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Gundersen, Per; Laurén, Ari; Finér, Leena; Ring, Eva; Koivusalo, Harri; Saetersdal, Magne; Weslien, Jan-Olov; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D; Högbom, Lars; Laine, Jukka; Hansen, Karin

    2010-12-01

    Riparian forests (RF) growing along streams, rivers and lakes comprise more than 2% of the forest area in the Nordic countries (considering a 10 m wide zone from the water body). They have special ecological functions in the landscape. They receive water and nutrients from the upslope areas, are important habitats for biodiversity, have large soil carbon stores, but may emit more greenhouse gases (GHG) than the uplands. In this article, we present a review of the environmental services related to water protection, terrestrial biodiversity, carbon storage and greenhouse gas dynamics provided by RF in the Nordic countries. We discuss the benefits and trade-offs when leaving the RF as a buffer against the impacts from upland forest management, in particular the impacts of clear cutting. Forest buffers are effective in protecting water quality and aquatic life, and have positive effects on terrestrial biodiversity, particularly when broader than 40 m, whereas the effect on the greenhouse gas exchange is unclear.

  4. Riparian Vegetation Control of In-Stream Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    Stream temperature is an important physical characteristic that can control the structure of aquatic fauna and influence key ecological processes. The response of in-stream temperature to topographic and vegetative shade can be predicted with reasonable accuracy at the sub-catchment scale. A more difficult task is to determine the biotic response to thermal stress and therefore set guideline values. A series of LD50 experiments supported extensive worldwide literature on temperature tolerances of aquatic fauna. Temperature modelling was applied at different biogeographic zones of Australia. In Mediterranean climates where low flow corresponded with high summer air temperatures, in-stream thermal stress was highly seasonal. In the tropics the situation was reversed such that high air temperatures, during summer, corresponded with high stream flows that moderated the magnitude of seasonal variation. When combined with the estimated thermal tolerance of selected taxa, model analyses identified critical bottlenecks, in space and time, and enabled prioritisation of riparian restoration efforts.

  5. Stream Community Structure: An Analysis of Riparian Forest Buffer Restoration in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzetti, L. L.; Jones, R. C.

    2005-05-01

    Forested riparian buffer zones have been proposed as an important aid in curtailing upland sources of pollution before they reach stream surface waters, and enhancing habitat for stream organisms. Our objective was to test the efficacy of restored forest riparian buffers along streams in the Chesapeake Bay watershed by examining the stream macrobenthic community structure. To test our hypothesis, we collected riffle benthic and water samples, and performed habitat evaluations at 30 stream sites in the mid-Atlantic Piedmont, ranging in buffer age from 0 to greater than 50 years of age. Results showed that habitat, water quality, and benthic macroinvertebrate metrics improved with age of restored buffer. Habitat scores were driven mostly by instream substrate availability and width and age of riparian buffer zones. Water quality parameters varied within buffer age groups depending age of surrounding forest vegetation. Benthic invertebrate taxa richness, % EPT, % Plecoptera, % Ephemeroptera, and the FBI all improved with age of buffer zone. Instream habitat quality was the greatest driver of benthic macroinvertebrate community diversity and health, and appeared to plateau within 10-15 years of restoration with noticeable improvements occurring within 5-10 years post restoration.

  6. Mature and old-growth riparian forests: structure, dynamics, and effects on Adirondack stream habitats.

    PubMed

    Keeton, William S; Kraft, Clifford E; Warren, Dana R

    2007-04-01

    Riparian forests regulate linkages between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, yet relationships among riparian forest development, stand structure, and stream habitats are poorly understood in many temperate deciduous forest systems. Our research has (1) described structural attributes associated with old-growth riparian forests and (2) assessed linkages between these characteristics and in-stream habitat structure. The 19 study sites were located along predominantly first- and second-order streams in northern hardwood-conifer forests in the Adirondack Mountains of New York (U.S.A.). Sites were classified as mature forest (6 sites), mature with remnant old-growth trees (3 sites), and old-growth (10 sites). Forest-structure attributes were measured over stream channels and at varying distances from each bank. In-stream habitat features such as large woody debris (LWD), pools, and boulders were measured in each stream reach. Forest structure was examined in relation to stand age using multivariate techniques, ANOVA, and linear regression. We investigated linkages between forest structure and stream characteristics using similar methods, preceded by information-theoretic modeling (AIC). Old-growth riparian forest structure is more complex than that found in mature forests and exhibits significantly greater accumulations of aboveground tree biomass, both living and dead. In-stream LWD volumes were significantly (alpha = 0.05) greater at old-growth sites (200 m3/ha) compared to mature sites (34 m3/ha) and were strongly related to the basal area of adjacent forests. In-stream large-log densities correlated strongly with debris-dam densities. AIC models that included large-log density, debris-dam density, boulder density, and bankfull width had the most support for predicting pool density. There were higher proportions of LWD-formed pools relative to boulder-formed pools at old-growth sites as compared to mature sites. Old-growth riparian forests provide in

  7. The influence of connectivity in forest patches, and riparian vegetation width on stream macroinvertebrate fauna.

    PubMed

    Valle, I C; Buss, D F; Baptista, D F

    2013-05-01

    We assessed two dimensions of stream connectivity: longitudinal (between forest patches along the stream) and lateral (riparian vegetation), using macroinvertebrate assemblages as bioindicators. Sites representing different land-uses were sampled in a lowland basin that holds a mosaic of protected areas. Land-use analysis, forest successional stages and riparian zone widths were calculated by the GIS analysis. Macroinvertebrate fauna was strongly affected by land-use. We observed a continuous decrease in the number of sensitive species, %Shredders and IBE-IOC biotic index from the upstream protected area to highly deforested sites, increasing again where the stream crosses a Biological Reserve. When analysing buffer strips, we found aquatic fauna responding to land-use alterations beyond the 30 m riparian corridor (60 m and 100 m wide). We discussed the longitudinal connectivity between forest patches and the riparian vegetation buffer strips necessary to hold high macroinvertebrate diversity. We recommend actions for the increase/maintenance of biodiversity in this and other lowland basins.

  8. Cooling Along Hyporheic Pathlines in a Large River Riparian Zone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Floodplains can contribute to hyporheic cooling and moderation of temperature for rivers, but extent and magnitude are dependent on ground water hydrology. Here we illustrate the controls and dynamics of hyporheic cooling in the ground water of a large river floodplain with field...

  9. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: STREAMFLOW, URBAN RIPARIAN ZONES, BMPS, AND IMPERVIOUS SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Landscape Ecology Branch (LEB) in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina is currently conducting collaborative landscape/stream ecology research in the Clarksburg Special Protection Area (CSPA) in Montgomery County, Maryland. The CSPA subwatersheds are on the outer e...

  10. Evapotranspiration Rates of Riparian Forests, Platte River, Nebraska, 2002-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landon, Matthew K.; Rus, David L.; Dietsch, Benjamin J.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Eggemeyer, Kathleen D.

    2009-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) in riparian areas is a poorly understood component of the regional water balance in the Platte River Basin, where competing demands have resulted in water shortages in the ground-water/surface-water system. From April 2002 through March 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey, Nebraska Platte River Cooperative Hydrology Study Group, and Central Platte Natural Resources District conducted a micrometeorological study of water and energy balances at two sites in central Nebraska near Odessa and Gothenburg to improve understanding of ET rates and factors affecting them in Platte River riparian forests. A secondary objective of the study was to constrain estimates of ground-water use by riparian vegetation to satisfy ET consumptive demands, a useful input to regional ground-water flow models. Both study sites are located on large islands within the Platte River characterized by a cottonwood-dominated forest canopy on primarily sandy alluvium. Although both sites are typical of riparian forests along the Platte River in Nebraska, the Odessa understory is dominated by deciduous shrubs, whereas the Gothenburg understory is dominated by eastern redcedars. Additionally, seasonal ground-water levels fluctuated more at Odessa than at Gothenburg. The study period of April 2002 through March 2006 encompassed precipitation conditions ranging from dry to wet. This study characterized the components of the water balance in the riparian zone of each site. ET was evaluated from eddy-covariance sensors installed on towers above the forest canopy at a height of 26.1 meters. Precipitation was measured both above and below the forest canopy. A series of sensors measured soil-moisture availability within the unsaturated zone in two different vertical profiles at each site. Changes in ground-water altitude were evaluated from piezometers. The areal footprint represented in the water balance extended up to 800 meters from each tower. During the study, ET was less variable

  11. Methods for evaluating riparian habitats with applications to management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Platts, William S.; Armour, C.L.; Booth, G.D.; Bryant, M.; Bufford, J.L.; Cuplin, P.; Jensen, S.; Lienkaemper, G.W.; Minshall, G.W.; Monsen, S.T.; Nelson, R.L.; Sedell, J.R.; Tuhy, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Riparian area planning and management is a major national issues today--something that should have been the case a century ago. A century of additive effects of land use has resulted in major impacts on many riparian stream habitats and their fisheries, wildlife, and domestic livestock use. Before scientists can evaluate the influences of various land and water uses on riparian environments, they must first understand these environments. This means being able to detect and measure with confidence the natural and artificial variation and instantaneous conditions of the riparian habitat. These conditions must then be related to the production capability of riparian habitat and any extraneous factors affecting this production potential.

  12. Effect of riparian vegetation on diatom assemblages in headwater streams under different land uses.

    PubMed

    Hlúbiková, Daša; Novais, Maria Helena; Dohet, Alain; Hoffmann, Lucien; Ector, Luc

    2014-03-15

    Differences in the structure of diatom assemblages in headwaters with contrasting shading conditions and different land use in the buffer zone and upper catchment were studied in order to evaluate the influence of the lack of riparian vegetation on the biofilm. The objective was to ascertain whether a riparian buffer can mitigate the negative influence of human induced disturbance and pollution on diatom assemblages in headwaters. Four streams were selected in order to maximize the differences in the land cover and minimize other environmental gradients. Multivariate statistics, different comparative and permutation tests and correlations were applied to compare the diatom assemblages, the Specific Polluosensitivity Index (IPS) and the diatom ecological guilds (low profile, high profile and motile) among the sites studied and to evaluate their responses to disturbances. The analysis showed that low profile diatoms typically dominated in forested headwaters with limited resources, whilst assemblages at impacted sites showed a wider range of growth forms. In unimpacted streams, the diatom assemblages were influenced by temperature, pH, conductivity and calcium, as usually reported for oligotrophic streams with high natural disturbance due to fast current and shading. In both shaded and unshaded impacted streams, the importance of nutrients and land use disturbance, especially urbanization, prevailed. This trend was also reflected by the IPS index that showed consistently lower values at impacted sites, correlating most significantly with nutrients. The diatom species composition as well as diatom guilds at impacted sites were similar, regardless of the presence or absence of riparian vegetation, and were significantly influenced by seasonal changes. Our results indicate that diatoms react sensitively to alterations of the water environment in headwaters, induced by anthropogenic activities, and these impacts are not buffered by an intact riparian zone. Diatoms

  13. Denitrification potential of riparian soils in relation to multiscale spatial environmental factors: a case study of a typical watershed, China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianbing; Feng, Hao; Cheng, Quanguo; Gao, Shiqian; Liu, Haiyan

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that environmental regulators of riparian zone soil denitrification potential differ according to spatial scale within a watershed; consequently, a second objective was to provide spatial strategies for conserving and restoring the purification function of runoff in riparian ecosystems. The results show that soil denitrification in riparian zones was more heterogeneous at the profile scale than at the cross-section and landscape scales. At the profile scale, biogeochemical factors (including soil total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and nitrate-nitrogen) were the major direct regulators of the spatial distribution of soil denitrification enzyme activity (DEA). At the cross-section scale, factors included distance from river bank and vegetation density, while landscape-scale factors, including topographic index, elevation, and land use types, indirectly regulated the spatial distribution of DEA. At the profile scale, soil DEA was greatest in the upper soil layers. At the cross-section scale, maximum soil DEA occurred in the mid-part of the riparian zone. At the landscape scale, soil DEA showed an increasing trend towards downstream sites, except for those in urbanized areas.

  14. Evaporative losses from a common reed-dominated peachleaf willow and cottonwood riparian plant community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabenge, Isa; Irmak, Suat

    2012-09-01

    Our study is one of the first to integrate and apply within-canopy radiation physics parameters and scaling-up leaf-level stomatal resistace (rL) to canopy resistance (rc) approach to quantify hourly transpiration (TRP) rates of individual riparian plant species—common reed (Phragmites australis), peachleaf willow (Salix amygdaloides), and cottonwood (Populus deltoides)— in a mixed riparian plant community in the Platte River Basin in central Nebraska. Two experimental years (2009 and 2010) were contrasted by warmer air temperature and presence of flood water in 2010. The seasonal average rc values for common reed, peachleaf willow, and cottonwood in 2009 were 76, 70, and 107 s m-1, respectively. The corresponding rc values in the flood year (2010) were 70, 66, and 105 s m-1 for the same species, respectively. In 2009, the seasonal total TRP for common reed, peachleaf willow, and cottonwood were 483, 522, and 431 mm, respectively. Corresponding TRP values in 2010 were greater as 550, 655, and 496 mm, respectively. In 2009, TRP accounted for 64% of ETa during June-September, and the proportion varied between 41% and 69% for most of the season. In 2010, TRP accounted for 61% of ETa during June-September, and the proportion varied between 41% and 65% for most of the season. The average surface evaporation rate of the riparian zone was 0.81 mm d-1 in 2009 and 1.70 mm d-1 in 2010. Seasonal evaporation was 160 mm in 2009 and 312 mm in 2010. The study provides a basis for understanding the dynamics of transpiration for riparian vegetation in response to the environmental conditions and provides valuable water use data for more complete water balance analyses by accounting for the water use of riparian vegetation species.

  15. Riparian litter inputs to streams in the central Oregon Coast Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Stephanie K.; Hibbs, David E.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Riparian-zone vegetation can influence terrestrial and aquatic food webs through variation in the amount, timing, and nutritional content of leaf and other litter inputs. We investigated how riparian-forest community composition, understory density, and lateral slope shaped vertical and lateral litter inputs to 16 streams in the Oregon Coast Range. Riparian forests dominated by deciduous red alder delivered greater annual vertical litter inputs to streams (504 g m−2 y−1) than did riparian forests dominated by coniferous Douglas-fir (394 g m−2 y−1). Deciduous forests also contributed greater lateral litter inputs per meter of stream bank on one side (109 g m−1 y−1) than did coniferous forests (63 g m−1 y−1). Total litter inputs from deciduous forests exceeded those from coniferous forests most strongly in November, coincident with an autumn peak in litter inputs. Lateral litter inputs contributed most to total inputs during winter in both forest types. Annual lateral litter movement increased with slope at deciduous sites, but only in spring/summer months at coniferous sites. Neither experimental removal of understory vegetation nor installation of mesh fences to block downslope litter movement affected lateral litter inputs to streams, suggesting that ground litter moves <5 m downslope annually. N concentrations of several litter fractions were higher at deciduous sites and, when combined with greater litter amounts, yielded twice as much total litter N flux to streams in deciduous than coniferous sites. The presence of red alder in riparian forests along many small streams of the deeply incised and highly dendritic basins of the Oregon Coast Range enhances total fluxes and seasonality of litter delivery to both terrestrial and aquatic food webs in this region and complements the shade and large woody debris provided by large coniferous trees.

  16. Effects of riparian timber harvesting on instream habitat and fish assemblages in northern Minnesota streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, Christopher J.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Blinn, Charles R.; Newman, Raymond M.; Atuke, Dickson M.; Fredricks, Keith; Hemstad, Nathaniel A.; Merten, Eric; Schlesser, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Relatively few evaluations of aquatic macroinvertebrate and fish communities have been published in peer-reviewed literature detailing the effect of varying residual basal area (RBA) after timber harvesting in riparian buffers. Our analysis investigated the effects of partial harvesting within riparian buffers on aquatic macroinvertebrate and fish communities in small streams from two experiments in northern Minnesota northern hardwood-aspen forests. Each experiment evaluated partial harvesting within riparian buffers. In both experiments, benthic macroinvertebrates and fish were collected 1 year prior to harvest and in each of 3 years after harvest. We observed interannual variation for the macroinvertebrate abundance, diversity and taxon richness in the single-basin study and abundance and diversity in the multiple-basin study, but few effects related to harvest treatments in either study. However, interannual variation was not evident in the fish communities and we detected no significant changes in the stream fish communities associated with partially harvested riparian buffers in either study. This would suggest that timber harvesting in riparian management zones along reaches ≤200 m in length on both sides of the stream that retains RBA ≥ 12.4 ± 1.3 m2 ha−1 or on a single side of the stream that retains RBA ≥ 8.7 ± 1.6 m2 ha−1 may be adequate to protect macroinvertebrate and fish communities in our Minnesota study systems given these specific timber harvesting techniques.

  17. Ground-water surface-water interactions and long-term change in riverine riparian vegetation in the southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Robert H.; Leake, Stanley A.

    2006-04-01

    Riverine riparian vegetation has changed throughout the southwestern United States, prompting concern about losses of habitat and biodiversity. Woody riparian vegetation grows in a variety of geomorphic settings ranging from bedrock-lined channels to perennial streams crossing deep alluvium and is dependent on interaction between ground-water and surface-water resources. Historically, few reaches in Arizona, southern Utah, or eastern California below 1530 m elevation had closed gallery forests of cottonwood and willow; instead, many alluvial reaches that now support riparian gallery forests once had marshy grasslands and most bedrock canyons were essentially barren. Repeat photography using more than 3000 historical images of rivers indicates that riparian vegetation has increased over much of the region. These increases appear to be related to several factors, notably the reduction in beaver populations by trappers in the 19th century, downcutting of arroyos that drained alluvial aquifers between 1880 and 1910, the frequent recurrence of winter floods during discrete periods of the 20th century, an increased growing season, and stable ground-water levels. Reductions in riparian vegetation result from agricultural clearing, excessive ground-water use, complete flow diversion, and impoundment of reservoirs. Elimination of riparian vegetation occurs either where high ground-water use lowers the water table below the rooting depth of riparian species, where base flow is completely diverted, or both. We illustrate regional changes using case histories of the San Pedro and Santa Cruz Rivers, which are adjacent watersheds in southern Arizona with long histories of water development and different trajectories of change in riparian vegetation.

  18. Ground-water surface-water interactions and long-term change in riverine riparian vegetation in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, R.H.; Leake, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    Riverine riparian vegetation has changed throughout the southwestern United States, prompting concern about losses of habitat and biodiversity. Woody riparian vegetation grows in a variety of geomorphic settings ranging from bedrock-lined channels to perennial streams crossing deep alluvium and is dependent on interaction between ground-water and surface-water resources. Historically, few reaches in Arizona, southern Utah, or eastern California below 1530 m elevation had closed gallery forests of cottonwood and willow; instead, many alluvial reaches that now support riparian gallery forests once had marshy grasslands and most bedrock canyons were essentially barren. Repeat photography using more than 3000 historical images of rivers indicates that riparian vegetation has increased over much of the region. These increases appear to be related to several factors, notably the reduction in beaver populations by trappers in the 19th century, downcutting of arroyos that drained alluvial aquifers between 1880 and 1910, the frequent recurrence of winter floods during discrete periods of the 20th century, an increased growing season, and stable ground-water levels. Reductions in riparian vegetation result from agricultural clearing, excessive ground-water use, complete flow diversion, and impoundment of reservoirs. Elimination of riparian vegetation occurs either where high ground-water use lowers the water table below the rooting depth of riparian species, where base flow is completely diverted, or both. We illustrate regional changes using case histories of the San Pedro and Santa Cruz Rivers, which are adjacent watersheds in southern Arizona with long histories of water development and different trajectories of change in riparian vegetation.

  19. Stream thermal heterogeneity prolongs aquatic-terrestrial subsidy and enhances riparian spider growth.

    PubMed

    Uno, Hiromi

    2016-10-01

    Emerging aquatic insects from streams are important food sources for riparian predators, yet their availability is seasonally limited. Spatial heterogeneity in stream water temperature was found to spatially desynchronize the emergence timing of aquatic insects, and prolong their flight period, potentially enhancing consumer growth. While a mayfly Ephemerella maculata emergence lasted for 12-22 d in local sites along a river, mayflies emerged 19 days earlier from warmer than cooler sites. Therefore, the overall emergence of E. maculata from the river lasted for 37 d, and adult swarms were observed over that same period in an adjacent reproductive habitat. A feeding experiment with the riparian spider Tetragnatha versicolor showed that a prolonged subsidy, as would occur in a heterogeneous river, led to higher juvenile growth than a synchronous pulsed subsidy of equal total biomass, as would typify a more homogeneous river. Since larger female adult spiders produce more eggs, spiders that received prolonged subsidy as juveniles should achieve higher fecundity. Restoring spatial heterogeneity in streams may benefit not only stream communities but also riparian predators.

  20. Riparian Buffer Project : Annual Report for the Period April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Wasco County Soil and Water Conservation District

    2002-01-01

    This project implements riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia, addressing limiting factors identified in the Fifteen mile Subbasin Summary, June 30, 2000. The project is providing the technical planning support needed to implement at least 36 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 872 acres covering an estimated 40 miles of anadromous fish streams over a three year period. In the first year of implementation, 26 buffer contracts were established on 25-26 miles of stream. This nearly doubled the annual goal. Buffer widths averaged 83 ft. on each side of the stream. Implementation included prescribed plantings, fencing, and related practices. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs are borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs. The lease period of each contract may vary between 10 to 15 years. During this year the average was 14.5 years. The total value of contracts established this year is $1,491,235 compared with $64,756 in BPA contract costs to provide the technical support needed to get the contracts implemented. This project provides technical staffing to conduct assessments and develop plans to help keep pace with the growing backlog of potential riparian buffer projects. Word of mouth from satisfied customers has brought in many new sign-ups during the year. More than half of the contracts this year have been done in the Hood and Fifteen mile sub-basins with additional contracts in adjacent sub-basins.

  1. Scale perspectives on avian diversity in western riparian ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    KNopf, Fritz L.; Samson, Fred B.

    1994-01-01

    Conservation of riparian vegetation in western North America has, in part, emphasized providing habitats for a locally diverse avifauna. Site diversity, especially relative to the number of species present, is generally high within riparian avifaunas. Between-habitat diversity changes across a watershed, with riparian species assemblages differing most from upland assemblages at the highest and lowest elevations. This pattern can be attributed to enhanced avian movements within the riparian vegetation. The corridors for bird movements, in turn, facilitate faunal mixing on a broader scale, influencing regional diversity within landscapes. Riparian ecosystems are viewed as connectors of forests across fragmental landscapes. In western settings, however, they are highly linearized forests transecting watersheds between upland associations of high elevations and very different associations at lower elevations. Regionally, riparian vegetation represents linear islands that are internally both floristically and faunistically dynamic rather than mere bridges of homogeneous vegetation in landscape networks. The significance of riparian vegetation as habitat for western birds has been defined primarily at the local level. Conservation activities favoring site diversity are short-sighted, however, and could have severe consequences for unique elements of riparian avifaunas. Conservation actions must evaluate how local activities alter potential dispersal opportunities for ecological-generalist versus riparian-obligate species. Maintaining the character and integrity of riparian avifaunas requires planning from regional and continental perspectives.

  2. Mechanisms of nutrient attenuation in a subsurface flow riparian wetland.

    PubMed

    Casey, R E; Taylor, M D; Klaine, S J

    2001-01-01

    Riparian wetlands are transition zones between terrestrial and aquatic environments that have the potential to serve as nutrient filters for surface and ground water due to their topographic location. We investigated a riparian wetland that had been receiving intermittent inputs of NO3- and PO4(3-) during storm runoff events to determine the mechanisms of nutrient attenuation in the wetland soils. Few studies have shown whether infrequent pulses of NO3- are sufficient to maintain substantial denitrifying communities. Denitrification rates were highest at the upstream side of the wetland where nutrient-rich runoff first enters the wetland (17-58 microg N2O-N kg soil(-1) h(-1)) and decreased further into the wetland. Carbon limitation for denitrification was minor in the wetland soils. Samples not amended with dextrose had 75% of the denitrification rate of samples with excess dextrose C. Phosphate sorption isotherms suggested that the wetland soils had a high capacity for P retention. The calculated soil PO4(3-) concentration that would yield an equilibrium aqueous P04(3-) concentration of 0.05 mg P L(-1) was found to be 100 times greater than the soil PO4(3-) concentration at the time of sampling. This indicated that the wetland could retain a large additional mass of PO4(3-) without increasing the dissolved P04(3-) concentrations above USEPA recommended levels for lentic waters. These results demonstrated that denitrification can be substantial in systems receiving pulsed NO3- inputs and that sorption could account for extensive PO4(3-) attenuation observed at this site.

  3. Evaluating nitrogen removal by vegetation uptake using satellite image time series in riparian catchments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelei; Wang, Qiao; Yang, Shengtian; Zheng, Donghai; Wu, Chuanqing; Mannaerts, C M

    2011-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) removal by vegetation uptake is one of the most important functions of riparian buffer zones in preventing non-point source pollution (NSP), and many studies about N uptake at the river reach scale have proven the effectiveness of plants in controlling nutrient pollution. However, at the watershed level, the riparian zones form dendritic networks and, as such, may be the predominant spatially structured feature in catchments and landscapes. Thus, assessing the functions of riparian system at the basin scale is important. In this study, a new method coupling remote sensing and ecological models was used to assess the N removal by riparian vegetation on a large spatial scale. The study site is located around the Guanting reservoir in Beijing, China, which was abandoned as the source water system for Beijing due to serious NSP in 1997. SPOT 5 data was used to map the land cover, and Landsat-5 TM time series images were used to retrieve land surface parameters. A modified forest nutrient cycling and biomass model (ForNBM) was used to simulate N removal, and the modified net primary productivity (NPP) module was driven by remote sensing image time series. Besides the remote sensing data, the necessary database included meteorological data, soil chemical and physical data and plant nutrient data. Pot and plot experiments were used to calibrate and validate the simulations. Our study has proven that, by coupling remote sensing data and parameters retrieval techniques to plant growth process models, catchment scale estimations of nitrogen uptake rates can be improved by spatial pixel-based modelling.

  4. Object-based class modelling for multi-scale riparian forest habitat mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, Thomas; Lang, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Object-based class modelling allows for mapping complex, hierarchical habitat systems. The riparian zone, including forests, represents such a complex ecosystem. Forests within riparian zones are biologically high productive and characterized by a rich biodiversity; thus considered of high community interest with an imperative to be protected and regularly monitored. Satellite earth observation (EO) provides tools for capturing the current state of forest habitats such as forest composition including intermixture of non-native tree species. Here we present a semi-automated object based image analysis (OBIA) approach for the mapping of riparian forests by applying class modelling of habitats based on the European Nature Information System (EUNIS) habitat classifications and the European Habitats Directive (HabDir) Annex 1. A very high resolution (VHR) WorldView-2 satellite image provided the required spatial and spectral details for a multi-scale image segmentation and rule-base composition to generate a six-level hierarchical representation of riparian forest habitats. Thereby habitats were hierarchically represented within an image object hierarchy as forest stands, stands of homogenous tree species and single trees represented by sunlit tree crowns. 522 EUNIS level 3 (EUNIS-3) habitat patches with a mean patch size (MPS) of 12,349.64 m2 were modelled from 938 forest stand patches (MPS = 6868.20 m2) and 43,742 tree stand patches (MPS = 140.79 m2). The delineation quality of the modelled EUNIS-3 habitats (focal level) was quantitatively assessed to an expert-based visual interpretation showing a mean deviation of 11.71%.

  5. Hydrologic assessment of a riparian section along Boulder Creek near Boulder, Colorado, September 1989-September 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrough, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Native woody riparian species, primarily plains cottonwood (Populus fremontii), are regenerating at less than historical rates along Boulder Creek, a regulated stream near Boulder, Colorado. Loss of native riparian habitats might cause a decline in numbers of some native wildlife species. Previous studies have indicated that streamflow regulation can adversely affect native riparian vegetation reproduction. Surface- and ground-water data were collected from September 1989 to September 1991 along a riparian section of Boulder Creek to assist ecologists in assessing woody plant-recruitment characteristics. Annual mean streamflows in Boulder Creek at Cottonwood Grove of 34.5 cubic feet per second for water year 1990 (October 1, 1989- September 30, 1990) and 34.1 cubic feet per second for water year 1991 were 53 percent less than a site on Boulder Creek about 5 miles upstream from the study area. Diversions dating from 1882 caused most of the decrease. The alluvial aquifer in the study area averaged 5 feet in thickness and consisted of gravel- to cobble-size particles derived from crystalline rock of Precambrian age. The direction of ground-water movement was similar to the direction of streamflow. Ground-water movement in the northeastern part of the grove was affected by a pond constructed at a lower elevation than the stream channel. Water levels in the alluvial aquifer adjacent to the stream pre- dominantly were affected by stream stage, whereas farther from the channel, ground-water levels were affected by other processes such as evapotrans- piration, infiltration, and recharge from urban runoff.

  6. Denitrification and a nitrogen budget of created riparian wetlands.

    PubMed

    Batson, Jacqulyn A; Mander, Ulo; Mitsch, William J

    2012-01-01

    Riparian wetland creation and restoration have been proposed to mediate nitrate-nitrogen (NO-N) pollution from nonpoint agricultural runoff. Denitrification by anaerobic microbial communities in wetland soils is believed to be one of the main sinks for NO-N as it flows through wetlands. Denitrification rates were quantified using an in situ acetylene inhibition technique at 12 locations in three wetland/riverine sites at the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, Columbus, Ohio for 1 yr. Sites included two created flow-through experimental wetlands and one bottomland forest/river-edge site. Points were spatially distributed at inflows, center, and outflows of the two wetlands to include permanently flooded open water, intermittently flooded transitions, and upland. Annual denitrification rates (median [mean]) were significantly higher ( < 0.001) in permanently flooded zones of the wetlands (266 [415] μg NO-N m h) than in shallower transition zones (58 [37.5] μg NO-N m h). Median wetland transition zone denitrification rates did not differ significantly ( ≥ 0.05) from riverside or upland sites. Denitrification rates peaked in spring; for the months of April through June, median denitrification rates ranged from 240 to 1010 μg NO-N m h in the permanently flooded zones. A N mass balance analysis showed that surface water flux of N was reduced by 57% as water flowed through the wetland, but only about 3.5% of the N inflow was permanently removed through denitrification. Most N was probably lost through groundwater seepage. Comparison with denitrification rates measured previously in these wetlands suggests that these rates have remained steady over the past 4 to 5 yr.

  7. Southern Arizona riparian habitat: Spatial distribution and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, J. R.; Ogden, P. R.; Foster, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    The objectives of this study were centered around the demonstration of remote sensing as an inventory tool and researching the multiple uses of riparian vegetation. Specific study objectives were to: (1) map riparian vegetation along the Gila River, San Simon Creek, San Pedro River, Pantano Wash, (2) determine the feasibility of automated mapping using LANDSAT-1 computer compatible tapes, (3) locate and summarize existing mpas delineating riparian vegetation, (4) summarize data relevant to Southern Arizona's riparian products and uses, (5) document recent riparian vegetation changes along a selected portion of the San Pedro River, (6) summarize historical changes in composition and distribution of riparian vegetation, and (7) summarize sources of available photography pertinent to Southern Arizona.

  8. Nesting ecology of Greater Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) in riparian and palustrine wetlands of eastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McWethy, D.B.; Austin, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Little information exists on breeding Greater Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) in riparian wetlands of the Intermountain West. We examined the nesting ecology of Sandhill Cranes associated with riparian and palustrine wetlands in the Henry's Fork Watershed in eastern Idaho in 2003. We located 36 active crane nests, 19 in riparian wetlands and 17 in palustrine wetlands. Nesting sites were dominated by rushes (Juncus spp.), sedges (Carex spp.), Broad-leaved Cattail (Typha latifolia) and willow (Salix spp.), and adjacent foraging areas were primarily composed of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.), cinquefoil (Potentilla spp.),Rabbitbrush (Ericameria bloomeri) bunch grasses, upland forbs, Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides) and cottonwood (Populus spp.). Mean water depth surrounding nests was 23 cm (SD = 22). A majority of nests (61%) were surrounded by vegetation between 3060 cm, 23% by vegetation 60 cm in height. We were able to determine the fate of 29 nests, of which 20 were successful (69%). Daily nest survival was 0.986 (95% LCI 0.963, UCI 0.995), equivalent to a Mayfield nest success of 0.654 (95% LCI 0.324, UCI 0.853). Model selection favored models with the covariates vegetation type, vegetation height, and water depth. Nest survival increased with increasing water depth surrounding nest sites. Mean water depth was higher around successful nests (30 cm, SD = 21) than unsuccessful nests (15 cm, SD 22). Further research is needed to evaluate the relative contribution of cranes nesting in palustrine and riparian wetlands distributed widely across the Intermountain West.

  9. Floral ecology and insect visitation in riparian Tamarix sp. (saltcedar)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, D.C.; Nelson, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change projections for semiarid and arid North America include reductions in stream discharge that could adversely affect riparian plant species dependent on stream-derived ground water. In order to better understand this potential impact, we used a space-for-time substitution to test the hypotheses that increasing depth-to-groundwater (DGW) is inversely related to Tamarix sp. (saltcedar) flower abundance (F) and nectar production per flower (N). We also assessed whether DGW affected the richness or abundance of insects visiting flowers. We examined Tamarix floral attributes and insect visitation patterns during 2010 and 2011 at three locations along a deep DWG gradient (3.2–4.1 m) on a floodplain terrace adjacent to Las Vegas Wash, an effluent-dominated Mojave Desert stream. Flower abundance and insect visitation patterns differed between years, but no effect from DGW on either F or N was detected. An eruption of a novel non-native herbivore, the splendid tamarisk weevil (Coniatus splendidulus), likely reduced flower production in 2011.

  10. Does stream flow structure woody riparian vegetation in subtropical catchments?

    PubMed

    James, Cassandra S; Mackay, Stephen J; Arthington, Angela H; Capon, Samantha J; Barnes, Anna; Pearson, Ben

    2016-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to test the relevance of hydrological classification and class differences to the characteristics of woody riparian vegetation in a subtropical landscape in Queensland, Australia. We followed classification procedures of the environmental flow framework ELOHA - Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration. Riparian surveys at 44 sites distributed across five flow classes recorded 191 woody riparian species and 15, 500 individuals. There were differences among flow classes for riparian species richness, total abundance, and abundance of regenerating native trees and shrubs. There were also significant class differences in the occurrence of three common tree species, and 21 indicator species (mostly native taxa) further distinguished the vegetation characteristics of each flow class. We investigated the influence of key drivers of riparian vegetation structure (climate, depth to water table, stream-specific power, substrate type, degree of hydrologic alteration, and land use) on riparian vegetation. Patterns were explained largely by climate, particularly annual rainfall and temperature. Strong covarying drivers (hydrology and climate) prevented us from isolating the independent influences of these drivers on riparian assemblage structure. The prevalence of species considered typically rheophytic in some flow classes implies a more substantial role for flow in these classes but needs further testing. No relationships were found between land use and riparian vegetation composition and structure. This study demonstrates the relevance of flow classification to the structure of riparian vegetation in a subtropical landscape, and the influence of covarying drivers on riparian patterns. Management of environmental flows to influence riparian vegetation assemblages would likely have most potential in sites dominated by rheophytic species where hydrological influences override other controls. In contrast, where vegetation assemblages are

  11. Multiscale remote sensing analysis to monitor riparian and upland semiarid vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Uyen

    The health of natural vegetation communities is of concern due to observed changes in the climatic-hydrological regime and land cover changes particularly in arid and semiarid regions. Monitoring vegetation at multi temporal and spatial scales can be the most informative approach for detecting change and inferring causal agents of change and remediation strategies. Riparian communities are tightly linked to annual stream hydrology, ground water elevations and sediment transport. These processes are subject to varying magnitudes of disturbance overtime and are candidates for multi-scale monitoring. My first research objective focused on the response of vegetation in the Upper San Pedro River, Arizona, to reduced base flows and climate change. I addressed the correlation between riparian vegetation and hydro-climate variables during the last three decades in one of the remaining undammed rivers in the southwestern U.S. Its riparian forest is threatened by the diminishing base flows, attributed by different studies either to increases in evapotranspiration (ET) due to conversion of grasslands to mesquite shrublands in the adjacent uplands, or to increased regional groundwater pumping to serve growing populations in surrounding urban areas and or to some interactions of those causes. Landsat 5 imagery was acquired for pre- monsoon period, when riparian trees had leafed out but before the arrival of summer monsoon rains in July. The result has showed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values from both Landsat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) had significant decreases which positively correlated to river flows, which decreased over the study period, and negatively correlated with air temperatures, which have increased by about 1.4°C from 1904 to the present. The predictions from other studies that decreased river flows could negatively impact the riparian forest were supported by this study. The pre-monsoon Normalized Different Vegetation

  12. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Urbanization - Riparian/Channel Alteration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to riparian and channel alteration associated with urbanization, summary of how riparian urbanization affects channel morphology, summary of how urbanization affects riparian hydrology, overview of stream burial associated with urbanization.

  13. Improving riparian wetland conditions based on infiltration and drainage behavior during and after controlled flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Tess A.; Fisher, Andrew T.; Roche, James W.

    2012-04-01

    SummaryWe present results of an observational and modeling study of the hydrologic response of a riparian wetland to controlled flooding. The study site is located in Poopenaut Valley, Yosemite National Park (USA), adjacent to the Tuolumne River. This area is flooded periodically by releases from the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, and was monitored during one flood sequence to assess the relative importance of inundation versus groundwater rise in establishing and maintaining riparian wetland conditions, defined on the basis of a minimum depth and duration of soil saturation, and to determine how restoration benefits might be achieved while reducing total flood discharge. Soil moisture data show how shallow soils were wetted by both inundation and a rising water table as the river hydrograph rose repeatedly during the controlled flood. The shallow groundwater aquifer under wetland areas responded quickly to conditions in the adjacent river, demonstrating a good connection between surface and subsurface regimes. The observed soil drainage response helped to calibrate a numerical model that was used to test scenarios for controlled flood releases. Modeling of this groundwater-wetland system suggests that inundation of surface soils is the most effective mechanism for developing wetland conditions, although an elevated water table helps to extend the duration of soil saturation. Achievement of wetland conditions can be achieved with a smaller total flood release, provided that repeated cycling of higher and lower river elevations is timed to benefit from the characteristic drainage behavior of wetland soils. These results are robust to modest variations in the initial water table elevation, as might result from wetter or dryer conditions prior to a flood. However, larger changes to initial water table elevation, as could be associated with long term climate change or drought conditions, would have a significant influence on wetland development. An ongoing controlled flooding

  14. Riparian vegetation as an indicator of riparian condition: Detecting departures from historic condition across the North American West.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, William W; Gilbert, Jordan T; Jensen, Martha L; Gilbert, Joshua D; Hough-Snee, Nate; McHugh, Peter A; Wheaton, Joseph M; Bennett, Stephen N

    2016-11-10

    Floodplain riparian ecosystems support unique vegetation communities and high biodiversity relative to terrestrial landscapes. Accordingly, estimating riparian ecosystem health across landscapes is critical for sustainable river management. However, methods that identify local riparian vegetation condition, an effective proxy for riparian health, have not been applied across broad, regional extents. Here we present an index to assess reach-scale (500 m segment) riparian vegetation condition across entire drainage networks within large, physiographically-diverse regions. We estimated riparian vegetation condition for 53,250 km of perennial streams and rivers, 25,685 km in Utah, and 27,565 km in twelve watersheds of the interior Columbia River Basin (CRB), USA. We used nationally available, existing land cover classification derived from 30 m Landsat imagery (LANDFIRE EVT) and a modeled estimate of pre-European settlement land cover (LANDFIRE BpS). The index characterizes riparian vegetation condition as the ratio of existing native riparian vegetation cover to pre-European settlement riparian vegetation cover at a given reach. Roughly 62% of Utah and 48% of CRB watersheds showed significant (>33%) to large (>66%) departure from historic condition. Riparian vegetation change was predominantly caused by human land-use impacts (development and agriculture), or vegetation change (native riparian to invasive or upland vegetation types) that likely resulted from flow and disturbance regime alteration. Through comparisons to ground-based classification results, we estimate the existing vegetation component of the index to be 85% accurate. Our assessments yielded riparian condition maps that will help resource managers better prioritize sites and treatments for reach-scale conservation and restoration activities.

  15. Perspectives on Screening Winter-Flood-Tolerant Woody Species in the Riparian Protection Forests of the Three Gorges Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Yong; Chan, Zhulong

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of riparian protection forests in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) is an ideal measure to cope with the eco-environmental problems of the water-level fluctuation zone (WLFZ). Thus, the information for screening winter-flood-tolerant woody plant species is useful for the recovery and re-establishment of the riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ. Therefore, we discussed the possibilities of constructing and popularizing riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ from several aspects, including the woody plant species distribution in the WLFZ, the survival rate analyses of suitable candidate woody species under controlled flooding conditions, the survival rate investigation of some woody plant species planted in the TGR WLFZ, and the physiological responses of some woody plant species during the recovery stage after winter floods. The results of woody species investigation showed that most woody plant species that existed as annual seedlings in the TGR WLFZ are not suitable candidates for the riparian protection forests. However, arbor species (e.g., Salix matsudana, Populus×canadensis, Morus alba, Pterocarya stenoptera, Taxodium ascendens, and Metasequoia glyptostroboides) and shrub species (e.g., Salix variegata, Distylium chinensis, Lycium chinense, Myricaria laxiflora, and Rosa multiflora) might be considered suitable candidates for the riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ by survival rate analyses under controlled winter flooding conditions, and survival rate investigations of woody plant species planted in the TGR WLFZ, respectively. Physiological analyses showed that P.×canadensis, M. alba, L. chinense, and S. variegata could develop specific self-repairing mechanisms to stimulate biomass accumulation and carbohydrate synthesis via the increases in chlorophyll pigments and photosynthesis during recovery after winter floods. Our results suggested these woody plant species could endure the winter flooding stress and recover well

  16. Perspectives on screening winter-flood-tolerant woody species in the riparian protection forests of the three gorges reservoir.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Yong; Chan, Zhulong

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of riparian protection forests in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) is an ideal measure to cope with the eco-environmental problems of the water-level fluctuation zone (WLFZ). Thus, the information for screening winter-flood-tolerant woody plant species is useful for the recovery and re-establishment of the riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ. Therefore, we discussed the possibilities of constructing and popularizing riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ from several aspects, including the woody plant species distribution in the WLFZ, the survival rate analyses of suitable candidate woody species under controlled flooding conditions, the survival rate investigation of some woody plant species planted in the TGR WLFZ, and the physiological responses of some woody plant species during the recovery stage after winter floods. The results of woody species investigation showed that most woody plant species that existed as annual seedlings in the TGR WLFZ are not suitable candidates for the riparian protection forests. However, arbor species (e.g., Salix matsudana, Populus×canadensis, Morus alba, Pterocarya stenoptera, Taxodium ascendens, and Metasequoia glyptostroboides) and shrub species (e.g., Salix variegata, Distylium chinensis, Lycium chinense, Myricaria laxiflora, and Rosa multiflora) might be considered suitable candidates for the riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ by survival rate analyses under controlled winter flooding conditions, and survival rate investigations of woody plant species planted in the TGR WLFZ, respectively. Physiological analyses showed that P.×canadensis, M. alba, L. chinense, and S. variegata could develop specific self-repairing mechanisms to stimulate biomass accumulation and carbohydrate synthesis via the increases in chlorophyll pigments and photosynthesis during recovery after winter floods. Our results suggested these woody plant species could endure the winter flooding stress and recover well

  17. Measuring and Monitoring HydroBiogeochemical Flux in a Forested Riparian Floodplain of the Missouri Ozarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnasamy, P.; Hubbart, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Forested riparian buffers play a vital role in protecting riparian ecosystems from natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Quantifying effective reach and catchment scale buffer designs is critical to achieve economic and riparian wetland natural resource sustainability. Advances in management of riparian wetlands require innovative reach-scale experimental studies and subsequent improvements in riparian modeling. Riparian recommended best management practices (BMPs) in Missouri (MO) have not been validated. Studies are therefore warranted to describe subsurface interactions between the stream, hyporheic zone (HZ), and adjoining riparian wetland/floodplain. Within the HZ groundwater discharge through highly permeable Karst geology can dramatically affect water quality. The following research is on-going in the Baskett Research and Education Area (BREA), a 9.17 km2 preserved wildland watershed located 8 km east of Ashland, in the Ozark border region of south-central MO. The climate at BREA is generally described as warm, humid, and continental, with mean January and August temperatures of -2.4 °C and 24.5 °C, respectively, and 1,022 mm mean annual precipitation. Limestone geology of Ordovician and Mississippian age underlies the BREA with dominant soils of Weller silt loam and Clinkenbeard clay loam. Vegetation at the BREA consists of northern and southern division oak dominated hickory forests. BREA offers a distinct opportunity to study wildland watershed processes to validate contemporary best management practices (BMP) in MO. To quantify hydrobiogeochemical flux, spatial and temporal (3 water years) variability in stream water temperatures, key nutrients (NO3, P, K, NH3) and hyporheic exchange are being monitored. Key hydrologic variables approaching a mass balance, plus groundwater monitoring (via piezometric arrays) are being studied. Results (beginning summer and fall 2009) will provide the necessary information to quantify the relationships between

  18. Ranking European regions as providers of structural riparian corridors for conservation and management purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerici, Nicola; Vogt, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Riparian zones are of utmost importance in providing a wide range of ecological and societal services. Among these, their role in maintaining landscape connectivity through ecological corridors for animals and plants is of major interest from a conservation and management perspective. This paper describes a methodology to identify European regions as providers of structural riparian corridors, and to rank them with reference to conservation priority. Physical riparian connectors among core habitat patches are identified through a recent segmentation technique, the Morphological Spatial Pattern Analysis. A multi-scale approach is followed by considering different edge distances to identify core and peripheral habitats for a range of hypothetical species. The ranking is performed using a simple set of indices that take into account the degree of environmental pressure and the presence of land protection schemes. An example for environmental reporting is carried out using European administrative regions and major rivers to summarize indices value. The approach is based on freely available software and simple metrics which can be easily reproduced in a GIS environment.

  19. Early response of soil properties and function to riparian rainforest restoration.

    PubMed

    Gageler, Rose; Bonner, Mark; Kirchhof, Gunnar; Amos, Mark; Robinson, Nicole; Schmidt, Susanne; Shoo, Luke P

    2014-01-01

    Reforestation of riparian zones is increasingly practiced in many regions for purposes of biodiversity conservation, bank stabilisation, and improvement in water quality. This is in spite of the actual benefits of reforestation for recovering underlying soil properties and function remaining poorly understood. Here we compare remnant riparian rainforest, pasture and reforestation plantings aged 2-20 years in an Australian subtropical catchment on ferrosols to determine the extent to which reforestation restores key soil properties. Of the nine soil attributes measured (total nitrogen, nitrate and ammonium concentrations, net nitrification and ammonification rates, organic carbon, bulk density, fine root biomass and water infiltration rates), only infiltration rates were significantly lower in pasture than remnant riparian rainforest. Within reforestation plantings, bulk density decreased up to 1.4-fold and infiltration rates increased up to 60-fold with time post-reforestation. Our results suggest that the main outcome of belowground processes of early reforestation is the recovery of the soils' physical structure, with potential beneficial ecosystem services including reduced runoff, erosion and associated sediment and nutrient loads in waterways. We also demonstrate differential impacts of two commonly planted tree species on a subset of soil properties suggesting that preferential planting of select species could accelerate progress on specific restoration objectives.

  20. Floodplain forest succession reveals fluvial processes: A hydrogeomorphic model for temperate riparian woodlands.

    PubMed

    Egger, Gregory; Politti, Emilio; Lautsch, Erwin; Benjankar, Rohan; Gill, Karen M; Rood, Stewart B

    2015-09-15

    River valley floodplains are physically-dynamic environments where fluvial processes determine habitat gradients for riparian vegetation. These zones support trees and shrubs whose life stages are adapted to specific habitat types and consequently forest composition and successional stage reflect the underlying hydrogeomorphic processes and history. In this study we investigated woodland vegetation composition, successional stage and habitat properties, and compared these with physically-based indicators of hydraulic processes. We thus sought to develop a hydrogeomorphic model to evaluate riparian woodland condition based on the spatial mosaic of successional phases of the floodplain forest. The study investigated free-flowing and dam-impacted reaches of the Kootenai and Flathead Rivers, in Idaho and Montana, USA and British Columbia, Canada. The analyses revealed strong correspondence between vegetation assessments and metrics of fluvial processes indicating morphodynamics (erosion and shear stress), inundation and depth to groundwater. The results indicated that common successional stages generally occupied similar hydraulic environments along the different river segments. Comparison of the spatial patterns between the free-flowing and regulated reaches revealed greater deviation from the natural condition for the braided channel segment than for the meandering segment. This demonstrates the utility of the hydrogeomorphic approach and suggests that riparian woodlands along braided channels could have lower resilience than those along meandering channels and might be more vulnerable to influences such as from river damming or climate change.

  1. Early Response of Soil Properties and Function to Riparian Rainforest Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Gageler, Rose; Bonner, Mark; Kirchhof, Gunnar; Amos, Mark; Robinson, Nicole; Schmidt, Susanne; Shoo, Luke P.

    2014-01-01

    Reforestation of riparian zones is increasingly practiced in many regions for purposes of biodiversity conservation, bank stabilisation, and improvement in water quality. This is in spite of the actual benefits of reforestation for recovering underlying soil properties and function remaining poorly understood. Here we compare remnant riparian rainforest, pasture and reforestation plantings aged 2–20 years in an Australian subtropical catchment on ferrosols to determine the extent to which reforestation restores key soil properties. Of the nine soil attributes measured (total nitrogen, nitrate and ammonium concentrations, net nitrification and ammonification rates, organic carbon, bulk density, fine root biomass and water infiltration rates), only infiltration rates were significantly lower in pasture than remnant riparian rainforest. Within reforestation plantings, bulk density decreased up to 1.4-fold and infiltration rates increased up to 60-fold with time post-reforestation. Our results suggest that the main outcome of belowground processes of early reforestation is the recovery of the soils' physical structure, with potential beneficial ecosystem services including reduced runoff, erosion and associated sediment and nutrient loads in waterways. We also demonstrate differential impacts of two commonly planted tree species on a subset of soil properties suggesting that preferential planting of select species could accelerate progress on specific restoration objectives. PMID:25117589

  2. Mechanisms driving the seasonality of catchment scale nitrate export: Evidence for riparian ecohydrologic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Jonathan M.; Band, Lawrence E.; Groffman, Peter M.; Bernhardt, Emily S.

    2015-06-01

    Considerable variability in the seasonal patterns of stream water nitrate (NO3-) has been observed in forested watersheds throughout the world. While many forested headwater catchments exhibit winter and early spring peaks in NO3- concentrations, several watersheds have peak concentrations during the summer months. Pond Branch, a headwater catchment in Maryland monitored for over 10 years, exhibits recurrent and broad summer peaks in both NO3- concentrations and watershed export. Higher NO3- export from June to September is particularly surprising, given that these summer months typically have the year's lowest discharge. A key challenge is identifying the source(s) of NO3- and the mechanism(s) by which it is transported to the watershed outlet during the summer. In this study, we assessed multiple hypotheses (not mutually exclusive) that could account for the seasonal trend including proximal controls of groundwater-surface water interactions, instream processes, and riparian groundwater-N cycling interactions, as well as two distal controls: geochemical weathering and senescence of riparian vegetation. A combination of long-term weekly and limited duration high-frequency sensor data reveals the importance of riparian ecohydrologic processes during base flow. In this watershed, patterns of seasonal stream water NO3- concentrations and fluxes depend fundamentally on interactions between groundwater dynamics and nitrogen (N) cycling in the riparian zone. Groundwater tables control nitrification-denitrification dynamics as well as hydrologic transport. Our results suggest that in many watersheds, a more sophisticated exploration of NO3- production and NO3- transport mechanisms is required to identify critical points in the landscape and over time that disproportionately drive patterns of watershed NO3- export.

  3. Riparian Bird Communities as Indicators of Human Impacts Along Mediterranean Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Stefano; Sorace, Alberto; Mancini, Laura

    2010-02-01

    Riparian areas link aquatic and terrestrial habitats, supporting species-rich bird communities, which integrate both terrestrial and aquatic processes. For this reason, inclusion of riparian birds in stream bioassessment could add to the information currently provided by existing programs that monitor aquatic organisms. To assess if bird community metrics could indicate stream conditions, we sampled breeding birds in the riparian zone of 37 reaches in 5 streams draining watersheds representing a gradient of agricultural intensity in central Italy. As a more direct indicator of water quality, stream macroinvertebrates were also sampled for computation of the Italian Extended Biotic Index (IBE). An anthropogenic index was calculated within 1 km of sampled reaches based on satellite-derived land-use classifications. Predictive models of macroinvertebrate integrity based on land-use and avian metrics were compared using an information-theoretic approach (AIC). We also determined if stream quality related to the detection of riverine species. Apparent bird species diversity and richness peaked at intermediate levels of land-use modification, but increased with IBE values. Water quality did not relate to the detection of riverine species as a guild, but two species, the dipper Cinclus cinclus and the grey wagtail Motacilla cinerea, were only observed in reaches with the highest IBE values. Small-bodied insectivorous birds and arboreal species were detected more often in reaches with better water quality and in less modified landscapes. In contrast, larger and granivorous species were more common in disturbed reaches. According to the information-theoretic approach, the best model for predicting water quality included the anthropogenic index, bird species diversity, and an index summarizing the trophic structure of the bird community. We conclude that, in combination with landscape-level information, the diversity and trophic structure of riparian bird communities could

  4. PATTERNS OF TREE DOMINANCE IN CONIFEROUS RIPARIAN FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research quantified patterns of riparian tree dominance in western Oregon, USA and then compared the observed patterns with the expected patterns defined from the literature. Research was conducted at 110 riparian sites located on private and public lands. The field sites we...

  5. Suspended sediment control and water quality conservation through riparian vegetation:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanelli, D.; Cavazza, C.; Correggiari, S.

    2009-04-01

    monitored. The problem of controlling the river suspended sediment concentration can be tackled by increasing the riparian vegetation able to hold back the ground eroded by the slopes, but it is necessary to know where the critical zones are. The aim of the work is to propose a method allow us to detect the risk of soil erosion areas near the river and the functionality of existing riparian vegetation along river as buffers / filters towards the eroded soil from the hill slopes. The proposed methodology is supposed has been designed for water pollution control from suspended solids, pollutants and nutrients coming from hills and an improvement of the quality of the river environment. The methodology was applied on the riparian vegetation of the Gaiana torrent where it was related to soil cover and erosion areas of the hillslope, thus correlating the impact of human activities. The Gaiana catchment area is 8.6 km2 and the mean altitude is 237 a.m.s.l., the average rainfall is of 784 mm.. It is a typical Apennines streams, about 35 km south of Bologna, Italy. The main trunk stream is 6 km long and the whole drainage network is organized in a dendritic pattern, typical of clayey lithology of the basins. The main erosion processes active in the area are caused by precipitation and surface runoff: sheet wash, concentrated water erosion and badlands watersheds (calanchi), which represent about 15% of the basin area. The vegetation of the Gaiana basin is constituted by crops (39%), woods (37%), rock outcrops(i.e. badlands)(15%), bushes (5%) and pastures(3%). The stages of the study are to spot critical areas made up of streambank and the eroded areas on the slopes near the river, with the support of aerial photos and satellite images, survey and a geographic information system. The Gaiana riparian vegetation map has been drawn and, on a strip buffer 200 metres wide along river, the Vegetation cover and the Geomorphology maps (scale 1:5000) has been drawn, after photogrammetric

  6. A Groundwater flow Model of the Colorado River Delta to Support Riparian Habitat Restoration in Northern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddock, T.; Feirstein, E.; Baird, K. J.; Ajami, H.

    2007-05-01

    Quantification of groundwater flow dynamics and of the interactions among groundwater, surface water, and riparian vegetation, represent key components in the development of a balanced restoration plan for functional riparian ecosystems. A groundwater model was developed using MODFLOW 2000 to support of riparian restoration along the Colorado River Delta (Mexico: Baja California, Sonora). The Colorado River is widely recognized as one of the most modified and allocated rivers in the United States. For over 50 years flows into the Delta were severely reduced by the requirements of an emergent American West. However, subsequent to discharge pulses associated with the filling of Lake Powell, and the increased precipitation that accompanied ENSO cycles, a semblance of a native riparian habitat has been observed in the Delta since the 1980's (Zamora- Arroyo et al. 2001). The Delta and the riparian ecosystems of the region have since become the focus of a substantial body of multidisciplinary research. The research goal is to understand water table dynamics with particular attention to stream-aquifer interactions and groundwater behavior in the root zone. Groundwater reliant transpiration requirements were quantified for a set of dominant native riparian species using the Riparian ET (RIP-ET) package, an improved MODFLOW evapotranspiration (ET) module. RIP-ET simulates ET using a set of eco-physiologically based curves that more accurately represents individual plant species, reflects habitat complexity, and deals spatially with plant and water table distribution. When used in conjunction with a GIS based postprocessor (RIP-GIS.net), RIP-ET provides the basis for mapping groundwater conditions as they relate to user-specified plant groups. This explicit link between groundwater and plant sustainability is a driver to restoration design and allows for scenario modeling of various hydrologic conditions. Groundwater requirements determined in this research will be used by

  7. Enhanced transpiration by riparian buffer trees in response to advection in a humid temperate agricultural landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hernandez-Santana, V.; Asbjornsen, H.; Sauer, T.; Isenhart, T.; Schilling, K.; Schultz, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Riparian buffers are designed as management practices to increase infiltration and reduce surface runoff and transport of sediment and nonpoint source pollutants from crop fields to adjacent streams. Achieving these ecosystem service goals depends, in part, on their ability to remove water from the soil via transpiration. In these systems, edges between crop fields and trees of the buffer systems can create advection processes, which could influence water use by trees. We conducted a field study in a riparian buffer system established in 1994 under a humid temperate climate, located in the Corn Belt region of the Midwestern U.S. (Iowa). The goals were to estimate stand level transpiration by the riparian buffer, quantify the controls on water use by the buffer system, and determine to what extent advective energy and tree position within the buffer system influence individual tree transpiration rates. We primarily focused on the water use response (determined with the Heat Ratio Method) of one of the dominant species (Acer saccharinum) and a subdominant (Juglans nigra). A few individuals of three additional species (Quercus bicolor, Betula nigra, Platanus occidentalis) were monitored over a shorter time period to assess the generality of responses. Meteorological stations were installed along a transect across the riparian buffer to determine the microclimate conditions. The differences found among individuals were attributed to differences in species sap velocities and sapwood depths, location relative to the forest edge and prevailing winds and canopy exposure and dominance. Sapflow rates for A. saccharinum trees growing at the SE edge (prevailing winds) were 39% greater than SE interior trees and 30% and 69% greater than NW interior and edge trees, respectively. No transpiration enhancement due to edge effect was detected in the subdominant J. nigra. The results were interpreted as indicative of advection effects from the surrounding crops. Further, significant

  8. Changes in community-level riparian plant traits over inundation gradients, Colorado River, Grand Canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy-Sulentic, Miles; Kolb, Thomas; Merritt, David; Palmquist, Emily C.; Ralston, Barbara; Sarr, Daniel; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2017-01-01

    Comparisons of community-level functional traits across environmental gradients have potential for identifying links among plant characteristics, adaptations to stress and disturbance, and community assembly. We investigated community-level variation in specific leaf area (SLA), plant mature height, seed mass, stem specific gravity (SSG), relative cover of C4 species, and total plant cover over hydrologic zones and gradients in years 2013 and 2014 in the riparian plant community along the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. Vegetation cover was lowest in the frequently inundated active channel zone, indicating constraints on plant establishment and production by flood disturbance and anaerobic stress. Changes in trait values over hydrologic zones and inundation gradients indicate that frequently inundated plots exhibit a community-level ruderal strategy with adaptation to submergence (high SLA and low SSG, height, seed mass, C4 relative cover), whereas less frequently inundated plots exhibit adaptation to drought and infrequent flood disturbance (low SLA and high SSG, height, seed mass, C4 relative cover). Variation in traits not associated with inundation suggests niche differentiation and multiple modes of community assembly. The results enhance understanding of future responses of riparian communities of the Grand Canyon to anticipated drying and changes in hydrologic regime.

  9. Classification of riparian forest species and health condition using multi-temporal and hyperspatial imagery from unmanned aerial system.

    PubMed

    Michez, Adrien; Piégay, Hervé; Lisein, Jonathan; Claessens, Hugues; Lejeune, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Riparian forests are critically endangered many anthropogenic pressures and natural hazards. The importance of riparian zones has been acknowledged by European Directives, involving multi-scale monitoring. The use of this very-high-resolution and hyperspatial imagery in a multi-temporal approach is an emerging topic. The trend is reinforced by the recent and rapid growth of the use of the unmanned aerial system (UAS), which has prompted the development of innovative methodology. Our study proposes a methodological framework to explore how a set of multi-temporal images acquired during a vegetative period can differentiate some of the deciduous riparian forest species and their health conditions. More specifically, the developed approach intends to identify, through a process of variable selection, which variables derived from UAS imagery and which scale of image analysis are the most relevant to our objectives.The methodological framework is applied to two study sites to describe the riparian forest through two fundamental characteristics: the species composition and the health condition. These characteristics were selected not only because of their use as proxies for the riparian zone ecological integrity but also because of their use for river management.The comparison of various scales of image analysis identified the smallest object-based image analysis (OBIA) objects (ca. 1 m(2)) as the most relevant scale. Variables derived from spectral information (bands ratios) were identified as the most appropriate, followed by variables related to the vertical structure of the forest. Classification results show good overall accuracies for the species composition of the riparian forest (five classes, 79.5 and 84.1% for site 1 and site 2). The classification scenario regarding the health condition of the black alders of the site 1 performed the best (90.6%).The quality of the classification models developed with a UAS-based, cost-effective, and semi-automatic approach

  10. Restoration ecology and invasive riparian plants: An introduction to the special section on Tamarix spp. in western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shafroth, Patrick B.; Briggs, Mark K.

    2008-01-01

    River systems around the world are subject to various perturbations, including the colonization and spread of non-native species in riparian zones. Riparian resource managers are commonly engaged in efforts to control problematic non-native species and restore native habitats. In western North America, small Eurasian trees or shrubs in the genus Tamarixoccupy hundreds of thousands of hectares of riparian lands, and are the targets of substantial and costly control efforts and associated restoration activities. Still, significant information gaps exist regarding approaches used in control and restoration efforts and their effects on riparian ecosystems. In this special section of papers, eight articles address various aspects of control and restoration associated with Tamarix spp. These include articles focused on planning restoration and revegetation; a synthetic analysis of past restoration efforts; and several specific research endeavors examining plant responses, water use, and various wildlife responses (including birds, butterflies, and lizards). These articles represent important additions to the Tamarix spp. literature and contain many lessons and insights that should be transferable to other analogous situations in river systems globally.

  11. Seasonal differences in riparian consumer diet and insect communities in an Oregon Coast Range watershed food web.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robillard, A.; Li, J.

    2005-05-01

    In riparian areas, terrestrial and aquatic habitats overlap creating zones where they interact as an aquatic-terrestrial interface. This coupling allows energy to move between systems and generates intertwining food webs. Thus, vertebrate riparian consumers, such as fish or birds, potentially have alternative prey from sources external to their habitats. The purpose of our study was to explore this reciprocal exchange in an alder dominated riparian forest of the Oregon Coast Range. Diet samples were collected from birds and fish in summer and fall 2003 with a suite of insect samples at Honeygrove Creek and two of its small tributaries. In a comparison of emerging aquatic insects and flying terrestrial insects during June and again in September, we detected seasonal differences in terrestrial and aquatic insects available to riparian consumers. Despite this availability of externally derived prey, fish depended more on resources derived from within their respective habitats during summer. Cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) and Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kitsutch) ate more juvenile aquatic than adult aquatic or terrestrial insects. During fall, the same pattern was exhibited by Coho but Cutthroat trout appeared to consume a slightly greater number of terrestrial insects. The preliminary analysis of bird diet samples from commonly encountered species such as, Swainson's thrush, Song Sparrow, and Pacific-slope Flycatcher, showed more terrestrial derived prey in their diets than aquatic during the summer sampling season.

  12. Synchronous DOM and dissolved phosphorus release in riparian soil waters: linking water table fluctuations and biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruau, G.; Dupas, R.; Humbert, G.; GU, S.; Jeanneau, L.; Fovet, O.; Denis, M.; Gascuel-Odoux, C.; Jaffrezic, A.; Faucheux, M.; Gilliet, N.; Hamon, Y.; Petitjean, P.

    2015-12-01

    Riparian zones are often viewed as hot spots controlling N, C, P and Fe cycling and export in catchments. Groundwater and surface water flowpaths converge in these zones, and encounter the most reactive, organic-rich, uppermost soil horizons, while being at the same time zones in which soil moisture conditions temporarily fluctuate due to changes in water table depth, which can trigger biogeochemical processes. One well documented example is the process of denitrification which can remove N from riparian groundwater due to the anaerobic reduction of nitrate by soil organic matter. However, the role of riparian zones on the cycling of other nutrients such as dissolved organic matter (DOM) and dissolved P (DP) is much less well documented. In this study, we evaluated this role by using time series of DOM and DP concentrations obtained on the Kervidy-Naizin catchment, a temperate agricultural headwater catchment controlled by shallow groundwater. Over 2 years, groundwater DOM and DP were monitored fortnightly both in the riparian zones and at the bottom of hillslope domains. Two periods of synchronous DOM and DP release were evidenced, the first corresponding to the rise of the water table after the dry summer period, the second being concomitant of the installation of reducing conditions. The reductive dissolution of soil Fe oxyhydroxides initiated by the prolonged soil water saturation caused the second peak, a process which was, however, strongly temporarily and spatially variable at the catchment scale, being dependent on i) the local topographic slope and ii) the annual rainfall amount and frequency. As regard the first peak, it was due either to the flushing by the water table of DOM and DP accumulated during the summer period, or to the release of microbial DOM and DP due to microbial biomass killing by osmotic shock. This study argues for the existence of coupled and complex DOM and DP release processes in the riparian zones of shallow groundwater dominated

  13. Riparian vegetation controls on braided stream dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, Karen; Paola, Chris

    2001-12-01

    Riparian vegetation can significantly influence the morphology of a river, affecting channel geometry and flow dynamics. To examine the effects of riparian vegetation on gravel bed braided streams, we conducted a series of physical experiments at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory with varying densities of bar and bank vegetation. Water discharge, sediment discharge, and grain size were held constant between runs. For each run, we allowed a braided system to develop, then seeded the flume with alfalfa (Medicago sativa), allowed the seeds to grow, and then continued the run. We collected data on water depth, surface velocity, and bed elevation throughout each run using image-based techniques designed to collect data over a large spatial area with minimal disturbance to the flow. Our results show that the influence of vegetation on overall river patterns varied systematically with the spatial density of plant stems. Vegetation reduced the number of active channels and increased bank stability, leading to lower lateral migration rates, narrower and deeper channels, and increased channel relief. These effects increased with vegetation density. Vegetation influenced flow dynamics, increasing the variance of flow direction in vegetated runs and increasing scour depths through strong downwelling where the flow collided with relatively resistant banks. This oblique bank collision also provides a new mechanism for producing secondary flows. We found it to be more important than the classical curvature-driven mechanism in vegetated runs.

  14. Linking riparian dynamics and groundwater: an ecohydrologic approach to modeling groundwater and riparian vegetation.

    PubMed

    Baird, Kathryn J; Stromberg, Juliet C; Maddock, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    The growing use of global freshwater supplies is increasing the need for improved modeling of the linkage between groundwater and riparian vegetation. Traditional groundwater models such as MODFLOW have been used to predict changes in regional groundwater levels, and thus riparian vegetation potential attributable to anthropogenic water use. This article describes an approach that improves on these modeling techniques through several innovations. First, evapotranspiration from riparian/wetland systems is modeled in a manner that more realistically reflects plant ecophysiology and vegetation complexity. In the authors' model programs (RIP-ET and PRE-RIP-ET), the single, monotonically increasing evapotranspiration flux curve in traditional groundwater models is replaced with a set of ecophysiologically based curves, one for each plant functional group present. For each group, the curve simulates transpiration declines that occur both as water levels decline below rooting depths and as waters rise to levels that produce anoxic soil conditions. Accuracy is further improved by more effective spatial handling of vegetation distribution, which allows modeling of surface elevation and depth to water for multiple vegetation types within each large model cell. The use of RIP-ET in groundwater models can improve the accuracy of basin scale estimates of riparian evapotranspiration rates, riparian vegetation water requirements, and water budgets. Two case studies are used to demonstrate that RIP-ET produces significantly different evapotranspiration estimates than the traditional method. When combined with vegetation mapping and a supporting program (RIP-GIS), RIP-ET also enables predictions of riparian vegetation response to water use and development scenarios. The RIP-GIS program links the head distribution from MODFLOW with surface digital elevation models, producing moderate- to high-resolution depth-to-groundwater maps. Together with information on plant rooting depths

  15. Post-wildfire natural restoration of riparian vegetation under stable hydro-geomorphic conditions: Nahal Grar, Northern Negev Desert, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egozi, Roey

    2015-04-01

    Wildfires are common to the Mediterranean region due to its defined dry season and long historical anthropogenic activities. Most of post-wildfire studies focus on mountains areas and thus refer to the hill-slope and its physical characteristics, e.g. morphology, length, angles, and aspect; its soil characteristics, e.g. type, infiltration rate, repellency; and its vegetative covers, e.g. planted trees vs. natural forest or native vs. exotic vegetation. In contrary there is very limited literature focusing on ecological and hydro-geomorphic aspects of post-wildfire of riparian vegetation / zone probably because of its negligible burned area relative to the spread of the fire, sometimes, over the whole watershed area. The limited literature on the topic is surprising given the fact that riparian vegetation zone has been acknowledged as a unique and important habitat supporting rich biodiversity. Herein we report on a wildfire event occurred on October 14th 2009 in a river section of Nahal Grar, Northern Negev Desert, Israel. The wildfire although was limited in its area (only 3 hectare) extended over the channel alone from bank to bank and thus provide a unique case study of completely burn down of riparian vegetation, mainly dense stands of Common Red (Australis Phragmites. Therefore a detailed study of this event provides an opportunity to tackle one of the basics questions which is determining the rate of natural restoration process that act at the immediate time after the wildfire event occurred. This type of information is most valuable to professional and stakeholders for better management of post-fire riparian zones. The results of the study suggest that under stable conditions, i.e. no major flood events occurred; disturbance time was short and ranged over 200 days due to, almost, immediate recovery of the riparian vegetation. However the re-growth of the riparian vegetation was not even but rather deferential and more complex then reported in the literature

  16. On the value of surface saturated area dynamics mapped with thermal infrared imagery for modeling the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Barbara; Klaus, Julian; Frei, Sven; Frentress, Jay; Pfister, Laurent; Hopp, Luisa

    2016-10-01

    The highly dynamic processes within a hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) continuum are known to affect streamflow generation, but are yet not fully understood. Within this study, we simulated a headwater HRS continuum in western Luxembourg with an integrated hydrologic surface subsurface model (HydroGeoSphere). The model was setup with thorough consideration of catchment-specific attributes and we performed a multicriteria model evaluation (4 years) with special focus on the temporally varying spatial patterns of surface saturation. We used a portable thermal infrared (TIR) camera to map surface saturation with a high spatial resolution and collected 20 panoramic snapshots of the riparian zone (approx. 10 m × 20 m) under different hydrologic conditions. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of the processed TIR panoramas and the corresponding model output panoramas revealed a good agreement between spatiotemporal dynamic model and field surface saturation patterns. A double logarithmic linear relationship between surface saturation extent and discharge was similar for modeled and observed data. This provided confidence in the capability of an integrated hydrologic surface subsurface model to represent temporal and spatial water flux dynamics at small (HRS continuum) scales. However, model scenarios with different parameterizations of the riparian zone showed that discharge and surface saturation were controlled by different parameters and hardly influenced each other. Surface saturation only affected very fast runoff responses with a small volumetric contribution to stream discharge, indicating that the dynamic surface saturation in the riparian zone does not necessarily imply a major control on runoff generation.

  17. Combining Field and Laboratory Experiments in Order to Understand Interactions Between Flow, Sediment, Vegetation And Bank Erosion in Riparian Rehabilitation Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. F.; Gorrick, S.; Kalma, J.; Cook, N.; Outhet, D.; Raine, A.

    2005-12-01

    Riparian lands are important for maintaining viable ecosystems, improving water quality and reducing sediment yields. Yet, riparian lands are frequently neglected, degraded and poorly managed. In many Australian riverine zones clearing or grazing of native riparian vegetation has resulted in varying degrees of erosion, sedimentation and degradation of aquatic ecosystems. Reintroducing riparian vegetation is one of the preferred methods for improving bank stability, reducing bank erosion to natural rates and rehabilitating channels. The present research aims to explore how reintroduced riparian vegetation modifies the flow and sediment transport patterns and at the same time how the vegetation is affected by flow and sediment. Both field experimentation and laboratory studies will lead to basic understanding of the processes involved and will help the efficient design of plantings for riparian rehabilitation. In order to be able to reproduce the most important processes in a laboratory physical model, a field site with a relatively simple geometry has been selected for the study. The site is on a small sand bed stream in the Hunter Valley in NSW. The reach has a large radius bend with no riparian vegetation on the outer bank, where erosion occurs periodically. Reintroduction of vegetation is planned for October 2005, with pre and post monitoring stages running from March 2005 to August 2008. Laboratory physical modelling based on field characteristics and with varying flow discharges and plant arrangement will provide information to help develop, adapt and test quantitative models of flow dynamics, sediment transport and bank erosion incorporating the effects of vegetation. These results can then be used by river managers when they are developing rehabilitation strategies.

  18. The influence of partial timber harvesting in riparian buffers on macroinvertebrate and fish communities in small streams in Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, Christopher J.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Blinn, Charles R.; Newman, Raymond M.; Atuke, Dickson M.; Fredricks, Keith; Hemstad, Nathaniel A.; Merten, Eric C.; Schlesser, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Relatively few evaluations of aquatic macroinvertebrate and fish communities have been published in peer-reviewed literature detailing the effect of varying residual basal area (RBA) after timber harvesting in riparian buffers. Our analysis investigated the effects of partial harvesting within riparian buffers on aquatic macroinvertebrate and fish communities in small streams from two experiments in northern Minnesota northern hardwood-aspen forests. Each experiment evaluated partial harvesting within riparian buffers. In both experiments, benthic macroinvertebrates and fish were collected 1 year prior to harvest and in each of 3 years after harvest. We observed interannual variation for the macroinvertebrate abundance, diversity and taxon richness in the single-basin study and abundance and diversity in the multiple-basin study, but few effects related to harvest treatments in either study. However, interannual variation was not evident in the fish communities and we detected no significant changes in the stream fish communities associated with partially harvested riparian buffers in either study. This would suggest that timber harvesting in riparian management zones along reaches ≤200 m in length on both sides of the stream that retains RBA ≥ 12.4 ± 1.3 m2 ha−1 or on a single side of the stream that retains RBA ≥ 8.7 ± 1.6 m2 ha−1 may be adequate to protect macroinvertebrate and fish communities in our Minnesota study systems given these specific timber harvesting techniques.

  19. Hydrologic dynamics and geochemical responses within a floodplain aquifer and hyporheic zone during Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, A. H.; Kaplan, L. A.; Lazareva, O.; Michael, H. A.

    2014-06-01

    Storms dominate solute export budgets from catchments and drive hydrogeochemical changes in the near-stream environment. We captured near-stream hydrogeochemical dynamics during an intense storm (Hurricane Sandy, October 2012), by instrumenting a riparian-hyporheic zone transect of White Clay Creek in the Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory with pressure transducers, redox probes, and pore water samplers. In the floodplain aquifer, preferential vertical flow paths such as macropores facilitated rapid infiltration early in the storm. Water table rose quickly and promoted continuous groundwater discharge to the stream. Floodplain-hillslope topography controlled poststorm aquifer drainage rates, as the broad, western floodplain aquifer drained more slowly than the narrow, eastern floodplain aquifer adjacent to a steep hillslope. These changes in groundwater flow drove heterogeneous geochemical responses in the floodplain aquifer and hyporheic zone. Vertical infiltration in the floodplain and hyporheic exchange in the streambed increased DOC and oxygen delivery to microbially active sediments, which may have enhanced respiration. Resulting geochemical perturbations persisted from days to weeks after the storm. Our observations suggest that groundwater-borne solute delivery to streams during storms depends on unique interactions of vertical infiltration along preferential pathways, perturbations to groundwater geochemistry, and topographically controlled drainage rates.

  20. Riparian Vegetation Response to the March 2008 Short-Duration, High-Flow Experiment-Implications of Timing and Frequency of Flood Disturbance on Nonnative Plant Establishment Along the Colorado River Below Glen Canyon Dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ralston, Barbara E.

    2010-01-01

    Riparian plant communities exhibit various levels of diversity and richness. These communities are affected by flooding and are vulnerable to colonization by nonnative species. Since 1996, a series of three high-flow experiments (HFE), or water releases designed to mimic natural seasonal flooding, have been conducted at Glen Canyon Dam, Ariz., primarily to determine the effectiveness of using high flows to conserve sediment, a limited resource. These experiments also provide opportunities to examine the susceptibility of riparian plant communities to nonnative species invasions. The third and most recent HFE was conducted from March 5 to 9, 2008, and scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey's Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center examined the effects of high flows on riparian vegetation as part of the overall experiment. Total plant species richness, nonnative species richness, percent plant cover, percent organic matter, and total carbon measured from sediment samples were compared for Grand Canyon riparian vegetation zones immediately following the HFE and 6 months later. These comparisons were used to determine if susceptibility to nonnative species establishment varied among riparian vegetation zones and if the timing of the HFE affected nonnative plant establishment success. The 2008 HFE primarily buried vegetation rather than scouring it. Percent nonnative cover did not differ among riparian vegetation zones; however, in the river corridor affected by Glen Canyon Dam operations, nonnative species richness showed significant variation. For example, species richness was significantly greater immediately after and 6 months following the HFE in the hydrologic zone farthest away from the shoreline, the area that represents the oldest riparian zone within the post-dam riparian area. In areas closer to the river channel, tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima X chinensis) seedling establishment occurred (<2 percent cover) in 2008 but not to the extent reported in

  1. Use of a wetland index to evaluate changes in riparian vegetation after livestock exclusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coles-Ritchie, M. C.; Roberts, D.W.; Kershner, J.L.; Henderson, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    A method was developed to characterize ecological integrity of riparian sites based on the abundance of hydric species. This wetland index can be calculated with species data, or with community type data as performed here. Classified riparian community types were used to describe vegetation at 14 livestock exclosures and adjacent grazed areas. Community type wetland index values were generated and used to calculate site wetland index values. It was hypothesized that removal of livestock would result in higher wetland index values because of release from herbivory and decreased physical disturbance of vegetation, streambanks, and soil. The wetland index for exclosures was about 12% higher than grazed sites; differences were statistically significant (p < 0.01) based on paired t-tests. The increase in hydric vegetation after livestock exclusion may have contributed to the greater bank stability (p = 0.002) and smaller width-to-depth ratio (p = 0.005) in exclosures. Challenges were encountered in using community types to describe and compare site vegetation, which could be avoided with species data collection. The wetland index can be a tool to monitor sites over time, compare sites with similar environments, or compare sites for which environmental differences can be accounted.

  2. Establishment of a Riparian Buffer Strip for Alleviating Lake Eutrophication in Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, M.; Naka, K.; Wu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Riparian buffer strips are a growing conservation practice to control and mitigate non-point source pollution in Asia. China has seen rapid population growth and economic development in the last fifty years, coupled with a rapid increase in environmental pollution. Freshwater ecosystems have been particularly affected. Lake Tai, China's 3rd largest freshwater lake by volume, has seen a severe reduction in water quality since economic reforms began in the 1970s. Thus, significant interest for establishing riparian buffer strips in agricultural watersheds and freshwater systems within China is warranted. Eight 50 m x 20 m plots adjacent to a rice-phragmites farm were cleared within the Lake Tai basin region in Jiangsu Province, China. Seven plots were planted with either a Poplar hybrid, Cypress hybrid or a combination of both at varying densities, while the control and final plot allowed only for local vegetation to grow naturally. Soil, tree and groundwater samples were collected from all plots and analyzed for nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. At this time in the study, results have been analyzed only for nitrogen concentrations using the ANOVA procedure. Results for both nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations are currently being analyzed.

  3. Bottom-up factors influencing riparian willow recovery in Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tercek, M.T.; Stottlemyer, R.; Renkin, R.

    2010-01-01

    After the elimination of wolves (Canis lupis L.) in the 1920s, woody riparian plant communities on the northern range of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) declined an estimated 50%. After the reintroduction of wolves in 19951996, riparian willows (Salix spp.) on YNP's northern range showed significant growth for the first time since the 1920s. However, the pace of willow recovery has not been uniform. Some communities have exceeded 400 cm, while others are still at pre-1995 levels of 250 cm max. height) willow sites where willows had escaped elk (Cervus elaphus L.) browsing with "short" willow sites that could still be browsed. Unlike studies that manipulated willow height with fences and artificial dams, we examined sites that had natural growth differences in height since the reintroduction of wolves. Tall willow sites had greater water availability, more-rapid net soil nitrogen mineralization, greater snow depth, lower soil respiration rates, and cooler summer soil temperatures than nearby short willow sites. Most of these differences were measured both in herbaceous areas adjacent to the willow patches and in the willow patches themselves, suggesting that they were not effects of varying willow height recovery but were instead preexisting site differences that may have contributed to increased plant productivity. Our results agree with earlier studies in experimental plots which suggest that the varying pace of willow recovery has been influenced by abiotic limiting factors that interact with top-down reductions in willow browsing by elk. ?? 2010 Western North American Naturalist.

  4. Species replacement by a nonnative salmonid alters ecosystem function by reducing prey subsidies that support riparian spiders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benjamin, J.R.; Fausch, K.D.; Baxter, C.V.

    2011-01-01

    Replacement of a native species by a nonnative can have strong effects on ecosystem function, such as altering nutrient cycling or disturbance frequency. Replacements may cause shifts in ecosystem function because nonnatives establish at different biomass, or because they differ from native species in traits like foraging behavior. However, no studies have compared effects of wholesale replacement of a native by a nonnative species on subsidies that support consumers in adjacent habitats, nor quantified the magnitude of these effects. We examined whether streams invaded by nonnative brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in two regions of the Rocky Mountains, USA, produced fewer emerging adult aquatic insects compared to paired streams with native cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii), and whether riparian spiders that depend on these prey were less abundant along streams with lower total insect emergence. As predicted, emergence density was 36% lower from streams with the nonnative fish. Biomass of brook trout was higher than the cutthroat trout they replaced, but even after accounting for this difference, emergence was 24% lower from brook trout streams. More riparian spiders were counted along streams with greater total emergence across the water surface. Based on these results, we predicted that brook trout replacement would result in 6-20% fewer spiders in the two regions. When brook trout replace cutthroat trout, they reduce cross-habitat resource subsidies and alter ecosystem function in stream-riparian food webs, not only owing to increased biomass but also because traits apparently differ from native cutthroat trout. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Species replacement by a nonnative salmonid alters ecosystem function by reducing prey subsidies that support riparian spiders.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Joseph R; Fausch, Kurt D; Baxter, Colden V

    2011-10-01

    Replacement of a native species by a nonnative can have strong effects on ecosystem function, such as altering nutrient cycling or disturbance frequency. Replacements may cause shifts in ecosystem function because nonnatives establish at different biomass, or because they differ from native species in traits like foraging behavior. However, no studies have compared effects of wholesale replacement of a native by a nonnative species on subsidies that support consumers in adjacent habitats, nor quantified the magnitude of these effects. We examined whether streams invaded by nonnative brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in two regions of the Rocky Mountains, USA, produced fewer emerging adult aquatic insects compared to paired streams with native cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii), and whether riparian spiders that depend on these prey were less abundant along streams with lower total insect emergence. As predicted, emergence density was 36% lower from streams with the nonnative fish. Biomass of brook trout was higher than the cutthroat trout they replaced, but even after accounting for this difference, emergence was 24% lower from brook trout streams. More riparian spiders were counted along streams with greater total emergence across the water surface. Based on these results, we predicted that brook trout replacement would result in 6-20% fewer spiders in the two regions. When brook trout replace cutthroat trout, they reduce cross-habitat resource subsidies and alter ecosystem function in stream-riparian food webs, not only owing to increased biomass but also because traits apparently differ from native cutthroat trout.

  6. Improved Mapping of Riparian Wetlands Using Reach Topography

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian wetlands provide a suite of ecosystems services including floodwater retention, biogeochemical processing, and habitat provisioning. However in one mid-Atlantic watershed the National Wetlands Inventory was shown to underrepresent these systems by greater than 50%. These...

  7. Improved Mapping of Riparian Wetlands Using Reach Topography (ECOSERV)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian wetlands provide a suite of ecosystems services including floodwater retention, biogeochemical processing, and habitat provisioning. However in one mid-Atlantic watershed the National Wetlands Inventory was shown to underrepresent these systems by greater than 50%. These...

  8. The fate of nitrate in riparian wetlands: results from a pan-European study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, T.; Pinay, G.

    2001-12-01

    Subsurface flow through the soil and deeper sediments of the riparian zone is known to be of crucial importance to denitrification and other nitrogen cycling processes. Since denitrification potential generally increases towards the soil surface, water table elevation can control the degree to which nitrate reduction is optimised. This paper presents data collected as part of a pan-European study of nitrate buffer zones, the NICOLAS project (Nitrogen Control by Landscape Structures in Agricultural Environments). An identical experimental design was employed at each site, allowing climatic controls on hydrology and nitrogen cycling processes to be explored. Nitrate elimination occurred at most of the 13 study sites spread out within Europe (between latitude 40\\deg and 55\\deg N) with an efficiency ranging from 5 to 30% of N concentration abatement per metre. This elimination usually occurred within the first few tens of metres at the upland-wetland interface depending on local geomorphological and hydrological conditions.

  9. Alaska Adjacent Zone Safe Oil Transport and Revenue Sharing Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Begich, Mark [D-AK

    2013-01-31

    01/31/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (text of measure as introduced: CR S442-443) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Incorporating climate change projections into riparian restoration planning and design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Laura G.; Lindsay V. Reynolds,; Beechie, Timothy J.; Collins, Mathias J.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and associated changes in streamflow may alter riparian habitats substantially in coming decades. Riparian restoration provides opportunities to respond proactively to projected climate change effects, increase riparian ecosystem resilience to climate change, and simultaneously address effects of both climate change and other human disturbances. However, climate change may alter which restoration methods are most effective and which restoration goals can be achieved. Incorporating climate change into riparian restoration planning and design is critical to long-term restoration of desired community composition and ecosystem services. In this review, we discuss and provide examples of how climate change might be incorporated into restoration planning at the key stages of assessing the project context, establishing restoration goals and design criteria, evaluating design alternatives, and monitoring restoration outcomes. Restoration planners have access to numerous tools to predict future climate, streamflow, and riparian ecology at restoration sites. Planners can use those predictions to assess which species or ecosystem services will be most vulnerable under future conditions, and which sites will be most suitable for restoration. To accommodate future climate and streamflow change, planners may need to adjust methods for planting, invasive species control, channel and floodplain reconstruction, and water management. Given the considerable uncertainty in future climate and streamflow projections, riparian ecological responses, and effects on restoration outcomes, planners will need to consider multiple potential future scenarios, implement a variety of restoration methods, design projects with flexibility to adjust to future conditions, and plan to respond adaptively to unexpected change.

  11. Spatial-seasonal variation of soil denitrification under three riparian vegetation types around the Dianchi Lake in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaojun; Cao, Zilin; Li, Xiaoying; Liao, Zhouyu; Hu, Binghui; Ni, Jie; Ruan, Honghua

    2013-05-01

    Outbreaks of nuisance cyanobacterial bloom are predicted to occur frequently under the effect of severe eutrophication in the water body of Lake Dianchi since the 1990s. Riparian buffers are now well recognized for their roles in the removal of inorganic nitrogen mainly via denitrification. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms of nitrate removal in the riparian buffers of Lake Dianchi. We investigated the wet and dry seasonal dynamics of denitrification rate (DNR) in the soil profiles along the topographic gradient in three riparian buffers with different vegetation types (i.e. forest, open forest, and grass). A strong vertical pattern was observed in soil organic C and N concentrations (i.e. total N, DON, NO3-N, and NH4-N) along the soil layers. We also found significantly higher in situ denitrification activity in the upper horizon along each topohydrosequence while the activities of soil denitrification could be detected down to deeper soil horizons (0.1 to 0.8 mg N per kg dry soil per day), which may contribute significantly to the reduction of the ground water nitrate. Meanwhile, the DNR in the zones near the lake was significantly higher than that in zones near the border with the upland terrace, and also in the wet seasons than in dry seasons. Denitrification rates in the forest, open forest and grass sites were significantly different only in wet seasons. Especially, we found soil organic C had a strong correlation with denitrification in all sites, despite the large intersite variability of soil and vegetation. Our data suggested spatial heterogeneity of substrate availability along a hydrologic and topographic gradient can be the primary control on spatial-seasonal patterns of denitrification in riparian buffers.

  12. Assessing the impact of changes in landuse and management practices on the diffuse pollution and retention of nitrate in a riparian floodplain.

    PubMed

    Krause, Stefan; Jacobs, Joerg; Voss, Anja; Bronstert, Axel; Zehe, Erwin

    2008-01-15

    In many European lowland rivers and riparian floodplains diffuse nutrient pollution is causing a major risk for the surface waters and groundwater to not achieve a good status as demanded by the European Water Framework Directive. In order to delimit the impact of diffuse nutrient pollution substantial and often controversial changes in landuse and management are under discussion. In this study we investigate the impact of two complex scenarios considering changes in landuse and land management practices on the nitrate loads of a typical lowland stream and the riparian groundwater in the North German Plains. Therefore the impacts of both scenarios on the nitrate dynamics, the attenuation efficiency and the nitrate exchange between groundwater and surface water were investigated for a 998.1 km(2) riparian floodplain of the Lower and Central Havel River and compared with the current conditions. Both scenarios target a substantial improvement of the ecological conditions and the water quality in the research area but promote different typical riparian landscape functions and consider a different grade of economical and legal feasibility of the proposed measures. Scenario 1 focuses on the optimisation of conservation measures for all natural resources of the riparian floodplain, scenario 2 considers measures in order to restore a good status of the water bodies mainly. The IWAN model was setup for the simulation of water balance and nitrate dynamics of the floodplain for a perennial simulation period of the current landuse and management conditions and of the scenario assumptions. The proposed landuse and management changes result in reduced rates of nitrate leaching from the root zone into the riparian groundwater (85% for scenario 1, 43% for scenario 2). The net contributions of nitrate from the floodplain can be reduced substantially for both scenarios. In case of scenario 2 a decrease by 70% can be obtained. For scenario 1 the nitrate exfiltration rates to the

  13. Functional classification of riparian roots for bank stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polvi, L. E.; Merritt, D. M.; Wohl, E. E.

    2010-12-01

    It is well established that the roots of riparian vegetation add tensile strength to stream banks, thus reducing bank erosion and undercutting. Bank stability models that add the mechanical strength of riparian roots, based on root tensile strength and density, contribute to the understanding of vegetation-enhanced bank strength. However, for land managers who require a simple method for determining which riparian vegetation species are most suited for bank stabilization (i.e., river restoration), these methods can require time-consuming efforts. The system the United States Forest Service (USFS) currently uses employs a qualitatively-based ranking scheme of riparian vegetation, which also implies that bank stability is an inherent characteristic of a riparian plant species, regardless of bank characteristics. We present a functional classification of riparian species for bank stability that meet the needs of land managers but still acknowledges that bank stability is not an inherent characteristic of vegetation, and that takes into account bank materials (sediment grain size and stratigraphy). The objectives of this research are to (1) develop a functional classification of riparian vegetation based on root morphology and role in stabilizing banks, using a bank stability model (BSTEM) to determine the added bank strength from diverse species for varying bank textures and geometries, and developing a ternary diagram of riparian vegetation based on bank stabilization characteristics (tensile strength, root depth and lateral extent, and root density or branching); and (2) understand the role of riparian indicator species in channel processes and streambank and valley formation. Tensile strength, root morphology and density, and stem density were obtained for 14 riparian species common to the Colorado Front Range (4 trees, 3 shrubs, 3 graminoids, and 4 forbs). We use BSTEM to determine the addition to bank stability for these species for a range of bank textures and

  14. From Sewers to Salix and Tailpipes to Typha: Riparian Plants Reflect Anthropogenic Nitrogen Sources Across Montane to Urban Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Hale, R. L.; Baker, M. A.; Bowling, D. R.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Urban and suburban streams typically receive anthropogenic nitrogen (N) from multiple sources, and their identification and partitioning is a prerequisite for effective water quality management. However, stream N fluxes and sources are often highly variable, limiting the utility of water samples for source identification. Nitrate in perennial streams can provide an important N source for riparian vegetation in semi-arid environments. Thus, riparian plant tissue may integrate the stable isotope composition (δ15N) of stream nitrate over longer timescales and assist in source identification. Here, we tested whether δ15N of riparian plant leaves could provide an effective indicator of spatial variation in N sources across land use gradients spanning wildland to urban ecosystems in Salt Lake City, Utah, and the surrounding Wasatch Range Megapolitan Area. We found that leaf δ15N varied systematically within and among eight streams and rivers (n = 378 leaf samples) consistent with spatial land use variations. Plants from a suburban stream adjacent to homes with septic systems (δ15N = 5.1‰) were highly enriched relative to similar species from an adjacent undeveloped stream (δ15N = -0.7 ‰), suggesting an important contribution of enriched human fecal N to the suburban stream. Plants from a montane stream in a largely undeveloped recreational canyon that permitted off-leash dogs (δ15N = 1.8 ‰) were enriched relative to an adjacent canyon with similar land use that strictly prohibited dogs but had comparable vehicle traffic (δ15N = -0.7 ‰), suggesting the contribution of dog waste to stream N. Plants from urban stream reaches were enriched by 1.3 - 2.8 ‰ relative to upstream wildland reaches, and δ15N increased by 0.2 ‰ per km in the urban streams. Mechanisms leading to this urban enrichment could include leaky municipal sewers, atmospheric N deposition, and/or increased rates of N cycling and gaseous losses. Overall, our results demonstrate the potential

  15. Remote sensing of the impact of a large dam on the riparian vegetation canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Kellogg, C.

    2013-12-01

    To tap the water resources and hydropower from large rivers, numerous large dams have been built in the world. How the construction of such dams impacts the riparian vegetation ecosystem along the river at which the dams have been built is still an open question. In this study we use the Three Gorges dam on the Yangtze River in China as a case to study the impact of the fluctuation of water levels of the reservoir due to the dam along the river (see Figure 1). Our hypothesis is that the impact of the dam construction on riparian plant ecosystem should be elevation-related. To test this, we divide the riparian area along the river into a certain zones according to elevation. Based on the remotely sensed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the Terra satellite, we derived the Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR). Remotely sensed NDVI, Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), and the derived FPAR data sources represent the vigor and health status of vegetation canopy and vegetation cover. The status of vegetation cover is categorized into three categories according to NDVI, EVI, or FPAR. For instance, the three categories according to NDVI are: non-vegetated (NDVI < 0.3), sparsely vegetated (0.3 < NDVI < 0.6), and densely vegetated (NDVI > 0.6). Area of each category within each elevation zone was derived from the vegetation indices or FPAR data and the overlapping digital elevation model (DEM) data from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). The time evolution of the area of each category within each elevation zone can thus be tracked down and regression analyzed with the water level data. Results show that over the decade-long water-storing period (2000-2010), non-vegetated land cover increased in the inundated zone (elevation below 175m); dense vegetation land cover increased within the elevation zone of 175m-775m and no change in

  16. A practical scientific approach to riparian vegetation rehabilitation in Australia.

    PubMed

    Webb, Ashley A; Erskine, Wayne D

    2003-08-01

    The clearance of indigenous riparian vegetation and removal of large woody debris (LWD) from streams combined with the planting of exotic plant species has resulted in widespread detrimental impacts on the fluvial geomorphology and aquatic ecology of Australian rivers. Vegetation exerts a significant influence on fluvial geomorphology by affecting resistance to flow, bank strength, sediment storage, bed stability and stream morphology and is important for aquatic ecosystem function. As the values of indigenous riparian vegetation are becoming better recognised by Australian river managers, large amounts of money and resources are being invested in the planting of indigenous riparian vegetation as part of river rehabilitation programs. This paper summarises the results of an investigation into the survival, growth and regeneration rates of a series of trial native riparian vegetation plantings on in-channel benches in the Hunter Valley of southeastern Australia. The trials were poorly designed for statistical analysis and the paper highlights a number of shortcomings in the methods used. As a result, a new approach to riparian vegetation rehabilitation is outlined that promotes the use of scientific principles and understanding. Appropriate species should be selected using a combination of remnant vegetation surveys, historical records, palynology and field trials. A number of important factors should be considered in the rehabilitation of riparian vegetation to achieve worthwhile results. These include flood disturbance, vegetation zonation, vegetation succession, substrate composition, corridor planting width, planting techniques, native plant regeneration, LWD recruitment and adaptive ecosystem management. This approach, if adopted, revised and improved by river managers, should result in greater success than has been achieved by previous riparian vegetation rehabilitation efforts in Australia.

  17. Riparian influences on stream fish assemblage structure in urbanizing streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, A.H.; Freeman, B.J.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2007-01-01

    We assessed the influence of land cover at multiple spatial extents on fish assemblage integrity, and the degree to which riparian forests can mitigate the negative effects of catchment urbanization on stream fish assemblages. Riparian cover (urban, forest, and agriculture) was determined within 30 m buffers at longitudinal distances of 200 m, 1 km, and the entire network upstream of 59 non-nested fish sampling locations. Catchment and riparian land cover within the upstream network were highly correlated, so we were unable to distinguish between those variables. Most fish assemblage variables were related to % forest and % urban land cover, with the strongest relations at the largest spatial extent of land cover (catchment), followed by riparian land cover in the 1-km and 200-m reach, respectively. For fish variables related to urban land cover in the catchment, we asked whether the influence of riparian land cover on fish assemblages was dependent on the amount of urban development in the catchment. Several fish assemblage metrics (endemic richness, endemic:cosmopolitan abundance, insectivorous cyprinid richness and abundance, and fluvial specialist richness) were all best predicted by single variable models with % urban land cover. However, endemic:cosmopolitan richness, cosmopolitan abundance, and lentic tolerant abundance were related to % forest cover in the 1-km stream reach, but only in streams that had <15% catchment urban land cover. In these cases, catchment urbanization overwhelmed the potential mitigating effects of riparian forests on stream fishes. Together, these results suggest that catchment land cover is an important driver of fish assemblages in urbanizing catchments, and riparian forests are important but not sufficient for protecting stream ecosystems from the impacts of high levels of urbanization.

  18. Prescribed grazing as a secondary impact in a western riparian floodplain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, J.A.; Knopf, F.L.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of late-autumn cattle grazing on plant biomass was examined in a western Great Plains cottonwood riparian zone prone to catastrophic flooding every 5-8 years. Following 1 year of pre-treatment data collection in 1982, five 16-ha pastures were grazed from 1982 to 1984 and compared to 5 control pastures within the South Platte River floodplain in northeastern Colorado. At a prescribed grazing level of 0.46 ha/AUM, riparian vegetation proved to be resilient to the impacts of grazing. We detected only a few significant treatment effects for above-ground biomass after succeeding growing seasons. Willows (Salix spp.) responded negatively to grazing whereas biomass of prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata Link) was greater on grazed plots. Yearly changes in above-ground biomass, especially dramatic following a severe flood in 1983, suggest that periodic, catastrophic flooding is a major perturbation to the ecosystem, and in conjunction with our results on grazing impacts, indicate that dormant-season grazing within Soil Conservation Service (SCS) guidelines is a comparatively minor impact within the floodplain. In addition, grazing impacts were probably further mitigated by a major forage supplement of cottonwood leaves which was available at the time of cattle introductions. This local forage supplement ultimately created a lighter grazing treatment than that originally prescribed.

  19. Low thermal tolerances of stream amphibians in the Pacific Northwest: Implications for riparian and forest management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bury, R.B.

    2008-01-01

    Temperature has a profound effect on survival and ecology of amphibians. In the Pacific Northwest, timber harvest is known to increase peak stream temperatures to 24??C or higher, which has potential to negatively impact cold-water stream amphibians. I determined the Critical Thermal Maxima (CT max) for two salamanders that are endemic to the Pacific Northwest. Rhyacotriton variegatus larvae acclimated at 10??C had mean CTmax of 26.7 ?? 0.7 SD??C and adults acclimated at 11??C had mean CT max of 27.9 ?? 1.1??C. These were among the lowest known values for any amphibian. Values were significantly higher for larval Dicamptodon tenebrosus acclimated at 14??C (x = 29.1 ?? 0.2??C). Although the smallest R. variegatus had some of the lowest values, size of larvae and adults did not influence CTmax in this species. Current forest practices retain riparian buffers along larger fish-bearing streams; however, such buffers along smaller headwaters and non-fish bearing streams may provide favorable habitat conditions for coldwater-associated species in the Pacific Northwest. The current study lends further evidence to the need for protection of Northwest stream amphibians from environmental perturbations. Forest guidelines that include riparian buffer zones and configurations of upland stands should be developed, while monitoring amphibian responses to determine their success. ?? 2008 Brill Academic Publishers.

  20. Spectral discrimination of giant reed (Arundo donax L.): A seasonal study in riparian areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Maria Rosário; Aguiar, Francisca C.; Silva, João M. N.; Ferreira, Maria Teresa; Pereira, José M. C.

    2013-06-01

    The giant reed (Arundo donax L.) is amongst the one hundred worst invasive alien species of the world, and it is responsible for biodiversity loss and failure of ecosystem functions in riparian habitats. In this work, field spectroradiometry was used to assess the spectral separability of the giant reed from the adjacent vegetation and from the common reed, a native similar species. The study was conducted at different phenological periods and also for the giant reed stands regenerated after mechanical cutting (giant reed_RAC). A hierarchical procedure using Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Classification and Regression Trees (CART) was used to select the minimum number of optimal bands that discriminate the giant reed from the adjacent vegetation. A new approach was used to identify sets of wavelengths - wavezones - that maximize the spectral separability beyond the minimum number of optimal bands. Jeffries Matusita and Bhattacharya distance were used to evaluate the spectral separability using the minimum optimal bands and in three simulated satellite images, namely Landsat, IKONOS and SPOT. Giant reed was spectrally separable from the adjacent vegetation, both at the vegetative and the senescent period, exception made to the common reed at the vegetative period. The red edge region was repeatedly selected, although the visible region was also important to separate the giant reed from the herbaceous vegetation and the mid infrared region to the discrimination from the woody vegetation. The highest separability was obtained for the giant reed_RAC stands, due to its highly homogeneous, dense and dark-green stands. Results are discussed by relating the phenological, morphological and structural features of the giant reed stands and the adjacent vegetation with their optical traits. Weaknesses and strengths of the giant reed spectral discrimination are highlighted and implications of imagery selection for mapping purposes are argued based on present results.

  1. Water use sources of desert riparian Populus euphratica forests.

    PubMed

    Si, Jianhua; Feng, Qi; Cao, Shengkui; Yu, Tengfei; Zhao, Chunyan

    2014-09-01

    Desert riparian forests are the main body of natural oases in the lower reaches of inland rivers; its growth and distribution are closely related to water use sources. However, how does the desert riparian forest obtains a stable water source and which water sources it uses to effectively avoid or overcome water stress to survive? This paper describes an analysis of the water sources, using the stable oxygen isotope technique and the linear mixed model of the isotopic values and of desert riparian Populus euphratica forests growing at sites with different groundwater depths and conditions. The results showed that the main water source of Populus euphratica changes from water in a single soil layer or groundwater to deep subsoil water and groundwater as the depth of groundwater increases. This appears to be an adaptive selection to arid and water-deficient conditions and is a primary reason for the long-term survival of P. euphratica in the desert riparian forest of an extremely arid region. Water contributions from the various soil layers and from groundwater differed and the desert riparian P. euphratica forests in different habitats had dissimilar water use strategies.

  2. Gilliam County Riparian Buffers; 2003-2004 Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect

    Coiner, Josh

    2004-06-01

    Interest appears to be at an all-time high for riparian conservation programs in Gilliam County. With the recently added Herbaceous Buffer and the already established CREP program interest is booming. However, more and more people are turning towards the herbaceous buffer because of expense. The riparian forest buffer is becoming too expensive. Even with the excellent cost share and incentives landowners are having trouble with Farm Service Agency's payment limitation. Because of this payment limitation landowners are not receiving their full rental and incentive payments, usually in year one. This has cooled the installation of riparian forest buffers and peaked interest in the CP-29 (Herbaceous Buffer for Wildlife). Either way, riparian lands are being enhanced and water quality is being improved. Year three should be very similar to the accomplishments of year 2. There has already been several projects proposed that may or may not be approved during year 3. I am currently working on three projects that are all over 2.5 miles long on each side and total anywhere from 60 to 250 acres in size. Along with these three projects there at least seven small projects being proposed. Four of those projects are riparian forest buffers and the remaining are herbaceous buffers.

  3. Riparian vegetation patterns in relation to fluvial landforms and channel evolution along selected rivers of Tuscany (Central Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, C.R.; Rinaldi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Riparian vegetation distribution patterns and diversity relative to various fluvial geomorphic channel patterns, landforms, and processes are described and interpreted for selected rivers of Tuscany, Central Italy; with emphasis on channel evolution following human impacts. Field surveys were conducted along thirteen gauged reaches for species presence, fluvial landforms, and the type and amount of channel/riparian zone change. Inundation frequency of different geomorphic surfaces was determined, and vegetation data were analyzed using BDA (binary discriminate analysis) and DCA (detrended correspondence analysis) and related to hydrogeomorphology. Multivariate analyses revealed distinct quantitative vegetation patterns relative to six major fluvial geomorphic surfaces. DCA of the vegetation data also showed distinct associations of plants to processes of adjustment that are related to stage of channel evolution, and clearly separated plants along disturbance/landform/soil moisture gradients. Species richness increases from the channel bed to the terrace and on heterogeneous riparian areas, whereas species richness decreases from moderate to intense incision and from low to intense narrowing. ?? 2007 by Association of American Geographers.

  4. Links between riparian landcover, instream environment and fish assemblages in headwater streams of south-eastern Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cruz, Bruna B.; Miranda, Leandro E.; Cetra, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesised and tested a hierarchical organisation model where riparian landcover would influence bank composition and light availability, which in turn would influence instream environments and control fish assemblages. The study was conducted during the dry season in 11 headwater tributaries of the Sorocaba River in the upper Paraná River Basin, south-eastern Brazil. We focused on seven environmental factors each represented by one or multiple environmental variables and seven fish functional traits each represented by two or more classes. Multivariate direct gradient analyses suggested that riparian zone landcover can be considered a higher level causal factor in a network of relations that control instream characteristics and fish assemblages. Our results provide a framework for a hierarchical conceptual model that identifies singular and collective influences of variables from different scales on each other and ultimately on different aspects related to stream fish functional composition. This conceptual model is focused on the relationships between riparian landcover and instream variables as causal factors on the organisation of stream fish assemblages. Our results can also be viewed as a model for headwater stream management in that landcover can be manipulated to influence factors such as bank composition, substrates and water quality, whereas fish assemblage composition can be used as indicators to monitor the success of such efforts.

  5. The dark side of suibsidies: quantifying contaminant exposure to riparian predators via stream insects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic insects provide a critical nutrient subsidy to riparian food webs, yet their role as vectors of contaminants to terrestrial ecosystems is poorly understood. We investigated relationships between aquatic (resource utilization) and contaminant exposure for a riparian invert...

  6. Linking Changes in Management and Riparian Physical Functionality to Water Quality and Aquatic Habitat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wildlife and aquatic habitats are dependent on the development of riparian area management strategies. Land management strategies consider certain basic ecological and economic relationships. These relationships are functions of riparian and te rrestrial ecosystems, which include...

  7. RELATIONSHIPS AMONG GEOMORPHOLOGY, HYDROLOGY, AND VEGETATION IN RIPARIAN MEADOWS: RESTORATION IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vegetation patterns and dynamics within riparian corridors are controlled largely by geomorphic position, substrate characteristics and hydrologic regimes. Understanding management and restoration options for riparian meadow complexes exhibiting stream incision requires knowledge...

  8. PREDICTIONS OF STREAM WOOD RECRUITMENT FROM RIPARIAN FORESTS: EFFECTS OF DATA RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluate whether different levels of detail of riparian forest characterizations result in different predictions of stream wood recruitment from riparian forests in northwestern Oregon. If less detailed information provides the same estimate of this function as more detailed i...

  9. EFFECTS OF HABITAT DISTURBANCE FROM RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON BREEDING BIRD COMMUNITIES IN RIPARIAN CORRIDORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to assess the relationship of land use, riparian vegetation, and avian populations. Our objective was to compare indicators of condition for vegetated riparian corridors with the composition of breeding bird populations in eight Rhode Island subwatersheds...

  10. Seismic analysis of adjacent buildings subjected to double pounding considering soil-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghaly, Ahmed Abdelraheem

    2017-02-01

    A 2D model of two adjacent buildings with different heights (6 and 12 floors) and foundation levels without separation distance under seismic load and considering SSI is investigated. A special arrangement of contact elements (gap elements) each 1 m of the low height building in the contact zone is taken into consideration to fulfill all possible deformation contact modes which take place under seismic load (earthquake). Soil is modeled by 2D shell elements in contact with foundations of the two adjacent buildings. This paper focuses on the study of double pounding that takes place between the two adjacent buildings in some upper points at superstructure in the contact zone and also at foundation level. The forces of double pounding between the two adjacent buildings, which increase by softening of the soil, give a valuable assessment of straining actions of the two adjacent buildings and change the behavior of soil under the foundations and around basement floor.

  11. Seismic analysis of adjacent buildings subjected to double pounding considering soil-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghaly, Ahmed Abdelraheem

    2017-03-01

    A 2D model of two adjacent buildings with different heights (6 and 12 floors) and foundation levels without separation distance under seismic load and considering SSI is investigated. A special arrangement of contact elements (gap elements) each 1 m of the low height building in the contact zone is taken into consideration to fulfill all possible deformation contact modes which take place under seismic load (earthquake). Soil is modeled by 2D shell elements in contact with foundations of the two adjacent buildings. This paper focuses on the study of double pounding that takes place between the two adjacent buildings in some upper points at superstructure in the contact zone and also at foundation level. The forces of double pounding between the two adjacent buildings, which increase by softening of the soil, give a valuable assessment of straining actions of the two adjacent buildings and change the behavior of soil under the foundations and around basement floor.

  12. Theory, methods and tools for determining environmental flows for riparian vegetation: Riparian vegetation-flow response guilds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, D.M.; Scott, M.L.; Leroy, Poff N.; Auble, G.T.; Lytle, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Riparian vegetation composition, structure and abundance are governed to a large degree by river flow regime and flow-mediated fluvial processes. Streamflow regime exerts selective pressures on riparian vegetation, resulting in adaptations (trait syndromes) to specific flow attributes. Widespread modification of flow regimes by humans has resulted in extensive alteration of riparian vegetation communities. Some of the negative effects of altered flow regimes on vegetation may be reversed by restoring components of the natural flow regime. 2. Models have been developed that quantitatively relate components of the flow regime to attributes of riparian vegetation at the individual, population and community levels. Predictive models range from simple statistical relationships, to more complex stochastic matrix population models and dynamic simulation models. Of the dozens of predictive models reviewed here, most treat one or a few species, have many simplifying assumptions such as stable channel form, and do not specify the time-scale of response. In many cases, these models are very effective in developing alternative streamflow management plans for specific river reaches or segments but are not directly transferable to other rivers or other regions. 3. A primary goal in riparian ecology is to develop general frameworks for prediction of vegetation response to changing environmental conditions. The development of riparian vegetation-flow response guilds offers a framework for transferring information from rivers where flow standards have been developed to maintain desirable vegetation attributes, to rivers with little or no existing information. 4. We propose to organise riparian plants into non-phylogenetic groupings of species with shared traits that are related to components of hydrologic regime: life history, reproductive strategy, morphology, adaptations to fluvial disturbance and adaptations to water availability. Plants from any river or region may be grouped

  13. Rivers through time: historical changes in the riparian vegetation of the semi-arid, winter rainfall region of South Africa in response to climate and land use.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M Timm; Rohde, Richard Frederick

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines how the riparian vegetation of perennial and ephemeral rivers systems in the semi-arid, winter rainfall region of South Africa has changed over time. Using an environmental history approach we assess the extent of change in plant cover at 32 sites using repeat photographs that cover a time span of 36-113 years. The results indicate that in the majority of sites there has been a significant increase in cover of riparian vegetation in both the channel beds and adjacent floodplain environments. The most important species to have increased in cover across the region is Acacia karroo. We interpret the findings in the context of historical changes in climate and land use practices. Damage to riparian vegetation caused by mega-herbivores probably ceased sometime during the early 19th century as did scouring events related to large floods that occurred at regular intervals from the 15th to early 20th centuries. Extensive cutting of riparian vegetation for charcoal and firewood has also declined over the last 150 years. Changes in the grazing history as well as increased abstraction and dam building along perennial rivers in the region also account for some of the changes observed in riparian vegetation during the second half of the 20th century. Predictions of climate change related to global warming anticipate increased drought events with the subsequent loss of species and habitats in the study area. The evidence presented here suggests that an awareness of the region's historical ecology should be considered more carefully in the modelling and formulation of future climate change predictions as well as in the understanding of climate change impacts over time frames of decades and centuries.

  14. Impacts of riparian wetlands on the seasonal variations of watershed-scale methane budget in a temperate monsoonal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakabe, Ayaka; Kosugi, Yoshiko; Okumi, Chika; Itoh, Masayuki; Takahashi, Kenshi

    2016-07-01

    Forest soils are considered a methane (CH4) sink because dry soils can oxidize CH4; however, previous studies on CH4 fluxes in humid temperate forests indicated a high spatial and temporal variability in CH4 fluxes, especially in CH4 emissions from wet soils close to riparian zones, which can turn the soil of a whole forest from a CH4 sink to a CH4 source. In this study, the spatial and temporal variability of soil CH4 fluxes was investigated in a Japanese coniferous forest, including a riparian wetland and a hillslope water-unsaturated forest floor, based on multipoint flux measurements using laser-based CH4 analyzers over a period of 2 years. We identified CH4 emission hot spots (60.2 ± 169.1 nmol m-2 s-1 from 117 sampling points) in the wetland in late summer, while the CH4 absorption rate in the forest floor was comparatively lower (-1.2 ± 1.4 nmol m-2 s-1 from 119 sampling points). The temporal variability of watershed-scale CH4 flux was amplified by a clear seasonal cycle of soil temperature and rainfall pattern under the Asian monsoon climate. The watershed-scale CH4 budget showed that the forest turned into a CH4 source during the summer owing to the high and variable CH4 emissions from the riparian wetland and the lower part of the hillslope. Overall, our results indicated that CH4 emissions from small riparian areas are important in controlling forest CH4 dynamics at a watershed scale.

  15. Composition of riparian litter input regulates organic matter decomposition: Implications for headwater stream functioning in a managed forest landscape.

    PubMed

    Lidman, Johan; Jonsson, Micael; Burrows, Ryan M; Bundschuh, Mirco; Sponseller, Ryan A

    2017-02-01

    Although the importance of stream condition for leaf litter decomposition has been extensively studied, little is known about how processing rates change in response to altered riparian vegetation community composition. We investigated patterns of plant litter input and decomposition across 20 boreal headwater streams that varied in proportions of riparian deciduous and coniferous trees. We measured a suite of in-stream physical and chemical characteristics, as well as the amount and type of litter inputs from riparian vegetation, and related these to decomposition rates of native (alder, birch, and spruce) and introduced (lodgepole pine) litter species incubated in coarse- and fine-mesh bags. Total litter inputs ranged more than fivefold among sites and increased with the proportion of deciduous vegetation in the riparian zone. In line with differences in initial litter quality, mean decomposition rate was highest for alder, followed by birch, spruce, and lodgepole pine (12, 55, and 68% lower rates, respectively). Further, these rates were greater in coarse-mesh bags that allow colonization by macroinvertebrates. Variance in decomposition rate among sites for different species was best explained by different sets of environmental conditions, but litter-input composition (i.e., quality) was overall highly important. On average, native litter decomposed faster in sites with higher-quality litter input and (with the exception of spruce) higher concentrations of dissolved nutrients and open canopies. By contrast, lodgepole pine decomposed more rapidly in sites receiving lower-quality litter inputs. Birch litter decomposition rate in coarse-mesh bags was best predicted by the same environmental variables as in fine-mesh bags, with additional positive influences of macroinvertebrate species richness. Hence, to facilitate energy turnover in boreal headwaters, forest management with focus on conifer production should aim at increasing the presence of native deciduous

  16. Temporal Hyporheic Zone Response to Water Table Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Malzone, Jonathan M; Anseeuw, Sierra K; Lowry, Christopher S; Allen-King, Richelle

    2016-03-01

    Expansion and contraction of the hyporheic zone due to temporal hydrologic changes between stream and riparian aquifer influence the biogeochemical cycling capacity of streams. Theoretical studies have quantified the control of groundwater discharge on the depth of the hyporheic zone; however, observations of temporal groundwater controls are limited. In this study, we develop the concept of groundwater-dominated differential hyporheic zone expansion to explain the temporal control of groundwater discharge on the hyporheic zone in a third-order stream reach flowing through glacially derived terrain typical of the Great Lakes region. We define groundwater-dominated differential expansion of the hyporheic zone as: differing rates and magnitudes of hyporheic zone expansion in response to seasonal vs. storm-related water table fluctuation. Specific conductance and vertical hydraulic gradient measurements were used to map changes in the hyporheic zone during seasonal water table decline and storm events. Planar and riffle beds were monitored in order to distinguish the cause of increasing hyporheic zone depth. Planar bed seasonal expansion of the hyporheic zone was of a greater magnitude and longer in duration (weeks to months) than storm event expansion (hours to days). In contrast, the hyporheic zone beneath the riffle bed exhibited minimal expansion in response to seasonal groundwater decline compared to storm related expansion. Results indicated that fluctuation in the riparian water table controlled seasonal expansion of the hyporheic zone along the planar bed. This groundwater induced hyporheic zone expansion could increase the potential for biogeochemical cycling and natural attenuation.

  17. Effect of gender on sap-flux-scaled transpiration in a dominant riparian tree species: Box elder (Acer negundo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultine, K. R.; Bush, S. E.; West, A. G.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2007-09-01

    flux from dominant riparian vegetation adjacent to the stream channel. Results from this investigation show that the population structure of dioecious riparian trees has direct consequences on ecosystem ET, particularly along stream margins. Shifts in population structure therefore, may have profound impacts on several ecohydrological processes including stream discharge, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystem productivity.

  18. Role of riparian areas in atmospheric pesticide deposition and its potential effect on water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian buffers are known to mitigate hydrologic losses of nutrients and other contaminants as they exit agricultural fields. The vegetation of riparian buffers can also trap atmospheric contaminants, but these pollutants can subsequently be delivered via rain to the riparian buffer floor. These ...

  19. Riparian land-use and stream bank erosion within grazed pastures in southern Iowa, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian land-uses such as cropping and grazing are major agricultural practices that have impacts on stream bank erosion. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of riparian land use considered in both field and catchment scale on stream bank erosion within grazed riparian pasture sites in t...

  20. Effects of Stream and Elevation Resolution on Riparian Metrics and Restoration Identification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Even though riparian areas attenuate nutrients and sediments from agricultural runoff at the field scale, best management practices and locations for restoring riparian areas should be determined at watershed scales. Riparian metrics (e.g., percent forest within 100m of stream)...

  1. Concentrated Flow through a Riparian Buffer: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. B.; Nogues, J. P.; Hutchinson, S. L.

    2005-05-01

    Riparian buffers are often used for in-situ treatment of agricultural runoff. Although the benefits of riparian buffers are well recongized, concentration of flow can restrict the efficiency of contaminant removal. This study evaluates flow concentration at a agricultural site near Manhattan, Kansas. Manual and automated GIS analyses of a high-resolution digital elevation model were used to determine the fraction of runoff contributing to each buffer segment. Subsequent simulation of the system in WEPP (Water Erosion and Prediction Project) demonstrates the extent to which flow concentration affects buffer efficiency. Recommendations are presented for the design of adaptive-width buffers.

  2. Concentrated Flow through a Riparian Buffer: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. B.; Nogues, J. P.; Hutchinson, S. L.

    2004-05-01

    Riparian buffers are often used for in-situ treatment of agricultural runoff. Although the benefits of riparian buffers are well recongized, concentration of flow can restrict the efficiency of contaminant removal. This study evaluates flow concentration at a agricultural site near Manhattan, Kansas. Manual and automated GIS analyses of a high-resolution digital elevation model were used to determine the fraction of runoff contributing to each buffer segment. Subsequent simulation of the system in WEPP (Water Erosion and Prediction Project) demonstrates the extend to which flow concentration affects buffer efficiency.

  3. A Long-term Reach-Scale Monitoring Network for Riparian Evapotranspiration, Rock Creek, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, H.; Solis, J. A.; Whittemore, D. O.; Butler, J. J.; Reboulet, E.; Knobbe, S.; Dealy, M.

    2011-12-01

    Riparian evapotranspiration (RET) is an important component of basin-wide evapotranspiration (ET), especially in subhumid to semi-arid regions, with significant impact on water management and conservation. In narrow riparian zones, typical of much of the subhumid to semi-arid U.S., direct measurement of RET by eddy correlation is precluded by the limited fetch distance of riparian vegetation. Alternative approaches based on water balance analyses have a long history, but their accuracy is not well understood. Factors such as heterogeneity in soil properties and root distributions, and sparse measurements, introduce uncertainties in RET estimates. As part of a larger effort aimed at improving understanding of basin-wide RET using scaling theories, we installed a continuous monitoring system for water balance estimation at the scale of a single (~100 m long) reach along Rock Creek in the Whitewater Basin in central Kansas. The distinguishing features of this site include a vadose zone with fine-grained soils underlain by a phreatic zone of coarse gravel embedded in clay, overlying karst bedrock. Across the width (~40 m) of the riparian zone, we installed one transect of four wells screened at the bottom of the alluvium (6-7 m depth), each accompanied by a soil moisture profiler with capacitance sensors at 4 vertical levels above the local water-table elevation (~2.5 m depth) and a shallow well screened just below the water table. All wells were instrumented with pressure transducers for monitoring water levels. Additional sets of all sensors were installed at the upstream and downstream ends of the study reach. Initial results from the monitoring network suggest significant complexities in the behavior of the subsurface system at the site, including a high degree of heterogeneity. All deep wells show a rapid response to streamflow variations and nearby pumping. However, the shallow water-table wells do not respond rapidly to either. Both the shallow wells and soil

  4. Floodplain ecohydrology: Climatic, anthropogenic, and local physical controls on partitioning of water sources to riparian trees

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Michael Bliss; Sargeant, Christopher I; Piégay, Hervé; Riquier, Jérémie; Wilson, Rob J S; Evans, Cristina M

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal and annual partitioning of water within river floodplains has important implications for ecohydrologic links between the water cycle and tree growth. Climatic and hydrologic shifts alter water distribution between floodplain storage reservoirs (e.g., vadose, phreatic), affecting water availability to tree roots. Water partitioning is also dependent on the physical conditions that control tree rooting depth (e.g., gravel layers that impede root growth), the sources of contributing water, the rate of water drainage, and water residence times within particular storage reservoirs. We employ instrumental climate records alongside oxygen isotopes within tree rings and regional source waters, as well as topographic data and soil depth measurements, to infer the water sources used over several decades by two co-occurring tree species within a riparian floodplain along the Rhône River in France. We find that water partitioning to riparian trees is influenced by annual (wet versus dry years) and seasonal (spring snowmelt versus spring rainfall) fluctuations in climate. This influence depends strongly on local (tree level) conditions including floodplain surface elevation and subsurface gravel layer elevation. The latter represents the upper limit of the phreatic zone and therefore controls access to shallow groundwater. The difference between them, the thickness of the vadose zone, controls total soil moisture retention capacity. These factors thus modulate the climatic influence on tree ring isotopes. Additionally, we identified growth signatures and tree ring isotope changes associated with recent restoration of minimum streamflows in the Rhône, which made new phreatic water sources available to some trees in otherwise dry years. Key Points Water shifts due to climatic fluctuations between floodplain storage reservoirs Anthropogenic changes to hydrology directly impact water available to trees Ecohydrologic approaches to integration of hydrology afford new

  5. Sand and sandbar willow: a feedback loop amplifies environmental sensitivity at the riparian interface.

    PubMed

    Rood, Stewart B; Goater, Lori A; Gill, Karen M; Braatne, Jeffrey H

    2011-01-01

    Riparian or streamside zones support dynamic ecosystems with three interacting components: flowing water, alluvia (river-transported sediments), and vegetation. River damming influences all three, and subsequent responses can provide insight into underlying processes. We investigated these components along the 315-km Hells Canyon corridor of the Snake River that included reaches upstream, along, and downstream from three large dams and reservoirs, and along the Salmon River, a free-flowing tributary. Sandbar willow was generally the woody plant at the lowest bank position and was abundant along upstream reaches (53, 45, 67% of transects), sparse along reservoirs (11, 12, 0%), and sparse along the Snake River downstream (11%). It was prolific along the undammed Salmon River (83%) and intermediate along the Snake River below the Salmon inflow (27%), indicating partial recovery with the contribution of water and sediments. Along these rivers, it commonly occurred on sandy substrates, especially on shallow-sloped surfaces, and emerged from interstitial sands between cobbles on steeper surfaces. However, along the Snake River below the dams, sandbars have eroded and willows were sparse on remnant, degrading sand surfaces. We conclude that a feedback loop exists between sands and sandbar willow. Sand favors willow colonization and clonal expansion, and reciprocally the extensively branched willows create slack-water zones that protect and trap sands. This feedback may sustain surface sands and sandbar willows along free-flowing river systems and it amplifies their mutual vulnerability to river damming. Following damming, sediment-depleted water is released downstream, eroding surface sands and reducing willow colonization and expansion. With willow decline, sands are further exposed and eroded, compounding these impacts. From this feedback, we predict the coordinated depletion of surface sands and riparian willows along dammed rivers throughout the Northern Hemisphere.

  6. Floodplain ecohydrology: Climatic, anthropogenic, and local physical controls on partitioning of water sources to riparian trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Michael Bliss; Sargeant, Christopher I.; Piégay, Hervé; Riquier, Jérémie; Wilson, Rob J. S.; Evans, Cristina M.

    2014-05-01

    Seasonal and annual partitioning of water within river floodplains has important implications for ecohydrologic links between the water cycle and tree growth. Climatic and hydrologic shifts alter water distribution between floodplain storage reservoirs (e.g., vadose, phreatic), affecting water availability to tree roots. Water partitioning is also dependent on the physical conditions that control tree rooting depth (e.g., gravel layers that impede root growth), the sources of contributing water, the rate of water drainage, and water residence times within particular storage reservoirs. We employ instrumental climate records alongside oxygen isotopes within tree rings and regional source waters, as well as topographic data and soil depth measurements, to infer the water sources used over several decades by two co-occurring tree species within a riparian floodplain along the Rhône River in France. We find that water partitioning to riparian trees is influenced by annual (wet versus dry years) and seasonal (spring snowmelt versus spring rainfall) fluctuations in climate. This influence depends strongly on local (tree level) conditions including floodplain surface elevation and subsurface gravel layer elevation. The latter represents the upper limit of the phreatic zone and therefore controls access to shallow groundwater. The difference between them, the thickness of the vadose zone, controls total soil moisture retention capacity. These factors thus modulate the climatic influence on tree ring isotopes. Additionally, we identified growth signatures and tree ring isotope changes associated with recent restoration of minimum streamflows in the Rhône, which made new phreatic water sources available to some trees in otherwise dry years.

  7. Floodplain ecohydrology: Climatic, anthropogenic, and local physical controls on partitioning of water sources to riparian trees.

    PubMed

    Singer, Michael Bliss; Sargeant, Christopher I; Piégay, Hervé; Riquier, Jérémie; Wilson, Rob J S; Evans, Cristina M

    2014-05-01

    Seasonal and annual partitioning of water within river floodplains has important implications for ecohydrologic links between the water cycle and tree growth. Climatic and hydrologic shifts alter water distribution between floodplain storage reservoirs (e.g., vadose, phreatic), affecting water availability to tree roots. Water partitioning is also dependent on the physical conditions that control tree rooting depth (e.g., gravel layers that impede root growth), the sources of contributing water, the rate of water drainage, and water residence times within particular storage reservoirs. We employ instrumental climate records alongside oxygen isotopes within tree rings and regional source waters, as well as topographic data and soil depth measurements, to infer the water sources used over several decades by two co-occurring tree species within a riparian floodplain along the Rhône River in France. We find that water partitioning to riparian trees is influenced by annual (wet versus dry years) and seasonal (spring snowmelt versus spring rainfall) fluctuations in climate. This influence depends strongly on local (tree level) conditions including floodplain surface elevation and subsurface gravel layer elevation. The latter represents the upper limit of the phreatic zone and therefore controls access to shallow groundwater. The difference between them, the thickness of the vadose zone, controls total soil moisture retention capacity. These factors thus modulate the climatic influence on tree ring isotopes. Additionally, we identified growth signatures and tree ring isotope changes associated with recent restoration of minimum streamflows in the Rhône, which made new phreatic water sources available to some trees in otherwise dry years.

  8. Impacts of livestock grazing and tree clearing on birds of woodland and riparian habitats.

    PubMed

    Martin, Tara G; McIntyre, S

    2007-04-01

    We investigated the impact of pastoral management on birds in subtropical grassy eucalypt woodland in southeastern Queensland, Australia, where the patterns of land management have made it possible to disentangle the effects of livestock grazing from those of tree clearing. We recorded changes in bird species composition, density, and relative abundance across two woodland habitat types (riparian and nonriparian) and two levels of clearing (wooded and nonwooded) and three levels of livestock grazing (low, moderate, and high) replicated over space (1000 km(2)) and time (2001-2002). We predicted that species that depend on understory vegetation would be most negatively affected by livestock grazing. A Bayesian generalized linear model showed that the level of grazing had the greatest effect when trees were present. When trees were absent, the impact of grazing was overshadowed by the effects of a lack of trees. Over 65% of species responded to different levels of grazing, and the abundance of 42% of species varied markedly with habitat and grazing. The most common response to grazing was high species relative abundance under low levels of grazing (28% of species), species absence at high levels of grazing (20%), and an increase in abundance with increasing grazing (18%). Despite having similar bird assemblages, the effect of grazing was stronger in riparian habitat than in adjacent woodland habitat. Our results suggest that any level of commercial livestock grazing is detrimental to some woodland birds, particularly the understory-dependant species, as predicted. Nevertheless, provided trees are not cleared, a rich and abundant bird fauna can coexist with moderate levels of grazing. Habitats with high levels of grazing, on the other hand, resulted in a species-poor bird assemblage dominated by birds that are increasing in abundance nationally.

  9. Diversity of Riparian Plants among and within Species Shapes River Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jackrel, Sara L.; Wootton, J. Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Organismal diversity among and within species may affect ecosystem function with effects transmitting across ecosystem boundaries. Whether recipient communities adjust their composition, in turn, to maximize their function in response to changes in donor composition at these two scales of diversity is unknown. We use small stream communities that rely on riparian subsidies as a model system. We used leaf pack experiments to ask how variation in plants growing beside streams in the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State, USA affects stream communities via leaf subsidies. Leaves from red alder (Alnus rubra), vine maple (Acer cinereus), bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) were assembled in leaf packs to contrast low versus high diversity, and deployed in streams to compare local versus non-local leaf sources at the among and within species scales. Leaves from individuals within species decomposed at varying rates; most notably thin leaves decomposed rapidly. Among deciduous species, vine maple decomposed most rapidly, harbored the least algal abundance, and supported the greatest diversity of aquatic invertebrates, while bigleaf maple was at the opposite extreme for these three metrics. Recipient communities decomposed leaves from local species rapidly: leaves from early successional plants decomposed rapidly in stream reaches surrounded by early successional forest and leaves from later successional plants decomposed rapidly adjacent to later successional forest. The species diversity of leaves inconsistently affected decomposition, algal abundance and invertebrate metrics. Intraspecific diversity of leaf packs also did not affect decomposition or invertebrate diversity. However, locally sourced alder leaves decomposed more rapidly and harbored greater levels of algae than leaves sourced from conspecifics growing in other areas on the Olympic Peninsula, but did not harbor greater aquatic invertebrate diversity. In contrast to

  10. Nutrient attenuation by a riparian wetland during natural and artificial runoff events.

    PubMed

    Casey, R E; Klaine, S J

    2001-01-01

    Due to chronic nutrient enrichment of surface water, wetlands adjacent to land managed with fertilizer have been studied to determine their role in nutrient dynamics. We sampled golf course runoff and determined the loads of NO3- and PO4(-3) transported during storms and the attenuation of those loads when runoff passed through a riparian wetland. All sampled storm events contained NO3- (2 to 1470 g NO3-N per event) and PO4(-3) (1 to 4156 g PO4-P per event). Extensive nutrient attenuation occurred when water passed through the riparian wetland. In 11 events, NO3- and PO4(-3) attenuation averaged 80 and 74%, respectively. In subsequent experiments, we created a stream of water flowing into the wetland and amended it with NO3-, PO4(-3) and Br-, creating an artificial runoff event. The experiments were conducted using conditions similar to those of natural runoff events. We observed rapid and complete attenuation of PO4(-3) immediately after runoff water infiltrated into the wetland subsurface. No PO4(-3) was observed in discharge from the wetland. Nitrate attenuation occurred following a lag phase of several hours that was probably due to reactivation of denitrifying enzymes. Nitrate attenuation was initially less than 60% but increased to 100% in all experiments. We observed extensive dilution of runoff water in the wetland subsurface indicating mixing with pre-event ground water in the wetland. The results indicated that intermittent inputs of NO3- and PO4(-3) could be successfully attenuated in the wetland on the time scale of natural storm events.

  11. Diversity of Riparian Plants among and within Species Shapes River Communities.

    PubMed

    Jackrel, Sara L; Wootton, J Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Organismal diversity among and within species may affect ecosystem function with effects transmitting across ecosystem boundaries. Whether recipient communities adjust their composition, in turn, to maximize their function in response to changes in donor composition at these two scales of diversity is unknown. We use small stream communities that rely on riparian subsidies as a model system. We used leaf pack experiments to ask how variation in plants growing beside streams in the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State, USA affects stream communities via leaf subsidies. Leaves from red alder (Alnus rubra), vine maple (Acer cinereus), bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) were assembled in leaf packs to contrast low versus high diversity, and deployed in streams to compare local versus non-local leaf sources at the among and within species scales. Leaves from individuals within species decomposed at varying rates; most notably thin leaves decomposed rapidly. Among deciduous species, vine maple decomposed most rapidly, harbored the least algal abundance, and supported the greatest diversity of aquatic invertebrates, while bigleaf maple was at the opposite extreme for these three metrics. Recipient communities decomposed leaves from local species rapidly: leaves from early successional plants decomposed rapidly in stream reaches surrounded by early successional forest and leaves from later successional plants decomposed rapidly adjacent to later successional forest. The species diversity of leaves inconsistently affected decomposition, algal abundance and invertebrate metrics. Intraspecific diversity of leaf packs also did not affect decomposition or invertebrate diversity. However, locally sourced alder leaves decomposed more rapidly and harbored greater levels of algae than leaves sourced from conspecifics growing in other areas on the Olympic Peninsula, but did not harbor greater aquatic invertebrate diversity. In contrast to

  12. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  13. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  14. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  15. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  16. Effects of experimental floods on riparian and aquatic ecosystems: Bill Williams River, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafroth, P. B.; Andersen, D. C.; Wilcox, A. C.; Kui, L.; Stella, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Development of flow prescriptions for environmental purposes along rivers is relatively common, but implementation of these 'environmental flows' occurs infrequently. Implementation is critical for testing hypotheses relating flow regime to biotic response, which ultimately can inform adaptive flow management. We describe the development of flow prescriptions and evaluate responses of riparian vegetation, beaver dams, and associated aquatic habitat to experimental floods and intervening base flows associated with an environmental flow program on the Bill Williams River (BWR), in semiarid Arizona. First, we assessed effects of flow releases between 1993 and 2009 designed to favor the establishment and maintenance of native riparian trees (Populus and Salix) and disfavor an invasive, nonnative shrub (Tamarix spp.) downstream of Alamo Dam on the BWR. Our data are multi-scaled and include a several-decade assessment of changes to major vegetation types based on a time series of aerial photography, an assessment of species composition and abundance sampled in permanent vegetation quadrats, and targeted seedling surveys following experimental floods. Between 1993 and 2009, we observed significant increases in Populus and Salix forests and essentially no change in Tamarix. Experimental floods in 2006 and 2007 resulted in higher mortality of Tamarix seedlings than Salix. These results illustrate the potential for managing streamflow to influence riparian vegetation dynamics, including management of nonnative species. Second, we examined the role of beaver as ecosystem engineers in the BWR and linkages to flow releases between 2004 and 2013. Beaver convert lotic stream habitat to lentic through dam construction and maintenance during low flow periods, and the process is reversed when a flood or other event causes dam failure. We estimated the extent of lotic and beaver-created lentic (beaver pond) habitat along the BWR and related the likelihood of damage or destruction of

  17. Agricultural conservation planning framework: 2. Classification of riparian buffer design-types with application to assess and map stream corridors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A watershed’s riparian corridor presents opportunities to stabilize streambanks, intercept runoff, and influence shallow groundwater with riparian buffers. This paper presents a system to classify these riparian opportunities and apply it towards riparian management planning in HUC12 watersheds. Hig...

  18. Woody riparian vegetation response to different alluvial water table regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shafroth, P.B.; Stromberg, J.C.; Patten, D.T.

    2000-01-01

    Woody riparian vegetation in western North American riparian ecosystems is commonly dependent on alluvial groundwater. Various natural and anthropogenic mechanisms can cause groundwater declines that stress riparian vegetation, but little quantitative information exists on the nature of plant response to different magnitudes, rates, and durations of groundwater decline. We observed groundwater dynamics and the response of Populus Fremontii, Salix gooddingii, and Tamarix ramosissima saplings at 3 sites between 1995 and 1997 along the Bill Williams River, Arizona. At a site where the lowest observed groundwater level in 1996 (-1.97 m) was 1.11 m lower than in 1995 (-0.86 m), 92-100% of Populus and Salix saplings died, whereas 0-13% of the Tamarix stems died. A site with greater absolute water table depths in 1996 (-2.55 m), but less change from the 1995 condition (0.55 m), showed less Populus and Salix mortality and increased basal area. Excavations of sapling roots suggest that root distribution is related to groundwater history. Therefore, a decline in water table relative to the condition under which roots developed may strand plant roots where they cannot obtain sufficient moisture. Plant response is likely mediated by other factors such as soil texture and stratigraphy, availability of precipitation-derived soil moisture, and physiological and morphological adaptations to water stress, and tree age. An understanding of the relationships between water table declines and plant response may enable land and water managers to avoid activities that are likely to stress desirable riparian vegetation.

  19. EFFECTS OF GEOMORPHIC PROCESSES AND HYDROLOGIC REGIMES ON RIPARIAN VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, the relationships among riparian vegetation and geomorphic and hydrologic processes in central Great Basin watersheds are evaluated over a range of scales. These relationships are examined through a series of case studies that have been conducted by the Great Ba...

  20. Quantifying Understory Transpiration in a Semiarid Riparian Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, R. R.; Scott, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    One of the most challenging components to estimate when determining water budgets in semiarid basins is riparian evapotranspiration (ET). Much research has been conducted upon riparian overstory vegetation in these areas; however understory vegetation water use has been ignored due to measurement difficulties and the belief that its quantity is negligible. To better understand the magnitude of understory water use in a semiarid riparian ecosystem, we measured whole plant transpiration of the dominant understory shrub, seep willow (Baccharis salicifolia), along a perennial reach of the San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona. . Shrub transpiration was monitored using the heat balance sap flow technique and was compared under two environmental conditions: a shrub patch located in a more open environment with decreased overstory canopy cover, and a more closed shrub patch situated more directly underneath a cottonwood (Populus fremontii) forest canopy. Despite the differences in atmospheric forcing, stand-level transpiration at both sites was similar and indicated that transpiration was rarely demand-limited. Growing season transpiration totals for seep willow were much greater than precipitation and of comparable magnitude to the overstory cottonwood transpiration. These results suggest that understory water use can be an important component of a riparian water budget, especially in regions like the western U.S. where evaporative demand is often high.

  1. EVALUATION OF METRIC PRECISION FOR A RIPARIAN FOREST SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper evaluates the performance of a protocol to monitor riparian forests in western Oregon based on the quality of the data obtained from a recent field survey. Precision and accuracy are the criteria used to determine the quality of 19 field metrics. The field survey con...

  2. Introduction to the Featured Collection on Riparian Ecosystems & Buffers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian ecosystems, located at the interface of terrestrial and aquatic systems, are often given special attention by scientists for their high biodiversity and biological activity (Naiman et al. 1993, Naiman and Decamps 1997) and significant role in nutrient and energy flux (Mc...

  3. A COMPARISON OF APPROACHES TO PRIORITIZING SITES FOR RIPARIAN RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study compares the results of Olson and Harris (1997) and Russell et al.(1997)in their work to prioritize sites for riparian restoration in the San Luis Rey River watershed. Olson and Harris defined reaches of the mainstem and evaluated the relative potential for restoration...

  4. Distribution of cattle grazing in a northeastern Oregon riparian pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock grazing of a northeastern Oregon riparian pasture was monitored using high-frequency GPS tracking of cattle and high-resolution aerial photography. Tracking collars recorded positions, velocity, date, and time at 1-sec intervals. Areas where animals rested and moved were identified and re...

  5. AN INDICATOR OF POTENTIAL STREAM WOOD CONTRIBUTION FOR RIPARIAN FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In northwestern Oregon a key function of riparian forests is to provide wood to the stream network. This function is a prominent feature of Federal and State forest practices in the region. Thus, defining indicators which are associated with this function are important for desi...

  6. Riparian Sediment Delivery Ratio: Stiff Diagrams and Artifical Neural Networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various methods are used to estimate sediment transport through riparian buffers and grass jilters with the sediment delivery ratio having been the most widely applied. The U.S. Forest Service developed a sediment delivery ratio using the stiff diagram and a logistic curve to int...

  7. STREAM NETWORK EXPANSION: A RIPARIAN WATER QUALITY FACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about how active stream network expansion during rainstorms influences the ability of riparian buffers to improve water quality. We used aerial photographs to quantify stream network expansion during the wet winter season in five agricultural watersheds in western...

  8. RIPARIAN FOREST INDICATORS OF POTENTIAL FUTURE STREAM CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large wood in streams can play an extraordinarily important role in influencing the physical structure of streams and in providing habitat for aquatic organisms. Since wood is continually lost from streams, predicting the future input of wood to streams from riparian forests is c...

  9. Bridging Disciplines with the Riparian Area Management Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cockerill, Kristan M.; Titus, Jonathan H.

    2004-01-01

    Faculty at Columbia University's Earth Semester created the interdisciplinary Riparian Area Management Project to help students integrate information and skills from life sciences, geosciences, social sciences, and humanities focused coursework. Structured as a "consulting" contract, students were required to make a policy recommendation…

  10. Riparian willow restoration at Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auble, G.T.; Roelle, J. E.; TImberman, A.

    2006-01-01

    Riparian willow communities along the Illinois River at Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge in North Park near Walden, Colorado, provide important habitat for a number of wildlife species, including neotropical migratory birds. Existing stands in the northern (downstream) portion of the refuge are sparse and discontinuous (Photo 1) compared to upstream portions of the Illinois River and the parallel Michigan River.

  11. LINKING WATERFOWL WITH CONTAMINANT SPECIATION IN RIPARIAN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 38, Linking Waterfowl with Contaminant Speciation in Riparian Soils, implemented and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U...

  12. Monitoring vegetation water uptake in a semiarid riparian corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J.; Ochoa, C. G.; Leonard, J.

    2015-12-01

    With a changing global climate and growing demand for water throughout the world, responsible and sustainable land and water resource management practices are becoming increasingly important. Accounting for the amount of water used by riparian vegetation is a critical element for better managing water resources in arid and semiarid environments. The objective of this study was to determine water uptake by selected riparian vegetative species in a semiarid riparian corridor in North-Central Oregon. Exo-skin sap flow sensors (Dynamax, Houston, TX, U.S.A.) were used to measure sap flux in red alder (Alnus rubra) trees, the dominant overstory vegetation at the field site. Xylem sap flow data was collected from selected trees at the field site and in a greenhouse setting. Transpiration rates were determined based on an energy balance method, which makes it possible to estimate the mass flow of sap by measuring the velocity of electrical heat pulses through the plant stem. Preliminary field results indicate that red alder tree branches of about 1 inch diameter transpire between 2 and 6 kg of water/day. Higher transpiration rates of up to 7.3 kg of water/day were observed under greenhouse conditions. Streamflow and stream water temperature, vegetation characteristics, and meteorological data were analyzed in conjunction with transpiration data. Results of this study provide insight on riparian vegetation water consumption in water scarce ecosystems. This study is part of an overarching project focused on climate-vegetation interactions and ecohydrologic processes in arid and semiarid landscapes.

  13. An Assessment of the Vulnerability of Native Phreatophytes to Replacement by Invasive Species in a Mid-Continent Riparian Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, J. A.; Bauer, J. P.; Keller, J.; Butler, J. J.; Kluitenberg, G. J.; Whittemore, D. O.; Jin, W.; Loheide, S. P.

    2005-12-01

    In many areas of the Great Plains region of the United States, non-native phreatophytes, particularly the salt cedar (Tamarix spp.) and the Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia L.), have become the dominant riparian-zone vegetation. The factors that contribute to the establishment of invasive species are under investigation at the Larned Research Site (LRS), located in the riparian corridor of the Arkansas River in south-central Kansas. The riparian zone at the LRS consists of native vegetation; the major phreatophytes at the site are the cottonwood (Populus deltoids), willow (Salix spp.), and mulberry (Morus spp.). The LRS has been the focus of extensive research on stream-aquifer interactions, so considerable data have been collected on the shallow groundwater flow system underlying the area. On-site instrumentation includes 18 wells equipped for continuous water-level monitoring, eight neutron-probe access tubes for observation of soil moisture, and a weather station. Inventories of all trees larger than 0.08 m in diameter at breast height (1266 trunks) were conducted in a portion of the LRS in the summers of 2002 and 2005, and sapflow data were collected in the summers of 2003 and 2004. Water-level data from mid-August 2002 to the present show diurnal fluctuations during the growing season superimposed on a general water-level decline. These diurnal fluctuations are a diagnostic indicator of phreatophyte activity, while the declining water levels can be attributed to regional irrigation pumping during periods of little recharge from streamflow. Estimates of groundwater consumption by phreatophytes, obtained using the approach of White (1932), show a year-to-year decrease in water use, associated with a falling water table; however, potential evapotranspiration values calculated from meteorological data did not decrease significantly. Groundwater consumption estimates using the White method are consistent with sapflow and soil-moisture data. In addition

  14. Reconciling Environmental and Flood Control Goals on an Arid-Zone River: Case Study of the Limitrophe Region of the Lower Colorado River in the United States and Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Edward P.; Hucklebridge, Kate; Hinojosa-Huerta, Osvel; Nagler, Pamela L.; Pitt, Jennifer

    2008-03-01

    Arid zone rivers have highly variable flow rates, and flood control projects are needed to protect adjacent property from flood damage. On the other hand, riparian corridors provide important wildlife habitat, especially for birds, and riparian vegetation is adapted to the natural variability in flows on these rivers. While environmental and flood control goals might appear to be at odds, we show that both goals can be accommodated in the Limitrophe Region (the shared border between the United States and Mexico) on the Lower Colorado River. In 1999, the International Boundary and Water Commission proposed a routine maintenance project to clear vegetation and create a pilot channel within the Limitrophe Region to improve flow capacity and delineate the border. In 2000, however, Minute 306 to the international water treaty was adopted, which calls for consideration of environmental effects of IBWC actions. We conducted vegetation and bird surveys within the Limitrophe and found that this river segment is unusually rich in native cottonwood and willow trees, marsh habitat, and resident and migratory birds compared to flow-regulated segments of river. A flood-frequency analysis showed that the existing levee system can easily contain a 100 year flood even if vegetation is not removed, and the existing braided channel system has greater carrying capacity than the proposed pilot channel.

  15. Reconciling environmental and flood control goals on an arid-zone river: case study of the limitrophe region of the lower colorado river in the United States and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Edward P; Hucklebridge, Kate; Hinojosa-Huerta, Osvel; Nagler, Pamela L; Pitt, Jennifer

    2008-03-01

    Arid zone rivers have highly variable flow rates, and flood control projects are needed to protect adjacent property from flood damage. On the other hand, riparian corridors provide important wildlife habitat, especially for birds, and riparian vegetation is adapted to the natural variability in flows on these rivers. While environmental and flood control goals might appear to be at odds, we show that both goals can be accommodated in the Limitrophe Region (the shared border between the United States and Mexico) on the Lower Colorado River. In 1999, the International Boundary and Water Commission proposed a routine maintenance project to clear vegetation and create a pilot channel within the Limitrophe Region to improve flow capacity and delineate the border. In 2000, however, Minute 306 to the international water treaty was adopted, which calls for consideration of environmental effects of IBWC actions. We conducted vegetation and bird surveys within the Limitrophe and found that this river segment is unusually rich in native cottonwood and willow trees, marsh habitat, and resident and migratory birds compared to flow-regulated segments of river. A flood-frequency analysis showed that the existing levee system can easily contain a 100 year flood even if vegetation is not removed, and the existing braided channel system has greater carrying capacity than the proposed pilot channel.

  16. Riparian and Associated Habitat Characteristics Related to Nutrient Concentrations and Biological Responses of Small Streams in Selected Agricultural Areas, United States, 2003-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, Ronald B.; Munn, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    sampled sites. The habitat characteristics sampled within the five study units were compared statistically. Bivariate correlations between riparian habitat variables and either nutrient-chemistry or biological-response variables were examined for all sites combined, and for sites within each study area. Nutrient concentrations were correlated with the extent of riparian cropland. For nitrogen species, these correlations were more frequently at the basin scale, whereas for phosphorus, they were about equally frequent at the segment and basin scales. Basin-level extents of riparian cropland and reach-level bank vegetative cover were correlated strongly with both total nitrogen and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) among multiple study areas, reflecting the importance of agricultural land-management and conservation practices for reducing nitrogen delivery from near-stream sources. When sites lacking segment-level wetlands were excluded, the negative correlation of riparian wetland extent with DIN among 49 sites was strong at the reach and segment levels. Riparian wetland vegetation thus may be removing dissolved nutrients from soil water and shallow groundwater passing through riparian zones. Other habitat variables that correlated strongly with nitrogen and phosphorus species included suspended sediment, light availability, and antecedent water temperature. Chlorophyll concentrations in seston were positively correlated with phosphorus concentrations for all sites combined. Benthic chlorophyll was correlated strongly with nutrient concentrations in only the Delmarva study area and only in fine-grained habitats. Current velocity or hydraulic scour could explain correlation patterns for benthic chlorophyll among Georgia sites, whereas chlorophyll in seston was correlated with antecedent water temperature among Washington and Delmarva sites. The lack of any consistent correlation pattern between habitat characteristics and organic material density (ash-free dry mass)

  17. Modeling spatial surface energy fluxes of agricultural and riparian vegetation using remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geli, Hatim Mohammed Eisa

    Modeling of surface energy fluxes and evapotranspiration (ET ) requires the understanding of the interaction between land and atmosphere as well as the appropriate representation of the associated spatial and temporal variability and heterogeneity. This dissertation provides new methodology showing how to rationally and properly incorporate surface features characteristics/properties, including the leaf area index, fraction of cover, vegetation height, and temperature, using different representations as well as identify the related effects on energy balance flux estimates including ET. The main research objectives were addressed in Chapters 2 through 4 with each presented in a separate paper format with Chapter 1 presenting an introduction and Chapter 5 providing summary and recommendations. Chapter 2 discusses a new approach of incorporating temporal and spatial variability of surface features. We coupled a remote sensing-based energy balance model with a traditional water balance method to provide improved estimates of ET. This approach was tested over rainfed agricultural fields ˜ 10 km by 30 km in Ames, Iowa. Before coupling, we modified the water balance method by incorporating a remote sensing-based estimate for one of its parameters to ameliorate its performance on a spatial basis. Promising results were obtained with indications of improved estimates of ET and soil moisture in the root zone. The effects of surface features heterogeneity on measurements of turbulence were investigated in Chapter 3. Scintillometer-based measurements/estimates of sensible heat flux (H) were obtained over the riparian zone of the Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), California. Surface roughness including canopy height (hc), roughness length, and zero-plane displacement height were incorporated in different ways, to improve estimates of H. High resolution, 1-m maps of ground surface digital elevation model and canopy height, hc, were derived from airborne LiDAR sensor data

  18. Prioritising the placement of riparian vegetation to reduce flood risk and end-of-catchment sediment yields: Important considerations in hydrologically-variable regions.

    PubMed

    Croke, Jacky; Thompson, Chris; Fryirs, Kirstie

    2017-04-01

    In perennial stream settings, there is abundant literature confirming that riparian vegetation affects flood hydrology by attenuating the flood wave, enhancing deposition and reducing bank erosion. In contrast, relatively little is known about the effectiveness of riparian vegetation during floods in hydrologically-variable regions. The dominant channel form in these settings is often referred to as a 'macrochannel' or compound channel-in-channel which displays multiple inundation surfaces where it is often difficult to identify the active channel bank and bank top. This study uses the inundation pattern of recent flood events in the Lockyer Valley of South East Queensland (SEQ), Australia to present a framework which specifically considers the interaction between inundation frequency and trapping potential on a range of inundation surfaces. Using hydrological modelling and a consistent definition of floodplains and within-channel features, it outlines five key priority areas for the placement of riparian vegetation to alleviate common flood problems within the catchment. The highest priority for the placement of riparian vegetation to ameliorate the effects of small-moderate floods is on within-channel benches. For out-of-macrochannel flows, riparian vegetation is most effective on genetic floodplains which occupy the largest spatial extent within the valley. In particular, it identifies the need for, and benefits of, revegetation in spill out zones (SOZ) which occur where upstream channel capacity is larger and flow is funnelled at high velocity onto the floodplain downstream. This study highlights the importance of understanding the key geomorphic processes occurring within a catchment and developing effective catchment management plans to suit these conditions.

  19. Recurrent Water Level Fluctuation Alleviates the Effects of Submergence Stress on the Invasive Riparian Plant Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haijie; Wang, Renqing; Wang, Xiao; Du, Ning; Ge, Xiuli; Du, Yuanda; Liu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent water level fluctuation and submergence of plants are common in riparian zones. Our study objectives were to test the independent and interactive effects of submergence level and fluctuation frequency on a globally important riparian invasive plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides. To this end, we conducted a greenhouse experiment, in which ramets of the plants, obtained from a wetla