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Sample records for adjacent stromal cells

  1. Mitochondria "fuel" breast cancer metabolism: fifteen markers of mitochondrial biogenesis label epithelial cancer cells, but are excluded from adjacent stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sotgia, Federica; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Salem, Ahmed F; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Lamb, Rebecca; Sneddon, Sharon; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-12-01

    Here, we present new genetic and morphological evidence that human tumors consist of two distinct metabolic compartments. First, re-analysis of genome-wide transcriptional profiling data revealed that > 95 gene transcripts associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation were significantly elevated in human breast cancer cells, as compared with adjacent stromal tissue. Remarkably, nearly 40 of these upregulated gene transcripts were mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs), functionally associated with mitochondrial translation of protein components of the OXPHOS complex. Second, during validation by immunohistochemistry, we observed that antibodies directed against 15 markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation (AKAP1, GOLPH3, GOLPH3L, MCT1, MRPL40, MRPS7, MRPS15, MRPS22, NRF1, NRF2, PGC1-α, POLRMT, TFAM, TIMM9 and TOMM70A) selectively labeled epithelial breast cancer cells. These same mitochondrial markers were largely absent or excluded from adjacent tumor stromal cells. Finally, markers of mitochondrial lipid synthesis (GOLPH3) and mitochondrial translation (POLRMT) were associated with poor clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. Thus, we conclude that human breast cancers contain two distinct metabolic compartments-a glycolytic tumor stroma, which surrounds oxidative epithelial cancer cells-that are mitochondria-rich. The co-existence of these two compartments is indicative of metabolic symbiosis between epithelial cancer cells and their surrounding stroma. As such, epithelial breast cancer cells should be viewed as predatory metabolic "parasites," which undergo anabolic reprogramming to amplify their mitochondrial "power." This notion is consistent with the observation that the anti-malarial agent chloroquine may be an effective anticancer agent. New anticancer therapies should be developed to target mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation in human cancer cells.

  2. Mitochondria “fuel” breast cancer metabolism: Fifteen markers of mitochondrial biogenesis label epithelial cancer cells, but are excluded from adjacent stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Sotgia, Federica; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Salem, Ahmed F.; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Lamb, Rebecca; Sneddon, Sharon; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present new genetic and morphological evidence that human tumors consist of two distinct metabolic compartments. First, re-analysis of genome-wide transcriptional profiling data revealed that > 95 gene transcripts associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation were significantly elevated in human breast cancer cells, as compared with adjacent stromal tissue. Remarkably, nearly 40 of these upregulated gene transcripts were mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs), functionally associated with mitochondrial translation of protein components of the OXPHOS complex. Second, during validation by immunohistochemistry, we observed that antibodies directed against 15 markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation (AKAP1, GOLPH3, GOLPH3L, MCT1, MRPL40, MRPS7, MRPS15, MRPS22, NRF1, NRF2, PGC1-α, POLRMT, TFAM, TIMM9 and TOMM70A) selectively labeled epithelial breast cancer cells. These same mitochondrial markers were largely absent or excluded from adjacent tumor stromal cells. Finally, markers of mitochondrial lipid synthesis (GOLPH3) and mitochondrial translation (POLRMT) were associated with poor clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. Thus, we conclude that human breast cancers contain two distinct metabolic compartments—a glycolytic tumor stroma, which surrounds oxidative epithelial cancer cells—that are mitochondria-rich. The co-existence of these two compartments is indicative of metabolic symbiosis between epithelial cancer cells and their surrounding stroma. As such, epithelial breast cancer cells should be viewed as predatory metabolic “parasites,” which undergo anabolic reprogramming to amplify their mitochondrial “power.” This notion is consistent with the observation that the anti-malarial agent chloroquine may be an effective anticancer agent. New anticancer therapies should be developed to target mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation in human cancer cells. PMID

  3. Mesenchymal stromal cell cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Renzi, Sabrina; Lombardo, Tina; Dotti, Silvia; Dessì, Sara S; De Blasio, Pasquale; Ferrari, Maura

    2012-06-01

    The advent of stem cells and stem cell-based therapies for specific diseases requires particular knowledge of laboratory procedures, which not only guarantee the continuous production of cells, but also provide them an identity and integrity as close as possible to their origin. Their cryopreservation at temperatures below -80°C and typically below -140°C is of paramount importance. This target can be achieved by incorporating high molar concentrations of cryoprotectant mixtures that preserve cells from deleterious ice crystal formation. Usually, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and animal proteins are used as protectant reagents, but unexpected changes in stem cell fate and downstream toxicity effects have been reported, limiting their wide use in clinical settings. In scientific reviews, there are not much data regarding viability of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) after the freezing/thawing process. During our routine analysis, a poor resistance to cryopreservation of these cells was observed, as well as their weak ability to replicate. This is an important point in the study of MSCs; moreover, it represents a limit for preservation and long-term storage. For this reason, MSCs isolated from equine, ovine, and rodent bone marrow and equine adipose tissue were compared using different cryopreservation solutions for this study of vitality. Our findings showed the best results regarding cell viability using a solution of fetal bovine serum with addition of 10% DMSO. In particular, we noted an increase in survival of equine bone marrow MSCs. This parameter has been evaluated by Trypan blue staining at fixed times (0, 24, and 48 hours post-thaw). This result highlights the fact that equine bone marrow MSCs are the frailest we analyzed. Therefore, it could be useful to delve further into this topic in order to improve the storage possibility for these cells and their potential use in cell-based therapies.

  4. Know thy neighbor: stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.; Hein, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    Although the stroma within carcinogenic lesions is known to be supportive and responsive to tumors, new data increasingly show that the stroma also has a more active, oncogenic role in tumorigenesis. Stromal cells and their products can transform adjacent tissues in the absence of pre-existing tumor cells by inciting phenotypic and genomic changes in the epithelial cells. The oncogenic action of distinctive stromal components has been demonstrated through a variety of approaches, which provide clues about the cellular pathways involved.

  5. Sonic hedgehog signals to multiple prostate stromal stem cells that replenish distinct stromal subtypes during regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Ching; Levine, Charles M.; Zahid, Sarwar; Wilson, E. Lynette; Joyner, Alexandra L.

    2013-01-01

    The adult mouse prostate has a seemingly endless capacity for regeneration, and sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling has been implicated in this stem cell-driven process. However, it is not clear whether SHH acts on the epithelium or stromal cells that secrete factors required for epithelial expansion. Because little is known about stromal stem cells compared with their epithelial counterparts, we used in vivo mouse genetics tools to characterize four prostate stromal subtypes and their stem cells. Using knockin reporter alleles, we uncovered that SHH signals from prostate basal epithelial cells to adjacent stromal cells. Furthermore, the SHH target gene Gli1 is preferentially expressed in subepithelial fibroblast-like cells, one of four prostate stromal subtypes and the subtype closest to the epithelial source of SHH. Using Genetic Inducible Fate Mapping to mark adult Gli1- or Smooth muscle actin-expressing cells and follow their fate during regeneration, we uncovered that Gli1-expressing cells exhibit long-term self-renewal capacity during multiple rounds of androgen-mediated regeneration after castration-induced involution, and depleted smooth muscle cells are mainly replenished by preexisting smooth muscle cells. Based on our Genetic Inducible Fate Mapping studies, we propose a model where SHH signals to multiple stromal stem cells, which are largely unipotent in vivo. PMID:24218555

  6. Stromal influences on breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    van Roozendaal, C. E.; van Ooijen, B.; Klijn, J. G.; Claassen, C.; Eggermont, A. M.; Henzen-Logmans, S. C.; Foekens, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Paracrine influences from fibroblasts derived from different sources of breast tissue on epithelial breast cancer cell growth in vitro were investigated. Medium conditioned (CM) by fibroblasts derived from tumours, adjacent normal breast tissue, and normal breast tissue obtained from reduction mammoplasty or from skin tissue significantly stimulated the growth of the steroid-receptor positive cell lines MCF-7 and ZR 75.1. The proliferation index (PI) on MCF-7 cells with CM from fibroblasts derived from breast tumour tissue was significantly higher than that obtained with fibroblasts derived from adjacent normal breast tissue (2p less than 0.05, n = 8). The PI obtained with CM from normal fibroblast cultures from reduction mammoplasty tissue, like normal tissue adjacent to the tumour, fell in the lower range of values. Skin fibroblast, like tumour tissue derived fibroblast, CM caused a high range PI. MDA-MB-231 and Evsa-T, two steroid-receptor negative cell lines, showed only a minor growth stimulatory responses with some of the fibroblast CM's. Evsa-T was occasionally inhibited by CM's. In conclusion, stromal factors play a role in the growth regulation of human breast cancer cells. The effects on cancer cell growth are, however, varying depending on the source of the stroma and the characteristics of the epithelial tumour cells. PMID:1733444

  7. Stromal Cell Subsets Directing Neonatal Spleen Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jonathan K. H.; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Development of lymphoid tissue is determined by interactions between stromal lymphoid tissue organiser (LTo) and hematopoietic lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. A failure for LTo to receive appropriate activating signals during embryogenesis through lymphotoxin engagement leads to a complete cessation of lymph node (LN) and Peyer’s patch development, identifying LTo as a key stromal population for lymphoid tissue organogenesis. However, little is known about the equivalent stromal cells that induce spleen development. Here, by dissociating neonatal murine spleen stromal tissue for re-aggregation and transplant into adult mouse recipients, we have identified a MAdCAM-1+CD31+CD201+ spleen stromal organizer cell-type critical for new tissue formation. This finding provides an insight into the regulation of post-natal spleen tissue organogenesis, and could be exploited in the development of spleen regenerative therapies. PMID:28067323

  8. Hepatic immune regulation by stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Schildberg, Frank A; Sharpe, Arlene H; Turley, Shannon J

    2015-02-01

    A metabolic organ, the liver also has a central role in tolerance induction. Stromal cells lining the hepatic sinusoids, such as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), are the first liver cells to encounter gut-derived and systemic antigens, thereby shaping local and systemic tolerance. Recent studies have demonstrated that stromal cells can modulate immune responses by antigen-dependent and independent mechanisms. Stromal cells interfere with the function of other antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and induce non-responsive T cells as well as regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The immunosuppressive microenvironment thus created provides a means to protect the liver from tissue damage. Such tolerized surroundings, however, can be exploited by certain pathogens, promoting persistent liver infections.

  9. Schwann cells induce neuronal differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Mercedes; Vaquero, Jesús; Oya, Santiago; Miguel, Miriam

    2005-04-04

    Bone marrow stromal cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, fat and muscle. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells have been shown to have the capacity to differentiate into neurons under specific experimental conditions, using chemical factors. We now describe how bone marrow stromal cells can be induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells when they are co-cultured with Schwann cells. When compared with chemical differentiation, expression of neuronal differentiation markers begins later, but one week after beginning co-culture, most bone marrow stromal cells showed a typical neuronal morphology. Our present findings support the transdifferentiation of bone marrow stromal cells, and the potential utility of these cells for the treatment of degenerative and acquired disorders of the nervous system.

  10. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C.; Miller, Crispin J.; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRASG12D) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRASG12D signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRASG12D engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRASG12D. Consequently, reciprocal KRASG12D produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRASG12D alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. Video Abstract PMID:27087446

  11. Crosstalk between stromal cells and cancer cells in pancreatic cancer: New insights into stromal biology.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Han-Xiang; Zhou, Bin; Cheng, Yu-Gang; Xu, Jian-Wei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Guang-Yong; Hu, San-Yuan

    2017-04-28

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. Increasing evidence has confirmed the pivotal role of stromal components in the regulation of carcinogenesis, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance in PC. Interaction between neoplastic cells and stromal cells builds a specific microenvironment, which further modulates the malignant properties of cancer cells. Instead of being a "passive bystander", stroma may play a role as a "partner in crime" in PC. However, the role of stromal components in PC is complex and requires further investigation. In this article, we review recent advances regarding the regulatory roles and mechanisms of stroma biology, especially the cellular components such as pancreatic stellate cells, macrophages, neutrophils, adipocytes, epithelial cells, pericytes, mast cells, and lymphocytes, in PC. Crosstalk between stromal cells and cancer cells is thoroughly investigated. We also review the prognostic value and molecular therapeutic targets of stroma in PC. This review may help us further understand the molecular mechanisms of stromal biology and its role in PC development and therapeutic resistance. Moreover, targeting stroma components may provide new therapeutic strategies for this stubborn disease.

  12. Origin of hemopoietic stromal progenitor cells in chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, J.L.; Drize, N.J.; Gurevitch, O.A.; Samoylova, R.S.

    1985-12-01

    Intravenously injected bone marrow cells do not participate in the regeneration of hemopoietic stromal progenitors in irradiated mice, nor in the curetted parts of the recipient's marrow. The hemopoietic stromal progenitors in allogeneic chimeras are of recipient origin. The adherent cell layer (ACL) of long-term cultures of allogeneic chimera bone marrow contains only recipient hemopoietic stromal progenitors. However, in ectopic hemopoietic foci produced by marrow implantation under the renal capsule and repopulated by the recipient hemopoietic cells after irradiation and reconstitution by syngeneic hemopoietic cells, the stromal progenitors were of implant donor origin, as were stromal progenitors of the ACL in long-term cultures of hemopoietic cells from ectopic foci. Our results confirm that the stromal and hemopoietic progenitors differ in origin and that hemopoietic stromal progenitors are not transplantable by the intravenous route in mice.

  13. Stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of studies of neoplastic transformation have focused attention on events that occur within transformed cells. These cell autonomous events result in the disruption of molecular pathways that regulate basic activities of the cells such as proliferation, death, movement and genomic integrity. Other studies have addressed the microenvironment of tumor cells and documented its importance in supporting tumor progression. Recent work has begun to expand on these initial studies of tumor microenvironment and now provide novel insights into the possible initiation and progression of malignant cells. This review will address the transforming effect of stromal cells on epithelial components. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cells for treatment of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Swart, J F; Wulffraat, N M

    2014-08-01

    Patients with refractory inflammatory arthritis can still respond favourable to autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, this treatment has a high morbidity and even 5% mortality. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), a subset of the non-haematopoietic stromal cells obtained from bone marrow, were found to have a strong immunosuppressive effect. MSC treatment is explored in many diseases like diabetes, SLE, MS and RA. This review covers all relevant literature regarding MSC treatment of inflammatory arthritis (RA and JIA). This review contains data of in vitro studies, animal studies and clinical studies. The following subjects will be discussed in detail: properties of MSC, presence of MSC in the joint, intra-articular versus intravenous route, autologous versus allogeneic, ideal source of MSC, distribution, transdifferentiation, engraftment, rejection, efficacy and toxicology. After reading this review the reader will be totally updated in this quickly evolving field of MSC therapy.

  15. Gastrointestinal pacemaker cell tumor (GIPACT): gastrointestinal stromal tumors show phenotypic characteristics of the interstitial cells of Cajal.

    PubMed Central

    Kindblom, L. G.; Remotti, H. E.; Aldenborg, F.; Meis-Kindblom, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) form a complex cell network within the gastrointestinal tract wall where they function as a pacemaker system. Expression of the kit proto-oncogene is essential for the development of this system. The aim of our study was to examine the hypothesis that gastrointestinal stromal tumors differentiate toward cells with an ICC phenotype. Ultrastructurally, 58 stromal tumors were characterized and found to share many features with ICC. Seventy-eight stromal tumors were immunophenotyped, particularly with regard to the kit receptor. All 78 tumors revealed strong, homogeneous immunoreactivity for the kit receptor as did ICC of adjacent and control gastrointestinal walls. Focal hyperplasia and hypertrophy of kit receptor positive cells were also observed in the gastrointestinal wall adjacent to the tumors. CD34 immunoreactivity observed in interstitial cells surrounding Auerbach's ganglia suggests that a subpopulation of ICC is CD34 positive and may explain why 56 of 78 stromal tumors were CD34 positive. Thirty control tumors, including gastrointestinal leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, were all negative for the kit receptor. We conclude that gastrointestinal stromal tumors show striking morphological and immunophenotypic similarities with ICC and that they may originate from stem cells that differentiate toward a pacemaker cell phenotype. We propose that the noncommittal name "gastrointestinal stromal tumor" be replaced by gastrointestinal pacemaker cell tumor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:9588894

  16. Heterogeneity of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells: from stromal cells to stem cells and vice versa.

    PubMed

    Dominici, Massimo; Paolucci, Paolo; Conte, Pierfranco; Horwitz, Edwin M

    2009-05-15

    Discovered more than 40 years ago, the biological features of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) were progressively compared first with hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and, more recently, with embryonic stem cells (ESC). Although these comparisons have been crucial in helping to clarify their nature, there is now a robust amount of data indicating that MSC in vitro represent an independent and heterogeneous group of progenitors with distinct self-renewal properties and established differentiation potentials. However, research developments both in humans and animals have progressively revealed the limits that MSC may face in vivo. To recognize these issues and challenge MSC stemness may seem to be a step backward. Nevertheless, it might also represent the beginning of a phase in which the introduction of novel preclinical approaches could provide better characterization and standardization of the in vivo factors influencing cell engraftment and survival, allowing a more successful impact of mesenchymal progenitors in several clinical settings.

  17. Tissue Digestion for Stromal Cell and Leukocyte Isolation.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Saba; Campos, Joana; Steinthal, Nathalie; Barone, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Tissue mechanical disruption is often not sufficient to disrupt cell-to-cell interactions; this is particularly relevant for stromal cells that are embedded within the extracellular matrix. For this reason, different enzyme combinations have been described to enable the isolation of single-cell populations, particularly stromal cells. This chapter aims to describe different methods used for enzymatic digestion of stromal cell and leukocyte populations from secondary and tertiary lymphoid organs. Collagenase D and P and collagenase D and dispase protocols provide a good yield of stromal cells, while a collagenase dispase-only protocol should be used if the main aim of the technique is to retrieve leukocyte populations. However, for isolation of both stroma and leukocyte populations the collagenase D and P protocol would provide the best results. Protocols for these techniques and illustrative results from flow cytometry analysis can be found in this chapter.

  18. Mesenchymal stromal cells in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Geyh, Stefanie; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by hematopoietic insufficiency. As MDS and AML are considered to originate from genetic and molecular defects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), the main focus of research in this field has focused on the characterization of these cells. Recently, the contribution of BM microenvironment to the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies, in particular MDS and AML has gained more interest. This is based on a better understanding of its physiological role in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Additionally, it was demonstrated as a ‘proof of principle’ that genetic disruption of cells of the mesenchymal or osteoblastic lineage can induce MDS, MPS or AML in mice. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the contribution of the BM microenvironment, in particular mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to the pathogenesis of AML and MDS. Furthermore, potential models integrating the BM microenvironment into the pathophysiology of these myeloid disorders are discussed. Finally, strategies to therapeutically exploit this knowledge and to interfere with the crosstalk between clonal hematopoietic cells and altered stem cell niches are introduced. PMID:28090484

  19. Effect of hydrocortisone on multipotent human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Shipunova, N N; Petinati, N A; Drize, N I

    2013-05-01

    We studied the effect of natural glucocorticosteroid hydrocortisone on total cell production, cloning efficiency, and expression of genes important for the function of mesenchymal stromal cells. Addition of hydrocortisone to the culture medium reduces the total cell yield by 2 times and significantly increased cloning efficiency by 2-3 times; this effect was more pronounced in multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells obtained from female donors. Hydrocortisone had no effect on the expression of immunomodulatory factors produced by multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. Hydrocortisone inhibits the expression of bone differentiation markers, increases the expression of the early adipocyte differentiation marker at the beginning of culturing, and dramatically stimulates the expression of the late adipocyte differentiation marker throughout the culturing period. The findings suggest that hydrocortisone activates multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

  20. Gut Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Valeria; Buccione, Carla; Marotta, Giulia; Ziccheddu, Giovanna; Signore, Michele; Mattia, Gianfranco; Puglisi, Rossella; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Biancone, Livia

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), first found in bone marrow (BM), are the structural architects of all organs, participating in most biological functions. MSCs possess tissue-specific signatures that allow their discrimination according to their origin and location. Among their multiple functions, MSCs closely interact with immune cells, orchestrating their activity to maintain overall homeostasis. The phenotype of tissue MSCs residing in the bowel overlaps with myofibroblasts, lining the bottom walls of intestinal crypts (pericryptal) or interspersed within intestinal submucosa (intercryptal). In Crohn's disease, intestinal MSCs are tightly stacked in a chronic inflammatory milieu, which causes their enforced expression of Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The absence of Class II MHC is a hallmark for immune-modulator and tolerogenic properties of normal MSCs and, vice versa, the expression of HLA-DR is peculiar to antigen presenting cells, that is, immune-activator cells. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is responsible for induction of Class II MHC expression on intestinal MSCs. The reversal of myofibroblasts/MSCs from an immune-modulator to an activator phenotype in Crohn's disease results in the formation of a fibrotic tube subverting the intestinal structure. Epithelial metaplastic areas in this context can progress to dysplasia and cancer. PMID:28337224

  1. Epigenetic Classification of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Danilo Candido; Ferreira, Marcelo R.P.; Franzen, Julia; Weidner, Carola I.; Frobel, Joana; Zenke, Martin; Costa, Ivan G.; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Summary Standardization of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is hampered by the lack of a precise definition for these cell preparations; for example, there are no molecular markers to discern MSCs and fibroblasts. In this study, we followed the hypothesis that specific DNA methylation (DNAm) patterns can assist classification of MSCs. We utilized 190 DNAm profiles to address the impact of tissue of origin, donor age, replicative senescence, and serum supplements on the epigenetic makeup. Based on this, we elaborated a simple epigenetic signature based on two CpG sites to classify MSCs and fibroblasts, referred to as the Epi-MSC-Score. Another two-CpG signature can distinguish between MSCs from bone marrow and adipose tissue, referred to as the Epi-Tissue-Score. These assays were validated by site-specific pyrosequencing analysis in 34 primary cell preparations. Furthermore, even individual subclones of MSCs were correctly classified by our epigenetic signatures. In summary, we propose an alternative concept to use DNAm patterns for molecular definition of cell preparations, and our epigenetic scores facilitate robust and cost-effective quality control of MSC cultures. PMID:26862701

  2. Immunological hallmarks of stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Turley, Shannon J; Cremasco, Viviana; Astarita, Jillian L

    2015-11-01

    A dynamic and mutualistic interaction between tumour cells and the surrounding stroma promotes the initiation, progression, metastasis and chemoresistance of solid tumours. Far less understood is the relationship between the stroma and tumour-infiltrating leukocytes; however, emerging evidence suggests that the stromal compartment can shape antitumour immunity and responsiveness to immunotherapy. Thus, there is growing interest in elucidating the immunomodulatory roles of the stroma that evolve within the tumour microenvironment. In this Review, we discuss the evidence that stromal determinants interact with leukocytes and influence antitumour immunity, with emphasis on the immunological attributes of stromal cells that may foster their protumorigenic function.

  3. Stromal cells in chronic inflammation and tertiary lymphoid organ formation.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Christopher D; Barone, Francesca; Nayar, Saba; Bénézech, Cecile; Caamaño, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is an unstable state. It either resolves or persists. Why inflammation persists and the factors that define tissue tropism remain obscure. Increasing evidence suggests that tissue-resident stromal cells not only provide positional memory but also actively regulate the differential accumulation of inflammatory cells within inflamed tissues. Furthermore, at many sites of chronic inflammation, structures that mimic secondary lymphoid tissues are observed, suggesting that chronic inflammation and lymphoid tissue formation share common activation programs. Similarly, blood and lymphatic endothelial cells contribute to tissue homeostasis and disease persistence in chronic inflammation. This review highlights our increasing understanding of the role of stromal cells in inflammation and summarizes the novel immunological role that stromal cells exert in the persistence of inflammatory diseases.

  4. Analysis of stromal cell secretomes reveals a critical role for stromal cell-derived HGF and fibronectin in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Andrew C.; Chou, Wayne; Welch-Reardon, Katrina M.; Fong, Ashley H.; Popson, Stephanie A.; Phan, Duc Thien; Sandoval, Daniel R.; Nguyen, Dananh P.; Gershon, Paul D.; Hughes, Christopher C. W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Angiogenesis requires tightly coordinated cross-talk between endothelial cells and stromal cells such as fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. The specific molecular mechanisms moderating this process are still poorly understood. Method and Results Stromal cell-derived factors are essential for endothelial cell sprouting and lumen formation. We therefore compared the abilities of two primary fibroblast isolates and a primary smooth muscle cell isolate to promote in vitro angiogenesis and analyzed their secretomes using a combination of nanoLC-MS/MS, qPCR and ELISA. Each isolate exhibited a different level of angiogenic ability. Using quantitative MS, we then compared the secretomes of a fibroblast isolate exhibiting low angiogenic activity, a fibroblast isolate exhibiting high angiogenic activity and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. High angiogenic fibroblast supernatants exhibited an over-abundance of proteins associated with extracellular matrix constituents compared to low angiogenic fibroblasts or endothelial cells. Finally, siRNA technology and purified protein were used to confirm a role for stromal cell-derived hepatocyte growth factor and fibronectin in inducing endothelial cell sprouting. Conclusion Differences in stromal cell ability to induce angiogenesis are due to differences in the secreted proteomes of both extracellular matrix proteins and pro-angiogenic growth factors. PMID:23288153

  5. Comparison of Gene Expression Profile Between Tumor Tissue and Adjacent Non-tumor Tissue in Patients with Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST).

    PubMed

    Kou, Youwei; Zhao, Ying; Bao, Chenhui; Wang, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are defined as spindle cell and/or epithelioid tumors originated from interstitial Cajal cells or precursors in the digestive tract. This study was conducted to identify genes differing in expression between the gastric tumors and the adjacent non-cancerous mucosas in patients with primary gastric GIST. The gene expression profile was determined by using oligonucleotide-based DNA microarrays and further validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis was performed to predict signaling pathways involved in gastric GIST. Our data showed that the expression levels of 957 genes (RAB39B, member RAS oncogene family; VCAN, versican; etc.) were higher and that of 526 genes (CXCL14, chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 14; MTUS1, microtubule-associated tumor suppressor 1; etc.) were lower in the gastric tumor tissues as compared with normal gastric tissues. Results from KEGG pathway analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were enriched into 16 signaling transduction pathways, including Hedeghog and Wnt signaling pathways. Our study may provide basis for identification of novel biomarkers associated with primary gastric GIST pathogenesis and for exploration of underlying mechanisms involved in this gastric sarcoma.

  6. Matrix remodeling stimulates stromal autophagy, “fueling” cancer cell mitochondrial metabolism and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bonuccelli, Gloria; Molchansky, Alex; Capozza, Franco; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Birbe, Ruth C; Howell, Anthony; Pestell, Richard G; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Sotgia, Federica

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that loss of stromal caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in cancer-associated fibroblasts is a strong and independent predictor of poor clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. However, the signaling mechanism(s) by which Cav-1 downregulation leads to this tumor-promoting microenvironment are not well understood. To address this issue, we performed an unbiased comparative proteomic analysis of wild-type (WT) and Cav-1-/- null mammary stromal fibroblasts (MSFs). Our results show that plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and type 2 (PAI-1 and PAI-2) expression is significantly increased in Cav-1-/- MSFs. To establish a direct cause-effect relationship, we next generated immortalized human fibroblast lines stably overexpressing either PAI-1 or PAI-2. Importantly, PAI-1/2(+) fibroblasts promote the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumors (a human breast cancer cell line) in a murine xenograft model, without any increases in angiogenesis. Similarly, PAI-1/2(+) fibroblasts stimulate experimental metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells using an in vivo lung colonization assay. Further mechanistic studies revealed that fibroblasts overexpressing PAI-1 or PAI-2 display increased autophagy (“self-eating”) and are sufficient to induce mitochondrial biogenesis/activity in adjacent cancer cells, in co-culture experiments. In xenografts, PAI-1/2(+) fibroblasts significantly reduce the apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells. The current study provides further support for the “Autophagic Tumor Stroma Model of Cancer” and identifies a novel “extracellular matrix”-based signaling mechanism, by which a loss of stromal Cav-1 generates a metastatic phenotype. Thus, the secretion and remodeling of extracellular matrix components (such as PAI-1/2) can directly regulate both (1) autophagy in stromal fibroblasts and (2) epithelial tumor cell mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:21646868

  7. Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to northwest cell: granite and brick threshold, poured concrete floors, plastered finished walls, vaulted veiling; northwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  8. Insufficient stromal support in MDS results from molecular and functional deficits of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Geyh, S; Oz, S; Cadeddu, R-P; Fröbel, J; Brückner, B; Kündgen, A; Fenk, R; Bruns, I; Zilkens, C; Hermsen, D; Gattermann, N; Kobbe, G; Germing, U; Lyko, F; Haas, R; Schroeder, T

    2013-09-01

    Ineffective hematopoiesis is a major characteristic of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) causing relevant morbidity and mortality. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to physiologically support hematopoiesis, but their contribution to the pathogenesis of MDS remains elusive. We show that MSC from patients across all MDS subtypes (n=106) exhibit significantly reduced growth and proliferative capacities accompanied by premature replicative senescence. Osteogenic differentiation was significantly reduced in MDS-derived MSC, indicated by cytochemical stainings and reduced expressions of Osterix and Osteocalcin. This was associated with specific methylation patterns that clearly separated MDS-MSC from healthy controls and showed a strong enrichment for biological processes associated with cellular phenotypes and transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, in MDS-MSC, we detected altered expression of key molecules involved in the interaction with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), in particular Osteopontin, Jagged1, Kit-ligand and Angiopoietin as well as several chemokines. Functionally, this translated into a significantly diminished ability of MDS-derived MSC to support CD34+ HSPC in long-term culture-initiating cell assays associated with a reduced cell cycle activity. Taken together, our comprehensive analysis shows that MSC from all MDS subtypes are structurally, epigenetically and functionally altered, which leads to impaired stromal support and seems to contribute to deficient hematopoiesis in MDS.

  9. Human mesenchymal stromal cells suppress T-cell proliferation independent of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema R; Copland, Ian B; Garcia, Marco A; Metz, Richard; Galipeau, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells deploy immune suppressive properties amenable for use as cell therapy for inflammatory disorders. It is now recognized that mesenchymal stromal cells necessitate priming with an inflammatory milieu, in particular interferon-γ, to exert augmented immunosuppressive effects. It has been recently suggested that the heme-catabolizing enzyme heme oxygenase-1 is an essential component of the mesenchymal stromal cell-driven immune suppressive response. Because mesenchymal stromal cells upregulate indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression on interferon-γ priming and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase requires heme as a cofactor for optimal catabolic function, we investigated the potential antagonism of heme oxygenase-1 activity on indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase and the impact on mesenchymal stromal cell immune plasticity. We herein sought to evaluate the molecular genetic effect of cytokine priming on human mesenchymal stromal cell heme oxygenase-1 expression and its functional role in differentially primed mesenchymal stromal cells. Contrary to previous reports, messenger RNA and protein analyses demonstrated that mesenchymal stromal cells derived from normal subjects (n = 6) do not express heme oxygenase-1 at steady state or after interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and/or transforming growth factor-β priming. Pharmacological inhibition of heme oxygenase-1 with the use of tin protoporphyrin did not significantly abrogate the ability of mesenchymal stromal cells to suppress T-cell proliferation in vitro. Overall, these results unequivocally demonstrate that under steady state and after cytokine priming, human mesenchymal stromal cells immunoregulate T-cell proliferation independent of heme oxygenase-1.

  10. Targeted Proapoptotic Peptides Depleting Adipose Stromal Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Florez, Fernando; Dadbin, Ali; Zhang, Tao; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-01-01

    Progression of many cancers is associated with tumor infiltration by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Adipose stromal cells (ASC) are MSC that serve as adipocyte progenitors and endothelium-supporting cells in white adipose tissue (WAT). Clinical and animal model studies indicate that ASC mobilized from WAT are recruited by tumors. Direct evidence for ASC function in tumor microenvironment has been lacking due to unavailability of approaches to specifically inactivate these cells. Here, we investigate the effects of a proteolysis-resistant targeted hunter-killer peptide D-WAT composed of a cyclic domain CSWKYWFGEC homing to ASC and of a proapoptotic domain KLAKLAK2. Using mouse bone marrow transplantation models, we show that D-WAT treatment specifically depletes tumor stromal and perivascular cells without directly killing malignant cells or tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. In several mouse carcinoma models, targeted ASC cytoablation reduced tumor vascularity and cell proliferation resulting in hemorrhaging, necrosis, and suppressed tumor growth. We also validated a D-WAT derivative with a proapoptotic domain KFAKFAK2 that was found to have an improved cytoablative activity. Our results for the first time demonstrate that ASC, recruited as a component of tumor microenvironment, support cancer progression. We propose that drugs targeting ASC can be developed as a combination therapy complementing conventional cancer treatments. PMID:26316391

  11. Application of cell sheet technology to bone marrow stromal cell transplantation for rat brain infarct.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaki; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2017-02-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplantation enhances functional recovery after cerebral infarct, but the optimal delivery route is undetermined. This study was aimed to assess whether a novel cell-sheet technology non-invasively serves therapeutic benefits to ischemic stroke. First, the monolayered cell sheet was engineered by culturing rat BMSCs on a temperature-responsive dish. The cell sheet was analysed histologically and then transplanted onto the ipsilateral neocortex of rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion at 7 days after the insult. Their behaviours and histology were compared with those in the animals treated with direct injection of BMSCs or vehicle over 4 weeks post-transplantation. The cell sheet was 27.9 ± 8.0 μm thick and was composed of 9.8 ± 2.4 × 10(5) cells. Cell sheet transplantation significantly improved motor function when compared with the vehicle-injected animals. Histological analysis revealed that the BMSCs were densely distributed to the neocortex adjacent to the cerebral infarct and expressed neuronal phenotype in the cell sheet-transplanted animals. These findings were almost equal to those for the animals treated with direct BMSC injection. The attachment of the BMSC sheet to the brain surface did not induce reactive astrocytes in the adjacent neocortex, although direct injection of BMSCs profoundly induced reactive astrocytes around the injection site. These findings suggest that the BMSCs in cell sheets preserve their biological capacity of migration and neural differentiation. Cell-sheet technology may enhance functional recovery after ischaemic stroke, using a less invasive method. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Transplantation of a mammary stromal cell line into a mammary fat pad: development of the site-specific in vivo analysis system for mammary stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Hajime; Aoki, Naohito; Nadano, Daita; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between mammary epithelial and stromal tissue is considered to be important in breast tissue development. In this study, we developed a transplantation procedure for the mammary stromal fibroblastic cell line (MSF) to examine its life in vivo. First we established MSF cells which stably expressed lacZ (lacZ/MSF) and had characteristics of mammary stromal cells. The lacZ/MSF cells were then transplanted into a cleared mammary fat pad of syngenic mice with and without mammary primary epithelial organoids. Whole mount X-gal and carmine staining of the transplants revealed that a number of undifferentiated lacZ/MSF cells survived around the mammary epithelial tissue when transplanted with organoids. These results indicate that transplantation of MSF cells into mammary fat pad was accomplished by co-transplantation with primary mammary organoids. Finally, we discuss the application of transplantation procedure for in vivo studies of the mammary stromal tissue development and stromal-epithelial interactions.

  13. Stromal vascular cells and adipogenesis: Cells within adipose depots regulate adipogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A collection of investigations indicate the importance of adipose tissue stromal/stem cells to vasculogenesis and angiogenesis during adipogenesis. Early in development the stromal-vascular (S-V) elements control and dictate the extent of adipogenesis in a depot dependent manner. For instance, the...

  14. Stromal and hematopoietic cells in secondary lymphoid organs: partners in immunity.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Deepali; Fletcher, Anne L; Turley, Shannon J

    2013-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs), including lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, and the spleen, have evolved to bring cells of the immune system together. In these collaborative environments, lymphocytes scan the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells for cognate antigens, while moving along stromal networks. The cell-cell interactions between stromal and hematopoietic cells in SLOs are therefore integral to the normal functioning of these tissues. Not only do stromal cells physically construct SLO architecture but they are essential for regulating hematopoietic populations within these domains. Stromal cells interact closely with lymphocytes and dendritic cells, providing scaffolds on which these cells migrate, and recruiting them into niches by secreting chemokines. Within lymph nodes, stromal cell-ensheathed conduit networks transport small antigens deep into the SLO parenchyma. More recently, stromal cells have been found to induce peripheral CD8(+) T-cell tolerance and control the extent to which newly activated T cells proliferate within lymph nodes. Thus, stromal-hematopoietic crosstalk has important consequences for regulating immune cell function within SLOs. In addition, stromal cell interactions with hematopoietic cells, other stroma, and the inflammatory milieu have profound effects on key stromal functions. Here, we examine ways in which these interactions within the lymph node environment influence the adaptive immune response.

  15. Stromal and hematopoietic cells in secondary lymphoid organs: partners in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Deepali; Fletcher, Anne L.; Turley, Shannon J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs), including lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, and the spleen, have evolved to bring cells of the immune system together. In these collaborative environments, lymphocytes scan the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells for cognate antigens, while moving along stromal networks. The cell-cell interactions between stromal and hematopoietic cells in SLOs are therefore integral to the normal functioning of these tissues. Not only do stromal cells physically construct SLO architecture, but they are essential for regulating hematopoietic populations within these domains. Stromal cells interact closely with lymphocytes and dendritic cells, providing scaffolds on which these cells migrate, and recruiting them into niches by secreting chemokines. Within lymph nodes, stromal cell-ensheathed conduit networks transport small antigens deep into the SLO parenchyma. More recently, stromal cells have been found to induce peripheral CD8+ T-cell tolerance and control the extent to which newly activated T cells proliferate within lymph nodes. Thus, stromal-hematopoietic crosstalk has important consequences for regulating immune cell function within SLOs. In addition, stromal cell interactions with hematopoietic cells, other stroma, and the inflammatory milieu have profound effects on key stromal functions. Here, we examine ways in which these interactions within the lymph node environment influence the adaptive immune response. PMID:23278748

  16. Characterization of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Hamzic, Edita; Whiting, Karen; Gordon Smith, Edward; Pettengell, Ruth

    2015-06-01

    In aplastic anaemia (AA), haemopoietic activity is significantly reduced and generally attributed to failure of haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) within the bone marrow (BM). The regulation of haemopoiesis depends on the interaction between HSC and various cells of the BM microenvironment, including mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). MSC involvement in the functional restriction of HSC in AA is largely unknown and therefore, the physical and functional properties of AA MSC were studied in vitro. MSC were characterized by their phenotype and ability to form adherent stromal layers. The functional properties of AA MSC were assessed through proliferative, clonogenic and cross-over culture assays. Results indicate that although AA MSC presented typical morphology and distinctive mesenchymal markers, stromal formation was reduced, with 50% of BM samples failing to produce adherent layers. Furthermore, their proliferative and clonogenic capacity was markedly decreased (P = 0·03 and P = 0·04 respectively) and the ability to sustain haemopoiesis was significantly reduced, as assessed by total cell proliferation (P = 0·032 and P = 0·019 at Week 5 and 6, respectively) and clonogenic potential of HSC (P = 0·02 at Week 6). It was concluded that the biological characteristics of AA MSC are different from those of control MSC and their in vitro haemopoiesis-supporting ability is significantly reduced.

  17. [Frequent allelic losses in tumor-associated stromal cells and tumor epitelium of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kekeeva, T V; Popova, O P; Shegaĭ, P V; Zavalishina, L E; Andreeva, Iu Iu; Zaletaev, D V; Nemtsova, M V

    2008-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Accumulation of genetic alterations is typical not only for cancer epithelial cells but tumor-associated fibroblasts as well. Tumor epithelia, tumor-associated stroma from prostatectomy specimens of patients with prostate cancer and cells from prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adjacent stroma from males with PIN were isolated by using laser capture microdissection. Microsatellite allelotyping was evaluated using 4 highly polymorphic markers for chromosomal regions 8p22, 16q23-24 and 13q14. Incidences of alterations (loss of heterozygosity or allelic imbalance) were 48% for region 8p22, 72% for 16q23 and 37% for 13q14. The LOH frequencies in tumor-associated stroma cells were very similar. Alterations at chromosome 13q were significantly associated with advanced tumor stage, whereas AI at 16q was also associated with high Gleason score and lymph node metastasis. We find some incidences of allelic imbalance in premalignant lesions in epithelial (16-27%) and stromal (7-22%) components. Our results show that the frequencies of genetic aberrations are as high in stromal cells as in tumor cells.

  18. Stromal-cell and cancer-cell exosomes leading the metastatic exodus for the promised niche.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2013-06-18

    Exosomes are thought to play an important role in metastasis. Luga and colleagues have described the production of exosomes by stromal cells such as cancer-associated fibroblasts that are taken up by breast cancer cells and are then loaded with Wnt 11, which is associated with stimulation of the invasiveness and metastasis of the breast cancer cells. Previous studies have shown that exosomes produced by breast cancer cells are taken up by stromal fibroblasts and other stromal cells, suggesting that exosomes are agents of cross-talk between cancer and stromal cells to stimulate metastasis. Imaging of exosomes by labeling with fluorescent proteins will enlighten the process by which exosomes enhance metastasis, including premetastatic niche formation.

  19. Bone marrow stromal stem cells: nature, biology, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Bianco, P; Riminucci, M; Gronthos, S; Robey, P G

    2001-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are progenitors of skeletal tissue components such as bone, cartilage, the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, and adipocytes. In addition, they may be experimentally induced to undergo unorthodox differentiation, possibly forming neural and myogenic cells. As such, they represent an important paradigm of post-natal nonhematopoietic stem cells, and an easy source for potential therapeutic use. Along with an overview of the basics of their biology, we discuss here their potential nature as components of the vascular wall, and the prospects for their use in local and systemic transplantation and gene therapy.

  20. Mesenchymal stromal cells and the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Le Blanc, Katarina; Davies, Lindsay C

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been exploited for their immunomodulatory properties in the treatment of a number of immune-based disorders, including Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) and type 1 diabetes. The mechanisms for inducing therapeutic effect still remain largely unknown however, with research focused on understanding how MSCs interact with individual immune cell subsets. Within this review we address what is known about the interactions of MSCs with cells of the innate immune system, how they respond to their microenvironment and how this relates to therapeutic effects we see both within in vivo animal models and in clinical trials.

  1. Legumain Regulates Differentiation Fate of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Is Altered in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Abbas; Qanie, Diyako; Andersen, Thomas L; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Li; Postert, Benno; Parsons, Stuart; Ditzel, Nicholas; Khosla, Sundeep; Johansen, Harald Thidemann; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Abdallah, Basem M; Hesselson, Daniel; Solberg, Rigmor; Kassem, Moustapha

    2017-02-14

    Secreted factors are a key component of stem cell niche and their dysregulation compromises stem cell function. Legumain is a secreted cysteine protease involved in diverse biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that legumain regulates lineage commitment of human bone marrow stromal cells and that its expression level and cellular localization are altered in postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. As shown by genetic and pharmacological manipulation, legumain inhibited osteoblast (OB) differentiation and in vivo bone formation through degradation of the bone matrix protein fibronectin. In addition, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of legumain activity led to precocious OB differentiation and increased vertebral mineralization in zebrafish. Finally, we show that localized increased expression of legumain in bone marrow adipocytes was inversely correlated with adjacent trabecular bone mass in a cohort of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our data suggest that altered proteolytic activity of legumain in the bone microenvironment contributes to decreased bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  2. Therapeutic effect of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells on memory in animals with Alzheimer-type neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, N V; Poltavtseva, R A; Samokhin, A N; Sukhikh, G T

    2013-11-01

    Transplantation of human mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells improved spatial memory in bulbectomized mice with Alzheimer-type neurodegeneration. The positive effect was observed in 1 month after intracerebral transplantation and in 3 months after systemic injection of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells. No cases of malignant transformation were noted. These findings indicate prospects of using mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells for the therapy of Alzheimer disease and the possibility of their systemic administration for attaining the therapeutic effect.

  3. Senescent stromal-derived osteopontin promotes preneoplastic cell growth.

    PubMed

    Pazolli, Ermira; Luo, Xianmin; Brehm, Sarah; Carbery, Kelly; Chung, Jun-Jae; Prior, Julie L; Doherty, Jason; Demehri, Shadmehr; Salavaggione, Lorena; Piwnica-Worms, David; Stewart, Sheila A

    2009-02-01

    Alterations in the tissue microenvironment collaborate with cell autonomous genetic changes to contribute to neoplastic progression. The importance of the microenvironment in neoplastic progression is underscored by studies showing that fibroblasts isolated from a tumor stimulate the growth of preneoplastic and neoplastic cells in xenograft models. Similarly, senescent fibroblasts promote preneoplastic cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Because senescent cells accumulate with age, their presence is hypothesized to facilitate preneoplastic cell growth and tumor formation in older individuals. To identify senescent stromal factors directly responsible for stimulating preneoplastic cell growth, we carried out whole-genome transcriptional profiling and compared senescent fibroblasts with their younger counterparts. We identified osteopontin (OPN) as one of the most highly elevated transcripts in senescent fibroblasts. Importantly, reduction of OPN protein levels by RNA interference did not affect senescence induction in fibroblasts; however, it dramatically reduced the growth-promoting activities of senescent fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo, showing that OPN is necessary for paracrine stimulation of preneoplastic cell growth. In addition, we found that recombinant OPN was sufficient to stimulate preneoplastic cell growth. Finally, we show that OPN is expressed in senescent stroma within preneoplastic lesions that arise following 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment of mice, suggesting that stromal-derived OPN-mediated signaling events affect neoplastic progression.

  4. Senescent Stromal-Derived Osteopontin Promotes Preneoplastic Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Pazolli, Ermira; Luo, Xianmin; Brehm, Sarah; Carbery, Kelly; Chung, Jun-Jae; Prior, Julie L.; Doherty, Jason; Demehri, Shadmehr; Salavaggione, Lorena; Piwnica-Worms, David; Stewart, Sheila A.

    2008-01-01

    Alterations in the tissue microenvironment collaborate with cell autonomous genetic changes to contribute to neoplastic progression. The importance of the microenvironment in neoplastic progression is underscored by studies demonstrating that fibroblasts isolated from a tumor stimulate the growth of preneoplastic and neoplastic cells in xenograft models. Similarly, senescent fibroblasts promote preneoplastic cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Because senescent cells accumulate with age, their presence is hypothesized to facilitate preneoplastic cell growth and tumor formation in older individuals. To identify senescent stromal factors directly responsible for stimulating preneoplastic cell growth, we carried out whole genome transcriptional profiling and compared senescent fibroblasts to their younger counterparts. We identified osteopontin (OPN) as one of the most highly elevated transcripts in senescent fibroblasts. Importantly, reduction of OPN protein levels by RNAi did not impact senescence induction in fibroblasts; however, it dramatically reduced the growth-promoting activities of senescent fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating that OPN is necessary for paracrine stimulation of preneoplastic cell growth. In addition, we found that recombinant OPN was sufficient to stimulate preneoplastic cell growth. Finally, we demonstrate that OPN is expressed in senescent stroma within preneoplastic lesions that arise following DMBA/TPA treatment of mice, suggesting that stromal-derived OPN-mediated signaling events impact neoplastic progression. PMID:19155301

  5. Cellular and molecular phenotypes of proliferating stromal cells from human carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kopantzev, E P; Vayshlya, N A; Kopantseva, M R; Egorov, V I; Pikunov, M; Zinovyeva, M V; Vinogradova, T V; Zborovskaya, I B; Sverdlov, E D

    2010-01-01

    Background: Stromal cells are a functionally important component of human carcinomas. The aim of this study was to obtain and characterise primary cultures of stromal cells from human carcinomas and the corresponding surrounding normal tissue. Methods: Primary stromal cell cultures from tumours of lung, oesophagus and pancreas were obtained using a mild tissue dissociation method and a medium for culturing mesenchymal cells. Immunofluorescence staining and western blotting were used to analyse the expression of differentiation markers and selected known oncoproteins in the cell cultures obtained. Results: A panel of stromal primary cultures was prepared from different human tumours and from matched normal cancer-free tissues. The in vitro proliferative potential of tumour-associated fibroblasts was shown to be higher than that of matched normal stromal cells. A mutational analysis of the TP53 and KRAS2 genes in a number of stromal cultures did not reveal known mutations in most cells of the cultures studied. Western blot analysis showed that stromal cells of lung tumours were characterised by a statistically significantly lower expression level of the p16 protein as compared with that in normal lung stromal cells. An important finding of our study was that, according to immunofluorescence assay, a fraction of fibroblast-like vimentin-positive cells in some tumour and normal stromal cell cultures expressed an epithelial marker – cytokeratins. Conclusions: Proliferating stromal cells from the carcinomas studied proved to be genetically normal cells with altered expression profiles of some genes involved in carcinogenesis, as compared with normal stromal cells. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition may lead to the emergence of transdifferentiated fibroblast-like cells in tumour stroma and in the tumour-surrounding tissue. PMID:20407446

  6. [VEGF gene expression in transfected human multipotent stromal cells].

    PubMed

    Smirnikhina, S A; Lavrov, A V; Bochkov, N P

    2011-01-01

    Dynamics of VEGF gene expression in transfected multipotent stromal cells from adipose tissue was examined using electroporation and lipofection. Differences in the potency and dynamics of plasmid elimination (up to day 9) between cell cultures were observed. All cultures were divided into fast and slow plasmid-eliminating ones. Interculture differences in VEGF expression were detected. The possibility of a 5-6-fold increase of VEGF expression was shown. There were no differences in transfection potency, plasmid elimination dynamics, and VEGF expression after transfection by both nonviral methods.

  7. Human Thymus Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Augment Force Production in Self-Organized Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sondergaard, Claus S.; Hodonsky, Chani J.; Khait, Luda; Shaw, John; Sarkar, Bedabrata; Birla, Ravi; Bove, Edward; Nolta, Jan; Si, Ming-Sing

    2011-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells have been recently isolated from thymus gland tissue discarded after surgical procedures. The role of this novel cell type in heart regeneration has yet to be defined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of human thymus-derived mesenchymal stromal cells using self-organized cardiac tissue as an in vitro platform for quantitative assessment. Methods Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from discarded thymus tissue from neonates undergoing heart surgery and were incubated in differentiation media to demonstrate multipotency. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes self-organized into cardiac tissue fibers in a custom culture dish either alone or in combination with varying numbers of mesenchymal stromal cells. A transducer measured force generated by spontaneously contracting self-organized cardiac tissue fibers. Work and power outputs were calculated from force tracings. Immunofluorescence was performed to determine the fate of the thymus-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. Results Mesenchymal stromal cells were successfully isolated from discarded thymus tissue. After incubation in differentiation media, mesenchymal stromal cells attained the expected phenotypes. Although mesenchymal stromal cells did not differentiate into mature cardiomyocytes, addition of these cells increased the rate of fiber formation, force production, and work and power outputs. Self-organized cardiac tissue containing mesenchymal stromal cells acquired a defined microscopic architecture. Conclusions Discarded thymus tissue contains mesenchymal stromal cells, which can augment force production and work and power outputs of self-organized cardiac tissue fibers by several-fold. These findings indicate the potential utility of mesenchymal stromal cells in treating heart failure. PMID:20732499

  8. Isolating stromal stem cells from periodontal granulation tissues.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tzu-Yuan; Lin, Hsiang-Chun; Chan, Ying-Jen; Yuan, Kuo

    2012-08-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising area in regenerative medicine. Periodontal granulation tissues are often discarded during conventional surgery. If stromal stem cells can be isolated from these tissues, they can be used for subsequent surgery on the same patient. Fifteen human periodontal granulation tissue samples were obtained from intrabony defects during surgery. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was carried out on five of the samples to identify STRO-1, a marker of mesenchymal stem cells. Five samples underwent flow cytometry analysis for the same marker. The remaining five samples were characterized by "colony formation unit-fibroblast" (CFU-f) assay and selected for proliferation assay, flow cytometry of stem cell markers, immunocytochemistry (ICC), multipotent differentiation assays, and repairing critical-size defects in mice. The ratio of STRO-1(+) cells detected by IHC was 5.91 ± 1.50%. The analysis of flow cytometry for STRO-1 was 6.70 ± 0.81%. Approximately two thirds of the CFU-f colonies had a strong reaction to STRO-1 in ICC staining. The cells were multipotent both in vitro and in vivo. Mice given bone grafts and stem cells showed significantly better bone healing than those without stem cells. Multipotent stromal stem cells can be isolated from human periodontal granulation tissues. These cells improve new bone formation when transplanted in mouse calvarial defects. Isolating stem cells from relatively accessible sites without extra procedures is clinically advantageous. This study demonstrated that human periodontal granulation tissues contain isolatable multipotent stem cells. The cells may be a good source for autotransplantation in subsequent treatment.

  9. Zfp423 promotes adipogenic differentiation of bovine stromal vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Das, Arun Kr; Yang, Qi-Yuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Du, Min

    2012-01-01

    Intramuscular fat or marbling is critical for the palatability of beef. In mice, very recent studies show that adipocytes and fibroblasts share a common pool of progenitor cells, with Zinc finger protein 423 (Zfp423) as a key initiator of adipogenic differentiation. To evaluate the role of Zfp423 in intramuscular adipogenesis and marbling in beef cattle, we sampled beef muscle for separation of stromal vascular cells. These cells were immortalized with pCI neo-hEST2 and individual clones were selected by G418. A total of 288 clones (3×96 well plates) were isolated and induced to adipogenesis. The presence of adipocytes was assessed by Oil-Red-O staining. Three clones with high and low adipogenic potential respectively were selected for further analyses. In addition, fibro/adipogenic progenitor cells were selected using a surface marker, platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) α. The expression of Zfp423 was much higher (307.4±61.9%, P<0.05) in high adipogenic cells, while transforming growth factor (TGF)-β was higher (156.1±48.7%, P<0.05) in low adipogenic cells. Following adipogenic differentiation, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) were much higher (239.4±84.1% and 310.7±138.4%, respectively, P<0.05) in high adipogenic cells. Over-expression of Zfp423 in stromal vascular cells and cloned low adipogenic cells dramatically increased their adipogenic differentiation, accompanied with the inhibition of TGF-β expression. Zfp423 knockdown by shRNA in high adipogenic cells largely prevented their adipogenic differentiation. The differential regulation of Zfp423 and TGF-β between low and high adipogenic cells is associated with the DNA methylation in their promoters. In conclusion, data show that Zfp423 is a critical regulator of adipogenesis in stromal vascular cells of bovine muscle, and Zfp423 may provide a molecular target for enhancing intramuscular adipogenesis

  10. A molecular classification of human mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Rohart, Florian; Mason, Elizabeth A.; Matigian, Nicholas; Mosbergen, Rowland; Korn, Othmar; Chen, Tyrone; Butcher, Suzanne; Patel, Jatin; Atkinson, Kerry; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Fisk, Nicholas M.; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are widely used for the study of mesenchymal tissue repair, and increasingly adopted for cell therapy, despite the lack of consensus on the identity of these cells. In part this is due to the lack of specificity of MSC markers. Distinguishing MSC from other stromal cells such as fibroblasts is particularly difficult using standard analysis of surface proteins, and there is an urgent need for improved classification approaches. Transcriptome profiling is commonly used to describe and compare different cell types; however, efforts to identify specific markers of rare cellular subsets may be confounded by the small sample sizes of most studies. Consequently, it is difficult to derive reproducible, and therefore useful markers. We addressed the question of MSC classification with a large integrative analysis of many public MSC datasets. We derived a sparse classifier (The Rohart MSC test) that accurately distinguished MSC from non-MSC samples with >97% accuracy on an internal training set of 635 samples from 41 studies derived on 10 different microarray platforms. The classifier was validated on an external test set of 1,291 samples from 65 studies derived on 15 different platforms, with >95% accuracy. The genes that contribute to the MSC classifier formed a protein-interaction network that included known MSC markers. Further evidence of the relevance of this new MSC panel came from the high number of Mendelian disorders associated with mutations in more than 65% of the network. These result in mesenchymal defects, particularly impacting on skeletal growth and function. The Rohart MSC test is a simple in silico test that accurately discriminates MSC from fibroblasts, other adult stem/progenitor cell types or differentiated stromal cells. It has been implemented in the www.stemformatics.org resource, to assist researchers wishing to benchmark their own MSC datasets or data from the public domain. The code is available from the CRAN

  11. Primary marrow-derived stromal cells: isolation and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Pillai, Manoj M

    2013-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) are relatively rare cells difficult to visualize in marrow biopsies or detect in aspirated marrow. Under specific conditions MSC can be expanded in vitro and the population can give rise to several mesenchymal lineages. "MSC" also refers to mesenchymal stem cells which implies that all cells in the population are multipotent. It is generally agreed that while there may be a few multipotent stem cells in an MSC population the majority are not stem cells. In either case MSCs do not produce hematopoietic cells. Although MSCs have been isolated and characterized from several tissues, bone marrow is their most common source for research and clinical use. Primary MSC populations can be derived from bone marrow mononuclear cells with relative ease, but it is important to recognize the cellular heterogeneity within a culture and how this may vary from donor to donor. In this chapter, we describe methodology to derive primary MSCs from bone marrow screens, an otherwise discarded by-product of bone marrow harvests used for clinical transplantation. We also describe some useful techniques to characterize and manipulate MSCs-both primary and immortalized cell lines.

  12. Zebrafish Caudal Haematopoietic Embryonic Stromal Tissue (CHEST) Cells Support Haematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Anja; Aggio, Julian; Campbell, Clyde; Wright, Francis; Marquez, Gabriel; Traver, David; Stachura, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Haematopoiesis is an essential process in early vertebrate development that occurs in different distinct spatial locations in the embryo that shift over time. These different sites have distinct functions: in some anatomical locations specific hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are generated de novo. In others, HSPCs expand. HSPCs differentiate and renew in other locations, ensuring homeostatic maintenance. These niches primarily control haematopoiesis through a combination of cell-to-cell signalling and cytokine secretion that elicit unique biological effects in progenitors. To understand the molecular signals generated by these niches, we report the generation of caudal hematopoietic embryonic stromal tissue (CHEST) cells from 72-hours post fertilization (hpf) caudal hematopoietic tissue (CHT), the site of embryonic HSPC expansion in fish. CHEST cells are a primary cell line with perivascular endothelial properties that expand hematopoietic cells in vitro. Morphological and transcript analysis of these cultures indicates lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid differentiation, indicating that CHEST cells are a useful tool for identifying molecular signals critical for HSPC proliferation and differentiation in the zebrafish. These findings permit comparison with other temporally and spatially distinct haematopoietic-supportive zebrafish niches, as well as with mammalian haematopoietic-supportive cells to further the understanding of the evolution of the vertebrate hematopoietic system. PMID:28300168

  13. PRIMARY MARROW DERIVED STROMAL CELLS: ISOLATION AND MANIPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Pillai, Manoj M

    2013-01-01

    Marrow Stromal Cells (MSCs) are relatively rare cells difficult to visualize in marrow biopsies or detect in aspirated marrow. Under specific conditions MSC can be expanded in vitro and the population can give rise to several mesenchymal lineages. “MSC” also refers to mesenchymal stem cells which implies that all cells in the population are multipotent. It is generally agreed that while there may be a few multipotent stem cells in an MSC population the majority are not stem cells. In either case MSC do not produce hematopoietic cells. Although MSCs have been isolated and characterized from several tissues, bone marrow is their most common source for research and clinical use. Primary MSC populations can be derived from bone marrow mononuclear cells with relative ease, but it is important to recognize the cellular heterogeneity within a culture and how this may vary from donor to donor. In this chapter, we will describe methodology to derive primary MSCs from bone marrow screens, an otherwise discarded byproduct of bone marrow harvests used for clinical transplantation. We will also describe some useful techniques to characterize and manipulate MSCs – both primary and immortalized cell lines. PMID:23959984

  14. Marginal reticular cells: a stromal subset directly descended from the lymphoid tissue organizer

    PubMed Central

    Katakai, Tomoya

    2012-01-01

    The architecture of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) is supported by several non-hematopoietic stromal cells. Currently it is established that two distinct stromal subsets, follicular dendritic cells and fibroblastic reticular cells, play crucial roles in the formation of tissue compartments within SLOs, i.e., the follicle and T zone, respectively. Although stromal cells in the anlagen are essential for SLO development, the relationship between these primordial cells and the subsets in adulthood remains poorly understood. In addition, the roles of stromal cells in the entry of antigens into the compartments through some tissue structures peculiar to SLOs remain unclear. A recently identified stromal subset, marginal reticular cells (MRCs), covers the margin of SLOs that are primarily located in the outer edge of follicles and construct a unique reticulum. MRCs are closely associated with specialized endothelial or epithelial structures for antigen transport. The similarities in marker expression profiles and successive localization during development suggest that MRCs directly descend from organizer stromal cells in the anlagen. Therefore, MRCs are thought to be a crucial stromal component for the organization and function of SLOs. PMID:22807928

  15. An improved method for isolation of epithelial and stromal cells from the human endometrium

    PubMed Central

    MASUDA, Ayako; KATOH, Noriko; NAKABAYASHI, Kazuhiko; KATO, Kiyoko; SONODA, Kenzo; KITADE, Mari; TAKEDA, Satoru; HATA, Kenichiro; TOMIKAWA, Junko

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to improve the efficiency of isolating endometrial epithelial and stromal cells (EMECs and EMSCs) from the human endometrium. We revealed by immunohistochemical staining that the large tissue fragments remaining after collagenase treatment, which are usually discarded after the first filtration in the conventional protocol, consisted of glandular epithelial and stromal cells. Therefore, we established protease treatment and cell suspension conditions to dissociate single cells from the tissue fragments and isolated epithelial (EPCAM-positive) and stromal (CD13-positive) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Four independent experiments showed that, on average, 1.2 × 106 of EMECs and 2.8 × 106 EMSCs were isolated from one hysterectomy specimen. We confirmed that the isolated cells presented transcriptomic features highly similar to those of epithelial and stromal cells obtained by the conventional method. Our improved protocol facilitates future studies to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the dynamic changes of the endometrium during the menstrual cycle. PMID:26853786

  16. Implication of Tumor Microenvironment in Chemoresistance: Tumor-Associated Stromal Cells Protect Tumor Cells from Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Castells, Magali; Thibault, Benoît; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Couderc, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    Tumor development principally occurs following the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in tumor cells. These changes pave the way for the transformation of chemosensitive cells to chemoresistant ones by influencing the uptake, metabolism, or export of drugs at the cellular level. Numerous reports have revealed the complexity of tumors and their microenvironment with tumor cells located within a heterogeneous population of stromal cells. These stromal cells (fibroblasts, endothelial or mesothelial cells, adipocytes or adipose tissue-derived stromal cells, immune cells and bone marrow-derived stem cells) could be involved in the chemoresistance that is acquired by tumor cells via several mechanisms: (i) cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions influencing the cancer cell sensitivity to apoptosis; (ii) local release of soluble factors promoting survival and tumor growth (crosstalk between stromal and tumor cells); (iii) direct cell-cell interactions with tumor cells (crosstalk or oncologic trogocytosis); (iv) generation of specific niches within the tumor microenvironment that facilitate the acquisition of drug resistance; or (v) conversion of the cancer cells to cancer-initiating cells or cancer stem cells. This review will focus on the implication of each member of the heterogeneous population of stromal cells in conferring resistance to cytotoxins and physiological mediators of cell death. PMID:22949815

  17. Isolation of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Cryopreserved Human Umbilical Cord Tissue.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Yu A; Balashova, E E; Volgina, N E; Kabaeva, N V; Dugina, T N; Sukhikh, G T

    2016-02-01

    Umbilical cord stroma is an easily available, convenient, and promising source of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for regenerative medicine. Cryogenic storage of umbilical cord tissue provides more possibilities for further isolation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for autologous transplantation or scientific purposes. Here we developed a protocol for preparation of the whole umbilical cord tissue for cryogenic storage that in combination with the previously described modified method of isolation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells allowed us to isolate cells with high proliferative potential, typical phenotype, and preserved differentiation potencies.

  18. B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and stromal cells communicate through Galectin-3

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Fei; Joo, Eun Ji; Tarighat, Somayeh S.; Schiffer, Isabelle; Paz, Helicia; Fabbri, Muller; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2015-01-01

    The molecular interactions between B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) cells and stromal cells in the bone marrow that provide microenvironmentally-mediated protection against therapeutic drugs are not well-defined. Galectin-3 (Lgals3) is a multifunctional galactose-binding lectin with reported location in the nucleus, cytoplasm and extracellular space in different cell types. We previously reported that ALL cells co-cultured with stroma contain high levels of Galectin-3. We here establish that, in contrast to more mature B-lineage cancers, Galectin-3 detected in and on the ALL cells originates from stromal cells, which express it on their surface, secrete it as soluble protein and also in exosomes. Soluble and stromal-bound Galectin-3 is internalized by ALL cells, transported to the nucleus and stimulates transcription of endogenous LGALS3 mRNA. When human and mouse ALL cells develop tolerance to different drugs while in contact with protective stromal cells, Galectin-3 protein levels are consistently increased. This correlates with induction of Galectin-3 transcription in the ALL cells. Thus Galectin-3 sourced from stroma becomes supplemented by endogenous Galectin-3 production in the pre-B ALL cells that are under continuous stress from drug treatment. Our data suggest that stromal Galectin-3 may protect ALL cells through auto-induction of Galectin-3 mRNA and tonic NFκB pathway activation. Since endogenously synthesized Galectin-3 protects pre-B ALL cells against drug treatment, we identify Galectin-3 as one possible target to counteract the protective effects of stroma. PMID:25869099

  19. Hitting the right spot with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Le Blanc, Katarina; Keating, Armand; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have captured considerable scientific and public interest because of their potential to limit physical and immune injury, to produce bioactive molecules and to regenerate tissues. MSCs are phenotypically heterogeneous, and distinct subpopulations within MSC cultures are presumed to contribute to tissue repair and the modulation of allogeneic immune responses. As the first example of efficacy, clinical trials for prevention and treatment of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after hematopoietic cell transplantation show that MSCs can effectively treat human disease. The view of the mechanisms whereby MSCs function as immunomodulatory and reparative cells has evolved simultaneously. Initially, donor MSC were thought to replace damaged cells in injured tissues of the recipient. More recently, however, it has become increasingly clear that even transient MSC engraftment may exert favorable effects through the secretion of cytokines and other paracrine factors, which engage and recruit recipient cells in productive tissue repair. Thus, an important reason to investigate MSCs in mechanistic preclinical models and in clinical trials with well defined end-points and controls is to better understand the therapeutic potential of these multifunctional cells. Here, we review the controversies and recent insights into MSC biology, the regulation of alloresponses by MSCs in preclinical models, as well as clinical experience with MSC infusions and the challenges of manufacturing a ready supply of highly defined transplantable MSCs. PMID:20597105

  20. CONCISE REVIEW Micro RNA Expression in Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmipathy, Uma; Hart, Ronald P.

    2009-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) isolated from various adult tissue sources have the capacity to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple lineages. Both of these processes are tightly regulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Emerging evidence indicates that the class of single-stranded non-coding RNAs known as “microRNAs” also plays a critical role in this process. First described in nematodes and plants, microRNAs have been shown to modulate major regulatory mechanisms in eukaryotic cells involved in a broad array of cellular functions. Studies with various types of embryonic as well as adult stem cells indicate an intricate network of microRNAs regulating key transcription factors and other genes which in turn determine cell fate. In addition, expression of unique microRNAs in specific cell types serves as a useful diagnostic marker to define a particular cell type. MicroRNAs are also found to be regulated by extracellular signaling pathways that are important for differentiation into specific tissues, suggesting that they play a role in specifying tissue identity. In this review we describe the importance of microRNAs in stem cells focusing on our current understanding of microRNAs in MSC and their derivatives. PMID:17991914

  1. Metabolic glycoengineering of mesenchymal stromal cells with N-propanoylmannosamine.

    PubMed

    Natunen, Suvi; Lampinen, Milla; Suila, Heli; Ritamo, Ilja; Pitkänen, Virve; Nairn, Alison V; Räbinä, Jarkko; Laitinen, Saara; Moremen, Kelley W; Reutter, Werner; Valmu, Leena

    2013-08-01

    There is an increasing interest in the modification of cell surface glycosylation to improve the properties of therapeutic cells. For example, glycosylation affects the biodistribution of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Metabolic glycoengineering is an efficient way to modify the cell surface. The mammalian biosynthetic machinery tolerates the unnatural sialic acid precursor, N-propanoylmannosamine (ManNProp), and incorporates it into cell surface glycoconjugates. We show here by mass spectrometric analysis of cell surface N-glycans that about half of N-acetylneuraminic acid was replaced by N-propanoylneuraminic acid in the N-glycans of human umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs supplemented with ManNProp. In addition, the N-glycan profile was altered. ManNProp-supplemented cells had more multiply fucosylated N-glycan species than control cells. The fucosylated epitopes were shown in tandem mass spectrometric analysis to be Lewis x or blood group H epitopes, but not sialyl Lewis x (sLex). The amounts of tri- and tetra-antennary and polylactosamine-containing N-glycans also increased in ManNProp supplementation. In accordance with previous studies of other cell types, increased expression of the sLex epitope in ManNProp-supplemented MSCs was demonstrated by flow cytometry. In light of the N-glycan analysis, the sLex epitope in these cells is likely to be carried by O-glycans or glycolipids. sLex has been shown to target MSCs to bone marrow, which may be desirable in therapeutic applications. The present results represent the first structural analysis of an N-glycome of ManNProp-supplemented cells and demonstrate the feasibility of modifying cell surface glycosylation of therapeutic cells by this type of metabolic glycoengineering.

  2. IFN type I and II induce BAFF secretion from human decidual stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Lundqvist, Christina; Telemo, Esbjörn; Nava, Silvia; Kaipe, Helen; Rudin, Anna

    2017-01-06

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) is a critical cytokine for maturation of immature B cells. In murine lymph nodes, BAFF is mainly produced by podoplanin-expressing stromal cells. We have previously shown that circulating BAFF levels are maximal at birth, and that farmers' children exhibit higher BAFF levels in cord blood than non-farmers' children. Here, we sought to investigate whether maternal-derived decidual stromal cells from placenta secrete BAFF and examine what factors could stimulate this production. We found that podoplanin is expressed in decidua basalis and in the underlying villous tissue as well as on isolated maternal-derived decidual stromal cells. Decidual stromal cells produced BAFF when stimulated with IFN-γ and IFN-α, and NK cells and NK-T-like cells competent of IFN-γ production were isolated from the decidua. Finally, B cells at different maturational stages are present in decidua and all expressed BAFF-R, while stromal cells did not. These findings suggest that decidual stromal cells are a cellular source of BAFF for B cells present in decidua during pregnancy.

  3. IFN type I and II induce BAFF secretion from human decidual stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Lundqvist, Christina; Telemo, Esbjörn; Nava, Silvia; Kaipe, Helen; Rudin, Anna

    2017-01-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) is a critical cytokine for maturation of immature B cells. In murine lymph nodes, BAFF is mainly produced by podoplanin-expressing stromal cells. We have previously shown that circulating BAFF levels are maximal at birth, and that farmers’ children exhibit higher BAFF levels in cord blood than non-farmers’ children. Here, we sought to investigate whether maternal-derived decidual stromal cells from placenta secrete BAFF and examine what factors could stimulate this production. We found that podoplanin is expressed in decidua basalis and in the underlying villous tissue as well as on isolated maternal-derived decidual stromal cells. Decidual stromal cells produced BAFF when stimulated with IFN-γ and IFN-α, and NK cells and NK-T-like cells competent of IFN-γ production were isolated from the decidua. Finally, B cells at different maturational stages are present in decidua and all expressed BAFF-R, while stromal cells did not. These findings suggest that decidual stromal cells are a cellular source of BAFF for B cells present in decidua during pregnancy. PMID:28057926

  4. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells regulates proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Stopp, Sabine; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ugarte, Fernando; Wobus, Manja; Kuhn, Matthias; Brenner, Sebastian; Thieme, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The melanoma cell adhesion molecule defines mesenchymal stromal cells in the human bone marrow that regenerate bone and establish a hematopoietic microenvironment in vivo. The role of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in primary human mesenchymal stromal cells and the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during ex vivo culture has not yet been demonstrated. We applied RNA interference or ectopic overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells to evaluate the effect of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule on their proliferation and differentiation as well as its influence on co-cultivated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Knockdown and overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule affected several characteristics of human mesenchymal stromal cells related to osteogenic differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Furthermore, knockdown of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells stimulated the proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and strongly reduced the formation of long-term culture-initiating cells. In contrast, melanoma cell adhesion molecule-overexpressing human mesenchymal stromal cells provided a supportive microenvironment for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule increased the adhesion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to human mesenchymal stromal cells and their migration beneath the monolayer of human mesenchymal stromal cells. Our results demonstrate that the expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells determines their fate and regulates the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells through direct cell-cell contact.

  5. Impaired Function of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Systemic Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, K.; Wilson, T.M.; Ren, J.J.; Sabatino, M.; Stroncek, D.F.; Krepuska, M.; Bai, Y.; Robey, P.G.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Mezey, E.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM) have a wide variety of problems, including skeletal abnormalities. The disease results from a mutation of the stem cell receptor (c-kit) in mast cells and we wondered if the function of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs; also known as MSCs or mesenchymal stem cells) might be affected by the invasion of bone marrow by mutant mast cells. As expected, BMSCs from SM patients do not have a mutation in c-kit, but they proliferate poorly. In addition, while osteogenic differentiation of the BMSCs seems to be deficient, their adipogenic potential appears to be increased. Since the hematopoietic supportive abilities of BMSCs are also important, we also studied the engraftment in NSG mice of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, after being co-cultured with BMSCs of healthy volunteers vs. BMSCs derived from patients with SM. BMSCs derived from the bone marrow of patients with SM could not support hematopoiesis to the extent that healthy BMSCs do. Finally, we performed an expression analysis and found significant differences between healthy and SM derived BMSCs in the expression of genes with a variety of functions, including the WNT signaling, ossification, and bone remodeling. We suggest that some of the symptoms associated with SM might be driven by epigenetic changes in BMSCs caused by dysfunctional mast cells in the bone marrow of the patients. PMID:26001169

  6. Optimized Protocol for Isolation of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Human Umbilical Cord.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Yu A; Balashova, E E; Volgina, N E; Kabaeva, N V; Dugina, T N; Sukhikh, G T

    2015-11-01

    Extraembryonic tissues, in particular, umbilical cord stroma are promising sources of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for regenerative medicine. In recent years, methods for isolation of mesenchymal stromal cells from different compartments of the umbilical cords based on enzymatic disaggregation of the tissue or on tissue explants have been proposed. Here we propose a protocol of isolation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells from the whole umbilical cord that combines the advantages of each approach and ensures sufficient cell yield for further experimental and clinical applications. A combination of short-term incubation of tissue fragments on cold collagenase solution followed by their culturing in the form of explants significantly increased the yield of cells with high proliferative activity, typical pluripotent mesenchymal stromal cell phenotype, and preserved differentiation capacity.

  7. Infection Programs Sustained Lymphoid Stromal Cell Responses and Shapes Lymph Node Remodeling upon Secondary Challenge.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Julia L; Walter, Anne; Alexandre, Yannick O; Hor, Jyh Liang; Liu, Ruijie; Ma, Joel Z; Devi, Sapna; Tokuda, Nobuko; Owada, Yuji; Mackay, Laura K; Smyth, Gordon K; Heath, William R; Mueller, Scott N

    2017-01-10

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are constructed of intricate networks of endothelial and mesenchymal stromal cells. How these lymphoid stromal cells (LSCs) regulate lymphoid tissue remodeling and contribute to immune responses remains poorly understood. We performed a comprehensive functional and transcriptional analysis of LSC responses to skin viral infection and found that LSC subsets responded robustly, with different kinetics for distinct pathogens. Recruitment of cells to inflamed LNs induced LSC expansion, while B cells sustained stromal responses in an antigen-independent manner. Infection induced rapid transcriptional responses in LSCs. This transcriptional program was transient, returning to homeostasis within 1 month of infection, yet expanded fibroblastic reticular cell networks persisted for more than 3 months after infection, and this altered LN composition reduced the magnitude of LSC responses to subsequent heterologous infection. Our results reveal the complexity of LSC responses during infection and suggest that amplified networks of LN stromal cells support successive immune responses.

  8. Cordycepin disrupts leukemia association with mesenchymal stromal cells and eliminates leukemia stem cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shu-Man; Lu, Yi-Jhu; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Jan, Yee-Jee; Shyue, Song-Kun; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Liou, Jun-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining stemness of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) and reciprocal interactions between leukemia and stromal cells support leukemic progression and resistance to chemotherapy. Targeting the niche-based microenvironment is thus a new approach for leukemia therapy. Cordycepin is an analogue of adenosine and has been suggested to possess anti-leukemia properties. However, whether cordycepin influences association of leukemia and mesenchymal stromal cells has never been investigated. Here we show that cordycepin reduces CD34+CD38− cells in U937 and K562 cells and induces Dkk1 expression via autocrine and paracrine regulation in leukemia and mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs). Cordycepin suppresses cell attachment of leukemia with MSCs and downregulates N-cadherin in leukemia and VCAM-1 in MSCs. Moreover, incubation with leukemic conditioned media (CM) significantly induces IL-8 and IL-6 expression in MSCs, which is abrogated by cordycepin. Suppression of leukemic CM-induced VCAM-1 and IL-8 by cordycepin in MSCs is mediated by impairing NFκB signaling. Finally, cordycepin combined with an adenosine deaminase inhibitor prolongs survival in a leukemic mouse model. Our results indicate that cordycepin is a potential anti-leukemia therapeutic adjuvant via eliminating LSCs and disrupting leukemia-stromal association. PMID:28266575

  9. Differential gene expression in stromal cells of human giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Wuelling, M; Delling, G; Kaiser, E

    2004-12-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) offers a unique model for the hematopoietic-stromal cell interaction in human bone marrow. Evidence has been presented that GCT stromal cells (GCTSCs) promote accumulation, size and activity of the giant cells. Although GCTSCs are considered the neoplastic component of GCT, little is known about their genetic basis and, to date, a tumor-specific gene expression pattern has not been characterized. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified as the origin of the GCT neoplastic stromal cell. Using state of the art array technology, expression profiling was applied to enriched stromal cell populations from five different GCTs and two primary MSCs as controls. Of the 29 differentially expressed genes found, 25 showed an increased expression. Differential mRNA expression was verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of 10 selected genes, supporting the validity of cDNA arrays as a tool to identify tumor-related genes in GCTSCs. Increased expression of two oncogenes, JUN and NME2, was substantiated at the protein level, utilizing immunohistochemical evaluation of GCT sections and Western-blot analysis. Increased phosphorylation of JUN Ser-63 was also found.

  10. Paracrine Factors Produced by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Induce Apoptosis and Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chu; Soori, Mehrnoosh; Miles, Fayth; Sikes, Robert A.; Carson, Daniel D.; Chung, Leland L.W.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Preferential bony metastasis of human prostate cancer (PCa) cells contributes to disease mortality and morbidity. Local factors in bone stromal extracellular matrix microenvironment affect tumor growth through paracrine interactions between tumor and stromal cells. Methods Using co-culture and medium transfer, we used several methods to assess interactions between PCa and bone stromal cells using three PCa cell lines: PC3, LNCaP, and the LNCaP derivative, C4-2B. Results Co-culture of LNCaP and C4-2B cells with bone marrow stromal cell lines, HS27a and HS5, decreased cell number, as did culture with conditioned medium (CM) harvested from these two cell lines suggesting a soluble paracrine factor was responsible. PC3 cell growth was unaffected. CM harvested from bone stromal cell lines triggered apoptosis in LNCaP and C4-2B cell lines, but not in PC3 cells. Surviving C4-2B cells grown in bone stromal cell CM over several days were growth arrested, suggesting presence of a growth inhibitor. Apoptosis induced by CM was dose-dependent. Flow cytometry demonstrated that over a five day culture period in stromal cell CM, LNCaP and C4-2B cell lines, but not PC3 cells, underwent greater apoptosis than parallel cultures in SF medium. The LNCaP and C4-2B cells showed morphology and biomarker expression consistent with transdifferentiation towards a neuroendocrine phenotype after exposure to stromal cell CM. Conclusions The reactive bone stromal microenvironment initially is hostile to PCa cells producing widespread apoptosis. Activation of transdifferentiation in a subset of apoptotic resistant cells may support phenotypic adaptation during disease progression in bone, eventually favoring lethal disease. PMID:20665531

  11. Proapoptotic activity of bortezomib in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Sebastian; Parry, Joshua A; Mühlenberg, Thomas; Brown, Matthew F; Seneviratne, Danushka; Chatterjee, Payel; Chin, Anna; Rubin, Brian P; Kuan, Shih-Fan; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Duensing, Stefan; Duensing, Anette

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are caused by activating mutations in the KIT or PDGFRA receptor tyrosine kinase genes. Although >85% of GIST patients treated with the small-molecule inhibitor imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) achieve disease stabilization, complete remissions are rare and a substantial proportion of patients develop resistance to imatinib over time. Upregulation of soluble, non-chromatin-bound histone H2AX has an important role in imatinib-induced apoptosis of GIST cells. Additionally, H2AX levels in untreated GIST are maintained at low levels by a pathway that involves KIT, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In this study, we asked whether bortezomib-mediated inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome machinery could lead to upregulation of histone H2AX and GIST cell death. We show that bortezomib rapidly triggers apoptosis in GIST cells through a combination of mechanisms involving H2AX upregulation and loss of KIT protein expression. Downregulation of KIT transcription was an underlying mechanism for bortezomib-mediated inhibition of KIT expression. In contrast, the nuclear factor-kappaB signaling pathway did not seem to play a major role in bortezomib-induced GIST cell death. Significantly, we found that bortezomib would induce apoptosis in two imatinib-resistant GIST cell lines as well as a short-term culture established from a primary imatinib-resistant GIST. Collectively, our results provide a rationale to test the efficacy of bortezomib in GIST patients with imatinib-sensitive or -resistant tumors.

  12. Bioenergetics of Stromal Cells As a Predictor of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    1 AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0255 TITLE: BIOENERGETICS OF STROMAL CELLS AS A PREDICTOR OF AGGRESSIVE PROSTATE CANCER...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Bioenergetics Of Stromal Cells As A Predictor Of Aggressive Prostate Cancer” 5b. GRANT NUMBER...form and rapidly falls below the normal as they become aggressive in prostate tumorigenesis. We have validated this in five prostate cancer cell

  13. The effect of autologous bone marrow stromal cells differentiated on scaffolds for canine tibial bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Özdal-Kurt, F; Tuğlu, I; Vatansever, H S; Tong, S; Deliloğlu-Gürhan, S I

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow contains mesenchymal stem cells that form many tissues. Various scaffolds are available for bone reconstruction by tissue engineering. Osteoblastic differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) promote osteogenesis on scaffolds and stimulate bone regeneration. We investigated the use of cultured autologous BMSC on different scaffolds for healing defects in tibias of adult male canines. BMSC were isolated from canine humerus bone marrow, differentiated into osteoblasts in culture and loaded onto porous ceramic scaffolds including hydroxyapatite 1, hydroxyapatite gel and calcium phosphate. Osteoblast differentiation was verified by osteonectine and osteocalcine immunocytochemistry. The scaffolds with stromal cells were implanted in the tibial defect. Scaffolds without stromal cells were used as controls. Sections from the defects were processed for histological, ultrastructural, immunohistochemical and histomorphometric analyses to analyze the healing of the defects. BMSC were spread, allowed to proliferate and differentiate to osteoblasts as shown by alizarin red histochemistry, and osteocalcine and osteonectine immunostaining. Scanning electron microscopy showed that BMSC on the scaffolds were more active and adhesive to the calcium phosphate scaffold compared to the others. Macroscopic bone formation was observed in all groups, but scaffolds with stromal cells produced significantly better results. Bone healing occurred earlier and faster with stromal cells on the calcium phosphate scaffold and produced more callus compared to other scaffolds. Tissue healing and osteoblastic marker expression also were better with stromal cells on the scaffolds. Increased trabecula formation, cell density and decreased fibrosis were observed in the calcium phosphate scaffold with stromal cells. Autologous cultured stromal cells on the scaffolds were useful for healing of canine tibial bone defects. The calcium phosphate scaffold was the best for both cell

  14. An unusual infiltrative basal cell carcinoma with osteoclastic stromal changes mimicking carcinosarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Naujokas, Agne; Simsek, Hasan Aktug; McCalmont, Timothy H

    2015-01-01

    A 91-year-old man presented with an ulcerated nodule on his left lower eyelid. The tumor showed an epithelial component composed of basaloid and clear cells and a stroma that contained many osteoclastic giant cells. Strong, diffuse expression for cytokeratin 17 and p63 was noted in the epithelial component, whereas no staining was present in the sarcomatoid stroma, suggesting that the osteoclast-rich stromal component represented an unusual benign stromal reaction to the carcinoma rather than a manifestation of carcinosarcoma. Further supporting this interpretation was the absence of mitotic figures and low Ki-67 proliferation index (of approximately 1%) in the stromal cells. We herein reported a case of unusual infiltrative basal cell carcinoma, accompanied by a clear cell carcinomatous features and concurrent benign osteoclastic stromal changes.

  15. Stromal cell migration precedes hemopoietic repopulation of the bone marrow after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Werts, E.D.; Gibson, D.P.; Knapp, S.A.; DeGowin, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Circulation of hemopoietic stem cells into an irradiated site has been thoroughly documented, but migration of stromal cells to repair radiation damage has not. We determined the radiosensitivity of mouse bone marrow stroma and evaluated stromal and hemopoietic repopulation in x-irradiated marrow. The D/sub 0/ for growth of colonies of marrow stromal cells (MSC) was 215 to 230 rad. Total-body irradiation (TB) obliterated marrow stromal and hemopoietic cells within 3 days. In contrast, 1 day after 1000 rad leg irradiation (LI), MSC rose to 80% of normal, but fell to 34% by 3 days and recovered to 72% by 30 days. However, femoral nucleated cells diminished to 20% by 3 days and recovered to 74% of normal by 30 days. Likewise, differentiated marrow cells and hemopoietic stem cells were initially depleted. With 1000 rad LI followed 3 h later by 1000 rad to the body while shielding the leg, MSC and femoral nucleated cells recovered to values intermediate between 1000 rad TB and 1000 rad LI. We concluded that: (1) the D/sub 0/ for MSC was 215 to 230 rad, (2) stromal repopulation preceded hemopoietic recovery, and (3) immigration of stromal cells from an unirradiated sanctuary facilitated hemopoietic repopulation of a heavily irradiated site.

  16. CollagenVI-Cre mice: A new tool to target stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Alejandro; Kollias, George; Koliaraki, Vasiliki

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are non-hematopoietic cells involved in the regulation of adaptive immune responses. Three major stromal populations have been identified in adult SLOs: fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and marginal reticular cells (MRCs). The properties of these individual populations are not clearly defined, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic tools, especially for MRCs. Here, we analyzed stromal cell targeting in SLOs from a transgenic mouse strain that expresses Cre recombinase under the CollagenVI promoter, using lineage tracing approaches. We show that these mice target specifically MRCs and FDCs, but not FRCs in Peyer’s patches and isolated lymphoid follicles in the intestine. In contrast, stromal cells in lymph nodes and the spleen do not express the transgene, which renders ColVI-cre mice ideal for the specific targeting of stromal cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). This funding further supports the hypothesis of organ-specific stromal precursors in SLOs. Interestingly, in all tissues analyzed, there was also high specificity for perivascular cells, which have been proposed to act as FDC precursors. Taken together, ColVI-Cre mice are a useful new tool for the dissection of MRC- and FDC-specific functions and plasticity in the GALT. PMID:27604178

  17. Focal adhesion protein abnormalities in myelodysplastic mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Aanei, Carmen Mariana; Eloae, Florin Zugun; Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale; Tavernier, Emmanuelle; Carasevici, Eugen; Guyotat, Denis; Campos, Lydia

    2011-11-01

    Direct cell-cell contact between haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and their cellular microenvironment is essential to maintain 'stemness'. In cancer biology, focal adhesion (FA) proteins are involved in survival signal transduction in a wide variety of human tumours. To define the role of FA proteins in the haematopoietic microenvironment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), CD73-positive mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were immunostained for paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and p130CAS, and analysed for reactivity, intensity and cellular localisation. Immunofluorescence microscopy allowed us to identify qualitative and quantitative differences, and subcellular localisation analysis revealed that in pathological MSCs, paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} formed nuclear molecular complexes. Increased expression of paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and enhanced nuclear co-localisation of these proteins correlated with a consistent proliferative advantage in MSCs from patients with refractory anaemia with excess blasts (RAEB) and negatively impacted clonogenicity of HPCs. These results suggest that signalling via FA proteins could be implicated in HPC-MSC interactions. Further, because FAK is an HSP90{alpha}/{beta} client protein, these results suggest the utility of HSP90{alpha}/{beta} inhibition as a target for adjuvant therapy for myelodysplasia.

  18. A rare ovarian tumor, leydig stromal cell tumor, presenting with virilization: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Aminimoghaddam, Soheila; Hashemi, Forough

    2012-01-01

    Leydig stromal cell tumor is a rare ovarian tumor that belongs to the group of sex-cord stromal tumors. They produce testosterone leading to hyperandrogenism. We present a 41yr old woman with symptoms of virilization and a mass of right adenex via ultra Sonography, and a rise of total and free serum testosterone. An ovarian source of androgen was suspected and a surgery performed. A diagnosis of leydig-stromal cell tumor was confirmed. Our report is a reminder that although idiopathic hirsutism and other benign androgen excess disorder like Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOs) are common, ovarian mass should be considered in differential diagnosis. PMID:23482693

  19. Increased infiltrated macrophages in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): role of stromal androgen receptor in macrophage-induced prostate stromal cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohai; Lin, Wen-Jye; Izumi, Kouji; Jiang, Qi; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Xu, Defeng; Fang, Lei-Ya; Lu, Tianjing; Li, Lei; Xia, Shujie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-05-25

    Infiltrated macrophages may play important roles in the development and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. We found increased macrophages infiltration in human and mouse BPH tissues. By establishing a co-culture transwell system, we found increased migration of macrophages and proliferation of prostate stromal cells during co-culture. Importantly, stromal androgen receptor (AR) could enhance the migration of macrophages and macrophage-mediated stromal cell proliferation. We identified CCL3 as an AR downstream player, and found CCL3 levels were notably increased in human and mouse BPH prostates. Ablation of prostate stromal AR in a mouse BPH model significantly reduced CCL3 expression levels in prostates. Consistently, targeting AR via an AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9®, or neutralization of CCL3 with an antibody, resulted in suppression of macrophage migration and prostate stromal cell growth. Our study provides mechanistic insights on the regulation of prostate stromal cells by macrophages via stromal AR/CCL3 signaling pathways, which could potentially allow the development of therapeutic approaches for battling BPH with persistent inflammation.

  20. A Rare Collision Tumour of Uterus- Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bindiya; Pathre, Abhishek; Rajaram, Shalini; Goyal, Neerja

    2017-01-01

    Collision tumours are defined by co-existence of two tumours in the same or adjacent organs which are topographically and histologically distinct with minimal or no histological admixture. Collision tumours have been described in many organs notably thyroid, brain, adrenal gland, stomach and rarely uterus. Most of the collision tumours reported in uterus have two components; an adenocarcinoma and a sarcoma. We report a case of a 60-year-old lady who presented with complaints of post-menopausal bleeding. A cervical biopsy was performed which showed a non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma of cervix. Intra-operatively the uterus was bulky with a 6 cm x 5 cm polypoidal mass in the endometrial canal along with a 2 cm friable cervical growth. The fleshy uterine cavity mass was a spindle cell tumour with moderate pleomorphism and frequent mitosis. It was immunopositive for CD10 and negative for smooth muscle actin and cytokeratin 5/6. The other growth showed non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma which was positive for cytokeratin 5/6. Based on the distinct topographical location and limited areas of tumour admixture of the two tumours, a diagnosis of collision tumour of uterus comprising of endometrial stromal sarcoma (high grade) uterus and squamous cell carcinoma cervix was made. PMID:28384878

  1. Characterization of mesenchymal stromal cells: potency assay development.

    PubMed

    Hematti, Peiman

    2016-04-01

    Based on their many different mechanisms of action, presumed immune-privileged status, and relative ease of production, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are under intensive clinical investigation for treating a wide range of degenerative, inflammatory, and immunologic disorders. Identification of relevant and robust potency assays is not only a regulatory requirement, but it is also the basis for producing and delivering a product that is consistent, safe, and ultimately an effective therapy. Although development of an appropriate potency assay is one of the most challenging issues in cell-based therapies, it is of paramount importance in the process of developing and testing cellular products. Regardless of the many different tissue sources and methods used in culture expansion of MSCs, they possess many of the same morphologic, cell surface markers, and differentiation characteristics. However, MSC products with similar phenotypic characteristics could still have major differences in their biologic and functional attributes. Understanding the different mechanisms of action and establishment of relevant potency assays is of pivotal importance in allowing investigators and regulatory agencies to compare MSCs used in different clinical trials.

  2. Characterization of Human AB Serum for Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Vanessa Tieko Marques; Mizukami, Amanda; Orellana, Maristela Delgado; Caruso, Samia Rigotto; da Silva, Fernanda Borges; Traina, Fabiola; de Lima Prata, Karen; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Swiech, Kamilla

    2017-01-01

    Background So far, using human blood-derived components appears to be the most efficient and safest approach available for mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) expansion. In this paper, we report on the characterization of human AB serum (AB HS) produced by using different plasma sources, and its use as an alternative supplement to MSC expansion. Methods Two plasma sources were used for AB HS production: plasma removed from whole blood after 24 h of collection (PC > 24 h) and plasma, cryoprecipitate reduced (PCryoR). The biochemical profile and quality of the produced AB HS batches were analyzed and their ability to support MSC cell growth after different storage times (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months) was evaluated. Results The two plasma sources used showed similar characteristics regarding biochemical constituents and quality parameters and were effective in promoting MSC growth. MSCs cultured in medium supplemented with 10% AB HS presented similar doubling times and cumulative population doublings when compared to the 10% fetal bovine serum(FBS)-supplemented culture while maintaining immunophenotype, functional features, and cytogenetic profile. Conclusion Overall, the results indicate that AB HS is an efficient FBS substitute and can be used for at least 12 months after production without impairing cell proliferation and quality. PMID:28275329

  3. Human mesenchymal stromal cells are mechanosensitive to vibration stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kim, I S; Song, Y M; Lee, B; Hwang, S J

    2012-12-01

    Low-magnitude high-frequency (LMHF) vibrations have the ability to stimulate bone formation and reduce bone loss. However, the anabolic mechanisms that are mediated by vibration in human bone cells at the cellular level remain unclear. We hypothesized that human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) display direct osteoblastic responses to LMHF vibration signals. Daily exposure to vibrations increased the proliferation of hMSCs, with the highest efficiency occurring at a peak acceleration of 0.3 g and vibrations at 30 to 40 Hz. Specifically, these conditions promoted osteoblast differentiation through an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity and in vitro matrix mineralization. The effect of vibration on the expression of osteogenesis-related factors differed depending on culture method. hMSCs that underwent vibration in a monolayer culture did not exhibit any changes in the expressions of these genes, while cells in three-dimensional culture showed increased expression of type I collagen, osteoprotegerin, or VEGF, and VEGF induction appeared in 2 different hMSC lines. These results are among the first to demonstrate a dose-response effect upon LMHF stimulation, thereby demonstrating that hMSCs are mechanosensitive to LMHF vibration signals such that they could facilitate the osteogenic process.

  4. Stromal-epithelial interaction study: The effect of corneal epithelial cells on growth factor expression in stromal cells using organotypic culture model.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Atsushi; Hara, Yuko; Kadota, Yuko; Yang, Lujun; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Shirakata, Yuji; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    Interactions between stromal and epithelial cells play important roles in the development, homeostasis, and pathological conditions of the cornea. Soluble cytokines are critical factors in stromal-epithelial interactions, and growth factors secreted from corneal stromal cells contribute to the regulation of proliferation and differentiation of corneal epithelial cells (CECs). However, the manner in which the expression of growth factors is regulated in stromal cells has not been completely determined. To study stromal-epithelial cell interactions, we used an organotypic culture model. Human or rabbit CECs (HCECs or RCECs) were cultured on amniotic membranes placed on human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs) embedded in a collagen gel. The properties of the organotypic culture were examined by hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunofluorescence. In the organotypic culture, HCECs or RCECs were stratified into two-three layers after five days and five-seven layers after nine days. However, stratification was not observed when the HCECs were seeded on a collagen gel without fibroblasts. K3/K12 were expressed on day 9. The HCF-embedded collagen gels were collected on days 3, 5, or 9 after seeding the RCECs, and mRNA expression of growth factors FGF7, HGF, NGF, EGF, TGF-α, SCF, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and TGF-β3 were quantified by real-time PCR. mRNA expression of the growth factors in HCFs cultured with RCECs were compared with those cultured without RCECs, as well as in monolayer cultures. mRNA expression of TGF-α was markedly increased in HCFs cultured with RCECs. However, mRNA expression of the TGF-β family was suppressed in HCFs cultured with RCECs. Principal component analysis revealed that mRNA expression of the growth factors in HCFs were generally similar when they were cultured with RCECs. In organotypic cultures, the morphological changes in the CECs and the expression patterns of the growth factors in the stromal cells clearly demonstrated stromal-epithelial cell

  5. A mouse model of luciferase-transfected stromal cells of giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Lau, Carol P Y; Wong, Kwok Chuen; Huang, Lin; Li, Gang; Tsui, Stephen K W; Kumta, Shekhar Madhukar

    2015-11-01

    A major barrier towards the study of the effects of drugs on Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (GCT) has been the lack of an animal model. In this study, we created an animal model in which GCT stromal cells survived and functioned as proliferating neoplastic cells. A proliferative cell line of GCT stromal cells was used to create a stable and luciferase-transduced cell line, Luc-G33. The cell line was characterized and was found that there were no significant differences on cell proliferation rate and recruitment of monocytes when compared with the wild type GCT stromal cells. We delivered the Luc-G33 cells either subcutaneously on the back or to the tibiae of the nude mice. The presence of viable Luc-G33 cells was assessed using real-time live imaging by the IVIS 200 bioluminescent imaging (BLI) system. The tumor cells initially propagated and remained viable on site for 7 weeks in the subcutaneous tumor model. We also tested in vivo antitumor effects of Zoledronate (ZOL) and Geranylgeranyl transferase-I inhibitor (GGTI-298) alone or their combinations in Luc-G33-transplanted nude mice. ZOL alone at 400 µg/kg and the co-treatment of ZOL at 400 µg/kg and GGTI-298 at 1.16 mg/kg reduced tumor cell viability in the model. Furthermore, the anti-tumor effects by ZOL, GGTI-298 and the co-treatment in subcutaneous tumor model were also confirmed by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. In conclusion, we established a nude mice model of GCT stromal cells which allows non-invasive, real-time assessments of tumor development and testing the in vivo effects of different adjuvants for treating GCT.

  6. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST).

    PubMed

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites.

  7. Inflammation, Innate Immunity, and the Intestinal Stromal Cell Niche: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Benjamin M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal cells of multiple tissues contribute to immune-mediated protective responses and, conversely, the pathological tissue changes associated with chronic inflammatory disease. However, unlike hematopoietic immune cells, tissue stromal cell populations remain poorly characterized with respect to specific surface marker expression, their ontogeny, self-renewal, and proliferative capacity within tissues and the extent to which they undergo phenotypic immunological changes during the course of an infectious or inflammatory insult. Extending our knowledge of the immunological features of stromal cells provides an exciting opportunity to further dissect the underlying biology of many important immune-mediated diseases, although several challenges remain in bringing the emerging field of stromal immunology to equivalence with the study of the hematopoietic immune cell compartment. This review highlights recent studies that have begun unraveling the complexity of tissue stromal cell function in immune responses, with a focus on the intestine, and proposes strategies for the development of the field to uncover the great potential for stromal immunology to contribute to our understanding of the fundamental pathophysiology of disease, and the opening of new therapeutic avenues in multiple chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:26150817

  8. Management of Fibrosis: The Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Breakthrough

    PubMed Central

    Usunier, Benoît; Benderitter, Marc; Tamarat, Radia; Chapel, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is the endpoint of many chronic inflammatory diseases and is defined by an abnormal accumulation of extracellular matrix components. Despite its slow progression, it leads to organ malfunction. Fibrosis can affect almost any tissue. Due to its high frequency, in particular in the heart, lungs, liver, and kidneys, many studies have been conducted to find satisfactory treatments. Despite these efforts, current fibrosis management therapies either are insufficiently effective or induce severe adverse effects. In the light of these facts, innovative experimental therapies are being investigated. Among these, cell therapy is regarded as one of the best candidates. In particular, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have great potential in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. The value of their immunomodulatory effects and their ability to act on profibrotic factors such as oxidative stress, hypoxia, and the transforming growth factor-β1 pathway has already been highlighted in preclinical and clinical studies. Furthermore, their propensity to act depending on the microenvironment surrounding them enhances their curative properties. In this paper, we review a large range of studies addressing the use of MSCs in the treatment of fibrotic diseases. The results reported here suggest that MSCs have antifibrotic potential for several organs. PMID:25132856

  9. Expression of epigenetic effectors in decidualizing human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Giulia; Christian, Mark; Quenby, Siobhan; Brosens, Jan J

    2012-09-01

    Cyclic differentiation of human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs) into decidual cells is a highly coordinated process essential for embryo implantation and pregnancy. This differentiation process is closely recapitulated in culture upon exposure of purified HESCs to cyclic AMP and progesterone signaling. Mining of gene expression data revealed that HESCs express 147 genes coding for epigenetic effectors, 33 (22%) of which are significantly regulated (P < 0.05) upon decidualization. Among these are genes encoding for histone-modifying proteins and their cofactors, histone-binding proteins, histone variants, CpG-binding proteins and DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). Interestingly, more than two-thirds of differentially expressed chromatin-modifying genes are down-regulated upon the transition from a proliferative to a differentiated HESC phenotype. Despite the strong regulation of DNMTs, colorimetric and long interspersed nuclear element 1 methylation assays did not show global changes in DNA methylation levels upon differentiation of HESCs. Taken together, the coordinated regulation of diverse effector molecules suggests that complex epigenetic modification at specific loci underpins the acquisition of a decidual endometrial phenotype.

  10. RelB-Dependent Stromal Cells Promote T-Cell Leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Nuno R.; Williame, Maryvonne; Gachet, Stéphanie; Cormier, Françoise; Janin, Anne; Weih, Debra; Weih, Falk; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Background The Rel/NF-κB transcription factors are often activated in solid or hematological malignancies. In most cases, NF-κB activation is found in malignant cells and results from activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway, leading to RelA and/or c-Rel activation. Recently, NF-κB activity in inflammatory cells infiltrating solid tumors has been shown to contribute to solid tumor initiation and progression. Noncanonical NF-κB activation, which leads to RelB activation, has also been reported in breast carcinoma, prostate cancer, and lymphoid leukemia. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report a novel role for RelB in stromal cells that promote T-cell leukemogenesis. RelB deficiency delayed leukemia onset in the TEL-JAK2 transgenic mouse model of human T acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Bone marrow chimeric mouse experiments showed that RelB is not required in the hematopoietic compartment. In contrast, RelB plays a role in radio-resistant stromal cells to accelerate leukemia onset and increase disease severity. Conclusions/Significance The present results are the first to uncover a role for RelB in the crosstalk between non-hematopoietic stromal cells and leukemic cells. Thus, besides its previously reported role intrinsic to specific cancer cells, the noncanonical NF-κB pathway may also play a pro-oncogenic role in cancer microenvironmental cells. PMID:18596915

  11. Supernatant of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induces Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Possessing Mesenchymal Features

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gang; Xu, Jun-jun; Deng, Zhi-hong; Feng, Jie; Jin, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that some cells from peripheral blood fibroblast-like mononuclear cells have the capacity to differentiate into mesenchymal lineages. However, the insufficiency of these cells in the circulation challenges the cell isolation and subsequently limits the clinical application of these cells. In the present study, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (pbMNCs) were isolated from wound animals and treated with the supernatant of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs). Results showed these pbMNCs were fibroblast-like, had stromal morphology, were negative for CD34 and CD45, but positive for Vimentin and Collagen I, and had the multipotency to differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts. We named these induced peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ipbMSCs). Skin grafts in combination with ipbMSCs and collagen I were applied for wound healing, and results revealed ipbMSC exhibited similar potency and effectiveness in the promotion of wound healing to the bmMSCs. Hereafter, we speculate that the mixture of growth factors and chemokines secreted by bmMSCs may play an important roles in the induction of the proliferation and mesenchymal differentiation of mononuclear cells. Our results are clinically relevant because it provide a new method for the acquisition of MSCs which can be used as a candidate for the wound repair. PMID:21494428

  12. Immunization of stromal cell targeting fibroblast activation protein providing immunotherapy to breast cancer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Meng, Mingyao; Wang, Wenju; Yan, Jun; Tan, Jing; Liao, Liwei; Shi, Jianlin; Wei, Chuanyu; Xie, Yanhua; Jin, Xingfang; Yang, Li; Jin, Qing; Zhu, Huirong; Tan, Weiwei; Yang, Fang; Hou, Zongliu

    2016-08-01

    Unlike heterogeneous tumor cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are genetically more stable which serve as a reliable target for tumor immunotherapy. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) which is restrictively expressed in tumor cells and CAF in vivo and plays a prominent role in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis can function as a tumor rejection antigen. In the current study, we have constructed artificial FAP(+) stromal cells which mimicked the FAP(+) CAF in vivo. We immunized a breast cancer mouse model with FAP(+) stromal cells to perform immunotherapy against FAP(+) cells in the tumor microenvironment. By forced expression of FAP, we have obtained FAP(+) stromal cells whose phenotype was CD11b(+)/CD34(+)/Sca-1(+)/FSP-1(+)/MHC class I(+). Interestingly, proliferation capacity of the fibroblasts was significantly enhanced by FAP. In the breast cancer-bearing mouse model, vaccination with FAP(+) stromal cells has significantly inhibited the growth of allograft tumor and reduced lung metastasis indeed. Depletion of T cell assays has suggested that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were involved in the tumor cytotoxic immune response. Furthermore, tumor tissue from FAP-immunized mice revealed that targeting FAP(+) CAF has induced apoptosis and decreased collagen type I and CD31 expression in the tumor microenvironment. These results implicated that immunization with FAP(+) stromal cells led to the disruption of the tumor microenvironment. Our study may provide a novel strategy for immunotherapy of a broad range of cancer.

  13. Expression of Pitx2 in stromal cells is required for normal hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kieusseian, Aurélie; Chagraoui, Jalila; Kerdudo, Cécile; Mangeot, Philippe-Emmanuel; Gage, Philip J; Navarro, Nicole; Izac, Brigitte; Uzan, Georges; Forget, Bernard G; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2006-01-15

    Although the expression of Pitx2, a bicoid family homeodomain transcription factor, is highly regulated during hematopoiesis, its function during this process was not documented; we thus studied hematopoiesis in Pitx2-null mice. We found that Pitx2(-/-) embryos display hypoplastic livers with reduced numbers of hematopoietic cells, but these cells had normal hematopoietic potential, as evidenced by colony-forming assays, immature progenitor cell assays, and long-term repopulation assays. Because the microenvironment is also crucial to the development of normal hematopoiesis, we established Pitx2(-/-) and Pitx2(+/+) stromas from fetal liver and studied their hematopoietic supportive capacity. We showed that the frequency of cobblestone area-forming cells was 4-fold decreased when using Pitx2(-/-) stromal cells compared with Pitx2(+/+) stromal cells, whatever the Pitx2 genotype of hematopoietic cells tested in this assay. This defect was rescued by expression of Pitx2 into Pitx2(-/-) fetal liver stromal cells, demonstrating a major and direct role of Pitx2 in the hematopoietic supportive capacity of fetal liver stroma. Finally, we showed a reduced capacity of MS5 stromal cells expressing Pitx2 RNAi to support human hematopoiesis. Altogether these data showed that Pitx2 has major functions in the hematopoietic supportive capacity of fetal liver and adult bone marrow stromal cells.

  14. Expression of Pitx2 in stromal cells is required for normal hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kieusseian, Aurélie; Chagraoui, Jalila; Kerdudo, Cécile; Mangeot, Philippe-Emmanuel; Gage, Philip J.; Navarro, Nicole; Izac, Brigitte; Uzan, Georges; Forget, Bernard G.; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Although the expression of Pitx2, a bicoid family homeodomain transcription factor, is highly regulated during hematopoiesis, its function during this process was not documented; we thus studied hematopoiesis in Pitx2-null mice. We found that Pitx2–/– embryos display hypoplastic livers with reduced numbers of hematopoietic cells, but these cells had normal hematopoietic potential, as evidenced by colony-forming assays, immature progenitor cell assays, and long-term repopulation assays. Because the microenvironment is also crucial to the development of normal hematopoiesis, we established Pitx2–/– and Pitx2+/+ stromas from fetal liver and studied their hematopoietic supportive capacity. We showed that the frequency of cobblestone area-forming cells was 4-fold decreased when using Pitx2–/– stromal cells compared with Pitx2+/+ stromal cells, whatever the Pitx2 genotype of hematopoietic cells tested in this assay. This defect was rescued by expression of Pitx2 into Pitx2–/– fetal liver stromal cells, demonstrating a major and direct role of Pitx2 in the hematopoietic supportive capacity of fetal liver stroma. Finally, we showed a reduced capacity of MS5 stromal cells expressing Pitx2 RNAi to support human hematopoiesis. Altogether these data showed that Pitx2 has major functions in the hematopoietic supportive capacity of fetal liver and adult bone marrow stromal cells. PMID:16195330

  15. Hematopoiesis on cellulose ester membranes (CEM). X. Effects of in vitro irradiation of stromal cells prior to application on CEM

    SciTech Connect

    Knospe, W.H.; Husseini, S.G.

    1986-11-01

    Cellulose ester membranes (CEM) were coated with stromal cells from murine bone or bone marrow irradiated in vitro with 1000, 2000, or 4000 rad and then implanted i.p. in CAF1 mice for periods of six and 12 months. CEM coated with stromal cells from bone showed excellent regeneration of bone and hematopoiesis after 1000 rad in vitro irradiation. After 2000 rad, hematopoietic and bone regeneration was reduced by about 50%, and after 4000 rad it was completely absent in CEM coated with stromal cells from bone. CEM coated with stromal cells from bone marrow showed no regeneration of hematopoiesis or bone after 1000, 2000, and 4000 rad in vitro irradiation and residence i.p. for six and 12 months. These results indicate that regeneration of the hematopoietic microenvironment is dependent upon living stromal cells. A difference in radiation sensitivity is demonstrated between stromal cells from bone and from bone marrow.

  16. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Generate Muscle Cells and Repair Muscle Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezawa, Mari; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Itokazu, Yutaka; Yoshihara, Tomoyuki; Hoshino, Mikio; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Ide, Chizuka; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2005-07-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) have great potential as therapeutic agents. We report a method for inducing skeletal muscle lineage cells from human and rat general adherent MSCs with an efficiency of 89%. Induced cells differentiated into muscle fibers upon transplantation into degenerated muscles of rats and mdx-nude mice. The induced population contained Pax7-positive cells that contributed to subsequent regeneration of muscle upon repetitive damage without additional transplantation of cells. These MSCs represent a more ready supply of myogenic cells than do the rare myogenic stem cells normally found in muscle and bone marrow.

  17. Asiatic acid inhibits adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; Piao, Cheng-dong; Sun, Hong-hui; Ren, Xian-Sheng; Bai, Yun-Shen

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) are the common precursors for both osteoblasts and adipocytes. With aging, BMSC osteoblast differentiation decreases whereas BMSC differentiation into adipocytes increases, resulting in increased adipogenesis and bone loss. In the present study, we investigated the effect of asiatic acid (AA) on adipocytic differentiation of BMSCs. AA inhibited the adipogenic induction of lipid accumulation, activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and expression of marker genes in adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (ap) 2, and adipsin. Further, we found that AA did not alter clonal expansion rate and expression of C/EBPβ, upstream key regulator of PPARγ, and binding activity of C/EBPβ to PPARγ promoter was not affected by AA as well. These findings suggest that AA may modulate differentiation of BMSCs to cause a lineage shift away from the adipocytes, and inhibition of PPARγ by AA is through C/EBPβ-independent mechanisms. Thus, AA could be a potential candidate for a novel drug against osteoporosis.

  18. A relativity concept in mesenchymal stromal cell manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ivan; De Boer, Jan; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are being experimentally tested in several biological systems and clinical settings with the aim of verifying possible therapeutic effects for a variety of indications. MSCs are also known to be heterogeneous populations, with phenotypic and functional features that depend heavily on the individual donor, the harvest site, and the culture conditions. In the context of this multidimensional complexity, a recurrent question is whether it is feasible to produce MSC batches as "standard" therapeutics, possibly within scalable manufacturing systems. Here, we provide a short overview of the literature on different culture methods for MSCs, including those employing innovative technologies, and of some typically assessed functional features (e.g., growth, senescence, genomic stability, clonogenicity, etc.). We then offer our perspective of a roadmap on how to identify and refine manufacturing systems for MSCs intended for specific clinical indications. We submit that the vision of producing MSCs according to a unique standard, although commercially attractive, cannot yet be scientifically substantiated. Instead, efforts should be concentrated on standardizing methods for characterization of MSCs generated by different groups, possibly covering a vast gamut of functionalities. Such assessments, combined with hypotheses on the therapeutic mode of action and associated clinical data, should ultimately allow definition of in-process controls and measurable release criteria for MSC manufacturing. These will have to be validated as predictive of potency in suitable pre-clinical models and of therapeutic efficacy in patients.

  19. IFATS Collection: Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Improve the Foreign Body Response

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, Heather L.; Reichert, William; Klitzman, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Many implanted devices fail due to the formation of an avascular capsule surrounding the device. Additionally, fat has long been known to promote healing and vascularization. The goals of this study were to identify potential mechanisms of the provascular actions of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) and to improve implant biocompatibility. First, adult ASCs and fibroblasts from rats were attached to polyurethane and polystyrene in vitro and their cytokine secretion profile was analyzed. Secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from ASCs was 10 –70 times higher than fibroblasts after 3 and 6 days. Next, polyurethane, bare and with cellular coatings, was implanted subcutaneously in rats. The fibrous capsule surrounding bare polyurethane implants was 17%–32% thicker and the amount of collagen was 27% greater than the capsule surrounding ASC-coated implants. Finally, the microvessel density adjacent to ASC-coated polyurethane was approximately 50%–80% higher than bare polyurethane. In summary, ASCs attached to polyurethane have a dramatically increased VEGF production compared with fibroblasts in vitro, and these cells also produce an increased microvessel density in the surrounding tissue when implanted subcutaneously in rats. PMID:18436858

  20. Patient factors influencing the concentration of stromal vascular fraction (SVF) for adipose-derived stromal cell (ASC) therapy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Astor, Donniel E; Hoelzler, Michael G; Harman, Robert; Bastian, Richard P

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether patient factors influence the concentration of the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) in fat for adipose-derived stromal cell (ASC) therapy in dogs. A total of 1265 dogs underwent adipose collection surgeries by veterinarians for processing by the Vet-Stem laboratory and data on cell counts and patient factors were collected. Body condition score (BCS) and breed size did not significantly affect the viable cells per gram (VCPG) of adipose tissue that represents the viable SVF. Age significantly affected the VCPG, with dogs in age quartile 1 having a significantly higher VCPG than those in quartile 2 (P = 0.003) and quartile 4 (P = 0.002). Adipose tissue collected at the falciform location had significantly fewer VCPG than tissue collected at the thoracic wall and inguinal locations (P < 0.001). When the interaction of gender and location was evaluated, there were significantly fewer VCPG in tissue collected at the falciform location than at the thoracic wall and inguinal locations in female spayed dogs (P < 0.001) and male neutered dogs (P < 0.001), but not in female intact dogs (P = 0.743) or male intact dogs (P = 0.208). It was concluded that specific patient factors should be taken into consideration in order to obtain the maximal yield of VCPG from an adipose collection procedure.

  1. HB-EGF directs stromal cell polyploidy and decidualization via cyclin D3 during implantation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Li, Meiling; Cox, Sandra; Davis, Marilyn K; Tawfik, Ossama; Paria, Bibhash C; Das, Sanjoy K

    2004-01-01

    Stromal cell polyploidy is a unique phenomenon that occurs during uterine decidualization following embryo implantation, although the developmental mechanism still remains elusive. The general consensus is that the aberrant expression and altered functional activity of cell cycle regulatory molecules at two particular checkpoints G1 to S and G2 to M in the cell cycle play an important role in the development of cellular polyploidy. Despite the compelling evidence of intrinsic cell cycle alteration, it has been implicated that the development of cellular polyploidy may be controlled by specific actions of extracellular growth regulators. Here we show a novel role for heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) in the developmental process of stromal cell polyploidy in mice. HB-EGF, which is one of the earliest known molecular mediators of implantation in mice and humans, promotes stromal cell polyploidy via upregulation of cyclin D3. Adenoviral delivery of antisense cyclin D3 attenuates cyclin D3 expression and abrogates HB-EGF-induced stromal cell polyploidy in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, the results demonstrate that the regulation of stromal cell polyploidy and decidualization induced by HB-EGF depend on cyclin D3 induction.

  2. The role of stromal cells in the persistence of chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, A J; Filer, A; Buckley, C D

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is an unstable state; it either resolves or persists. Inflammatory reactions often have a propensity for specific anatomical sites. Why inflammation persists with specific tissue tropism remains obscure. Increasing evidence suggests that stromal cells which define tissue architecture are the key cells involved, and therefore make attractive therapeutic targets. Research on stromal cells in general and fibroblasts in particular has so far been hampered by a lack of fibroblast-specific cell markers. This review highlights our increasing understanding of the role of fibroblasts in inflammation, and suggests that these cells provide the cellular basis for site specific chronic inflammation. PMID:23199320

  3. Periostin expression in intra-tumoral stromal cells is prognostic and predictive for colorectal carcinoma via creating a cancer-supportive niche

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaojie; Ding, Yibo; Luo, Yanxin; Cai, Hui; Liu, Yan; Gao, Xianhua; Liu, Qizhi; Yu, Yongwei; Du, Yan; Wang, Hao; Ma, Liye; Wang, Jianping; Chen, Kun; Ding, Yanqing; Fu, Chuangang; Cao, Guangwen

    2016-01-01

    Periostin (POSTN) expression in cancer cells and circulation has been related to poor prognosis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). However, the role of POSTN expressed in intra-tumoral stroma on CRC progression remains largely unknown. This study enrolled 1098 CRC patients who received surgical treatment in Shanghai and Guangzhou, Mainland China. In Shanghai cohort, immunohistochemistry score of stromal POSTN expression increased consecutively from adjacent mucosa, primary CRC tissues, to metastatic CRC tissues (P < 0.001), while medium- and high-stromal POSTN expression, rather than epithelial POSTN expression, independently predicted unfavorable prognoses of CRC, adjusted for covariates including TNM stage and postoperative chemotherapy in multivariate Cox models. The results in Shanghai cohort were faithfully replicated in Guangzhou cohort. Stromal POSTN expression dose-dependently predicted an unfavorable prognosis of stage III CRC patients with postoperative chemotherapy in both cohorts. POSTN derived from colonic fibroblasts or recombinant POSTN significantly promoted proliferation, anchorage independent growth, invasion, and chemo-resistance of CRC cells; whereas these effects were counteracted via targeting to PI3K/Akt or Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. CRC cell RKO-derived factor(s) significantly induced POSTN production in colonic fibroblasts and autocrine POSTN promoted proliferation, migration, and anchorage independent growth of fibroblasts. Conclusively, stromal POSTN is prognostic and predictive for CRC via creating a niche to facilitate cancer progression. Targeting POSTN-induced signaling pathways may be therapeutic options for metastatic or chemoresistant CRC. PMID:26556874

  4. Human-derived normal mesenchymal stem/stromal cells in anticancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Shi-Jie; Wen, Qin; Zhong, Jiang F; Chen, Xue-Lian; Stucky, Andres; Press, Michael F; Zhang, Xi

    2017-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) not only plays a pivotal role during cancer progression and metastasis, but also has profound effects on therapeutic efficacy. Stromal cells of the TME are increasingly becoming a key consideration in the development of active anticancer therapeutics. However, dispute concerning the role of stromal cells to fight cancer continues because the use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) as an anticancer agent is dependent on the specific MSCs subtype, in vitro or in vivo conditions, factors secreted by MSCs, types of cancer cell lines and interactions between MSCs, cancer cells and host immune cells. In this review, we mainly focus on the role of human-derived normal MSCs in anticancer therapies. We first discuss the use of different MSCs in the therapies for various cancers. We then focus on their anticancer mechanism and clinical application. PMID:28123601

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Induced DDR2 Mediates Stromal-Breast Cancer Interactions and Metastasis Growth.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Maria E; Martin, Emily E; Anwar, Talha; Arellano-Garcia, Caroline; Medhora, Natasha; Lama, Arjun; Chen, Yu-Chih; Tanager, Kevin S; Yoon, Euisik; Kidwell, Kelley M; Ge, Chunxi; Franceschi, Renny T; Kleer, Celina G

    2017-01-31

    Increased collagen deposition by breast cancer (BC)-associated mesenchymal stem/multipotent stromal cells (MSC) promotes metastasis, but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we report that the collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is essential for stromal-BC communication. In human BC metastasis, DDR2 is concordantly upregulated in metastatic cancer and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. In MSCs isolated from human BC metastasis, DDR2 maintains a fibroblastic phenotype with collagen deposition and induces pathological activation of DDR2 signaling in BC cells. Loss of DDR2 in MSCs impairs their ability to promote DDR2 phosphorylation in BC cells, as well as BC cell alignment, migration, and metastasis. Female ddr2-deficient mice homozygous for the slie mutation show inefficient spontaneous BC metastasis. These results point to a role for mesenchymal stem cell DDR2 in metastasis and suggest a therapeutic approach for metastatic BC.

  6. Inflammatory response of a prostate stromal cell line induced by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Im, S J; Han, I H; Kim, J H; Gu, N Y; Seo, M Y; Chung, Y H; Ryu, J S

    2016-04-01

    While Trichomonas vaginalis, a cause of sexually transmitted infection, is known as a surface-dwelling protozoa, trichomonads have been detected in prostatic tissue from benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis by immunoperoxidase assay or PCR. However, the immune response of prostate stromal cells infected with T. vaginalis has not been investigated. Our objective was to investigate whether T. vaginalis could induce an inflammatory response in prostate stromal cells. Incubation of a human prostate stromal myofibroblast cells (WPMY-1) with live T. vaginalis T016 increased expression of the inflammatory chemokines CXCL8 and CCL2. In addition, TLR4, ROS, MAPK and NF-κB expression increased, while inhibitors of TLR4, ROS, MAPKs and NF-κB reduced CXCL8 and CCL2 production. Medium conditioned by incubation of WPMY-1 cells with T. vaginalis stimulated the migration of human neutrophils and monocytes (THP-1 cells). We conclude that T. vaginalis increases CXCL8 and CCL2 production by human prostate stromal cells by activating TLR4, ROS, MAPKs and NF-κB, and this in turn attracts neutrophils and monocytes and leads to an inflammatory response. This study is the first attempt to demonstrate an inflammatory reaction in prostate stromal cells caused by T. vaginalis.

  7. Modulation of Mammary Stromal Cell Lactate Dynamics by Ambient Glucose and Epithelial Factors.

    PubMed

    Tobar, Nicolas; Porras, Omar; Smith, Patricio C; Barros, L Felipe; Martínez, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a risk factor for a variety of human cancers. Increased access to glucose and that tumor metabolize glucose by a glycolytic process even in the presence of oxygen (Warburg effect), provide a framework to analyze a particular set of metabolic adaptation mechanisms that may explain this phenomenon. In the present work, using a mammary stromal cell line derived from healthy tissue that was subjected to a long-term culture in low (5 mM) or high (25 mM) glucose, we analyzed kinetic parameters of lactate transport using a FRET biosensor. Our results indicate that the glucose pre-culture and soluble epithelial factors constitute a stimulus for lactate stromal production, factors that also modify the kinetic parameters and the monocarboxylate transporters expression in stromal cells. We also observed a vectorial flux of lactate from stroma to epithelial cells in a co-culture setting and found that the uptake of lactate by epithelial cells correlates with the degree of malignancy. Glucose preconditioning of the stromal cell stimulated epithelial motility. Our findings suggest that lactate generated by stromal cells in the high glucose condition stimulate epithelial migration. Overall, our results support the notion that glucose not only provides a substrate for tumor nutrition but also behaves as a signal promoting malignancy. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 136-144, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mouse granulated metrial gland cells require contact with stromal cells to maintain viability

    PubMed Central

    STEWART, I. J.

    2000-01-01

    Granulated metrial gland (GMG) cells differentiate in the uterine wall in pregnancy in mice but the mechanisms which control their differentiation and maintenance are unknown. In vivo, GMG cells share an intimate association with fibroblast-like stromal cells. The importance of this association has been assessed by examining the effects of withdrawal of stromal cell contact on GMG cell maintenance in vitro. When single cell suspensions of cells were prepared from mouse metrial glands there was a steady decline in numbers with days of culture but usually some remained at 7 d of culture. The ability of metrial gland cells to kill Wehi 164 target cells in 51Cr-release cytotoxicity assays was retained by cells cultured for at least 3 d. When explants of metrial gland were maintained in culture to allow GMG cell migration onto the culture flask, the attached GMG cells were lost by 1 d later. Overall, these results suggest that a juxtacrine regulatory mechanism maintains GMG cells. The rapid loss of unsupported GMG cells in culture has major implications in the design of assays to examine GMG cell function. PMID:11117633

  9. Neuromodulatory loop mediated by nerve growth factor and interleukin 6 in thymic stromal cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Screpanti, I; Meco, D; Scarpa, S; Morrone, S; Frati, L; Gulino, A; Modesti, A

    1992-01-01

    Neural crest cell derivatives have been suggested to be involved in thymus development. We established nonlymphoid thymic stromal cell cultures capable of supporting T-cell differentiation. In these nonlymphoid cell cultures, we identified cells with phenotypic and biochemical markers specific for neuronal cells. Neurofilament mRNA and 68- and 160-kDa neurofilament proteins, as well as 74-kDa synapsin I isoform, were expressed in many of the cultured cells. For example, neurofilament immunoreactivity was detected in 20-30% of the cells. To see whether thymic neuronal-like cells were involved in a neural differentiation pathway, we investigated the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), two known neurotrophic factors. The expression of the above-described neural markers was enhanced by NGF and IL-6, which we report to be produced in an autocrine way by thymic stromal cell cultures. Finally, we found that IL-6 gene expression in these cell cultures was enhanced by NGF. Evidence is thus offered of a neuromodulatory loop within the thymic stromal cell population supported by local production of NGF and IL-6 and involving neural cell elements. Interestingly, IL-6, which is known to be implicated in thymocyte differentiation, also displays a neuromodulatory activity on thymic stromal cells, suggesting a multivalent role for this cytokine within the thymus. Images PMID:1373490

  10. Label-Retaining Stromal Cells in Mouse Endometrium Awaken for Expansion and Repair After Parturition

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mingzhu; Yeung, William S.B.

    2015-01-01

    Human and mouse endometrium undergo dramatic cellular reorganization during pregnancy and postpartum. Somatic stem cells maintain homeostasis of the tissue by providing a cell reservoir for regeneration. We hypothesized that endometrial cells with quiescent properties (stem/progenitor cells) were involved in the regeneration of the endometrial tissue. Given that stem cells divide infrequently, they can retain the DNA synthesis label [bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] after a prolonged chase period. In this study, prepubertal mice were pulsed with BrdU and after a 6-week chase a small population of label-retaining stromal cells (LRSC) was located primarily beneath the luminal epithelium, adjacent to blood vessels, and near the endometrial–myometrial junction. Marker analyses suggested that they were of mesenchymal origin expressing CD44+, CD90+, CD140b+, CD146+, and Sca-1+. During pregnancy, nonproliferating LRSC predominately resided at the interimplantation/placental loci of the gestational endometrium. Immediately after parturition, a significant portion of the LRSC underwent proliferation (BrdU+/Ki-67+) and expressed total and active β-catenin. The β-catenin expression in the LRSC was transiently elevated at postpartum day (PPD) 1. The proliferation of LRSC resulted in a significant decline in the proportion of LRSC in the postpartum uterus. The LRSC returned to dormancy at PPD7, and the percentage of LRSC remained stable thereafter until 11 weeks. This study demonstrated that LRSC can respond efficiently to physiological stimuli upon initiation of uterine involution and return to its quiescent state after postpartum repair. PMID:25386902

  11. A macrophage and theca cell-enriched stromal cell population influences growth and survival of immature murine follicles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tingen, Candace M; Kiesewetter, Sarah E; Jozefik, Jennifer; Thomas, Cristina; Tagler, David; Shea, Lonnie; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2011-06-01

    Innovations in in vitro ovarian follicle culture have revolutionized the field of fertility preservation, but the successful culturing of isolated primary and small secondary follicles remains difficult. Herein, we describe a revised 3D culture system that uses a feeder layer of ovarian stromal cells to support early follicle development. This culture system allows significantly improved primary and early secondary follicle growth and survival. The stromal cells, consisting mostly of thecal cells and ovarian macrophages, recapitulate the in vivo conditions of these small follicles and increase the production of androgens and cytokines missing from stromal cell-free culture conditions. These results demonstrate that small follicles have a stage-specific reliance on the ovarian environment, and that growth and survival can be improved in vitro through a milieu created by pre-pubertal ovarian stromal cell co-culture.

  12. Inhibition of tumor cells interacting with stromal cells by xanthones isolated from a Costa Rican Penicillium sp.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shugeng; McMillin, Douglas W; Tamayo, Giselle; Delmore, Jake; Mitsiades, Constantine S; Clardy, Jon

    2012-04-27

    CR1642D, an endophytic isolate of Penicillium sp. collected from a Costa Rican rainforest, was identified through a high-throughput approach to identify natural products with enhanced antitumor activity in the context of tumor-stromal interactions. Bioassay-guided separation led to the identification of five xanthones (1-5) from CR1642D. The structures of the xanthone dimer penexanthone A (1) and monomer penexanthone B (2) were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses, including 2D NMR experiments. All of the compounds were tested against a panel of tumor cell lines in the presence and absence of bone marrow stromal cells. Compound 3 was the most active, with IC(50) values of 1-17 μM, and its activity was enhanced 2-fold against tumor cell line RPMI8226 in the presence of stromal cells (IC(50) 1.2 μM, but 2.4 μM without stromal cells).

  13. Prostaglandin E2 regulates macrophage colony stimulating factor secretion by human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Besse, A; Trimoreau, F; Faucher, J L; Praloran, V; Denizot, Y

    1999-07-08

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate marrow haematopoiesis by secreting growth factors such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) that regulates the proliferation, differentiation and several functions of cells of the mononuclear-phagocytic lineage. By using a specific ELISA we found that their constitutive secretion of M-CSF is enhanced by tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) markedly reduces in a time- and dose-dependent manner the constitutive and TNF-alpha-induced M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, other lipid mediators such as 12-HETE, 15-HETE, leukotriene B4, leukotriene C4 and lipoxin A4 have no effect. EP2/EP4 selective agonists (11-deoxy PGE1 and 1-OH PGE1) and EP2 agonist (19-OH PGE2) inhibit M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells while an EP1/EP3 agonist (sulprostone) has no effect. Stimulation with PGE2 induces an increase of intracellular cAMP levels in bone marrow stromal cells. cAMP elevating agents (forskolin and cholera toxin) mimic the PGE2-induced inhibition of M-CSF production. In conclusion, PGE2 is a potent regulator of M-CSF production by human bone marrow stromal cells, its effects being mediated via cAMP and PGE receptor EP2/EP4 subtypes.

  14. Fetal liver hepatic progenitors are supportive stromal cells for hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Song; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-04-27

    Previously we showed that the ~2% of fetal liver cells reactive with an anti-CD3epsilon monoclonal antibody support ex vivo expansion of both fetal liver and bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs); these cells express two proteins important for HSC ex vivo expansion, IGF2, and angiopoietin-like 3. Here we show that these cells do not express any CD3 protein and are not T cells; rather, we purified these HSC-supportive stromal cells based on the surface phenotype of SCF(+)DLK(+). Competitive repopulating experiments show that SCF(+)DLK(+) cells support the maintenance of HSCs in ex vivo culture. These are the principal fetal liver cells that express not only angiopoietin-like 3 and IGF2, but also SCF and thrombopoietin, two other growth factors important for HSC expansion. They are also the principal fetal liver cells that express CXCL12, a factor required for HSC homing, and also alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), indicating that they are fetal hepatic stem or progenitor cells. Immunocytochemistry shows that >93% of the SCF(+) cells express DLK and Angptl3, and a portion of SCF(+) cells also expresses CXCL12. Thus SCF(+)DLK(+) cells are a highly homogenous population that express a complete set of factors for HSC expansion and are likely the primary stromal cells that support HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  15. A Novel Bacterial Artificial Chromosome-Transgenic Podoplanin–Cre Mouse Targets Lymphoid Organ Stromal Cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Onder, Lucas; Scandella, Elke; Chai, Qian; Firner, Sonja; Mayer, Christian T.; Sparwasser, Tim; Thiel, Volker; Rülicke, Thomas; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Stromal cells provide the structural foundation of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs), and regulate leukocyte access and cell migration within the different compartments of spleen and lymph nodes (LNs). Furthermore, several stromal cell subsets have been implied in shaping of T cell responses through direct presentation of antigen. Despite significant gain of knowledge on the biology of different SLO-resident stromal cell subsets, their molecular and functional characterization has remained incomplete. To address this need, we have generated a bacterial artificial chromosome-transgenic mouse model that utilizes the podoplanin (pdpn) promoter to express the Cre-recombinase exclusively in stromal cells of SLOs. The characterization of the Pdpn–Cre mouse revealed transgene expression in subsets of fibroblastic reticular cells and lymphatic endothelial cells in LNs. Furthermore, the transgene facilitated the identification of a novel splenic perivascular stromal cell subpopulation that forms web-like structures around central arterioles. Assessment of the in vivo antigen expression in the genetically tagged stromal cells in Pdpn–Cre mice revealed activation of both MHC I and II-restricted TCR transgenic T cells. Taken together, stromal pdpn–Cre expression is well-suited to characterize the phenotype and to dissect the function of lymphoid organ stromal cells. PMID:22566840

  16. Analysis of stromal cells in osteofibrous dysplasia and adamantinoma of long bones.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Richard M; Kashima, Takeshi G; Ferguson, David J; Szuhai, Károly; Hogendoorn, Pancras C; Athanasou, Nicholas A

    2012-01-01

    Adamantinoma of long bones and osteofibrous dysplasia are rare, osteolytic primary bone tumours of uncertain origin containing areas of fibrous and fibro-osseous proliferation. We investigated the nature of the stromal cells in adamantinoma of long bones and osteofibrous dysplasia, and determined cellular and molecular mechanisms of osteolysis in these tumours. Cell culture, molecular (RT-PCR, western blot) and immunohistochemical studies on cases of adamantinoma of long bones and of osteofibrous dysplasia were undertaken to determine the expression of epithelial, osteoblast and osteoclast markers. Ultrastructural and immunophenotypic studies on cultured adamantinoma and osteofibrous dysplasia stromal cells showed that these cells were mainly fibroblast-like with few cells expressing epithelial markers. Osteofibrous dysplasia but not adamantinoma cells expressed alkaline phosphatase. Both osteofibrous dysplasia and adamantinoma cells expressed the ostoclastogenic factors M-CSF and RANKL. Adamantinoma and osteofibrous dysplasia cells also expressed messenger RNA for osteocalcin, osteonectin, osteopontin, osterix and collagen type 1. Adamantinoma and osteofibrous dysplasia cells cultured alone on dentine slices were not capable of lacunar resorption, but in co-cultures with monocytes induced formation of osteoclast-like cells was observered. Cultured osteofibrous dysplasia and adamantinoma stromal cells show similar ultrastructural and immunophenotypic characteristics, and differentially express osteoblast markers. Promotion of osteoclastogenesis by stromal cells may contribute to osteolysis in adamantinoma of long bones and osteofibrous dysplasia.

  17. A method for measurement of drug sensitivity of myeloma cells co-cultured with bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Misund, Kristine; Baranowska, Katarzyna A; Holien, Toril; Rampa, Christoph; Klein, Dionne C G; Børset, Magne; Waage, Anders; Sundan, Anders

    2013-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment can profoundly affect tumor cell survival as well as alter antitumor drug activity. However, conventional anticancer drug screening typically is performed in the absence of stromal cells. Here, we analyzed survival of myeloma cells co-cultured with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) using an automated fluorescence microscope platform, ScanR. By staining the cell nuclei with DRAQ5, we could distinguish between BMSC and myeloma cells, based on their staining intensity and nuclear shape. Using the apoptotic marker YO-PRO-1, the effects of drug treatment on the viability of the myeloma cells in the presence of stromal cells could be measured. The method does not require cell staining before incubation with drugs, and less than 5000 cells are required per condition. The method can be used for large-scale screening of anticancer drugs on primary myeloma cells. This study shows the importance of stromal cell support for primary myeloma cell survival in vitro, as half of the cell samples had a marked increase in their viability when cultured in the presence of BMSC. Stromal cell-induced protection against common myeloma drugs is also observed with this method.

  18. Standard of care therapy for malignant glioma and its effect on tumor and stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, T S; Holland, E C

    2012-04-19

    Glioblastoma is the most common and deadly of the primary central nervous system tumors. Recent advances in molecular characterization have subdivided these tumors into at least three main groups. In addition, these tumors are cellularly complex with multiple stromal cell types contributing to the biology of the tumor and treatment response. Because essentially all glioma patients are treated with radiation, various chemotherapies and steroids, the tumor that finally kills them has been modified by these treatments. Most of the investigation of the effects of therapy on these tumors has focused on the glioma cells per se. However, despite the importance of the stromal cells in these tumors, little has been done to understand the effects of treatment on stromal cells and their contribution to disease. Understanding how current standard therapy affects the biology of the tumor and the tumor stroma may provide insight into the mechanisms that are important to the inhibition of tumor growth as well as the biology of recurrent tumors.

  19. Selection of malonate-resistant stromal cell-derived osteoprogenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Klein, B Y; Gal, I; Segal, D

    1993-02-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells give rise to osteoprogenitor cell (OPC) colonies, with characteristic mineralized bone nodules in vitro. During differentiation, OPCs in the culture are surrounded by heterogeneous populations of various cell lineages and by different OPC differentiation stages. In the present study, attempts were made to increase the homogeneity of OPCs in culture. The reliance on energy metabolism restricted to glycolysis, which is specific to the premineralizing skeletal cells, was tested as a selectable marker for cells in this stage. Day 12 alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and day 20-21 calcium precipitates were used as early and late OPC differentiation markers. Malonate, a competitive inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, was added to the OPC stimulation medium, to interfere with the Krebs cycle-dependent energy metabolism operating in most of the stromal cells. OPCs that entered the stage of energy metabolism restricted to glycolysis were expected to become malonate resistant. Malonate showed dose and time dependence, 10 mM malonate added on day 3, decreased day 12 ALP activity/well to the lowest level. Variations in time and length of exposure to malonate used during the first 12 days of differentiation showed an inverse correlation between specific ALP activity and cell yield. Malonate-treated variations of specific ALP and of cell yield indices were up to 30- to 40-fold larger than variations within day 21 calcium precipitates. Thus, calcifying cells were almost unchanged relatively to noncalcifying cells. These results indicate that malonate-resistant cells are mostly selected, rather than induced, to differentiate by malonate. The results also show that stromal derived OPCs undergo a similar biochemical stage as in chondrocytes.

  20. Mitotic cells form actin-based bridges with adjacent cells to provide intercellular communication during rounding.

    PubMed

    Fykerud, Tone A; Knudsen, Lars M; Totland, Max Z; Sørensen, Vigdis; Dahal-Koirala, Shiva; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Brech, Andreas; Leithe, Edward

    2016-11-01

    In order to achieve accurate chromosome segregation, eukaryotic cells undergo a dramatic change in morphology to obtain a spherical shape during mitosis. Interphase cells communicate directly with each other by exchanging ions and small molecules via gap junctions, which have important roles in controlling cell growth and differentiation. As cells round up during mitosis, the gap junctional communication between mitotic cells and adjacent interphase cells ceases. Whether mitotic cells use alternative mechanisms for mediating direct cell-cell communication during rounding is currently unknown. Here, we have studied the mechanisms involved in the remodeling of gap junctions during mitosis. We further demonstrate that mitotic cells are able to form actin-based plasma membrane bridges with adjacent cells during rounding. These structures, termed "mitotic nanotubes," were found to be involved in mediating the transport of cytoplasm, including Rab11-positive vesicles, between mitotic cells and adjacent cells. Moreover, a subpool of the gap-junction channel protein connexin43 localized in these intercellular bridges during mitosis. Collectively, the data provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in the remodeling of gap junctions during mitosis and identify actin-based plasma membrane bridges as a novel means of communication between mitotic cells and adjacent cells during rounding.

  1. Mitotic cells form actin-based bridges with adjacent cells to provide intercellular communication during rounding

    PubMed Central

    Fykerud, Tone A.; Knudsen, Lars M.; Totland, Max Z.; Dahal-Koirala, Shiva; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Brech, Andreas; Leithe, Edward

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to achieve accurate chromosome segregation, eukaryotic cells undergo a dramatic change in morphology to obtain a spherical shape during mitosis. Interphase cells communicate directly with each other by exchanging ions and small molecules via gap junctions, which have important roles in controlling cell growth and differentiation. As cells round up during mitosis, the gap junctional communication between mitotic cells and adjacent interphase cells ceases. Whether mitotic cells use alternative mechanisms for mediating direct cell-cell communication during rounding is currently unknown. Here, we have studied the mechanisms involved in the remodeling of gap junctions during mitosis. We further demonstrate that mitotic cells are able to form actin-based plasma membrane bridges with adjacent cells during rounding. These structures, termed “mitotic nanotubes,” were found to be involved in mediating the transport of cytoplasm, including Rab11-positive vesicles, between mitotic cells and adjacent cells. Moreover, a subpool of the gap-junction channel protein connexin43 localized in these intercellular bridges during mitosis. Collectively, the data provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in the remodeling of gap junctions during mitosis and identify actin-based plasma membrane bridges as a novel means of communication between mitotic cells and adjacent cells during rounding. PMID:27625181

  2. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo. PMID:26924503

  3. Bone marrow-derived stromal cells are more beneficial cell sources for tooth regeneration compared with adipose-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lanfeng; Chen, Lin; Feng, Fan; Cui, Junhui; Li, Kaide; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Tooth loss is presently a global epidemic and tooth regeneration is thought to be a feasible and ideal treatment approach. Choice of cell source is a primary concern in tooth regeneration. In this study, the odontogenic differentiation potential of two non-dental-derived stem cells, adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs), were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. ADSCs and BMSCs were induced in vitro in the presence of tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (TGC-CM) prior to implantation into the omentum majus of rats, in combination with inactivated dentin matrix (IDM). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to detect the mRNA expression levels of odontogenic-related genes. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays were used to detect the protein levels of odontogenic-specific genes, such as DSP and DMP-1 both in vitro and in vivo. The results suggest that both ADSCs and BMSCs have odontogenic differentiation potential. However, the odontogenic potential of BMSCs was greater compared with ADSCs, showing that BMSCs are a more appropriate cell source for tooth regeneration.

  4. Stromal cell-dependent growth of leukemic cells from murine erythroblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Itoh, K; Sasaki, R; Ono, K; Tezuka, H; Sakoda, H; Sawada, H; Hitomi, K; Nakane, H; Uchiyama, T; Uchino, H

    1988-08-01

    Transplantable erythroblastic leukemia was induced by 300-rad irradiation of C3H mice. Conditions for in vitro growth of the leukemic cells were studied. None of interleukin-3, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor and erythropoietin could support the growth of the cells in vitro. In contrast, the leukemic cells grew into a stroma-dependent cell line, ELM-D, in close contact with the stromal cell layer of 900-rad-irradiated long-term bone marrow culture. A stroma-independent cell line, termed ELM-I-1, was further established from the non-adherent population in the co-culture of the leukemic cells, ELM-D, with stromal cells. Reverse transcriptase activity was not detectable in ELM-D or ELM-I-1 cells. Studies on binding and cross-linking of 125I-erythropoietin showed that ELM-I-1 cells had erythropoietin receptors, and two major radiolabeled protein products with molecular weights of 120 kDa and 140 kDa were detected on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions.

  5. Interleukin-6 receptor in spindle-shaped stromal cells, a prognostic determinant of early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Labovsky, Vivian; Martinez, Leandro Marcelo; Calcagno, María de Luján; Davies, Kevin Mauro; García-Rivello, Hernán; Wernicke, Alejandra; Feldman, Leonardo; Giorello, María Belén; Matas, Ayelén; Borzone, Francisco Raúl; Howard, Scott C; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra

    2016-10-01

    Spindle-shaped stromal cells, like carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells, influence tumor behavior and can serve as parameters in the clinical diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis of early breast cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study is to explore the clinicopathological significance of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-induced ligand (TRAIL) receptors (Rs) 2 and 4 (TRAIL-R2 and R4), and interleukin-6 R (IL-6R) in spindle-shaped stromal cells, not associated with the vasculature, as prognostic determinants of early breast cancer patients. Receptors are able to trigger the migratory activity, among other functions, of these stromal cells. We conducted immunohistochemical analysis for the expression of these receptors in spindle-shaped stromal cells, not associated with the vasculature, of primary tumors from early invasive breast cancer patients, and analyzed their association with clinicopathological characteristics. Here, we demonstrate that the elevated levels of TRAIL-R2, TRAIL-R4, and IL-6R in these stromal cells were significantly associated with a higher risk of metastatic occurrence (p = 0.034, 0.026, and 0.006; respectively). Moreover, high expression of TRAIL-R4 was associated with shorter disease-free survival and metastasis-free survival (p = 0.013 and 0.019; respectively). Also, high expression of IL-6R was associated with shorter disease-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival (p = 0.003, 0.001, and 0.003; respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that IL-6R expression was an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival and metastasis-free survival (p = 0.035). This study is the first to demonstrate that high levels of IL-6R expression in spindle-shaped stromal cells, not associated with the vasculature, could be used to identify early breast cancer patients with poor outcomes.

  6. Light scattering by adjacent red blood cells: a mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunoglou, Nikolaos K.; Stamatakos, Georgios; Koutsouris, Dimitrios; Yova-Loukas, Dido M.

    1995-01-01

    Simple approximate scattering theories such as the Rayleigh-Gans theory are not generally applicable to the case of light scattering by red blood cell (RBC) aggregates, including thrombus. This is mainly due to the extremely short distance separating erythrocytes in the aggregates (of the order of 25 nm) as well as to the substantial size of the aggregates. Therefore, in this paper a new mathematical model predicting the electromagnetic field produced by the scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a system of two adjacent RBCs is presented. Each RBC is modeled as a homogeneous dielectric ellipsoid of complex index of refraction surrounded by transparent plasma. The relative position and orientation of the ellipsoids are arbitrary. Scattering is formulated in terms of an integral equation which, however, contains two singular kernels. The singular equation is transformed into a pair of nonsingular integral equations for the Fourier transform of the internal field of each RBC. The latter equations are solved by reducing them by quadrature into a matrix equation. The resulting solutions are used to estimate the scattering amplitude. Convergence aspects concerning the numerical calculation of the matrix elements originating from the interaction between the RBCs are also presented.

  7. Bone Marrow Stromal Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Polymeri, A; Giannobile, W V; Kaigler, D

    2016-11-01

    Bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) are adult multipotent cells, which have the potential to differentiate into cell types of mesodermal origin, namely osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Due to their accessibility and expansion potential, BMSCs have historically held therapeutic promise in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. More recently, it has been demonstrated that not only can bone marrow stromal stem cells directly participate in tissue regeneration, but they also have the capacity to migrate to distant sites of tissue injury, where they can participate in tissue repair either directly through their differentiation or indirectly through paracrine mechanisms. Additionally, they can elicit various immunomodulatory signals, which can attenuate the inflammatory and immune responses. As such, bone marrow stromal stem cells have been explored clinically for treatment of a wide variety of different conditions including bone defects, graft-vs.-host disease, cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and liver and kidney diseases. This review provides an overview of current clinical applications of bone marrow stromal stem cells and discusses their therapeutic properties, while also addressing limitations of their use. PubMed, Ovid, and Google Scholar online databases were searched using several keywords, including "stem cells", "tissue engineering", tissue regeneration" and "clinical trials". Additionally, Clinical trials.gov was used to locate completed clinical trials using bone marrow derived stem cells.

  8. The differentiation directions of the bone marrow stromal cells under modeling microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, Olga; Rodionova, Natalia; Katkova, Olena

    Within experiments on rats simulating microgravity by base load remove from back limbs (duration of the experiment 1,5 months) on marrow stromal cells cultures (ex vivo, in vitro) comprising osteogenic cells-predecessors, extracted from femurs, studied their peculiarities of the colony formation ablity, the cell structure, some cytological and ultra-structural characteristics and differentiation direction. It was found that that under microgravity conditions there is a decline of the stromal cells colony formation intensity, decrease of the colonies size and cells mitotic activity that indicates decrease of their growth potential. Both in control and in experiment the colonies were presented by population of low-differentiated cells, differentiated cells and mature cells. The comparative cytological and morphometric analysis have shown that the studied stromal cells in colonies have the smaller sizes, more elongated shape, and higher nucleocytoplasmic ratio. Cells composition in the experiment colonies is reliably different by the ratio of the low-differentiating to being differentiated cells; a ratio of low-differentiated to already differentiated cells; ratio of differentiated cells to total number of all cells. In comparison with control group, amount of the cells passed trough a differentiation stage and mature cells in colonies is decreased by 3 to 4 times. Among the differentiated stromal cells in colonies increasing amount of adipocytes was revealed. The analysis of electron microscope microphotographs showed that in osteogenic cells differentiated under microgravity conditions, there is a reduction of the specific volume of a granular endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi's complex and quantity of nuclei reduction that indicates depression of the specific biosyntheses process intensity in cells. The increase of lysosomes and myelinic structures quantity is linked to organelles partial reduction. Consolidation of mitochondrias is an evidence of the cells’ energy

  9. Effect of dexamethasone on moesin gene expression in rabbit bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Cornet, F; Broux, O; Anselme, K; Hardouin, P; Jeanfils, J

    2004-10-01

    The influence of dexamethasone on rabbit bone marrow stromal cells differentiation was studied by screening the action of dexamethasone on gene expression. Using differential display, we observed some differential amplifications. The use of five of thirteen different primers combination allowed to identify one or more differential bands. One of them was identified as moesin gene. Real-time PCR confirmed a significant reduction of moesin gene expression following dexamethasone treatment. The decrease of expression for this protein, involved in cytoskeletal organization, could explain the effects of dexamethasone treatment on bone marrow stromal cells differentiation.

  10. [Effect of extracellular matrix components on adhesion of bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells to polytetrafluoroethylene].

    PubMed

    Karpenko, A A; Rozanova, I A; Poveshchenko, O V; Lykov, A P; Bondarenko, N A; Kim, I I; Nikonorova, Iu V; Podkhvatilina, N A; Sergeevichev, D S; Popova, I V; Konenkov, V I

    2015-01-01

    Search for new bioengineering materials for creation of small-diameter vascular grafts is currently a priority task. One of the promising trends of creating tissue engineering constructions is coating the internal layer of implants made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with autologous mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells. In the study we assessed the ability of separate components of the extracellular matrix such as fibronectin, type I collagen and type IV collagen to influence adhesion, proliferation and morphology of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells being cultured on PTFE. Bone marrow multipotent stromal cells taken from second-passage Wistar rats in the amount of 106 per 1 cm2 were applied onto PTFE. We used the following variants of preliminary treatment of the material prior to seeding: fibronectin with type I collagen, fibronectin with type IV collagen, fibronectin with a mixture of type I and IV collagens, as well as a control group without coating. After six weeks of cell growth on PTFE patches the samples were subjected to fixation in 10% formalin followed by haematoxylin-eosin stain and morphometric assessment of adhered cells by calculation using the software AxioVision (Carl Zeiss), assessing the number of cells, area of the cellular monolayer, dimensions and ratios of the area of separate cells and the area of cellular nuclei. The maximal area of the monolayer from mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells on the PTFE surface was revealed while culturing with a mixture of fibronectin and type I and IV collagens. Cell colonization density while treatment of the synthetic material with mixtures of fibronectin with type I collagen, type IV collagen and type I and IV collagens demonstrated the results exceeding the parameters of the control specimen 5-, 2.5- and 7-fold, respectively. Hence, extracellular matrix components considerably increase enhance adhesion of cells to PTFE, as well as improve formation of a monolayer from mesenchymal multipotent

  11. Differences in xenobiotic detoxifying activities between bone marrow stromal cells from mice and rats: Implications for benzene-induced hematotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hong; Li, Yunbo; Trush, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    benzene is a human carcinogen; exposure can result in aplastic anemia and leukemia. Data from animal models are frequently used in benzene risk assessment. In rodent studies, mice are more sensitive to benzene-induced hematotoxicity than rats. Bone marrow stromal cells from mice were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxicity induced by the benzene metabolites hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) than cells from rats. Since cellular gluthathione (GSH) and quinone reductase (QR) are known to play critical roles in modulating HQ-induced cytotoxicity, the GSH content and the QR and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in stromal cells from both species was measured. In rat cells, the GSH content and the QR specific activity were 2 and 28 times as much as those from mice, respectively. GSH and QR in both mouse and rat stromal cells were inducible by 1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T). D3T pretreatment of both mouse and rat stromal cells resulted in a marked protection against HQ-induced toxicity. Pretreatment of both mouse and rat stromal cells with GSH ethyl ester also provided a dramatic protection against HQ-induced toxicity. Conversely, dicoumarol, an inhibitor of QR, enhanced the HQ-induced toxicity in stromal cells from both mice and rats, indicating an important role for QR in modulating HQ-induced stromal toxicity. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), which depleted GSH significantly in both species, potentiated the HQ-induced toxicity in mouse but not in rat stromal cells. Surprisingly, incubation of stromal cells with BSO resulted in a significant induction of QR, especially in rats. Overall, this study demonstrates that the differences in stromal cellular GSH content and QR activity between mice and rats contribute to their respective susceptibility to HQ-induced cytotoxicity in vitro, and may be involved in the greater in vivo sensitivity of mice to benzene-induced hematotoxicity. 51 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. [Reorganization of actin cytoskeleton in the initial stage of transendothelial migration of bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, S A; Pinaev, G P

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of actin cytoskeleton reorganization in rat bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells after one hour adhesion to a monolayer of endothelial cell line EA.hy 926 allowed us to identify three types of cells interacting with the endothelial cells. Approximately half of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells retained a rounded shape, most of them contained large round actin aggregates, had irregular borders and contacted with the surface of the endothelial cells by microvilli or protrusions similar to small lamellae. Almost all other cells were surrounded by narrow lamellae along the entire perimeter. In addition, a small amount.of elongated flattened cells that contacting with endothelial cells by means of focal contacts was observed. Microenvironmental factors such as proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α or plasma proteins affected the ratio of stromal cell types, with different types of organization of the actin cytoskeleton in multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells population.

  13. Melanoma-Derived BRAF(V600E) Mutation in Peritumoral Stromal Cells: Implications for in Vivo Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos V; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Oláh, Judit; Jakab, Ádám; Polyánka, Hilda; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B

    2016-06-21

    Melanoma often recurs in patients after the removal of the primary tumor, suggesting the presence of recurrent tumor-initiating cells that are undetectable using standard diagnostic methods. As cell fusion has been implicated to facilitate the alteration of a cell's phenotype, we hypothesized that cells in the peritumoral stroma having a stromal phenotype that initiate recurrent tumors might originate from the fusion of tumor and stromal cells. Here, we show that in patients with BRAF(V600E) melanoma, melanoma antigen recognized by T-cells (MART1)-negative peritumoral stromal cells express BRAF(V600E) protein. To confirm the presence of the oncogene at the genetic level, peritumoral stromal cells were microdissected and screened for the presence of BRAF(V600E) with a mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, cells carrying the BRAF(V600E) mutation were not only found among cells surrounding the primary tumor but were also present in the stroma of melanoma metastases as well as in a histologically tumor-free re-excision sample from a patient who subsequently developed a local recurrence. We did not detect any BRAF(V600E) mutation or protein in the peritumoral stroma of BRAF(WT) melanoma. Therefore, our results suggest that peritumoral stromal cells contain melanoma-derived oncogenic information, potentially as a result of cell fusion. These hybrid cells display the phenotype of stromal cells and are therefore undetectable using routine histological assessments. Our results highlight the importance of genetic analyses and the application of mutation-specific antibodies in the identification of potentially recurrent-tumor-initiating cells, which may help better predict patient survival and disease outcome.

  14. Notch signalling drives bone marrow stromal cell-mediated chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Takam Kamga, Paul; Bassi, Giulio; Cassaro, Adriana; Midolo, Martina; Di Trapani, Mariano; Gatti, Alessandro; Carusone, Roberta; Resci, Federica; Perbellini, Omar; Gottardi, Michele; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Nwabo Kamdje, Armel Hervé; Ambrosetti, Achille; Krampera, Mauro

    2016-04-19

    Both preclinical and clinical investigations suggest that Notch signalling is critical for the development of many cancers and for their response to chemotherapy. We previously showed that Notch inhibition abrogates stromal-induced chemoresistance in lymphoid neoplasms. However, the role of Notch in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its contribution to the crosstalk between leukemia cells and bone marrow stromal cells remain controversial. Thus, we evaluated the role of the Notch pathway in the proliferation, survival and chemoresistance of AML cells in co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells expanded from both healthy donors (hBM-MSCs) and AML patients (hBM-MSCs*). As compared to hBM-MSCs, hBM-MSCs* showed higher level of Notch1, Jagged1 as well as the main Notch target gene HES1. Notably, hBM-MSCs* induced expression and activation of Notch signalling in AML cells, supporting AML proliferation and being more efficientin inducing AML chemoresistance than hBM-MSCs*. Pharmacological inhibition of Notch using combinations of Notch receptor-blocking antibodies or gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), in presence of chemotherapeutic agents, significant lowered the supportive effect of hBM-MSCs and hBM-MSCs* towards AML cells, by activating apoptotic cascade and reducing protein level of STAT3, AKT and NF-κB.These results suggest that Notch signalling inhibition, by overcoming the stromal-mediated promotion of chemoresistance,may represent a potential therapeutic targetnot only for lymphoid neoplasms, but also for AML.

  15. Melanoma-Derived BRAFV600E Mutation in Peritumoral Stromal Cells: Implications for in Vivo Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos V.; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Oláh, Judit; Jakab, Ádám; Polyánka, Hilda; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma often recurs in patients after the removal of the primary tumor, suggesting the presence of recurrent tumor-initiating cells that are undetectable using standard diagnostic methods. As cell fusion has been implicated to facilitate the alteration of a cell’s phenotype, we hypothesized that cells in the peritumoral stroma having a stromal phenotype that initiate recurrent tumors might originate from the fusion of tumor and stromal cells. Here, we show that in patients with BRAFV600E melanoma, melanoma antigen recognized by T-cells (MART1)-negative peritumoral stromal cells express BRAFV600E protein. To confirm the presence of the oncogene at the genetic level, peritumoral stromal cells were microdissected and screened for the presence of BRAFV600E with a mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, cells carrying the BRAFV600E mutation were not only found among cells surrounding the primary tumor but were also present in the stroma of melanoma metastases as well as in a histologically tumor-free re-excision sample from a patient who subsequently developed a local recurrence. We did not detect any BRAFV600E mutation or protein in the peritumoral stroma of BRAFWT melanoma. Therefore, our results suggest that peritumoral stromal cells contain melanoma-derived oncogenic information, potentially as a result of cell fusion. These hybrid cells display the phenotype of stromal cells and are therefore undetectable using routine histological assessments. Our results highlight the importance of genetic analyses and the application of mutation-specific antibodies in the identification of potentially recurrent-tumor-initiating cells, which may help better predict patient survival and disease outcome. PMID:27338362

  16. Molecular Analysis of Stromal Cells-Induced Neural Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ramila; Buchanan, James Carlton; Paruchuri, Sailaja; Morris, Nathan; Tavana, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Deriving specific neural cells from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is a promising approach for cell replacement therapies of neurodegenerative diseases. When co-cultured with certain stromal cells, mouse ESCs (mESCs) differentiate efficiently to neural cells. In this study, a comprehensive gene and protein expression analysis of differentiating mESCs is performed over a two-week culture period to track temporal progression of cells from a pluripotent state to specific terminally-differentiated neural cells such as neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Expression levels of 26 genes consisting of marker genes for pluripotency, neural progenitors, and specific neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendrocytic cells are tracked using real time q-PCR. The time-course gene expression analysis of differentiating mESCs is combined with the hierarchal clustering and functional principal component analysis (FPCA) to elucidate the evolution of specific neural cells from mESCs at a molecular level. These statistical analyses identify three major gene clusters representing distinct phases of transition of stem cells from a pluripotent state to a terminally-differentiated neuronal or glial state. Temporal protein expression studies using immunohistochemistry demonstrate the generation of neural stem/progenitor cells and specific neural lineages and show a close agreement with the gene expression profiles of selected markers. Importantly, parallel gene and protein expression analysis elucidates long-term stability of certain proteins compared to those with a quick turnover. Describing the molecular regulation of neural cells commitment of mESCs due to stromal signaling will help identify major promoters of differentiation into specific cell types for use in cell replacement therapy applications. PMID:27832161

  17. Alpha-ketoglutarate Curbs Differentiation and Induces Cell Death in Mesenchymal Stromal Precursors with Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karmveer; Krug, Linda; Basu, Abhijit; Meyer, Patrick; Treiber, Nicolai; Vander Beken, Seppe; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Kochanek, Stefan; Bloch, Wilhelm; Geiger, Hartmut; Maity, Pallab; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2017-04-11

    Increased concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) originating from dysfunctional mitochondria contribute to diverse aging-related degenerative disorders. But so far little is known about the impact of distinct ROS on metabolism and fate of stromal precursor cells. We here demonstrate that an increase in superoxide anion radicals due to superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2) deficiency in stromal precursor cells suppress osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation through fundamental changes in the global metabolite landscape. Our data identify impairment of the pyruvate and L-glutamine metabolism causing toxic accumulation of alpha-ketoglutarate in the Sod2 deficient and intrinsically aged stromal precursor cells as a major cause for their reduced lineage differentiation. Alpha-ketoglutarate accumulation led to enhanced nucleocytoplasmic vacuolation and chromatin condensation-mediated cell death in Sod2 deficient stromal precursor cells as a consequence of DNA damage, Hif-1α instability and reduced histone H3 (Lys27) acetylation. These findings hold promise for prevention and treatment of mitochondrial disorders commonly associated with aged individuals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibiting stromal cell heparan sulfate synthesis improves stem cell mobilization and enables engraftment without cytotoxic conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Borja; Ferraro, Francesca; Yusuf, Rushdia Z.; Cook, Colleen M.; Yu, Vionnie W. C.; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Sykes, Stephen M.; Palchaudhuri, Rahul; Schajnovitz, Amir; Lotinun, Sutada; Lymperi, Stefania; Mendez-Ferrer, Simon; del Toro, Raquel; Day, Robyn; Vasic, Radovan; Acharya, Sanket S.; Baron, Roland; Lin, Charles P.; Yamaguchi, Yu; Wagers, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    The glycosyltransferase gene, Ext1, is essential for heparan sulfate production. Induced deletion of Ext1 selectively in Mx1-expressing bone marrow (BM) stromal cells, a known population of skeletal stem/progenitor cells, in adult mice resulted in marked changes in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) localization. HSPC egressed from BM to spleen after Ext1 deletion. This was associated with altered signaling in the stromal cells and with reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 production by them. Further, pharmacologic inhibition of heparan sulfate mobilized qualitatively more potent and quantitatively more HSPC from the BM than granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone, including in a setting of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor resistance. The reduced presence of endogenous HSPC after Ext1 deletion was associated with engraftment of transfused HSPC without any toxic conditioning of the host. Therefore, inhibiting heparan sulfate production may provide a means for avoiding the toxicities of radiation or chemotherapy in HSPC transplantation for nonmalignant conditions. PMID:25202142

  19. Low-frequency vibration treatment of bone marrow stromal cells induces bone repair in vivo

    PubMed Central

    He, Shengwei; Zhao, Wenzhi; Zhang, Lu; Mi, Lidong; Du, Guangyu; Sun, Chuanxiu; Sun, Xuegang

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): To study the effect of low-frequency vibration on bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and potential bone repair in vivo. Materials and Methods: Forty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into five groups with eight rabbits in each group. For each group, bone defects were generated in the left humerus of four rabbits, and in the right humerus of the other four rabbits. To test differentiation, bones were isolated and demineralized, supplemented with bone marrow stromal cells, and implanted into humerus bone defects. Varying frequencies of vibration (0, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 Hz) were applied to each group for 30 min each day for four weeks. When the bone defects integrated, they were then removed for histological examination. mRNA transcript levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligan, and pre-collagen type 1 α were measured. Results: Humeri implanted with bone marrow stromal cells displayed elevated callus levels and wider, more prevalent, and denser trabeculae following treatment at 25 and 50 Hz. The mRNA levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand, and pre-collagen type 1 α were also markedly higher following 25 and 50 Hz treatment. Conclusion: Low frequency (25–50 Hz) vibration in vivo can promote bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and repair bone injury. PMID:28133520

  20. Incidental detection of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor on Tc-99m red blood cell scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Gupta, Vikas; Singh, Rajinder; Radotra, Bishan Dass; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2012-10-01

    The role of 99m-technetium labeled red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy in acute gastro-intestinal bleed is well-established. The authors report a case of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) incidentally discovered on Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy.

  1. Screening for Stromal and Matrix Effects in 3D Microenvironments of Breast Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.

    Breast cancer progression ensures through the acquisition of genetic mutations, the uncontrollable growth of cells, and their progression to invasion. Studies have shown that the surrounding three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment can also influence breast cancer cell progression by controlling the morphology, differentiation, proliferation, and migration of cells. However, most of the currently available in vitro screening platforms are based on the two-dimensional (2D) culture of cells, and do not provide cells with the complex 3D microenvironment that exists in vivo. Therefore, there is a need for more biologically relevant in vitro platforms to help decipher the complexity of the microenvironment and its influence in breast cancer. In this dissertation we present an automated microfluidic platform that allows to efficiently screen for the effect of multiple matrix and stromal microenvironment in 3D cultures of breast cancer cells. Several extracellular matrix (ECM) compositions and stromal cells are included in the 3D microenvironments to examine their influence on breast cancer cell behavior. The screening results suggest that collagen gels with fibronectin might be influencing paracrine signals between breast cancer cells and stromal cells. The ability of the platform to culture and treat cells in 3D microenvironments offers a powerful screening tool for the identification of compounds and interactions using more in vivo-like 3D microenvironments. The identification of these mechanisms will increase our current understanding of breast cancer, and will aid in the identification of potential therapeutics.

  2. Dendritic cells maintain dermal adipose–derived stromal cells in skin fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Jennifer J.; Zhu, Tong; Chyou, Susan; Dasoveanu, Dragos C.; Carballo, Camila; Tian, Sha; Magro, Cynthia M.; Rodeo, Scott; Spiera, Robert F.; Ruddle, Nancy H.; McGraw, Timothy E.; Browning, Jeffrey L.; Lafyatis, Robert; Gordon, Jessica K.; Lu, Theresa T.

    2016-01-01

    Scleroderma is a group of skin-fibrosing diseases for which there are no effective treatments. A feature of the skin fibrosis typical of scleroderma is atrophy of the dermal white adipose tissue (DWAT). Adipose tissue contains adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ADSCs) that have regenerative and reparative functions; however, whether DWAT atrophy in fibrosis is accompanied by ADSC loss is poorly understood, as are the mechanisms that might maintain ADSC survival in fibrotic skin. Here, we have shown that DWAT ADSC numbers were reduced, likely because of cell death, in 2 murine models of scleroderma skin fibrosis. The remaining ADSCs showed a partial dependence on dendritic cells (DCs) for survival. Lymphotoxin β (LTβ) expression in DCs maintained ADSC survival in fibrotic skin by activating an LTβ receptor/β1 integrin (LTβR/β1 integrin) pathway on ADSCs. Stimulation of LTβR augmented the engraftment of therapeutically injected ADSCs, which was associated with reductions in skin fibrosis and improved skin function. These findings provide insight into the effects of skin fibrosis on DWAT ADSCs, identify a DC-ADSC survival axis in fibrotic skin, and suggest an approach for improving mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in scleroderma and other diseases. PMID:27721238

  3. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa; Nagai, Mami; Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi; Roeder, Robert G.; Asano, Shigetaka; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  4. Capture and printing of fixed stromal cell membranes for bioactive display on PDMS surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoo; Wang, Jennifer B.; Bersani, Francesca; Parekkadan, Biju

    2013-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has emerged as an extremely useful polymer for various biological applications. The conjugation of PDMS with bioactive molecules to create functional surfaces is feasible, yet limited to single molecule display with imprecise localization of the molecules on PDMS. Here we report a robust technique that can transfer and print the membrane surface of glutaraldehyde-fixed stromal cells intact to a PDMS substrate using an intermediate polyvinylalcohol (PVA) film as a transporter system. The cell-PVA film capturing the entirety of surface molecules can be peeled off and subsequently printed onto PDMS while maintaining the spatial display of the original cell surface molecules. Proof-of-concept studies are described using human bone marrow stromal cell membranes, including the demonstration of bioactivity of transferred membranes to capture and adhere hematopoietic cells. The presented process is applicable to virtually any adherent cell and can broaden the functional display of biomolecules on PDMS for biotechnology applications. PMID:23927769

  5. Lgr5 Marks Neural Crest Derived Multipotent Oral Stromal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Boddupally, Keerthi; Wang, Guangfang; Chen, Yibu; Kobielak, Agnieszka

    2016-03-01

    It has been suggested that multipotent stem cells with neural crest (NC) origin persist into adulthood in oral mucosa. However their exact localization and role in normal homeostasis is unknown. In this study, we discovered that Lgr5 is expressed in NC cells during embryonic development, which give rise to the dormant stem cells in the adult tongue and oral mucosa. Those Lgr5 positive oral stromal stem cells display properties of NC stem cells including clonal growth and multipotent differentiation. RNA sequencing revealed that adult Lgr5+ oral stromal stem cells express high number of neural crest related markers like Sox9, Twist1, Snai1, Myc, Ets1, Crabp1, Epha2, and Itgb1. Using lineage-tracing experiments, we show that these cells persist more than a year in the ventral tongue and some areas of the oral mucosa and give rise to stromal progeny. In vivo transplantation demonstrated that these cells reconstitute the stroma. Our studies show for the first time that Lgr5 is expressed in the NC cells at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) and is maintained during embryonic development and postnataly in the stroma of the ventral tongue, and some areas of the oral mucosa and that Lgr5+ cells participate in the maintenance of the stroma.

  6. Carbon Monoxide Improves Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells During Sepsis by Production of Specialized Proresolving Lipid Mediators*

    PubMed Central

    Tsoyi, Konstantin; Hall, Sean R. R.; Dalli, Jesmond; Colas, Romain A.; Ghanta, Sailaja; Ith, Bonna; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Baron, Rebecca M.; Choi, Augustine M. K.; Serhan, Charles N.; Liu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Mesenchymal stromal cells are being investigated as a cell-based therapy for a number of disease processes, with promising results in animal models of systemic inflammation and sepsis. Studies are ongoing to determine ways to further improve the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells. A gas molecule that improves outcome in experimental sepsis is carbon monoxide. We hypothesized that preconditioning of mesenchymal stromal cells with carbon monoxide ex vivo would promote further therapeutic benefit when cells are administered in vivo after the onset of polymicrobial sepsis in mice. Design: Animal study and primary cell culture. Setting: Laboratory investigation. Subjects: BALB/c mice. Interventions: Polymicrobial sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Mesenchymal stromal cells, mesenchymal stromal cells-conditioned with carbon monoxide, fibroblasts, or fibroblasts-conditioned with carbon monoxide were delivered by tail vein injections to septic mice. The mice were assessed for survival, bacterial clearance, and the inflammatory response during sepsis in each of the groups. Mesenchymal stromal cells were also assessed for their ability to promote bacterial phagocytosis by neutrophils, the production of specialized proresolving lipid mediators, and their importance for mesenchymal stromal cells function using gene silencing. Measurements and Main Results: Ex vivo preconditioning with carbon monoxide allowed mesenchymal stromal cells to be administered later after the onset of sepsis (6 hr), and yet maintain their therapeutic effect with increased survival. Carbon monoxide preconditioned mesenchymal stromal cells were also able to alleviate organ injury, improve bacterial clearance, and promote the resolution of inflammation. Mesenchymal stromal cells exposed to carbon monoxide, with docosahexaenoic acid substrate, produced specialized proresolving lipid mediators, particularly D-series resolvins, which promoted survival. Silencing

  7. Single-cell hydrogel encapsulation for enhanced survival of human marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Karoubi, Golnaz; Ormiston, Mark L; Stewart, Duncan J; Courtman, David W

    2009-10-01

    Inadequate extracellular matrix cues and subsequent apoptotic cell death are among crucial factors currently limiting cell viability and organ retention in cell-based therapeutic strategies for vascular regeneration. Here we describe the use of a single-cell hydrogel capsule to provide enhanced cell survival of adherent cells in transient suspension culture. Human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) were singularly encapsulated in agarose capsules containing the immobilized matrix molecules, fibronectin and fibrinogen to ameliorate cell-matrix survival signals. MSCs in the enriched capsules demonstrated increased viability, greater metabolic activity and enhanced cell-cytoskeletal patterning. Increased cell viability resulted from the re-induction of cell-matrix interactions likely via integrin clustering and subsequent activation of the extracellular signal regulated MAPK (ERK)/mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade. Proof of principle in-vivo studies, investigating autologous MSC delivery into Fisher 344 rat hindlimb, depicted a significant increase in the number of engrafted cells using the single-cell encapsulation system. Incorporation of immobilized adhesion molecules compensates, at least in part, for the missing cell-matrix cues, thereby attenuating the initial anoikis stimuli and providing protection from subsequent apoptosis. Thus, this single-cell encapsulation strategy may markedly enhance therapeutic cell survival in targeted tissues.

  8. Cancer cells enter dormancy after cannibalizing mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Bartosh, Thomas J.; Ullah, Mujib; Zeitouni, Suzanne; Beaver, Joshua; Prockop, Darwin J.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer often develop malignant regrowth of residual drug-resistant dormant tumor cells years after primary treatment, a process defined as cancer relapse. Deciphering the causal basis of tumor dormancy therefore has obvious therapeutic significance. Because cancer cell behavior is strongly influenced by stromal cells, particularly the mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) that are actively recruited into tumor-associated stroma, we assessed the impact of MSCs on breast cancer cell (BCC) dormancy. Using 3D cocultures to mimic the cellular interactions of an emerging tumor niche, we observed that MSCs sequentially surrounded the BCCs, promoted formation of cancer spheroids, and then were internalized/degraded through a process resembling the well-documented yet ill-defined clinical phenomenon of cancer cell cannibalism. This suspected feeding behavior was less appreciable in the presence of a rho kinase inhibitor and in 2D monolayer cocultures. Notably, cannibalism of MSCs enhanced survival of BCCs deprived of nutrients but suppressed their tumorigenicity, together suggesting the cancer cells entered dormancy. Transcriptome profiles revealed that the resulting BCCs acquired a unique molecular signature enriched in prosurvival factors and tumor suppressors, as well as inflammatory mediators that demarcate the secretome of senescent cells, also referred to as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Overall, our results provide intriguing evidence that cancer cells under duress enter dormancy after cannibalizing MSCs. Importantly, our practical 3D coculture model could provide a valuable tool to understand the antitumor activity of MSCs and cell cannibalism further, and therefore open new therapeutic avenues for the prevention of cancer recurrence. PMID:27698134

  9. Epigenetic Alterations Affecting Transcription Factors and Signaling Pathways in Stromal Cells of Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Yotova, Iveta; Hsu, Emily; Do, Catherine; Gaba, Aulona; Sczabolcs, Matthias; Dekan, Sabine; Kenner, Lukas; Wenzl, Rene; Tycko, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by growth of endometrial-like tissue outside the uterine cavity. Since its pathogenesis may involve epigenetic changes, we used Illumina 450K Methylation Beadchips to profile CpG methylation in endometriosis stromal cells compared to stromal cells from normal endometrium. We validated and extended the Beadchip data using bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq), and analyzed differential methylation (DM) at the CpG-level and by an element-level classification for groups of CpGs in chromatin domains. Genes found to have DM included examples encoding transporters (SLC22A23), signaling components (BDNF, DAPK1, ROR1, and WNT5A) and transcription factors (GATA family, HAND2, HOXA cluster, NR5A1, OSR2, TBX3). Intriguingly, among the TF genes with DM we also found JAZF1, a proto-oncogene affected by chromosomal translocations in endometrial stromal tumors. Using RNA-Seq we identified a subset of the DM genes showing differential expression (DE), with the likelihood of DE increasing with the extent of the DM and its location in enhancer elements. Supporting functional relevance, treatment of stromal cells with the hypomethylating drug 5aza-dC led to activation of DAPK1 and SLC22A23 and repression of HAND2, JAZF1, OSR2, and ROR1 mRNA expression. We found that global 5hmC is decreased in endometriotic versus normal epithelial but not stroma cells, and for JAZF1 and BDNF examined by oxidative bis-seq, found that when 5hmC is detected, patterns of 5hmC paralleled those of 5mC. Together with prior studies, these results define a consistent epigenetic signature in endometriosis stromal cells and nominate specific transcriptional and signaling pathways as therapeutic targets. PMID:28125717

  10. Radiation-induced DNA damage in canine hemopoietic cells and stromal cells as measured by the comet assay

    SciTech Connect

    Kreja, L.; Selig, C.; Plappert, U.; Nothdurft, W.

    1996-12-31

    Stromal cell progenitors (fibroblastoid colony-forming unit; CFU-Fs) are representative of the progenitor cell population of the hemopoietic microenvironment in bone marrow (BM). Previous studies of the radiation dose-effect relationships for colony formation have shown that canine CFU-Fs are relatively radioresistant as characterized by a D{sub 0} value of about 2.4 Gy. In contrast, hemopoietic progenitors are particularly radiosensitive (D{sub 0} values = 0.12-0.60 Gy). In the present study, the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis technique for the in situ quantitation of DNA strand breaks and alkalilabile site was employed. Canine buffy coat cells from BM aspirates and cells harvested from CFU-F colonies or from mixed populations of adherent BM stromal cell (SC) layers were exposed to increasing doses of X-rays, embedded in agarose gel on slides, lysed with detergents, and placed in an electric field. DNA migrating from single cells in the gel was made visible as {open_quotes}comets{close_quotes} by ethidium bromide staining. Immediate DNA damage was much less in cultured stromal cells than in hemopoietic cells in BM aspirates. These results suggest that the observed differences in clonogenic survival could be partly due to differences in the type of the initial DNA damage between stromal cells and hemopoietic cells. 37 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. A murine stromal cell line promotes the proliferation of the human factor-dependent leukemic cell line UT-7.

    PubMed

    Auffray, I; Dubart, A; Izac, B; Vainchenker, W; Coulombel, L

    1994-05-01

    In long-term human bone marrow cultures, stromal cells of human origin are usually used on the assumption that human primitive progenitor cells do not respond to cytokines produced by stromal cells from other species. There is accumulating evidence, however, that murine stromal cells also promote maintenance and differentiation of very primitive human stem cells, which suggests the existence of novel stromal activities that cross species barriers. In this study, we show that a murine bone marrow-derived stromal cell line, MS-5, allows the proliferation of the human leukemic cell line UT-7. The long-term growth of UT-7 is usually supported only by human interleukin-3 (IL-3), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or erythropoietin (Epo). None of these three cytokines was involved in the observed effect, since murine GM-CSF and IL-3 do not act on human cells and MS-5 cells do not produce Epo. Soluble stem cell factor (SCF) induced UT-7 cell proliferation. However, S1/S1 mutant fibroblasts also supported UT-7 cell growth and anti-c-kit antibodies only partially abolished UT-7 cell proliferative response to MS-5 cells. These observations excluded a major role of SCF in this system. MS-5-derived growth-promoting activity was diffusible, but attempts to grow UT-7 cells in high levels of known soluble murine stromal-derived cytokines active on human cells showed no or minimal response, suggesting that MS-5's proliferative effect was not mediated by known cytokines. Finally, involvement of an autocrine loop of activation induced by MS-5 was excluded: RT-PCR analysis did not detect increased transcripts for GM-CSF, IL-3, IL-6, SCF, or Epo in UT-7 cells cocultured for 2 to 6 days with MS-5. In addition, UT-7 cell proliferation on MS-5 was not inhibited by neutralizing antibodies against the human GM-CSF receptor or the human IL-6 receptor alpha chain. Whether UT-7 cell proliferation triggered by MS-5 reflects the existence of novel stromal cytokines or

  12. The Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells: Commitment and Regulation of Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tencerova, Michaela; Kassem, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment represents an important compartment of bone that regulates bone homeostasis and the balance between bone formation and bone resorption depending on the physiological needs of the organism. Abnormalities of BM microenvironmental dynamics can lead to metabolic bone diseases. BM stromal cells (also known as skeletal or mesenchymal stem cells) [bone marrow stromal stem cell (BMSC)] are multipotent stem cells located within BM stroma and give rise to osteoblasts and adipocytes. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms of BMSC lineage commitment to adipocytic lineage and regulation of BM adipocyte formation are not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss recent findings pertaining to identification and characterization of adipocyte progenitor cells in BM and the regulation of differentiation into mature adipocytes. We have also emphasized the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:27708616

  13. CD34+ stromal cells/fibroblasts/fibrocytes/telocytes as a tissue reserve and a principal source of mesenchymal cells. Location, morphology, function and role in pathology.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, L; Gutiérrez, R; García, M P; Sáez, F J; Díaz-Flores, L; Valladares, F; Madrid, J F

    2014-07-01

    We review the morphofunctional characteristics of CD34+ stromal fibroblastic/fibrocytic cells (CD34+ SFCs) and report our observations. We consider the following aspects of CD34+ SFCs: A) The confusing terms applied to this cell type, often combining the prefix CD34 with numerous names, including fibroblasts, fibrocytes, dendrocytes, keratocytes, telocytes and stromal, dendritic, adventitial, supraadventitial, perivascular, paravascular and delimiting cells; B) Changes in their immunophenotype, e.g., loss of CD34 expression and gain of other markers, such as those defining mesenchymal and derivate cells (myofibroblasts, osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes); C) Morphology (elongated or triangular cell body and thin, moniliform, bipolar or multipolar cytoplasmic processes), immunohistochemistry (co-expression of and changes in molecular expression) and structure (characteristics of nucleus and cytoplasmic organelles, and points of contact and junctions in quiescent and activated stages by light and electron microscopy); D) Location and distribution in the vessels (adventitia or external layer), in the tissues (connective, adipose, blood, muscle and nervous) and in the organs and systems (skin, oral cavity and oropharynx, respiratory, digestive, urinary, male, female, endocrine and lymphoid systems, serosal and synovial membranes, heart, eye and meninges); E) Origin from the mesoderm and cranial neural crest in the embryo, and from stem cells (themselves or other cells) and/or peripheral blood pluripotent stem cells (circulating progenitor cells) in post-natal life; F) Functions, such as synthesis of different molecules, progenitor of mesenchymal cells, immunomodulation, parenchymal regulation (growth, maturation and differentiation of adjacent cells), induction of angiogenesis, scaffolding support of other cells and phagocytic properties. Since CD34+ SFCs are the main reservoir of tissue mesenchymal cells (great mesenchymal potential, probably higher than that

  14. Zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, survival, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Clyde; Su, Tammy; Lau, Ryan P; Shah, Arpit; Laurie, Payton C; Avalos, Brenda; Aggio, Julian; Harris, Elena; Traver, David; Stachura, David L

    2015-12-01

    Forward genetic screens in zebrafish have been used to identify genes essential for the generation of primitive blood and the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but have not elucidated the genes essential for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation and differentiation because of the lack of methodologies to functionally assess these processes. We previously described techniques used to test the developmental potential of HSPCs by culturing them on zebrafish kidney stromal (ZKS) cells, derived from the main site of hematopoiesis in the adult teleost. Here we describe an additional primary stromal cell line we refer to as zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells, derived from tissue surrounding the embryonic dorsal aorta, the site of HSC emergence in developing fish. ZEST cells encouraged HSPC differentiation toward the myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid pathways when assessed by morphologic and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses. Additionally, ZEST cells significantly expanded the number of cultured HSPCs in vitro, indicating that these stromal cells are supportive of both HSPC proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Examination of ZEST cells indicates that they express numerous cytokines and Notch ligands and possess endothelial characteristics. Further characterization of ZEST cells should prove to be invaluable in understanding the complex signaling cascades instigated by the embryonic hematopoietic niche required to expand and differentiate HSPCs. Elucidating these processes and identifying possibilities for the modulation of these molecular pathways should allow the in vitro expansion of HSPCs for a multitude of therapeutic uses.

  15. Tumor-Activated Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Osteosarcoma Stemness and Migratory Potential via IL-6 Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Cortini, Margherita; Massa, Annamaria; Avnet, Sofia; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is an aggressive bone malignancy with a high relapse rate despite combined treatment with surgery and multiagent chemotherapy. As for other cancers, OS-associated microenvironment may contribute to tumor initiation, growth, and metastasis. We consider mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) as a relevant cellular component of OS microenvironment, and have previously found that the interaction between MSC and tumor cells is bidirectional: tumor cells can modulate their peripheral environment that in turn becomes more favorable to tumor growth through metabolic reprogramming. Here, we determined the effects of MSC on OS stemness and migration, two major features associated with recurrence and chemoresistance. The presence of stromal cells enhanced the number of floating spheres enriched in cancer stem cells (CSC) of the OS cell population. Furthermore, the co-culturing with MSC stimulated the migratory capacity of OS via TGFβ1 and IL-6 secretion, and the neutralizing antibody anti-IL-6 impaired this effect. Thus, stromal cells in combination with OS spheres exploit a vicious cycle where the presence of CSC stimulates mesenchymal cytokine secretion, which in turn increases stemness, proliferation, migration, and metastatic potential of CSC, also through the increase of expression of adhesion molecules like ICAM-1. Altogether, our data corroborate the concept that a comprehensive knowledge of the interplay between tumor and stroma that also includes the stem-like fraction of tumor cells is needed to develop novel and effective anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27851822

  16. [The hepatic differentiation of adult and fetal liver stromal cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Kholodenko, I V; Kholodenko, R V; Manukyan, G V; Yarygin, K N

    2016-11-01

    The liver has a marked capacity for regeneration. In most cases the liver regeneration is determined by hepatocytes. The regenerative capacity of hepatocytes is significantly reduced in acute or chronic damage. In particular, repair mechanisms are not activated in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. Organ transplantation or advanced methods of regenerative medicine can help such patients. The promising results were obtained in clinical trials involving patients with various forms of liver disease who received transplantation of autologous bone marrow stem cells. However, to improve the effectiveness of such treatment it is necessary to search for more optimal sources of progenitor cells, as well as to evaluate the possibility of using descendants of these cells differentiated in vitro. In this study we isolated stromal cells from the liver biopsies of three patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, conducted their morphological and phenotypic analysis, and evaluated the hepatic potential of these cells in vitro. The stromal cells isolated from fetal liver were used for comparison. The results of this can serve as a basis for the development of a new method for the treatment of end-stage liver disease. The stromal cells isolated from the liver biopsies for a long time proliferate in a culture and this which makes it possible to expand them to large amounts for subsequent differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells and autologous transplantation.

  17. Paracrine Engineering of Human Explant-Derived Cardiac Stem Cells to Over-Express Stromal-Cell Derived Factor 1α Enhances Myocardial Repair.

    PubMed

    Tilokee, Everad L; Latham, Nicholas; Jackson, Robyn; Mayfield, Audrey E; Ye, Bin; Mount, Seth; Lam, Buu-Khanh; Suuronen, Erik J; Ruel, Marc; Stewart, Duncan J; Davis, Darryl R

    2016-07-01

    First generation cardiac stem cell products provide indirect cardiac repair but variably produce key cardioprotective cytokines, such as stromal-cell derived factor 1α, which opens the prospect of maximizing up-front paracrine-mediated repair. The mesenchymal subpopulation within explant derived human cardiac stem cells underwent lentiviral mediated gene transfer of stromal-cell derived factor 1α. Unlike previous unsuccessful attempts to increase efficacy by boosting the paracrine signature of cardiac stem cells, cytokine profiling revealed that stromal-cell derived factor 1α over-expression prevented lv-mediated "loss of cytokines" through autocrine stimulation of CXCR4+ cardiac stem cells. Stromal-cell derived factor 1α enhanced angiogenesis and stem cell recruitment while priming cardiac stem cells to readily adopt a cardiac identity. As compared to injection with unmodified cardiac stem cells, transplant of stromal-cell derived factor 1α enhanced cells into immunodeficient mice improved myocardial function and angiogenesis while reducing scarring. Increases in myocardial stromal-cell derived factor 1α content paralleled reductions in myocyte apoptosis but did not influence long-term engraftment or the fate of transplanted cells. Transplantation of stromal-cell derived factor 1α transduced cardiac stem cells increased the generation of new myocytes, recruitment of bone marrow cells, new myocyte/vessel formation and the salvage of reversibly damaged myocardium to enhance cardiac repair after experimental infarction. Stem Cells 2016;34:1826-1835.

  18. Manipulation of human early T lymphopoiesis by coculture on human bone marrow stromal cells: potential utility for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Ohishi, Kohshi; Orito, Yuki; Nakamori, Yoshiki; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Ino, Kazuko; Suzuki, Kei; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Masuya, Masahiro; Hamada, Hirofumi; Mineno, Junichi; Ono, Ryoichi; Nosaka, Tetsuya; Shiku, Hiroshi; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2013-04-01

    T cell precursors are an attractive target for adoptive immunotherapy. We examined the regulation of human early T lymphopoiesis by human bone marrow stromal cells to explore in vitro manipulation of human T cell precursors in a human-only coculture system. The generation of CD7(+)CD56(-)cyCD3(-) proT cells from human hematopoietic progenitors on telomerized human bone marrow stromal cells was enhanced by stem cell factor, flt3 ligand, and thrombopoietin, but these stimulatory effects were suppressed by interleukin 3. Expression of Notch ligands Delta-1 and -4 on stromal cells additively promoted T cell differentiation into the CD7(+)cyCD3(+) pre-T cell stage, while cell growth was strongly inhibited. By combining these coculture systems, we found that initial coculture with telomerized stromal cells in the presence of stem cell factor, flt3 ligand, and thrombopoietin, followed by coculture on Delta-1- and -4-coexpressing stromal cells led to a higher percentage and number of pre-T cells. Adoptive immunotherapy using peripheral blood T cells transduced with a tumor antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) is a promising strategy but has several limitations, such as the risk of forming a chimeric TCR with the endogenous TCR. We demonstrated that incubation of TCR-transduced hematopoietic progenitors with the combination of coculture systems gave rise to CD7(+)TCR(+)CD3(+)CD1a(-) T cell precursors that rapidly proliferated and differentiated under the culture condition to induce mature T cell differentiation. These data show the regulatory mechanism of early T lymphopoiesis on human stromal cells and the potential utility of engineered human stromal cells to manipulate early T cell development for clinical application.

  19. Phenotypic characteristics of hybrid cells generated by transferring neuronal nuclei into bone marrow stromal cell cytoplasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhujuan; Xu, Yan; Zhong, Qi; Zheng, Jian

    2012-02-10

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are promising donor cells for transplantation therapies for a variety of diseases. However, there still lack efficient ways to induce directional differentiation of BMSCs to promote their practical use in transplantation therapy. In this study, we constructed hybrid cells by transferring neuronal nuclei into BMSC cytoplasts and investigated the proliferative capacity and phenotypic characteristics of the hybrid cells. The neuronal nuclei were labeled with Hoechst 33342 before the transfer process, and the cell membrane antigen CD71 was used as a marker of BMSC cytoplasts. The BMSC cytoplasts and neuronal karyoplasts were separated by Ficoll density gradient ultracentrifugation. The hybrid cells were generated by the polyethylene glycol-mediated fusion of BMSC cytoplasts with neuronal karyoplasts. The hybrid cells exhibited Hoechst 33342 staining in their nuclei and CD71 staining on their cytomembranes, which confirmed the success of cell fusion. The hybrid cells were positive for BrdU immunostaining. Viability analysis of the cultured hybrid cells by the MTT assay demonstrated their proliferative ability. Immunocytochemical staining revealed the expression of the neuron-specific markers NeuN and MAP2 in the third passage hybrid cells, which indicated their neuronal phenotypic characteristics. The results demonstrated that the hybrid cells produced by fusing neuronal karyoplasts with BMSC cytoplasts had proliferative capability and expressed the neuron-specific markers. Further study is required to investigate the phenotype of the hybrid cells both structurally and functionally.

  20. [Abberant methylation of p16, HIC1, N33 and GSTP1 genes in tumor epitelium and tumor-associated stromal cells of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kekeeva, T V; Popova, O P; Shegaĭ, P V; Alekseev, B Ia; Adnreeva, Iu Iu; Zaletaev, D V; Nemtsova, M V

    2007-01-01

    The methylation status of four genes significant in prostate carcinogenesis p16, HIC1, N33 and GSTP1, were evaluated using quantitative methylationsensitive polymerase chain reaction. Tumor epithelia, tumor-associated stroma, normal epithelia, foci of PIN and benign prostate hyperplasia, and stroma adjacent to tumor tissues were isolated from whole-mount prostatectomy specimens of patients with localized prostate cancer by using laser capture microdissection. We found high levels of gene methylation in the tumor epithelium and tumor-associated stromal cells and some methylation in both hyperplastic epithelium and stromal cells in normal-appearing tissues located adjacent to tumors. Promoter methylation in the non-neoplastic cells of the prostate tumor microenvironment may play an important role in cancer development and progression. We examined the promoter methylation status of pl6, HIC1, N33 and GSTP1 in prostate biopsy fragments and prostate tissues after radical prostatectomy from patients with adenocarcinoma without laser capture microdissection. Methylation frequencies of all genes in tumor samples were considerably lower than frequencies in microdissected tumour samples (HIC1, 71 versus 89%; p16, 22 versus 78%; GSTP1, 32 versus 100%; N33, 20 versus 33%). The laser capture microdissection is required procedure in methylation studies taking into account multifocality and heterogenity of prostate cancer tissue.

  1. Apoptosis induction of human endometriotic epithelial and stromal cells by noscapine

    PubMed Central

    Khazaei, Mohammad Rasoul; Rashidi, Zahra; Chobsaz, Farzaneh; Khazaei, Mozafar

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Endometriosis is a complex gynecologic disease with unknown etiology. Noscapine has been introduced as a cancer cell suppressor. Endometriosis was considered as a cancer like disorder, The aim of present study was to investigate noscapine apoptotic effect on human endometriotic epithelial and stromal cells in vitro. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, endometrial biopsies from endometriosis patients (n=9) were prepared and digested by an enzymatic method (collagenase I, 2 mg/ml). Stromal and epithelial cells were separated by sequential filtration through a cell strainer and ficoll layering. The cells of each sample were divided into five groups: control (0), 10, 25, 50 and 100 micromole/liter (µM) concentration of noscapine and were cultured for three different periods of times; 24, 48 and 72 hr. Cell viability was assessed by colorimetric assay. Nitric oxide (NO) concentration was measured by Griess reagent. Cell death was analyzed by Acridine Orange (AO)–Ethidium Bromide (EB) double staining and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results: Viability of endometrial epithelial and stromal cells significantly decreased in 10, 25, 50 and 100 µM noscapine concentration in 24, 48, 72 hr (P<0.05) and apoptotic index increased in 25, 50 and 100 µM noscapine concentrations in 48 hr significantly (P<0.05). Concentrations of NO didn’t show a significant decrease. Conclusion: Noscapine increased endometriotic epithelial and stromal cell death and can be suggested as a treatment for endometriosis. PMID:27803780

  2. TRPC6 regulates cell cycle progression by modulating membrane potential in bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Jun; Inoue, Ryuji

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ca2+ influx is important for cell cycle progression, but the mechanisms involved seem to vary. We investigated the potential roles of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE)-related molecules STIM (stromal interaction molecule)/Orai in the cell cycle progression of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), a reliable therapeutic resource for regenerative medicine. Experimental Approach PCR and immunoblot analyses were used to examine mRNA and protein levels, fluorescence imaging and patch clamping for Ca2+ influx and membrane potential measurements, and flow cytometry for cell cycle analysis. Key Results Cell cycle synchronization of BMSCs revealed S phase-specific enhancement of TRPC1, STIM and Orai mRNA and protein expression. In contrast, TRPC6 expression decreased in the S phase and increased in the G1 phase. Resting membrane potential (RMP) of BMSCs was most negative and positive in the S and G1 phases, respectively, and was accompanied by an enhancement and attenuation of SOCE respectively. Chemically depolarizing/hyperpolarizing the membrane erased these differences in SOCE magnitude during the cell cycle. siRNA knockdown of TRPC6 produced a negative shift in RMP, increased SOCE and caused redistribution of BMSCs with increased populations in the S and G2/M phases and accumulation of cyclins A2 and B1. A low concentration of Gd3+ (1 μM) suppressed BMSC proliferation at its concentration to inhibit SOC channels relatively specifically. Conclusions and Implications TRPC6, by changing the membrane potential, plays a pivotal role in controlling the SOCE magnitude, which is critical for cell cycle progression of BMSCs. This finding provides a new therapeutic strategy for regulating BMSC proliferation. PMID:25041367

  3. Stromal cell contributions to the homeostasis and functionality of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Scott N.; Germain, Ronald N.

    2009-01-01

    A defining characteristic of the immune system is the constant movement of many of its constituent cells through the secondary lymphoid tissues, mainly the spleen and lymph nodes, where crucial interactions that underlie homeostatic regulation, peripheral tolerance, and effective development of adaptive immunity take place. What has only recently been recognized is the role that non-haematopoietic stromal elements have in multiple aspects of immune cell migration, activation and survival. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of lymphoid compartment stromal cells, examine their possible heterogeneity, discuss how these cells contribute to immune homeostasis and the efficient initiation of adaptive immunity, and highlight how targeting of these elements by some pathogens can influence the host response. PMID:19644499

  4. Stromal cell contributions to the homeostasis and functionality of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Scott N; Germain, Ronald N

    2009-09-01

    A defining characteristic of the immune system is the constant movement of many of its constituent cells through the secondary lymphoid tissues, mainly the spleen and lymph nodes, where crucial interactions that underlie homeostatic regulation, peripheral tolerance and the effective development of adaptive immune responses take place. What has only recently been recognized is the role that non-haematopoietic stromal elements have in many aspects of immune cell migration, activation and survival. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of lymphoid compartment stromal cells, examine their possible heterogeneity, discuss how these cells contribute to immune homeostasis and the efficient initiation of adaptive immune responses, and highlight how targeting of these elements by some pathogens can influence the host immune response.

  5. Marrow stromal fibroblastic cell cultivation in vitro on decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Timothy F; French, Samuel W

    2010-02-01

    The in vitro biocompatibility of decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix was evaluated. Following a freeze-thaw cycle, sectioned discs of fresh frozen rat metaphyseal bone were sequentially incubated in solutions of hypertonic, then hypotonic Ringer's solution, followed by deoxycholic acid, then DNAase I. The adequacy of decellularization of marrow stroma was examined by light microscopy. Marrow stromal fibroblastic cells were harvested by dispersion of rat long bone marrow, followed by concentration by discontinuous Ficoll-Paque gradient centrifugation. The fibroblastic cells were expanded by in vitro cultivation, and second passage cells were cryopreserved until needed. Cryopreserved marrow stromal cells were applied dropwise to sections of decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix, and cultured in BJGb medium with 20% fetal bovine serum for ten days. Mature cultures were formalin fixed, decalcified, and embedded in paraffin. Light microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections showed individual spindle cells invading the upper portion of the decellularized extracellular matrix, and also a monolayer of spindle cells on the upper surfaces of exposed trabecular and cortical bone. This experiment showed that decellularized marrow extracellular matrix is a biocompatible three dimensional in vitro substrate for marrow stromal fibroblastic cells.

  6. Distinct effects of SIRT1 in cancer and stromal cells on tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Choi, Yong-Joon; Jin, Peng; Yoon, Haejin; Chun, Yang-Sook; Shin, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Ja-Eun; Park, Jong-Wan

    2016-04-26

    The lysyl deacetylase SIRT1 acts as a metabolic sensor in adjusting metabolic imbalance. To explore the role of SIRT1 in tumor-stroma interplay, we designed an in vivo tumor model using SIRT1-transgenic mice. B16F10 mouse melanoma grew more quickly in SIRT1-transgenic mice than in wild-type mice, whereas SIRT1-overexpressing one grew slowly in both mice. Of human tumors, SIRT1 expression in stromal fibroblasts was found to correlate with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer. B16F10 and human ovarian cancer (SKOV3 and SNU840) cells were more proliferative in co-culture with SIRT1-overexpressiong fibroblasts. In contrast, SIRT1 within cancer cells has a negative effect on cell proliferation. In conditioned media from SIRT1-overexpressing fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) was identified in cytokine arrays to be secreted from fibroblasts SIRT1-dependently. Fibroblast-derived MMP3 stimulated cancer cell proliferation, and such a role of MMP3 was also demonstrated in cancer/fibroblast co-grafts. In conclusion, SIRT1 plays differential roles in cancer and stromal cells. SIRT1 in stromal cells promotes cancer growth by producing MMP3, whereas SIRT1 in cancer cells inhibits growth via an intracellular event. The present study provides a basis for setting new anticancer strategies targeting SIRT1.

  7. Breast tumor and stromal cell responses to TGF-β and hypoxia in matrix deposition

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Colleen S.; Keely, Patricia J

    2012-01-01

    The components that comprise the extracellular matrix (ECM) are integral to normal tissue homeostasis as well as the development and progression of breast tumors. The secretion, construction, and remodeling of the ECM are each regulated by a complex interplay between tumor cells, fibroblasts and macrophages. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is an essential molecule in regulating the cellular production of ECM molecules and the adhesive interactions of cells with the ECM. Additionally, hypoxic cell signals, initiated by oxygen deprivation, additional metabolic factors or receptor activation, are associated with ECM formation and the progression of breast cancer. Both TGF-β and hypoxic cell signals are implicated in the functional and morphological changes of cancer-associated-fibroblasts and tumor-associated-macrophages. Moreover, the enhanced recruitment of tumor and stromal cells in response to hypoxia-induced chemokines leads to increased ECM deposition and remodeling, increased blood vessel formation, and enhanced tumor migration. Thus, elucidation of the collaborative networks between tumor and stromal cells in response to the combined signals of TGF-β and hypoxia may yield insight into treatment parameters that target both tumor and stromal cells. PMID:23262216

  8. Very Late Antigen-5 Facilitates Stromal Progenitor Cell Differentiation Into Myofibroblast

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Namita; Weingarten, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Fibrotic disease is associated with abrogated stromal cell proliferation and activity. The precise identity of the cells that drive fibrosis remains obscure, in part because of a lack of information on their lineage development. To investigate the role of an early stromal progenitor cell (SPC) on the fibrotic process, we selected for, and monitored the stages of, fibroblast development from a previously reported free-floating anchorage-independent cell (AIC) progenitor population. Our findings demonstrate that organotypic pulmonary, cardiac, and renal fibroblast commitment follows a two-step process of attachment and remodeling in culture. Cell differentiation was confirmed by the inability of SPCs to revert to the free-floating state and functional mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) differentiation into osteoblast, adipocyte, chondrocyte, and fibroblastic lineages. The myofibroblastic phenotype was reflected by actin stress-fiber formation, α-smooth muscle production, and a greater than threefold increase in proliferative activity compared with that of the progenitors. SPC-derived pulmonary myofibroblasts demonstrated a more than 300-fold increase in fibronectin-1 (Fn1), collagen, type 1, α1, integrin α-5 (Itga5), and integrin β-1 (Itgb1) transcript levels. Very late antigen-5 (ITGA5/ITGB1) protein cluster formations were also prevalent on the differentiated cells. Normalized SPC-derived myofibroblast expression patterns reflected those of primary cultured lung myofibroblasts. Intratracheal implantation of pulmonary AICs into recipient mouse lungs resulted in donor cell FN1 production and evidence of epithelial derivation. SPC derivation into stromal tissue in vitro and in vivo and the observation that MSC and fibroblast lineages share a common ancestor could potentially lead to personalized antifibrotic therapies. PMID:25273539

  9. Mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow treated with bovine tendon extract acquire the phenotype of mature tenocytes☆

    PubMed Central

    Augusto, Lívia Maria Mendonça; Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro; Bonfim, Danielle Cabral; dos Santos Cavalcanti, Amanda; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Duarte, Maria Eugênia Leite

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated in vitro differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow, in tenocytes after treatment with bovine tendon extract. Methods Bovine tendons were used for preparation of the extract and were stored at −80 °C. Mesenchymal stromal cells from the bone marrow of three donors were used for cytotoxicity tests by means of MTT and cell differentiation by means of qPCR. Results The data showed that mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow treated for up to 21 days in the presence of bovine tendon extract diluted at diminishing concentrations (1:10, 1:50 and 1:250) promoted activation of biglycan, collagen type I and fibromodulin expression. Conclusion Our results show that bovine tendon extract is capable of promoting differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in tenocytes. PMID:26962503

  10. Human fetal liver stromal cells expressing erythropoietin promote hematopoietic development from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Ji, Lei; Yue, Wen; Shi, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Ruo-Yong; Li, Yan-Hua; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Xi, Jia-Fei; He, Li-Juan; Nan, Xue; Pei, Xue-Tao

    2012-02-01

    Blood cells transfusion and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplantation are important methods for cell therapy. They are widely used in the treatment of incurable hematological disorder, infectious diseases, genetic diseases, and immunologic deficiency. However, their availability is limited by quantity, capacity of proliferation and the risk of blood transfusion complications. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been shown to be an alternative resource for the generation of hematopoietic cells. In the current study, we describe a novel method for the efficient production of hematopoietic cells from hESCs. The stable human fetal liver stromal cell lines (hFLSCs) expressing erythropoietin (EPO) were established using the lentiviral system. We observed that the supernatant from the EPO transfected hFLSCs could induce the hESCs differentiation into hematopoietic cells, especially erythroid cells. They not only expressed fetal and embryonic globins but also expressed the adult-globin chain on further maturation. In addition, these hESCs-derived erythroid cells possess oxygen-transporting capacity, which indicated hESCs could generate terminally mature progenies. This should be useful for ultimately developing an animal-free culture system to generate large numbers of erythroid cells from hESCs and provide an experimental model to study early human erythropoiesis.

  11. Induction of T Cell Development In Vitro by Delta-Like (Dll)-Expressing Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Mohtashami, Mahmood; Zarin, Payam; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Recreating the thymic microenvironment in vitro poses a great challenge to immunologists. Until recently, the only approach was to utilize the thymic tissue in its three-dimensional form and to transfer the hematopoietic progenitors into this tissue to generate de novo T cells. With the advent of OP9-DL cells (bone marrow-derived cells that are transduced to express Notch ligand, Delta-like), hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) could be induced to differentiate into T cells in culture for the first time outside of the thymic tissue on a monolayer. We, as well as others, asked whether the ability to support T cell development in vitro in a monolayer is unique to BM-derived OP9 cells, and showed that provision of Delta-like expression to thymic epithelial cells and fibroblasts also allowed for T cell development. This provides the opportunity to design an autologous coculture system where the supportive stromal and the hematopoietic components are both derived from the same individual, which has obvious clinical implications. In this chapter, we describe methods for establishing a primary murine dermal fibroblast cell population that is transduced to express Delta-like 4, and describe the conditions for its coculture with HSCs to support T cell lineage initiation and expansion, while comparing it to the now classic OP9-DL coculture.

  12. Stromal cell-derived CXCL12 and CCL8 cooperate to support increased development of regulatory dendritic cells following Leishmania infection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Liu, Hao; Juaréz, Julius; Aziz, Naveed; Kaye, Paul M; Svensson, Mattias

    2010-08-15

    In the immune system, stromal cells provide specialized niches that control hematopoiesis by coordinating the production of chemokines, adhesion molecules, and growth factors. Stromal cells also have anti-inflammatory effects, including support for the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors into dendritic cells (DCs) with immune regulatory properties. Together, these observations suggest that the alterations in hematopoiesis commonly seen in infectious disease models, such as experimental visceral leishmaniasis in mice, might result from altered stromal cell function. We report in this study that the stromal cell-derived chemokines CXCL12 and CCL8 cooperate to attract hematopoietic progenitors with the potential to differentiate into regulatory DCs. We also show that infection of murine bone marrow stromal cells by Leishmania donovani enhanced their capacity to support the development of regulatory DCs, as well as their capacity to produce CCL8. Likewise, in experimental visceral leishmaniasis, CCL8 production was induced in splenic stromal cells, leading to an enhanced capacity to attract hematopoietic progenitor cells. Thus, intracellular parasitism of stromal cells modifies their capacity to recruit and support hematopoietic progenitor differentiation into regulatory DCs, and aberrant expression of CCL8 by diseased stromal tissue may be involved in the switch from resolving to persistent infection.

  13. Octacalcium phosphate ceramics combined with gingiva-derived stromal cells for engineered functional bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Zorin, Vadim L; Komlev, Vladimir S; Zorina, Alla I; Khromova, Natalia V; Solovieva, Elena V; Fedotov, Alexander Yu; Eremin, Ilya I; Kopnin, Pavel B

    2014-08-28

    Biocompatible ceramic fillers are capable of sustaining bone formation in the proper environment. The major drawback of these scaffolding materials is the absence of osteoinductivity. To overcome this limitation, bioengineered scaffolds combine osteoconductive components (biomaterials) with osteogenic features such as cells and growth factors. The bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMMSCs) and the β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) are well-known and characterized in this regard. The present study was conducted to compare the properties of novel octacalcium phosphate ceramic (OCP) granules with β-TCP (Cerasorb(®)), gingiva-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (GMSCs) properties with the BMMSCs and osteogenic and angiogenic properties of a bioengineered composite based on OCP granules and the GMSCs. This study demonstrates that GMSCs and BMMSСs have a similar osteogenic capacity. The usage of OCP ceramic granules in combination with BMMSCs/GMSCs significantly affects the osteo- and angiogenesis in bone grafts of ectopic models.

  14. Stromal interaction molecule 1 regulates growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis of human tongue squamous carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaobo; Song, Laixiao; Bai, Yunfei; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Boqian; Wang, Wei

    2017-04-30

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is the most common type of oral carcinomas. However, the molecular mechanism by which OTSCC developed is not fully identified. Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is a transmembrane protein, mainly located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). STIM1 is involved in several types of cancers. Here, we report that STIM1 contributes to the development of human OTSCC. We knocked down STIM1 in OTSCC cell line Tca-8113 with lentivirus-mediated shRNA and found that STIM1 knockdown repressed the proliferation of Tca-8113 cells. In addition, we also showed that STIM1 deficiency reduced colony number of Tca-8113 cells. Knockdown of STIM1 repressed cells to enter M phase of cell cycle and induced cellular apoptosis. Furthermore, we performed microarray and bioinformatics analysis and found that STIM1 was associated with p53 and MAPK pathways, which may contribute to the effects of STIM1 on cell growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Finally, we confirmed that STIM1 controlled the expression of MDM2, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), and growth arrest and DNA damage inducible α (GADD45A) in OTSCC cells. In conclusion, we provide evidence that STIM1 contributes to the development of OTSCC partially through regulating p53 and MAPK pathways to promote cell cycle and survival.

  15. Studies on T cell maturation on defined thymic stromal cell populations in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We describe an in vitro system in which positive selection of developing T cells takes place on defined stromal cell preparations, which include major histocompatibility complex class II+ epithelial cells but exclude cells of bone marrow origin. In this system, maturation of double-positive T cell receptor negative (TCR-), CD4+8+ thymocytes into single-positive TCR+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells takes place together with the development of functional competence. As in vivo, this maturation is associated with the upregulation of TCR levels as cells progress from double-positive to single-positive status. We also show that class II+ epithelial cells in these cultures are less efficient than dendritic cells in mediating the deletion (negative selection) of V beta 8+ cells by the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B. For the first time, this approach provides a model in which the cellular interactions involved in both positive and negative selection can be studied under controlled in vitro conditions. PMID:1512547

  16. 3D Functional Corneal Stromal Tissue Equivalent Based on Corneal Stromal Stem Cells and Multi-Layered Silk Film Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Benedetto; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Funderburgh, James L.; Kaplan, David L.

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide need for human cornea equivalents continues to grow. Few clinical options are limited to allogenic and synthetic material replacements. We hypothesized that tissue engineered human cornea systems based on mechanically robust, patterned, porous, thin, optically clear silk protein films, in combination with human corneal stromal stem cells (hCSSCs), would generate 3D functional corneal stroma tissue equivalents, in comparison to previously developed 2D approaches. Silk film contact guidance was used to control the alignment and distribution of hCSSCs on RGD-treated single porous silk films, which were then stacked in an orthogonally, multi-layered architecture and cultured for 9 weeks. These systems were compared similar systems generated with human corneal fibroblasts (hCFs). Both cell types were viable and preferentially aligned along the biomaterial patterns for up to 9 weeks in culture. H&E histological sections showed that the systems seeded with the hCSSCs displayed ECM production throughout the entire thickness of the constructs. In addition, the ECM proteins tested positive for keratocyte-specific tissue markers, including keratan sulfate, lumican, and keratocan. The quantification of hCSSC gene expression of keratocyte-tissue markers, including keratocan, lumican, human aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1), prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTDGS), and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 4 (PDK4), within the 3D tissue systems demonstrated upregulation when compared to 2D single silk films and to the systems generated with the hCFs. Furthermore, the production of ECM from the hCSSC seeded systems and subsequent remodeling of the initial matrix significantly improved cohesiveness and mechanical performance of the constructs, while maintaining transparency after 9 weeks. PMID:28099503

  17. Breast Cancer/Stromal Cells Coculture on Polyelectrolyte Films Emulates Tumor Stages and miRNA Profiles of Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Daverey, Amita; Brown, Karleen M; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we demonstrate a method for controlling breast cancer cells adhesion on polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films without the aid of adhesive proteins/ligands to study the role of tumor and stromal cell interaction on cancer biology. Numerous studies have explored engineering coculture of tumor and stromal cells predominantly using transwell coculture of stromal cells cultured onto coverslips that were subsequently added to tumor cell cultures. However, these systems imposed an artificial boundary that precluded cell-cell interactions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of patterned coculture of tumor cells and stromal cells that captures the temporal changes in the miRNA signature as the breast tumor develops through various stages. In our study we used synthetic polymers, namely poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDAC) and sulfonated poly(styrene) (SPS), as the polycation and polyanion, respectively, to build PEMs. Breast cancer cells attached and spread preferentially on SPS surfaces while stromal cells attached to both SPS and PDAC surfaces. SPS patterns were formed on PEM surfaces, by either capillary force lithography (CFL) of SPS onto PDAC surfaces or vice versa, to obtain patterns of breast cancer cells and patterned cocultures of breast cancer and stromal cells. In this study, we utilized cancer cells derived from two different tumor stages and two different stromal cells to effectively model a heterogeneous tumor microenvironment and emulate various tumor stages. The coculture model mimics the proliferative index (Ki67 expression) and tumor aggressiveness (HER-2 expression) akin to those observed in clinical tumor samples. We also demonstrated that our patterned coculture model captures the temporal changes in the miRNA-21 and miRNA-34 signature as the breast tumor develops through various stages. The engineered coculture platform lays groundwork toward precision medicine wherein patient-derived tumor cells can be

  18. Reversible Commitment to Differentiation by Human Multipotent Stromal Cells (MSCs) in Single-Cell Derived Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Ylöstalo, Joni; Bazhanov, Nikolay; Prockop, Darwin J

    2008-01-01

    Objective Human multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) readily form single-cell derived colonies when plated at clonal densities. However, the colonies are heterogeneous since the cells from a colony form new colonies that vary in size and differentiation potential when re-plated at clonal densities. The experiments here tested the hypothesis that the cells in the inner regions of colonies are partially differentiated but the differentiation is reversible. Materials and Methods Cells were separately isolated from the dense inner regions (IN) and less dense outer regions (OUT) of single-cell derived colonies. The cells were then compared by assays of their transcriptomes and proteins, and for clonogenicity and differentiation. Results The IN cells expressed fewer cell-cycle genes and higher levels of genes for extracellular matrix than the OUT cells. When transferred to differentiation medium, differentiation of the colonies occurred primarily in the IN regions. However, the IN cells were indistinguishable from OUT cells when re-plated at clonal densities and assayed for rates of propagation and clonogenicity. Also, the colonies formed by IN cells were similar to colonies formed by OUT cells in that they had distinct IN and OUT regions. Cultures of IN and OUT cells remained indistinguishable through multiple passages (30-75 population doublings), and both cells formed colonies that were looser and less dense as they were expanded. Conclusions The results demonstrated that the cells in the inner region of single-derived colonies are partially differentiated but the differentiation can be reversed by re-plating the cells at clonal densities. PMID:18619725

  19. In vitro inhibitory effects of imatinib mesylate on stromal cells and hematopoietic progenitors from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Soares, P.B.; Jeremias, T.S.; Alvarez-Silva, M.; Licínio, M.A.; Santos-Silva, M.C.; Vituri, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) because it selectively inhibits tyrosine kinase, which is a hallmark of CML oncogenesis. Recent studies have shown that IM inhibits the growth of several non-malignant hematopoietic and fibroblast cells from bone marrow (BM). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of IM on stromal and hematopoietic progenitor cells, specifically in the colony-forming units of granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), using BM cultures from 108 1.5- to 2-month-old healthy Swiss mice. The results showed that low concentrations of IM (1.25 µM) reduced the growth of CFU-GM in clonogenic assays. In culture assays with stromal cells, fibroblast proliferation and α-SMA expression by immunocytochemistry analysis were also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner, with a survival rate of approximately 50% with a dose of 2.5 µM. Cell viability and morphology were analyzed using MTT and staining with acrydine orange/ethidium bromide. Most cells were found to be viable after treatment with 5 µM IM, although there was gradual growth inhibition of fibroblastic cells while the number of round cells (macrophage-like cells) increased. At higher concentrations (15 µM), the majority of cells were apoptotic and cell growth ceased completely. Oil red staining revealed the presence of adipocytes only in untreated cells (control). Cell cycle analysis of stromal cells by flow cytometry showed a blockade at the G0/G1 phases in groups treated with 5-15 µM. These results suggest that IM differentially inhibits the survival of different types of BM cells since toxic effects were achieved. PMID:23011404

  20. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

    PubMed Central

    Mindaye, Samuel T.; Lo Surdo, Jessica; Bauer, Steven R.; Alterman, Michail A.

    2015-01-01

    Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5], [6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results. PMID:26702413

  1. The use of bone marrow stromal cells (bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells) for alveolar bone tissue engineering: basic science to clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Kagami, Hideaki; Agata, Hideki; Inoue, Minoru; Asahina, Izumi; Tojo, Arinobu; Yamashita, Naohide; Imai, Kohzoh

    2014-06-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a promising field of regenerative medicine in which cultured cells, scaffolds, and osteogenic inductive signals are used to regenerate bone. Human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are the most commonly used cell source for bone tissue engineering. Although it is known that cell culture and induction protocols significantly affect the in vivo bone forming ability of BMSCs, the responsible factors of clinical outcome are poorly understood. The results from recent studies using human BMSCs have shown that factors such as passage number and length of osteogenic induction significantly affect ectopic bone formation, although such differences hardly affected the alkaline phosphatase activity or gene expression of osteogenic markers. Application of basic fibroblast growth factor helped to maintain the in vivo osteogenic ability of BMSCs. Importantly, responsiveness of those factors should be tested under clinical circumstances to improve the bone tissue engineering further. In this review, clinical application of bone tissue engineering was reviewed with putative underlying mechanisms.

  2. Expression of Surface Molecules in Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Co-Cultured with Nucleated Umbilical Cord Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Yu A; Balashova, E E; Volgina, N E; Kabaeva, N V; Dugina, T N; Sukhikh, G T

    2017-02-01

    We studied the expression of different classes of surface molecules (CD13, CD29, CD40, CD44, CD54, CD71, CD73, CD80, CD86, CD90, CD105, CD106, CD146, HLA-I, and HLA-DR) in mesenchymal stromal cells from human umbilical cord and bone marrow during co-culturing with nucleated umbilical cord blood cells. Expression of the majority of surface markers in both types of mesenchymal stromal cells was stable and did not depend on the presence of the blood cells. Significant differences were found only for cell adhesion molecules CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD106 (VCAM-1) responsible for direct cell-cell contacts with leukocytes and only for bone marrow derived cells.

  3. Stromal uptake and transmission of acid is a pathway for venting cancer cell-generated acid

    PubMed Central

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Black, Nicholas; Hsia, Lin-Ting; Wilding, Jennifer; Bodmer, Walter F.; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and invasion of cancer cells require favorable pH, yet potentially toxic quantities of acid are produced metabolically. Membrane-bound transporters extrude acid from cancer cells, but little is known about the mechanisms that handle acid once it is released into the poorly perfused extracellular space. Here, we studied acid handling by myofibroblasts (colon cancer-derived Hs675.T, intestinal InMyoFib, embryonic colon-derived CCD-112-CoN), skin fibroblasts (NHDF-Ad), and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells (HCT116, HT29) grown in monoculture or coculture. Expression of the acid-loading transporter anion exchanger 2 (AE2) (SLC4A2 product) was detected in myofibroblasts and fibroblasts, but not in CRC cells. Compared with CRC cells, Hs675.T and InMyoFib myofibroblasts had very high capacity to absorb extracellular acid. Acid uptake into CCD-112-CoN and NHDF-Ad cells was slower and comparable to levels in CRC cells, but increased alongside SLC4A2 expression under stimulation with transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), a cytokine involved in cancer–stroma interplay. Myofibroblasts and fibroblasts are connected by gap junctions formed by proteins such as connexin-43, which allows the absorbed acid load to be transmitted across the stromal syncytium. To match the stimulatory effect on acid uptake, cell-to-cell coupling in NHDF-Ad and CCD-112-CoN cells was strengthened with TGFβ1. In contrast, acid transmission was absent between CRC cells, even after treatment with TGFβ1. Thus, stromal cells have the necessary molecular apparatus for assembling an acid-venting route that can improve the flow of metabolic acid through tumors. Importantly, the activities of stromal AE2 and connexin-43 do not place an energetic burden on cancer cells, allowing resources to be diverted for other activities. PMID:27543333

  4. Targeting Stromal-Cancer Cell Crosstalk Networks in Ovarian Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Tsz-Lun; Leung, Cecilia S.; Li, Fuhai; Wong, Stephen T. C.; Mok, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a histologically, clinically, and molecularly diverse disease with a five-year survival rate of less than 30%. It has been estimated that approximately 21,980 new cases of epithelial ovarian cancer will be diagnosed and 14,270 deaths will occur in the United States in 2015, making it the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Ovarian tumor tissue is composed of cancer cells and a collection of different stromal cells. There is increasing evidence that demonstrates that stromal involvement is important in ovarian cancer pathogenesis. Therefore, stroma-specific signaling pathways, stroma-derived factors, and genetic changes in the tumor stroma present unique opportunities for improving the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the major components of the tumor stroma that have demonstrated supportive roles in tumor progression. In this review, we highlight various types of signaling crosstalk between ovarian cancer cells and stromal cells, particularly with CAFs. In addition to evaluating the importance of signaling crosstalk in ovarian cancer progression, we discuss approaches that can be used to target tumor-promoting signaling crosstalk and how these approaches can be translated into potential ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26751490

  5. Stromal fibroblasts facilitate cancer cell invasion by a novel invadopodia-independent matrix degradation process

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Eugene W.; Chen, Jing; Qiang, Li; McNiven, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic invasion of tumors into peripheral tissues is known to rely upon protease-mediated degradation of the surrounding stroma. This remodeling process utilizes complex, actin-based, specializations of the plasma membrane termed invadopodia that act both to sequester and release matrix metalloproteinases. Here we report that cells of mesenchymal origin, including tumor-associated fibroblasts, degrade substantial amounts of surrounding matrix by a mechanism independent of conventional invadopodia. These degradative sites lack the punctate shape of conventional invadopodia to spread along the cell base and are reticular and/or fibrous in character. In marked contrast to invadopodia, this degradation does not require the action of Src kinase, Cdc42, or Dyn2. Rather, inhibition of Dyn2 causes a dramatic upregulation of stromal matrix degradation. Further, expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases are differentially regulated between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts. This matrix remodeling by fibroblasts increases the invasive capacity of tumor cells, thereby illustrating how the tumor microenvironment can contribute to metastasis. These findings provide evidence for a novel matrix remodeling process conducted by stromal fibroblasts that is substantially more effective than conventional invadopodia, distinct in structural organization, and regulated by disparate molecular mechanisms. PMID:25982272

  6. Nanotopography Induced Human Bone Marrow Mesangiogenic Progenitor Cells (MPCs) to Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) Transition

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Sara; Montali, Marina; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Meucci, Sandro; Parchi, Paolo D.; Barachini, Serena; Panvini, Francesca M.; Pacini, Simone; Petrini, Iacopo; Cecchini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Mesangiogenic progenitor cells (MPCs) are a very peculiar population of cells present in the human adult bone marrow, only recently discovered and characterized. Owing to their differentiation potential, MPCs can be considered progenitors for mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), and for this reason they potentially represent a promising cell population to apply for skeletal tissue regeneration applications. Here, we evaluate the effects of surface nanotopography on MPCs, considering the possibility that this specific physical stimulus alone can trigger MPC differentiation toward the mesenchymal lineage. In particular, we exploit nanogratings to deliver a mechanical, directional stimulus by contact interaction to promote cell morphological polarization and stretching. Following this interaction, we study the MPC-MSC transition by i. analyzing the change in cell morphotype by immunostaining of the key cell-adhesion structures and confocal fluorescence microscopy, and ii. quantifying the expression of cell-phenotype characterizing markers by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that the MPC mesengenic differentiation can be induced by the solely interaction with the NGs, in absence of any other external, chemical stimulus. This aspect is of particular interest in the case of multipotent progenitors as MPCs that, retaining both mesengenic and angiogenic potential, possess a high clinical appeal. PMID:28066765

  7. Human foreskin fibroblast-like stromal cells can differentiate into functional hepatocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsing-I; Chen, Shao-Kuan; Wang, Robert Y-L; Shen, Chia-Rui; Cheng, Yu-Che

    2013-12-01

    Foreskin fibroblast-like stromal cells (FDSCs) are progenitors isolated from human tissue that can differentiate into diverse cell types. Many types of stem cells can differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells, which could be used for drug testing or in liver regeneration therapy, but whether FDSCs can be converted into functional hepatocytes is unknown. FDSCs show divergent properties when cultured in distinct media, forming spheres in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) containing F12, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF), but have fibroblast-like morphology when cultured in DMEM-based growth medium. Both cell populations express the typical mesenchymal stem cell markers CD90, CD105, and CD73, but the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) was detected only in FDSC spheres. Both types of FDSCs can differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells, which express typical liver markers, including albumin and hepatocyte paraffin 1 (Hep Par1), along with liver-specific biological activities. When plasmids containing the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome were transfected transiently into FDSCs, differentiated hepatocyte-like cells secrete large amounts of HBe and HBs antigens. FDSCs could be used for clinical hepatic therapy and/or serve as a model of HBV.

  8. Mesenchymal stromal cell derived extracellular vesicles rescue radiation damage to murine marrow hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Sicheng; Dooner, Mark; Cheng, Yan; Papa, Elaine; Del Tatto, Michael; Pereira, Mandy; Deng, Yanhui; Goldberg, Laura; Aliotta, Jason; Chatterjee, Devasis; Stewart, Connor; Carpanetto, Andrea; Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Camussi, Giovanni; Quesenberry, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to reverse radiation damage to marrow stem cells. We have evaluated the capacity of MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) to mitigate radiation injury to marrow stem cells at 4 hours to 7 days after irradiation. Significant restoration of marrow stem cell engraftment at 4, 24 and 168 hours post-irradiation by exposure to MSC-EVs was observed at 3 weeks to 9 months after transplant and further confirmed by secondary engraftment. Intravenous injection of MSC-EVs to 500cGy exposed mice led to partial recovery of peripheral blood counts and restoration of the engraftment of marrow. The murine hematopoietic cell line, FDC-P1 exposed to 500 cGy, showed reversal of growth inhibition, DNA damage and apoptosis on exposure to murine or human MSC-EVs. Both murine and human MSC-EVs reverse radiation damage to murine marrow cells and stimulate normal murine marrow stem cell/progenitors to proliferate. A preparation with both exosomes and microvesicles was found to be superior to either microvesicles or exosomes alone. Biologic activity was seen in freshly isolated vesicles and in vesicles stored for up to 6 months in 10% DMSO at −80°C. These studies indicate that MSC-EVs can reverse radiation damage to bone marrow stem cells. PMID:27150009

  9. Inhibition of Tumor Cells Interacting with Stromal Cells by Xanthones Isolated from a Costa Rican Penicillium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shugeng; McMillin, Douglas W.; Tamayo, Giselle; Delmore, Jake; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Clardy, Jon

    2012-01-01

    CR1642D, an endophytic isolate of Penicillium sp. collected from a Costa Rican rainforest, was identified through a high-throughput approach to identify natural products with enhanced anti-tumor activity in the context of tumor-stromal interactions. Bioassay-guided separation led to the identification of five xanthones (1-5) from CR1642D. The structures of the xanthone dimer penexanthone A (1) and monomer penexanthone B (2) were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses, including 2D NMR experiments. All of the compounds were tested against a panel of tumor cell lines in the presence and absence of bone marrow stromal cells. Compound 3 was the most active, with IC50 values of 1~17 μM, and its activity was enhanced two-fold against tumor cell line RPMI8226 in the presence of stromal cells (IC50 1.2 μM, but 2.4 μM without stromal cells). PMID:22458669

  10. Melanoma Cells Can Adopt the Phenotype of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages by Spontaneous Cell Fusion in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Kemény, Lajos V; Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Jakab, Ádám; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B

    2016-06-02

    After the removal of primary cutaneous melanoma some patients develop local recurrences, even after having histologically tumor-free re-excision. A potential explanation behind this phenomenon is that tumor cells switch their phenotype, making their recognition via standard histopathological assessments extremely difficult. Tumor-stromal cell fusion has been proposed as a potential mechanism for tumor cells to acquire mesenchymal traits; therefore, we hypothesized that melanoma cells could acquire fibroblast- and macrophage-like phenotypes via cell fusion. We show that melanoma cells spontaneously fuse with human dermal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The hybrid cells' nuclei contain chromosomes from both parental cells and are indistinguishable from the parental fibroblasts or macrophages based on their morphology and immunophenotype, as they could lose the melanoma specific MART1 marker, but express the fibroblast marker smooth muscle actin or the macrophage marker CD68. Our results suggest that, by spontaneous cell fusion in vitro, tumor cells can adopt the morphology and immunophenotype of stromal cells while still carrying oncogenic, tumor-derived genetic information. Therefore, melanoma-stromal cell fusion might play a role in missing tumor cells by routine histopathological assessments.

  11. Bone-like nodules formed by human bone marrow stromal cells: comparative study and characterization.

    PubMed

    Schecroun, N; Delloye, C h

    2003-03-01

    Autologous bone marrow stromal cells have been proposed as an adjuvant in the treatment of bone nonunion. This cell therapy would require the establishment of culture conditions that permit the rapid expansion of these cells ex vivo while retaining their potential for further differentiation. Our aim was to achieve a full differentiation process using human bone marrow aspirates. We first analyzed the effects of mineralization medium (with ascorbic acid and phosphate) and dexamethasone (dex) during the primary culture of human bone marrow stromal (HBMS) cells on the proliferation/differentiation behavior of first-passage cells. The most appropriate schedule was then selected to further characterize this differentiation model. We showed that primary culture of HBMS cells in proliferation medium (DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum), with a 48-h treatment by mineralization medium and dex resulted in a better osteoblastic differentiation of first-passage cells than primary culture carried out in mineralization medium with or without dex. We showed that culture of HBMS cells under these conditions (primary culture in proliferation medium, followed by subculture in mineralization medium) led to the formation of specifically mineralized bone-like nodules similar to the ones observed with rat bone marrow stromal cells. Our nodules exhibited three distinct cell types, reproducing in vitro a tissue-like structure. This treatment demonstrated an optimal proliferation and expression of osteoblastic markers such as alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and type I collagen. The primary culture allowed the multiplication of the number of adherent progenitor cells at the initial time of plating by a mean factor of 44,000, which was found to be negatively correlated with age. Thus, this differentiation model could provide a new tool to elaborate an autologous cell therapy designed to enhance osteogenesis.

  12. A Reproducible Method for Isolation and In Vitro Culture of Functional Human Lymphoid Stromal Cells from Tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ephraim, Yotam E.; Konijn, Tanja; Gönültas, Mehmet; Mebius, Reina E.

    2016-01-01

    The stromal compartment of secondary lymphoid organs is classicaly known for providing a mechanical scaffold for the complex interactions between hematopoietic cells during immune activation as well as for providing a niche which is favorable for survival of lymphocytes. In recent years, it became increasingly clear that these cells also play an active role during such a response. Currently, knowledge of the interactions between human lymphoid stroma and hematopoietic cells is still lacking and most insight is based on murine systems. Although methods to isolate stromal cells from tonsils have been reported, data on stability in culture, characterization, and functional properties are lacking. Here, we describe a reproducible and easy method for isolation and in vitro culture of functional human lymphoid stromal cells from palatine tonsils. The cells isolated express markers and characteristics of T cell zone fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and react to inflammatory stimuli by upregulating inflammatory cytokines and chemokines as well as adhesion molecules, as previously described for mouse lymphoid stroma. Also, cultured tonsil stromal cells support survival of human innate lymphoid cells, showing that these stromal cells can function as bone fide FRCs, providing a favorable microenvironment for hematopoietic cells. PMID:27907202

  13. Gremlin 1 Identifies a Skeletal Stem Cell with Bone, Cartilage, and Reticular Stromal Potential

    PubMed Central

    Worthley, Daniel L.; Churchill, Michael; Compton, Jocelyn T.; Tailor, Yagnesh; Rao, Meenakshi; Si, Yiling; Levin, Daniel; Schwartz, Matthew G.; Uygur, Aysu; Hayakawa, Yoku; Gross, Stefanie; Renz, Bernhard W.; Setlik, Wanda; Martinez, Ashley N.; Chen, Xiaowei; Nizami, Saqib; Lee, Heon Goo; Kang, H. Paco; Caldwell, Jon-Michael; Asfaha, Samuel; Westphalen, C. Benedikt; Graham, Trevor; Jin, Guangchun; Nagar, Karan; Wang, Hongshan; Kheirbek, Mazen A.; Kolhe, Alka; Carpenter, Jared; Glaire, Mark; Nair, Abhinav; Renders, Simon; Manieri, Nicholas; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Fox, James G.; Reichert, Maximilian; Giraud, Andrew S.; Schwabe, Robert F.; Pradere, Jean-Phillipe; Walton, Katherine; Prakash, Ajay; Gumucio, Deborah; Rustgi, Anil K.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Friedman, Richard A.; Gershon, Michael D.; Sims, Peter; Grikscheit, Tracy; Lee, Francis Y.; Karsenty, Gerard; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Wang, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cells that maintain and repair the postnatal skeleton remain undefined. One model suggests that perisinusoidal mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) give rise to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, marrow stromal cells, and adipocytes, although the existence of these cells has not been proven through fate-mapping experiments. We demonstrate here that expression of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist gremlin 1 defines a population of osteochondroreticular (OCR) stem cells in the bone marrow. OCR stem cells self-renew and generate osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and reticular marrow stromal cells, but not adipocytes. OCR stem cells are concentrated within the metaphysis of long bones not in the perisinusoidal space and are needed for bone development, bone remodeling, and fracture repair. Grem1 expression also identifies intestinal reticular stem cells (iRSCs) that are cells of origin for the periepithelial intestinal mesenchymal sheath. Grem1 expression identifies distinct connective tissue stem cells in both the bone (OCR stem cells) and the intestine (iRSCs). PMID:25594183

  14. Melanoma Cells Can Adopt the Phenotype of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages by Spontaneous Cell Fusion in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kemény, Lajos V.; Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Jakab, Ádám; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    After the removal of primary cutaneous melanoma some patients develop local recurrences, even after having histologically tumor-free re-excision. A potential explanation behind this phenomenon is that tumor cells switch their phenotype, making their recognition via standard histopathological assessments extremely difficult. Tumor-stromal cell fusion has been proposed as a potential mechanism for tumor cells to acquire mesenchymal traits; therefore, we hypothesized that melanoma cells could acquire fibroblast- and macrophage-like phenotypes via cell fusion. We show that melanoma cells spontaneously fuse with human dermal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The hybrid cells’ nuclei contain chromosomes from both parental cells and are indistinguishable from the parental fibroblasts or macrophages based on their morphology and immunophenotype, as they could lose the melanoma specific MART1 marker, but express the fibroblast marker smooth muscle actin or the macrophage marker CD68. Our results suggest that, by spontaneous cell fusion in vitro, tumor cells can adopt the morphology and immunophenotype of stromal cells while still carrying oncogenic, tumor-derived genetic information. Therefore, melanoma–stromal cell fusion might play a role in missing tumor cells by routine histopathological assessments. PMID:27271591

  15. A Reproducible Immunopotency Assay to Measure Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Mediated T cell Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Debra D.; Centanni, John M.; Bhatia, Neehar; Emler, Carol A.; Drier, Diana; Leverson, Glen E.; McKenna, David H.; Gee, Adrian P.; Lindblad, Robert; Hei, Derek J.; Hematti, Peiman

    2014-01-01

    Background The T cell suppressive property of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been considered a major mode of action and basis for their utilization in a number of human clinical trials. However, there is no well-established reproducible assay to measure MSC-mediated T cell suppression. Methods At the University of Wisconsin-Madison Production Assistance for Cellular Therapy (PACT) Center we developed an in vitro quality control T cell suppression immunopotency assay (IPA) which utilizes anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies to stimulate T cell proliferation. We measured MSC-induced suppression of CD4+ T cell proliferation at various effector to target cell ratios using defined peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in parallel compared to a reference standard MSC product. We calculated an IPA value for suppression of CD4+ T cells for each MSC product. Results Eleven MSC products generated at three independent PACT centers were evaluated for cell surface phenotypic markers and T cell suppressive properties. Flow cytometry results demonstrated typical MSC cell surface marker profiles. There was significant variability in the level of suppression of T cell proliferation with IPA values ranging from 27% to 88%. However, MSC suppression did not correlate with HLA-DR expression. Discussion We have developed a reproducible immunopotency assay to measure allogeneic MSC-mediated suppression of CD4+ T cells. Additional studies may be warranted to determine how these in vitro assay results may correlate with other immunomodulatory properties of MSCs, in addition to evaluating the ability of this assay to predict in vivo efficacy. PMID:25455739

  16. The Role of the Transcriptional Regulation of Stromal Cells in Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Valin, Alvaro; Pablos, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a common process connecting pathologies that vary in their etiology and pathogenesis such as cancer, autoimmune diseases, and infections. The response of the immune system to tissue damage involves a carefully choreographed series of cellular interactions between immune and non-immune cells. In recent years, it has become clear that stromal resident cells have an essential role perpetuating the inflammatory environment and dictating in many cases the outcome of inflammatory based pathologies. Signal transduction pathways remain the main focus of study to understand how stimuli contribute to perpetuating the inflammatory response, mainly due to their potential role as therapeutic targets. However, molecular events orchestrated in the nucleus by transcription factors add additional levels of complexity and may be equally important for understanding the phenotypic differences of activated stromal components during the chronic inflammatory process. In this review, we focus on the contribution of transcription factors to the selective regulation of inducible proinflammatory genes, with special attention given to the regulation of the stromal fibroblastic cell function and response. PMID:26501341

  17. The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 regulates decidual prolactin expression in human endometrial stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yue; Hu, Yali; Zhao, Jing; Zhen, Xin; Yan, Guijun; Sun, Haixiang

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Decidually produced PRL plays a key role during pregnancy. {yields} Overexpression of Nur77 increased PRL mRNA expression and enhanced decidual PRL promoter activity. {yields} Knockdown of Nur77 decreased decidual PRL secretion induced by 8-Br-cAMP and MPA. {yields} Nur77 is a novel transcription factor that plays an active role in decidual prolactin expression. -- Abstract: Prolactin (PRL) is synthesized and released by several extrapituitary tissues, including decidualized stromal cells. Despite the important role of decidual PRL during pregnancy, little is understood about the factors involved in the proper regulation of decidual PRL expression. Here we present evidence that the transcription factor Nur77 plays an active role in decidual prolactin expression in human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs). Nur77 mRNA expression in hESCs was significantly increased after decidualization stimulated by 8-Br-cAMP and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Nur77 in hESCs markedly increased PRL mRNA expression and enhanced decidual PRL promoter (dPRL/-332Luc) activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, knockdown of Nur77 in hESCs significantly decreased decidual PRL promoter activation and substantially attenuated PRL mRNA expression and PRL secretion (P < 0.01) induced by 8-Br-cAMP and MPA. These results demonstrate that Nur77 is a novel transcription factor that contributes significantly to the regulation of prolactin gene expression in human endometrial stromal cells.

  18. Enhancement of terminal B lymphocyte differentiation in vitro by fibroblast-like stromal cells from human spleen.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, G; Skibinska, A; Stewart, G D; James, K

    1998-12-01

    Stromal elements are major components of lymphoid tissues contributing to both tissue architecture and function. In this study we report on the phenotype and function of fibroblast-like stromal cells obtained from human spleen. These cells express high levels of CD44 and ICAM-1 and moderate levels of VLA-4, VCAM, CD40 and CD21. They fail to express endothelial, epithelial, lymphocyte and monocyte/macrophage markers. We show that these cells interact with B cell blasts induced in vitro by anti-CD40 and anti-mu stimulation. As a result of these interactions both IL-6 and IgG secretion into culture medium is increased. The enhanced secretion of IgG is partly inhibited by abolishing B cell blaststromal cell contact or by anti-IL-6, anti-VCAM or anti-CD49d antibodies. Our studies also suggest that the ability of stromal cells to promote B cell survival is most likely the underlying mechanism of the enhanced immunoglobulin secretion. Comparison of stromal cells from different lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs revealed that bone marrow- and spleen-derived stromal cells are the most effective in promoting B cell blast differentiation.

  19. Human Olfactory Mucosa Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Survival, Proliferation, and Differentiation of Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Solano, Dylana; Wittig, Olga; Ayala-Grosso, Carlos; Pieruzzini, Rosalinda

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the human olfactory mucosa (OM) are cells that have been proposed as a niche for neural progenitors. OM-MSCs share phenotypic and functional properties with bone marrow (BM) MSCs, which constitute fundamental components of the hematopoietic niche. In this work, we investigated whether human OM-MSCs may promote the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). For this purpose, human bone marrow cells (BMCs) were co-cultured with OM-MSCs in the absence of exogenous cytokines. At different intervals, nonadherent cells (NACs) were harvested from BMC/OM-MSC co-cultures, and examined for the expression of blood cell markers by flow cytometry. OM-MSCs supported the survival (cell viability >90%) and proliferation of BMCs, after 54 days of co-culture. At 20 days of co-culture, flow cytometric and microscopic analyses showed a high percentage (73%) of cells expressing the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, and the presence of cells of myeloid origin, including polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes, basophils, eosinophils, erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes. Likewise, T (CD3), B (CD19), and NK (CD56/CD16) cells were detected in the NAC fraction. Colony-forming unit–granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) progenitors and CD34+ cells were found, at 43 days of co-culture. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies showed that OM-MSCs constitutively express early and late-acting hematopoietic cytokines (i.e., stem cell factor [SCF] and granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]). These results constitute the first evidence that OM-MSCs may provide an in vitro microenvironment for HSCs. The capacity of OM-MSCs to support the survival and differentiation of HSCs may be related with the capacity of OM-MSCs to produce hematopoietic cytokines. PMID:22471939

  20. Different Procoagulant Activity of Therapeutic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Bone Marrow and Placental Decidua.

    PubMed

    Moll, Guido; Ignatowicz, Lech; Catar, Rusan; Luecht, Christian; Sadeghi, Behnam; Hamad, Osama; Jungebluth, Philipp; Dragun, Duska; Schmidtchen, Artur; Ringdén, Olle

    2015-10-01

    While therapeutic mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have usually been obtained from bone marrow, perinatal tissues have emerged as promising new sources of cells for stromal cell therapy. In this study, we present a first safety follow-up on our clinical experience with placenta-derived decidual stromal cells (DSCs), used as supportive immunomodulatory and regenerative therapy for patients with severe complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We found that DSCs are smaller, almost half the volume of MSCs, which may favor microvascular passage. DSCs also show different hemocompatibility, with increased triggering of the clotting cascade after exposure to human blood and plasma in vitro. After infusion of DSCs in HSCT patients, we observed a weak activation of the fibrinolytic system, but the other blood activation markers remained stable, excluding major adverse events. Expression profiling identified differential levels of key factors implicated in regulation of hemostasis, such as a lack of prostacyclin synthase and increased tissue factor expression in DSCs, suggesting that these cells have intrinsic blood-activating properties. The stronger triggering of the clotting cascade by DSCs could be antagonized by optimizing the cell graft reconstitution before infusion, for example, by use of low-dose heparin anticoagulant in the cell infusion buffer. We conclude that DSCs are smaller and have stronger hemostatic properties than MSCs, thus triggering stronger activation of the clotting system, which can be antagonized by optimizing the cell graft preparation before infusion. Our results highlight the importance of hemocompatibility safety testing for every novel cell therapy product before clinical use, when applied using systemic delivery.

  1. Down-regulation of Dicer1 promotes cellular senescence and decreases the differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Youshan; Wu, Dong; Fei, Chengming; Guo, Juan; Gu, Shuncheng; Zhu, Yang; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Zheng; Wu, Lingyun; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chunkang

    2015-02-01

    Although it has been reported that mesenchymal stromal cells are unable to provide sufficient hematopoietic support in myelodysplastic syndrome, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we found that mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome displayed a significant increase in senescence, as evidenced by their decreased proliferative capacity, flattened morphology and increased expression of SA-β-gal and p21. Senescent mesenchymal stromal cells from patients had decreased differentiation potential and decreased stem cell support capacity. Gene knockdown of Dicer1, which was down-regulated in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients, induced senescence. The differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities were significantly inhibited by Dicer1 knockdown. Overexpression of Dicer1 in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients reversed cellular senescence and enhanced stem cell properties. Furthermore, we identified reduced expression in the microRNA-17 family (miR-17-5p, miR-20a/b, miR-106a/b and miR-93) as a potential factor responsible for increased p21 expression, a key senescence mediator, in Dicer1 knockdown cells. Moreover, we found that miR-93 and miR-20a expression levels were significantly reduced in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients and miR-93/miR-20a gain of function resulted in a decrease of cellular senescence. Collectively, the results of our study show that mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome are prone to senescence and that Dicer1 down-regulation promotes cellular senescence and decreases the differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells. Dicer1 down-regulation seems to contribute to the insufficient hematopoietic support capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

  2. Enhanced mesenchymal stromal cell recruitment via natural killer cells by incorporation of inflammatory signals in biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Catarina R.; Vasconcelos, Daniela P.; Gonçalves, Raquel M.; Barbosa, Mário A.

    2012-01-01

    An exacerbated inflammatory response questions biomaterial biocompatibility, but on the other hand, inflammation has a central role in the regulation of tissue regeneration. Therefore, it may be argued that an ‘ideal’ inflammatory response is crucial to achieve efficient tissue repair/regeneration. Natural killer (NK) cells, being one of the first populations arriving at an injury site, can have an important role in regulating bone repair/regeneration, particularly through interactions with mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). Here, we studied how biomaterials designed to incorporate inflammatory signals affected NK cell behaviour and NK cell–MSC interactions. Adsorption of the pro-inflammatory molecule fibrinogen (Fg) to chitosan films led to a 1.5-fold increase in adhesion of peripheral blood human NK cells, without an increase in cytokine secretion. Most importantly, it was found that NK cells are capable of stimulating a threefold increase in human bone marrow MSC invasion, a key event taking place in tissue repair, but did not affect the expression of the differentiation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Of significant importance, this NK cell-mediated MSC recruitment was modulated by Fg adsorption. Designing novel biomaterials leading to rational modulation of the inflammatory response is proposed as an alternative to current bone regeneration strategies. PMID:21752807

  3. Tissue engineering of corneal stromal layer with dermal fibroblasts: phenotypic and functional switch of differentiated cells in cornea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan Qing; Zhang, Wen Jie; Liu, Wei; Hu, Xiao Jie; Zhou, Guang Dong; Cui, Lei; Cao, Yilin

    2008-02-01

    Previously, we successfully engineered a corneal stromal layer using corneal stromal cells. However, the limited source and proliferation potential of corneal stromal cells has driven us to search for alternative cell sources for corneal stroma engineering. Based on the idea that the tissue-specific environment may alter cell fate, we proposed that dermal fibroblasts could switch their phenotype to that of corneal stromal cells in the corneal environment. Thus, dermal fibroblasts were harvested from newborn rabbits, seeded on biodegradable polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds, cultured in vitro for 1 week, and then implanted into adult rabbit corneas. After 8 weeks of implantation, nearly transparent corneal stroma was formed, with a histological structure similar to that of its native counterpart. The existence of cells that had been retrovirally labeled with green fluorescence protein (GFP) demonstrated the survival of implanted cells. In addition, all GFP-positive cells that survived expressed keratocan, a specific marker for corneal stromal cells, and formed fine collagen fibrils with a highly organized pattern similar to that of native stroma. However, neither dermal fibroblast-PGA construct pre-incubated in vitro for 3 weeks nor chondrocyte-PGA construct could form transparent stroma. The results demonstrated that neonatal dermal fibroblasts could switch their phenotype in the new tissue environment under restricted conditions. The functional restoration of corneal transparency using dermal fibroblasts suggests that they could be an alternative cell source for corneal stroma engineering.

  4. Immunomodulation of endothelial differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells: impact on T and NK cells.

    PubMed

    El Omar, Reine; Xiong, Yu; Dostert, Gabriel; Louis, Huguette; Gentils, Monique; Menu, Patrick; Stoltz, Jean-François; Velot, Émilie; Decot, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stromal cells (WJ-MSCs) are promising candidates for tissue engineering, as their immunomodulatory activity allows them to escape immune recognition and to suppress several immune cell functions. To date, however, few studies have investigated the effect of differentiation of the MSCs on this immunomodulation. To address this question, we sought to determine the impact of differentiation toward endothelial cells on immunoregulation by WJ-MSCs. Following differentiation, the endothelial-like cells (ELCs) were positive for CD31, vascular endothelial cadherin and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and able to take up acetylated low-density lipoproteins. The expression of HLA-DR and CD86, which contribute to MSCs immunoprivilege, was still weak after differentiation. We then co-cultured un- and differentiated MSCs with immune cells, under conditions of both direct and indirect contact. The proliferation and phenotype of the immune cells were analyzed and the mediators secreted by both ELCs and WJ-MSCs quantified. Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, prostaglandin E2 and in particular indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase expression were upregulated in ELCs on stimulation by T and NK cells, suggesting the possible involvement of these factors in allosuppression. ELCs co-cultured with T cells were able to generate CD25(+) T cells, which were shown to be of the CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory subset. Direct contact between NK cells and ELCs or WJ-MSCs decreased the level of NK-activating receptor natural-killer group 2, member D. Moreover, direct co-culturing with ELCs stimulates CD73 acquisition on NK cells, a mechanism which may induce adenosine secretion by the cells and lead to an immunosuppressive function. Taken together, our results show that ELCs obtained following differentiation of WJ-MSCs remain largely immunosuppressive.

  5. Adipose-derived stromal cells inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation inducing apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Takahara, Kiyoshi; Ii, Masaaki; Inamoto, Teruo; Komura, Kazumasa; Ibuki, Naokazu; Minami, Koichiro; Uehara, Hirofumi; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kiyama, Satoshi; Asahi, Michio; Azuma, Haruhito

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • AdSC transplantation exhibits inhibitory effect on tumor progressions of PCa cells. • AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway. • High expression of the TGF-β1 gene in AdSCs. - Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in the field of regenerative medicine. Adipose-derived stromal cells (AdSCs) are known to exhibit extensive proliferation potential and can undergo multilineage differentiation, sharing similar characteristics to bone marrow-derived MSCs. However, as the effect of AdSCs on tumor growth has not been studied sufficiently, we assessed the degree to which AdSCs affect the proliferation of prostate cancer (PCa) cell. Human AdSCs exerted an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of androgen-responsive (LNCaP) and androgen-nonresponsive (PC3) human PCa cells, while normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) did not, and in fact promoted PCa cell proliferation to a degree. Moreover, AdSCs induced apoptosis of LNCaP cells and PC3 cells, activating the caspase3/7 signaling pathway. cDNA microarray analysis suggested that AdSC-induced apoptosis in both LNCaP and PC3 cells was related to the TGF-β signaling pathway. Consistent with our in vitro observations, local transplantation of AdSCs delayed the growth of tumors derived from both LNCaP- and PC3-xenografts in immunodeficient mice. This is the first preclinical study to have directly demonstrated that AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway, irrespective of androgen-responsiveness. Since autologous AdSCs can be easily isolated from adipose tissue without any ethical concerns, we suggest that therapy with these cells could be a novel approach for patients with PCa.

  6. Multiple Functions of MSCA-1/TNAP in Adult Mesenchymal Progenitor/Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Estève, David; Galitzky, Jean; Bouloumié, Anne; Fonta, Caroline; Buchet, René; Magne, David

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge about mesenchymal stem cells has considerably grown in the last years. Since the proof of concept of the existence of such cells in the 70s by Friedenstein et al., a growing mass of reports were conducted for a better definition of these cells and for the reevaluation from the term “mesenchymal stem cells” to the term “mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs).” Being more than a semantic shift, concepts behind this new terminology reveal the complexity and the heterogeneity of the cells grouped in MSC family especially as these cells are present in nearly all adult tissues. Recently, mesenchymal stromal cell antigen-1 (MSCA-1)/tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) was described as a new cell surface marker of MSCs from different tissues. The alkaline phosphatase activity of this protein could be involved in wide range of MSC features described below from cell differentiation to immunomodulatory properties, as well as occurrence of pathologies. The present review aims to decipher and summarize the role of TNAP in progenitor cells from different tissues focusing preferentially on brain, bone marrow, and adipose tissue. PMID:26839555

  7. [Analysis of sensitivity of stromal stem cells (CFU-f) from rat bone marrow and fetal liver to 5-fluorouracil].

    PubMed

    Paiushina, O V; Damaratskaia, E I; Bueverova, E I; Nikonova, T M; Butorina, N N; Molchanova, E A; Starostin, V I

    2006-01-01

    The sensitivity of stromal stem cells (CFU-f) from rat bone marrow and fetal liver to the cytotoxic effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was compared in vivo and in vitro. Cells from both tissues demonstrated a similar resistance to 5-FU in vitro; however, stromal stem cells from fetal liver proved notably more sensitive to 5-FU compared to marrow CFU-f in vivo. Cells forming colonies of different size were identified in stem cell populations from both tissues. Cells giving rise to small colonies had a higher resistance to 5-FU both in vivo and in vitro.

  8. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells induce nitric oxide synthase-dependent differentiation of CD11b+ cells that expedite hematopoietic recovery.

    PubMed

    Trento, Cristina; Marigo, Ilaria; Pievani, Alice; Galleu, Antonio; Dolcetti, Luigi; Wang, Chun-Yin; Serafini, Marta; Bronte, Vincenzo; Dazzi, Francesco

    2017-02-09

    Bone marrow microenvironment is fundamental for hematopoietic homeostasis. Numerous efforts have been made to reproduce or manipulate its activity to facilitate engraftment after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation but clinical results remain unconvincing. This probably reflects the complexity of the hematopoietic niche. Recent data have demonstrated the fundamental role of stromal and myeloid cells in regulating hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and mobilization in the bone marrow. In this study we unveil a novel interaction by which bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells induce the rapid differentiation of CD11b+ myeloid cells from bone marrow progenitors. Such an activity requires the expression of nitric oxide synthase-2. Importantly, the administration of these mesenchymal stromal cells-educated CD11b+ cells accelerates hematopoietic reconstitution in bone marrow transplant recipients. We conclude that the liaison between mesenchymal stromal cells and myeloid cells is fundamental in hematopoietic homeostasis and suggests that it can be harnessed in clinical transplantation.

  9. Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumours and nested stromal epithelial tumours of the liver.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sunayana; Bihari, Chhagan

    2016-04-01

    Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumour of liver (DNSTL), nested stromal-epithelial tumour (NSET) and calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumour (CNSET) are recently described entities with similar morphology, immunohistochemistry and molecular genetics. These are rare entities with only three large case series described till date. These tumours commonly present in the paediatric age group. NSETs, in addition have been described to be associated with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production and Cushingoid features. It is important to discuss this rare group of tumours with a low malignant potential as the most common radiological differential diagnosis is hepatoblastoma, which has a relatively poorer prognosis. Thus, a pathologist needs to keep this entity in mind, so as to offer a correct histological diagnosis.

  10. A simple and efficient method for deriving neurospheres from bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Qin; Mu Jun; Li Qi; Li Ao; Zeng Zhilei; Yang Jun; Zhang Xiaodong; Tang Jin; Xie Peng

    2008-08-08

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be differentiated into neuronal and glial-like cell types under appropriate experimental conditions. However, previously reported methods are complicated and involve the use of toxic reagents. Here, we present a simplified and nontoxic method for efficient conversion of rat MSCs into neurospheres that express the neuroectodermal marker nestin. These neurospheres can proliferate and differentiate into neuron, astrocyte, and oligodendrocyte phenotypes. We thus propose that MSCs are an emerging model cell for the treatment of a variety of neurological diseases.

  11. Distinctive Responsiveness to Stromal Signaling Accompanies Histologic Grade Programming of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sayeed, Aejaz; Champion, Stacey; Goodson, William H.; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Mindrinos, Michael; Davis, Ronald W.; Dairkee, Shanaz H.

    2011-01-01

    Whether stromal components facilitate growth, invasion, and dissemination of cancer cells or suppress neoplastic lesions from further malignant progression is a continuing conundrum in tumor biology. Conceptualizing a dynamic picture of tumorigenesis is complicated by inter-individual heterogeneity. In the post genomic era, unraveling such complexity remains a challenge for the cancer biologist. Towards establishing a functional association between cellular crosstalk and differential cancer aggressiveness, we identified a signature of malignant breast epithelial response to stromal signaling. Proximity to fibroblasts resulted in gene transcript alterations of >2-fold for 107 probes, collectively designated as Fibroblast Triggered Gene Expression in Tumor (FTExT). The hazard ratio predicted by the FTExT classifier for distant relapse in patients with intermediate and high grade breast tumors was significant compared to routine clinical variables (dataset 1, n = 258, HR – 2.11, 95% CI 1.17–3.80, p-value 0.01; dataset 2, n = 171, HR - 3.07, 95% CI 1.21–7.83, p-value 0.01). Biofunctions represented by FTExT included inflammatory signaling, free radical scavenging, cell death, and cell proliferation. Unlike genes of the ‘proliferation cluster’, which are overexpressed in aggressive primary tumors, FTExT genes were uniquely repressed in such cases. As proof of concept for our correlative findings, which link stromal-epithelial crosstalk and tumor behavior, we show a distinctive differential in stromal impact on prognosis-defining functional endpoints of cell cycle progression, and resistance to therapy-induced growth arrest and apoptosis in low vs. high grade cancer cells. Our experimental data thus reveal aspects of ‘paracrine cooperativity’ that are exclusively contingent upon the histopathologically defined grade of interacting tumor epithelium, and demonstrate that epithelial responsiveness to the tumor microenvironment is a deterministic factor

  12. Cell studies of hybridized carbon nanofibers containing bioactive glass nanoparticles using bone mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiu-Rui; Hu, Xiao-Qing; Jia, Xiao-Long; Yang, Li-Ka; Meng, Qing-Yang; Shi, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Zheng-Zheng; Cai, Qing; Ao, Yin-Fang; Yang, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bone regeneration required suitable scaffolding materials to support the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone-related cells. In this study, a kind of hybridized nanofibrous scaffold material (CNF/BG) was prepared by incorporating bioactive glass (BG) nanoparticles into carbon nanofibers (CNF) via the combination of BG sol-gel and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) electrospinning, followed by carbonization. Three types (49 s, 68 s and 86 s) of BG nanoparticles were incorporated. To understand the mechanism of CNF/BG hybrids exerting osteogenic effects, bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured directly on these hybrids (contact culture) or cultured in transwell chambers in the presence of these materials (non-contact culture). The contributions of ion release and contact effect on cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were able to be correlated. It was found that the ionic dissolution products had limited effect on cell proliferation, while they were able to enhance osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs in comparison with pure CNF. Differently, the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were both significantly promoted in the contact culture. In both cases, CNF/BG(68 s) showed the strongest ability in influencing cell behaviors due to its fastest release rate of soluble silicium-relating ions. The synergistic effect of CNF and BG would make CNF/BG hybrids promising substrates for bone repairing. PMID:27924854

  13. Cell studies of hybridized carbon nanofibers containing bioactive glass nanoparticles using bone mesenchymal stromal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiu-Rui; Hu, Xiao-Qing; Jia, Xiao-Long; Yang, Li-Ka; Meng, Qing-Yang; Shi, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Zheng-Zheng; Cai, Qing; Ao, Yin-Fang; Yang, Xiao-Ping

    2016-12-01

    Bone regeneration required suitable scaffolding materials to support the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone-related cells. In this study, a kind of hybridized nanofibrous scaffold material (CNF/BG) was prepared by incorporating bioactive glass (BG) nanoparticles into carbon nanofibers (CNF) via the combination of BG sol-gel and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) electrospinning, followed by carbonization. Three types (49 s, 68 s and 86 s) of BG nanoparticles were incorporated. To understand the mechanism of CNF/BG hybrids exerting osteogenic effects, bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured directly on these hybrids (contact culture) or cultured in transwell chambers in the presence of these materials (non-contact culture). The contributions of ion release and contact effect on cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were able to be correlated. It was found that the ionic dissolution products had limited effect on cell proliferation, while they were able to enhance osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs in comparison with pure CNF. Differently, the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were both significantly promoted in the contact culture. In both cases, CNF/BG(68 s) showed the strongest ability in influencing cell behaviors due to its fastest release rate of soluble silicium-relating ions. The synergistic effect of CNF and BG would make CNF/BG hybrids promising substrates for bone repairing.

  14. Substrate Induced Osteoblast-Like Differentiation of Stromal Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belizar, Jacqueline; Glaser, Reena; Hung, Matthew; Simon, Marcia; Jurukovski, Vladimir; Rafailovich, Miriam; Shih, Alice

    2009-03-01

    We have demonstrated that Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can be induced to biomineralize on a polybutadiene (PB) coated Si substrate. The cells began to generate calcium phosphate deposits after a five-day incubation period in the absence of dexamethasone. Control cells plated on tissue culture PS culture dish (TCP) did not biomineralize. In addition, the biomineralizing culture retained proliferative cells In order to determine whether the induction was transient, we transferred the cells exposed to polybutadiene after 14 and 28-day incubation periods to TCP dishes. These cells continued to biominerlize. Genetic testing is underway which will determine whether differentiation is maintained after transfer.

  15. Kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells and supportive activities of stromal cells in a three-dimensional bone marrow culture system.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tomonori; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tsuboi, Isao; Glomm, Wilhelm Robert; Yasuda, Masahiro; Aizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    In the bone marrow, hematopoietic cells proliferate and differentiate in close association with a three-dimensional (3D) hematopoietic microenvironment. Previously, we established a 3D bone marrow culture system. In this study, we analyzed the kinetics of hematopoietic cells, and more than 50% of hematopoietic progenitor cells, including CFU-Mix, CFU-GM and BFU-E in 3D culture were in a resting (non-S) phase. Furthermore, we examined the hematopoietic supportive ability of stromal cells by measuring the expression of various mRNAs relevant to hematopoietic regulation. Over the 4 weeks of culture, the stromal cells in the 3D culture are not needlessly activated and "quietly" regulate hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation during the culture, resulting in the presence of resting hematopoietic stem cells in the 3D culture for a long time. Thus, the 3D culture system may be a new tool for investigating hematopoietic stem cell-stromal cell interactions in vitro.

  16. Tumour stromal cells derived from paediatric malignancies display MSC-like properties and impair NK cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tumour growth and metastatic infiltration are favoured by several components of the tumour microenvironment. Bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are known to contribute to the tumour stroma. When isolated from healthy bone marrow, MSC exert potent antiproliferative effects on immune effector cells. Due to phenotypic and morphological similarities of MSC and tumour stromal cells (TStrC), we speculated that immunotherapeutic approaches may be hampered if TStrC may still exhibit immunomodulatory properties of MSC. Methods In order to compare immunomodulatory properties of MSC and tumour stromal cells (TStrC), we established and analyzed TStrC cultures from eleven paediatric tumours and MSC preparations from bone marrow aspirates. Immunophenotyping, proliferation assays and NK cell cytotoxicity assays were employed to address the issue. Results While TStrC differed from MSC in terms of plasticity, they shared surface expression of CD105, CD73 and other markers used for MSC characterization. Furthermore, TStrC displayed a strong antiproliferative effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in coculture experiments similar to MSC. NK cell cytotoxicity was significantly impaired after co-culture with TStrC and expression of the activating NK cell receptors NKp44 and NKp46 was reduced. Conclusions Our data show that TStrC and MSC share important phenotypic and functional characteristics. The inhibitory effect of TStrC on PBMC and especially on NK cells may facilitate the immune evasion of paediatric tumours. PMID:20858262

  17. Toad skin extract cinobufatini inhibits migration of human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells into a model stromal tissue.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Munehiro; Mori, Shuya; Kamoshida, Yo; Kawaguchi, Shota; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko; Gao, Bo; Tang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Toad skin extract cinobufatini study has been focused on anticancer activity, especially apoptosis-inducing activity by bufosteroids. The present study examined effect of the toad skin extract on cancer cell migration into model stromal tissues. Human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 was incubated in the presence or absence of toad skin extract on a surface of reconstituted type I collagen gel as a model stromal tissue allowing the cells to migrate into the gel. Frozen sections were microscopically observed after azan staining. Data showed a decrease of cell number in a microscopic field and shortening of cell migration into the model stromal tissue in a dose dependent manner. This suggests that toad skin extract may possess migration-preventing activity in addition to cell toxicity such as apoptosis-inducing activity. The multifaceted effects including apoptosis-inducing and cancer cell migration-preventing activities would improve usefulness of toad skin extract cinobufatini as an anticancer medicine.

  18. Autologous bone marrow stromal cells are promising candidates for cell therapy approaches to treat bone degeneration in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lebouvier, Angélique; Poignard, Alexandre; Coquelin-Salsac, Laura; Léotot, Julie; Homma, Yasuhiro; Jullien, Nicolas; Bierling, Philippe; Galactéros, Frédéric; Hernigou, Philippe; Chevallier, Nathalie; Rouard, Hélène

    2015-11-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a frequent complication in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). To delay hip arthroplasty, core decompression combined with concentrated total bone marrow (BM) treatment is currently performed in the early stages of the osteonecrosis. Cell therapy efficacy depends on the quantity of implanted BM stromal cells. For this reason, expanded bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells) can be used to improve osteonecrosis treatment in SCD patients. In this study, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the function of BMSCs isolated from a large number of SCD patients with osteonecrosis (SCD-ON) compared with control groups (patients with osteonecrosis not related to SCD (ON) and normal donors (N)). BM total nuclear cells and colony-forming efficiency values (CFE) were significantly higher in SCD-ON patients than in age and sex-matched controls. The BMSCs from SCD-ON patients were similar to BMSCs from the control groups in terms of their phenotypic and functional properties. SCD-ON patients have a higher frequency of BMSCs that retain their bone regeneration potential. Our findings suggest that BMSCs isolated from SCD-ON patients can be used clinically in cell therapy approaches. This work provides important preclinical data that is necessary for the clinical application of expanded BMSCs in advanced therapies and medical products.

  19. Expression of {beta}{sub 1} integrins in human endometrial stromal and decidual cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shiokawa, Shigetatsu; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Nakamura, Yukio

    1996-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the expression of {beta}{sub 1} integrins in human endometrium and decidua using flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoprecipitation. Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry demonstrated the greater expression of the {beta}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 2}, and {alpha}{sub 5} subunits of the {beta}{sub 1} integrin family in cultured stromal cells from the midsecretory phase, than in those of the early proliferative phase. The addition of estradiol (E{sub 2}) and progesterone (P) to cultured stromal cells in the early proliferative phase increased the expression of {beta}{sub 1} integrins in vitro. Flow cytometry also demonstrated the expression of the {beta}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 2}, {alpha}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {alpha}{sub 6} subunits of {beta}{sub 1} integrin family in cultured decidual cells, and the enriched-fraction of prolactin (PRL)-producing decidual cells isolated by Percoll gradients showed high levels of {beta}{sub 1} integrins expression. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the {beta}{sub 1} integrin cell surface phenotypes in cultured decidual cells observed by flow cytometry. In summary, the present study demonstrated that endometrial stromal and decidual cells expressed {beta}{sub 1} integrin subunits at their surfaces. The expression exhibited a variability throughout the menstrual cycles, being predominantly detected in the secretory phase, and was maintained highly in the decidua. Thus, {beta}{sub 1} integrins in human endometrium and decidua may be important in mediating the organization of extracellular matrix proteins derived from embryos during the early stage of implantation. 43 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Changes in adipose tissue stromal-vascular cells in primary culture due to porcine sera

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, D.E.; Hausman, G.J.

    1986-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine the response of rat stromal-vascular cells to pig sea. Sera were collected from unselected contemporary (lean) and high backfat thickness selected (obese) pigs. Sera from obese pigs were collected either by exsanguination or cannulation. sera from lean pigs during the growing phase (45 kg) and the fattening phase (100-110 kg) were collected. Stromal-vascular cells derived rom rat inguinal tissue were cultured on either 25 cm/sup 2/ flasks, collagen-coated coverslips or petri dishes. Cell proliferation was measured by (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation during the fourth day of culture. Coverslip cultures were used for histochemical analysis. Petri dish cultures were used for analysis of Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity. All cells were plated for 24 hours in media containing 10 fetal bovine sera. Test media contained 2.5, 5.0, 10.0% sera. Sera from obese pigs increased GPDH activity and fat cell production when compared to the lean controls. The increased concentration of sera increased esterase activity and lipid as measured with oil red O. The sera from obese pigs collected at slaughter stimulated more fat cell production than obese sera collected by cannulation. These studies show there are adipogenic factors in obese pigs sera which promote fat cell development in primary cell culture.

  1. Scalable microcarrier-based manufacturing of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    PubMed

    de Soure, António M; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; da Silva, Cláudia L; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2016-10-20

    Due to their unique features, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) have been exploited in clinical settings as therapeutic candidates for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, the success in obtaining clinically-relevant MSC numbers for cell-based therapies is dependent on efficient isolation and ex vivo expansion protocols, able to comply with good manufacturing practices (GMP). In this context, the 2-dimensional static culture systems typically used for the expansion of these cells present several limitations that may lead to reduced cell numbers and compromise cell functions. Furthermore, many studies in the literature report the expansion of MSC using fetal bovine serum (FBS)-supplemented medium, which has been critically rated by regulatory agencies. Alternative platforms for the scalable manufacturing of MSC have been developed, namely using microcarriers in bioreactors, with also a considerable number of studies now reporting the production of MSC using xenogeneic/serum-free medium formulations. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview on the scalable manufacturing of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, depicting the various steps involved in the process from cell isolation to ex vivo expansion, using different cell tissue sources and culture medium formulations and exploiting bioprocess engineering tools namely microcarrier technology and bioreactors.

  2. Mechanical Stimulation Increases Knee Meniscus Gene RNA-level Expression in Adipose-derived Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Elizabeth M.; Wu, Bin; Siddiqui, Aamir; Tepper, Donna G.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Efforts have been made to engineer knee meniscus tissue for injury repair, yet most attempts have been unsuccessful. Creating a cell source that resembles the complex, heterogeneous phenotype of the meniscus cell remains difficult. Stem cell differentiation has been investigated, mainly using bone marrow mesenchymal cells and biochemical means for differentiation, resulting in no solution. Mechanical stimulation has been investigated to an extent with no conclusion. Here, we explore the potential for and effectiveness of mechanical stimulation to induce the meniscal phenotype in adipose-derived stromal cells. Methods: Human adipose-derived stromal cells were chosen for their fibrogenic nature and conduciveness for chondrogenesis. Biochemical and mechanical stimulation were investigated. Biochemical stimulation included fibrogenic and chondrogenic media. For mechanical stimulation, a custom-built device was used to apply constant, cyclical, uniaxial strain for up to 6 hours. Strain and frequency varied. Results: Under biochemical stimulation, both fibrogenic (collagen I, versican) and chondrogenic (collagen II, Sox9, aggrecan) genes were expressed by cells exposed to either fibrogenic or chondrogenic biochemical factors. Mechanical strain was found to preferentially promote fibrogenesis over chondrogenesis, confirming that tensile strain is an effective fibrogenic cue. Three hours at 10% strain and 1 Hz in chondrogenic media resulted in the highest expression of fibrochondrogenic genes. Although mechanical stimulation did not seem to affect protein level expression, biochemical means did affect protein level presence of collagen fibers. Conclusion: Mechanical stimulation can be a useful differentiation tool for mechanoresponsive cell types as long as biochemical factors are also integrated. PMID:27757329

  3. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Alessandro; Giuliani, Massimo

    2016-11-08

    The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells' growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells' behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity.

  4. Mouse adipose tissue stromal cells give rise to skeletal and cardiomyogenic cell sub-populations

    PubMed Central

    Dromard, Cécile; Barreau, Corinne; André, Mireille; Berger-Müller, Sandra; Casteilla, Louis; Planat-Benard, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that adipose tissue could generate cardiomyocyte-like cells from crude stromal vascular fraction (SVF) in vitro that improved cardiac function in a myocardial infarction context. However, it is not clear whether these adipose-derived cardiomyogenic cells (AD-CMG) constitute a homogenous population and if AD-CMG progenitors could be isolated as a pure population from the SVF of adipose tissue. This study aims to characterize the different cell types that constitute myogenic clusters and identify the earliest AD-CMG progenitors in vitro for establishing a complete phenotype and use it to sort AD-CMG progenitors from crude SVF. Here, we report cell heterogeneity among adipose-derived clusters during their course of maturation and highlighted sub-populations that exhibit original mixed cardiac/skeletal muscle phenotypes with a progressive loss of cardiac phenotype with time in liquid culture conditions. Moreover, we completed the phenotype of AD-CMG progenitors but we failed to sort them from the SVF. We demonstrated that micro-environment is required for the maturation of myogenic phenotype by co-culture experiments. These findings bring complementary data on AD-CMG and suggest that their emergence results from in vitro events. PMID:25364749

  5. Immunomodulation of mesenchymal stromal cells on regulatory T cells and its possible mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhidong; Zhuansun, Yongxun; Chen, Rui; Li, Jianguo; Ran, Pixin

    2014-05-15

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) have both garnered abundant interests from immunologists worldwide, as both MSCs and Tregs can be considered immunosuppressive in their own right. But a little attention has been paid to the impacts of MSCs on Tregs. To clarify the effects of MSCs on Tregs, we performed the coculture systems within MSCs and Tregs. We confirmed that MSC-exposed Tregs are capable of more immunosuppressive than Tregs without coculturing with MSCs. And this augmenting suppressive capacity was accompanied with an upregulation of programmed cell death 1 receptor (PD-1) on Tregs. Importantly, we found that cell viability of Tregs was excluded from the influences of MSCs. Finally, we showed that PD-1/B7-H1 interactions and IL-10 might be responsible for the enhanced suppressive capability of MSC-exposed Tregs. Further analysis revealed that PD-1/B7-H1 interactions were not responsible for the productions of IL-10 and TGF-β1 in the MSC-Treg coculture systems; in contrast, IL-10 rather than TGF-β1 played a role in the upregualtion of PD-1. Furthermore, this is the first explorative study to evaluate the immunomodulation of MSCs on the suppressive capacity of Tregs in MSC-Treg in vitro coculture setting.

  6. Stromal expression of Fer suppresses tumor progression in renal cell carcinoma and is a predictor of survival

    PubMed Central

    Mitsunari, Kensuke; Miyata, Yasuyoshi; Watanabe, Shin-Ichi; Asai, Akihiro; Yasuda, Takuji; Kanda, Shigeru; Sakai, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Fps/Fes related (Fer) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that is expressed in fibroblasts, immune cells and endothelial cells. Fer serves an important pathological role in cell survival, angiogenesis and the immune system. However, the pathological role of Fer expression in the stromal cells surrounding renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has not been previously investigated. In the present study, immunohistochemical analysis of Fer was performed using the formalin-fixed tissue samples of 152 patients with RCC. The proliferative and apoptotic indices were used to represent the percentage of proliferation marker protein Ki-67- and cleaved caspase-3-positive cells, respectively. The microvessel density was defined as the number of cluster of differentiation (CD) 31-positively stained vessels/mm2. In addition, CD57+ and CD68+ cells were counted using semi-quantification of natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages. Fer expression in stromal cells was negatively associated with Fuhrman grade, pathological tumor stage and metastasis (P<0.001). Fer expression in stromal cells was negatively associated with CD68+ macrophage density, whereas it was positively associated with CD57+ NK cell density. Kaplan-Meier estimators indicated that decreased stromal Fer expression was a predictive marker of decreased cause-specific survival rate (P<0.001). Furthermore, low expression of Fer was identified as being an independent marker of decreased cause-specific survival using multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 7.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.7–33.0; P<0.001). The results of the present study suggested that low Fer expression in stromal cells is associated with increased malignant aggressiveness and decreased survival in patients with RCC. CD57+ NK cell and CD68+ macrophage regulation in cancer-stromal tissue is considered to affect RCC pathology. PMID:28356966

  7. The Use of Technetium-99m for Intravital Tracing of Transplanted Multipotent Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Silachev, D N; Kondakov, A K; Znamenskii, I A; Kurashvili, Yu B; Abolenskaya, A V; Antipkin, N R; Danilina, T I; Manskikh, V N; Gulyaev, M V; Pirogov, Yu A; Plotnikov, E Yu; Zorov, D B; Sukhikh, G T

    2016-11-01

    We studied the possibility of in vivo tracing of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells labeled with a radiophermaceutic preparation based on metastable isotope Technetium-99m and injected to rats with modeled traumatic brain injury. Accumulation of labeled cells occurred primarily in the liver and lungs. The cells distribution in internal organs greatly varied depending on the administration route. Cell injection into the carotid artery led to their significant accumulation in the damaged brain hemisphere, while intravenous injection was followed by diffuse cell distribution in all brain structures. Scintigraphy data were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and histological staining of cells. Visualization of stem cells labeled with Technetium-99m-based preparation by scintigraphy is an objective and highly informative method allowing real-time in vivo cell tracing in the body.

  8. Quantification of stromal vascular cell mechanics with a linear cell monolayer rheometer

    SciTech Connect

    Elkins, Claire M. Fuller, Gerald G.; Shen, Wen-Jun; Khor, Victor K.; Kraemer, Fredric B.

    2015-01-15

    Over the past few decades researchers have developed a variety of methods for measuring the mechanical properties of whole cells, including traction force microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and single-cell tensile testing. Though each of these techniques provides insight into cell mechanics, most also involve some nonideal conditions for acquiring live cell data, such as probing only one portion of a cell at a time, or placing the cell in a nonrepresentative geometry during testing. In the present work, we describe the development of a linear cell monolayer rheometer (LCMR) and its application to measure the mechanics of a live, confluent monolayer of stromal vascular cells. In the LCMR, a monolayer of cells is contacted on both top and bottom by two collagen-coated plates and allowed to adhere. The top plate then shears the monolayer by stepping forward to induce a predetermined step strain, while a force transducer attached to the top plate collects stress information. The stress and strain data are then used to determine the maximum relaxation modulus recorded after step-strain, G{sub r}{sup 0}, referred to as the zero-time relaxation modulus of the cell monolayer. The present study validates the ability of the LCMR to quantify cell mechanics by measuring the change in G{sub r}{sup 0} of a confluent cell monolayer upon the selective inhibition of three major cytoskeletal components (actin microfilaments, vimentin intermediate filaments, and microtubules). The LCMR results indicate that both actin- and vimentin-deficient cells had ∼50% lower G{sub r}{sup 0} values than wild-type, whereas tubulin deficiency resulted in ∼100% higher G{sub r}{sup 0} values. These findings constitute the first use of a cell monolayer rheometer to quantitatively distinguish the roles of different cytoskeletal elements in maintaining cell stiffness and structure. Significantly, they are consistent with results obtained using single-cell mechanical testing methods

  9. Leptin as a mediator of tumor-stromal interactions promotes breast cancer stem cell activity.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Cinzia; Chemi, Francesca; Panza, Salvatore; Barone, Ines; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Lanzino, Marilena; Cordella, Angela; Campana, Antonella; Hashim, Adnan; Rizza, Pietro; Leggio, Antonella; Győrffy, Balázs; Simões, Bruno M; Clarke, Robert B; Weisz, Alessandro; Catalano, Stefania; Andò, Sebastiano

    2016-01-12

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) play crucial roles in tumor initiation, metastasis and therapeutic resistance. A strict dependency between BCSCs and stromal cell components of tumor microenvironment exists. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies aimed to target the crosstalk between activated microenvironment and BCSCs have the potential to improve clinical outcome. Here, we investigated how leptin, as a mediator of tumor-stromal interactions, may affect BCSC activity using patient-derived samples (n = 16) and breast cancer cell lines, and determined the potential benefit of targeting leptin signaling in these model systems. Conditioned media (CM) from cancer-associated fibroblasts and breast adipocytes significantly increased mammosphere formation in breast cancer cells and depletion of leptin from CM completely abrogated this effect. Mammosphere cultures exhibited increased leptin receptor (OBR) expression and leptin exposure enhanced mammosphere formation. Microarray analyses revealed a similar expression profile of genes involved in stem cell biology among mammospheres treated with CM and leptin. Interestingly, leptin increased mammosphere formation in metastatic breast cancers and expression of OBR as well as HSP90, a target of leptin signaling, were directly correlated with mammosphere formation in metastatic samples (r = 0.68/p = 0.05; r = 0.71/p = 0.036, respectively). Kaplan-Meier survival curves indicated that OBR and HSP90 expression were associated with reduced overall survival in breast cancer patients (HR = 1.9/p = 0.022; HR = 2.2/p = 0.00017, respectively). Furthermore, blocking leptin signaling by using a full leptin receptor antagonist significantly reduced mammosphere formation in breast cancer cell lines and patient-derived samples. Our results suggest that leptin/leptin receptor signaling may represent a potential therapeutic target that can block the stromal-tumor interactions driving BCSC-mediated disease progression.

  10. Functional differences in mesenchymal stromal cells from human dental pulp and periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Vasandan, Anoop Babu; Shankar, Shilpa Rani; Prasad, Priya; Sowmya Jahnavi, Vulugundam; Bhonde, Ramesh Ramachandra; Jyothi Prasanna, Susarla

    2014-02-01

    Clinically reported reparative benefits of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are majorly attributed to strong immune-modulatory abilities not exactly shared by fibroblasts. However, MSCs remain heterogeneous populations, with unique tissue-specific subsets, and lack of clear-cut assays defining therapeutic stromal subsets adds further ambiguity to the field. In this context, in-depth evaluation of cellular characteristics of MSCs from proximal oro-facial tissues: dental pulp (DPSCs) and periodontal ligament (PDLSCs) from identical donors provides an opportunity to evaluate exclusive niche-specific influences on multipotency and immune-modulation. Exhaustive cell surface profiling of DPSCs and PDLSCs indicated key differences in expression of mesenchymal (CD105) and pluripotent/multipotent stem cell-associated cell surface antigens: SSEA4, CD117, CD123 and CD29. DPSCs and PDLSCs exhibited strong chondrogenic potential, but only DPSCs exhibited adipogenic and osteogenic propensities. PDLSCs expressed immuno-stimulatory/immune-adhesive ligands like HLA-DR and CD50, upon priming with IFNγ, unlike DPSCs, indicating differential response patterns to pro-inflammatory cytokines. Both DPSCs and PDLSCs were hypo-immunogenic and did not elicit robust allogeneic responses despite exposure to IFNγ or TNFα. Interestingly, only DPSCs attenuated mitogen-induced lympho-proliferative responses and priming with either IFNγ or TNFα enhanced immuno-modulation capacity. In contrast, primed or unprimed PDLSCs lacked the ability to suppress polyclonal T cell blast responses. This study indicates that stromal cells from even topographically related tissues do not necessarily share identical MSC properties and emphasizes the need for a thorough functional testing of MSCs from diverse sources with respect to multipotency, immune parameters and response to pro-inflammatory cytokines before translational usage.

  11. The resistance of activated T-cells from SLE patients to apoptosis induced by human thymic stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Budagyan, V M; Bulanova, E G; Sharova, N I; Nikonova, M F; Stanislav, M L; Yarylin, A A

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we show the differential sensitivity of phytohemagglutinine (PHA) activated T-cells from healthy donors or patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to apoptosis induced by human thymic stromal cell line of epithelial origin. T-cells from SLE patients were mainly resistant to the apoptotic action of the stromal cells, while normal T-lymphocytes readily died via apoptosis. Gel electrophoresis revealed a DNA fragmentation pattern characteristic of apoptosis after 18 h of coculture. The simultaneous measurement of [3H]-thymidine uptake showed that the proliferative response of T-cells from SLE patients was significantly decreased compared to their normal counterparts. Such difference may account for the distinct result of interactions between the stromal and lymphoid cells, leading to the subsequent survival of T-lymphocytes from SLE patients. Nevertheless pretreatment of normal activated T-lymphocytes with anti-Fas mAbs, which have the capacity to substantially inhibit signaling through this receptor resulted in abolition of this form of programmed cell death. Thus, the precise role of Fas receptor and its ligand in this in vitro test system needs further investigation.

  12. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Expression in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Modulates Cancer Cell Growth and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Parascandolo, Alessia; Rappa, Francesca; Cappello, Francesco; Kim, Jaehyup; Cantu, David A.; Chen, Herbert; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Hematti, Peiman; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Salvatore, Marco; Laukkanen, Mikko O.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor stroma-secreted growth factors, cytokines, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence tumor development from early stages to the metastasis phase. Previous studies have demonstrated downregulation of ROS-producing extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) in thyroid cancer cell lines although according to recent data, the expression of SOD3 at physiological levels stimulates normal and cancer cell proliferation. Therefore, to analyze the expression of SOD3 in tumor stroma, we characterized stromal cells from the thyroid. We report mutually exclusive desmoplasia and inflammation in papillary and follicular thyroid cancers and the presence of multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) in non-carcinogenic thyroids and papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). The phenotypic and differentiation characteristics of Thyroid MSCs and PTC MSCs were comparable with bone marrow MSCs. A molecular level analysis showed increased FIBROBLAST ACTIVATING PROTEIN, COLLAGEN 1 TYPE A1, TENASCIN, and SOD3 expression in PTC MSCs compared to Thyroid MSCs, suggesting the presence of MSCs with a fibrotic fingerprint in papillary thyroid cancer tumors and the autocrine-paracrine conversion of SOD3 expression, which was enhanced by cancer cells. Stromal SOD3 had a stimulatory effect on cancer cell growth and an inhibitory effect on cancer cell migration, thus indicating that SOD3 might be a novel player in thyroid tumor stroma. PMID:28216675

  13. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yingbin; Cai, Shaoxi; Yang, Li; Yu, Shuhui; Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Haoxing; Liu, Lan; Liu, Qun; Du, Jun; Cai, Shaohui; Sung, K.L. Paul

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  14. Engineering cartilage tissue by pellet coculture of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling; Post, Janine N; Karperien, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Coculture of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in pellets has been shown to be beneficial in engineering cartilage tissue in vitro. In these cultures trophic effects of MSCs increase the proliferation and matrix deposition of chondrocytes. Thus, large cartilage constructs can be made with a relatively small number of chondrocytes. In this chapter, we describe the methods for making coculture pellets of MSCs and chondrocytes. We also provide detailed protocols for analyzing coculture pellets with cell tracking, proliferation assays, species specific polymerase chain reactions (PCR), short tandem repeats analysis, and histological examination.

  15. Role of Nanog in the maintenance of marrow stromal stem cells during post natal bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Bais, Manish V.; Shabin, Zabrina M.; Young, Megan; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Gerstnefeld, Louis C.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is related to marrow stromal stem cell maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing Nanog expression is seen during post natal surgical bone repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog knockdown decreases post surgical bone regeneration. -- Abstract: Post natal bone repair elicits a regenerative mechanism that restores the injured tissue to its pre-injury cellular composition and structure and is believed to recapitulate the embryological processes of bone formation. Prior studies showed that Nanog, a central epigenetic regulator associated with the maintenance of embryonic stem cells (ESC) was transiently expressed during fracture healing, Bais et al. . In this study, we show that murine bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) before they are induced to undergo osteogenic differentiation express {approx}50 Multiplication-Sign the background levels of Nanog seen in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and the W20-17 murine marrow stromal cell line stably expresses Nanog at {approx}80 Multiplication-Sign the MEF levels. Nanog expression in this cell line was inhibited by BMP7 treatment and Nanog lentivrial shRNA knockdown induced the expression of the terminal osteogenic gene osteocalcin. Lentivrial shRNA knockdown or lentiviral overexpression of Nanog in bone MSCs had inverse effects on proliferation, with knockdown decreasing and overexpression increasing MSC cell proliferation. Surgical marrow ablation of mouse tibia by medullary reaming led to a {approx}3-fold increase in Nanog that preceded osteogenic differentiation during intramembranous bone formation. Lentiviral shRNA knockdown of Nanog after surgical ablation led to an initial overexpression of osteogenic gene expression with no initial effect on bone formation but during subsequent remodeling of the newly formed bone a {approx}50% decrease was seen in the expression of terminal osteogenic gene expression and a {approx}50% loss in trabecular bone mass. This

  16. Regulatory Effects of Urokinase on Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Migration, Proliferation, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Secretion.

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, I B; Zubkova, E S; Tsokolaeva, Z I; Stafeev, Yu S; Dergilev, K V; Ratner, E I; Shestakova, M V; Sukhareva, O Yu; Parfenova, E V; Men'shikov, M Yu

    2016-10-01

    We studied the effect of urokinase, its recombinant forms, and domain fragments on migration and proliferation of adipose tissue mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and MMP secretion by these cells. Urokinase, but not its recombinant forms, slightly induced directed migration of MSCs. Spontaneous migration of MSCs increased under the action of urokinase or its isolated kringle domain. Migration induced by platelet-derived growth factor was inhibited by proteolytically inactive form of urokinase, the kringle domain, and blocking antibody to urokinase receptor. Urokinase, its proteolytically inactive form, and kringle domain produced no effect on MSC proliferation. In contrast to platelet-derived growth factor, all urokinase forms induced secretion of MMP-9 by MSCs.

  17. Intravenous transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells has therapeutic effects in a sepsis mouse model through inhibition of septic natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenhua; Gao, Yang; Li, Haibo; Wang, Hongliang; Ye, Ming; Jiang, Guihua; Chen, Yongsheng; Liu, Yang; Kong, Junying; Liu, Wei; Sun, Meng; Hou, Meng; Yu, Kaijiang

    2016-10-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells is a promising strategy for treating sepsis. Natural killer cells are important in the development of sepsis, and their functions can be inhibited by mesenchymal stromal cells, we asked whether mesenchymal stromal cells exert their therapeutic effects through inhibiting the functions of natural killer cells in a septic mouse model generated with cecal ligation puncture method. Using co-cultures of cells, small interfering RNA, enzyme-linked immnuosorbent assays, fluorescence assays, western blotting, and pathological examination, we investigated the levels of inflammatory cytokines, proliferation of natural killer cells, inflammatory infiltration of important organs in mice, and activity of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling pathway and found that mesenchymal stromal cells inhibited the function and proliferation of septic natural killer cells, increased interleukin-10 levels and increased the expression of components, such as Janus kinase 1, Janus kinase 2, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway both in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that mesenchymal stromal cells have their therapeutic effect in the septic mouse model through inhibiting the function and proliferation of septic natural killer cells. This biological process may involve interleukin-10 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 as well as other pathway components in the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway. Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells is an effective strategy to treat sepsis.

  18. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Profiling of the Neoplastic Giant Cell Tumor of Bone Stromal Cells by RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lau, Carol P Y; Kwok, Jamie S L; Tsui, Joseph C C; Huang, Lin; Yang, Kevin Y; Tsui, Stephen K W; Kumta, Shekhar Madhukar

    2016-11-15

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is the most common non-malignant primary bone tumor reported in Hong Kong. Failure of treatment in advanced GCTB with aggressive local recurrence remains a clinical challenge. In order to reveal the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of this tumor, we aimed to examine the transcriptome profiling of the neoplastic stromal cells of GCTB in this study. RNA-sequencing was performed on three GCTB stromal cell samples and one bone marrow-derived MSC sample and 174 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between these two cell types. The top five up-regulated genes are SPP1, F3, TSPAN12, MMP13, and LGALS3BP and further validated by qPCR and Western Blotting. Knockdown of SPP1 was found to induce RUNX2 and OPG expression in GCTB stromal cells but not the MSCs. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) of the 174 DEGs revealed significant alternations in 23 pathways; variant calling analysis revealed 1915 somatic variants of 384 genes with high or moderate impacts. Interestingly, four canonical pathways were found overlapping in both analyses; from which VEGFA, CSF1, PLAUR, and F3 genes with somatic mutation were found up-regulated in GCTB stromal cells. The STRING diagram showed two main clusters of the DEGs; one cluster of histone genes that are down-regulated in GCTB samples and another related to osteoblast differentiation, angiogenesis, cell cycle progression, and tumor growth. The DEGs and somatic mutations found in our study warrant further investigation and validation, nevertheless, our study add new insights in the search for new therapeutic targets in treating GCTB. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-12, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Thiol-ene Michael-type formation of gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrices for three-dimensional mesenchymal stromal/stem cell administration to cutaneous wounds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kedi; Cantu, David Antonio; Fu, Yao; Kim, Jaehyup; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Hematti, Peiman; Kao, W John

    2013-11-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are considered promising cellular therapeutics in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. MSCs secrete high concentrations of immunomodulatory cytokines and growth factors, which exert paracrine effects on infiltrating immune and resident cells in the wound microenvironment that could favorably promote healing after acute injury. However, better spatial delivery and improved retention at the site of injury are two factors that could improve the clinical application of MSCs. In this study, we utilized thiol-ene Michael-type addition for rapid encapsulation of MSCs within a gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrix. This biomatrix was also applied as a provisional dressing to full thickness wounds in Sprague-Dawley rats. The three-way interaction of MSCs, gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrices, and host immune cells and adjacent resident cells in the wound microenvironment favorably modulated wound progression and host response. In this model we observed attenuated immune cell infiltration, lack of foreign giant cell (FBGC) formation, accelerated wound closure and re-epithelialization, as well as enhanced neovascularization and granulation tissue formation by 7 days. The MSC entrapped in the gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrix localized cell presentation adjacent to the wound microenvironment and thus mediated the early resolution of inflammatory events and facilitated the proliferative phases in wound healing.

  20. T cell development critically depends on prethymic stromal patched expression.

    PubMed

    Uhmann, Anja; van den Brandt, Jens; Dittmann, Kai; Hess, Ina; Dressel, Ralf; Binder, Claudia; Lühder, Fred; Christiansen, Hans; Fassnacht, Martin; Bhandoola, Avinash; Wienands, Jürgen; Reichardt, Holger M; Hahn, Heidi

    2011-03-15

    We recently described that T cell specification in mice deficient in the Hedgehog (Hh) receptor Patched (Ptch) is blocked at the level of the common lymphoid progenitor in the bone marrow (BM). Adoptive transfer of wild-type BM in Ptch-deficient mice provides evidence that T cell development strictly depends on Ptch expression in the nonhematopoietic compartment. Transplantation experiments using BM deficient in the glucocorticoid receptor exclude any involvement of the stress hormone corticosterone in our model. Using cell-type-specific knockout mice, we show that T cell development is independent of T cell-intrinsic Ptch expression. Furthermore, Ptch expression by the thymus stroma is dispensable, as revealed by fetal thymus organ culture and thymus transplantation. In contrast, analysis of the earliest thymic progenitors in Ptch-deficient mice indicated that Ptch is required for the development or supply of thymic homing progenitors that give rise to earliest thymic progenitors. Collectively, our findings identified Ptch as an exclusive T cell-extrinsic factor necessary for proper development of T cells at their prethymic stage. This observation may be important for current considerations using Hh inhibitors upstream of Ptch in diseases accompanied by aberrant Hh signaling.

  1. Comparison of manual and automated cultures of bone marrow stromal cells for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Asako; Ichimura, Masaki; Tone, Hiroshi; Nakatani, Masaru; Inoue, Minoru; Tojo, Arinobu; Kagami, Hideaki

    2015-11-01

    The development of an automated cell culture system would allow stable and economical cell processing for wider clinical applications in the field of regenerative medicine. However, it is crucial to determine whether the cells obtained by automated culture are comparable to those generated by manual culture. In the present study, we focused on the primary culture process of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) for bone tissue engineering and investigated the feasibility of its automation using a commercially available automated cell culture system in a clinical setting. A comparison of the harvested BMSCs from manual and automated cultures using clinically acceptable protocols showed no differences in cell yields, viabilities, surface marker expression profiles, and in vivo osteogenic abilities. Cells cultured with this system also did not show malignant transformation and the automated process was revealed to be safe in terms of microbial contamination. Taken together, the automated procedure described in this report provides an approach to clinical bone tissue engineering.

  2. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Alessandro; Giuliani, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells’ growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells’ behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity. PMID:27834810

  3. Gingival Stromal Cells as an In Vitro Model: Cannabidiol Modulates Genes Linked With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; Scionti, Domenico; Diomede, Francesca; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Pollastro, Federica; Piattelli, Adriano; Cocco, Lucio; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela; Trubiani, Oriana

    2017-04-01

    Research in recent years has extensively investigated the therapeutic efficacy of mesenchymal stromal cells in regenerative medicine for many neurodegenerative diseases at preclinical and clinical stages. However, the success rate of stem cell therapy remains less at translational phase. Lack of relevant animal models that potentially simulate the molecular etiology of human pathological symptoms might be a reason behind such poor clinical outcomes associated with stem cell therapy. Apparently, self-renewal and differentiation ability of mesenchymal stem cells may help to study the early developmental signaling pathways connected with the diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), etc., at in vitro level. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotrophic cannabinoid, has been demonstrated as a potent anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agent in neurological preclinical models. In the present study, we investigated the modulatory role of cannabidiol on genes associated with ALS using human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hGMSCs) as an in vitro model system. Next generation transcriptomic sequencing analysis demonstrated considerable modifications in the expression of genes connected with ALS pathology, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and excitotoxicity in hGMSCs treated with cannabidiol. Our results suggest the efficacy of cannabidiol to delineate the unknown molecular pathways, which may underlie ALS pathology at an early stage using hGMSCs as a compelling in vitro system. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 819-828, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Molecular pathology of myelodysplastic syndromes: biology of medullary stromal and hematopoietic cells (review).

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Masanobu; Kurata, Morito; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Abe, Shinya; Suzuki, Shiho; Umeda, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have been defined as a disease entity based on clinical features and morphological findings. Despite similarities in clinical manifestations, genetic abnormalities occurring in hematopoietic cells are heterogeneous among the syndromes. However, recent investigations have revealed that there are common biological events in the bone marrow of MDS cases. Most notably, excessive apoptosis of hematopoietic cells was observed to be induced by the bone marrow microenvironment. The apoptosis was mediated by paracrine as well as autocrine factors, suggesting that medullary stromal and hematopoietic cells play a role in the pathology of disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα, in the bone marrow microenvironment are predominantly paracrine mediators of apoptosis. Regarding autocrine stimulation mechanisms, it has recently been shown that the deregulation of ribosomal protein is capable of initiating a stress response in the hematopoietic cell through a p53-mediated signaling pathway. Thus, both the stromal cells of the bone marrow microenvironment and hematopoietic cells themselves possess a common and characteristic biology in this heterogeneous disease entity.

  5. Bone deficit in ovariectomized rats. Functional contribution of the marrow stromal cell population and the effect of oral dihydrotachysterol treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Tabuchi, C; Simmons, D J; Fausto, A; Russell, J E; Binderman, I; Avioli, L V

    1986-01-01

    This study investigates the proliferative and osteogenic role of marrow stromal/osteoprogenitor cells in the development of the cortical bone deficit in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats. In vitro, clonal growth of marrow stromal cells from OVX rats was significantly impaired (vs. sham-operated controls). Yet in vivo, cells from sham-operated and OVX rats had equal osteogenic potential in several in vivo experimental situations, such as in intraperitoneally implanted millipore diffusion chambers and in intramuscular implants of marrow plus osteoinductive bone matrix (composite grafts). Long-term (6 mo) dihydrotachysterol (DHT) treatment of OVX rats enhanced their in vitro proliferative potential and clonal growth, as well as their osteogenic expression in composite grafts. The observation that the in vivo osteogenic performance of OVX rat marrow stromal cells was normal at extraosseous sites suggests that the mechanisms leading to osteopenia may involve an abnormality in cell-matrix interactions. PMID:3528218

  6. In vitro growth and osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells supported by autologous plasma.

    PubMed

    Schecroun, N; Delloye, Ch

    2004-08-01

    Autologous bone marrow stromal cells have been proposed as an adjuvant in the treatment of bone nonunion. This cell therapy requires the establishment of culture conditions that permit the rapid expansion of these cells ex vivo while retaining their potential for further differentiation. Several culture models have been proposed, all of them using fetal calf serum (FCS) as a source of growth factors. This is problematic for subsequent autologous implantation because of possible disease transmission. Here we report the establishment and characterization of a cell culture system in which standard FCS has been replaced by autologous plasma recovered from bone marrow (APM). Short-term cultures of human bone marrow stromal (HBMS) cells grown in mineralizing conditions with APM exhibited a significantly higher number of ALP-positive colonies than those grown with FCS, indicating an enhanced ability of APM to recruit osteoprogenitor cells for culture. Analyses of long-term cultures showed that the use of APM did not affect cell proliferation as cell number at confluence and proliferation rate were similar whether primary cultures had been maintained with APM or FCS. In first-passage cultures, an osteoblastic differentiation was observed in both cases as the cells expressed ALP and formed mineralized bone-like nodules. We noted that the age of donor had a negative effect on the number of osteoprogenitor cells recruited for culture. This effect had an impact on proliferation rate in primary cultures performed with APM, although the cell number obtained after expansion remained independent of age. Our study shows that proliferative capacity and osteoblastic differentiation potential of HBMS cells are maintained when cultured with APM. Thus, this cell culture system could provide a new and safer tool to elaborate an autologous cell therapy designed to enhance osteogenesis.

  7. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Patients with Sickle Cell Disease Display Intact Functionality.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Elizabeth O; Chinnadurai, Raghavan; Yuan, Shala; Garcia, Marco; Arafat, Dalia; Gibson, Greg; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Galipeau, Jacques

    2017-01-26

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only cure for sickle cell disease (SCD), but engraftment remains challenging in patients lacking matched donors. Infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) at the time of HCT may promote hematopoiesis and ameliorate graft-versus-host disease. Experimental murine models suggest MSC major histocompatibility complex compatibility with recipient impacts their in vivo function, suggesting autologous MSCs could be superior to third-party MSCs for promoting HCT engraftment. Here we tested whether bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs from SCD subjects have comparable functionality compared with MSCs from healthy volunteers. SCD MSC doubling time and surface marker phenotype did not differ significantly from non-SCD. Third-party and autologous (SCD) T cell proliferation was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by all MSCs. SCD MSCs comparably expressed indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, which based on transwell and blocking experiments appeared to be the dominant immunomodulatory pathway. The expression of key genes involved in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-MSC interactions was minimally altered between SCD and non-SCD MSCs. Expression was, however, altered by IFN-γ stimulation, particularly CXCL14, CXCL26, CX3CL1, CKITL, and JAG1, indicating the potential to augment MSC expression by cytokine stimulation. These data demonstrate the feasibility of expanding BM-derived MSCs from SCD patients that phenotypically and functionally do not differ per International Society of Cell Therapy essential criteria from non-SCD MSCs, supporting initial evaluation (primarily for safety) of autologous MSCs to enhance haploidentical HSC engraftment in SCD.

  8. Early postradition recovery of hematopoietic stromal precursor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Todriya, T.V.

    1985-04-01

    The aim of this investigation was an immunohistochemical study of alpha-endorphin-producing cells and also a study of rat mast cells (MC in the antral mucosa of the human stomach. Men aged 18 to 30 years undergoing in-patient treatment wre studied. According to the results of radioimmunoassay, antibodies against alpha-endorphin did not react with enkephalins, beta-endorphin, or the C-terminal fragment of beta-endorphin, but had cross reactivity of about 10% with gammaendorphin. Results were subjected to statistical analysis by Student's test at a 85% level of significance and they are shown. The facts presented here suggest that MC of human gastric mucosa include argyrophilic cells which contain alpha-endorphin.

  9. Human Endometrial Stromal Cells Are Highly Permissive To Productive Infection by Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Isabel; Ghezzi, Silvia; Ulisse, Adele; Rubio, Alicia; Turrini, Filippo; Garavaglia, Elisabetta; Candiani, Massimo; Castilletti, Concetta; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Poli, Guido; Broccoli, Vania; Panina-Bordignon, Paola; Vicenzi, Elisa

    2017-03-10

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a recently re-emerged flavivirus transmitted to humans by mosquito bites but also from mother to fetus and by sexual intercourse. We here show that primary human endometrial stromal cells (HESC) are highly permissive to ZIKV infection and support its in vitro replication. ZIKV envelope expression was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum whereas double-stranded viral RNA colocalized with vimentin filaments to the perinuclear region. ZIKV productive infection also occurred in the human T-HESC cell line together with the induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and of IFN-stimulated genes. Notably, in vitro decidualization of T-HESC with cyclic AMP and progesterone upregulated the cell surface expression of the ZIKV entry co-receptor AXL and boosted ZIKV replication by ca. 100-fold. Thus, endometrial stromal cells, particularly if decidualized, likely represent a crucial cell target of ZIKV reaching them, either via the uterine vasculature in the viremic phase of the infection or by sexual viral transmission, and a potential source of virus spreading to placental trophoblasts during pregnancy.

  10. Human Endometrial Stromal Cells Are Highly Permissive To Productive Infection by Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Isabel; Ghezzi, Silvia; Ulisse, Adele; Rubio, Alicia; Turrini, Filippo; Garavaglia, Elisabetta; Candiani, Massimo; Castilletti, Concetta; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Poli, Guido; Broccoli, Vania; Panina-Bordignon, Paola; Vicenzi, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a recently re-emerged flavivirus transmitted to humans by mosquito bites but also from mother to fetus and by sexual intercourse. We here show that primary human endometrial stromal cells (HESC) are highly permissive to ZIKV infection and support its in vitro replication. ZIKV envelope expression was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum whereas double-stranded viral RNA colocalized with vimentin filaments to the perinuclear region. ZIKV productive infection also occurred in the human T-HESC cell line together with the induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and of IFN-stimulated genes. Notably, in vitro decidualization of T-HESC with cyclic AMP and progesterone upregulated the cell surface expression of the ZIKV entry co-receptor AXL and boosted ZIKV replication by ca. 100-fold. Thus, endometrial stromal cells, particularly if decidualized, likely represent a crucial cell target of ZIKV reaching them, either via the uterine vasculature in the viremic phase of the infection or by sexual viral transmission, and a potential source of virus spreading to placental trophoblasts during pregnancy. PMID:28281680

  11. Sca-1(+) mesenchymal stromal cells inhibit splenic marginal zone B lymphocytes commitment through Caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaozhen; Yang, Jialei; Zhang, Hui-Jie; Fan, Hong; An, Ning; Xin, Jiajia; Li, Na; Xu, Jinmei; Yin, Wen; Wu, Zhongliang; Hu, Xingbin

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been characterized as an important component of hematopoietic niche, which are capable of modulating the immune system through interaction with a wide range of immune cells. Marginal zone B cells, one main type of mature B lymphocytes, play a central role in eliciting antibody response against pathogens. However, how MSCs and its subpopulations regulate marginal zone B cells commitment is unknown yet. In this study, we assessed the contribution of Sca-1(+) MSCs on marginal zone B cells commitment. Our results showed that Sca-1(+) MSCs inhibit the commitment of marginal zone B lymphocytes. The inhibition was exerted through lowered Caspase-3 expression. Furthermore, we found marginal zone B lymphocytes in spleen of Caspase-3 knockout mice decreased and Caspase-3 knockout Sca-1(+) MSCs accounted for the MZB lymphocytes decrease. In conclusion, our investigation provided clues about Sca-1(+) MSCs regulation on the commitment of marginal zone B cells through Caspase-3 gene.

  12. Solid tumor therapy by selectively targeting stromal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shihui; Liu, Jie; Ma, Qian; Cao, Liu; Fattah, Rasem J.; Yu, Zuxi; Bugge, Thomas H.; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Engineered tumor-targeted anthrax lethal toxin proteins have been shown to strongly suppress growth of solid tumors in mice. These toxins work through the native toxin receptors tumor endothelium marker-8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2), which, in other contexts, have been described as markers of tumor endothelium. We found that neither receptor is required for tumor growth. We further demonstrate that tumor cells, which are resistant to the toxin when grown in vitro, become highly sensitive when implanted in mice. Using a range of tissue-specific loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic models, we determined that this in vivo toxin sensitivity requires CMG2 expression on host-derived tumor endothelial cells. Notably, engineered toxins were shown to suppress the proliferation of isolated tumor endothelial cells. Finally, we demonstrate that administering an immunosuppressive regimen allows animals to receive multiple toxin dosages and thereby produces a strong and durable antitumor effect. The ability to give repeated doses of toxins, coupled with the specific targeting of tumor endothelial cells, suggests that our strategy should be efficacious for a wide range of solid tumors. PMID:27357689

  13. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Serum: Effective Substitute of Fetal Bovine Serum for Culturing of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Yu A; Balashova, E E; Volgina, N E; Kabaeva, N V; Dugina, T N; Sukhikh, G T

    2017-02-01

    Optimal conditions for culturing of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the presence of pooled umbilical cord blood serum were determined. It was found that umbilical cord blood serum in a concentration range of 1-10% effectively supported high viability and proliferative activity of cells with unaltered phenotype and preserved multilineage differentiation capacity. The proposed approach allows avoiding the use of xenogenic animal sera for culturing of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells and creates prerequisites for designing and manufacturing safe cellular and/or acellular products for medical purposes.

  14. Pleiotrophin commits human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells towards hypertrophy during chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bouderlique, Thibault; Henault, Emilie; Lebouvier, Angelique; Frescaline, Guilhem; Bierling, Phillipe; Rouard, Helene; Courty, José; Albanese, Patricia; Chevallier, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a growth factor present in the extracellular matrix of the growth plate during bone development and in the callus during bone healing. Bone healing is a complicated process that recapitulates endochondral bone development and involves many cell types. Among those cells, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are able to differentiate toward chondrogenic and osteoblastic lineages. We aimed to determine PTN effects on differentiation properties of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) under chondrogenic induction using histological analysis and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. PTN dramatically potentiated chondrogenic differentiation as indicated by a strong increase of collagen 2 protein, and cartilage-related gene expression. Moreover, PTN increased transcription of hypertrophic chondrocyte markers such as MMP13, collagen 10 and alkaline phosphatase and enhanced calcification and the content of collagen 10 protein. These effects are dependent on PTN receptors signaling and PI3 K pathway activation. These data suggest a new role of PTN in bone regeneration as an inducer of hypertrophy during chondrogenic differentiation of hBMSC.

  15. Detection of Osteogenic Differentiation by Differential Mineralized Matrix Production in Mesenchymal Stromal Cells by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, He-Guei; Chiang, Hui-Hua Kenny; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) hold great potential in skeletal tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, conventional methods that are used in molecular biology to evaluate osteogenic differentiation of MSCs require a relatively large amount of cells. Cell lysis and cell fixation are also required and all these steps are time-consuming. Therefore, it is imperative to develop a facile technique which can provide real-time information with high sensitivity and selectivity to detect the osteogenic maturation of MSCs. In this study, we use Raman spectroscopy as a biosensor to monitor the production of mineralized matrices during osteogenic induction of MSCs. In summary, Raman spectroscopy is an excellent biosensor to detect the extent of maturation level during MSCs-osteoblast differentiation with a non-disruptive, real-time and label free manner. We expect that this study will promote further investigation of stem cell research and clinical applications. PMID:23734254

  16. Generation of clinical grade human bone marrow stromal cells for use in bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Robey, Pamela G; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Ren, Jiaqiang; Klein, Harvey G; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David F

    2015-01-01

    In current orthopaedic practice, there is a need to increase the ability to reconstruct large segments of bone lost due to trauma, resection of tumors and skeletal deformities, or when normal regenerative processes have failed such as in non-unions and avascular necrosis. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells), when used in conjunction with appropriate carriers, represent a means by which to achieve bone regeneration in such cases. While much has been done at the bench and in pre-clinical studies, moving towards clinical application requires the generation of clinical grade cells. What is described herein is an FDA-approved cell manufacturing procedure for the ex vivo expansion of high quality, biologically active human BMSCs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Stem Cells and Bone.

  17. [Mesenchymal stromal cells transplantation in acute and chronic pancreatitis in rats].

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, L B; Trubitsyna, I E; Agafonov, M A; Kniazev, O V; Liundup, A V

    2011-01-01

    Before using MSC transplantation in the clinic to conduct preclinical studies MSCs to animals with acute and chronic pancreatitis. Work out the timing and dose of MSCs. The rationale of MSCs transplantation for the regeneration of damaged pancreatic tissue. The essence of the experiments is to establish the existence of common pathogenetic mechanisms for the development of pathological processes and sanogenesis toxic damage of pancreatic tissue. The study was work out in the rat model of acute and chronic pancreatitis, to explore beneficial and adverse effects of allogeneic stem cells for regenerative-reduction processes. For cell transplantation using allogenic stromal cell fraction of bone marrow, the cell suspension was injected at a dose of 2 x 10(6) and 5 x 10(6) cells.

  18. Characterization of CD34+ thymic stromal cells located in the subcapsular cortex of the human thymus.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cáceres, E; Jaleco, A C; Res, P; Noteboom, E; Weijer, K; Spits, H

    1998-07-01

    In this paper we report that suspensions of human fetal thymocytes contain cells that express high levels of CD34 and Thy-1. These cells were characterized with regard to location within the thymus, phenotype, and function. Confocal laser scan analysis of frozen sections of fetal thymus with anti-CD34 and Thy-1 antibodies revealed that the double-labeled cells were located in the pericortical area. In addition, it was found that the CD34+Thy-1+ cells lacked CD45 and CD50, indicating that these cells are not of hematopoietic origin; this was confirmed by the finding that these cells could be cultured as adherent cells in a medium with cholera toxin and dexamethasone, but failed to grow in mixtures of hematopoietic growth factors. Further analysis indicated that most cultured CD34+Thy-1+ cells expressed cytokeratin (CK) 14 but lacked CK 13, suggesting that these cells are immature epithelial cells. Cultured CD34+Thy-1+ cells were able to induce differentiation of CD1-CD34+CD3-CD4-CD8- thymic precursors into CD4+CD8+ cells in a reaggregate culture in the absence of exogenous cytokines. The CD4+CD8+ cells that developed in these cultures did not express CD3, indicating that CD34+Thy-1+ thymic stromal cells are not capable of completing full T cell differentiation of thymic hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  19. Fluorine-19 Labeling of Stromal Vascular Fraction Cells for Clinical Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Laura C.; Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Wang, Guan; Bar-Shir, Amnon; Helfer, Brooke M.; O’Hanlon, Charles F.; Kraitchman, Dara L.; Rodriguez, Ricardo L.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells are used clinically for various therapeutic targets. The location and persistence of engrafted SVF cells are important parameters for determining treatment failure versus success. We used the GID SVF-1 platform and a clinical protocol to harvest and label SVF cells with the fluorinated (19F) agent CS-1000 as part of a first-in-human phase I trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02035085) to track SVF cells with magnetic resonance imaging during treatment of radiation-induced fibrosis in breast cancer patients. Flow cytometry revealed that SVF cells consisted of 25.0% ± 15.8% CD45+, 24.6% ± 12.5% CD34+, and 7.5% ± 3.3% CD31+ cells, with 2.1 ± 0.7 × 105 cells per cubic centimeter of adipose tissue obtained. Fluorescent CS-1000 (CS-ATM DM Green) labeled 87.0% ± 13.5% of CD34+ progenitor cells compared with 47.8% ± 18.5% of hematopoietic CD45+ cells, with an average of 2.8 ± 2.0 × 1012 19F atoms per cell, determined using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The vast majority (92.7% ± 5.0%) of CD31+ cells were also labeled, although most coexpressed CD34. Only 16% ± 22.3% of CD45−/CD31−/CD34− (triple-negative) cells were labeled with CS-ATM DM Green. After induction of cell death by either apoptosis or necrosis, >95% of 19F was released from the cells, indicating that fluorine retention can be used as a surrogate marker for cell survival. Labeled-SVF cells engrafted in a silicone breast phantom could be visualized with a clinical 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner at a sensitivity of approximately 2 × 106 cells at a depth of 5 mm. The current protocol can be used to image transplanted SVF cells at clinically relevant cell concentrations in patients. Significance Stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells harvested from adipose tissue offer great promise in regenerative medicine, but methods to track such cell therapies are needed to ensure correct administration and monitor survival. A clinical protocol

  20. Necrotizing cellulitis of the abdominal wall, caused by Pediococcus sp., due to rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, Nick; Arampatzi, Stergiani; Papavramidis, Theodossis S.; Kotidis, Efstathios; Laskou, Styliani; Papavramidis, Spiros T.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Soft tissue necrotizing infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to present a patient with necrotizing infection of abdominal wall resulting from the rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal tumor. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a 60-year-old Caucasian male patient with necrotizing infection of abdominal wall secondary to the rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal tumor. The patient was initially treated with debridement and fasciotomy of the anterior abdominal wall. Laparotomy revealed purulent peritonitis caused by infiltration and rupture of the splenic flexure by the tumor. Despite prompt intervention the patient died 19 days later. The isolated microorganism causing the infection was the rarely identified as cause of infections in humans Pediococcus sp., a gram-positive, catalase-negative coccus. DISCUSSION Necrotizing infections of abdominal wall are usually secondary either to perineal or to intra-abdominal infections. Gastrointestinal stromal cell tumors could be rarely complicated with perforation and abscess formation. In our case, the infiltrated by the extra-gastrointestinal stromal cell tumor ruptured colon was the source of the infection. The pediococci are rarely isolated as the cause of severe septicemia. CONCLUSION Ruptured retroperitoneal stromal cell tumors are extremely rare cause of necrotizing fasciitis, and before this case, Pediococcus sp. has never been isolated as the responsible agent. PMID:23357010

  1. Distribution patterns of stromal eosinophil cells in chick thymus during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai-Bo; Liu, Yin-Xue; Hou, Yong; Wen, Le; Ge, Xiao-Hong; Peng, Ke-Mei; Liu, Hua-Zhen

    2013-05-15

    Eosinophils are a type of thymic stromal cell that are present in the thymus of both humans and mice. They participate in regulating T-cell development under non-pathological conditions. However, studies are scarce regarding the role of eosinophils in the development of the thymus in chickens. Therefore, this study investigated the distribution of eosinophils in normal chicken thymi at different stages of development. Seven thymi were obtained from chickens at days 1, 21 and 35 of development. The distribution of eosinophils in the thymi was analyzed by histological and immunohistochemical techniques using Lendrum's chromotrope 2R method and an antibody against eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP), respectively. Eosinophils were constitutively located in the chick thymus. They were mainly distributed in the thymic corticomedullary junction and medulla, especially around vessels and Hassall's corpuscles, and only a few were in the trabeculae among thymic lobules and around vessels. There were none in the cortex. The number of thymic eosinophils decreased with increasing age (P<0.01). These results indicated that eosinophils comprise a type of thymic stromal cells in the chick, which may regulate thymic development, especially during the early stages of development.

  2. Interactions between acute lymphoblastic leukemia and bone marrow stromal cells influence response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Tesfai, Yordanos; Ford, Jette; Carter, Kim W; Firth, Martin J; O'Leary, Rebecca A; Gottardo, Nicholas G; Cole, Catherine; Kees, Ursula R

    2012-03-01

    The cure rate for pediatric patients with B precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) is steadily improving, however relapses do occur despite initial response to therapy. To identify links between drug resistance and gene deregulation we used oligonucleotide microarray technology and determined in 184 pre-B ALL specimen genes differentially expressed compared to normal CD34(+) specimens. We identified 20 signature genes including CTGF, BMP-2, CXCR4 and IL7R, documented to regulate interactions in the bone marrow. We recorded remarkably similar levels of expression in three independent patient cohorts, and found distinct patterns in cytogenetically defined subgroups of pre-B ALL. The canonical pathways that were affected are involved in inter- and intra-cellular communication, regulating signaling within the microenvironment. We tested experimentally whether interaction with stromal cells conferred protection to four drugs used in current ALL therapy, and demonstrated that bone marrow stromal cells significantly influenced resistance to vincristine and cytosine arabinoside. Compounds designed to block the identified cellular interactions within the bone marrow microenvironment are expected to mobilise the leukemic cells and make them more accessible to contemporary antileukemic agents. The data provide novel insight into the pathobiology of ALL and indicate new therapeutic targets for patients with ALL.

  3. Adipogenic differentiation potential of rat adipose tissue-derived subpopulations of stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Gierloff, M; Petersen, L; Oberg, H-H; Quabius, E S; Wiltfang, J; Açil, Y

    2014-10-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are mostly isolated by enzymatic digestion, centrifugation and adherent growth resulting in a very heterogeneous cell population. Therefore, other cell types in the cell culture can comprise the differentiation and proliferation potential of the ASC population. Recent studies indicated that an antibody-aided isolation of distinct ASC subpopulations provides advantages over the conventional method of ASC isolation. The aim of this study was to investigate the adipogenic differentiation potential of CD29-, CD71-, CD73- and CD90-selected ASCs in vitro. The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) was obtained from rat adipose tissue by enzymatic digestion and centrifugation. Subsequently, CD29(+)-, CD71(+)-, CD73(+)- and CD90(+) cells were isolated by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS), seeded into culture plates and differentiated into the adipogenic lineage. ASCs isolated by adherent growth only served as controls. Adipogenic differentiation was assessed by Oil Red O staining and quantification of the adiponectin and leptin concentrations in the cell culture supernatants. Statistical analysis was carried out using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Scheffe's post hoc procedure. The results showed that different subpopulations with different adipogenic differentiation potentials can be isolated by the MACS procedure. The highest adipogenic differentiation potential was determined in the CD29-selected ASC population followed by the unsorted ASC population. The CD71-, CD73- and CD90-selected cells exhibited significantly the lowest adipogenic differentiation potential. In conclusion, the CD29-selected ASCs and the unsorted ASCs exhibited a similar adipogenic differentiation potential. Therefore, we do not see a clear advantage in the application of an anti-CD29-based isolation of ASCs over the conventional technique using adherent growth. However, the research on isolation/purification methods of adipogenic ASCs should

  4. Microencapsulation of Neuroblastoma Cells and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Collagen Microspheres: A 3D Model for Cancer Cell Niche Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Pan; Sin, Hoi Shun; Chan, Shing; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing trend for researchers to use in vitro 3D models in cancer studies, as they can better recapitulate the complex in vivo situation. And the fact that the progression and development of tumor are closely associated to its stromal microenvironment has been increasingly recognized. The establishment of such tumor supportive niche is vital in understanding tumor progress and metastasis. The mesenchymal origin of many cells residing in the cancer niche provides the rationale to include MSCs in mimicking the niche in neuroblastoma. Here we co-encapsulate and co-culture NBCs and MSCs in a 3D in vitro model and investigate the morphology, growth kinetics and matrix remodeling in the reconstituted stromal environment. Results showed that the incorporation of MSCs in the model lead to accelerated growth of cancer cells as well as recapitulation of at least partially the tumor microenvironment in vivo. The current study therefore demonstrates the feasibility for the collagen microsphere to act as a 3D in vitro cancer model for various topics in cancer studies. PMID:26657086

  5. High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Identifies a Subset of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with Vascular Regenerative Potential.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Stephen E; Kuljanin, Miljan; Cooper, Tyler T; Putman, David M; Lajoie, Gilles A; Hess, David A

    2017-03-15

    During culture expansion, multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentially express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), an intracellular detoxification enzyme that protects long-lived cells against oxidative stress. Thus, MSC selection based on ALDH-activity may be used to reduce heterogeneity and distinguish MSC subsets with improved regenerative potency. After expansion of human bone marrow-derived MSCs, cell progeny was purified based on low versus high ALDH-activity (ALDH(hi) ) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and each subset was compared for multipotent stromal and provascular regenerative functions. Both ALDH(l) ° and ALDH(hi) MSC subsets demonstrated similar expression of stromal cell (>95% CD73(+) , CD90(+) , CD105(+) ) and pericyte (>95% CD146(+) ) surface markers and showed multipotent differentiation into bone, cartilage, and adipose cells in vitro. Conditioned media (CDM) generated by ALDH(hi) MSCs demonstrated a potent proliferative and prosurvival effect on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) under serum-free conditions and augmented HMVEC tube-forming capacity in growth factor-reduced matrices. After subcutaneous transplantation within directed in vivo angiogenesis assay implants into immunodeficient mice, ALDH(hi) MSC or CDM produced by ALDH(hi) MSC significantly augmented murine vascular cell recruitment and perfused vessel infiltration compared with ALDH(l) ° MSC. Although both subsets demonstrated strikingly similar mRNA expression patterns, quantitative proteomic analyses performed on subset-specific CDM revealed the ALDH(hi) MSC subset uniquely secreted multiple proangiogenic cytokines (vascular endothelial growth factor beta, platelet derived growth factor alpha, and angiogenin) and actively produced multiple factors with chemoattractant (transforming growth factor-β, C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 1, 2, and 3 (GRO), C-C motif chemokine ligand 5 (RANTES), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8

  6. Characterization and angiogenic potential of human neonatal and infant thymus mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyun; Mundada, Lakshmi; Johnson, Sean; Wong, Joshua; Witt, Russell; Ohye, Richard G; Si, Ming-Sing

    2015-04-01

    Resident mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are involved in angiogenesis during thymus regeneration. We have previously shown that MSCs can be isolated from enzymatically digested human neonatal and infant thymus tissue that is normally discarded during pediatric cardiac surgical procedures. In this paper, we demonstrate that thymus MSCs can also be isolated by explant culture of discarded thymus tissue and that these cells share many of the characteristics of bone marrow MSCs. Human neonatal thymus MSCs are clonogenic, demonstrate exponential growth in nearly 30 population doublings, have a characteristic surface marker profile, and express pluripotency genes. Furthermore, thymus MSCs have potent proangiogenic behavior in vitro with sprout formation and angiogenic growth factor production. Thymus MSCs promote neoangiogenesis and cooperate with endothelial cells to form functional human blood vessels in vivo. These characteristics make thymus MSCs a potential candidate for use as an angiogenic cell therapeutic agent and for vascularizing engineered tissues in vitro.

  7. The therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells on hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bayo, Juan; Marrodán, Mariano; Aquino, Jorge B; Silva, Marcelo; García, Mariana G; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-03-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are more often obtained from adult and extraembryonic tissues, with the latter sources being likely better from a therapeutic perspective. MSCs show tropism towards inflamed or tumourigenic sites. Mechanisms involved in MSC recruitment into tumours are comprehensively analysed, including chemoattractant signalling axes, endothelial adhesion and transmigration. In addition, signals derived from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumour microenvironment and their influence in MSC tropism and tumour recruitment are dissected, as well as the present controversy regarding their influence on tumour growth and/or metastasis. Finally, evidences available on the use of MSCs and other selected progenitor/stem cells as vehicles of antitumourigenic genes are discussed. A better knowledge of the mechanisms involved in progenitor/stem cell recruitment to HCC tumours is proposed in order to enhance their tumour targeting which may result in improvements in cell-based gene therapy strategies.

  8. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells: A promising strategy to manage alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ezquer, Fernando; Bruna, Flavia; Calligaris, Sebastián; Conget, Paulette; Ezquer, Marcelo

    2016-01-07

    Chronic alcohol consumption is a major cause of liver disease. The term alcoholic liver disease (ALD) refers to a spectrum of mild to severe disorders including steatosis, steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. With limited therapeutic options, stem cell therapy offers significant potential for these patients. In this article, we review the pathophysiologic features of ALD and the therapeutic mechanisms of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, also referred to as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), based on their potential to differentiate into hepatocytes, their immunomodulatory properties, their potential to promote residual hepatocyte regeneration, and their capacity to inhibit hepatic stellate cells. The perfect match between ALD pathogenesis and MSC therapeutic mechanisms, together with encouraging, available preclinical data, allow us to support the notion that MSC transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy to manage ALD onset and progression.

  9. Characterization and Angiogenic Potential of Human Neonatal and Infant Thymus Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuyun; Mundada, Lakshmi; Johnson, Sean; Wong, Joshua; Witt, Russell; Ohye, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Resident mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are involved in angiogenesis during thymus regeneration. We have previously shown that MSCs can be isolated from enzymatically digested human neonatal and infant thymus tissue that is normally discarded during pediatric cardiac surgical procedures. In this paper, we demonstrate that thymus MSCs can also be isolated by explant culture of discarded thymus tissue and that these cells share many of the characteristics of bone marrow MSCs. Human neonatal thymus MSCs are clonogenic, demonstrate exponential growth in nearly 30 population doublings, have a characteristic surface marker profile, and express pluripotency genes. Furthermore, thymus MSCs have potent proangiogenic behavior in vitro with sprout formation and angiogenic growth factor production. Thymus MSCs promote neoangiogenesis and cooperate with endothelial cells to form functional human blood vessels in vivo. These characteristics make thymus MSCs a potential candidate for use as an angiogenic cell therapeutic agent and for vascularizing engineered tissues in vitro. PMID:25713463

  10. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells: A promising strategy to manage alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ezquer, Fernando; Bruna, Flavia; Calligaris, Sebastián; Conget, Paulette; Ezquer, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption is a major cause of liver disease. The term alcoholic liver disease (ALD) refers to a spectrum of mild to severe disorders including steatosis, steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. With limited therapeutic options, stem cell therapy offers significant potential for these patients. In this article, we review the pathophysiologic features of ALD and the therapeutic mechanisms of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, also referred to as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), based on their potential to differentiate into hepatocytes, their immunomodulatory properties, their potential to promote residual hepatocyte regeneration, and their capacity to inhibit hepatic stellate cells. The perfect match between ALD pathogenesis and MSC therapeutic mechanisms, together with encouraging, available preclinical data, allow us to support the notion that MSC transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy to manage ALD onset and progression. PMID:26755858

  11. Connective tissue growth factor is expressed in bone marrow stromal cells and promotes interleukin-7-dependent B lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Laurence C; Strickland, Deborah H; Howlett, Meegan; Ford, Jette; Charles, Adrian K; Lyons, Karen M; Brigstock, David R; Goldschmeding, Roel; Cole, Catherine H; Alexander, Warren S; Kees, Ursula R

    2014-07-01

    Hematopoiesis occurs in a complex bone marrow microenvironment in which bone marrow stromal cells provide critical support to the process through direct cell contact and indirectly through the secretion of cytokines and growth factors. We report that connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf, also known as Ccn2) is highly expressed in murine bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, connective tissue growth factor is barely detectable in unfractionated adult bone marrow cells. While connective tissue growth factor has been implicated in hematopoietic malignancies, and is known to play critical roles in skeletogenesis and regulation of bone marrow stromal cells, its role in hematopoiesis has not been described. Here we demonstrate that the absence of connective tissue growth factor in mice results in impaired hematopoiesis. Using a chimeric fetal liver transplantation model, we show that absence of connective tissue growth factor has an impact on B-cell development, in particular from pro-B to more mature stages, which is linked to a requirement for connective tissue growth factor in bone marrow stromal cells. Using in vitro culture systems, we demonstrate that connective tissue growth factor potentiates B-cell proliferation and promotes pro-B to pre-B differentiation in the presence of interleukin-7. This study provides a better understanding of the functions of connective tissue growth factor within the bone marrow, showing the dual regulatory role of the growth factor in skeletogenesis and in stage-specific B lymphopoiesis.

  12. Total lymphoid irradiation leads to transient depletion of the mouse thymic medulla and persistent abnormalities among medullary stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, B.; Gandour, D.; Strober, S.; Weissman, I.

    1988-05-15

    Mice given multiple doses of sublethal irradiation to both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid tissues showed major transient, and some persistent disruptions in general thymic architecture and in thymic stromal components. At 2 wk after total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), the thymus lacked identifiable medullary regions by immunohistochemical analyses. Medullary stromal cells expression MHC Ag or a medullary epithelial cell Ag, as well as medullary macrophages, were undetectable. Instead, the processes of cortical epithelial cells were observed throughout the entire thymus. Strikingly, thymocyte subsets with mature phenotypes (CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+) were present in the apparent absence of a medulla. This early, gross effect was rapidly reversed such that by 1 to 2 mo after TLI, medullary areas with MHC Ag-positive cells were evident. However, abnormalities in a subset of medullary stromal cells appeared to be more persistent. Medullary epithelial cells, identified by the MD1 mAb, were greatly reduced in number and abnormally organized for at least 4 mo after TLI. In addition, macrophages containing endogenous peroxidase activity, normally abundant in medullary regions, were undetectable at all times examined after TLI. Therefore, this irradiation regimen induced both transient and long term effects in the thymus, primarily in medullary regions. These results suggest that TLI may be used as an experimental tool for studying the impact of selective depletion of medullary stromal cells on the development of specific T cell functions.

  13. Senescent stromal cells induce cancer cell migration via inhibition of RhoA/ROCK/myosin-based cell contractility

    PubMed Central

    Aifuwa, Ivie; Giri, Anjil; Longe, Nick; Lee, Sang Hyuk; An, Steven S.; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Cells induced into senescence exhibit a marked increase in the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines termed senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Here we report that SASP from senescent stromal fibroblasts promote spontaneous morphological changes accompanied by an aggressive migratory behavior in originally non-motile human breast cancer cells. This phenotypic switch is coordinated, in space and time, by a dramatic reorganization of the actin and microtubule filament networks, a discrete polarization of EB1 comets, and an unconventional front-to-back inversion of nucleus-MTOC polarity. SASP-induced morphological/migratory changes are critically dependent on microtubule integrity and dynamics, and are coordinated by the inhibition of RhoA and cell contractility. RhoA/ROCK inhibition reduces focal adhesions and traction forces, while promoting a novel gliding mode of migration. PMID:26483365

  14. Osteoblasts and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Migration and Proliferation in 3D In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Ana Paula D. N.; Takiya, Christina M.; Garzoni, Luciana R.; Leal-Ferreira, Mona Lisa; Dutra, Hélio S.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; Meirelles, Maria Nazareth; Borojevic, Radovan; Rossi, Maria Isabel D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are dependent upon a complex three-dimensional (3D) bone marrow microenvironment. Although osteoblasts control the HSC pool, the subendosteal niche is complex and its cellular composition and the role of each cell population in HSC fate have not been established. In vivo models are complex and involve subtle species-specific differences, while bidimensional cultures do not reflect the 3D tissue organization. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the role of human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC) and active osteoblasts in control of migration, lodgment, and proliferation of HSCs. Methodology/Principal Findings A complex mixed multicellular spheroid in vitro model was developed with human BMSC, undifferentiated or induced for one week into osteoblasts. A clear limit between the two stromal cells was established, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagens I and IV, laminin, and osteopontin was similar to the observed in vivo. Noninduced BMSC cultured as spheroid expressed higher levels of mRNA for the chemokine CXCL12, and the growth factors Wnt5a and Kit ligand. Cord blood and bone marrow CD34+ cells moved in and out the spheroids, and some lodged at the interface of the two stromal cells. Myeloid colony-forming cells were maintained after seven days of coculture with mixed spheroids, and the frequency of cycling CD34+ cells was decreased. Conclusions/Significance Undifferentiated and one-week osteo-induced BMSC self-assembled in a 3D spheroid and formed a microenvironment that is informative for hematopoietic progenitor cells, allowing their lodgment and controlling their proliferation. PMID:20161704

  15. Restoration of the GM2 ganglioside metabolism in bone marrow-derived stromal cells from Tay-Sachs disease animal model.

    PubMed

    Martino, S; Cavalieri, C; Emiliani, C; Dolcetta, D; Cusella De Angelis, M G; Chigorno, V; Severini, G M; Sandhoff, K; Bordignon, C; Sonnino, S; Orlacchio, A

    2002-08-01

    The therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived stromal cells for the therapy of Tay-Sachs disease is primarily related to the restoration of their own GM2 ganglioside storage. With this aim, we produced bone marrow-derived stromal cells from the adult Tay-Sachs animal model and transduced them with a retroviral vector encoding for the alpha-subunit of the lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase A (E.C. 3.2.1.52). Our results demonstrate that transduced Tay-Sachs bone marrow-derived stromal cells have beta-hexosaminidase A comparable to that of bone marrow-derived stromal cells from wild-type mice. Moreover, beta-hexosaminidase A in transduced Tay-Sachs bone marrow-derived stromal cells was able to hydrolyze the GM2 ganglioside in a feeding experiment, thus demonstrating the correction of the altered phenotype.

  16. Bystander effect in glioma suicide gene therapy using bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoyi; Gu, Chunyu; Gao, Yun; Amano, Shinji; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2012-11-01

    An established rat intracranial glioma was successfully treated through the tumoricidal bystander effect generated by intratumoral injection of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transduced with the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase gene (BMSCtk cells) followed by systemic ganciclovir administration. In the present study, we tested the bystander effect of this treatment strategy when using human BMSCs as the vector cells. Human BMSCtk cells were mixed with various kinds of brain tumor cell lines (human and rat glioma cells) and examined in vitro and in vivo tumoricidal bystander effects, by co-culture study and co-implantation study in the nude mouse, respectively. A significant in vitro bystander effect was observed between human BMSCtk cells and any of the tumor cells examined in the ganciclovir-containing medium. A potent in vivo bystander effect against human and rat glioma cells was also demonstrated when ganciclovir was administered. Migratory activity of the human BMSCs toward the tumor cells was enhanced by the conditioned media obtained from both human and rat glioma cells compared to the fresh media. The results of this study have demonstrated that the bystander effect generated by BMSCtk cells and ganciclovir is not cell type-specific, suggesting that the strategy would be quite feasible for clinical use.

  17. Comparative proteomic analysis of normal and tumor stromal cells by tissue on chip based mass spectrometry (toc-MS)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In carcinoma tissues, genetic and metabolic changes not only occur at the tumor cell level, but also in the surrounding stroma. This carcinoma-reactive stromal tissue is heterogeneous and consists e.g. of non-epithelial cells such as fibroblasts or fibrocytes, inflammatory cells and vasculature-related cells, which promote carcinoma growth and progression of carcinomas. Nevertheless, there is just little knowledge about the proteomic changes from normal connective tissue to tumor stroma. In the present study, we acquired and analysed specific protein patterns of small stromal sections surrounding head and neck cell complexes in comparison to normal subepithelial connective tissue. To gain defined stromal areas we used laser-based tissue microdissection. Because these stromal areas are limited in size we established the highly sensitive 'tissue on chip based mass spectrometry' (toc-MS). Therefore, the dissected areas were directly transferred to chromatographic arrays and the proteomic profiles were subsequently analysed with mass spectrometry. At least 100 cells were needed for an adequate spectrum. The locating of differentially expressed proteins enables a precise separation of normal and tumor stroma. The newly described toc-MS technology allows an initial insight into proteomic differences between small numbers of exactly defined cells from normal and tumor stroma. PMID:20205871

  18. Mucosal stromal fibroblasts markedly enhance HIV infection of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kohgadai, Nargis; Müller, Janis A.; Laustsen, Anders; Thavachelvam, Karthiga; Stürzel, Christina M.; Jones, Jennifer J.; Somsouk, Ma; Garcia, Maurice M.; Smith, James F.; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Münch, Jan; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Giudice, Linda C.; Greene, Warner C.; Roan, Nadia R.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding early events of HIV transmission within mucosal tissues is vital for developing effective prevention strategies. Here, we report that primary stromal fibroblasts isolated from endometrium, cervix, foreskin, male urethra, and intestines significantly increase HIV infection of CD4+ T cells–by up to 37-fold for R5-tropic HIV and 100-fold for X4-tropic HIV–without themselves becoming infected. Fibroblasts were more efficient than dendritic cells at trans-infection and mediate this response in the absence of the DC-SIGN and Siglec-1 receptors. In comparison, mucosal epithelial cells secrete antivirals and inhibit HIV infection. These data suggest that breaches in the epithelium allow external or luminal HIV to escape an antiviral environment to access the infection-favorable environment of the stromal fibroblasts, and suggest that resident fibroblasts have a central, but previously unrecognized, role in HIV acquisition at mucosal sites. Inhibiting fibroblast-mediated enhancement of HIV infection should be considered as a novel prevention strategy. PMID:28207890

  19. Comparison between Stromal Vascular Fraction and Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Remodeling Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Maumus, Marie; Toupet, Karine; Frouin, Eric; Rigau, Valérie; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Magalon, Guy; Jorgensen, Christian; Noël, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are characterized by excessive amount of collagen deposition and principally occur following burn injuries or surgeries. In absence of effective treatments, the use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, which have been shown to attenuate fibrosis in various applications, seems of interest. The objectives of the present study were therefore to evaluate the effect of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASC) on a pre-existing HTS in a humanized skin graft model in Nude mice and to compare the efficacy of hASCs versus stromal vascular fraction (SVF). We found that injection of SVF or hASCs resulted in an attenuation of HTS as noticed after clinical evaluation of skin thickness, which was associated with lower total collagen contents in the skins of treated mice and a reduced dermis thickness after histological analysis. Although both SVF and hASCs were able to significantly reduce the clinical and histological parameters of HTS, hASCs appeared to be more efficient than SVF. The therapeutic effect of hASCs was attributed to higher expression of TGFβ3 and HGF, which are important anti-fibrotic mediators, and to higher levels of MMP-2 and MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratio, which reflect the remodelling activity responsible for fibrosis resorption. These results demonstrated the therapeutic potential of hASCs for clinical applications of hypertrophic scarring. PMID:27227960

  20. Fetal stromal niches enhance human embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic differentiation and globin switch.

    PubMed

    Lee, King Yiu; Fong, Benny Shu Pan; Tsang, Kam Sze; Lau, Tze Kin; Ng, Pak Cheung; Lam, Audrey Carmen; Chan, Kathy Yuen Yee; Wang, Chi Chiu; Kung, Hsiang Fu; Li, Chi Kong; Li, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoiesis during mammalian embryonic development has been perceived as a migratory phenomenon, from the yolk sac blood island to the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, fetal liver (FL), and subsequently, the fetal bone marrow. In this study, we investigated the effects of primary stromal cells from fetal hematopoietic niches and their conditioned media (CM), applied singly or in sequential orders, on induction of human embryonic stem cells, H1, H9, and H14 lines, to hematopoietic cells. Our results demonstrated that stromal support of FL, AGM + FL, and AGM + FL + fetal bone marrow significantly increased the proliferation of embryoid bodies (EB) at day 18 of hematopoietic induction in the presence of thrombopoietin, stem cell factor, and Flt-3 ligand. AGM + FL also increased hematopoietic colony-forming unit (CFU) formation. CM did not enhance EB proliferation but CM of FL and AGM + FL significantly increased the density of total CFU and early erythroid (burst-forming unit) progenitors. Increased commitment to the hematopoietic lineage was demonstrated by enhanced expressions of CD45, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-globins in CFU at day 32, compared with EB at day 18. CM of FL significantly increased these globin expressions, indicating enhanced switches from embryonic to fetal and adult erythropoiesis. Over 50% and 10% of cells derived from CFU expressed CD45 and beta-globin proteins, respectively. Expressions of hematopoietic regulatory genes (Bmi-1, β-Catenin, Hox B4, GATA-1) were increased in EB or CFU cultures supported by FL or sequential CM. Our study has provided a strategy for derivation of hematopoietic cells from embryonic stem cells under the influence of primary hematopoietic niches and CM, particularly the FL.

  1. Episomal plasmid-based generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from fetal femur-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Megges, Matthias; Oreffo, Richard O C; Adjaye, James

    2016-01-01

    Human bone mesenchymal stromal cells derived from fetal femur 55 days post-conception were reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells using episomal plasmid-based expression of OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, LIN28, SV40LT, KLF4 and c-MYC and supplemented with the following pathway inhibitors - TGFβ receptor inhibitor (A-83-01), MEK inhibitor (PD325901), GSK3β inhibitor (CHIR99021) and ROCK inhibitor (HA-100). Successful induction of pluripotency in two iPS-cell lines was demonstrated in vitro and by the Pluritest.

  2. In vitro differentiation of human skin-derived multipotent stromal cells into putative endothelial-like cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Multipotent stem cells have been successfully isolated from various tissues and are currently utilized for tissue-engineering and cell-based therapies. Among the many sources, skin has recently emerged as an attractive source for multipotent cells because of its abundance. Recent literature showed that skin stromal cells (SSCs) possess mesoderm lineage differentiation potential; however, the endothelial differentiation and angiogenic potential of SSC remains elusive. In our study, SSCs were isolated from human neonatal foreskin (hNFSSCs) and adult dermal skin (hADSSCs) using explants cultures and were compared with bone marrow (hMSC-TERT) and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) for their potential differentiation into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. Results Concordant with previous studies, both MSCs and SSCs showed similar morphology, surface protein expression, and were able to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Using an endothelial induction culture system combined with an in vitro matrigel angiogenesis assay, hNFSSCs and hADSSCs exhibited the highest tube-forming capability, which was similar to those formed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), with hNFSSCs forming the most tightly packed, longest, and largest diameter tubules among the three cell types. CD146 was highly expressed on hNFSSCs and HUVEC followed by hADSSCs, and hMSC-TERT, while its expression was almost absent on hADMSCs. Similarly, higher vascular density (based on the expression of CD31, CD34, vWF, CD146 and SMA) was observed in neonatal skin, followed by adult dermal skin and adipose tissue. Thus, our preliminary data indicated a plausible relationship between vascular densities, and the expression of CD146 on multipotent cells derived from those tissues. Conclusions Our data is the first to demonstrate that human dermal skin stromal cells can be differentiated into endothelial lineage. Hence, SSCs represents a novel

  3. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Tissues: Primitive Cells with Potential for Clinical and Tissue Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Pierre; Hatlapatka, Tim; Marten, Dana; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Majore, Ingrida; Hass, Ralf; Kasper, Cornelia

    Mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSCs) have a high potential for cell-based therapies as well as for tissue engineering applications. Since Friedenstein first isolated stem or precursor cells from the human bone marrow (BM) stroma that were capable of osteogenesis, BM is currently the most common source for MSCs. However, BM presents several disadvantages, namely low frequency of MSCs, high donor-dependent variations in quality, and painful invasive intervention. Thus, tremendous research efforts have been observed during recent years to find alternative sources for MSCs.

  4. Coculturing human endometrial epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts alters cell-specific gene expression and cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joseph C.; Erikson, David W.; Piltonen, Terhi T.; Meyer, Michelle R.; Barragan, Fatima; McIntire, Ramsey H.; Tamaresis, John S.; Vo, Kim Chi; Giudice, Linda C.; Irwin, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of coculturing endometrial epithelial cells (eEC) with paired endometrial stromal fibroblasts (eSF) on cell-specific gene expression and cytokine secretion patterns. Design In vitro study. Setting University research laboratory. Patient(s) Endometrial biopsies were obtained from premenopausal women. Intervention(s) Polarized eEC and subject-paired eSF were cultured for 12.5 hours alone (monoculture) or combined in a two-chamber coculture system without cell-cell contact. Cells and conditioned media were analyzed for global gene expression and cytokine secretion, respectively. Purified, endometrial tissue-derived eEC and eSF isolated by fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) were used as noncultured controls. Main Outcome Measure(s) Cell-specific global gene expression profiling and analysis of secreted cytokines in eEC/eSF cocultures and respective monocultures. Result(s) Transepithelial resistance, diffusible tracer exclusion, expression of tight junction proteins, and apical/basolateral vectorial secretion confirmed eEC structural and functional polarization. Distinct transcriptomes of eEC and eSF were consistent with their respective lineages and their endometrial origin. Coculture of eEC with eSF resulted in altered cell-specific gene expression and cytokine secretion. Conclusion(s) This coculture model provides evidence that interactions between endometrial functionally polarized epithelium and stromal fibroblasts affect cell-specific gene expression and cytokine secretion underscoring their relevance when modeling endometrium in vitro. PMID:23849844

  5. Role of CXCL13-CXCR5 crosstalk between malignant neuroblastoma cells and Schwannian stromal cells in neuroblastic tumors.

    PubMed

    Del Grosso, Federica; Coco, Simona; Scaruffi, Paola; Stigliani, Sara; Valdora, Francesca; Benelli, Roberto; Salvi, Sandra; Boccardo, Simona; Truini, Mauro; Croce, Michela; Ferrini, Silvano; Longo, Luca; Tonini, Gian Paolo

    2011-07-01

    Neuroblastoma is a stroma-poor (SP) aggressive pediatric cancer belonging to neuroblastic tumors, also including ganglioneuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma, two stroma-rich (SR) less aggressive tumors. Our previous gene-expression profiling analysis showed a different CXCL13 mRNA expression between SP and SR tumors. Therefore, we studied 13 SP and 13 SR tumors by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) and we found that CXCR5b was more expressed in SP than in SR and CXCL13 was predominantly expressed in SR tumors. Then, we isolated neuroblastic and Schwannian stromal cells by laser capture microdissection and we found that malignant neuroblasts express CXCR5b mRNA, whereas Schwannian stromal cells express CXCL13. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that stroma expresses CXCL13 but not CXCR5. To better understand the role of CXCL13 and CXCR5 in neuroblastic tumors we studied 11 neuroblastoma cell lines and we detected a heterogeneous expression of CXCL13 and CXCR5b. Interestingly, we found that only CXCR5b splice variant was expressed in both tumors and neuroblastoma lines, whereas CXCR5a was never detected. Moreover, we found that neuroblastoma cells expressing CXCR5 receptor migrate toward a source of recombinant CXCL13. Lastly, neuroblastoma cells induced to glial cell differentiation expressed CXCL13 mRNA and protein. The chemokine released in the culture medium was able to stimulate chemotaxis of LA1-5S neuroblastoma cells. Collectively, our data suggest that CXCL13 produced by stromal cells may contribute to the generation of an environment in which the malignant neuroblasts are retained, thus limiting the possible development of metastases in patients with SR tumor.

  6. Identification of differentiation-inducing activity produced by human bone marrow stromal cell line LP101.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Masaki; Kawakami, Yutaka; Nabeshima, Ryusuke; Shima, Daisuke; Handa, Hiroshi; Aizawa, Shin

    2004-11-01

    We have previously reported that human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate into mature granulocytes when HL-60 co-cultivated with human bone marrow stromal LP101 cells. In the present study, we investigated which factors produced by LP101 cells induce HL-60 cells to differentiate into mature granulocytes. The expression of the cell surface antigen CD11b on HL-60 cells was increased after a 72-h culture with the conditioned medium (CM) obtained from LP101 cells. LP101 cells were observed to produce various cytokines, including TNF-alpha, GM-CSF and IL-6. The neutralizing antibodies against these cytokines partially suppressed the CM-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells. Recombinant TNF-alpha induced the differentiation of HL-60 cells, and GM-CSF and IL-6 additionally enhanced the effect of TNF-alpha. When the CM was divided into a low molecular weight (LMW) fraction and a high molecular weight (HMW) fraction by ultrafiltration, the LMW fraction synergistically enhanced the differentiation inducible activity of TNF-alpha. These results demonstrate that LP101 cells induce the differentiation of HL-60 cells by producing various cytokines including TNF-alpha, IL-6, and GM-CSF, and that unknown low molecular weight factors also participate.

  7. Bone regeneration by implantation of adipose-derived stromal cells expressing BMP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Li Huiwu; Dai Kerong . E-mail: krdai@163.com; Tang Tingting; Zhang Xiaoling; Yan Mengning; Lou Jueren

    2007-05-18

    In this study, we reported that the adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) genetically modified by bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) healed critical-sized canine ulnar bone defects. First, the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential of the ADSCs derived from canine adipose tissue were demonstrated. And then the cells were modified by the BMP-2 gene and the expression and bone-induction ability of BMP-2 were identified. Finally, the cells modified by BMP-2 gene were applied to a {beta}-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) carrier and implanted into ulnar bone defects in the canine model. After 16 weeks, radiographic, histological, and histomorphometry analysis showed that ADSCs modified by BMP-2 gene produced a significant increase of newly formed bone area and healed or partly healed all of the bone defects. We conclude that ADSCs modified by the BMP-2 gene can enhance the repair of critical-sized bone defects in large animals.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Regenerative Medicine: Can Preconditioning Strategies Improve Therapeutic Efficacy?

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Richard; Spohn, Gabriele; Baer, Patrick C.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are becoming increasingly important for the development of cell therapeutics in regenerative medicine. Featuring immunomodulatory potential as well as secreting a variety of trophic factors, MSCs showed remarkable therapeutic effects in numerous preclinical disease models. However, sustainable translation of MSC therapies to the clinic is hampered by heterogeneity of MSCs and non-standardized in vitro culture technologies. Moreover, potent MSC therapeutics require MSCs with maximum regenerative capacity. There is growing evidence that in vitro preconditioning strategies of MSCs can optimize their therapeutic potential. In the following we will discuss achievements and challenges of the development of MSC therapies in regenerative medicine highlighting specific in vitro preconditioning strategies prior to cell transplantation to increase their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:27721701

  9. Serum-free media for the production of human mesenchymal stromal cells: a review.

    PubMed

    Gottipamula, S; Muttigi, M S; Kolkundkar, U; Seetharam, R N

    2013-12-01

    The regenerative potential of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) holds great promise in using them for treatment of a wide range of debilitating diseases. Several types of culture media and systems have been used for large-scale expansion of MSCs in vitro; however, the majority of them rely heavily on using foetal bovine serum (FBS)-supplement for optimal cell proliferation. FBS-based cultures pose the potential threat of spread of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy and bovine spongiform encephalopathy to MSCs and then to their recipients. A recent trend in cell culture is to change from serum-use to serum-free media (SFM). In this context, the current review focuses specifically on employment of various SFM for MSCs and discusses existences of various options with which to substitute FBS. In addition, we analyse MSC population growth kinetic patterns using various SFM for large-scale production of MSCs.

  10. Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of bone marrow stromal cell surface gene, BST2, that may be involved in pre-B-cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Jun; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Tomizawa, Hitoshi

    1995-04-10

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate B-cell growth and development through their surface molecules and cytokines. In this study, we generated a mAb, RS38, that recognized a novel human membrane protein, BST-2, expressed on bone marrow stromal cell lines and synovial cell lines. We cloned a cDNA encoding BST-2 from a rheumatoid arthritis-derived synovial cell line. BST-2 is a 30- to 36-kDa type II transmembrane protein, consisting of 180 amino acids. The BST-2 gene (HGMW-approved symbol BST2) is located on chromosome 19p13.2. BST-2 is expressed not only on certain bone marrow stromal cell lines but also on various normal tissues, although its expression pattern is different from that of another bone marrow stromal cell surface molecule, BST-1. BST-2 surface expression on fibroblast cell lines facilitated the stromal cell-dependent growth of a murine bone marrow-derived pre-B-cell line, DW34. The results suggest that BST-2 may be involved in pre-B-cell growth. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Human endometrial stromal stem cells differentiate into megakaryocytes with the ability to produce functional platelets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinju; Chen, Shuzhen; Zhang, Cheng; Stegeman, Samantha; Pfaff-Amesse, Teresa; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Wenfeng; Amesse, Lawrence; Chen, Yanfang

    2012-01-01

    Human endometrium is a high dynamic tissue that contains endometrial stromal stem cells (hESSCs). The hESSCs have been differentiated into a number of cell lineages. However, differentiation of hESSCs into megakaryocytes (MKs) has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of MK generation from hESSCs and subsequent production of functional platelets (PLTs). In our study, hESSCs were cultured from endometrial stromal cells as confirmed by positive stromal cell specific markers (CD90 and CD29) and negative hematopoietic stem cell markers (CD45 and CD34) expression. Then, hESSCs were differentiated in a medium supplemented with thrombopoietin (TPO) for 18 days. The MK differentiation was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The differentiation medium was collected for PLT production analysis by flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and functional measurements. Our results show: 1) MKs were successfully generated from hESSCs as identified by expression of specific markers (CD41a: 1 ± 0.09% and 39 ± 3.0%; CD42b: 1.2 ± 0.06% and 28 ± 2.0%, control vs. differentiation) accompanied with reduction of pluripotent transcription factors (Oct4 and Sox2) expression; 2) The level of PLTs in the differentiation medium was 16 ± 1 number/µl as determined by size (2-4 µm) and CD41a expression (CD41a: 1 ± 0.4% and 90±2.0%, control vs. differentiation); 3) Generated PLTs were functional as evidenced by the up-regulation of CD62p expression and fibrinogen binding following thrombin stimulation; 4) Released PLTs showed similar ultra-structure characteristics (alpha granules, vacuoles and dense tubular system) as PLTs from peripheral blood determined by electron microscopic analysis. Data demonstrate the feasibility of generating MKs from hESSCs, and that the generated MKs release functional PLTs. Therefore, hESSCs could be a potential new stem cell source for in vitro MK/PLT production.

  12. Dexamethasone induction of osteoblast mRNAs in rat marrow stromal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Leboy, P S; Beresford, J N; Devlin, C; Owen, M E

    1991-03-01

    We have examined the ability of dexamethasone, retinoic acid, and vitamin D3 to induce osteogenic differentiation in rat marrow stromal cell cultures by measuring the expression of mRNAs associated with the differentiated osteoblast phenotype as well as analyzing collagen secretion and alkaline phosphatase activity. Marrow cells were cultured for 8 days in primary culture and 8 days in secondary culture, with and without 10 nM dexamethasone or 1 microM retinoic acid. Under all conditions, cultures produced high levels of osteonectin mRNA. Cells grown with dexamethasone in both primary and secondary culture contained elevated alkaline phosphatase mRNA and significant amounts of type I collagen and osteopontin mRNA. Addition of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to these dexamethasone-treated cultures induced expression of osteocalcin mRNA and increased osteopontin mRNA. The levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin mRNAs in Dex/Dex/VitD3 cultures were comparable to those of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-treated ROS 17/2.8 osteosarcoma cells. Omitting dexamethasone from either primary or secondary culture resulted in significantly less alkaline phosphatase mRNA, little osteopontin mRNA, and no osteocalcin mRNA. Retinoic acid increased alkaline phosphatase activity to a greater extent than did dexamethasone but did not have a parallel effect on the expression of alkaline phosphatase mRNA and induced neither osteopontin or osteocalcin mRNAs. In all conditions, marrow stromal cells synthesized and secreted a mixture of type I and III collagens. However, dexamethasone-treated cells also synthesized an additional collagen type, provisionally identified as type V. The synthesis and secretion of collagens type I and III was decreased by both dexamethasone and retinoic acid. Neither dexamethasone nor retinoic acid induced mRNAs associated with the chondrogenic phenotype. We conclude that dexamethasone, but not retinoic acid, promotes the expression of markers of the

  13. Imaging modalities for the in vivo surveillance of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Ayaz; Chowdhury, Tina; Bagul, Atul

    2015-11-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells exist as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and have the capacity to differentiate into multiple tissue types when subjected to appropriate culture conditions. This property of MSCs creates therapeutic opportunities in regenerative medicine for the treatment of damage to neural, cardiac and musculoskeletal tissues or acute kidney injury. The prerequisite for successful cell therapy is delivery of cells to the target tissue. Assessment of therapeutic outcomes utilize traditional methods to examine cell function of MSC populations involving routine biochemical or histological analysis for cell proliferation, protein synthesis and gene expression. However, these methods do not provide sufficient spatial and temporal information. In vivo surveillance of MSC migration to the site of interest can be performed through a variety of imaging modalities such as the use of radiolabelling, fluc protein expression bioluminescence imaging and paramagnetic nanoparticle magnetic resonance imaging. This review will outline the current methods of in vivo surveillance of exogenously administered MSCs in regenerative medicine while addressing potential technological developments. Furthermore, nanoparticles and microparticles for cellular labelling have shown that migration of MSCs can be spatially and temporally monitored. In vivo surveillance therefore permits time-stratified assessment in animal models without disruption of the target organ. In vivo tracking of MSCs is non-invasive, repeatable and non-toxic. Despite the excitement that nanoparticles for tracking MSCs offer, delivery methods are difficult because of the challenges with imaging three-dimensional systems. The current advances and growth in MSC research, is likely to provide a wealth of evidence overcoming these issues.

  14. Molecular signature and in vivo behavior of bone marrow endosteal and subendosteal stromal cell populations and their relevance to hematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Balduino, Alex; Mello-Coelho, Valeria; Wang, Zhou; Taichman, Russell S.; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Weeraratna, Ashani T.; Becker, Kevin G.; Mello, Wallace de; Taub, Dennis D.; Borojevic, Radovan

    2012-11-15

    In the bone marrow cavity, hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been shown to reside in the endosteal and subendosteal perivascular niches, which play specific roles on HSC maintenance. Although cells with long-term ability to reconstitute full hematopoietic system can be isolated from both niches, several data support a heterogenous distribution regarding the cycling behavior of HSC. Whether this distinct behavior depends upon the role played by the stromal populations which distinctly create these two niches is a question that remains open. In the present report, we used our previously described in vivo assay to demonstrate that endosteal and subendosteal stromal populations are very distinct regarding skeletal lineage differentiation potential. This was further supported by a microarray-based analysis, which also demonstrated that these two stromal populations play distinct, albeit complementary, roles in HSC niche. Both stromal populations were preferentially isolated from the trabecular region and behave distinctly in vitro, as previously reported. Even though these two niches are organized in a very close range, in vivo assays and molecular analyses allowed us to identify endosteal stroma (F-OST) cells as fully committed osteoblasts and subendosteal stroma (F-RET) cells as uncommitted mesenchymal cells mainly represented by perivascular reticular cells expressing high levels of chemokine ligand, CXCL12. Interestingly, a number of cytokines and growth factors including interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-7, IL-15, Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) were also found to be differentially expressed by F-OST and F-RET cells. Further microarray analyses indicated important mechanisms used by the two stromal compartments in order to create and coordinate the 'quiescent' and 'proliferative' niches in which hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors reside.

  15. Mechanisms of tumor escape from immune system: role of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Alessandro; Musso, Alessandra; Dapino, Irene; Zocchi, Maria Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment represents the site where the tumor tries to survive and escape from immune system-mediated recognition. Indeed, to proliferate tumor cells can divert the immune response inducing the generation of myeloid derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells which can limit the efficiency of effector antitumor lymphocytes in eliminating neoplastic cells. Many components of the tumor microenvironment can serve as a double sword for the tumor and the host. Several types of fibroblast-like cells, which herein we define mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), secrete extracellular matrix components and surrounding the tumor mass can limit the expansion of the tumor. On the other hand, MSC can interfere with the immune recognition of tumor cells producing immunoregulatory cytokines as transforming growth factor (TGF)ß, releasing soluble ligands of the activating receptors expressed on cytolytic effector cells as decoy molecules, affecting the correct interaction among lymphocytes and tumor cells. MSC can also serve as target for the same anti-tumor effector lymphocytes or simply impede the interaction between these lymphocytes and neoplastic cells. Thus, several evidences point out the role of MSC, both in epithelial solid tumors and hematological malignancies, in regulating tumor cell growth and immune response. Herein, we review these evidences and suggest that MSC can be a suitable target for a more efficient anti-tumor therapy.

  16. Enzymatically crosslinked gelatin hydrogel promotes the proliferation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaomei; Long, Haiyan; Qian, Hong; Ma, Kunlong

    2016-01-01

    Gelatin hydrogel crosslinked by microbial transglutaminase (mTG) exhibits excellent performance in cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. We examined the gelation time and gel strength of gelatin/mTG hydrogels in various proportions to investigate their physical properties and tested their degradation performances in vitro. Cell morphology and viability of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) cultured on the 2D gel surface or in 3D hydrogel encapsulation were evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. Cell proliferation was tested via Alamar Blue assay. To investigate the hydrogel effect on cell differentiation, the cardiac-specific gene expression levelsof Nkx2.5, Myh6, Gja1, and Mef2c in encapsulated ADSCs with or without cardiac induction medium were detected by real-time RT-PCR. Cell release from the encapsulated status and cell migration in a 3D hydrogel model were assessed in vitro. Results show that the gelatin/mTG hydrogels are not cytotoxic and that their mechanical properties are adjustable. Hydrogel degradation is related to gel concentration and the resident cells. Cell growth morphology and proliferative capability in both 2D and 3D cultures were mainly affected by gel concentration. PCR result shows that hydrogel modulus together with induction medium affects the cardiac differentiation of ADSCs. The cell migration experiment and subcutaneous implantation show that the hydrogels are suitable for cell delivery. PMID:27703850

  17. Enzymatically crosslinked gelatin hydrogel promotes the proliferation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gang; Xiao, Zhenghua; Ren, Xiaomei; Long, Haiyan; Qian, Hong; Ma, Kunlong; Guo, Yingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Gelatin hydrogel crosslinked by microbial transglutaminase (mTG) exhibits excellent performance in cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. We examined the gelation time and gel strength of gelatin/mTG hydrogels in various proportions to investigate their physical properties and tested their degradation performances in vitro. Cell morphology and viability of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) cultured on the 2D gel surface or in 3D hydrogel encapsulation were evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. Cell proliferation was tested via Alamar Blue assay. To investigate the hydrogel effect on cell differentiation, the cardiac-specific gene expression levelsof Nkx2.5, Myh6, Gja1, and Mef2c in encapsulated ADSCs with or without cardiac induction medium were detected by real-time RT-PCR. Cell release from the encapsulated status and cell migration in a 3D hydrogel model were assessed in vitro. Results show that the gelatin/mTG hydrogels are not cytotoxic and that their mechanical properties are adjustable. Hydrogel degradation is related to gel concentration and the resident cells. Cell growth morphology and proliferative capability in both 2D and 3D cultures were mainly affected by gel concentration. PCR result shows that hydrogel modulus together with induction medium affects the cardiac differentiation of ADSCs. The cell migration experiment and subcutaneous implantation show that the hydrogels are suitable for cell delivery.

  18. Periodontal Tissue Regeneration Using Syngeneic Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, Mathieu; Monsarrat, Paul; Blasco-Baque, Vincent; Loubières, Pascale; Burcelin, Rémy; Casteilla, Louis; Planat-Bénard, Valérie; Kémoun, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Current treatment of periodontitis is still associated with a high degree of variability in clinical outcomes. Recent advances in regenerative medicine by mesenchymal cells, including adipose stromal cells (ASC) have paved the way to improved periodontal regeneration (PD) but little is known about the biological processes involved. Here, we aimed to use syngeneic ASCs for periodontal regeneration in a new, relevant, bacteria-induced periodontitis model in mice. Periodontal defects were induced in female C57BL6/J mice by oral gavage with periodontal pathogens. We grafted 2 × 10(5) syngeneic mouse ASCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) (GFP+/ASC) within a collagen vehicle in the lingual part of the first lower molar periodontium (experimental) while carrier alone was implanted in the contralateral side (control). Animals were sacrificed 0, 1, 6, and 12 weeks after treatment by GFP+/ASC or vehicle graft, and microscopic examination, immunofluorescence, and innovative bio-informatics histomorphometry methods were used to reveal deep periodontium changes. From 1 to 6 weeks after surgery, GFP+ cells were identified in the periodontal ligament (PDL), in experimental sites only. After 12 weeks, cementum regeneration, the organization of PDL fibers, the number of PD vessels, and bone morphogenetic protein-2 and osteopontin expression were greater in experimental sites than in controls. Specific stromal cell subsets were recruited in the newly formed tissue in ASC-implanted periodontium only. These data suggest that ASC grafting in diseased deep periodontium, relevant to human pathology, induces a significant improvement of the PDL microenvironment, leading to a recovery of tooth-supporting tissue homeostasis. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:656-665.

  19. Stromal Cells in Dense Collagen Promote Cardiomyocyte and Microvascular Patterning in Engineered Human Heart Tissue.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Meredith A; Tran, Dominic; Coulombe, Kareen L K; Razumova, Maria; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles E; Zheng, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a strategy to replace damaged contractile tissue and model cardiac diseases to discover therapies. Current cardiac and vascular engineering approaches independently create aligned contractile tissue or perfusable vasculature, but a combined vascularized cardiac tissue remains to be achieved. Here, we sought to incorporate a patterned microvasculature into engineered heart tissue, which balances the competing demands from cardiomyocytes to contract the matrix versus the vascular lumens that need structural support. Low-density collagen hydrogels (1.25 mg/mL) permit human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) to form a dense contractile tissue but cannot support a patterned microvasculature. Conversely, high collagen concentrations (density ≥6 mg/mL) support a patterned microvasculature, but the hESC-CMs lack cell-cell contact, limiting their electrical communication, structural maturation, and tissue-level contractile function. When cocultured with matrix remodeling stromal cells, however, hESC-CMs structurally mature and form anisotropic constructs in high-density collagen. Remodeling requires the stromal cells to be in proximity with hESC-CMs. In addition, cocultured cardiac constructs in dense collagen generate measurable active contractions (on the order of 0.1 mN/mm(2)) and can be paced up to 2 Hz. Patterned microvascular networks in these high-density cocultured cardiac constructs remain patent through 2 weeks of culture, and hESC-CMs show electrical synchronization. The ability to maintain microstructural control within engineered heart tissue enables generation of more complex features, such as cellular alignment and a vasculature. Successful incorporation of these features paves the way for the use of large scale engineered tissues for myocardial regeneration and cardiac disease modeling.

  20. The tropism of neurally differentiated bone marrow stromal cells towards C6 glioma.

    PubMed

    Long, Qianfa; Liu, Weiping; Zhong, Jun; Yi, Xicai; Liu, Yang; Liu, Yuanyang; Yang, Yang; Han, Rui; Fei, Zhou

    2011-10-24

    Recent studies have indicated that bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have significant tropism towards glioma which makes them play an important role in carrying genes/drugs to inhibit the growth of glioma as cell vehicles. But BMSCs may differentiate into neural cells under entocranial environment and few researches support the idea that neurally differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (N-D-BMSCs) still hold the capacity of migrating to the tumor sites. The aim of our study was to investigate the tropism of N-D-BMSCs towards C6 glioma. In vitro migration assay was employed by transwell co-culture system and Student's t-test analysis indicated that N-D-BMSCs had the significant tropism towards C6 glioma-conditioned medium (GCM) (P<0.01). Furthermore, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) bioactivity of the C6 GCM was neutralized by the anti-rat VEGF antibody and our data suggested that the VEGF from C6 GCM hold chemoattraction for N-D-BMSCs and some other cytokines from the C6 GCM may be responsible for the chemoattraction for N-D-BMSCs. In vivo migration assay was carried out with cells transplantation and one way ANOVA analysis indicated that the tropism of N-D-BMSCs towards C6 glioma sites presented time variation (P-value=2.9E-20). Moreover, multiple comparisons for the time variables with the Student's t-test and the results suggested that the migration capacity of N-D-BMSCs towards C6 glioma sites reach the peak on the 7th day after transplantation. These results demonstrate that N-D-BMSCs as well as BMSCs have significant tropism towards C6 glioma.

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species Limit the Ability of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Support Hematopoietic Reconstitution in Aging Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Rahul; Krishnan, Shyam; Roy, Sushmita; Chattopadhyay, Saborni; Kumar, Vikash

    2016-01-01

    Aging of organ and abnormal tissue regeneration are recurrent problems in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. This is most crucial in case of high-turnover tissues, like bone marrow (BM). Using reciprocal transplantation experiments in mouse, we have shown that self-renewal potential of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and BM cellularity are markedly influenced with the age of the recipient mice rather than donor mice. Moreover, accumulation of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) in BM stromal cells compared to HSPC compartment, in time-dependent manner, suggests that oxidative stress is involved in suppression of BM cellularity by affecting microenvironment in aged mice. Treatment of these mice with a polyphenolic antioxidant curcumin is found to partially quench ROS, thereby rescues stromal cells from oxidative stress-dependent cellular injury. This rejuvenation of stromal cells significantly improves hematopoietic reconstitution in 18-month-old mice compared to age control mice. In conclusion, this study implicates the role of ROS in perturbation of stromal cell function upon aging, which in turn affects BM's reconstitution ability in aged mice. Thus, a rejuvenation therapy using curcumin, before HSPC transplantation, is found to be an efficient strategy for successful marrow reconstitution in older mice. PMID:27140293

  2. The intestinal micro-environment imprints stromal cells to promote efficient Treg induction in gut-draining lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Cording, S; Wahl, B; Kulkarni, D; Chopra, H; Pezoldt, J; Buettner, M; Dummer, A; Hadis, U; Heimesaat, M; Bereswill, S; Falk, C; Bode, U; Hamann, A; Fleissner, D; Huehn, J; Pabst, O

    2014-03-01

    De novo induction of Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells (Tregs) is particularly efficient in gut-draining mesenteric and celiac lymph nodes (mLN and celLN). Here we used LN transplantations to dissect the contribution of stromal cells and environmental factors to the high Treg-inducing capacity of these LN. After transplantation into the popliteal fossa, mLN and celLN retained their high Treg-inducing capacity, whereas transplantation of skin-draining LN into the gut mesenteries did not enable efficient Treg induction. However, de novo Treg induction was abolished in the absence of dendritic cells (DC), indicating that this process depends on synergistic contributions of stromal and DC. Stromal cells themselves were influenced by environmental signals as mLN grafts taken from germ-free donors and celLN grafts taken from vitamin A-deficient donors did not show any superior Treg-inducing capacity. Collectively, our observations reveal a hitherto unrecognized role of LN stromal cells for the de novo induction of Foxp3⁺ Tregs.

  3. Bio- chemical and physical characterizations of mesenchymal stromal cells along the time course of directed differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yin-Quan; Liu, Yi-Shiuan; Liu, Yu-An; Wu, Yi-Chang; del Álamo, Juan C.; Chiou, Arthur; Lee, Oscar K.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular biophysical properties are novel biomarkers of cell phenotypes which may reflect the status of differentiating stem cells. Accurate characterizations of cellular biophysical properties, in conjunction with the corresponding biochemical properties could help to distinguish stem cells from primary cells, cancer cells, and differentiated cells. However, the correlated evolution of these properties in the course of directed stem cells differentiation has not been well characterized. In this study, we applied video particle tracking microrheology (VPTM) to measure intracellular viscoelasticity of differentiating human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs). Our results showed that osteogenesis not only increased both elastic and viscous moduli, but also converted the intracellular viscoelasticity of differentiating hMSCs from viscous-like to elastic-like. In contrast, adipogenesis decreased both elastic and viscous moduli while hMSCs remained viscous-like during the differentiation. In conjunction with bio- chemical and physical parameters, such as gene expression profiles, cell morphology, and cytoskeleton arrangement, we demonstrated that VPTM is a unique approach to quantify, with high data throughput, the maturation level of differentiating hMSCs and to anticipate their fate decisions. This approach is well suited for time-lapsed study of the mechanobiology of differentiating stem cells especially in three dimensional physico-chemical biomimetic environments including porous scaffolds. PMID:27526936

  4. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 promotes migration of cells from the upper rhombic lip in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Huang, Hai; Li, Hui-Fang

    2010-10-01

    During cerebellar development, the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1 alpha) has been shown to play an important role in recruiting cells from the upper rhombic lip (URL) and external granule cell layer (EGL). However, its function in cerebellar development is still poorly understood. Our results have demonstrated that SDF-1 is necessary for EGL development, and URL cells stream to the SDF-1 source in vitro. Results of embryonic URL explant assays and transwell assays indicated that SDF-1 induces neural cell migration from the URL region in chemotactic and chemokinetic responses. The time-lapse results showed that the migration speed of granule cell progenitors out of the URL was accelerated by the addition of recombinant SDF-1 alpha. Collectively, our study shows that SDF-1 increases the motility of URL cells in the absence of a gradient and promotes the migration of granule cell progenitors during cerebellar development.

  5. Stromal cell expression of caveolin-1 predicts outcome in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Erica K; Ciocca, Daniel R; Pouliot, Normand; Natoli, Anthony; Restall, Christina; Henderson, Michael A; Fanelli, Mariel A; Cuello-Carrión, Fernando D; Gago, Francisco E; Anderson, Robin L

    2009-06-01

    Caveolin-1 has been linked to tumor progression and clinical outcome in breast cancer, but a clear resolution of its role as a prognostic marker is lacking. We assessed caveolin-1 levels in normal breast tissue and two breast cancer cohorts for which outcome data were available. We found that caveolin-1 was not expressed in normal breast luminal epithelium but was present in the epithelial compartment of some tumors. We found no association between caveolin-1 expression in the epithelial compartment and clinical outcome. However, high levels of caveolin-1 in the stromal tissue surrounding the tumor, rather than within tumor cells, associated strongly with reduced metastasis and improved survival (P < 0.0001). The onset of mammary tumors driven by Her2/neu overexpression was accelerated in mice lacking caveolin-1, thereby supporting the observation that the presence of caveolin-1 in the tumor microenvironment modulates tumor development. These studies suggest that stromal caveolin-1 expression may be a potential therapeutic target and a valuable prognostic indicator of breast cancer progression.

  6. Stromal Cell Expression of Caveolin-1 Predicts Outcome in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Erica K.; Ciocca, Daniel R.; Pouliot, Normand; Natoli, Anthony; Restall, Christina; Henderson, Michael A.; Fanelli, Mariel A.; Cuello-Carrión, Fernando D.; Gago, Francisco E.; Anderson, Robin L.

    2009-01-01

    Caveolin-1 has been linked to tumor progression and clinical outcome in breast cancer, but a clear resolution of its role as a prognostic marker is lacking. We assessed caveolin-1 levels in normal breast tissue and two breast cancer cohorts for which outcome data were available. We found that caveolin-1 was not expressed in normal breast luminal epithelium but was present in the epithelial compartment of some tumors. We found no association between caveolin-1 expression in the epithelial compartment and clinical outcome. However, high levels of caveolin-1 in the stromal tissue surrounding the tumor, rather than within tumor cells, associated strongly with reduced metastasis and improved survival (P < 0.0001). The onset of mammary tumors driven by Her2/neu overexpression was accelerated in mice lacking caveolin-1, thereby supporting the observation that the presence of caveolin-1 in the tumor microenvironment modulates tumor development. These studies suggest that stromal caveolin-1 expression may be a potential therapeutic target and a valuable prognostic indicator of breast cancer progression. PMID:19411449

  7. Direct reprogramming of human bone marrow stromal cells into functional renal cells using cell-free extracts.

    PubMed

    Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Tomasoni, Susanna; Benedetti, Valentina; Longaretti, Lorena; Rota, Cinzia; Todeschini, Marta; Rizzo, Paola; Introna, Martino; Grazia de Simoni, Maria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Goligorsky, Michael S; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-04-14

    The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes-formation of "domes" and tubule-like structures-and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy.

  8. Direct Reprogramming of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Functional Renal Cells Using Cell-free Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Tomasoni, Susanna; Benedetti, Valentina; Longaretti, Lorena; Rota, Cinzia; Todeschini, Marta; Rizzo, Paola; Introna, Martino; Grazia de Simoni, Maria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Goligorsky, Michael S.; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes—formation of “domes” and tubule-like structures—and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy. PMID:25754206

  9. Polydatin induces bone marrow stromal cells migration by activation of ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Chen, ZhenQiu; Wei, QiuShi; Hong, GuoJu; Chen, Da; Liang, Jiang; He, Wei; Chen, Mei Hui

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have proven to be useful for the treatment of numerous human diseases. However, the reparative ability of BMSCs is limited by their poor migration. Polydatin, widely used in traditional Chinese remedies, has proven to exert protective effects to BMSCs. However, little is known about its role in BMSCs migration. In this study, we studied the effects of polydatin on rat BMSCs migration using the scratch wound healing and transwell migration assays. Our results showed polydatin could promote BMSCs migration. Further experiments showed activation of ERK 1/2, but not JNK, was required for polydatin-induced BMSCs migration, suggesting that polydatin may promote BMSCs migration via the ERK 1/2 signaling pathways. Taken together, our results indicate that polydatin might be beneficial for stem cell replacement therapy by improving BMSCs migration.

  10. Role of stromal cell-derived factor 1α pathway in bone metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nisha; Duda, Dan G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metastatic prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in men. The primary site of metastasis from prostate cancers is the bone. During the last decade, multiple studies have pointed to the role of the stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF1α)/CXCR4 axis in the metastatic spread of the disease, but the mechanisms that underlie this effect are still incompletely understood. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of the SDF1α/CXCR4 pathway in bone metastatic prostate cancer. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of disrupting the interaction between prostate tumor cells and bone environment with focus on the SDF1α pathway. PMID:27533927

  11. Expression of brain natriuretic peptide by human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Kamath, S; Mosquera, D; Zigova, T; Sanberg, P; Vesely, D L; Sanchez-Ramos, J

    2004-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) have been shown to generate neural cells under experimental conditions in vitro and following transplantation into animal models of stroke and traumatic CNS injury. Hastened recovery from the neurological deficit has not correlated with structural repair of the lesion in the stroke model. Secretory functions of BMSC, such as the elaboration of growth factors and cytokines, have been hypothesized to play a role in the enhanced recovery of neurological function. Using gene expression arrays, real time RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay, we have found that brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is synthesized and released by BMSC at physiologically relevant levels in vitro. BNP, like its close homolog atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), exerts powerful natriuretic, diuretic and vasodilatory effects. We speculate that transplanted BMSCs facilitate recovery from brain and spinal cord lesions by releasing BNP and other vasoactive factors that reduce edema, decrease intracranial pressure and improve cerebral perfusion.

  12. Clinical-grade production of human mesenchymal stromal cells: occurrence of aneuploidy without transformation.

    PubMed

    Tarte, Karin; Gaillard, Julien; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Fouillard, Loic; Becker, Martine; Mossafa, Hossein; Tchirkov, Andrei; Rouard, Hélène; Henry, Catherine; Splingard, Marie; Dulong, Joelle; Monnier, Delphine; Gourmelon, Patrick; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Sensebé, Luc

    2010-02-25

    Clinical-grade human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been expanded in vitro for tissue engineering or immunoregulatory purposes without standardized culture conditions or release criteria. Although human MSCs show poor susceptibility for oncogenic transformation, 2 recent studies described their capacity to accumulate chromosomal instability and to give rise to carcinoma in immunocompromised mice after long-term culture. We thus investigated the immunologic and genetic features of MSCs expanded with fetal calf serum and fibroblast growth factor or with platelet lysate in 4 cell-therapy facilities during 2 multicenter clinical trials. Cultured MSCs showed a moderate expression of human leukocyte antigen-DR without alteration of their low immunogenicity or their immunomodulatory capacity. Moreover, some transient and donor-dependent recurring aneuploidy was detected in vitro, independently of the culture process. However, MSCs with or without chromosomal alterations showed progressive growth arrest and entered senescence without evidence of transformation either in vitro or in vivo.

  13. Clinical-scale expansion of Adipose derived Stromal Cells starting from Stromal Vascular Fraction in a single-use bioreactor: Proof of concept for autologous applications.

    PubMed

    Gadelorge, Mélanie; Bourdens, Marion; Espagnolle, Nicolas; Bardiaux, Clémence; Murrell, Julie; Savary, Lenaig; Ribaud, Sylvain; Chaput, Benoît; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-12-11

    Adipose derived stromal cells (ASC) are adult multipotent cells increasingly used for cell therapy due to their differentiation potential, their paracrine effect and their convenience. ASC are currently selected from stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue and expanded in 2D flasks following Good Manufacturing Practices. This process is limited in surface area, labor-intensive and expensive, especially for autologous applications requiring selection and expansion steps for every patient. Closed and automated bioreactors offer an alternative for scalable and cost-effective production of ASCs. This study investigated a single-use stirred-tank bioreactor that can expand ASC from SVF on microcarriers. A preliminary microcarrier screening in static and spinner flask conditions was performed to evaluate the best candidate for adhesion, amplification and harvest. The selected microcarrier was used for process development in the bioreactor. The first experiments showed poor selectivity and growth of the ASC from the SVF (n = 2). The process was then adjusted by two means: 1. decreasing the platelet lysate in the medium for enhancing cell adherence and 2. adding a shear protectant (Pluronic F68). Following these modifications, we demonstrated that the number of population doublings of ASCs from SVF was not significantly different between the bioreactor and the 2D controls (n = 3). In addition, the ASC characterization after culture showed that cells maintained their clonogenic potential, phenotype, differentiation potential and immunosuppressive capacities. This study provides the proof of concept that isolation and amplification of functional ASC from SVF can be performed in a stirred-tank bioreactor combined with microcarriers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Tumor Associated Stromal Cells Play a Critical Role on the Outcome of the Oncolytic Efficacy of Conditionally Replicative Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, M. Verónica; Viale, Diego L.; Cafferata, Eduardo G. A.; Bravo, Alicia I.; Carbone, Cecilia; Gould, David; Chernajovsky, Yuti; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L.

    2009-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of conditionally replicative oncolytic adenoviruses (CRAd) is still limited by the inefficient infection of the tumor mass. Since tumor growth is essentially the result of a continuous cross-talk between malignant and tumor-associated stromal cells, targeting both cell compartments may profoundly influence viral efficacy. Therefore, we developed SPARC promoter-based CRAds since the SPARC gene is expressed both in malignant cells and in tumor-associated stromal cells. These CRAds, expressing or not the Herpes Simplex thymidine kinase gene (Ad-F512 and Ad(I)-F512-TK, respectively) exerted a lytic effect on a panel of human melanoma cells expressing SPARC; but they were completely attenuated in normal cells of different origins, including fresh melanocytes, regardless of whether cells expressed or not SPARC. Interestingly, both CRAds displayed cytotoxic activity on SPARC positive-transformed human microendothelial HMEC-1 cells and WI-38 fetal fibroblasts. Both CRAds were therapeutically effective on SPARC positive-human melanoma tumors growing in nude mice but exhibited restricted efficacy in the presence of co-administered HMEC-1 or WI-38 cells. Conversely, co-administration of HMEC-1 cells enhanced the oncolytic efficacy of Ad(I)-F512-TK on SPARC-negative MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Moreover, conditioned media produced by stromal cells pre-infected with the CRAds enhanced the in vitro viral oncolytic activity on pancreatic cancer cells, but not on melanoma cells. The whole data indicate that stromal cells might play an important role on the outcome of the oncolytic efficacy of conditionally replicative adenoviruses. PMID:19337591

  15. Isolation, characterization and cardiac differentiation of human thymus tissue derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ze Bang; Qian, Bo; Yang, Yu Zhong; Zhou, Kai; Sun, Jian; Mo, Xu Ming; Wu, Kai Hong

    2015-07-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidate donor cells for replacement of cardiomyocyte loss during ischemia and in vitro generation of myocardial tissue. We have successfully isolated MSCs from the discarded neonatal thymus gland during cardiac surgery. The thymus MSCs were characterized by cell-surface antigen expression. These cells have high ability for proliferation and are able to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes in vitro. For cardiac differentiation, the cells were divided into 3 groups: untreated control; 5-azacytidine group and sequential exposure to 5-azacytidine, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Thymus MSCs showed a fibrolast-like morphology and some differentiated cells increased in size, formed a ball-like appearance over time and spontaneously contracting cells were observed in sequential exposure group. Immunostaining studies, cardiac specific genes/protein expression confirmed the cardiomyocyte phenotype of the differentiated cells. These results demonstrate that thymus MSCs can be a promising cellular source for cardiac cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  16. Microvesicles from Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Are Involved in HPC-Microenvironment Crosstalk in Myelodysplastic Patients.

    PubMed

    Muntión, Sandra; Ramos, Teresa L; Diez-Campelo, María; Rosón, Beatriz; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Misiewicz-Krzeminska, Irena; Preciado, Silvia; Sarasquete, María-Eugenia; de Las Rivas, Javier; González, Marcos; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Del Cañizo, María-Consuelo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes/microvesicles (MVs) provide a mechanism of intercellular communication. Our hypothesis was that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients could modify CD34+ cells properties by MVs. They were isolated from MSC from MDS patients and healthy donors (HD). MVs from 30 low-risk MDS patients and 27 HD were purified by ExoQuick-TC™ or ultracentrifugation and identified by transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry (FC) and western blot for CD63. Incorporation of MVs into CD34+ cells was analyzed by FC, and confocal and fluorescence microscopy. Changes in hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) properties were assessed from modifications in microRNAs and gene expression in CD34+ cells as well as viability and clonogenic assays of CD34+ cells after MVs incorporation. Some microRNAs were overexpressed in MVs from patients MSC and two of them, miR-10a and miR-15a, were confirmed by RT-PCR. These microRNAs were transferred to CD34+ cells, modifying the expression of MDM2 and P53 genes, which was evaluated by RT-PCR and western blot. Finally, examining CD34+ cells properties after incorporation, higher cell viability (p = 0.025) and clonogenic capacity (p = 0.037) were observed when MVs from MDS patients were incorporated. In summary, we show that BM-MSC release MVs with a different cargo in MDS patients compared with HD. These structures are incorporated into HPC and modify their properties.

  17. Microvesicles from Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Are Involved in HPC-Microenvironment Crosstalk in Myelodysplastic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Muntión, Sandra; Ramos, Teresa L.; Diez-Campelo, María; Rosón, Beatriz; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Misiewicz-Krzeminska, Irena; Preciado, Silvia; Sarasquete, María-Eugenia; de las Rivas, Javier; González, Marcos; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; del Cañizo, María-Consuelo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes/microvesicles (MVs) provide a mechanism of intercellular communication. Our hypothesis was that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients could modify CD34+ cells properties by MVs. They were isolated from MSC from MDS patients and healthy donors (HD). MVs from 30 low-risk MDS patients and 27 HD were purified by ExoQuick-TC™ or ultracentrifugation and identified by transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry (FC) and western blot for CD63. Incorporation of MVs into CD34+ cells was analyzed by FC, and confocal and fluorescence microscopy. Changes in hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) properties were assessed from modifications in microRNAs and gene expression in CD34+ cells as well as viability and clonogenic assays of CD34+ cells after MVs incorporation. Some microRNAs were overexpressed in MVs from patients MSC and two of them, miR-10a and miR-15a, were confirmed by RT-PCR. These microRNAs were transferred to CD34+ cells, modifying the expression of MDM2 and P53 genes, which was evaluated by RT-PCR and western blot. Finally, examining CD34+ cells properties after incorporation, higher cell viability (p = 0.025) and clonogenic capacity (p = 0.037) were observed when MVs from MDS patients were incorporated. In summary, we show that BM-MSC release MVs with a different cargo in MDS patients compared with HD. These structures are incorporated into HPC and modify their properties. PMID:26836120

  18. Periodontal Tissue Regeneration Using Syngeneic Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, Mathieu; Monsarrat, Paul; Blasco-Baque, Vincent; Loubières, Pascale; Burcelin, Rémy; Casteilla, Louis; Planat-Bénard, Valérie; Kémoun, Philippe

    2016-09-16

    : Current treatment of periodontitis is still associated with a high degree of variability in clinical outcomes. Recent advances in regenerative medicine by mesenchymal cells, including adipose stromal cells (ASC) have paved the way to improved periodontal regeneration (PD) but little is known about the biological processes involved. Here, we aimed to use syngeneic ASCs for periodontal regeneration in a new, relevant, bacteria-induced periodontitis model in mice. Periodontal defects were induced in female C57BL6/J mice by oral gavage with periodontal pathogens. We grafted 2 × 10(5) syngeneic mouse ASCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) (GFP+/ASC) within a collagen vehicle in the lingual part of the first lower molar periodontium (experimental) while carrier alone was implanted in the contralateral side (control). Animals were sacrificed 0, 1, 6, and 12 weeks after treatment by GFP+/ASC or vehicle graft, and microscopic examination, immunofluorescence, and innovative bio-informatics histomorphometry methods were used to reveal deep periodontium changes. From 1 to 6 weeks after surgery, GFP+ cells were identified in the periodontal ligament (PDL), in experimental sites only. After 12 weeks, cementum regeneration, the organization of PDL fibers, the number of PD vessels, and bone morphogenetic protein-2 and osteopontin expression were greater in experimental sites than in controls. Specific stromal cell subsets were recruited in the newly formed tissue in ASC-implanted periodontium only. These data suggest that ASC grafting in diseased deep periodontium, relevant to human pathology, induces a significant improvement of the PDL microenvironment, leading to a recovery of tooth-supporting tissue homeostasis.

  19. Vitamin D Metabolism and Action in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuanhu; LeBoff, Meryl S.; Glowacki, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D metabolites are important effectors of bone and mineral homeostasis. Extrarenal conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) to the biologically active form of vitamin D, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] is catalyzed in several cell types by the 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), but little is known about the expression or regulation of CYP27B1 in human bones. We examined whether human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs, also known as mesenchymal stem cells) participate in vitamin D metabolism and whether vitamin D hydroxylases in hMSCs are influenced by the vitamin D status of the individual from whom the hMSCs were obtained. We also investigated the effects of vitamin D metabolites on osteoblast differentiation and the role of IGF-I in the regulation of CYP27B1. In a series of 27 subjects, vitamin D hydroxylases in hMSCs were expressed at different levels and were correlated with serum 25OHD, 1,25(OH)2D, and PTH. In vitro treatment with 25OHD up-regulated CYP27B1 and IGF-I in hMSCs; IGF-I also up-regulated CY27B1 expression and stimulated osteoblast differentiation. When hydroxylation of 25OHD was blocked by ketoconazole, a cytochrome P450 inhibitor, 25OHD was no longer able to induce CYP27B1 expression. In summary, these findings show that human bone marrow stromal cells have the molecular machinery both to metabolize and respond to vitamin D. We propose that circulating 25OHD, by virtue of its local conversion to 1,25(OH)2D catalyzed by basal CYP27B1 in hMSCs, amplifies vitamin D signaling through IGF-I up-regulation, which in turn induces CYP27B1 in a feed-forward mechanism to potentiate osteoblast differentiation initiated by IGF-I. PMID:19966181

  20. Hmgn1 acts downstream of C/EBPβ to regulate the decidualization of uterine stromal cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Dang-Dang; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Guo, Chuan-Hui; Yue, Liang; Duan, Cui-Cui; Cao, Hang; Guo, Bin; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Although Hmgn1 is involved in the regulation of gene expression and cellular differentiation, its physiological roles on the differentiation of uterine stromal cells during decidualization still remain unknown. Here we showed that Hmgn1 mRNA was highly expressed in the decidua on days 6-8 of pregnancy. Simultaneously, increased expression of Hmgn1 was also observed in the artificial and in vitro induced decidualization models. Hmgn1 induced the proliferation of uterine stromal cells and expression of Ccna1, Ccnb1, Ccnb2 and Cdk1 in the absence of estrogen and progesterone. Overexpression of Hmgn1 could enhance the expression of Prl8a2 and Prl3c1 which were 2 well-known differentiation markers for decidualization, whereas inhibition of Hmgn1 with specific siRNA could reduce their expression. Further studies found that Hmgn1 could mediate the effects of C/EBPβ on the expression of Prl8a2 and Prl3c1 during in vitro decidualization. In the uterine stromal cells, cAMP analog 8-Br-cAMP could stimulate the expression of Hmgn1 via C/EBPβ. Moreover, siRNA-mediated down-regulation of Hmgn1 could attenuate the effects of cAMP on the differentiation of uterine stromal cells. During in vitro decidualization, Hmgn1 might act downstream of C/EBPβ to regulate the expression of Cox-2, mPGES-1 and Vegf. Progesterone could up-regulate the expression of Hmgn1 in the ovariectomized mouse uterus, uterine epithelial cells and stromal cells. Knockdown of C/EBPβ with siRNA alleviated the up-regulation of progesterone on Hmgn1 expression. Collectively, Hmgn1 may play an important role during mouse decidualization.

  1. Quantitative microplate assay for studying mesenchymal stromal cell-induced neuropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Aizman, Irina; McGrogan, Michael; Case, Casey C

    2013-03-01

    Transplanting mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) or their derivatives in a neurodegenerative environment is believed to be beneficial because of the trophic support, migratory guidance, and neurogenic stimuli they provide. There is a growing need for in vitro models of mesenchymal-neural cell interactions to enable identification of mediators of the MSC activity and quantitative assessment of neuropoietic potency of MSC preparations. Here, we characterize a microplate-format coculture system in which primary embryonic rat cortex cells are directly cocultured with human MSCs on cell-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) in the absence of exogenous growth factors. In this system, expression levels of the rat neural stem/early progenitor marker nestin, as well as neuronal and astrocytic markers, directly depended on MSC dose, whereas an oligodendrogenic marker exhibited a biphasic MSC-dose response, as measured using species-specific quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in total cell lysates and confirmed using immunostaining. Both neural cell proliferation and differentiation contributed to the MSC-mediated neuropoiesis. ECM's heparan sulfate proteoglycans were essential for the growth of the nestin-positive cell population. Neutralization studies showed that MSC-derived fibroblast growth factor 2 was a major and diffusible inducer of rat nestin, whereas MSC-derived bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), particularly, BMP4, were astrogenesis mediators, predominantly acting in a coculture setting. This system enables analysis of multifactorial MSC-neural cell interactions and can be used for elucidating the neuropoietic potency of MSCs and their derivative preparations.

  2. Radiologic differences between bone marrow stromal and hematopoietic progenitor cell lines from Fanconi Anemia (Fancd2(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Hebist; Epperly, Michael W; Goff, Julie; Kalash, Ronny; Cao, Shaonan; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Shields, Donna; Houghton, Frank; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Parmar, Kalindi; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    FancD2 plays a central role in the human Fanconi anemia DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. Fancd2(-/-) mice exhibit many features of human Fanconi anemia including cellular DNA repair defects. Whether the DNA repair defect in Fancd2(-/-) mice results in radiologic changes in all cell lineages is unknown. We measured stress of hematopoiesis in long-term marrow cultures and radiosensitivity in clonogenic survival curves, as well as comet tail intensity, total antioxidant stores and radiation-induced gene expression in hematopoietic progenitor compared to bone marrow stromal cell lines. We further evaluated radioprotection by a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant GS-nitroxide, JP4-039. Hematopoiesis longevity in Fancd2(-/-) mouse long-term marrow cultures was diminished and bone marrow stromal cell lines were radiosensitive compared to Fancd2(+/+) stromal cells (Fancd2(-/-) D0 = 1.4 ± 0.1 Gy, ñ = 5.0 ± 0.6 vs. Fancd2(+/+) D0 = 1.6 ± 0.1 Gy, ñ = 6.7 ± 1.6), P = 0.0124 for D0 and P = 0.0023 for ñ, respectively). In contrast, Fancd2(-/-) IL-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cells were radioresistant (D0 = 1.71 ± 0.04 Gy and ñ = 5.07 ± 0.52) compared to Fancd2(+/+) (D0 = 1.39 ± 0.09 Gy and ñ = 2.31 ± 0.85, P = 0.001 for D0). CFU-GM from freshly explanted Fancd2(-/-) marrow was also radioresistant. Consistent with radiosensitivity, irradiated Fancd2(-/-) stromal cells had higher DNA damage by comet tail intensity assay compared to Fancd2(+/+) cells (P < 0.0001), slower DNA damage recovery, lower baseline total antioxidant capacity, enhanced radiation-induced depletion of antioxidants, and increased CDKN1A-p21 gene transcripts and protein. Consistent with radioresistance, Fancd2(-/-) IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells had higher baseline and post irradiation total antioxidant capacity. While, there was no detectable alteration of radiation-induced cell cycle arrest with Fancd2(-/-) stromal cells, hematopoietic progenitor cells showed reduced G2/M cell cycle

  3. Stromal fibroblasts support dendritic cells to maintain IL-23/Th17 responses after exposure to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Malecka, Anna; Wang, Qunwei; Shah, Sabaria; Sutavani, Ruhcha V.; Spendlove, Ian; Ramage, Judith M.; Greensmith, Julie; Franks, Hester A.; Gough, Michael J.; Saalbach, Anja; Patel, Poulam M.; Jackson, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell function is modulated by stromal cells, including fibroblasts. Although poorly understood, the signals delivered through this crosstalk substantially alter dendritic cell biology. This is well illustrated with release of TNF-α/IL-1β from activated dendritic cells, promoting PGE2 secretion from stromal fibroblasts. This instructs dendritic cells to up-regulate IL-23, a key Th17-polarizing cytokine. We previously showed that ionizing radiation inhibited IL-23 production by human dendritic cells in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the hypothesis that dendritic cell-fibroblast crosstalk overcomes the suppressive effect of ionizing radiation to support appropriately polarized Th17 responses. Radiation (1–6 Gy) markedly suppressed IL-23 secretion by activated dendritic cells (P < 0.0001) without adversely impacting their viability and consequently, inhibited the generation of Th17 responses. Cytokine suppression by ionizing radiation was selective, as there was no effect on IL-1β, -6, -10, and -27 or TNF-α and only a modest (11%) decrease in IL-12p70 secretion. Coculture with fibroblasts augmented IL-23 secretion by irradiated dendritic cells and increased Th17 responses. Importantly, in contrast to dendritic cells, irradiated fibroblasts maintained their capacity to respond to TNF-α/IL-1β and produce PGE2, thus providing the key intermediary signals for successful dendritic cell-fibroblasts crosstalk. In summary, stromal fibroblasts support Th17-polarizing cytokine production by dendritic cells that would otherwise be suppressed in an irradiated microenvironment. This has potential ramifications for understanding the immune response to local radiotherapy. These findings underscore the need to account for the impact of microenvironmental factors, including stromal cells, in understanding the control of immunity. PMID:27049023

  4. Aminobisphosphonates prevent the inhibitory effects exerted by lymph node stromal cells on anti-tumor Vδ 2 T lymphocytes in non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Musso, Alessandra; Catellani, Silvia; Canevali, Paolo; Tavella, Sara; Venè, Roberta; Boero, Silvia; Pierri, Ivana; Gobbi, Marco; Kunkl, Annalisa; Ravetti, Jean-Louis; Zocchi, Maria Raffaella; Poggi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the influence of mesenchymal stromal cells derived from lymph nodes of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, on effector functions and differentiation of Vdelta (δ)2 T lymphocytes. We show that: i) lymph-node mesenchymal stromal cells of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma inhibit NKG2D-mediated lymphoid cell killing, but not rituximab-induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, exerted by Vδ2 T lymphocytes; ii) pre-treatment of mesenchymal stromal cells with the aminobisphosphonates pamidronate or zoledronate can rescue lymphoma cell killing via NKG2D; iii) this is due to inhibition of transforming growth factor-β and increase in interleukin-15 production by mesenchymal stromal cells; iv) aminobisphosphonate-treated mesenchymal stromal cells drive Vδ2 T-lymphocyte differentiation into effector memory T cells, expressing the Thelper1 cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ. In non-Hodgkin's lymphoma lymph nodes, Vδ2 T cells were mostly naïve; upon co-culture with autologous lymph-node mesenchymal stromal cells exposed to zoledronate, the percentage of terminal differentiated effector memory Vδ2 T lymphocytes increased. In all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, low or undetectable transcription of Thelper1 cytokines was found. In diffused large B-cell lymphomas and in a group of follicular lymphoma, transcription of transforming growth factor β and interleukin-10 was enhanced compared to non-neoplastic lymph nodes. Thus, in non-Hodgkin lymphomas mesenchymal stromal cells interfere with Vδ2 T-lymphocyte cytolytic function and differentiation to Thelper1 and/or effector memory cells, depending on the prominent in situ cytokine milieu. Aminobisphosphonates, acting on lymph-node mesenchymal stromal cells, can push the balance towards Thelper1/effector memory and rescue the recognition and killing of lymphoma cells through NKG2D, sparing rituximab-induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  5. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances osteogenesis and represses adipogenic differentiation of human primary bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Heim, M; Frank, O; Kampmann, G; Sochocky, N; Pennimpede, T; Fuchs, P; Hunziker, W; Weber, P; Martin, I; Bendik, I

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of the phytoestrogen genistein and 17beta-estradiol in human bone marrow stromal cells, undergoing induced osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation. Profiling of estrogen receptors (ERs)-alpha, -beta1, -beta2, -beta3, -beta4, -beta5, and aromatase mRNAs revealed lineage-dependent expression patterns. During osteogenic differentiation, the osteoblast-determining core binding factor-alpha1 showed a progressive increase, whereas the adipogenic regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) was sequentially decreased. This temporal regulation of lineage-determining marker genes was strongly enhanced by genistein during the early osteogenic phase. Moreover, genistein increased alkaline phosphatase mRNA levels and activity, the osteoprotegerin:receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand gene expression ratio, and the expression of TGFbeta1. During adipogenic differentiation, down-regulation in the mRNA levels of PPARgamma and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-alpha at d 3 and decreased lipoprotein lipase and adipsin mRNA levels at d 21 were observed after genistein treatment. This led to a lower number of adipocytes and a reduction in the size of their lipid droplets. At d 3 of adipogenesis, TGFbeta1 was strongly up-regulated by genistein in an ER-dependent manner. Blocking the TGFbeta1 pathway abolished the effects of genistein on PPARgamma protein levels and led to a reduction in the proliferation rate of precursor cells. Overall, genistein enhanced the commitment and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells to the osteoblast lineage but did not influence the late osteogenic maturation markers. Adipogenic differentiation and maturation, on the other hand, were reduced by genistein (and 17beta-estradiol) via an ER-dependent mechanism involving autocrine or paracrine TGFbeta1 signaling.

  6. MicroRNA expression profiles and networks in CXCL12-stimulated human endometrial stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Jie; Li, Ming-Qing; Li, Da-Jin; Sun, Hai-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 12; CXCL12) is important in the recruitment of leukocytes to the peritoneal cavity and the regulation of endometriotic tissue growth in endometriosis patients. However, the alterations in microRNA (miRNA) expression induced by CXCL12 remain to be fully elucidated. The present study evaluated key miRNAs in CXCL12-stimulated endometrial stromal cells (ESCs), and investigated the underlying cellular regulatory mechanisms of CXCL12 in endometriosis by building networks between miRNAs, genes and gene ontologies (GOs). Differential expression of miRNAs and mRNAs induced by CXCL12 stimulation in ESCs was measured using miRNA and gene chips, and it was observed that 35 miRNAs and 1,671 mRNAs were differentially expressed. Using potential target genes of the 35 miRNAs, intersections of these genes were examined and 63 intersection genes were identified. A total of 39 GOs were obtained for these intersection genes, based on information from GO databases, including immune cell chemoattractants, inflammatory and immune responses, and pathological processes of endometriotic lesions in endometriosis. In addition, miRNA-gene networks were built according to the GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. The present study, to the best of our knowledge, provides the most complete miRNAome and mRNAome profiles, and the most detailed investigation of the underlying cellular regulatory mechanisms, of the effects of CXCL12 in endometriosis. These results may facilitate the complete elucidation of the role of CXCL12 in endometriosis, and its underlying epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:27959395

  7. PDGFRβ Is a Novel Marker of Stromal Activation in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rong; Haines, Paul; Gallagher, George; Noonan, Vikki; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Monti, Stefano; Trojanowska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) form the main constituents of tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor growth and invasion. The presence of CAFs is a strong predictor of poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite significant progress in determining the role of CAFs in tumor progression, the mechanisms contributing to their activation remain poorly characterized, in part due to fibroblast heterogeneity and the scarcity of reliable fibroblast surface markers. To search for such markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), we applied a novel approach that uses RNA-sequencing data derived from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Specifically, our strategy allowed for an unbiased identification of genes whose expression was closely associated with a set of bona fide stroma-specific transcripts, namely the interstitial collagens COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL3A1. Among the top hits were genes involved in cellular matrix remodeling and tumor invasion and migration, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ), which was found to be the highest-ranking receptor protein genome-wide. Similar analyses performed on ten additional TCGA cancer datasets revealed that other tumor types shared CAF markers with OSCC, including PDGFRβ, which was found to significantly correlate with the reference collagen expression in ten of the 11 cancer types tested. Subsequent immunostaining of OSCC specimens demonstrated that PDGFRβ was abundantly expressed in stromal fibroblasts of all tested cases (12/12), while it was absent in tumor cells, with greater specificity than other known markers such as alpha smooth muscle actin or podoplanin (3/11). Overall, this study identified PDGFRβ as a novel marker of stromal activation in OSCC, and further characterized a list of promising candidate CAF markers that may be relevant to other carcinomas. Our novel approach provides for a fast and accurate method to identify CAF markers without the need for

  8. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and cell-to-cell communication in bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sena, Kotaro; Angle, Siddhesh R; Kanaji, Arihiko; Aher, Chetan; Karwo, David G; Sumner, Dale R; Virdi, Amarjit S

    2011-07-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is an established therapy for fracture repair and has been used widely in the clinics, but its underlying mechanism of action remains unclear. The aim of the current research was to determine the effect of LIPUS on gap junctional cell-to-cell intercellular communication in rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) in vitro and to determine whether the ability of BMSCs to communicate by gap junctions would affect their response to LIPUS. Single or daily-multiple LIPUS treatment at 1.5MHz, 30mW/cm(2), for 20min was applied to BMSC. We demonstrated that BMSC form functional gap junctions and single LIPUS treatment significantly increased the intracellular dye transfer between BMSC. In addition, activated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 by LIPUS stimulation was diminished when cells were treated with a gap junction inhibitor 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18β). We further demonstrated that 18β diminished the significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity following LIPUS stimulation. These results suggest a potential role of gap junctional cell-to-cell intercellular communication on the effects of LIPUS in BMSC.

  9. Regulation of B lymphocytes and plasma cells by innate immune mechanisms and stromal cells in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Maseda, Damian; Bonami, Rachel H; Crofford, Leslie J

    2016-01-01

    B cells mediate multiple functions that influence immune and inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis. Production of a diverse array of autoantibodies can happen at different stages of the disease, and are important markers of disease outcome. In turn, the magnitude and quality of acquired humoral immune responses is strongly dependent on signals delivered by innate immune cells. Additionally, the milieu of cells and chemokines that constitute a niche for plasma cells rely strongly on signals provided by stromal cells at different anatomical locations and times. The chronic inflammatory state therefore importantly impacts the developing humoral immune response and its intensity and specificity. We focus this review on B cell biology and the role of the innate immune system in the development of autoimmunity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24734886

  10. Visualization of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in 2Dand 3D-Cultures by Scanning Electron Microscopy with Lanthanide Contrasting.

    PubMed

    Novikov, I A; Vakhrushev, I V; Antonov, E N; Yarygin, K N; Subbot, A M

    2017-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells from deciduous teeth in 2D- and 3D-cultures on culture plastic, silicate glass, porous polystyrene, and experimental polylactoglycolide matrices were visualized by scanning electron microscopy with lanthanide contrasting. Supravital staining of cell cultures with a lanthanide-based dye (neodymium chloride) preserved normal cell morphology and allowed assessment of the matrix properties of the carriers. The developed approach can be used for the development of biomaterials for tissue engineering.

  11. Comparative analysis of multilineage properties of mesenchymal stromal cells derived from fetal sources shows an advantage of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from cord blood in chondrogenic differentiation potential

    PubMed Central

    Pievani, Alice; Scagliotti, Valeria; Russo, Francesca Maria; Azario, Isabella; Rambaldi, Benedetta; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Marzorati, Simona; Erba, Eugenio; Giudici, Giovanni; Riminucci, Mara; Biondi, Andrea; Vergani, Patrizia; Serafini, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Background aims Cord blood (CB) and amniotic fluid (AF) could represent new and attractive mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) sources, but their potential therapeutic applications are still limited by lack of standardized protocols for isolation and differentiation. In particular, chondrogenic differentiation has never been deeply investigated. Methods MSCs were obtained from CB and AF samples collected during cesarean sections at term and compared for their biological and differentiation properties, with particular interest in cartilage differentiation, in which quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the expression of type 2 collagen, type 10 collagen, SRY-box9 and aggrecan. Results We were able to isolate MSCs from 12 of 30 (40%) and 5 of 20 (25%) CB and AF units, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis indicated the fetal origin of isolated MSC strains. Both populations expressed mesenchymal but not endothelial and hematopoietic markers, even though we observed a lower expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) I in CB-MSCs. No differences in proliferation rate and cell cycle analysis could be detected. After osteogenic induction, both populations showed matrix mineralization and typical marker expression. Under chondrogenic conditions, pellets derived from CB-MSCs, in contrast with AF-MSCs pellets, were significantly larger, showed cartilage-like morphology and resulted positive for chondrocyte-associated markers, such as type 2 collagen, type 10 collagen, SRY-box9 and aggrecan. Conclusions Our results show that CB-MSCs and AF-MSCs collected at term differ from each other in their biological and differentiation properties. In particular, only CB-MSCs showed a clear chondrogenic potential and thus could represent an ideal candidate for cartilage-tissue engineering. PMID:24794181

  12. Game theory in the death galaxy: interaction of cancer and stromal cells in tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Tlsty, Thea D; Sturm, James C; Austin, Robert H

    2014-08-06

    Preventing relapse is the major challenge to effective therapy in cancer. Within the tumour, stromal (ST) cells play an important role in cancer progression and the emergence of drug resistance. During cancer treatment, the fitness of cancer cells can be enhanced by ST cells because their molecular signalling interaction delays the drug-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. On the other hand, competition among cancer and ST cells for space or resources should not be ignored. We explore the population dynamics of multiple myeloma (MM) versus bone marrow ST cells by using an experimental microecology that we call the death galaxy, with a stable drug gradient and connected microhabitats. Evolutionary game theory is a quantitative way to capture the frequency-dependent nature of interactive populations. Therefore, we use evolutionary game theory to model the populations in the death galaxy with the gradients of pay-offs and successfully predict the future densities of MM and ST cells. We discuss the possible clinical use of such analysis for predicting cancer progression.

  13. Myocardial Ischemic Subject’s Thymus Fat: A Novel Source of Multipotent Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Julián; Lhamyani, Said; Gentile, Adriana-Mariel; Sarria García, Esteban; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Zayed, Hatem; Vega-Rioja, Antonio; Tinahones, Francisco J.; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adipose Tissue Stromal Cells (ASCs) have important clinical applications in the regenerative medicine, cell replacement and gene therapies. Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue (SAT) is the most common source of these cells. The adult human thymus degenerates into adipose tissue (TAT). However, it has never been studied before as a source of stem cells. Material and Methods We performed a comparative characterization of TAT-ASCs and SAT-ASCs from myocardial ischemic subjects (n = 32) according to the age of the subjects. Results TAT-ASCs and SAT-ASCs showed similar features regarding their adherence, morphology and in their capacity to form CFU-F. Moreover, they have the capacity to differentiate into osteocyte and adipocyte lineages; and they present a surface marker profile corresponding with stem cells derived from AT; CD73+CD90+CD105+CD14-CD19-CD45-HLA-DR. Interestingly, and in opposition to SAT-ASCs, TAT-ASCs have CD14+CD34+CD133+CD45- cells. Moreover, TAT-ASCs from elderly subjects showed higher adipogenic and osteogenic capacities compared to middle aged subjects, indicating that, rather than impairing; aging seems to increase adipogenic and osteogenic capacities of TAT-ASCs. Conclusions This study describes the human TAT as a source of mesenchymal stem cells, which may have an enormous potential for regenerative medicine. PMID:26657132

  14. Cannabidiol Activates Neuronal Precursor Genes in Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Soundara Rajan, Thangavelu; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Scionti, Domenico; Diomede, Francesca; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Pollastro, Federica; Piattelli, Adriano; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela; Trubiani, Oriana

    2016-12-05

    In the last years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from oral tissues have received considerable interest in regenerative medicine since they can be obtained with minimal invasive procedure and exhibit immunomodulatory properties. This study was aimed to investigate whether in vitro pre-treatment of MSCs obtained from human gingiva (hGMSCs) with Cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabinoid component produced by the plant Cannabis sativa, may promote human gingiva derived MSCs to differentiate toward neuronal precursor cells. Specifically, we have treated the hGMSCs with CBD (5 µM) for 24 h in order to evaluate the expression of genes involved in cannabidiol signaling, cell proliferation, self-renewal and multipotency, and neural progenitor cells differentiation. Next generation sequencing (NGS) demonstrated that CBD activates genes associated with G protein coupled receptor signaling in hGMSCs. Genes involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis were regulated. Moreover, genes associated with the biological process of neuronal progenitor cells (NCPs) proliferation, neuron differentiation, neurogenesis, and nervous system development were significantly modulated. From our results, we hypothesize that human gingiva-derived MSCs conditioned with CBD could represent a valid method for improving the hGMSCs phenotype and thus might be a potential therapeutic tool in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-16, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Molecular heterogeneity in adjacent cells in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huebschman, Michael L; Lane, Nancy L; Liu, Huaying; Sarode, Venetia R; Devlin, Judith L; Frenkel, Eugene P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study interrogates the molecular status of individual cells in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and explores the molecular identification and characterization of these tumors to consider the exploitation of a potential-targeted therapeutic approach. Patients and methods Hyperspectral immunologic cell by cell analysis was applied to touch imprint smears obtained from fresh tumors of breast cancer patients. Results Cell by cell analysis confirms significant intratumoral molecular heterogeneity in cancer markers with differences from polymerase chain reaction marker reporting. The individual cell heterogeneity was recognized in adjacent cells examined with panels of ten molecular markers in each single cell and included some markers that are considered to express “stem-cell” character. In addition, heterogeneity did not relate either to the size or stage of the primary tumor or to the site from within the cancer. Conclusion There is a very significant molecular heterogeneity when “adjacent cells” are examined in triple-negative breast cancer, thereby making a successful targeted approach unlikely. In addition, it is not reasonable to consider that these changes will provide an answer to tumor dormancy. PMID:26316815

  16. Axonal Growth Arrests After an Increased Accumulation of Schwann Cells Expressing Senescence Markers and Stromal Cells in Acellular Nerve Allografts.

    PubMed

    Poppler, Louis H; Ee, Xueping; Schellhardt, Lauren; Hoben, Gwendolyn M; Pan, Deng; Hunter, Daniel A; Yan, Ying; Moore, Amy M; Snyder-Warwick, Alison K; Stewart, Sheila A; Mackinnon, Susan E; Wood, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Acellular nerve allografts (ANAs) and other nerve constructs do not reliably facilitate axonal regeneration across long defects (>3 cm). Causes for this deficiency are poorly understood. In this study, we determined what cells are present within ANAs before axonal growth arrest in nerve constructs and if these cells express markers of cellular stress and senescence. Using the Thy1-GFP rat and serial imaging, we identified the time and location of axonal growth arrest in long (6 cm) ANAs. Axonal growth halted within long ANAs by 4 weeks, while axons successfully regenerated across short (3 cm) ANAs. Cellular populations and markers of senescence were determined using immunohistochemistry, histology, and senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Both short and long ANAs were robustly repopulated with Schwann cells (SCs) and stromal cells by 2 weeks. Schwann cells (S100β(+)) represented the majority of cells repopulating both ANAs. Overall, both ANAs demonstrated similar cellular populations with the exception of increased stromal cells (fibronectin(+)/S100β(-)/CD68(-) cells) in long ANAs. Characterization of ANAs for markers of cellular senescence revealed that long ANAs accumulated much greater levels of senescence markers and a greater percentage of Schwann cells expressing the senescence marker p16 compared to short ANAs. To establish the impact of the long ANA environment on axonal regeneration, short ANAs (2 cm) that would normally support axonal regeneration were generated from long ANAs near the time of axonal growth arrest ("stressed" ANAs). These stressed ANAs contained mainly S100β(+)/p16(+) cells and markedly reduced axonal regeneration. In additional experiments, removal of the distal portion (4 cm) of long ANAs near the time of axonal growth arrest and replacement with long isografts (4 cm) rescued axonal regeneration across the defect. Neuronal culture derived from nerve following axonal growth arrest in long ANAs revealed no

  17. Nuclear Localization of β-Catenin in Sertoli Cell Tumors and Other Sex Cord-Stromal Tumors of the Testis: An Immunohistochemical Study of 87 Cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Ulbright, Thomas M

    2015-10-01

    The diagnosis and subclassification of Sertoli cell tumors (SCT) of the testis are often challenging to general surgical pathologists because of the rarity of the tumors. Immunohistochemical study to date has limited diagnostic value. Nuclear localization of β-catenin, which correlated closely with CTNNB1 gene mutation, was recently reported in SCTs. We investigated the utility of β-catenin nuclear localization in diagnosing SCTs and differentiating them from other testicular sex cord-stromal tumors. Immunohistochemical staining for β-catenin was evaluated in 87 cases of testicular sex cord-stromal tumor: 33 SCTs, not otherwise specified (SCT-NOS) (15 with benign and 18 with malignant features), 10 sclerosing SCTs (SSCT), 5 large cell calcifying SCTs (LCCSCT), 6 Sertoli-stromal cell tumors, 10 Leydig cell tumors, 7 juvenile granulosa cell tumors, 4 adult granulosa cell tumors, and 12 sex cord-stromal tumors, unclassified. Twenty-one of 33 (64%) SCT-NOS, 6 of 10 (60%) SSCTs, and 4 of 6 (67%) Sertoli-stromal cell tumors showed strong, diffuse β-catenin nuclear staining. Nuclear β-catenin positivity was more frequent in SCTs-NOS with benign features than in those with malignant features (93% and 39%, respectively, P=0.13) and, in the Sertoli-stromal cell tumors, occurred only in the Sertoli component. All 5 LCCSCTs and all other types of sex cord-stromal tumor were negative for β-catenin nuclear staining. In conclusion, SCT-NOS and SSCT frequently show β-catenin nuclear localization. Positive nuclear staining of β-catenin is specific for SCT-NOS, SSCT, and Sertoli-stromal cell tumor among testicular sex cord-stromal tumors but has limited sensitivity (63%) in this group. The similar reactivity of SCT-NOS and SSCT provides additional support that these 2 variants are not distinct entities.

  18. Serially Transplanted Nonpericytic CD146(-) Adipose Stromal/Stem Cells in Silk Bioscaffolds Regenerate Adipose Tissue In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Trivia P; Bowles, Annie; Lee, Stephen; Abbott, Rosalyn; Tucker, Hugh A; Kaplan, David; Wang, Mei; Strong, Amy; Brown, Quincy; He, Jibao; Bunnell, Bruce A; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2016-04-01

    Progenitors derived from the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of white adipose tissue (WAT) possess the ability to form clonal populations and differentiate along multiple lineage pathways. However, the literature continues to vacillate between defining adipocyte progenitors as "stromal" or "stem" cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that a nonpericytic subpopulation of adipose stromal cells, which possess the phenotype, CD45(-) /CD31(-) /CD146(-) /CD34(+) , are mesenchymal, and suggest this may be an endogenous progenitor subpopulation within adipose tissue. We hypothesized that an adipose progenitor could be sorted based on the expression of CD146, CD34, and/or CD29 and when implanted in vivo these cells can persist, proliferate, and regenerate a functional fat pad over serial transplants. SVF cells and culture expanded adipose stromal/stem cells (ASC) ubiquitously expressing the green fluorescent protein transgene (GFP-Tg) were fractionated by flow cytometry. Both freshly isolated SVF and culture expanded ASC were seeded in three-dimensional silk scaffolds, implanted subcutaneously in wild-type hosts, and serially transplanted. Six-week WAT constructs were removed and evaluated for the presence of GFP-Tg adipocytes and stem cells. Flow cytometry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and confocal microscopy demonstrated GFP-Tg cell persistence, proliferation, and expansion, respectively. Glycerol secretion and glucose uptake assays revealed GFP-Tg adipose was metabolically functional. Constructs seeded with GFP-Tg SVF cells or GFP-Tg ASC exhibited higher SVF yields from digested tissue, and higher construct weights, compared to nonseeded controls. Constructs derived from CD146(-) CD34(+) -enriched GFP-Tg ASC populations exhibited higher hemoglobin saturation, and higher frequency of GFP-Tg cells than unsorted or CD29(+) GFP-Tg ASC counterparts. These data demonstrated successful serial transplantation of nonpericytic adipose-derived progenitors that can

  19. Osterix enhances proliferation and osteogenic potential of bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tu Qisheng; Valverde, Paloma . E-mail: paloma.valverde@tufts.edu; Chen, Jake

    2006-03-24

    Osterix (Osx) is a zinc-finger-containing transcription factor that is expressed in osteoblasts of all endochondral and membranous bones. In Osx null mice osteoblast differentiation is impaired and bone formation is absent. In this study, we hypothesized that overexpression of Osx in murine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) would be able to enhance their osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization in vitro. Retroviral transduction of Osx in BMSC cultured in non-differentiating medium did not affect expression of Runx2/Cbfa1, another key transcription factor of osteoblast differentiation, but induced an increase in the expression of other markers associated with the osteoblastic lineage including alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and osteopontin. Retroviral transduction of Osx in BMSC also increased their proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and ability to form bone nodules. These events occurred without significant changes in the expression of {alpha}1(II) procollagen or lipoprotein lipase, which are markers of chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiation, respectively.

  20. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells From Peripheral Blood of ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Ina Laura; Smith, Rachel; Bishop, Joanna C; Aldalati, Omar; Chase, Alex J; Morgan, Gareth; Thornton, Catherine A

    2017-02-28

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have shown therapeutic potential in the treatment of myocardial infarction patients. However, bone marrow requires invasive harvesting techniques. Therefore, the aim was to carry out a feasibility study of using autologous peripheral blood (PB) as a source for MSCs and platelet lysate (PL), a potential novel therapeutic intervention in acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. Autologous PL and MSCs were prepared from STEMI patient and healthy control blood. MSCs were analyzed by trilineage differentiation and flow cytometry. PB MSCs were isolated from 83% of patients (n = 6) but not from controls. The use of PL was feasible in the first passage but not in subsequent ones due to volume. To conclude, PB is a promising alternative to bone marrow. It negates the need for invasive harvesting techniques, and reduces hemorrhagic risk in this patient population routinely managed with anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents.

  1. Research using Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells: quality metric towards developing a reference material

    PubMed Central

    Tanavde, Vivek; Vaz, Candida; Rao, Mahendra S; Vemuri, Mohan C; Pochampally, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been extensively investigated for their regenerative, immune-modulatory, and wound healing properties. While the laboratory studies have suggested that MSC’s have a unique potential for modulating the etiopathology of multiple diseases, the results from clinical trials have not been encouraging or reproducible. One of the explanations for such variability is explained by the “art” of isolating and propagating MSCs. Therefore, establishing more than minimal criteria to define MSC would help understand best protocols to isolate, propagate and deliver MSCs. Developing a calibration standard, a database and a set of functional tests would be a better quality metric for MSCs. In this review, we discuss the importance of selecting a standard, issues associated with coming up with such a standard and how these issues can be mitigated. PMID:26276001

  2. Comparison of the anti-tumor effects of denosumab and zoledronic acid on the neoplastic stromal cells of giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Lau, Carol P Y; Huang, Lin; Wong, Kwok Chuen; Kumta, Shekhar Madhukar

    2013-01-01

    Denosumab and Zoledronic acid (ZOL) are two antiresorptive drugs currently in use for treating osteoporosis. They have different mechanisms of action but both have been shown to delay the onset of skeletal-related events in patients with giant cell tumor of bone (GCT). However, the anti-tumor mechanisms of denosumab on the neoplastic GCT stromal cells remain unknown. In this study, we focused on the direct effects of denosumab on the neoplastic GCT stromal cells and compared with ZOL. The microscopic view demonstrated a reduced cell growth in ZOL-treated but not in denosumab-treated GCT stromal cells. ZOL was found to exhibit a dose-dependent inhibition in cell growth in all GCT stromal cell lines tested and cause apoptosis in two out of three cell lines. In contrast, denosumab only exerted a minimal inhibitory effect in one cell line and did not induce any apoptosis. ZOL significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in two GCT stromal cell lines whereas their protein levels remained unchanged. On the contrary, denosumab did not regulate RANKL and OPG expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, the protein expression of Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (M-CSF), Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP), and Collagen α1 Type I were not regulated by denosumab and ZOL either. Our findings provide new insights in the anti-tumor effect of denosumab on GCT stromal cells and raise a concern that tumor recurrence may occur after the withdrawal of the drug.

  3. Do Cryopreserved Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Impaired Immunomodulatory and Therapeutic Properties?

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Guido; Alm, Jessica J.; Davies, Lindsay C.; von Bahr, Lena; Heldring, Nina; Stenbeck-Funke, Lillemor; Hamad, Osama A.; Hinsch, Robin; Ignatowicz, Lech; Locke, Matthew; Lönnies, Helena; Lambris, John D.; Teramura, Yuji; Nilsson-Ekdahl, Kristina; Nilsson, Bo; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that therapeutic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have low engraftment and trigger the instant blood mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) after systemic delivery to patients, resulting in compromised cell function. In order to optimize the product, we compared the immunomodulatory, blood regulatory, and therapeutic properties of freeze-thawed and freshly harvested cells. We found that freeze-thawed MSCs, as opposed to cells harvested from continuous cultures, have impaired immunomodulatory and blood regulatory properties. Freeze-thawed MSCs demonstrated reduced responsiveness to proinflammatory stimuli, an impaired production of anti-inflammatory mediators, increased triggering of the IBMIR, and a strong activation of the complement cascade compared to fresh cells. This resulted in twice the efficiency in lysis of thawed MSCs after 1 hour of serum exposure. We found a 50% and 80% reduction in viable cells with freshly detached as opposed to thawed in vitro cells, indicating a small benefit for fresh cells. In evaluation of clinical response, we report a trend that fresh cells, and cells of low passage, demonstrate improved clinical outcome. Patients treated with freshly harvested cells in low passage had a 100% response rate, twice the response rate of 50% observed in a comparable group of patients treated with freeze-thawed cells at higher passage. We conclude that cryobanked MSCs have reduced immunomodulatory and blood regulatory properties directly after thawing, resulting in faster complement-mediated elimination after blood exposure. These changes seem to be paired by differences in therapeutic efficacy in treatment of immune ailments after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24805247

  4. Metallofullerene nanoparticles promote osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells through BMP signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kangning; Cao, Weipeng; Hao, Xiaohong; Xue, Xue; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Juan; Zhao, Yuliang; Meng, Jie; Sun, Baoyun; Zhang, Jinchao; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Although endohedral metallofullerenol [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles have anti-tumor efficiency and mostly deposit in the bones of mice, how these nanoparticles act in bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) remains largely unknown. Herein, we observed that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles facilitated the differentiation of MSCs toward osteoblasts, as evidenced by the enhancement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation upon [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticle treatment. Mechanistically, the effect of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles on ALP activity was inhibited by the addition of noggin as an inhibitor of the BMP signaling pathway. Moreover, the in vivo results of the ovariectomized rats further indicated that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles effectively improved bone density and prevented osteoporosis.Although endohedral metallofullerenol [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles have anti-tumor efficiency and mostly deposit in the bones of mice, how these nanoparticles act in bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) remains largely unknown. Herein, we observed that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles facilitated the differentiation of MSCs toward osteoblasts, as evidenced by the enhancement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation upon [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticle treatment. Mechanistically, the effect of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles on ALP activity was inhibited by the addition of noggin as an inhibitor of the BMP signaling pathway. Moreover, the in vivo results of the ovariectomized rats further indicated that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles effectively improved bone density and prevented osteoporosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33575a

  5. Early wound healing of laser in situ keratomileusis–like flaps after treatment with human corneal stromal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Siân R.; Dooley, Erin P.; Kamma-Lorger, Christina; Funderburgh, James L.; Funderburgh, Martha L.; Meek, Keith M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To use a well-established organ culture model to investigate the effects of corneal stromal stem cells on the optical and biomechanical properties of corneal wounds after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK)–like flap creation. Setting School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. Design Experimental study. Methods The LASIK-like flaps were produced in sheep corneas. The flap beds were treated with corneal stromal stem cells and were then replaced and allowed to heal for different periods of up to 3 weeks in organ culture. The optical transmission of the cornea, the force required to detach the flap, and the presence of myofibroblasts near the flap bed were measured. Results Corneal stromal stem cell–treated flap beds were statistically significantly more transparent after 3 weeks in culture than the untreated controls. At 3 weeks, the mean force necessary to detach the flap was more than twice the force required for the respective control samples. Concurrently, there were 44% activated cells immediately below the flap margin of the controls compared with 29% in the same region of the corneal stromal stem cell–treated flaps. Conclusions In this system, the presence of corneal stromal stem cells at the wound margin significantly increased the adherence of LASIK-like flaps while maintaining corneal transparency. It is postulated that this is achieved by the deposition of extracellular connective tissue similar to that found in the normal cornea and by the paucity of activated keratocytes (myofibroblasts), which are known to scatter a significant amount of the incident light. Financial Disclosure No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. PMID:27026456

  6. Cx43 expressed on bone marrow stromal cells plays an essential role in multiple myeloma cell survival and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Connexin-43 (Cx43), a connexin constituent of gap junctions (GJs) is mainly expressed in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and played a important role on hematopoiesis. In this study, we explored the role of gap junctions (GJs) formed by Cx43 between BMSCs and multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Material and methods qPCR and western blot assays were employed to assay Cx43 expression in three MM cell lines (RPMI 8266, U266, and XG7), freshly isolated MM cells, and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Cx43 mRNA and proteins were detected in all three MM cell lines and six out of seven freshly isolated MM cells. Resuths The BMSCs from MM patients expressed Cx43 at higher levels than of normal donor (ND-BMSCs). Dye transfer assays demonstrated that gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) occurring via Cx43 situated between MM and BMSCs is functional. Cytometry beads array (CBA) assays showed that cytokines production changed when the ND-BMSCs were co-cultured with MM cells, especially the levels of IL-6, SDF-1α and IL-10 were higher than those the cells cultured alone and decreased significantly in the presence of GJ inhibitor heptanol. Our results demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of BTZ to MM cells decreased significantly in the presence of BMSCs, an effect that was partially recovered in the presence of GJ inhibitor. Conclusions Our data suggest that GJIC between MM and BMSCs is a critical factor in tumor cell proliferation and drug sensitivity, and is implicated in MM pathogenesis. PMID:28144277

  7. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 potentiates bone morphogenetic protein-2 induced bone formation.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Kosaku; Viggeswarapu, Manjula; Bargouti, Maggie; Liu, Hui; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D

    2011-02-01

    The mechanisms driving bone marrow stem cell mobilization are poorly understood. A recent murine study found that circulating bone marrow-derived osteoprogenitor cells (MOPCs) were recruited to the site of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-induced bone formation. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) and its cellular receptor CXCR4 have been shown to mediate the homing of stem cells to injured tissues. We hypothesized that chemokines, such as SDF-1, are also involved with mobilization of bone marrow cells. The CD45(-) fraction is a major source of MOPCs. In this report we determined that the addition of BMP-2 or SDF-1 to collagen implants increased the number of MOPCs in the peripheral blood. BMP-2-induced mobilization was blocked by CXCR4 antibody, confirming the role of SDF-1 in mobilization. We determined for the first time that addition of SDF-1 to implants containing BMP-2 enhances mobilization, homing of MOPCs to the implant, and ectopic bone formation induced by suboptimal BMP-2 doses. These results suggest that SDF-1 increases the number of osteoprogenitor cells that are mobilized from the bone marrow and then home to the implant. Thus, addition of SDF-1 to BMP-2 may improve the efficiency of BMPs in vivo, making their routine use for orthopaedic applications more affordable and available to more patients.

  8. Triclosan and bisphenol a affect decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Mita, Luigi; Cobellis, Luigi; Merafina, Verdiana; Specchio, Raffaella; Rossi, Sergio; Mita, Damiano Gustavo; Mosca, Lavinia; Castaldi, Maria Antonietta; De Falco, Maria; Laforgia, Vincenza; Crispi, Stefania

    2016-02-15

    In recent years, impaired fertility and endometrium related diseases are increased. Many evidences suggest that environmental pollution might be considered a risk factor for endometrial physiopathology. Among environmental pollutants, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) act on endocrine system, causing hormonal imbalance which, in turn, leads to female and male reproductive dysfunctions. In this work, we studied the effects of triclosan (TCL) and bisphenol A (BPA), two widespread EDCs, on human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs), derived from endometrial biopsies from woman not affected by endometriosis. Cell proliferation, cell cycle, migration and decidualization mechanisms were investigated. Treatments have been performed with both the EDCs separately or in presence and in absence of progesterone used as decidualization stimulus. Both TCL and BPA did not affect cell proliferation, but they arrested ESCs at G2/M phase of cell cycle enhancing cell migration. TCL and BPA also increased gene expression and protein levels of some decidualization markers, such as insulin growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and prolactin (PRL), amplifying the effect of progesterone alone. All together, our data strongly suggest that TCL and BPA might alter human endometrium physiology so affecting fertility and pregnancy outcome.

  9. Efficient expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells in a disposable fixed bed culture system.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Amanda; Orellana, Maristela D; Caruso, Sâmia R; de Lima Prata, Karen; Covas, Dimas T; Swiech, Kamilla

    2013-01-01

    The need for efficient and reliable technologies for clinical-scale expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) has led to the use of disposable bioreactors and culture systems. Here, we evaluate the expansion of cord blood-derived MSC in a disposable fixed bed culture system. Starting from an initial cell density of 6.0 × 10(7) cells, after 7 days of culture, it was possible to produce of 4.2(±0.8) × 10(8) cells, which represents a fold increase of 7.0 (±1.4). After enzymatic retrieval from Fibra-Cell disks, the cells were able to maintain their potential for differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes and were positive for many markers common to MSC (CD73, CD90, and CD105). The results obtained in this study demonstrate that MSC can be efficiently expanded in the culture system. This novel approach presents several advantages over the current expansion systems, based on culture flasks or microcarrier-based spinner flasks and represents a key element for MSC cellular therapy according to GMP compliant clinical-scale production system.

  10. Ultrastructural features of human adipose-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Manea, Claudiu Marius; Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Constantin, Daniel; Mănoiu, Valentina Mariana; Moldovan, Lucia; Jianu, Adelina Maria

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MMSCs) are plastic-adherent cells with a well-established phenotype. Equine, but not human, adipose MMSCs have been characterized ultrastructurally. The purpose of our study was to evaluate ultrastructurally the adipose-derived human MMSCs. Cell cultures were prepared from human lipoaspirate. The flow cytometry evaluation of surface markers of cultured cells confirmed the expected profile of MMSCs, that were positive for CD73, CD90 and CD105, and negative for CD34 and CD45. We examined these human adipose-derived MMSCs in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by Epon en-face embedding the fixed MMSCs. The main ultrastructural features of MMSCs were the extremely rich content of endosomal/vesicular elements, long mitochondria, dilated RER (rough endoplasmic reticulum) cisternae, and abundant intermediate filaments and microtubules. We found two types of MMSCS prolongations: (a) thick processes, with opposite, vesicular and filaments-rich, sides and (b) slender processes (pseudopodes and filopodes), with occasional proximal dilated segments housing mitochondria, vesicles and secretory granules. These TEM features of MMSCs characterized an in vitro cell population and could use to distinguish between different cell types in culture.

  11. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors and KIT-positive mesenchymal cells in the omentum.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, S; Hishima, T; Takazawa, Y; Sano, T; Nakajima, T; Saito, K; Morinaga, S; Fukayama, M

    2001-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is currently considered to be derived from the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). To test the hypothesis that omental mesenchymal tumor is also a type of GIST, we evaluated the expression of specific molecules in GIST, and c-kit gene mutation in omental mesenchymal tumors, and we identified a possible counterpart of ICC in the omentum. Immunohistochemically, all of the omental mesenchymal tumors (n = 5) were positive for both KIT and CD34, and three of the five tumors were also positive for an embryonic form of smooth-muscle myosin heavy chain (SMemb). Polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis (PCR-SSCP) and direct sequencing revealed mutations in c-kit gene exon 11 in all five tumors. As for the ICC counterparts in the omentum, there were some KIT-positive mesenchymal cells resembling ICC at the surface of the omentum. Double fluorescence immunostaining, using anti-KIT polyclonal antibodies and monoclonal antibodies against other molecules, demonstrated that KIT-, CD34- and SMemb-positive cells were present just beneath the mesothelial cells of the omentum. These results show that omental mesenchymal tumor corresponds to GIST of the omentum, and that KIT-positive bipolar mesenchymal cells may be a counterpart of ICC in the gastrointestinal tract. Identification of a new type of KIT-positive mesenchymal cell in the omentum may lead to the discovery of a new physiological role for this organ.

  12. Expansion of adipose mesenchymal stromal cells is affected by human platelet lysate and plating density.

    PubMed

    Cholewa, Dominik; Stiehl, Thomas; Schellenberg, Anne; Bokermann, Gudrun; Joussen, Sylvia; Koch, Carmen; Walenda, Thomas; Pallua, Norbert; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Suschek, Christoph V; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The composition of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) changes in the course of in vitro culture expansion. Little is known how these cell preparations are influenced by culture media, plating density, or passaging. In this study, we have isolated MSCs from human adipose tissue in culture medium supplemented with either fetal calf serum (FCS) or human platelet lysate (HPL). In addition, culture expansion was simultaneously performed at plating densities of 10 or 10,000 cells/cm(2). The use of FCS resulted in larger cells, whereas HPL significantly enhanced proliferation. Notably, HPL also facilitated expansion for more population doublings than FCS (43 ± 3 vs. 22 ± 4 population doubling; p < 0.001), while plating density did not have a significant effect on long-term growth curves. To gain further insight into population dynamics, we conceived a cellular automaton model to simulate expansion of MSCS. It is based on the assumptions that the number of cell divisions is limited and that due to contact inhibition proliferation occurs only at the rim of colonies. The model predicts that low plating densities result in more heterogeneity with regard to cell division history, and favor subpopulations of higher migratory activity. In summary, HPL is a suitable serum supplement for isolation of MSC from adipose tissue and facilitates more population doublings than FCS. Cellular automaton computer simulations provided additional insights into how complex population dynamics during long-term expansion are affected by plating density and migration.

  13. Cultured Human Adipose Tissue Pericytes and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display a Very Similar Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Malta, Tathiane Maistro; de Deus Wagatsuma, Virgínia Mara; Palma, Patrícia Viana Bonini; Araújo, Amélia Goes; Ribeiro Malmegrim, Kelen Cristina; Morato de Oliveira, Fábio; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Silva, Wilson Araújo; Kashima Haddad, Simone; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are cultured cells that can give rise to mature mesenchymal cells under appropriate conditions and secrete a number of biologically relevant molecules that may play an important role in regenerative medicine. Evidence indicates that pericytes (PCs) correspond to mesenchymal stem cells in vivo and can give rise to MSCs when cultured, but a comparison between the gene expression profiles of cultured PCs (cPCs) and MSCs is lacking. We have devised a novel methodology to isolate PCs from human adipose tissue and compared cPCs to MSCs obtained through traditional methods. Freshly isolated PCs expressed CD34, CD140b, and CD271 on their surface, but not CD146. Both MSCs and cPCs were able to differentiate along mesenchymal pathways in vitro, displayed an essentially identical surface immunophenotype, and exhibited the ability to suppress CD3+ lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. Microarray expression data of cPCs and MSCs formed a single cluster among other cell types. Further analyses showed that the gene expression profiles of cPCs and MSCs are extremely similar, although MSCs differentially expressed endothelial cell (EC)-specific transcripts. These results confirm, using the power of transcriptomic analysis, that PCs give rise to MSCs and suggest that low levels of ECs may persist in MSC cultures established using traditional protocols. PMID:26192741

  14. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Kveiborg, Marie; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko; Mercurio, Arthur M; Wewer, Ulla M

    2011-11-01

    Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In this study, we found that ADAM12 deficiency reduces breast tumor progression in the PyMT model. However, the catalytic activity of ADAM12 seems to be dispensable for its tumor-promoting effect. Interestingly, we show that ADAM12 endogenously expressed in tumor-associated stroma in the PyMT model does not influence tumor progression, but that ADAM12 expression by tumor cells is necessary for tumor progression in these mice. This finding is consistent with our observation that in human breast carcinoma, ADAM12 is almost exclusively located in tumor cells and, only rarely, seen in the tumor-associated stroma. We hypothesized, however, that the tumor-associated stroma may stimulate ADAM12 expression in tumor cells, on the basis of the fact that TGF-β1 stimulates ADAM12 expression and is a well-known growth factor released from tumor-associated stroma. TGF-β1 stimulation of ADAM12-negative Lewis lung tumor cells induced ADAM12 synthesis, and growth of these cells in vivo induced more than 200-fold increase in ADAM12 expression. Our observation that ADAM12 expression is significantly higher in the terminal duct lobular units (TDLU) adjacent to human breast carcinoma compared with TDLUs found in normal breast tissue supports our hypothesis that tumor-associated stroma triggers ADAM12 expression.

  15. Epithelialization and stromalization of porcine follicular granulosa cells during real-time proliferation - a primary cell culture approach.

    PubMed

    Ciesiółka, S; Bryja, A; Budna, J; Kranc, W; Chachuła, A; Bukowska, D; Piotrowska, H; Porowski, L; Antosik, P; Bruska, M; Brüssow, K P; Nowicki, M; Zabel, M; Kempisty, B

    2016-01-01

    The process of oocyte growth and development takes place during long stages of folliculogenesis and oogenesis. This is accompanied by biochemical and morphological changes, occurring from the preantral to antral stages during ovarian follicle differentiation. It is well known that the process of follicle growth is associated with morphological modifications of theca (TCs) and granulosa cells (GCs). However, the relationship between proliferation and/or differentiation of porcine GCs during long-term in vitro culture requires further investigation. Moreover, the expression of cytokeratins and vimentin in porcine GCs, in relation to real-time cell proliferation, has yet to be explored. Utilizing confocal microscopy, we analyzed cytokeratin 18 (CK18), cytokeratin 8 + 18 + 19 (panCK), and vimentin (Vim) expression, as well as their protein distribution, within GCs isolated from slaughtered ovarian follicles. The cells were cultured for 168 h with protein expression and cell proliferation index analyzed at 24-h intervals. We found the highest expression of CK18, panCK, and Vim occurred at 120 h of in vitro culture (IVC) as compared with other experimental time intervals. All of the investigated proteins displayed cytoplasmic distribution. Analysis of real-time cell proliferation revealed an increased cell index after the first 24 h of IVC. Additionally, during each period between 24-168 h of IVC, a significant difference in the proliferation profile, expressed as the cell index, was also observed. We concluded that higher expression of vimentin at 120 h of in vitro proliferation might explain the culmination of the stromalization process associated with growth and domination of stromal cells in GC culture. Cytokeratin expression within GC cytoplasm confirms the presence of epithelial cells as well as epithelial-related GC development during IVC. Moreover, expression of both cytokeratins and vimentin during short-term culture suggests that the process of GC proliferation

  16. A Modified Approach to Inducing Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Differentiate into Cells with Mature Schwann Cell Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yutian; Chen, Jianghai; Liu, Wei; Lu, Xiaocheng; Liu, Zhenyu; Zhao, Xiaobo; Li, Gongchi; Chen, Zhenbing

    2016-02-15

    Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be induced to differentiate into Schwann-like cells under classical induction conditions. However, cells derived from this method are unstable, exhibiting a low neurotrophin expression level after the induction conditions are removed. In Schwann cell (SC) culture, progesterone (PROG) enhances neurotrophic synthesis and myelination, specifically regulating the expression of the myelin protein zero (P0)- and peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22)-encoding genes by acting in concert or in synergy with insulin and glucocorticoids (GLUCs). In the present study, we investigated whether combined PROG, GLUC, and insulin therapy induced MSCs to differentiate into modified SC-like cells with phenotypes similar to those of mature SCs. After being cultured for 2 weeks in modified differentiation medium, the modified SC-like cells showed increased expression of P0 and PMP22. In addition, morphological and phenotypic characterizations were conducted over a period of over 2 weeks, and functional characteristics persisted for more than 3 weeks after the induction reagents were withdrawn. The transplantation of green fluorescent protein-labeled, modified SC-like cells into transected sciatic nerves with a 10-mm gap significantly increased the proliferation of the original SCs and improved axon regeneration and myelination compared with original BM-SCs. Immunostaining for P0 revealed that more of the transplanted modified SC-like cells retained the phenotypic characteristics of SCs. Taken together, these results reveal that the combined application of PROG, GLUC, and insulin induces MSCs to differentiate into cells with phenotypic, molecular, and functional properties of mature SCs.

  17. Pre-diagnostic obesity and physical inactivity are associated with shorter telomere length in prostate stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshu, Corinne E; Peskoe, Sarah B; Heaphy, Christopher M; Kenfield, Stacey A; Van Blarigan, Erin L; Mucci, Lorelei A; Giovannucci, Edward L; Stampfer, Meir J; Yun, GhilSuk; Lee, Thomas K; Hicks, Jessica L; De Marzo, Angelo M; Meeker, Alan K; Platz, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and inactivity have been with associated advanced stage prostate cancer, and poor prostate cancer outcomes, though the underlying mechanism(s) is unknown. To determine if telomere shortening, which has been associated with lethal prostate cancer, may be a potential underlying mechanism, we prospectively evaluated the association between measures of adiposity, physical activity and telomere length in 596 participants in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, who were surgically treated for prostate cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we measured telomere length in cancer and benign cells using a telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization assay. Adiposity and activity were assessed via questionnaire within 2 years of diagnosis. Adjusting for age, pathologic stage and grade, the median and standard deviation of the per cell telomere signals were determined for each man for stromal cells and cancer cells by adiposity and activity categories. Overweight/obese men (54%) were similar to normal weight men on most factors, but had higher Gleason sum and lower activity levels. Overweight/obese men had 7.4% shorter telomeres in stromal cells than normal weight men (P=0.06). The least active men had shorter telomeres in stromal cells than more active men (P-trend=0.002). Men who were overweight/obese and the least active had the shortest telomeres in stromal cells (20.7% shorter; P=0.0005) compared to normal weight men who were the most active. Cancer cell telomere length and telomere length variability did not differ by measures of adiposity or activity. Telomere shortening in prostate cells may be one mechanism through which lifestyle influences prostate cancer risk and outcomes. PMID:25990087

  18. Modes of Antigen Presentation by Lymph Node Stromal Cells and Their Immunological Implications.

    PubMed

    Hirosue, Sachiko; Dubrot, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is no longer the exclusive domain of cells of hematopoietic origin. Recent works have demonstrated that lymph node stromal cell (LNSC) populations, such as fibroblastic reticular cells, lymphatic and blood endothelial cells, not only provide a scaffold for lymphocyte interactions but also exhibit active immunomodulatory roles that are critical to mounting and resolving effective immune responses. Importantly, LNSCs possess the ability to present antigens and establish antigen-specific interactions with T cells. One example is the expression of peripheral tissue antigens, which are presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I molecules with tolerogenic consequences on T cells. Additionally, exogenous antigens, including self and tumor antigens, can be processed and presented on MHC-I complexes, which result in dysfunctional activation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. While MHC-I is widely expressed on cells of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origins, antigen presentation via MHC-II is more precisely regulated. Nevertheless, LNSCs are capable of endogenously expressing, or alternatively, acquiring MHC-II molecules. Transfer of antigen between LNSC and dendritic cells in both directions has been recently suggested to promote tolerogenic roles of LNSCs on the CD4(+) T cell compartment. Thus, antigen presentation by LNSCs is thought to be a mechanism that promotes the maintenance of peripheral tolerance as well as generates a pool of diverse antigen-experienced T cells for protective immunity. This review aims to integrate the current and emerging literature to highlight the importance of LNSCs in immune responses, and emphasize their role in antigen trafficking, retention, and presentation.

  19. EFFECTS OF PLATING DENSITY AND CULTURE TIME ON BONE MARROW STROMAL CELL CHARACTERISTICS

    PubMed Central

    Neuhuber, Birgit; Swanger, Sharon A.; Howard, Linda; Mackay, Alastair; Fischer, Itzhak

    2008-01-01

    Objective Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent adult stem cells that have emerged as promising candidates for cell therapy in disorders including cardiac infarction, stroke and spinal cord injury. While harvesting methods used by different laboratories are relatively standard, MSC culturing protocols vary widely. This study is aimed at evaluating the effects of initial plating density and total time in culture on proliferation, cell morphology, and differentiation potential of heterogeneous MSC cultures and more homogeneous cloned subpopulations. Methods Rat MSC were plated at 20, 200 and 2000 cells/cm2 and grown to 50% confluency. The numbers of population doublings and doubling times were determined within and across multiple passages. Changes in cell morphology and differentiation potential to adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic lineages were evaluated and compared among early, intermediate and late passages, as well as between heterogeneous and cloned MSC populations. Results We found optimal cell growth at a plating density of 200 cells/cm2. Cultures derived from all plating densities developed increased proportions of flat cells over time. Assays for chondrogenesis, osteogenesis and adipogenesis showed that heterogeneous MSC plated at all densities sustained the potential for all three mesenchymal phenotypes through at least passage 5; the flat subpopulation lost adipogenic and chondrogenic potential. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the initial plating density is not critical for maintaining a well-defined, multipotent MSC population. Time in culture, however, affects cell characteristics, suggesting that cell expansion should be limited, especially until the specific characteristics of different MSC subpopulations are better understood. PMID:18495329

  20. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Li; Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin; Song, Wen-Hui; Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao; Li, Ang; Yang, Wu-Lin

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5.

  1. The Immunomodulatory and Therapeutic Effects of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Mirabelle S H; Mei, Shirley H J; Stewart, Duncan J

    2015-11-01

    It is increasingly recognized that immunomodulation represents an important mechanism underlying the benefits of many stem cell therapies, rather than the classical paradigm of transdifferentiation and cell replacement. In the former paradigm, the beneficial effects of cell therapy result from paracrine mechanism(s) and/or cell-cell interaction as opposed to direct engraftment and repair of diseased tissue and/or dysfunctional organs. Depending on the cell type used, components of the secretome, including microRNA (miRNA) and extracellular vesicles, may be able to either activate or suppress the immune system even without direct immune cell contact. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), also referred to as mesenchymal stem cells, are found not only in the bone marrow, but also in a wide variety of organs and tissues. In addition to any direct stem cell activities, MSCs were the first stem cells recognized to modulate immune response, and therefore they will be the focus of this review. Specifically, MSCs appear to be able to effectively attenuate acute and protracted inflammation via interactions with components of both innate and adaptive immune systems. To date, this capacity has been exploited in a large number of preclinical studies and MSC immunomodulatory therapy has been attempted with various degrees of success in a relatively large number of clinical trials. Here, we will explore the various mechanism employed by MSCs to effect immunosuppression as well as review the current status of its use to treat excessive inflammation in the context of acute lung injury (ALI) and sepsis in both preclinical and clinical settings.

  2. Autologous transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells ameliorates pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, N; Okumura, M; Mizuno, S; Imanishi, Y; Nakamura, T; Sawa, Y

    2006-11-01

    Adipose tissue is a useful tool for management of most complex cardiothoracic problems, including the reinforcement of damaged lungs, and adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs) have been suggested to secrete hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a multipotent regenerative factor that contributes to the repair process after lung injury. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the therapeutic impact of autologous transplantation of ASCs through HGF supplementation for the enhancement of alveolar repair in a rat model of emphysema. ASCs were isolated from inguinal subcutaneous fat pads and characterized by flow cytometry. Cultured ASC were found to secrete significantly larger amounts of HGF (15 112 +/- 1628 pg per 10(6) cells) than other angiogenic factors. Transplantation of ASCs into elastase-treated emphysema models induced a significant increase in endogenous HGF expression in lung tissues with a small amount of increase in other organs, with the high levels lasting for up to 4 weeks after transplantation. Further, alveolar and vascular regeneration were significantly enhanced via inhibition of alveolar cell apoptosis, enhancement of epithelial cell proliferation and promotion of angiogenesis in pulmonary vasculature, leading to restoration of pulmonary function affected by emphysema. These data suggest that autologous ASC cell therapy may have a therapeutic potential for pulmonary emphysema, through inducing HGF expression selectively in injured lung tissues.

  3. The roles of serum CXCL16 in circulating Tregs and gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common sarcomas of the digestive system. Abnormal expression of CXCL16 and its sole receptor, CXCR6, has been demonstrated in many cancers. However, no studies have shown the relationship between CXCL16 or CXCR6 expression and GIST. In this study, we detected CXCL16 and CXCR6 expression in GIST patient samples by using immunohistochemistry analysis and Western blot analysis. Serum CXCL16 level was determined by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Circulating Tregs were isolated by using flow cytometry. MTT assay, cell cycle assay, and transwell assay were used to test the effects of recombinant CXCL16 on Tregs and GIST cells in vitro. The levels of CXCL16 and CXCR6 protein were higher in cancer tissues than in normal tissues. Serum CXCL16 level and circulating Tregs were higher in GIST patients than that in the healthy volunteers. CXCL16, CXCR6, serum CXCL16, and circulating Tregs were significantly associated with a decreased survival time of patients. Relative to control cells, high concentration recombinant CXCL16 treated Tregs and GIST cells exhibited lower proliferation and mobility rates as assessed by MTT assay and transwell assay, respectively. Taken together, CXCL16 was observed to mediate the inhibitory effects in Tregs and GIST cells, and these involved suppression of the MEK/ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27418838

  4. Voltage-dependent calcium and chloride currents in S17 bone marrow stromal cell line.

    PubMed

    Silva, Henrique B; Medei, Emiliano; Rodrigues, Deivid C; Rondinelli, Edson; Almeida, Norma A S; Goldenberg, Regina C S; de Carvalho, Antonio C Campos; Nascimento, José H M

    2010-04-01

    The bone marrow stromal cell line S17 has been used to study hematopoiesis in vitro. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of calcium and chloride currents in cultured S17 cells. Calcium currents were of low amplitude or barely detectable (50-100 pA). Hence to amplify the currents, we have used barium as a charge carrier. Barium currents were identified based on their distinct voltage-dependence, and sensitivity to dihydropyridines. S17 cells also exhibited a slowly activating outward current without inactivation, most commonly seen when the sodium of the extracellular solution was replaced either by TEA (TEA/Cs saline) or NMDG (NMDG saline), or by addition of amiloride to the extracellular solution. This current was abolished either by 500 microM SITS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2-2'-disulfonic acid) or 500 microM DPC (diphenylamine-2-carboxylic acid) a cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel blocker, identifying it as a Cl(-) current. RT-PCR identified the presence of ENaC and CFTR transcripts. CFTR blockade reduced cell proliferation, suggesting that this channel plays a physiological role in regulation of S17 cell proliferation.

  5. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways.

    PubMed

    Perros, Frederic; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2011-09-24

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs.

  6. Acute Hypoxic Stress Affects Migration Machinery of Tissue O2-Adapted Adipose Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lobanova, Margarita V.; Andreeva, Elena R.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (MSCs) to be mobilised from their local depot towards sites of injury and to participate in tissue repair makes these cells promising candidates for cell therapy. Physiological O2 tension in an MSC niche in vivo is about 4–7%. However, most in vitro studies of MSC functional activity are performed at 20% O2. Therefore, this study focused on the effects of short-term hypoxic stress (0.1% O2, 24 h) on adipose tissue-derived MSC motility at tissue-related O2 level. No significant changes in integrin expression were detected after short-term hypoxic stress. However, O2 deprivation provoked vimentin disassembly and actin polymerisation and increased cell stiffness. In addition, hypoxic stress induced the downregulation of ACTR3, DSTN, MACF1, MID1, MYPT1, NCK1, ROCK1, TIAM1, and WASF1 expression, the products of which are known to be involved in leading edge formation and cell translocation. These changes were accompanied by the attenuation of targeted and nontargeted migration of MSCs after short-term hypoxic exposure, as demonstrated in scratch and transwell migration assays. These results indicate that acute hypoxic stress can modulate MSC function in their native milieu, preventing their mobilisation from sites of injury. PMID:28115943

  7. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 Alpha is Cardioprotective After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ankur; Fish, Jason E.; White, Michael D.; Yu, Sangho; Smyth, James WP; Shaw, Robin M.; DiMaio, J. Michael; Srivastava, Deepak

    2009-01-01

    Background Heart disease is a leading cause of mortality throughout the world. Tissue damage from vascular occlusive events results in the replacement of contractile myocardium by nonfunctional scar tissue. The potential of new technologies to regenerate damaged myocardium is significant, although cell-based therapies must overcome several technical barriers. One possible cell-independent alternative is the direct administration of small proteins to damaged myocardium. Methods and Results Here we show that the secreted signaling protein stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α), which activates the cell-survival factor protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) via the G-protein-coupled receptor CXCR4, protected tissue after an acute ischemic event in mice and activated Akt within endothelial cells and myocytes of the heart. Significantly better cardiac function than in control mice was evident as early as 24 hours post-infarction as well as at 3, 14 and 28 days post-infarction. Prolonged survival of hypoxic myocardium was followed by an increase in levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein and neo-angiogenesis. Consistent with improved cardiac function, mice exposed to SDF-1α demonstrated significantly decreased scar formation than control mice. Conclusions These findings suggest that SDF-1α may serve a tissue-protective and regenerative role for solid organs suffering a hypoxic insult. PMID:18427137

  8. Requirement of soluble factors produced by bone marrow stromal cells on the growth of novel established human myeloma cell line.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Shingo; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Megumi; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Yasukawa, Kiyotaka; Sawada, Umihiko; Horie, Takashi; Tsuboi, Isao; Aizawa, Shin

    2003-03-01

    The growth of myeloma cells is believed to be mediated by functional interactions between tumor cells and the marrow environment involving the action of several cytokines. We report on the establishment and characterization of a new human myeloma cell line (TAB1) that can be long-term maintained in the presence of conditioned medium of bone marrow stromal cells (BMCM) and a BMCM independent variant, C2-2. Both cell lines have plasma cell morphology and express plasma cell antigens (CD38, PCA-1 and immunoglobulin kappa light chain). In the absence of BMCM, TAB1 cells undergoing apoptosis were observed. Among the adherent molecules tested, these cells expressed VLA-4, ICAM-1 and H-CAM, but not VLA-5, suggesting that these were mostly immature plasmacytes. Introduction with exogenous IL-6 and/or GM-CSF, which were detected in BMCM, partially supported the proliferation of TAB1 cells. Treatment with anti-IL-6 antibody partially inhibited the proliferation of TAB1 cells cultured with BMCM. These findings strongly suggest that TAB1 required at least two or more factors on their growth in vitro; IL-6 was one of the factors necessary for cell growth. Further studies are required to clarify the precise molecules which support TAB1 cell growth in combination with IL-6, however, TAB1 and its variant C2-2 cells may offer an attractive model to unravel novel molecular mechanisms involved in bone marrow stroma-dependent growth of myeloma cells.

  9. Low stromal Foxp3+ regulatory T-cell density is associated with complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, M J; Hemmings, C; Miller, T J; Austin, S J; Bulsara, M K; Zeps, N; Nowak, A K; Lake, R A; Platell, C F

    2015-01-01

    Background: Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a vital role in preventing autoimmunity, but also suppress antitumour immune responses. Tumour infiltration by Tregs has strong prognostic significance in colorectal cancer, and accumulating evidence suggests that chemotherapy and radiotherapy efficacy has an immune-mediated component. Whether Tregs play an inhibitory role in chemoradiotherapy (CRT) response in rectal cancer remains unknown. Methods: Foxp3+, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and IL-17+ cell density in post-CRT surgical samples from 128 patients with rectal cancer was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The relationship between T-cell subset densities and clinical outcome (tumour regression and survival) was evaluated. Results: Stromal Foxp3+ cell density was strongly associated with tumour regression grade (P=0.0006). A low stromal Foxp3+ cell density was observed in 84% of patients who had a pathologic complete response (pCR) compared with 41% of patients who did not (OR: 7.56, P=0.0005; OR: 5.27, P=0.006 after adjustment for presurgery clinical factors). Low stromal Foxp3+ cell density was also associated with improved recurrence-free survival (HR: 0.46, P=0.03), although not independent of tumour regression grade. Conclusions: Regulatory T cells in the tumour microenvironment may inhibit response to neoadjuvant CRT and may represent a therapeutic target in rectal cancer. PMID:26645238

  10. Hematopoiesis on cellulose ester membranes. XI. Induction of new bone and a hematopoietic microenvironment by matrix factors secreted by marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Knospe, W H; Husseini, S G; Fried, W

    1989-07-01

    Cellulose ester membranes (CEM) were coated with stromal cells from bone marrow (BM) or bone and implanted intraperitoneally (IP) in CAF1 mice for intervals of 1 to 6 months. Previous studies indicated that matrix factors [glycoproteins (GPs), proteoglycans (PGs), and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs)] were secreted by the regenerating stromal cells and adsorbed by the CEM. After 1 to 6 months, the CEMs were removed, scraped free of adherent cells, and irradiated in vitro with 40 Gy. The scraped and irradiated CEMs were then reimplanted IP or subcutaneously (SC) for periods of 1 to 6 months in secondary syngeneic murine hosts. They were then removed for histologic study. CEMs reimplanted in SC sites developed bone and hematopoiesis as early as 1 month after implantation. Maximum hematopoiesis and bone formation was observed after 3 months. CEMs coated during the initial implantation with bone-derived stromal cells contained more bone and hematopoietic cells than did CEMs coated with marrow-derived stromal cells after SC implementation. Neither the CEMs coated with bone stromal cells nor those coated with marrow stromal cells developed new bone or trilineal hematopoiesis after being implanted IP. A few CEMs contained small foci of granulopoiesis only. We conclude that noncellular matrix substances deposited on CEMs by bone, and to a lesser degree by marrow cells, can induce prestromal cells in the SC tissues to produce a microenvironment suitable for trilineal hematopoiesis.

  11. Prostate Cancer Cell Telomere Length Variability and Stromal Cell Telomere Length as Prognostic Markers for Metastasis and Death

    PubMed Central

    Heaphy, Christopher M.; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Joshu, Corinne E.; Lee, Thomas K.; Giovannucci, Edward; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Kenfield, Stacey A.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Hicks, Jessica L.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Meeker, Alan K.

    2013-01-01

    Current prognostic indicators are imperfect predictors of outcome in men with clinicallylocalized prostate cancer. Thus, tissue-based markers are urgently needed to improve treatment and surveillance decision-making. Given that shortened telomeres enhance chromosomal instability and such instability is a hallmark of metastatic lesions, we hypothesized that alterations in telomere length in the primary cancer would predict risk of progression to metastasis and prostate cancer death. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a prospective cohort study of 596 surgically treated men who participated in the ongoing Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Men who had the combination of more variable telomere length among prostate cancer cells (cell-to-cell) and shorter telomere length in prostate cancer-associated stromal cells were substantially more likely to progress to metastasis or die of their prostate cancer. These findings point to the translational potential of this telomere biomarker for prognostication and risk stratification for individualized therapeutic and surveillance strategies. PMID:23779129

  12. BST2 Mediates Osteoblast Differentiation via the BMP2 Signaling Pathway in Human Alveolar-Derived Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Su-Hyang; Kim, Jae Goo; Kim, Beom-Su; Lee, Jun; Pi, Sung-Hee; Lim, Hyun-Dae; Shin, Hong-In; Cho, Eui-Sic

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling the differentiation of bone marrow stromal stem cells into osteoblasts remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated whether bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST2) influences differentiation toward the osteoblasts lineage. BST2 mRNA expression in human alveolar-derived bone marrow stromal cells (hAD-BMSCs) increased during differentiation into osteoblasts. hAD-BMSCs differentiation into osteoblasts and the mRNA expression of the bone-specific markers alkaline phosphatase, collagen type α 1, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and osterix were reduced by BST2 knockdown using siRNA. Furthermore, BST2 knockdown in hAD-BMSCs resulted in decreased RUNX2 mRNA and protein expression. We hypothesized that BST2 is involved in differentiation of into osteoblasts via the BMP2 signaling pathway. Accordingly, we evaluated the mRNA expression levels of BMP2, BMP receptors (BMPR1 and 2), and the downstream signaling molecules SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in BST2 knockdown cells. BMP2 expression following the induction of differentiation was significantly lower in BST2 knockdown cells than in cells treated with a non-targeting control siRNA. Similar results were found for the knockdown of the BMP2 receptor- BMPR1A. We also identified significantly lower expression of SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in the BST2 knockdown cells than control cells. Our data provide the first evidence that BST2 is involved in the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells via the regulation of the BMP2 signaling pathway. PMID:27359105

  13. BST2 Mediates Osteoblast Differentiation via the BMP2 Signaling Pathway in Human Alveolar-Derived Bone Marrow Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Su-Hyang; Kim, Jae Goo; Kim, Beom-Su; Lee, Jun; Pi, Sung-Hee; Lim, Hyun-Dae; Shin, Hong-In; Cho, Eui-Sic; You, Hyung-Keun

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling the differentiation of bone marrow stromal stem cells into osteoblasts remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated whether bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST2) influences differentiation toward the osteoblasts lineage. BST2 mRNA expression in human alveolar-derived bone marrow stromal cells (hAD-BMSCs) increased during differentiation into osteoblasts. hAD-BMSCs differentiation into osteoblasts and the mRNA expression of the bone-specific markers alkaline phosphatase, collagen type α 1, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and osterix were reduced by BST2 knockdown using siRNA. Furthermore, BST2 knockdown in hAD-BMSCs resulted in decreased RUNX2 mRNA and protein expression. We hypothesized that BST2 is involved in differentiation of into osteoblasts via the BMP2 signaling pathway. Accordingly, we evaluated the mRNA expression levels of BMP2, BMP receptors (BMPR1 and 2), and the downstream signaling molecules SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in BST2 knockdown cells. BMP2 expression following the induction of differentiation was significantly lower in BST2 knockdown cells than in cells treated with a non-targeting control siRNA. Similar results were found for the knockdown of the BMP2 receptor- BMPR1A. We also identified significantly lower expression of SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in the BST2 knockdown cells than control cells. Our data provide the first evidence that BST2 is involved in the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells via the regulation of the BMP2 signaling pathway.

  14. Human placental multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells modulate placenta angiogenesis through Slit2-Robo signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Yi; Tsai, Chin-Han; Chen, Chia-Yu; Wu, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Chie-Pein

    2016-03-03

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether human placental multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (hPMSC)-derived Slit2 and endothelial cell Roundabout (Robo) receptors are involved in placental angiogenesis. The hPMSC-conditioned medium and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were studied for Slit2 and Robo receptor expression by immunoassay and RT-PCR. The effect of the conditioned medium of hPMSCs with or without Slit2 depletion on endothelial cells was investigated by in vitro angiogenesis using growth factor-reduced Matrigel. hPMSCs express Slit2 and both Robo1 and Robo4 are present in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells do not express Robo2 and Robo3. The hPMSC-conditioned medium and Slit2 recombinant protein significantly inhibit the endothelial cell migration, but not by the hPMSC-conditioned medium with Slit2 depletion. The hPMSC-conditioned medium and Slit2 significantly enhance endothelial tube formation with increased cumulated tube length, polygonal network number and vessel branching point number compared to endothelial cells alone. The tube formation is inhibited by the depletion of Slit2 from the conditioned medium, or following the expression of Robo1, Robo4, and both receptor knockdown using small interfering RNA. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation reveals Slit2 binds to Robo1 and Robo4. Robo1 interacts and forms a heterodimeric complex with Robo4. These results suggest the implication of both Robo receptors with Slit2 signaling, which is involved in endothelial cell angiogenesis. Slit2 in the conditioned medium of hPMSCs has functional effect on endothelial cells and may play a role in placental angiogenesis.

  15. Transcriptomic Analyses of Adipocyte Differentiation From Human Mesenchymal Stromal-Cells (MSC).

    PubMed

    Casado-Díaz, Antonio; Anter, Jaouad; Müller, Sören; Winter, Peter; Quesada-Gómez, José Manuel; Dorado, Gabriel

    2017-04-01

    Adipogenesis is a physiological process required for fat-tissue development, mainly involved in regulating the organism energetic-state. Abnormal distribution-changes and dysfunctions in such tissue are associated to different pathologies. Adipocytes are generated from progenitor cells, via a complex differentiating process not yet well understood. Therefore, we investigated differential mRNA and miRNA expression patterns of human mesenchymal stromal-cells (MSC) induced and not induced to differentiate into adipocytes by next (second)-generation sequencing. A total of 2,866 differentially expressed genes (101 encoding miRNA) were identified, with 705 (46 encoding miRNA) being upregulated in adipogenesis. They were related to different pathways, including PPARG, lipid, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, redox, membrane-organelle biosynthesis, and endocrine system. Downregulated genes were related to extracellular matrix and cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Analyses of mRNA-miRNA interaction showed that repressed miRNA-encoding genes can act downregulating PPARG-related genes; mostly the PPARG activator (PPARGC1A). Induced miRNA-encoding genes regulate downregulated genes related to TGFB1. These results shed new light to understand adipose-tissue differentiation and physiology, increasing our knowledge about pathologies like obesity, type-2 diabetes and osteoporosis. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 771-784, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effects of continuous and pulsatile PTH treatments on rat bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Chiming; Frei, Hanspeter Burt, Helen M.; Rossi, Fabio

    2009-03-20

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) differentiation and proliferation are controlled by numerous growth factors and hormones. Continuous parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment has been shown to decrease osteoblast differentiation, whereas pulsatile PTH increases osteoblast differentiation. However, the effects of PTH treatments on MSCs have not been investigated. This study showed continuous PTH treatment in the presence of dexamethasone (DEX) promoted osteogenic differentiation of rat MSCs in vitro, as demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, number of ALP expressing cells, and up-regulation of PTH receptor-1, ALP, and osteocalcin mRNA expressions. In contrast, pulsatile PTH treatment was found to suppress osteogenesis of rat MSCs, possibly by promoting the maintenance of undifferentiated cells. Additionally, the observed effects of PTH were strongly dependent on the presence of DEX. MSC proliferation however was not influenced by PTH independent of treatment regimen and presence or absence of DEX. Furthermore, our work raised the possibility that PTH treatment may modulate stem/progenitor cell activity within MSC cultures.

  17. [Interleukine production in culture of mesenchymal stromal cells of humans during simulation of the microgravity effects].

    PubMed

    Gershovich, Iu G; Buravkova, L B

    2009-01-01

    Effects of simulated microgravity (cell clinostatting and containment in the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), Dutch Space, The Netherlands) on interleukins production by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) of the human marrow and MSC osteogenous derivatives obtained through cell stimulation by growth factors (10(-8) M dexamethazone, 0.2 mM ascorbic acid, 10 mM beta-glycerol-phosphate) were studied. Twenty-day clinostatting was found to increase 1.4 to 3.2 times the interleukin-8 (IL-8) content in the MSC and MSC osteogenous derivatives culture medium. Microgravity effects simulated with the use of RPM raised the IL-8 production 1.5 - 6 times and 1.6-2.1 times on the average after 10 days and 20 days of containment, respectively. MSC and MSC osteogenous derivatives demonstrated a downward trend in IL-6 secretion in the culture put in RPM. Therefore, simulation of the microgravity effects using different systems modifies interleukins production by MSC and also by mature cells of the osteoblastic phenotype.

  18. The role of mesenchymal stromal cells in spinal cord injury, regenerative medicine and possible clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Forostyak, Serhiy; Jendelova, Pavla; Sykova, Eva

    2013-12-01

    Diseases of the central nervous system still remain among the most challenging pathologies known to mankind, having no or limited therapeutic possibilities and a very pessimistic prognosis. Advances in stem cell biology in the last decade have shown that stem cells might provide an inexhaustible source of neurons and glia as well as exerting a neuroprotective effect on the host tissue, thus opening new horizons for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, we discuss the progress made in the cell-based therapy of spinal cord injury. An emphasis has been placed on the application of adult mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We then review the latest and most significant results from in vitro and in vivo research focusing on the regenerative/neuroprotective properties of MSCs. We also attempt to correlate the effect of MSCs with the pathological events that are taking place in the nervous tissue after SCI. Finally, we discuss the results from preclinical and clinical trials involving different routes of MSC application into patients with neurological disorders of the spinal cord.

  19. Proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells under hypoxic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Hongying; Cai Huiguo; Han Zhongchao; Yang Renchi; Zhao, Qinjun; Cao Ying; Li Jing; Zhou Cixiang; Liao Lianming; Jia Mingyue; Zhao Qian; Chen Guoqiang . E-mail: chengq@shsmu.edu.cn; Zhao, R.C. |. E-mail: chunhuaz@public.tpt.tj.cn

    2006-08-18

    Low oxygen tension is a potent differentiation inducer of numerous cell types and an effective stimulus of many gene expressions. Here, we described that under 8% O{sub 2}, bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) exhibited proliferative and morphologic changes. The level of differentiated antigen H-2Dd and the number of G{sub 2}/S/M phase cells increased evidently under 8% O{sub 2} condition. Also, the proportion of wide, flattened, and epithelial-like cells (which were alkaline phosphatase staining positive) in MSCs increased significantly. When cultured in adipogenic medium, there was a 5- to 6-fold increase in the number of lipid droplets under hypoxic conditions compared with that in normoxic culture. We also demonstrated the existence of MSC differentiation under hypoxic conditions by electron microscopy. Expression of Oct4 was inhibited under 8% O{sub 2} condition, but after adipocyte differentiation in normoxic culture and hypoxia-mimicking agents cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) and deferoxamine mesylate (DFX) treatments, Oct4 was still expressed in MSCs. These results indicate hypoxia accelerates MSC differentiation and hypoxia and hypoxia-mimicking agents exert different effects on MSC differentiation.

  20. Culture and Use of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Phase I and II Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, Bourin; Luc, Sensebé; Valérie, Planat-Bénard; Jérôme, Roncalli; Alessandra, Bura-Rivière; Louis, Casteilla

    2010-01-01

    Present in numerous tissues, mesenchymal stem cells/multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) can differentiate into different cell types from a mesoderm origin. Their potential has been extended to pluripotency, by their possibility of differentiating into tissues and cells of nonmesodermic origin. Through the release of cytokines, growth factors and biologically active molecules, MSCs exert important paracrine effects during tissue repair and inflammation. Moreover, MSCs have immunosuppressive properties related to non-HLA restricted immunosuppressive capacities. All these features lead to an increasing range of possible applications of MSCs, from treating immunological diseases to tissue and organ repair, that should be tested in phase I and II clinical trials. The most widely used MSCs are cultured from bone marrow or adipose tissue. For clinical trial implementation, BM MSCs and ADSCs should be produced according to Good Manufacturing Practices. Safety remains the major concern and must be ensured during culture and validated with relevant controls. We describe some applications of MSCs in clinical trials. PMID:21052537

  1. Human mesenchymal stromal cell-secreted lactate induces M2-macrophage differentiation by metabolic reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Civini, Sara; Pacelli, Consiglia; Dieng, Mame Massar; Lemieux, William; Jin, Ping; Bazin, Renée; Patey, Natacha; Marincola, Francesco M.; Moldovan, Florina; Zaouter, Charlotte; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Benabdhalla, Basma; Louis, Isabelle; Beauséjour, Christian; Stroncek, David; Le Deist, Françoise; Haddad, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to dampen immune response and promote tissue repair, but the underlying mechanisms are still under investigation. Herein, we demonstrate that umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) alter the phenotype and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) through lactate-mediated metabolic reprogramming. UC-MSC can secrete large quantities of lactate and, when present during monocyte-to-DC differentiation, induce instead the acquisition of M2-macrophage features in terms of morphology, surface markers, migratory properties and antigen presentation capacity. Microarray expression profiling indicates that UC-MSC modify the expression of metabolic-related genes and induce a M2-macrophage expression signature. Importantly, monocyte-derived DC obtained in presence of UC-MSC, polarize naïve allogeneic CD4+ T-cells into Th2 cells. Treatment of UC-MSC with an inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase strongly decreases lactate concentration in culture supernatant and abrogates the effect on monocyte-to-DC differentiation. Metabolic analysis further revealed that UC-MSC decrease oxidative phosphorylation in differentiating monocytes while strongly increasing the spare respiratory capacity proportional to the amount of secreted lactate. Because both MSC and monocytes are recruited in vivo at the site of tissue damage and inflammation, we propose the local increase of lactate concentration induced by UC-MSC and the consequent enrichment in M2-macrophage generation as a mechanism to achieve immunomodulation. PMID:27070086

  2. Native multipotential stromal cell colonization and graft expander potential of a bovine natural bone scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kouroupis, Dimitrios; Baboolal, Thomas G; Jones, Elena; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2013-12-01

    Graft expanders are bone scaffolds used, in combination with autografts, to fill large bone defects in trauma surgery. This study investigates the graft expander potential of a natural bone substitute Orthoss by studying its ability to support attachment, growth and osteogenic differentiation of neighboring multipotential stromal cells (MSCs). Material consisting of bone marrow (BM) aspirate and reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA)-harvested autograft bone was co-cultured with commercially available Orthoss granules. Native MSCs attached to Orthoss were expanded and phenotypically characterized. MSCs egress from neighboring cancelous bone was assessed in 3D Matrigel co-cultures. MSC differentiation was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity per cell. CD45(+) hematopoietic lineage cells and highly proliferative CD90(+) CD73(+) CD105(+) MSCs preferentially colonized Orthoss granules, over RIA bone chips. MSC colonization was followed by their intrinsic osteogenic differentiation, assessed as mineral deposition and gradual rise in ALP activity, even in the absence of osteogenic stimuli. When in contact with mixed cell populations and RIA chips, Orthoss granules support the attachment, growth and osteogenic differentiation of neighboring MSCs. Therefore, natural bone substitutes similar to Orthoss can be used as void fillers and graft expanders for repairing large bone defects in conjunction with autologous BM aspirates and autografts.

  3. Treatment with bone marrow-derived stromal cells accelerates wound healing in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kwon, David S; Gao, Xiaohua; Liu, Yong Bo; Dulchavsky, Deborah S; Danyluk, Andrew L; Bansal, Mona; Chopp, Michael; McIntosh, Kevin; Arbab, Ali S; Dulchavsky, Scott A; Gautam, Subhash C

    2008-06-01

    Bone marrow stem cells participate in tissue repair processes and may have a role in wound healing. Diabetes is characterised by delayed and poor wound healing. We investigated the potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) to promote healing of fascial wounds in diabetic rats. After manifestation of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic state for 5 weeks in male adult Sprague-Dawley rats, healing of fascial wounds was severely compromised. Compromised wound healing in diabetic rats was characterised by excessive polymorphonuclear cell infiltration, lack of granulation tissue formation, deficit of collagen and growth factor [transforming growth factor (TGF-beta), epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor PDGF-BB and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF)] expression in the wound tissue and significant decrease in biomechanical strength of wounds. Treatment with BMSC systemically or locally at the wound site improved the wound-breaking strength (WBS) of fascial wounds. The improvement in WBS was associated with an immediate and significant increase in collagen levels (types I-V) in the wound bed. In addition, treatment with BMSCs increased the expression of growth factors critical to proper repair and regeneration of the damaged tissue moderately (TGF-beta, KGF) to markedly (EGF, VEGF, PDGF-BB). These data suggest that cell therapy with BMSCs has the potential to augment healing of the diabetic wounds.

  4. Zoledronic acid in vivo increases in vitro proliferation of rat mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Heino, Terhi J; Alm, Jessica J; Halkosaari, Heikki J; Välimäki, Ville-Valtteri

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Bisphosphonates are widely used in the treatment of bone loss, but they might also have positive effects on osteoblastic cells and bone formation. We evaluated the effect of in vivo zoledronic acid (ZA) treatment and possible concomitant effects of ZA and fracture on the ex vivo osteogenic capacity of rat mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Methods A closed femoral fracture model was used in adult female rats and ZA was administered as a single bolus or as weekly doses up to 8 weeks. Bone marrow MSCs were isolated and cultured for in vitro analyses. Fracture healing was evaluated by radiography, micro-computed tomography (μCT), and histology. Results Both bolus and weekly ZA increased fracture-site bone mineral content and volume. MSCs from weekly ZA-treated animals showed increased ex vivo proliferative capacity, while no substantial effect on osteoblastic differentiation was observed. Fracture itself did not have any substantial effect on cell proliferation or differentiation at 8 weeks. Serum biochemical markers showed higher levels of bone formation in animals with fracture than in intact animals, while no difference in bone resorption was observed. Interestingly, ex vivo osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs was found to correlate with in vivo serum bone markers. Interpretation Our data show that in vivo zoledronic acid treatment can influence ex vivo proliferation of MSCs, indicating that bisphosphonates can have sustainable effects on cells of the osteoblastic lineage. Further research is needed to investigate the mechanisms. PMID:27196705

  5. CXCL1 mediates obesity-associated adipose stromal cell trafficking and function in the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Sirin, Olga; Corn, Paul G.; Li-Ning-Tapia, Elsa M.; Troncoso, Patricia; Davis, John; Pettaway, Curtis; Ward, John; Frazier, Marsha L.; Logothetis, Christopher; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) overgrowth in obesity is linked with increased aggressiveness of certain cancers. Adipose stromal cells (ASCs) can become mobilized from WAT, recruited by tumours and promote cancer progression. Mechanisms underlying ASC trafficking are unclear. Here we demonstrate that chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8 chemoattract ASC by signalling through their receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, in cell culture models. We further show that obese patients with prostate cancer have increased epithelial CXCL1 expression. Concomitantly, we observe that cells with ASC phenotype are mobilized and infiltrate tumours in obese patients. Using mouse models, we show that the CXCL1 chemokine gradient is required for the obesity-dependent tumour ASC recruitment, vascularization and tumour growth promotion. We demonstrate that αSMA expression in ASCs is induced by chemokine signalling and mediates the stimulatory effects of ASCs on endothelial cells. Our data suggest that ASC recruitment to tumours, driven by CXCL1 and CXCL8, promotes prostate cancer progression. PMID:27241286

  6. Reprogramming of the retinoic acid pathway in decidualizing human endometrial stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Rie; Ikemoto, Yuko; Ochiai, Asako; Matsumoto, Akemi; Kumakiri, Jun; Kitade, Mari; Itakura, Atsuo; Muter, Joanne; Brosens, Jan J; Takeda, Satoru

    2017-01-01

    Upon breaching of the endometrial surface epithelium, the implanting embryo embeds in the decidualizing stroma. Retinoic acid (RA), a metabolite of vitamin A, is an important morphogen during embryonic and fetal development, although the role of the RA pathway in the surrounding decidual cells is not understood. Here we show that decidual transformation of human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs) results in profound reprogramming of the RA signaling and metabolism pathways. Differentiating HESCs downregulate the intracellular carrier proteins CRABP2 and FABP5, responsible for transfer and binding of RA to the nuclear receptors RAR and PPARβ/δ, respectively. Furthermore, the expression of RAR, the receptor that mediates the pro-apoptotic effects of RA, was also inhibited. By contrast, PPARβ/δ, which transduces the differentiation responses of RA, was upregulated. Decidualization was also associated with increased expression of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and various enzymes involved in the metabolism of RA and its precursor, retinaldehyde (Rald), including CYP26A1, DHRS3, and RDH12. Exposure of differentiating HESCs to RA or Rald reversed the inhibition of the CRABP2-RAR pathway, perturbed the expression of decidual marker genes and triggered cell death. Taken together, the data demonstrate that decidualizing HESCs silence RA signaling by downregulating key cytoplasmic binding proteins and by increasing retinoid metabolism. However, excessive RA exposure is toxic for decidual cells and triggers a response that may lead to pregnancy failure. PMID:28253328

  7. Adult rat bone marrow stromal cells express genes associated with dopamine neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Brian C.; Woodbury, Dale . E-mail: WOODBURYDL@AOL.COM; Black, Ira B.

    2006-05-19

    An intensive search is underway to identify candidates to replace the cells that degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). To date, no suitable substitute has been found. We have recently found that adult rat bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be induced to assume a neuronal phenotype in vitro. These findings may have particular relevance to the treatment of PD. We now report that adult MSCs express multiple dopaminergic genes, suggesting that they are potential candidates for cell therapy. Using RT-PCR, we have examined families of genes that are associated with the development and/or survival of dopaminergic neurons. MSCs transcribe a variety of dopaminergic genes including patched and smoothened (components of the Shh receptor), Gli-1 (downstream mediator of Shh), and Otx-1, a gene associated with formation of the mesencephalon during development. Furthermore, Shh treatment elicits a 1.5-fold increase in DNA synthesis in cultured MSCs, suggesting the presence of a functional Shh receptor complex. We have also found that MSCs transcribe and translate Nurr-1, a nuclear receptor essential for the development of dopamine neurons. In addition, MSCs express a variety of growth factor receptors including the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored ligand-binding subunit of the GDNF receptor, GFR{alpha}1, as well as fibroblast growth factor receptors one and four. The expression of genes that are associated with the development and survival of dopamine neurons suggests a potential role for these cells in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  8. Bottlenecks in the Efficient Use of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products Based on Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Escacena, Natalia; Quesada-Hernández, Elena; Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Soria, Bernat; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been established as promising candidate sources of universal donor cells for cell therapy due to their contributions to tissue and organ homeostasis, repair, and support by self-renewal and multidifferentiation, as well as by their anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, immunomodulatory, trophic, and proangiogenic properties. Various diseases have been treated by MSCs in animal models. Additionally, hundreds of clinical trials related to the potential benefits of MSCs are in progress. However, although all MSCs are considered suitable to exert these functions, dissimilarities have been found among MSCs derived from different tissues. The same levels of efficacy and desired outcomes have not always been achieved in the diverse studies that have been performed thus far. Moreover, autologous MSCs can be affected by the disease status of patients, compromising their use. Therefore, collecting information regarding the characteristics of MSCs obtained from different sources and the influence of the host (patient) medical conditions on MSCs is important for assuring the safety and efficacy of cell-based therapies. This review provides relevant information regarding factors to consider for the clinical application of MSCs. PMID:26273307

  9. Bone marrow regeneration promoted by biophysically sorted osteoprogenitors from mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Poon, Zhiyong; Lee, Wong Cheng; Guan, Guofeng; Nyan, Lin Myint; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue repair deficiencies can be supplemented through strategies to isolate, expand in vitro, and reimplant regenerative cells that supplant damaged cells or stimulate endogenous repair mechanisms. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), a subset of which is described as mesenchymal stem cells, are leading candidates for cell-mediated bone repair and wound healing, with hundreds of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. An outstanding key challenge for successful clinical translation of MSCs is the capacity to produce large quantities of cells in vitro with uniform and relevant therapeutic properties. By leveraging biophysical traits of MSC subpopulations and label-free microfluidic cell sorting, we hypothesized and experimentally verified that MSCs of large diameter within expanded MSC cultures were osteoprogenitors that exhibited significantly greater efficacy over other MSC subpopulations in bone marrow repair. Systemic administration of osteoprogenitor MSCs significantly improved survival rates (>80%) as compared with other MSC subpopulations (0%) for preclinical murine bone marrow injury models. Osteoprogenitor MSCs also exerted potent therapeutic effects as "cell factories" that secreted high levels of regenerative factors such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenetic protein 2, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 1, and angiopoietin-1; this resulted in increased cell proliferation, vessel formation, and reduced apoptosis in bone marrow. This MSC subpopulation mediated rescue of damaged marrow tissue via restoration of the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, as well as subsequent hematopoiesis. Together, the capabilities described herein for label-freeisolation of regenerative osteoprogenitor MSCs can markedly improve the efficacy of MSC-based therapies.

  10. Gene markers of cellular aging in human multipotent stromal cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Human multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow or other tissue sources have great potential to treat a wide range of injuries and disorders in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In particular, MSCs have inherent characteristics to suppress the immune system and are being studied in clinical studies to prevent graft-versus-host disease. MSCs can be expanded in vitro and have potential for differentiation into multiple cell lineages. However, the impact of cell passaging on gene expression and function of the cells has not been determined. Methods Commercially available human MSCs derived from bone marrow from six different donors, grown under identical culture conditions and harvested at cell passages 3, 5, and 7, were analyzed with gene-expression profiling by using microarray technology. Results The phenotype of these cells did not change as reported previously; however, a statistical analysis revealed a set of 78 significant genes that were distinguishable in expression between passages 3 and 7. None of these significant genes corresponded to the markers established by the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) for MSC identification. When the significant gene lists were analyzed through pathway analysis, these genes were involved in the top-scoring networks of cellular growth and proliferation and cellular development. A meta-analysis of the literature for significant genes revealed that the MSCs seem to be undergoing differentiation into a senescent cell type when cultured extensively. Consistent with the differences in gene expression at passage 3 and 7, MSCs exhibited a significantly greater potential for cell division at passage 3 in comparison to passage 7. Conclusions Our results identified specific gene markers that distinguish aging MSCs grown in cell culture. Confirmatory studies are needed to correlate these molecular markers with biologic attributes that may facilitate the development

  11. The cultivation of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in clinical grade medium for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pytlík, Robert; Stehlík, David; Soukup, Tomás; Kalbácová, Marie; Rypácek, Frantisek; Trc, Tomás; Mulinková, Katarína; Michnová, Petra; Kideryová, Linda; Zivný, Jan; Klener, Pavel; Veselá, Romana; Trnený, Marek; Klener, Pavel

    2009-07-01

    Clinical application of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) requires their expansion to be safe and rapid. We aimed to develop an expansion protocol which would avoid xenogeneic proteins, including fetal calf serum (FCS), and which would shorten the cultivation time and avoid multiple passaging. First, we have compared research-grade alpha-MEM medium with clinical grade CellGro for Hematopoietic Cells' Medium. When FCS was used for supplementation and non-adherent cells were discarded, both media were comparable. Both media were comparable also when pooled human serum (hS) was used instead of FCS, but the numbers of hMSCs were lower when non-adherent cells were discarded. However, significantly more hMSCs were obtained both in alpha-MEM and in CellGro supplemented with hS when the non-adherent cells were left in the culture. Furthermore, addition of recombinant cytokines and other supplements (EGF, PDGF-BB, M-CSF, FGF-2, dexamethasone, insulin and ascorbic acid) to the CellGro co-culture system with hS led to 40-fold increase of hMSCs' yield after two weeks of cultivation compared to alpha-MEM with FCS. The hMSCs expanded in the described co-culture system retain their osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potential in vitro and produce bone-like mineralized tissue when propagated on 3D polylactide scaffolds in immunodeficient mice. Our protocol thus allows for very effective one-step, xenogeneic protein-free expansion of hMSCs, which can be easily transferred into good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions for large-scale, clinical-grade production of hMSCs for purposes of tissue engineering.

  12. Effect of coating Straumann Bone Ceramic with Emdogain on mesenchymal stromal cell hard tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Mrozik, Krzysztof Marek; Gronthos, Stan; Menicanin, Danijela; Marino, Victor; Bartold, P Mark

    2012-06-01

    Periodontal tissue engineering requires a suitable biocompatible scaffold, cells with regenerative capacity, and instructional molecules. In this study, we investigated the capacity of Straumann Bone Ceramic coated with Straumann Emdogain, a clinical preparation of enamel matrix protein (EMP), to aid in hard tissue formation by post-natal mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) including bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLFs). MSCs were isolated and ex vivo-expanded from human bone marrow and periodontal ligament and, in culture, allowed to attach to Bone Ceramic in the presence or absence of Emdogain. Gene expression of bone-related proteins was investigated by real time RT-PCR for 72 h, and ectopic bone formation was assessed histologically in subcutaneous implants of Bone Ceramic containing MSCs with or without Emdogain in NOD/SCID mice. Alkaline phosphatase activity was also assessed in vitro, in the presence or absence of Emdogain. Collagen-I mRNA was up-regulated in both MSC populations over the 72-h time course with Emdogain. Expression of BMP-2 and the osteogenic transcription factor Cbfa-1 showed early stimulation in both MSC types after 24 h. In contrast, expression of BMP-4 was consistently down-regulated in both MSC types with Emdogain. Up-regulation of osteopontin and periostin mRNA was restricted to BMSCs, while higher levels of bone sialoprotein-II were observed in PDLFs with Emdogain. Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase activity levels were reduced in both BMSCs and PDLFs in the presence of Emdogain. Very little evidence was found for ectopic bone formation following subcutaneous implantation of MSCs with Emdogain-coated or -uncoated Bone Ceramic in NOD/SCID mice. The early up-regulation of several important bone-related genes suggests that Emdogain may have a significant stimulatory effect in the commitment of mesenchymal cells to osteogenic differentiation in vitro. While Emdogain inhibited AP activity and appeared

  13. Evaluation of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Frisbie, David D; Kisiday, John D; Kawcak, Chris E; Werpy, Natasha M; McIlwraith, C Wayne

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was the assessment of clinical, biochemical, and histologic effects of intraarticular administered adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis was induced arthroscopically in the middle carpal joint of all horses, the contralateral joint being sham-operated. All horses received treatment on Day 14. Eight horses received placebo treatment and eight horses received adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction in their osteoarthritis-affected joint. The final eight horses were treated the in osteoarthritis-affected joint with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Evaluations included clinical, radiographic, synovial fluid analysis, gross, histologic, histochemical, and biochemical evaluations. No adverse treatment-related events were observed. The model induced a significant change in all but two parameters, no significant treatment effects were demonstrated, with the exception of improvement in synovial fluid effusion PGE2 levels with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells when compared to placebo. A greater improvement was seen with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells when compared to adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction and placebo treatment. Overall, the findings of this study were not significant enough to recommend the use of stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis represented in this model.

  14. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Culture and Delivery in Autologous Conditions: A Smart Approach for Orthopedic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Trombi, Luisa; Danti, Serena; Savelli, Sara; Moscato, Stefania; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Ricci, Claudio; Giannotti, Stefano; Petrini, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (hMSCs) are cultured in vitro with different media. Limits on their use in clinical settings, however, mainly depend on potential biohazard and inflammation risks exerted by xenogeneic nutrients for their culture. Human derivatives or recombinant materials are the first choice candidates to reduce these reactions. Therefore, culture supplements and materials of autologous origin represent the best nutrients and the safest products. Here, we describe a new protocol for the isolation and culture of bone marrow hMSCs in autologous conditions — namely, patient-derived serum as a supplement for the culture medium and fibrin as a scaffold for hMSC administration. Indeed, hMSC/fibrin clot constructs could be extremely useful for several clinical applications. In particular, we focus on their use in orthopedic surgery, where the fibrin clot derived from the donor's own blood allowed effective cell delivery and nutrient/waste exchanges. To ensure optimal safety conditions, it is of the utmost importance to avoid the risks of hMSC transformation and tissue overgrowth. For these reasons, the approach described in this paper also indicates a minimally ex vivo hMSC expansion, to reduce cell senescence and morphologic changes, and short-term osteo-differentiation before implantation, to induce osteogenic lineage specification, thus decreasing the risk of subsequent uncontrolled proliferation. PMID:28060333

  15. Cerium oxide nanoparticles protect primary mouse bone marrow stromal cells from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qun; Ge, Kun; Duan, Jianlei; Chen, Shizhu; Zhang, Ran; Zhang, Cuimiao; Wang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2014-11-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) have been widely used in industries and biomedical fields due to its unique properties. Previous biodistribution studies of nanoceria in vivo have shown that they are accumulated in the bone of mice after intravenous administration, about 20 % of the total intake, however, the potential effect and the mechanism of nanoceria on bone metabolism are not well-understood. Our results showed that both 25 and 50 nm nanceria decreased the damage of cell viability induced by H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. The apoptosis ratio of pre-incubated group with nanoceria was lower than the H2O2 group. The cellular uptake studies indicated that there was a dose-dependent accumulation of both two size nanoparticles in bone marrow stromal cells. Nanoceria could be uptaken by cells due to the synergistic effect of multiple endocytosis mechanisms, and then evenly distributed in the cytoplasm without entering the nucleus. Our results suggest that nanoceria could reduce intracellular ROS level induced by H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner, moreover, maintain the normal function of mitochondria, suggesting nanoceria may have potent applications for preventing or treating osteoporosis.

  16. The molecular signature of AML mesenchymal stromal cells reveals candidate genes related to the leukemogenic process.

    PubMed

    Binato, Renata; de Almeida Oliveira, Nathalia Correa; Du Rocher, Barbara; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2015-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by myeloid precursor proliferation in the bone marrow, apoptosis reduction and differentiation arrest. Although there are several studies in this field, events related to disease initiation and progression remain unknown. The malignant transformation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is thought to generate leukemic stem cells, and this transformation could be related to changes in mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) signaling. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the gene expression profile of hMSC from AML patients (hMSC-AML) compared to healthy donors hMSCs (hMSC-HD). The results showed a common molecular signature for all hMSC-AML. Other assays were performed with a large number of patients and the results confirmed a molecular signature that is capable of distinguishing hMSC-AML from hMSC-HD. Moreover, CCL2 and BMP4 genes encode secreted proteins that could affect HSCs. To verify whether these proteins are differentially expressed in AML patients, ELISA was performed with plasma samples. CCL2 and BMP4 proteins are differentially expressed in AML patients, indicating changes in hMSC-AML signaling. Altogether, hMSCs-AML signaling alterations could be an important factor in the leukemic transformation process.

  17. Enhanced differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells by three-dimensional culture and azacitidine

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Yoo-Jin; Kwon, Yong-Rim; Kim, Hye Joung; Lee, Seok

    2017-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are useful for cell therapy because of their potential for multilineage differentiation. However, MSCs that are expanded in traditional two-dimensional (2D) culture systems eventually lose their differentiation abilities. Therefore, we investigated whether azacitidine (AZA) supplementation and three-dimensional culture (3D) could improve the differentiation properties of MSCs. Methods 2D- or 3D-cultured MSCs which were prepared according to the conventional or hanging-drop culture method respectively, were treated with or without AZA (1 µM for 72 h), and their osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential were determined and compared. Results AZA treatment did not affect the cell apoptosis or viability in both 2D- and 3D-cultured MSCs. However, compared to conventionally cultured 2D-MSCs, AZA-treated 2D-MSCs showed marginally increased differentiation abilities. In contrast, 3D-MSCs showed significantly increased osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation ability. When 3D culture was performed in the presence of AZA, the osteogenic differentiation ability was further increased, whereas adipogenic differentiation was not affected. Conclusion 3D culture efficiently promoted the multilineage differentiation of MSCs, and in combination with AZA, it could help MSCs to acquire greater osteogenic differentiation ability. This optimized culture method can enhance the therapeutic potential of MSCs.

  18. Mesenchymal stromal-cell transplants induce oligodendrocyte progenitor migration and remyelination in a chronic demyelination model.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Merchán, J; Jones, J; Ivorra, J L; Pastor, D; Viso-León, M C; Armengól, J A; Moltó, M D; Geijo-Barrientos, E; Martínez, S

    2013-08-29

    Demyelinating disorders such as leukodystrophies and multiple sclerosis are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the progressive loss of myelin that may lead toward a chronic demyelination of the brain's white matter, impairing normal axonal conduction velocity and ultimately causing neurodegeneration. Current treatments modifying the pathological mechanisms are capable of ameliorating the disease; however, frequently, these therapies are not sufficient to repress the progressive demyelination into a chronic condition and permanent loss of function. To this end, we analyzed the effect that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (BM-MSC) grafts exert in a chronically demyelinated mouse brain. As a result, oligodendrocyte progenitors were recruited surrounding the graft due to the expression of various trophic signals by the grafted MSCs. Although there was no significant reaction in the non-grafted side, in the grafted regions oligodendrocyte progenitors were detected. These progenitors were derived from the nearby tissue as well as from the neurogenic niches, including the subependymal zone and dentate gyrus. Once near the graft site, the cells matured to myelinating oligodendrocytes. Finally, electrophysiological studies demonstrated that axonal conduction velocity was significantly increased in the grafted side of the fimbria. In conclusion, we demonstrate here that in chronic demyelinated white matter, BM-MSC transplantation activates oligodendrocyte progenitors and induces remyelination in the tissue surrounding the stem cell graft.

  19. Pulsed Direct Current Electric Fields Enhance Osteogenesis in Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hammerick, Kyle E.; James, Aaron W.; Huang, Zubin; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2010-01-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) constitute a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine applications. Previous studies of osteogenic potential in ASCs have focused on chemicals, growth factors, and mechanical stimuli. Citing the demonstrated role electric fields play in enhancing healing in bone fractures and defects, we investigated the ability of pulsed direct current electric fields to drive osteogenic differentiation in mouse ASCs. Employing 50 Hz direct current electric fields in concert with and without osteogenic factors, we demonstrated increased early osteoblast-specific markers. We were also able to establish that commonly reported artifacts of electric field stimulation are not the primary mediators of the observed effects. The electric fields caused marked changes in the cytoskeleton. We used atomic force microscopy–based force spectroscopy to record an increase in the cytoskeletal tension after treatment with electric fields. We abolished the increased cytoskeletal stresses with the rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y27632, and did not see any decrease in osteogenic gene expression, suggesting that the pro-osteogenic effects of the electric fields are not transduced via cytoskeletal tension. Electric fields may show promise as candidate enhancers of osteogenesis of ASCs and may be incorporated into cell-based strategies for skeletal regeneration. PMID:19824802

  20. Resveratrol inhibits development of experimental endometriosis in vivo and reduces endometrial stromal cell invasiveness in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bruner-Tran, Kaylon L; Osteen, Kevin G; Taylor, Hugh S; Sokalska, Anna; Haines, Kaitlin; Duleba, Antoni J

    2011-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common gynecologic disorder characterized by ectopic attachment and growth of endometrial tissues. Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol with antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory properties. Our objective was to study the effects of resveratrol on human endometriotic implants in a nude mouse model and to examine its impact on human endometrial stromal (HES) cell invasiveness in vitro. Human endometrial tissues were obtained from healthy donors. Endometriosis was established in oophorectomized nude mice by intraperitoneal injection of endometrial tissues. Mice were treated with 17β-estradiol (8 mg, silastic capsule implants) alone (n = 16) or with resveratrol (6 mg/mouse; n = 20) for 10-12 and 18-20 days beginning 1 day after tissue injection. Mice were killed and endometrial implants were evaluated. A Matrigel invasion assay was used to examine the effects of resveratrol on HES cells. We assessed number and size of endometriotic implants in vivo and Matrigel invasion in vitro. Resveratrol decreased the number of endometrial implants per mouse by 60% (P < 0.001) and the total volume of lesions per mouse by 80% (P < 0.001). Resveratrol (10-30 μM) also induced a concentration-dependent reduction of invasiveness of HES by up to 78% (P < 0.0001). Resveratrol inhibits development of endometriosis in the nude mouse and reduces invasiveness of HES cells. These observations may aid in the development of novel treatments of endometriosis.

  1. The osteogenic response of mesenchymal stromal cells to strontium‐substituted bioactive glasses

    PubMed Central

    Santocildes‐Romero, Martin E.; Crawford, Aileen; Goodchild, Rebecca L.; Reaney, Ian M.; Miller, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bioactive glasses are known to stimulate bone healing, and the incorporation of strontium has the potential to increase their potency. In this study, calcium oxide in the 45S5 bioactive glass composition was partially (50%, Sr50) or fully (100%, Sr100) substituted with strontium oxide on a molar basis. The effects of the substitution on bioactive glass properties were studied, including density, solubility, and in vitro cytotoxicity. Stimulation of osteogenic differentiation was investigated using mesenchymal stromal cells obtained from rat bone marrow. Strontium substitution resulted in altered physical properties including increased solubility. Statistically significant reductions in cell viability were observed with the addition of bioactive glass powders to culture medium. Specifically, addition of ≥ 13.3 mg/ml of 45S5 bioactive glass or Sr50, or ≥ 6.7 mg/ml of Sr100, resulted in significant inhibition. Real‐time PCR analyses detected the upregulation of genes associated with osteoblastic differentiation in the presence of all bioactive glass compositions. Some genes, including Alpl and Bglap, were further stimulated in the presence of Sr50 and Sr100. It was concluded that strontium‐substituted bioactive glasses promoted osteogenesis in a differentiating bone cell culture model and, therefore, have considerable potential for use as improved bioactive glasses for bone tissue regeneration. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25757935

  2. Interleukin-2 gene-encoded stromal cells inhibit the growth of metastatic cholangiocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Hwan; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Sung Koo; Lee, Seung-Gyu; Suh, Chul-Won; Gong, Gyung-Yub; Park, Jung-Sun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Sang-Hee

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can be used as an attractive target for genetic modification in the treatment of malignant diseases. METHODS: Using a hamster model of biliary cancer, we investigated the therapeutic effects of interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene-modified BMSCs. Syrian golden hamsters were injected via the femoral vein with 5×105 cells of the KIGB-5 biliary cancer cell line (n=20). One week later, the hamsters were injected intraperitoneally with BMSCs containing Ad/hIL-2 and Ad/ΔE1, unmodified BMSCs, or RPMI only (control) and observed for 12 wk (n=5 /each group). RESULTS: All hamsters treated with BMSCs containing Ad/hIL-2 survived with no evidence of the disease during this period. In contrast, hamsters in the other three groups showed disseminated metastases involving the lungs as early as 4 wk. CONCLUSION: Ad/IL-2 therapy is effective in the treatment of biliary cancer. PMID:16609995

  3. Concise Review: Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Used for Periodontal Regeneration: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Monsarrat, Paul; Vergnes, Jean-Noël; Nabet, Cathy; Sixou, Michel; Snead, Malcolm L.; Planat-Bénard, Valérie; Casteilla, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic infectious disease of the soft and hard tissues supporting the teeth. Recent advances in regenerative medicine and stem cell biology have paved the way for periodontal tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) delivered in situ to periodontal defects may exert their effects at multiple levels, including neovascularization, immunomodulation, and tissue regeneration. This systematic review had two goals: (a) to objectively quantify key elements for efficacy and safety of MSCs used for periodontal regeneration and (b) to identify patterns in the existing literature to explain differences between studies and suggest recommendations for future research. This systematic review provided good evidence of the capacity of MSCs to regenerate periodontal tissues in animals; however, experimentally generated defects used in animal studies do not sufficiently mimic the pathophysiology of periodontitis in humans. Moreover, the safety of such interventions in humans still needs to be studied. There were marked differences between experimental and control groups that may be influenced by characteristics that are crucial to address before translation to human clinical trials. We suggest that the appropriate combination of cell source, carrier type, and biomolecules, as well as the inclusion of critical path issues for a given clinical case, should be further explored and refined before transitioning to clinical trials. Future studies should investigate periodontal regenerative procedures in animal models, including rodents, in which the defects generated are designed to more accurately reflect the inflammatory status of the host and the shift in their pathogenic microflora. PMID:24744392

  4. Increased proliferation and chemosensitivity of human mesenchymal stromal cells expressing fusion yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kucerova, Lucia; Poturnajova, Martina; Tyciakova, Silvia; Matuskova, Miroslava

    2012-03-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered to be suitable vehicles for cellular therapy in various conditions. The expression of reporter and/or effector protein(s) enabled both the identification of MSCs within the organism and the exploitation in targeted tumor therapies. The aim of this study was to evaluate cellular changes induced by retrovirus-mediated transgene expression in MSCs in vitro. Human Adipose Tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs) were transduced to express (i) the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter transgene, (ii) the fusion yeast cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CDy::UPRT) enzyme along with the expression of dominant positive selection gene NeoR or (iii) the selection marker NeoR alone (MOCK). CDy::UPRT expression resulted in increased proliferation of CDy::UPRT-MSCs versus naïve AT-MSCs, MOCK-MSCs or EGFP-MSCs. Furthermore, CDy::UPRT-MSCs were significantly more sensitive to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), cisplatin, cyclophosphamide and cytosine arabinoside as determined by increased Caspase 3/7 activation and/or decreased relative proliferation. CDy::UPRT-MSCs in direct cocultures with breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 increased tumor cell killing induced by low concentrations of 5FU. Our data demonstrated the changes in proliferation and chemoresistance in engineered MSCs expressing transgene with enzymatic function and suggested the possibilities for further augmentation of targeted MSC-mediated antitumor therapy.

  5. The influence of macrophages on mesenchymal stromal cell therapy: passive or aggressive agents?

    PubMed

    Carty, F; Mahon, B P; English, K

    2017-04-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have emerged as promising cell therapies for multiple conditions based on demonstrations of their potent immunomodulatory and regenerative capacities in models of inflammatory disease. Understanding the effects of MSC on T cells has dominated the majority of work carried out in this field to date; recently, however, a number of studies have shown that the therapeutic effect of MSC requires the presence of macrophages. It is timely to review the mechanisms and manner by which MSC modulate macrophage populations in order to design more effective MSC therapies and clinical studies. A complex cross-talk exists through which MSC and macrophages communicate, a communication that is not controlled exclusively by MSC. Here, we examine the evidence that suggests that MSC not only respond to inflammatory macrophages and adjust their secretome accordingly, but also that macrophages respond to encounters with MSC, creating a feedback loop which contributes to the immune regulation observed following MSC therapy. Future studies examining the effects of MSC on macrophages should consider the antagonistic role that macrophages play in this exchange.

  6. Mesenchymal stromal-cell transplants induce oligodendrocyte progenitor migration and remyelination in a chronic demyelination model

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Merchán, J; Jones, J; Ivorra, J L; Pastor, D; Viso-León, M C; Armengól, J A; Moltó, M D; Geijo-Barrientos, E; Martínez, S

    2013-01-01

    Demyelinating disorders such as leukodystrophies and multiple sclerosis are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the progressive loss of myelin that may lead toward a chronic demyelination of the brain's white matter, impairing normal axonal conduction velocity and ultimately causing neurodegeneration. Current treatments modifying the pathological mechanisms are capable of ameliorating the disease; however, frequently, these therapies are not sufficient to repress the progressive demyelination into a chronic condition and permanent loss of function. To this end, we analyzed the effect that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (BM-MSC) grafts exert in a chronically demyelinated mouse brain. As a result, oligodendrocyte progenitors were recruited surrounding the graft due to the expression of various trophic signals by the grafted MSCs. Although there was no significant reaction in the non-grafted side, in the grafted regions oligodendrocyte progenitors were detected. These progenitors were derived from the nearby tissue as well as from the neurogenic niches, including the subependymal zone and dentate gyrus. Once near the graft site, the cells matured to myelinating oligodendrocytes. Finally, electrophysiological studies demonstrated that axonal conduction velocity was significantly increased in the grafted side of the fimbria. In conclusion, we demonstrate here that in chronic demyelinated white matter, BM-MSC transplantation activates oligodendrocyte progenitors and induces remyelination in the tissue surrounding the stem cell graft. PMID:23990019

  7. Effects of Dexamethasone on Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Chondrogenesis and Aggrecanase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Florine, Emily M.; Miller, Rachel E.; Porter, Ryan M.; Evans, Christopher H.; Kurz, Bodo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Dexamethasone (Dex) is a synthetic glucocorticoid that has pro-anabolic and anticatabolic effects in cartilage tissue engineering systems, though the mechanisms by which these effects are mediated are not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that the addition of Dex to chondrogenic medium would affect matrix production and aggrecanase activity of human and bovine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured in self-assembling peptide and agarose hydrogels. Design: We cultured young bovine and adult human BMSCs in (RADA)4 self-assembling peptide and agarose hydrogels in medium containing TGF-β1±Dex and analyzed extracellular matrix composition, aggrecan cleavage products, and the effects of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-486 on proteoglycan content, synthesis, and catabolic processing. Results: Dex improved proteoglycan synthesis and retention in agarose hydrogels seeded with young bovine cells but decreased proteoglycan accumulation in peptide scaffolds. These effects were mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor. Adult human BMSCs showed minimal matrix accumulation in agarose, but accumulated ~50% as much proteoglycan and collagen as young bovine BMSCs in peptide hydrogels. Dex reduced aggrecanase activity in (RADA)4 and agarose hydrogels, as measured by anti-NITEGE Western blotting, for both bovine and human BMSC-seeded gels. Conclusions: The effects of Dex on matrix production are dependent on cell source and hydrogel identity. This is the first report of Dex reducing aggrecanase activity in a tissue engineering culture system. PMID:24533173

  8. Bizarre stromal cells in the esophagus: report of 2 cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Bal M; De Petris, Giovanni

    2013-08-01

    A significant mimicker of malignancy in the esophagus is the presence of atypical/bizarre stromal cells (BSCs). Two patients, a 60-year-old woman and a 59-year-old man, with esophageal polyps at the gastroesophageal junction showed highly atypical/bizarre cells in the polyps' stroma. BSCs were admixed with inflammatory cells and had large atypical nuclei, prominent nucleoli, and variably abundant amphophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical studies showed that BSCs expressed vimentin whereas S-100, CD68, HMB45, CD45, Pan-cytokeratin, CK5/6, p63, CD10, EMA, MART-1, desmin, smooth muscle actin, CD31, CD34, and CMV were negative. Ki-67 showed low proliferative rate (less than 1% positivity). No evidence of intracellular mucin was found after histochemical stains (AB/PAS and mucicarmine). Follow-up endoscopic mucosal resection was available in both cases and showed benign esophageal mucosa and submucosa with disappearance, in one case, or marked decrease of BSCs. Esophageal BSCs reports in the literature invariably locate them in distal esophagus polyps or masses. Awareness of BSCs, of their location and associations, may help to prevent misdiagnosis of malignancy. The literature of esophageal BSCs is reviewed and the approach to this abnormality is discussed.

  9. Morphological features of IFN-γ–stimulated mesenchymal stromal cells predict overall immunosuppressive capacity

    PubMed Central

    Klinker, Matthew W.; Marklein, Ross A.; Lo Surdo, Jessica L.; Wei, Cheng-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) lines can vary significantly in their functional characteristics, and the effectiveness of MSC-based therapeutics may be realized by finding predictive features associated with MSC function. To identify features associated with immunosuppressive capacity in MSCs, we developed a robust in vitro assay that uses principal-component analysis to integrate multidimensional flow cytometry data into a single measurement of MSC-mediated inhibition of T-cell activation. We used this assay to correlate single-cell morphological data with overall immunosuppressive capacity in a cohort of MSC lines derived from different donors and manufacturing conditions. MSC morphology after IFN-γ stimulation significantly correlated with immunosuppressive capacity and accurately predicted the immunosuppressive capacity of MSC lines in a validation cohort. IFN-γ enhanced the immunosuppressive capacity of all MSC lines, and morphology predicted the magnitude of IFN-γ–enhanced immunosuppressive activity. Together, these data identify MSC morphology as a predictive feature of MSC immunosuppressive function. PMID:28283659

  10. The osteogenic response of mesenchymal stromal cells to strontium-substituted bioactive glasses.

    PubMed

    Santocildes-Romero, Martin E; Crawford, Aileen; Hatton, Paul V; Goodchild, Rebecca L; Reaney, Ian M; Miller, Cheryl A

    2015-05-01

    Bioactive glasses are known to stimulate bone healing, and the incorporation of strontium has the potential to increase their potency. In this study, calcium oxide in the 45S5 bioactive glass composition was partially (50%, Sr50) or fully (100%, Sr100) substituted with strontium oxide on a molar basis. The effects of the substitution on bioactive glass properties were studied, including density, solubility, and in vitro cytotoxicity. Stimulation of osteogenic differentiation was investigated using mesenchymal stromal cells obtained from rat bone marrow. Strontium substitution resulted in altered physical properties including increased solubility. Statistically significant reductions in cell viability were observed with the addition of bioactive glass powders to culture medium. Specifically, addition of ≥ 13.3 mg/ml of 45S5 bioactive glass or Sr50, or ≥ 6.7 mg/ml of Sr100, resulted in significant inhibition. Real-time PCR analyses detected the upregulation of genes associated with osteoblastic differentiation in the presence of all bioactive glass compositions. Some genes, including Alpl and Bglap, were further stimulated in the presence of Sr50 and Sr100. It was concluded that strontium-substituted bioactive glasses promoted osteogenesis in a differentiating bone cell culture model and, therefore, have considerable potential for use as improved bioactive glasses for bone tissue regeneration.

  11. The Roles of Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Tumor Microenvironment Associated with Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Krstić, Jelena; Djordjević, Ivana Okić; Jauković, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    State of tumor microenvironment (TME) is closely linked to regulation of tumor growth and progression affecting the final outcome, refractoriness, and relapse of disease. Interactions of tumor, immune, and mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as crucial for understanding tumorigenesis. Due to their outstanding features, stem cell-like properties, capacity to regulate immune response, and dynamic functional phenotype dependent on microenvironmental stimuli, MSCs have been perceived as important players in TME. Signals provided by tumor-associated chronic inflammation educate MSCs to alter their phenotype and immunomodulatory potential in favor of tumor-biased state of MSCs. Adjustment of phenotype to TME and acquisition of tumor-promoting ability by MSCs help tumor cells in maintenance of permissive TME and suppression of antitumor immune response. Potential utilization of MSCs in treatment of tumor is based on their inherent ability to home tumor tissue that makes them suitable delivery vehicles for immune-stimulating factors and vectors for targeted antitumor therapy. Here, we review data regarding intrusive effects of inflammatory TME on MSCs capacity to affect tumor development through modification of their phenotype and interactions with immune system. PMID:27630452

  12. Different Donors Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Secretomes Reveal Heterogeneous Profile of Relevance for Therapeutic Use.

    PubMed

    Assoni, Amanda; Coatti, Giuliana; Valadares, Marcos C; Beccari, Melinda; Gomes, Juliana; Pelatti, Mayra; Mitne-Neto, Miguel; Carvalho, Valdemir M; Zatz, Mayana

    2017-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal X-linked disorder caused by null mutations in the dystrophin gene. Although the primary defect is the deficiency of muscle dystrophin, secondary events, including chronic inflammation, fibrosis, and muscle regeneration failure are thought to actively contribute to disease progression. Despite several advances, there is still no effective therapy for DMD. Therefore, the potential regenerative capacities, and immune-privileged properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), have been the focus of intense investigation in different animal models aiming the treatment of these disorders. However, these studies have shown different outcomes according to the sources from which MSCs were obtained, which raise the question whether stem cells from distinct sources have comparable clinical effects. Here, we analyzed the protein content of the secretome of MSCs, isolated from three different sources (adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and uterine tubes), obtained from five donors and evaluated their in vitro properties when cocultured with DMD myoblasts. All MSC lineages showed pathways enrichment related to protein metabolic process, oxidation-reduction process, cell proliferation, and regulation of apoptosis. We found that MSCs secretome proteins and their effect in vitro vary significantly according to the tissue and donors, including opposite effects in apoptosis assay, indicating the importance of characterizing MSC secretome profile before its use in animal and clinical trials. Despite the individual differences a pool of conditioned media from all MSCs lineages was able to delay apoptosis and enhance migration when in contact with DMD myoblasts.

  13. In vivo biocompatibility of custom-fabricated apatite-wollastonite-mesenchymal stromal cell constructs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer A; Knight, Charlotte A; Kun, Xiao; Yang, Xuebin B; Wood, David J; Dalgarno, Kenneth W; Genever, Paul G

    2015-10-01

    We have used the additive manufacturing technology of selective laser sintering (SLS), together with post SLS heat treatment, to produce porous three dimensional scaffolds from the glass-ceramic apatite-wollastonite (A-W). The A-W scaffolds were custom-designed to incorporate a cylindrical central channel to increase cell penetration and medium flow to the center of the scaffolds under dynamic culture conditions during in vitro testing and subsequent in vivo implantation. The scaffolds were seeded with human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and cultured in spinner flasks. Using confocal and scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrated that MSCs formed and maintained a confluent layer of viable cells on all surfaces of the A-W scaffolds during dynamic culture. MSC-seeded, with and without osteogenic pre-differentiation, and unseeded A-W scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in MF1 nude mice where osteoid formation and tissue in-growth were observed following histological assessment. The results demonstrate that the in vivo biocompatibility and osteo-supportive capacity of A-W scaffolds can be enhanced by SLS-custom design, without the requirement for osteogenic pre-induction, to advance their potential as patient-specific bone replacement materials.

  14. Extracellular calcium and CaSR drive osteoinduction in mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    González-Vázquez, Arlyng; Planell, Josep A; Engel, Elisabeth

    2014-06-01

    Bone is the main store of calcium and progenitor cells in the body. During the resorption process, the local calcium concentration reaches 8-40mM, and the surrounding cells are exposed to these fluctuations in calcium. This stimulus is a signal that is detected through the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), which modulates chemotactic and proliferative G protein-dependent signaling pathways. The objective of the present work is to evaluate the roles of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) and the CaSR in osteoinduction. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (rBMSCs) were stimulated with 10mM of Ca(2+). Several experiments were conducted to demonstrate the effect of [Ca(2+)]o on chemotaxis, proliferation and differentiation on the osteoblastic lineage. It was found that [Ca(2+)]o induces rBMSCs to migrate and proliferate in a concentration-dependent manner. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence also revealed that 10mM Ca(2+) stimulates overexpression of osteogenic markers in rBMSCs, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein, collagen Ia1 and osteocalcin. Functional assays determining ALP activity and mineralization tests both corroborate the increased expression of these markers in rBMSCs stimulated with Ca(2+). Moreover, CaSR blockage inhibited the cellular response to stimulation with high concentrations of [Ca(2+)]o, revealing that the CaSR is a key modulator of these cellular responses.

  15. Inhibition of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C prevents bone marrow stromal cell senescence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunhui; Wang, Nan; Huang, Jie; Xin, Jie; Peng, Fen; Ren, Yinshi; Zhang, Shangli; Miao, Junying

    2009-10-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can proliferate in vitro and can be transplanted for treating many kinds of diseases. However, BMSCs become senescent with long-term culture, which inhibits their application. To understand the mechanism underlying the senescence, we investigated the activity of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) and levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS with BMSC senescence. The activity of PC-PLC and levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS increased greatly during cell senescence. Selective inhibition of increased PC-PLC activity with D609 significantly decreased the number of senescence-associated beta galactosidase positive cells in BMSCs. Furthermore, D609 restored proliferation of BMSCs and their differentiation into adipocytes. Moreover, D609 suppressed the elevated levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS. The data suggest that PC-PLC is involved in senescence of BMSCs, and its function is associated with integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS.

  16. Pulsed direct current electric fields enhance osteogenesis in adipose-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Hammerick, Kyle E; James, Aaron W; Huang, Zubin; Prinz, Fritz B; Longaker, Michael T

    2010-03-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) constitute a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine applications. Previous studies of osteogenic potential in ASCs have focused on chemicals, growth factors, and mechanical stimuli. Citing the demonstrated role electric fields play in enhancing healing in bone fractures and defects, we investigated the ability of pulsed direct current electric fields to drive osteogenic differentiation in mouse ASCs. Employing 50 Hz direct current electric fields in concert with and without osteogenic factors, we demonstrated increased early osteoblast-specific markers. We were also able to establish that commonly reported artifacts of electric field stimulation are not the primary mediators of the observed effects. The electric fields caused marked changes in the cytoskeleton. We used atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy to record an increase in the cytoskeletal tension after treatment with electric fields. We abolished the increased cytoskeletal stresses with the rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y27632, and did not see any decrease in osteogenic gene expression, suggesting that the pro-osteogenic effects of the electric fields are not transduced via cytoskeletal tension. Electric fields may show promise as candidate enhancers of osteogenesis of ASCs and may be incorporated into cell-based strategies for skeletal regeneration.

  17. Stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) targeting reperfusion reduces myocardial infarction in isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young-Ho; Kim, June-Hong; Ban, Changill; Ahn, Kyohan; Cheong, Jae-Hun; Kim, Hyung-Hoi; Kim, Jung-Soo; Park, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Jun; Chun, Kook-Jin; Lee, Gyeong-Ho; Kim, Miju; Kim, Cheolmin; Xu, Zhelong

    2012-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1), first known as a cytokine involved in recruiting stem cells into injured organs, confers myocardial protection in myocardial infarction, which is not dependent on stem cell recruitment but related with modulation of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the effect of SDF has been studied only in a preischemic exposure model, which is not clinically relevant if SDF is to be used as a therapeutic agent. Our study was aimed at evaluating whether or not SDF-1 confers cardioprotection during the reperfusion period. Hearts from SD rats were isolated and perfused with the Langendorff system. Proximal left coronary artery ligation, reperfusion, and SDF perfusion in KH buffer was done according to study protocol. Area of necrosis (AN) relative to area at risk (AR) was the primary endpoint of the study. Significant reduction of AN/AR by SDF in an almost dose-dependent manner was noted during both the preischemic exposure and reperfusion periods. In particular, infusion of a high concentration of SDF (25 nM/L) resulted in a dramatic reduction of infarct size, which was greater than that achieved with ischemic pre- or postconditioning. SDF perfusion during reperfusion was associated with a similar significant reduction of infarct size as preischemic SDF exposure. Further studies are warranted to assess the potential of SDF as a therapeutic agent for reducing I/R injury in clinical practice.

  18. The effects of dietary phytoestrogens on aromatase activity in human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Katie M; Holloway, Alison C; Crankshaw, Denis J; Agarwal, Sanjay K; Foster, Warren G

    2005-01-01

    Dietary phytoestrogens have been reported to inhibit aromatase activity in placental microsomes, but the effects in the human endometrium are unknown. Aromatase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of androgens to estrogens, has recently been shown to be expressed in the endometrium of women with endometriosis and is thought to play a role in the pathophysiology of this disease. Therefore, the objective of this study was to screen dietary phytoestrogens for their ability to inhibit aromatase activity in human endometrial stromal cells (ESC) and identify potential novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of endometriosis. The inhibition of aromatase activity by direct interaction with the dietary phytoestrogens genistein, daidzein, chrysin, and naringenin was tested in a cell free assay. Furthermore, test compound effects on aromatase activity in ESC cultures were also examined. Genistein and daidzein were inactive in the human recombinant aromatase assay whereas naringenin and chrysin inhibited aromatase activit