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Sample records for adjacent stromal fibroblasts

  1. Stromal Fibroblasts in Digestive Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Worthley, Daniel L.; Giraud, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    The normal gastrointestinal stroma consists of extra-cellular matrix and a community of stromal cells including fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, pericytes, endothelium and inflammatory cells. α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) positive stromal fibroblasts, often referred to as myofibroblasts or activated fibroblasts, are critical in the development of digestive cancer and help to create an environment that is permissive of tumor growth, angiogenesis and invasion. This review focusses on the contribution of activated fibroblasts in carcinogenesis and where possible directly applies this to, and draws on examples from, gastrointestinal cancer. In particular, the review expands on the definition, types and origins of activated fibroblasts. It examines the molecular biology of stromal fibroblasts and their contribution to the peritumoral microenvironment and concludes by exploring some of the potential clinical applications of this exciting branch of cancer research. Understanding the origin and biology of activated fibroblasts will help in the development of an integrated epithelial-stromal sequence to cancer that will ultimately inform cancer pathogenesis, natural history and future therapeutics. PMID:21209778

  2. Arousal of cancer-associated stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF), comprised of activated fibroblasts or myofibroblasts, are found in stroma surrounding solid tumors; these myofibroblasts promote invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. Activation of stromal fibroblasts into myofibroblasts is induced by expression of cystoskeleton protein, palladin, at early stages in tumorigenesis and increases with neoplastic progression. Expression of palladin in fibroblasts is triggered by paracrine signaling from adjacent k-ras-expressing epithelial cells. Three-dimensional co-cultures of palladin-expressing fibroblasts and pancreatic cancer cells reveals that the activated fibroblasts lead the invasion by creating tunnels through the extracellular matrix through which the cancer cells follow. Invasive tunneling occurs as a result of the development of invadopodia-like cellular protrusions in the palladin-activated fibroblasts and the addition of a wounding/inflammatory trigger. Abrogation of palladin reduces the invasive capacity of these cells. CAF also play a role in cancer resistance and immuno-privilege, making the targeting of activators of these cells of interest for oncologists. PMID:23076142

  3. Inactivation of Rb in stromal fibroblasts promotes epithelial cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Adam; Cichon, Ann-Christin; Barry, Anna; Kieran, Declan; Patel, Daksha; Hamilton, Peter; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; James, Jacqueline; McCance, Dennis J

    2012-07-18

    Stromal-derived growth factors are required for normal epithelial growth but are also implicated in tumour progression. We have observed inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb), through phosphorylation, in cancer-associated fibroblasts in oro-pharyngeal cancer specimens. Rb is well known for its cell-autonomous effects on cancer initiation and progression; however, cell non-autonomous functions of Rb are not well described. We have identified a cell non-autonomous role of Rb, using three-dimensional cultures, where depletion of Rb in stromal fibroblasts enhances invasive potential of transformed epithelia. In part, this is mediated by upregulation of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), which is produced by the depleted fibroblasts. KGF drives invasion of epithelial cells through induction of MMP1 expression in an AKT- and Ets2-dependent manner. Our data identify that stromal fibroblasts can alter the invasive behaviour of the epithelium, and we show that altered expression of KGF can mediate these functions. PMID:22643222

  4. Mesenchymal stromal cells and fibroblasts: a case of mistaken identity?

    PubMed

    Hematti, Peiman

    2012-05-01

    The plastic-adherent fibroblast-looking cells that can be isolated and culture-expanded from bone marrow and many other tissues are widely known as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). In addition to their fibroblast-like morphology, they are characterized by a panel of cell-surface markers and their potential to differentiate into bone, fat and cartilage. Based on their intriguing immunomodulatory and regenerative properties, MSC are being investigated as cellular therapeutics for a variety of clinical indications. However, many questions regarding the true identity and functionality of these cells in vivo remain unanswered. Fibroblasts, known for a much longer time but still poorly characterized, are also considered to be a ubiquitous stromal element of almost all tissues and are believed to play a role in tissue homeostasis. Despite the presence of MSC and fibroblasts in almost all tissues, similar morphology and other shared characteristics, the exact relationship between MSC and fibroblasts has remained undetermined. In this review, based on recent and old, but often neglected, literature it is suggested that ex vivo culture-expanded MSC and fibroblasts are indistinguishable by morphology, cell-surface markers, differentiation potential and immunologic properties. PMID:22458957

  5. Pten in Stromal Fibroblasts Suppresses Mammary Epithelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Trimboli, Anthony J.; Cantemir-Stone, Carmen Z.; Li, Fu; Wallace, Julie A.; Merchant, Anand; Creasap, Nicholas; Thompson, John C.; Caserta, Enrico; Wang, Hui; Chong, Jean-Leon; Naidu, Shan; Wei, Guo; Sharma, Sudarshana M.; Stephens, Julie A.; Fernandez, Soledad A.; Gurcan, Metin N.; Weinstein, Michael B.; Barsky, Sanford H.; Yee, Lisa; Rosol, Thomas J.; Stromberg, Paul C.; Robinson, Michael L.; Pepin, Francois; Hallett, Michael; Park, Morag; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Leone, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The tumor stroma is believed to contribute to some of the most malignant characteristics of epithelial tumors. However, signaling between stromal and tumor cells is complex and remains poorly understood. Here we show that the genetic inactivation of Pten in stromal fibroblasts of mouse mammary glands accelerated the initiation, progression and malignant transformation of mammary epithelial tumors. This was associated with the massive remodeling of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM), innate immune cell infiltration and increased angiogenesis. Loss of Pten in stromal fibroblasts led to increased expression, phosphorylation (T72) and recruitment of Ets2 to target promoters known to be involved in these processes. Remarkably, Ets2 inactivation in Pten stroma-deleted tumors ameliorated disruption of the tumor microenvironment and was sufficient to decrease tumor growth and progression. Global gene expression profiling of mammary stromal cells identified a Pten-specific signature that was highly represented in the tumor stroma of breast cancer patients. These findings identify the Pten-Ets2 axis as a critical stroma-specific signaling pathway that suppresses mammary epithelial tumors. PMID:19847259

  6. p16(INK4A) represses the paracrine tumor-promoting effects of breast stromal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Al-Ansari, M M; Hendrayani, S F; Shehata, A I; Aboussekhra, A

    2013-05-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the most abundant and probably the most active cellular component of breast cancer-associated stroma, promote carcinogenesis through paracrine effects; however, the molecular basis remains elusive. We have shown here that p16(INK4A) expression is reduced in 83% CAFs as compared with their normal adjacent counterparts cancer-free tissues isolated from the same patients. This decrease is mainly due to AUF1-dependent higher turnover of the CDKN2A mRNA in CAFs. Importantly, p16(INK4A) downregulation using specific siRNA activated breast fibroblasts and increased the expression/secretion levels of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. Consequently, media conditioned with these cells stimulated the proliferation of epithelial cells. Furthermore, the migration/invasion of breast cancer cells was also enhanced in an SDF-1-dependent manner. This effect was mediated through inducing an epithelial-mesenchymal transition state. By contrast, increase in p16(INK4A) level through ectopic expression or AUF1 downregulation, reduced the secreted levels of SDF-1 and MMP-2 and suppressed the pro-carcinogenic effects of CAFs. In addition, p16(INK4A)-defective fibroblasts accelerated breast tumor xenograft formation and growth rate in mice. Importantly, tumors formed in the presence of p16(INK4A)-defective fibroblasts exhibited higher levels of active Akt, Cox-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9, showing their greater aggressiveness as compared with xenografts formed in the presence of p16(INK4A)-proficient fibroblasts. These results provide the first indication that p16(INK4A) downregulation in breast stromal fibroblasts is an important step toward their activation. PMID:22751126

  7. miR-146b-5p mediates p16-dependent repression of IL-6 and suppresses paracrine procarcinogenic effects of breast stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ansari, Mysoon M.; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence support the critical roles of active stromal fibroblasts in breast cancer development and spread. However, the mediators and the mechanisms of regulation are still not well defined. We have shown here that the tumor suppressor p16INK4A protein inhibits the pro-carcinogenic effects of breast stromal fibroblasts through repressing the expression/secretion of IL-6. Indeed, p16INK4A suppresses IL-6 at the mRNA and protein levels. This effect is mediated trough miR-146b-5p, which inhibits IL-6 expression through a specific sequence at the IL-6 3′UTR. In addition, we present clear evidence that miR-146b-5p inhibition is sufficient to transactivate breast stromal fibroblasts, which promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition in breast cancer cells in a paracrine manner. By contrast, ectopic expression of miR-146b-5p in active fibroblasts abrogated their pro-carcinogenic effects. The physiological importance of miR-146b-5p inhibition was revealed by showing that the levels of pre-miR-146b-5p as well as its mature form are reduced in cancer-associated fibroblasts as compared with their normal adjacent counterparts from cancer-free tissues isolated from the same patients. Interestingly, treatment of active breast stromal fibroblasts with curcumin increased the level of the p16INK4A coding CDKN2A mRNA and miR-146b-5p and suppressed IL-6, which confirms the repressive effect of these two tumor suppressor molecules on IL-6, and shows the possible “normalization” of cancer-related active fibroblasts. These results show that miR-146b-5p has non-cell-autonomous tumor suppressor function through inhibition of IL-6, suggesting that targeting this microRNA in breast stromal fibroblasts could be of great therapeutic value. PMID:26338965

  8. Activation of Notch1 signaling in stromal fibroblasts inhibits melanoma growth by upregulating WISP-1.

    PubMed

    Shao, H; Cai, L; Grichnik, J M; Livingstone, A S; Velazquez, O C; Liu, Z-J

    2011-10-20

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as an important target for cancer therapy. Fibroblasts (Fbs) within the tumor stroma are critically involved in promoting tumor growth and angiogenesis through secretion of soluble factors, synthesis of extracellular matrix and direct cell-cell interaction. In this work, we aim to alter the biological activity of stromal Fbs by modulating the Notch1 signaling pathway. We show that Fbs engineered to constitutively activate the Notch1 pathway significantly inhibit melanoma growth and tumor angiogenesis. We determine that the inhibitory effect of 'Notch-engineered' Fbs is mediated by increased secretion of Wnt-induced secreted protein-1 (WISP-1) as the effects of Notch1 activation in Fbs are reversed by shRNA-mediated blockade of WISP-1. When 'Notch-engineered' Fbs are co-grafted with melanoma cells in SCID mice, shRNA-mediated blockade of WISP-1 reverses the tumor-suppressive phenotype of the 'Notch-engineered' Fbs, significantly increases melanoma growth and tumor angiogenesis. Consistent with these findings, supplement of recombinant WISP-1 protein inhibits melanoma cell growth in vitro. In addition, WISP-1 is modestly expressed in melanoma-activated Fbs but highly expressed in inactivated Fbs. Evaluation of human melanoma skin biopsies indicates that expression of WISP-1 is significantly lower in melanoma nests and surrounding areas filled with infiltrated immune cells than in the adjacent dermis unaffected by the melanoma. Overall, our study shows that constitutive activation of the Notch1 pathway confers Fbs with a suppressive phenotype to melanoma growth, partially through WISP-1. Thus, targeting tumor stromal Fbs by activating Notch signaling and/or increasing WISP-1 may represent a novel therapeutic approach to combat melanoma. PMID:21516124

  9. Stromal fibroblasts derived from mammary gland of bovine with mastitis display inflammation-specific changes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; He, Guiliang; Zhang, Wenyao; Xu, Tong; Qi, Hongliang; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yong; Gao, Ming-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblasts are predominant components of mammary stromal cells and play crucial roles in the development and involution of bovine mammary gland; however, whether these cells contribute to mastitis has not been demonstrated. Thus, we have undertaken biological and molecular characterization of inflammation-associated fibroblasts (INFs) extracted from bovine mammary glands with clinical mastitis and normal fibroblasts (NFs) from slaughtered dairy cows because of fractured legs during lactation. The functional contributions of INFs to normal epithelial cells were also investigated by using an in vitro co-culture model. We present evidence that the INFs were activated fibroblasts and showed inflammation-related features. Moreover, INFs significantly inhibited the proliferation and β-casein secretion of epithelial cells, as well as upregulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 in epithelial cells. These findings indicate that functional alterations can occur in stromal fibroblasts within the bovine mammary gland during mastitis, demonstrating the importance of stromal fibroblasts in bovine mastitis and its treatment. PMID:27272504

  10. Stromal fibroblasts derived from mammary gland of bovine with mastitis display inflammation-specific changes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing; He, Guiliang; Zhang, Wenyao; Xu, Tong; Qi, Hongliang; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yong; Gao, Ming-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblasts are predominant components of mammary stromal cells and play crucial roles in the development and involution of bovine mammary gland; however, whether these cells contribute to mastitis has not been demonstrated. Thus, we have undertaken biological and molecular characterization of inflammation-associated fibroblasts (INFs) extracted from bovine mammary glands with clinical mastitis and normal fibroblasts (NFs) from slaughtered dairy cows because of fractured legs during lactation. The functional contributions of INFs to normal epithelial cells were also investigated by using an in vitro co-culture model. We present evidence that the INFs were activated fibroblasts and showed inflammation-related features. Moreover, INFs significantly inhibited the proliferation and β-casein secretion of epithelial cells, as well as upregulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 in epithelial cells. These findings indicate that functional alterations can occur in stromal fibroblasts within the bovine mammary gland during mastitis, demonstrating the importance of stromal fibroblasts in bovine mastitis and its treatment. PMID:27272504

  11. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) from stromal fibroblasts stimulates the progression of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Hiroaki; Yashiro, Masakazu; Kinoshita, Haruhito; Fukuoka, Tatsunari; Morisaki, Tamami; Masuda, Go; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kubo, Naoshi; Ohira, Masaichi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2014-11-28

    The aim of this study was to clarify the role of fibroblast-derived Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) in the development of gastric cancer. The correlation between the clinicopathological features of 548 primary gastric carcinomas and LOXL2 expression in stromal cells was examined by immunohistochemistry. Two gastric cancer cell lines, OCUM-12 and NUGC-3, and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) were used in this in vitro study. The effect of fibroblast-derived LOXL2 on the motility of gastric cancer cells was analyzed by using a wound-healing assay, a double-chamber invasion assay, and western blot. LOXL2 expression in stromal cells was significantly associated with tumor invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, and peritoneal dissemination. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that LOXL2 expression in stromal cells could be an independent predictive parameter for the overall survival of patients. CAFs significantly stimulated the migration and invasion of OCUM-12 and NUGC-3 cells. This motility-stimulating ability of CAFs was inhibited by LOXL2 siRNA. Western blot analysis indicated that phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in cancer cells was increased by the conditioned medium from CAFs, and was decreased by the conditioned medium from LOXL2 siRNA-treated CAFs. LOXL2 expression in stromal cells may be a useful prognostic factor for patients with gastric cancer. Fibroblast-derived LOXL2 may stimulate the motility of gastric cancer cells. PMID:25128648

  12. Stromal fibroblasts facilitate cancer cell invasion by a novel invadopodia-independent matrix degradation process.

    PubMed

    Cao, H; Eppinga, R D; Razidlo, G L; Krueger, E W; Chen, J; Qiang, L; McNiven, M A

    2016-03-01

    Metastatic invasion of tumors into peripheral tissues is known to rely upon protease-mediated degradation of the surrounding stroma. This remodeling process uses complex, actin-based, specializations of the plasma membrane termed invadopodia that act both to sequester and release matrix metalloproteinases. Here we report that cells of mesenchymal origin, including tumor-associated fibroblasts, degrade substantial amounts of surrounding matrix by a mechanism independent of conventional invadopodia. These degradative sites lack the punctate shape of conventional invadopodia to spread along the cell base and are reticular and/or fibrous in character. In marked contrast to invadopodia, this degradation does not require the action of Src kinase, Cdc42 or Dyn2. Rather, inhibition of Dyn2 causes a marked upregulation of stromal matrix degradation. Further, expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases are differentially regulated between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts. This matrix remodeling by fibroblasts increases the invasive capacity of tumor cells, thereby illustrating how the tumor microenvironment can contribute to metastasis. These findings provide evidence for a novel matrix remodeling process conducted by stromal fibroblasts that is substantially more effective than conventional invadopodia, distinct in structural organization and regulated by disparate molecular mechanisms. PMID:25982272

  13. [Morphological characteristics of stromal fibroblasts and limphocites in colon and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Gvamichava, T; Gachechiladze, I; Machavariani, T; Gogiashvili, L

    2012-12-01

    Stromal substance, lymphocytes (populations and subpopulations) and different mature fibroblasts were studied in the colon and breast cancers by the histology, electron microscopy, and immunocytochemistry and electron radioautographic methods. In cancer stroma marked decrease the total number of T and B cells, in addition to a disturbance of the relations between populations and subpopulations, witch leads to the imbalance of the immune response to tumor growth. In the colon and breast cancer the disturbance of the specific function of fibroblasts and the violation of their cytodifferentiation occur. The above is confirmed by the electronradioautography study of DNA, RNA and aminoacid mixture synthesis. Perversion of the specific function appears by the decrease the number of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and increase the number of nonsulfated fraction. We believe that the change of the cancer stromal chemical substance composition is also one of the basic precondition of local immune response damage, which in turn promotes cancer cells invasion. PMID:23293237

  14. Isolation and Culture of Human Endometrial Epithelial Cells and Stromal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joseph C.; Roan, Nadia R.

    2016-01-01

    Purification and culture of endometrial epithelial cells (eEC) and stromal fibroblasts (eSF) from endometrial biopsies allows for downstream cell-specific in vitro studies. The utility of this protocol is the ease with which cells are purified without contamination from unwanted cell types, and the ability to use patient-paired eEC and eSF in experiments. These methods have been previously published, but here the protocol has been updated for maximum efficiency. PMID:27347495

  15. Adipose-Derived Stromal Vascular Fraction Differentially Expands Breast Progenitors in Tissue Adjacent to Tumors Compared to Healthy Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sumanta; Laliberte, Mike; Blelloch, Sarah; Ratanshi, Imran; Safneck, Janice; Buchel, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autologous fat grafts supplemented with adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction are used in reconstructive and cosmetic breast procedures. Stromal vascular fraction contains adipose-derived stem cells that are thought to encourage wound healing, tissue regeneration, and graft retention. Although use of stromal vascular fraction has provided exciting perspectives for aesthetic procedures, no studies have yet been conducted to determine whether its cells contribute to breast tissue regeneration. The authors examined the effect of these cells on the expansion of human breast epithelial progenitors. Methods: From patients undergoing reconstructive breast surgery following mastectomies, abdominal fat, matching tissue adjacent to breast tumors, and the contralateral non–tumor-containing breast tissue were obtained. Ex vivo co-cultures using breast epithelial cells and the stromal vascular fraction cells were used to study the expansion potential of breast progenitors. Breast reduction samples were collected as a source of healthy breast cells. Results: The authors observed that progenitors present in healthy breast tissue or contralateral non–tumor-containing breast tissue showed significant and robust expansion in the presence of stromal vascular fraction (5.2- and 4.8-fold, respectively). Whereas the healthy progenitors expanded up to 3-fold without the stromal vascular fraction cells, the expansion of tissue adjacent to breast tumor progenitors required the presence of stromal vascular fraction cells, leading to a 7-fold expansion, which was significantly higher than the expansion of healthy progenitors with stromal vascular fraction. Conclusions: The use of stromal vascular fraction might be more beneficial to reconstructive operations following mastectomies compared with cosmetic corrections of the healthy breast. Future studies are required to examine the potential risk factors associated with its use. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE

  16. Fibroblast Activation Protein Expression by Stromal Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Julia, Tchou; Zhang Paul, J; Yingtao, Bi; Celine, Satija; Rajrupa, Marjumdar; Stephen, TL; Lo, A; Haiying, Chen; Carolyn, Mies; June, Carl H; Jose, Conejo-Garcia; Ellen, Puré

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) has long been known to be expressed in the stroma of breast cancer. However, very little is known if the magnitude of FAP expression within the stroma may have prognostic value and reflect the heterogeneous biology of the tumor cell. An earlier study had suggested that stromal FAP expression in breast cancer was inversely proportional to prognosis. We, therefore, hypothesized that stromal FAP expression may correlate with clinicopathologic variables and may serve as an adjunct prognostic factor in breast cancer. We evaluated the expression of FAP in a panel of breast cancer tissues (n=52) using a combination of immunostain analyses at the tissue and single cell level using freshly frozen or freshly digested human breast tumor samples respectively. Our results showed that FAP expression was abundantly expressed in the stroma across all breast cancer subtypes without significant correlation with clinicopathologic factors. We further identified a subset of FAP positive or FAP+ stromal cells that also expressed CD45, a pan-leukocyte marker. Using freshly dissociated human breast tumor specimens (n=5), we demonstrated that some of these FAP+ CD45+ cells were CD11b+CD14+MHC-II+ indicating that they were likely tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). Although FAP+CD45+ cells have been demonstrated in the mouse tumor stroma, our results demonstrating that human breast TAMs expressed FAP was novel and suggested that existing and future FAP directed therapy may have dual therapeutic benefits targeting both stromal mesenchymal cells and immune cells such as TAMs. More work is needed to explore the role of FAP as a potential targetable molecule in breast cancer treatment. PMID:24074532

  17. Effect of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Erythropoietin on Functional Activity of Fibroblasts and Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, N A; Nikonorova, Yu V; Surovtseva, M A; Lykov, A P; Poveshchenko, O V; Poveshchenko, A F; Pokushalov, E A; Romanov, A B; Konenkov, V I

    2016-02-01

    The study examined the effect of VEGF and erythropoietin on proliferative and migratory activities of skin fibroblasts and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells of human adipose tissue. VEGF stimulated proliferation and migration of fi broblasts, but produced no significant effect on functional activity of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells. Erythropoietin stimulated proliferation of both cell types, but did not affect their migration. PMID:26899850

  18. Stromal fibroblasts support dendritic cells to maintain IL-23/Th17 responses after exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Malecka, Anna; Wang, Qunwei; Shah, Sabaria; Sutavani, Ruhcha V; Spendlove, Ian; Ramage, Judith M; Greensmith, Julie; Franks, Hester A; Gough, Michael J; Saalbach, Anja; Patel, Poulam M; Jackson, Andrew M

    2016-08-01

    Dendritic cell function is modulated by stromal cells, including fibroblasts. Although poorly understood, the signals delivered through this crosstalk substantially alter dendritic cell biology. This is well illustrated with release of TNF-α/IL-1β from activated dendritic cells, promoting PGE2 secretion from stromal fibroblasts. This instructs dendritic cells to up-regulate IL-23, a key Th17-polarizing cytokine. We previously showed that ionizing radiation inhibited IL-23 production by human dendritic cells in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the hypothesis that dendritic cell-fibroblast crosstalk overcomes the suppressive effect of ionizing radiation to support appropriately polarized Th17 responses. Radiation (1-6 Gy) markedly suppressed IL-23 secretion by activated dendritic cells (P < 0.0001) without adversely impacting their viability and consequently, inhibited the generation of Th17 responses. Cytokine suppression by ionizing radiation was selective, as there was no effect on IL-1β, -6, -10, and -27 or TNF-α and only a modest (11%) decrease in IL-12p70 secretion. Coculture with fibroblasts augmented IL-23 secretion by irradiated dendritic cells and increased Th17 responses. Importantly, in contrast to dendritic cells, irradiated fibroblasts maintained their capacity to respond to TNF-α/IL-1β and produce PGE2, thus providing the key intermediary signals for successful dendritic cell-fibroblasts crosstalk. In summary, stromal fibroblasts support Th17-polarizing cytokine production by dendritic cells that would otherwise be suppressed in an irradiated microenvironment. This has potential ramifications for understanding the immune response to local radiotherapy. These findings underscore the need to account for the impact of microenvironmental factors, including stromal cells, in understanding the control of immunity. PMID:27049023

  19. Metabolic reprogramming of stromal fibroblasts through p62-mTORC1 signaling promotes inflammation and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Tania; Kim, Ji Young; Abu-Baker, Shadi; Moscat-Pardos, Jorge; Ahn, Christopher S; Reina-Campos, Miguel; Duran, Angeles; Castilla, Elias A; Metallo, Christian M; Diaz-Meco, Maria T; Moscat, Jorge

    2014-07-14

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in cancer progression, but the precise mechanisms by which stromal cells influence the epithelium are poorly understood. Here we show that p62 levels were reduced in the stroma of several tumors and that its loss in the tumor microenvironment or stromal fibroblasts resulted in increased tumorigenesis of epithelial prostate cancer cells. The mechanism involves the regulation of cellular redox through an mTORC1/c-Myc pathway of stromal glucose and amino acid metabolism, resulting in increased stromal IL-6 production, which is required for tumor promotion in the epithelial compartment. Thus, p62 is an anti-inflammatory tumor suppressor that acts through the modulation of metabolism in the tumor stroma. PMID:25002027

  20. Prognostic and Predictive Significance of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Benjamin Y.; Vaid, Mudit; Kaler, Pawan; Klampfer, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Colon cancer development and malignant progression are driven by genetic and epigenetic alterations in tumor cells and by factors from the tumor microenvironment. Cancer cells become reliant on the activity of specific oncogenes and on prosurvival and proliferative signals they receive from the abnormal environment they create and reside in. Accordingly, the response to anticancer therapy is determined by genetic and epigenetic changes that are intrinsic to tumor cells and by the factors present in the tumor microenvironment. Recent advances in the understanding of the involvement of the tumor microenvironment in tumor progression and therapeutic response are optimizing the application of prognostic and predictive factors in colon cancer. Moreover, new targets in the tumor microenvironment that are amenable to therapeutic intervention have been identified. Because stromal cells are with rare exceptions genetically stable, the tumor microenvironment has emerged as a preferred target for therapeutic drugs. In this review, we discuss the role of stromal fibroblasts and macrophages in colon cancer progression and in the response of colon cancer patients to therapy. PMID:26568685

  1. Adenovirus i-Leader Truncation Bioselected Against Cancer-associated Fibroblasts to Overcome Tumor Stromal Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Saus, Cristina; Gros, Alena; Alemany, Ramon; Cascalló, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-associated stromal cells constitute a major hurdle in the antitumor efficacy with oncolytic adenoviruses. To overcome this biological barrier, an in vitro bioselection of a mutagenized AdwtRGD stock in human cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) was performed. Several rounds of harvest at early cytopathic effect (CPE) followed by plaque isolation led us to identify one mutant with large plaque phenotype, enhanced release in CAFs and enhanced cytotoxicity in CAF and several tumor cell lines. Whole genome sequencing and functional mapping identified the truncation of the last 17 amino acids in C-terminal end of the i-leader protein as the mutation responsible for this phenotype. Similar mutations have been previously isolated in two independent bioselection processes in tumor cell lines. Importantly, our results establish the enhanced antitumor activity in vivo of the i-leader C-terminal truncated mutants, especially in a desmotic fibroblast-embedded lung carcinoma model in mice. These results indicate that the i-leader truncation represents a promising trait to improve virotherapy with oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:21863000

  2. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells but Not Cardiac Fibroblasts Exert Beneficial Systemic Immunomodulatory Effects in Experimental Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Miteva, Kapka; Pappritz, Kathleen; Westermann, Dirk; Schefold, Joerg C.; Fusch, Gerhard; Weithäuser, Alice; Rauch, Ursula; Becher, Peter-Moritz; Klingel, Karin; Ringe, Jochen; Kurtz, Andreas; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Systemic application of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in inflammatory cardiomyopathy exerts cardiobeneficial effects. The mode of action is unclear since a sufficient and long-acting cardiac homing of MSCs is unlikely. We therefore investigated the regulation of the immune response in coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced acute myocarditis after intravenous application of MSCs. Wildtype mice were infected with CVB3 and treated with either PBS, human MSCs or human cardiac fibroblasts intravenously 1 day after infection. Seven days after infection, MSCs could be detected in the spleen, heart, pancreas, liver, lung and kidney, whereby the highest presence was observed in the lung. MSCs increased significantly the myocardial expression of HGF and decreased the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL1β and IL6 as well as the severity of myocarditis and ameliorated the left ventricular dysfunction measured by conductance catheter. MSCs upregulated the production of IFNγ in CD4+ and CD8+ cells, the number of IL10-producing regulatory T cells and the apoptosis rate of T cells in the spleen. An increased number of CD4+CD25+FoxP3 could be found in the spleen as well as in the circulation. In contrast, application of human cardiac fibroblasts had no effect on the severity of myocarditis and the systemic immune response observed after MSCs-administration. In conclusion, modulation of the immune response in extracardiac organs is associated with cardiobeneficial effects in experimental inflammatory cardiomyopathy after systemic application of MSCs. PMID:22815907

  3. Melanoma Cells Can Adopt the Phenotype of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages by Spontaneous Cell Fusion in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kemény, Lajos V.; Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Jakab, Ádám; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    After the removal of primary cutaneous melanoma some patients develop local recurrences, even after having histologically tumor-free re-excision. A potential explanation behind this phenomenon is that tumor cells switch their phenotype, making their recognition via standard histopathological assessments extremely difficult. Tumor-stromal cell fusion has been proposed as a potential mechanism for tumor cells to acquire mesenchymal traits; therefore, we hypothesized that melanoma cells could acquire fibroblast- and macrophage-like phenotypes via cell fusion. We show that melanoma cells spontaneously fuse with human dermal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The hybrid cells’ nuclei contain chromosomes from both parental cells and are indistinguishable from the parental fibroblasts or macrophages based on their morphology and immunophenotype, as they could lose the melanoma specific MART1 marker, but express the fibroblast marker smooth muscle actin or the macrophage marker CD68. Our results suggest that, by spontaneous cell fusion in vitro, tumor cells can adopt the morphology and immunophenotype of stromal cells while still carrying oncogenic, tumor-derived genetic information. Therefore, melanoma–stromal cell fusion might play a role in missing tumor cells by routine histopathological assessments. PMID:27271591

  4. Mesenchymal stromal cells reverse hypoxia-mediated suppression of α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Faulknor, Renea A.; Olekson, Melissa A.; Nativ, Nir I.; Ghodbane, Mehdi; Gray, Andrea J.; Berthiaume, François

    2015-02-27

    During wound healing, fibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix that guides angiogenesis and supports the migration and proliferation of cells that eventually form the scar. They also promote wound closure via differentiation into α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-expressing myofibroblasts, which cause wound contraction. Low oxygen tension typical of chronic nonhealing wounds inhibits fibroblast collagen production and differentiation. It has been suggested that hypoxic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete factors that promote wound healing in animal models; however, it is unclear whether these factors are equally effective on the target cells in a hypoxic wound environment. Here we investigated the impact of MSC-derived soluble factors on the function of fibroblasts cultured in hypoxic fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs). Hypoxia alone significantly decreased FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression. MSC-conditioned medium restored hypoxic FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression to levels similar to normoxic FPCLs. (SB431542), an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β{sub 1} (TGF-β{sub 1})-mediated signaling, blocked most of the MSC effect on FPCL contraction, while exogenous TGF-β{sub 1} at levels similar to that secreted by MSCs reproduced the MSC effect. These results suggest that TGF-β{sub 1} is a major paracrine signal secreted by MSCs that can restore fibroblast functions relevant to the wound healing process and that are impaired in hypoxia. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts were cultured in collagen lattices (FPCLs) as model contracting wounds. • Hypoxia decreased FPCL contraction and fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. • Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) restored function of hypoxic fibroblasts. • MSCs regulate fibroblast function mainly via secreted transforming growth factor-β{sub 1}.

  5. Mesenchymal stromal cells, colony-forming unit fibroblasts, from bone marrow of untreated advanced breast and lung cancer patients suppress fibroblast colony formation from healthy marrow.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Erica Leonor; Labovsky, Vivian; La Russa, Vincent; Vallone, Valeria Fernández; Honegger, Alba Elizabeth; Belloc, Carlos Gabriel; Wen, Huei Chi; Bordenave, Raúl Horacio; Bullorsky, Eduardo Oscar; Feldman, Leonardo; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra

    2010-03-01

    We have shown that bone marrow (BM) from untreated advanced lung and breast cancer patients (LCP and BCP) have a reduced number of colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Factors that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of CFU-F are produced by the patients' BM microenvironment. We have now examined whether conditioned media (CM) from patients' CFU-F-derived stromal cells also inhibits the colony-forming efficiency (CFE) of CFU-F in primary cultures from healthy volunteers (HV)-BM. Thus the number and proliferation potential of HV-CFU-F were also found to be decreased and similar to colony numbers and colony size of patients' CFU-F. Stromal cells from both of these types of colonies appeared relatively larger and lacked the characteristic spindle morphology typically seen in healthy stromal cells. We developed an arbitrary mesenchymal stromal cell maturational index by taking three measures consisting of stromal cell surface area, longitudinal and horizontal axis. All stromal indices derived from HV-CFU-F grown in patients' CM were similar to those from stromal elements derived from patients' CFU-F. These indices were markedly higher than stromal indices typical of HV-CFU-F cultured in healthy CM or standard medium [alpha-medium plus 20% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (FBS)]. Patients' CM had increased concentrations of the CFU-F inhibitor, GM-CSF, and low levels of bFGF and Dkk-1, strong promoters of self-renewal of MSCs, compared to the levels quantified in CM from HV-CFU-F. Moreover, the majority of patients' MSCs were unresponsive in standard medium and healthy CM to give CFU-F, indicating that the majority of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients' CFU-F are locked in maturational arrest. These results show that alterations of GM-CSF, bFGF, and Dkk-1 are associated with deficient cloning and maturation arrest of CFU-F. Defective autocrine and paracrine mechanisms may be involved in the BM microenvironments of

  6. TGF-β in jaw tumor fluids induces RANKL expression in stromal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Chiaki; Aikawa, Tomonao; Okuno, Emi; Miyagawa, Kazuaki; Amano, Katsuhiko; Takahata, Sosuke; Kimata, Masaaki; Okura, Masaya; Iida, Seiji; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2016-08-01

    Odontogenic tumors and cysts, arising in the jawbones, grow by resorption and destruction of the jawbones. However, mechanisms underlying bone resorption by odontogenic tumors/cysts remain unclear. Odontogenic tumors/cysts comprise odontogenic epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts, which originate from the developing tooth germ. It has been demonstrated that odontogenic epithelial cells of the developing tooth germ induce osteoclastogenesis to prevent the tooth germ from invading the developing bone to maintain its structure in developing bones. Thus, we hypothesized that odontogenic epithelial cells of odontogenic tumors/cysts induce osteoclast formation, which plays potential roles in tumor/cyst outgrowth into the jawbone. The purpose of this study was to examine osteoclastogenesis by cytokines, focusing on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), produced by odontogenic epithelial cells. We observed two pathways for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) induction by keratocystic odontogenic tumor fluid: the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) pathway through interleukin-1α (IL-1α) signaling and non-COX-2/PGE2 pathway through TGF-β receptor signaling. TGF-β1 and IL-1α produced by odontogenic tumors/cysts induced osteoclastogenesis directly in the osteoclast precursor cells and indirectly via increased RANKL induction in the stroma. PMID:27279422

  7. TGF-β in jaw tumor fluids induces RANKL expression in stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Chiaki; Aikawa, Tomonao; Okuno, Emi; Miyagawa, Kazuaki; Amano, Katsuhiko; Takahata, Sosuke; Kimata, Masaaki; Okura, Masaya; Iida, Seiji; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors and cysts, arising in the jawbones, grow by resorption and destruction of the jawbones. However, mechanisms underlying bone resorption by odontogenic tumors/cysts remain unclear. Odontogenic tumors/cysts comprise odontogenic epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts, which originate from the developing tooth germ. It has been demonstrated that odontogenic epithelial cells of the developing tooth germ induce osteoclastogenesis to prevent the tooth germ from invading the developing bone to maintain its structure in developing bones. Thus, we hypothesized that odontogenic epithelial cells of odontogenic tumors/cysts induce osteoclast formation, which plays potential roles in tumor/cyst outgrowth into the jawbone. The purpose of this study was to examine osteoclastogenesis by cytokines, focusing on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), produced by odontogenic epithelial cells. We observed two pathways for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) induction by keratocystic odontogenic tumor fluid: the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) pathway through interleukin-1α (IL-1α) signaling and non-COX-2/PGE2 pathway through TGF-β receptor signaling. TGF-β1 and IL-1α produced by odontogenic tumors/cysts induced osteoclastogenesis directly in the osteoclast precursor cells and indirectly via increased RANKL induction in the stroma. PMID:27279422

  8. T Cells and Stromal Fibroblasts in Human Tumor Microenvironments Represent Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Barnas, Jennifer L.; Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R.; Yokota, Sandra J.; Kelleher, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    The immune system of cancer patients recognizes tumor-associated antigens expressed on solid tumors and these antigens are able to induce tumor-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. Diverse immunotherapeutic strategies have been used in an attempt to enhance both antibody and T cell responses to tumors. While several tumor vaccination strategies significantly increase the number of tumor-specific lymphocytes in the blood of cancer patients, most vaccinated patients ultimately experience tumor progression. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with an effector memory phenotype infiltrate human tumor microenvironments, but most are hyporesponsive to stimulation via the T cell receptor (TCR) and CD28 under conditions that activate memory T cells derived from the peripheral blood of the cancer patients or normal donors. Attempts to identify cells and molecules responsible for the TCR signaling arrest of tumor-infiltrating T cells have focused largely upon the immunosuppressive effects of tumor cells, tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells. Here we review potential mechanisms by which human T cell function is arrested in the tumor microenvironment with a focus on the immunomodulatory effects of stromal fibroblasts. Determining in vivo which cells and molecules are responsible for the TCR arrest in human tumor-infiltrating T cells will be necessary to formulate and test strategies to prevent or reverse the signaling arrest of the human T cells in situ for a more effective design of tumor vaccines. These questions are now addressable using novel human xenograft models of tumor microenvironments. PMID:21209773

  9. Loss of p53 in Stromal Fibroblasts Promotes Epithelial Cell Invasion through Redox-Mediated ICAM1 Signal

    PubMed Central

    Trachootham, Dunyaporn; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Wan; Lu, Weiqin; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jinsong; Huang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays a major role in cancer development. Understanding how the stroma affects epithelial transformation will provide a basis for new preventive strategies. Recent evidences suggest that oxidative stress in stroma may play a role in cancer progression and loss of p53 function in the stromal cells were associated with poor prognosis and high tumor recurrence. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated the role of p53 loss in fibroblasts on epithelial transformation and the mechanistic involvement of reactive species. Using 3D-organotypic culture and other assays, we report that the stroma containing p53-deficient fibroblasts could transform the non-tumorigenic epithelial cells of oral and ovarian tissues origins to become invasive through reactive nitrogen species (RNS)-mediated release of cytokine ICAM1. The p53-deficient fibroblasts have increased RNS production and accumulation of oxidative DNA damage products associated with specific up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Suppression of RNS production by siRNA of eNOS or antioxidant NAC reduced ICAM1 expression and prevented the stroma-mediated epithelial invasion. Our study uncovers the novel mechanism by which redox alteration associated with loss of p53 in stromal fibroblasts function as a key inducer of epithelial transformation and invasion via RNS-mediated-ICAM1 signaling. Thus, modulation of the redox signaling in microenvironment may serve as a new approach to prevent epithelial transformation and suppress cancer invasion. PMID:23376231

  10. Exosomes released by chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells induce the transition of stromal cells into cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Paggetti, Jerome; Haderk, Franziska; Seiffert, Martina; Janji, Bassam; Distler, Ute; Ammerlaan, Wim; Kim, Yeoun Jin; Adam, Julien; Lichter, Peter; Solary, Eric; Berchem, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes derived from solid tumor cells are involved in immune suppression, angiogenesis, and metastasis, but the role of leukemia-derived exosomes has been less investigated. The pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is stringently associated with a tumor-supportive microenvironment and a dysfunctional immune system. Here, we explore the role of CLL-derived exosomes in the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which malignant cells create this favorable surrounding. We show that CLL-derived exosomes are actively incorporated by endothelial and mesenchymal stem cells ex vivo and in vivo and that the transfer of exosomal protein and microRNA induces an inflammatory phenotype in the target cells, which resembles the phenotype of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). As a result, stromal cells show enhanced proliferation, migration, and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, contributing to a tumor-supportive microenvironment. Exosome uptake by endothelial cells increased angiogenesis ex vivo and in vivo, and coinjection of CLL-derived exosomes and CLL cells promoted tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. Finally, we detected α-smooth actin–positive stromal cells in lymph nodes of CLL patients. These findings demonstrate that CLL-derived exosomes actively promote disease progression by modulating several functions of surrounding stromal cells that acquire features of cancer-associated fibroblasts. PMID:26100252

  11. The Transcriptomic Evolution of Mammalian Pregnancy: Gene Expression Innovations in Endometrial Stromal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kin, Koryu; Maziarz, Jamie; Chavan, Arun R; Kamat, Manasi; Vasudevan, Sreelakshmi; Birt, Alyssa; Emera, Deena; Lynch, Vincent J; Ott, Troy L; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Wagner, Günter P

    2016-01-01

    The endometrial stromal fibroblast (ESF) is a cell type present in the uterine lining of therian mammals. In the stem lineage of eutherian mammals, ESF acquired the ability to differentiate into decidual cells in order to allow embryo implantation. We call the latter cell type "neo-ESF" in contrast to "paleo-ESF" which is homologous to eutherian ESF but is not able to decidualize. In this study, we compare the transcriptomes of ESF from six therian species: Opossum (Monodelphis domestica; paleo-ESF), mink, rat, rabbit, human (all neo-ESF), and cow (secondarily nondecidualizing neo-ESF). We find evidence for strong stabilizing selection on transcriptome composition suggesting that the expression of approximately 5,600 genes is maintained by natural selection. The evolution of neo-ESF from paleo-ESF involved the following gene expression changes: Loss of expression of genes related to inflammation and immune response, lower expression of genes opposing tissue invasion, increased markers for proliferation as well as the recruitment of FOXM1, a key gene transiently expressed during decidualization. Signaling pathways also evolve rapidly and continue to evolve within eutherian lineages. In the bovine lineage, where invasiveness and decidualization were secondarily lost, we see a re-expression of genes found in opossum, most prominently WISP2, and a loss of gene expression related to angiogenesis. The data from this and previous studies support a scenario, where the proinflammatory paleo-ESF was reprogrammed to express anti-inflammatory genes in response to the inflammatory stimulus coming from the implanting conceptus and thus paving the way for extended, trans-cyclic gestation. PMID:27401177

  12. Visible red and infrared light alters gene expression in human marrow stromal fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jie; Wang, Qing; Wai, Daniel; Zhou, Qunzhou; Shi, Shihong; Le, Anh D; Shi, Songtao; Yen, Stephen L-K

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study tested whether or not gene expression in human marrow stromal fibroblast (MSF) cells depends on light wavelength and energy density. Material and Methods Primary cultures of isolated human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSC) were exposed to visible red (VR, 633 nm) and infrared (IR, 830) radiation wavelengths from a light emitting diode (LED) over a range of energy densities (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 Joules/cm2) Cultured cells were assayed for cell proliferation, osteogenic potential, adipogenesis, mRNA and protein content. mRNA was analyzed by microarray, and compared among different wavelengths and energy densities. Mesenchymal and epithelial cell responses were compared to determine whether responses were cell-type specific. Protein array analysis was used to further analyze key pathways identified by microarrays. Result Different wavelengths and energy densities produced unique sets of genes identified by microarray analysis. Pathway analysis pointed to TGF beta 1 in the visible red and Akt 1 in the infrared wavelengths as key pathways to study. TGF beta protein arrays suggested switching from canonical to non-canonical TGF beta pathways with increases to longer IR wavelengths. Microarrays suggest RANKL and TIMP 10 followed IR energy density dose response curves. Epithelial and mesenchymal cells respond differently to stimulation by light suggesting cell-type specific response is possible. Conclusions These studies demonstrate differential gene expression with different wavelengths, energy densities and cell types. These differences in gene expression have the potential to be exploited for therapeutic purposes and can help explain contradictory results in the literature when wavelengths, energy densities and cell types differ. PMID:25865533

  13. The Transcriptomic Evolution of Mammalian Pregnancy: Gene Expression Innovations in Endometrial Stromal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kin, Koryu; Maziarz, Jamie; Chavan, Arun R.; Kamat, Manasi; Vasudevan, Sreelakshmi; Birt, Alyssa; Emera, Deena; Lynch, Vincent J.; Ott, Troy L.; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Wagner, Günter P.

    2016-01-01

    The endometrial stromal fibroblast (ESF) is a cell type present in the uterine lining of therian mammals. In the stem lineage of eutherian mammals, ESF acquired the ability to differentiate into decidual cells in order to allow embryo implantation. We call the latter cell type “neo-ESF” in contrast to “paleo-ESF” which is homologous to eutherian ESF but is not able to decidualize. In this study, we compare the transcriptomes of ESF from six therian species: Opossum (Monodelphis domestica; paleo-ESF), mink, rat, rabbit, human (all neo-ESF), and cow (secondarily nondecidualizing neo-ESF). We find evidence for strong stabilizing selection on transcriptome composition suggesting that the expression of approximately 5,600 genes is maintained by natural selection. The evolution of neo-ESF from paleo-ESF involved the following gene expression changes: Loss of expression of genes related to inflammation and immune response, lower expression of genes opposing tissue invasion, increased markers for proliferation as well as the recruitment of FOXM1, a key gene transiently expressed during decidualization. Signaling pathways also evolve rapidly and continue to evolve within eutherian lineages. In the bovine lineage, where invasiveness and decidualization were secondarily lost, we see a re-expression of genes found in opossum, most prominently WISP2, and a loss of gene expression related to angiogenesis. The data from this and previous studies support a scenario, where the proinflammatory paleo-ESF was reprogrammed to express anti-inflammatory genes in response to the inflammatory stimulus coming from the implanting conceptus and thus paving the way for extended, trans-cyclic gestation. PMID:27401177

  14. Stromal cells in the human gut show ultrastructural features of fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells but not myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Eyden, Brian; Curry, Alan; Wang, Guofeng

    2011-07-01

    The free spindled cells of the lamina propria of the gut have been reported as showing fibroblastic, smooth-muscle and myofibroblastic differentiation. A precise understanding of the differentiation of these cells is essential for appreciating their functions, and this paper addresses this question using ultrastructural analysis. Histologically normal samples from different areas of the gastrointestinal tract were studied. Both subepithelial stromal cells, lying immediately beneath the basal lamina, and the deeper interstitial stromal cells, were studied. Subepithelial and interstitial cells had comparable features, reinforcing the idea that these formed a single reticulum of cells. Two major cell types were identified. Some were smooth-muscle cells, on the basis of abundant myofilaments with focal densities, glycogen, an irregular cell surface, focal lamina and multiple attachment plaques alternating with plasmalemmal caveolae. Some cells had a lesser expression of these markers, especially of myofilaments, and were regarded as poorly differentiated smooth-muscle cells and descriptively referred to as 'myoid'. Other cells were fibroblastic to judge by prominent rough endoplasmic reticulum, an absence of myofilaments and lamina, but presence of focal adhesions. The fibronexus junctions of true myofibroblasts were not seen. The study emphasises that the smooth-muscle actin immunoreactivity in this anatomical site resides in smooth-muscle cells and not in myofibroblasts, a view consistent with earlier ultrastructural and immunostaining results. The recognition that these cells are showing smooth-muscle or fibroblastic but not true myofibroblastic differentiation should inform our understanding of the function of these cells. PMID:20662992

  15. CD34+ stromal cells/fibroblasts/fibrocytes/telocytes as a tissue reserve and a principal source of mesenchymal cells. Location, morphology, function and role in pathology.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, L; Gutiérrez, R; García, M P; Sáez, F J; Díaz-Flores, L; Valladares, F; Madrid, J F

    2014-07-01

    We review the morphofunctional characteristics of CD34+ stromal fibroblastic/fibrocytic cells (CD34+ SFCs) and report our observations. We consider the following aspects of CD34+ SFCs: A) The confusing terms applied to this cell type, often combining the prefix CD34 with numerous names, including fibroblasts, fibrocytes, dendrocytes, keratocytes, telocytes and stromal, dendritic, adventitial, supraadventitial, perivascular, paravascular and delimiting cells; B) Changes in their immunophenotype, e.g., loss of CD34 expression and gain of other markers, such as those defining mesenchymal and derivate cells (myofibroblasts, osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes); C) Morphology (elongated or triangular cell body and thin, moniliform, bipolar or multipolar cytoplasmic processes), immunohistochemistry (co-expression of and changes in molecular expression) and structure (characteristics of nucleus and cytoplasmic organelles, and points of contact and junctions in quiescent and activated stages by light and electron microscopy); D) Location and distribution in the vessels (adventitia or external layer), in the tissues (connective, adipose, blood, muscle and nervous) and in the organs and systems (skin, oral cavity and oropharynx, respiratory, digestive, urinary, male, female, endocrine and lymphoid systems, serosal and synovial membranes, heart, eye and meninges); E) Origin from the mesoderm and cranial neural crest in the embryo, and from stem cells (themselves or other cells) and/or peripheral blood pluripotent stem cells (circulating progenitor cells) in post-natal life; F) Functions, such as synthesis of different molecules, progenitor of mesenchymal cells, immunomodulation, parenchymal regulation (growth, maturation and differentiation of adjacent cells), induction of angiogenesis, scaffolding support of other cells and phagocytic properties. Since CD34+ SFCs are the main reservoir of tissue mesenchymal cells (great mesenchymal potential, probably higher than that

  16. Paracrine effect of GTP cyclohydrolase and angiopoietin-1 interaction in stromal fibroblasts on tumor Tie2 activation and breast cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liye; Zeng, Xin; Kleibeuker, Esther; Buffa, Francesca; Barberis, Alessandro; Leek, Russell D; Roxanis, Ioannis; Zhang, Wei; Worth, Andrew; Beech, John S; Harris, Adrian L; Cai, Shijie

    2016-02-23

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a key role in promoting tumor growth, acting through complex paracrine regulation. GTP cyclohydrolase (GTPCH) expression for tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis in tumor stroma is implicated in angiogenesis and tumor development. However, the clinical significance of GTPCH expression in breast cancer is still elusive and how GTPCH regulates stromal fibroblast and tumor cell communication remains unknown. We found that GTPCH was upregulated in breast CAFs and epithelia, and high GTPCH RNA was significantly correlated with larger high grade tumors and worse prognosis. In cocultures, GTPCH expressing fibroblasts stimulated breast cancer cell proliferation and motility, cancer cell Tie2 phosphorylation and consequent downstream pathway activation. GTPCH interacted with Ang-1 in stromal fibroblasts and enhanced Ang-1 expression and function, which in turn phosphorylated tumor Tie2 and induced cell proliferation. In coimplantation xenografts, GTPCH in fibroblasts enhanced tumor growth, upregulating Ang-1 and alpha-smooth muscle actin mainly in fibroblast-like cells. GTPCH inhibition resulted in the attenuation of tumor growth and angiogenesis. GTPCH/Ang-1 interaction in stromal fibroblasts and activation of Tie2 on breast tumor cells could play an important role in supporting breast cancer growth. GTPCH may be an important mechanism of paracrine tumor growth and hence a target for therapy in breast cancer. PMID:26814432

  17. Paracrine effect of GTP cyclohydrolase and angiopoietin-1 interaction in stromal fibroblasts on tumor Tie2 activation and breast cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Kleibeuker, Esther; Buffa, Francesca; Barberis, Alessandro; Leek, Russell D.; Roxanis, Ioannis; Zhang, Wei; Worth, Andrew; Beech, John S.; Harris, Adrian L.; Cai, Shijie

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a key role in promoting tumor growth, acting through complex paracrine regulation. GTP cyclohydrolase (GTPCH) expression for tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis in tumor stroma is implicated in angiogenesis and tumor development. However, the clinical significance of GTPCH expression in breast cancer is still elusive and how GTPCH regulates stromal fibroblast and tumor cell communication remains unknown. We found that GTPCH was upregulated in breast CAFs and epithelia, and high GTPCH RNA was significantly correlated with larger high grade tumors and worse prognosis. In cocultures, GTPCH expressing fibroblasts stimulated breast cancer cell proliferation and motility, cancer cell Tie2 phosphorylation and consequent downstream pathway activation. GTPCH interacted with Ang-1 in stromal fibroblasts and enhanced Ang-1 expression and function, which in turn phosphorylated tumor Tie2 and induced cell proliferation. In coimplantation xenografts, GTPCH in fibroblasts enhanced tumor growth, upregulating Ang-1 and alpha-smooth muscle actin mainly in fibroblast-like cells. GTPCH inhibition resulted in the attenuation of tumor growth and angiogenesis. GTPCH/Ang-1 interaction in stromal fibroblasts and activation of Tie2 on breast tumor cells could play an important role in supporting breast cancer growth. GTPCH may be an important mechanism of paracrine tumor growth and hence a target for therapy in breast cancer. PMID:26814432

  18. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchigami, Takao; Kibe, Toshiro; Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio; Nishizawa, Yoshiaki; Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Ueda, Masahiro; Nakamura, Norifumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Kishida, Michiko

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between tumor cells and fibroblasts in ameloblastoma. • AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted significantly high IL-1α levels. • IL-1α derived from AM-3 cells promoted IL-6 and IL-8 secretion of fibroblasts. • IL-6 and IL-8 activated the cellular motility and proliferation of AM-3 cells. - Abstract: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave

  19. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  20. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk of malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation and branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts – the ability to alter epithelial differentiation – that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging. PMID:15657080

  1. Lactate is a mediator of metabolic cooperation between stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts and glycolytic tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Rattigan, Yanique I.; Patel, Brijesh B.; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Sukenick, George; Koutcher, Jason A.; Glod, John W.; and others

    2012-02-15

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are bone marrow-derived stromal cells, which play a role in tumor progression. We have shown earlier that breast cancer cells secrete higher levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) under hypoxia, leading to the recruitment of hMSCs towards hypoxic tumor cells. We found that (i) MDA-MB-231 cells secrete significantly higher levels of lactate (3-fold more) under hypoxia (1% O{sub 2}) than under 20% O{sub 2} and (ii) lactate recruits hMSCs towards tumor cells by activating signaling pathways to enhance migration. The mRNA and protein expression of functional MCT1 in hMSCs is increased in response to lactate exposure. Thus, we hypothesized that hMSCs and stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the tumor microenvironment have the capacity to take up lactate expelled from tumor cells and use it as a source of energy. Our {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic measurements indicate that {sup 13}C-lactate is converted to {sup 13}C-alpha ketoglutarate in hMSCs and CAFs supporting this hypothesis. To our knowledge this is the first in vitro model system demonstrating that hMSCs and CAFs can utilize lactate produced by tumor cells.

  2. Stromal fibroblast activation and their potential association with uterine fibroids (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, LI-HUA; CAI, FENG-FENG; GE, ISABELL; BISKUP, EWELINA; CHENG, ZHONG-PING

    2014-01-01

    Uterine fibroids are the most common type of benign, gynecologic neoplasm and are the primary indication for performance of a hysterectomy, accounting for >200,000 hysterectomies annually in the USA. At present, females are younger and exhibit larger leiomyomas at the time of diagnosis. Cancer-associated fibroblasts in tumor microenvironments have emerged as an important target for cancer therapy. Repeated stimulation by infectious or non-infectious agents in the uterine tissues, including inflammation, mechanical forces or hypoxia, stimulate the resident fibroblasts to undergo specific activation and, thus, are significant in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, complex signaling pathways regulate the mechanisms of fibroblastic activation. The current review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of fibroblastic activation and the potential association with uterine leiomyoma pathogenesis, enabling an integrated pathogenic analysis for review of the therapeutic options. PMID:25013460

  3. Cell Surface Glycoprotein of Reactive Stromal Fibroblasts as a Potential Antibody Target in Human Epithelial Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Old, Lloyd J.; Rettig, Wolfgang J.

    1990-09-01

    The F19 antigen is a cell surface glycoprotein (M_r, 95,000) of human sarcomas and proliferating, cultured fibroblasts that is absent from resting fibroblasts in normal adult tissues. Normal and malignant epithelial cells are also F19^-. The present immunohistochemical study describes induction of F19 in the reactive mesenchyme of epithelial tumors. F19^+ fibroblasts were found in primary and metastatic carcinomas, including colorectal (18 of 18 cases studied), breast (14/14), ovarian (21/21), bladder (9/10), and lung carcinomas (13/13). In contrast, the stroma of benign colorectal adenomas, fibrocystic disease and fibroadenomas of breast, benign prostate hyperplasia, in situ bladder carcinomas, and benign ovarian tumors showed no or only moderate numbers of F19^+ fibroblasts. Analysis of dermal incision wounds revealed that F19 is strongly induced during scar formation. Comparison of F19 with the extracellular matrix protein tenascin, a putative marker of tumor mesenchyme, showed a cellular staining pattern for F19 vs. the extracellular matrix pattern for tenascin and widespread expression of tenascin in F19^- normal tissues and benign tumors. Our results suggest that the F19^+ phenotype correlates with specialized fibroblast functions in wound healing and malignant tumor growth. Because of its abundance in tumor mesenchyme, F19 may serve as a target for antibodies labeled with radioisotopes or toxic agents, or inflammatogenic antibodies, in carcinoma patients.

  4. Cell-cell interaction between vocal fold fibroblasts and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in three-dimensional hyaluronan hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xia; Thibeault, Susan L

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotential adult cells present in all tissues. Paracrine effects and differentiating ability make MSCs an ideal cell source for tissue regeneration. However, little is known about how interactions between implanted MSCs and native cells influence cellular growth, proliferation, and behaviour. By using an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) co-culture assay of normal or scarred human vocal fold fibroblasts (VFFs) and bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) in a uniquely suited hyaluronan hydrogel (HyStem-VF), we investigated cell morphology, survival rate, proliferation and protein and gene expression of VFFs and BM-MSCs. BM-MSCs inhibited cell proliferation of both normal and scarred VFFs without changes in VFF morphology or viability. BM-MSCs demonstrated decreased proliferation and survival rate after 7 days of co-culture with VFFs. Interactions between BM-MSCs and VFFs led to a significant increase in protein secretion of collagen I and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and a decrease of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). In particular, BM-MSCs significantly upregulated matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) and HGF gene expression for scarred VFFs compared to normal VFFs, indicating the potential for increases in extracellular matrix remodelling and tissue regeneration. Application of BM-MSCs-hydrogels may play a significant role in tissue regeneration, providing a therapeutic approach for vocal fold scarring. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23653427

  5. Stromal influences on breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    van Roozendaal, C. E.; van Ooijen, B.; Klijn, J. G.; Claassen, C.; Eggermont, A. M.; Henzen-Logmans, S. C.; Foekens, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Paracrine influences from fibroblasts derived from different sources of breast tissue on epithelial breast cancer cell growth in vitro were investigated. Medium conditioned (CM) by fibroblasts derived from tumours, adjacent normal breast tissue, and normal breast tissue obtained from reduction mammoplasty or from skin tissue significantly stimulated the growth of the steroid-receptor positive cell lines MCF-7 and ZR 75.1. The proliferation index (PI) on MCF-7 cells with CM from fibroblasts derived from breast tumour tissue was significantly higher than that obtained with fibroblasts derived from adjacent normal breast tissue (2p less than 0.05, n = 8). The PI obtained with CM from normal fibroblast cultures from reduction mammoplasty tissue, like normal tissue adjacent to the tumour, fell in the lower range of values. Skin fibroblast, like tumour tissue derived fibroblast, CM caused a high range PI. MDA-MB-231 and Evsa-T, two steroid-receptor negative cell lines, showed only a minor growth stimulatory responses with some of the fibroblast CM's. Evsa-T was occasionally inhibited by CM's. In conclusion, stromal factors play a role in the growth regulation of human breast cancer cells. The effects on cancer cell growth are, however, varying depending on the source of the stroma and the characteristics of the epithelial tumour cells. PMID:1733444

  6. Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Induces Chondrogenic Differentiation in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dzobo, Kevin; Turnley, Taegyn; Wishart, Andrew; Rowe, Arielle; Kallmeyer, Karlien; van Vollenstee, Fiona A.; Thomford, Nicholas E.; Dandara, Collet; Chopera, Denis; Pepper, Michael S.; Parker, M. Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) represent an area being intensively researched for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. MSCs may provide the opportunity to treat diseases and injuries that currently have limited therapeutic options, as well as enhance present strategies for tissue repair. The cellular environment has a significant role in cellular development and differentiation through cell–matrix interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of adipose-derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) in the context of a cell-derived matrix so as to model the in vivo physiological microenvironment. The fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (fd-ECM) did not affect ad-MSC morphology, but reduced ad-MSC proliferation. Ad-MSCs cultured on fd-ECM displayed decreased expression of integrins α2 and β1 and subsequently lost their multipotency over time, as shown by the decrease in CD44, Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), SOX2, and NANOG gene expression. The fd-ECM induced chondrogenic differentiation in ad-MSCs compared to control ad-MSCs. Loss of function studies, through the use of siRNA and a mutant Notch1 construct, revealed that ECM-mediated ad-MSCs chondrogenesis requires Notch1 and β-catenin signaling. The fd-ECM also showed anti-senescence effects on ad-MSCs. The fd-ECM is a promising approach for inducing chondrogenesis in ad-MSCs and chondrogenic differentiated ad-MSCs could be used in stem cell therapy procedures. PMID:27527147

  7. Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Induces Chondrogenic Differentiation in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Dzobo, Kevin; Turnley, Taegyn; Wishart, Andrew; Rowe, Arielle; Kallmeyer, Karlien; van Vollenstee, Fiona A; Thomford, Nicholas E; Dandara, Collet; Chopera, Denis; Pepper, Michael S; Parker, M Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) represent an area being intensively researched for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. MSCs may provide the opportunity to treat diseases and injuries that currently have limited therapeutic options, as well as enhance present strategies for tissue repair. The cellular environment has a significant role in cellular development and differentiation through cell-matrix interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of adipose-derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) in the context of a cell-derived matrix so as to model the in vivo physiological microenvironment. The fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (fd-ECM) did not affect ad-MSC morphology, but reduced ad-MSC proliferation. Ad-MSCs cultured on fd-ECM displayed decreased expression of integrins α2 and β1 and subsequently lost their multipotency over time, as shown by the decrease in CD44, Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), SOX2, and NANOG gene expression. The fd-ECM induced chondrogenic differentiation in ad-MSCs compared to control ad-MSCs. Loss of function studies, through the use of siRNA and a mutant Notch1 construct, revealed that ECM-mediated ad-MSCs chondrogenesis requires Notch1 and β-catenin signaling. The fd-ECM also showed anti-senescence effects on ad-MSCs. The fd-ECM is a promising approach for inducing chondrogenesis in ad-MSCs and chondrogenic differentiated ad-MSCs could be used in stem cell therapy procedures. PMID:27527147

  8. Cell Injury-Induced Release of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2: Relevance to Intracerebral Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantations.

    PubMed

    Aizman, Irina; Vinodkumar, Deepti; McGrogan, Michael; Bates, Damien

    2015-07-15

    Beneficial effects of intracerebral transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and their derivatives are believed to be mediated mostly by factors produced by engrafted cells. However, the mesenchymal cell engraftment rate is low, and the majority of grafted cells disappear within a short post-transplantation period. Here, we hypothesize that dying transplanted cells can affect surrounding tissues by releasing their active intracellular components. To elucidate the type, amounts, and potency of these putative intracellular factors, freeze/thaw extracts of MSC or their derivatives were tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and bioassays. We found that fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and FGF1, but not vascular endothelial growth factor and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 levels were high in extracts despite being low in conditioned media. Extracts induced concentration-dependent proliferation of rat cortical neural progenitor cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells; these proliferative responses were specifically blocked by FGF2-neutralizing antibody. In the neuropoiesis assay with rat cortical cells, both MSC extracts and killed cells induced expression of nestin, but not astrocyte differentiation. However, suspensions of killed cells strongly potentiated the astrogenic effects of live MSC. In transplantation-relevant MSC injury models (peripheral blood cell-mediated cytotoxicity and high cell density plating), MSC death coincided with the release of intracellular FGF2. The data showed that MSC contain a major depot of active FGF2 that is released upon cell injury and is capable of acutely stimulating neuropoiesis and angiogenesis. We therefore propose that both dying and surviving grafted MSC contribute to tissue regeneration. PMID:25873141

  9. The Initiator Methionine tRNA Drives Secretion of Type II Collagen from Stromal Fibroblasts to Promote Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Cassie J.; Berg, Tracy J.; Birch, Joanna; Ennis, Darren; Mitchell, Louise; Cloix, Catherine; Campbell, Andrew; Sumpton, David; Nixon, Colin; Campbell, Kirsteen; Bridgeman, Victoria L.; Vermeulen, Peter B.; Foo, Shane; Kostaras, Eleftherios; Jones, J. Louise; Haywood, Linda; Pulleine, Ellie; Yin, Huabing; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen; Blyth, Karen; McNeish, Iain; Zanivan, Sara; Reynolds, Andrew R.; Norman, Jim C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Expression of the initiator methionine tRNA (tRNAiMet) is deregulated in cancer. Despite this fact, it is not currently known how tRNAiMet expression levels influence tumor progression. We have found that tRNAiMet expression is increased in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, implicating deregulated expression of tRNAiMet in the tumor stroma as a possible contributor to tumor progression. To investigate how elevated stromal tRNAiMet contributes to tumor progression, we generated a mouse expressing additional copies of the tRNAiMet gene (2+tRNAiMet mouse). Growth and vascularization of subcutaneous tumor allografts was enhanced in 2+tRNAiMet mice compared with wild-type littermate controls. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by fibroblasts from 2+tRNAiMet mice supported enhanced endothelial cell and fibroblast migration. SILAC mass spectrometry indicated that elevated expression of tRNAiMet significantly increased synthesis and secretion of certain types of collagen, in particular type II collagen. Suppression of type II collagen opposed the ability of tRNAiMet-overexpressing fibroblasts to deposit pro-migratory ECM. We used the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB) to determine whether collagen synthesis contributes to the tRNAiMet-driven pro-tumorigenic stroma in vivo. DHB had no effect on the growth of syngeneic allografts in wild-type mice but opposed the ability of 2+tRNAiMet mice to support increased angiogenesis and tumor growth. Finally, collagen II expression predicts poor prognosis in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. Taken together, these data indicate that increased tRNAiMet levels contribute to tumor progression by enhancing the ability of stromal fibroblasts to synthesize and secrete a type II collagen-rich ECM that supports endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. PMID:26948875

  10. The Initiator Methionine tRNA Drives Secretion of Type II Collagen from Stromal Fibroblasts to Promote Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Cassie J; Berg, Tracy J; Birch, Joanna; Ennis, Darren; Mitchell, Louise; Cloix, Catherine; Campbell, Andrew; Sumpton, David; Nixon, Colin; Campbell, Kirsteen; Bridgeman, Victoria L; Vermeulen, Peter B; Foo, Shane; Kostaras, Eleftherios; Jones, J Louise; Haywood, Linda; Pulleine, Ellie; Yin, Huabing; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen; Blyth, Karen; McNeish, Iain; Zanivan, Sara; Reynolds, Andrew R; Norman, Jim C

    2016-03-21

    Expression of the initiator methionine tRNA (tRNAi(Met)) is deregulated in cancer. Despite this fact, it is not currently known how tRNAi(Met) expression levels influence tumor progression. We have found that tRNAi(Met) expression is increased in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, implicating deregulated expression of tRNAi(Met) in the tumor stroma as a possible contributor to tumor progression. To investigate how elevated stromal tRNAi(Met) contributes to tumor progression, we generated a mouse expressing additional copies of the tRNAi(Met) gene (2+tRNAi(Met) mouse). Growth and vascularization of subcutaneous tumor allografts was enhanced in 2+tRNAi(Met) mice compared with wild-type littermate controls. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by fibroblasts from 2+tRNAi(Met) mice supported enhanced endothelial cell and fibroblast migration. SILAC mass spectrometry indicated that elevated expression of tRNAi(Met) significantly increased synthesis and secretion of certain types of collagen, in particular type II collagen. Suppression of type II collagen opposed the ability of tRNAi(Met)-overexpressing fibroblasts to deposit pro-migratory ECM. We used the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB) to determine whether collagen synthesis contributes to the tRNAi(Met)-driven pro-tumorigenic stroma in vivo. DHB had no effect on the growth of syngeneic allografts in wild-type mice but opposed the ability of 2+tRNAi(Met) mice to support increased angiogenesis and tumor growth. Finally, collagen II expression predicts poor prognosis in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. Taken together, these data indicate that increased tRNAi(Met) levels contribute to tumor progression by enhancing the ability of stromal fibroblasts to synthesize and secrete a type II collagen-rich ECM that supports endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. PMID:26948875

  11. The Response of Vocal Fold Fibroblasts and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells to Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Joel; Quinchia Rios, Beatriz; Bartlett, Rebecca; Berchtold, Craig; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Illumination of cellular changes caused by mechanical forces present within the laryngeal microenvironment may well guide strategies for tissue engineering the vocal fold lamina propria. The purpose of this study was to compare the response of human vocal fold fibroblasts (hVFF) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) to vibratory stimulus. In order to study these effects, a bioreactor capable of vibrating two cell seeded substrates was developed. The cell seeded substrates contact each other as a result of the sinusoidal frequency, producing a motion similar to the movement of true vocal folds. Utilizing this bioreactor, hVFF and BM-MSC were subjected to 200 Hz vibration and 20% strain for 8 hours. Immunohistochemistry (Ki-67 and TUNEL) was performed to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis respectively, while semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to assess extracellular matrix related gene expression. HVFF significantly proliferated (p = 0.011) when subjected to 200 Hz vibration and 20% strain, while BM-MSC did not (p = 1.0). A statistically significant increase in apoptosis of BM-MSC (p = 0.0402) was observed under the experimental conditions; however high cell viability (96%) was maintained. HVFF did not have significantly altered apoptosis (p = 0.7849) when subjected to vibration and strain. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR results show no significant differences in expression levels of collagen I (BM-MSC p = 0.1951, hVFF p = v0.3629), fibronectin (BM-MSC p = 0.1951, hVFF p = 0.2513), and TGF-β1 (BM-MSC p = 0.2534, hVFF p = 0.6029) between vibratory and static conditions in either cell type. Finally, smooth muscle actin mRNA was not present in either vibrated or static samples, indicating that no myofibroblast differentiation occurred for either cell type. Together, these results demonstrate that BM-MSC may be a suitable alternative to hVFF for vocal fold tissue engineering. Further investigation into a larger number of

  12. Irradiated fibroblast-induced bystander effects on invasive growth of squamous cell carcinoma under cancer-stromal cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Kamochi, Noriyuki; Nakashima, Masahiro; Aoki, Shigehisa; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Sugihara, Hajime; Toda, Shuji; Kudo, Sho

    2008-12-01

    The irradiated fibroblast-induced response of non-irradiated neighboring cells is called 'radiation-induced bystander effect', but it is unclear in non-irradiated human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells. The present study shows that irradiated fibroblasts promoted the invasive growth of T3M-1 SCC cells, but not their apoptosis, more greatly than non-irradiated fibroblasts, using collagen gel invasion assay, immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The number of irradiated fibroblasts decreased to about 30% of that of non-irradiated fibroblasts, but irradiated fibroblasts increased the growth marker ki-67 display of SCC cells more greatly than non-irradiated fibroblasts. Irradiated fibroblasts did not affect the apoptosis marker ss-DNA expression of SCC cells. Irradiated fibroblasts enhanced the display of the following growth-, invasion- and motility-related molecules in SCC cells more greatly than non-irradiated fibroblasts: c-Met, Ras, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade (Raf-1, MEK-1 and ERK-1/2), matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -9, laminin 5 and filamin A. Irradiated fibroblasts, but not non-irradiated ones, formed irradiation-induced foci (IRIF) of the genomic instability marker p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and expressed transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF- beta1). Irradiated fibroblasts in turn enabled SCC cells to enhance 53BP1 IRIF formation more extensively than non-irradiated fibroblasts. Finally, effects of irradiated fibroblasts on growth and apoptosis of another HEp-2 SCC cell type were similar to those of T3M-1. These results suggest that irradiated fibroblasts promotes invasion and growth of SCC cells by enhancement of invasive growth-related molecules above through TGF- beta1-mediated bystander mechanism, in which irradiated fibroblast-induced genomic instability of SCC cells may be involved. PMID:19018771

  13. The Action of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in Basal Tumor Cells and Stromal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Is Critical for Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Corsa, Callie A S; Brenot, Audrey; Grither, Whitney R; Van Hove, Samantha; Loza, Andrew J; Zhang, Kun; Ponik, Suzanne M; Liu, Yuming; DeNardo, David G; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Keely, Patricia J; Longmore, Gregory D

    2016-06-14

    High levels of collagen deposition in human and mouse breast tumors are associated with poor outcome due to increased local invasion and distant metastases. Using a genetic approach, we show that, in mice, the action of the fibrillar collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) in both tumor and tumor-stromal cells is critical for breast cancer metastasis yet does not affect primary tumor growth. In tumor cells, DDR2 in basal epithelial cells regulates the collective invasion of tumor organoids. In stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), DDR2 is critical for extracellular matrix production and the organization of collagen fibers. The action of DDR2 in CAFs also enhances tumor cell collective invasion through a pathway distinct from the tumor-cell-intrinsic function of DDR2. This work identifies DDR2 as a potential therapeutic target that controls breast cancer metastases through its action in both tumor cells and tumor-stromal cells at the primary tumor site. PMID:27264173

  14. Functionally and Phenotypically Distinct Subpopulations of Marrow Stromal Cells Are Fibroblast in Origin and Induce Different Fates in Peripheral Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Mineo; Sandstrom, Richard S.; Delrow, Jeffrey J.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells constitute a heterogeneous population of cells, typically isolated after expansion in culture. In vivo, stromal cells often exist in close proximity or in direct contact with monocyte-derived macrophages, yet their interaction with monocytes is largely unexplored. In this report, isolated CD146+ and CD146− stromal cells, as well as immortalized cell lines representative of each (designated HS27a and HS5, respectively), were shown by global DNase I hypersensitive site mapping and principal coordinate analysis to have a lineage association with marrow fibroblasts. Gene expression profiles generated for the CD146+ and CD146− cell lines indicate significant differences in their respective transcriptomes, which translates into differences in secreted factors. Consequently, the conditioned media (CM) from these two populations induce different fates in peripheral blood monocytes. Monocytes incubated in CD146+ CM acquire a tissue macrophage phenotype, whereas monocytes incubated in CM from CD146− cells express markers associated with pre-dendritic cells. Importantly, when CD14+ monocytes are cultured in contact with the CD146+ cells, the combined cell populations, assayed as a unit, show increased levels of transcripts associated with organismal development and hematopoietic regulation. In contrast, the gene expression profile from cocultures of monocytes and CD146− cells does not differ from that obtained when monocytes are cultured with CD146− CM. These in vitro results show that the CD146+ marrow stromal cells together with monocytes increase the expression of genes relevant to hematopoietic regulation. In vivo relevance of these data is suggested by immunohistochemistry of marrow biopsies showing juxtaposed CD146+ cells and CD68+ cells associated with these upregulated proteins. PMID:24131213

  15. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes support B-cell pseudoemperipolesis via a stromal cell–derived factor-1– and CD106 (VCAM-1)–dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Jan A.; Zvaifler, Nathan J.; Tsukada, Nobuhiro; Firestein, Gary S.; Kipps, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    B-cell accumulation and formation of ectopic germinal centers are characteristic changes in the diseased joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Earlier studies suggested that interactions between B lymphocytes and specialized synovial “nurse-like” cells peculiar to the RA synovium may be responsible for the homing and sustained survival of B cells in the synovium. However, in this study, we found that B cells spontaneously migrate beneath ordinary fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) and then experience prolonged survival. FLSs isolated from joints of patients with osteoarthritis also supported this activity, termed B-cell pseudoemperipolesis. We found that FLSs constitutively expressed the chemokine stromal cell–derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and that pertussis toxin or antibodies to the SDF-1 receptor (CXCR4) could inhibit B-cell pseudoemperipolesis. However, expression of SDF-1 is not sufficient, as dermal fibroblasts also expressed this chemokine but were unable to support B-cell pseudoemperipolesis unless previously stimulated with IL-4 to express CD106 (VCAM-1), a ligand for the α4β1 integrin, very-late-antigen-4 (VLA-4 or CD49d). Furthermore, mAb’s specific for CD49d and CD106, or the synthetic CS1 fibronectin peptide, could inhibit B-cell pseudoemperipolesis. We conclude that ordinary FLSs can support B-cell pseudoemperipolesis via a mechanism dependent upon fibroblast expression of SDF-1 and CD106. PMID:11160154

  16. Seminal plasma induces global transcriptomic changes associated with cell migration, proliferation and viability in endometrial epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joseph C.; Johnson, Brittni A.; Erikson, David W.; Piltonen, Terhi T.; Barragan, Fatima; Chu, Simon; Kohgadai, Nargis; Irwin, Juan C.; Greene, Warner C.; Giudice, Linda C.; Roan, Nadia R.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION How does seminal plasma (SP) affect the transcriptome of human primary endometrial epithelial cells (eEC) and stromal fibroblasts (eSF)? SUMMARY ANSWER Exposure of eEC and eSF to SP in vitro increases expression of genes and secreted proteins associated with cellular migration, proliferation, viability and inhibition of cell death. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Studies in both humans and animals suggest that SP can access and induce physiological changes in the upper female reproductive tract (FRT), which may participate in promoting reproductive success. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This is a cross sectional study involving control samples versus treatment. SP (pooled from twenty donors) was first tested for dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effects on eEC and eSF (n = 4). As exposure of eEC or eSF to 1% SP for 6 h proved to be non-toxic, a second set of eEC/eSF samples (n = 4) was treated under these conditions for transcriptome, protein and functional analysis. With a third set of samples (n = 3), we further compared the transcriptional response of the cells to SP versus fresh semen. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS eEC and eSF were isolated from endometrial biopsies from women of reproductive age undergoing benign gynecologic procedures and maintained in vitro. RNA was isolated and processed for microarray studies to analyze global transcriptomic changes. Secreted factors in conditioned media from SP-treated cells were analyzed by Luminex and for the ability to stimulate migration of CD14+ monocytes and CD4+ T cells. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Pathway identifications were determined using the Z-scoring system in Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (Z scores ≥|1.5|). SP induced transcriptomic changes (P < 0.05) associated with promoting leukocyte and endothelial cell recruitment, and proliferation of eEC and eSF. Cell viability pathways were induced, while those associated with cell death were suppressed (P < 0.05). SP and fresh semen induced

  17. Noggin Over-Expressing Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts and MS5 Stromal Cells Enhance Directed Differentiation of Dopaminergic Neurons from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mi-Sun; Shin, Min-Seop; Lee, Soo Young; Minn, Yang-Ki; Hoh, Jeong-Kyu; Cho, Youl-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Chun-Hyung; Park, Chang-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Directed methods for differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into dopaminergic (DA) precursor cells using stromal cells co-culture systems are already well established. However, not all of the hESCs differentiate into DA precursors using these methods. HSF6, H1, H7, and H9 cells differentiate well into DA precursors, but CHA13 and CHA15 cells hardly differentiate. To overcome this problem, we modified the differentiation system to include a co-culturing step that exposes the cells to noggin early in the differentiation process. This was done using γ-irradiated noggin-overexpressing CF1-mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF-noggin) and MS5 stromal cells (MS5-noggin and MS5-sonic hedgehog). After directed differentiation, RT-PCR analyses revealed that engrailed-1 (En-1), Lmx1b, and Nurr1, which are midbrain DA markers, were expressed regardless of differentiation stage. Moreover, tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) and an A9 midbrain-specific DA marker (Girk2) were expressed during differentiation, whereas levels of Oct3/4, an undifferentiated marker, decreased. Immunocytochemical analyses revealed that protein levels of the neuronal markers TH and TuJ1 increased during the final differentiation stage. These results demonstrate that early noggin exposure may play a specific role in the directed differentiation of DA cells from human embryonic stem cells. PMID:26383864

  18. Central Nervous System Stromal Cells Control Local CD8(+) T Cell Responses during Virus-Induced Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Cupovic, Jovana; Onder, Lucas; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Weiler, Elke; Caviezel-Firner, Sonja; Perez-Shibayama, Christian; Rülicke, Thomas; Bechmann, Ingo; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2016-03-15

    Stromal cells generate a complex cellular scaffold that provides specialized microenvironments for lymphocyte activation in secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we assessed whether local activation of stromal cells in the central nervous system (CNS) is mandatory to transfer immune recognition from secondary lymphoid organs into the infected tissue. We report that neurotropic virus infection in mice triggered the establishment of such stromal cell niches in the CNS. CNS stromal cell activation was dominated by a rapid and vigorous production of CC-motif chemokine receptor (CCR) 7 ligands CCL19 and CCL21 by vascular endothelial cells and adjacent fibroblastic reticular cell (FRC)-like cells in the perivascular space. Moreover, CCR7 ligands produced by CNS stromal cells were crucial to support recruitment and local re-activation of antiviral CD8(+) T cells and to protect the host from lethal neuroinflammatory disease, indicating that CNS stromal cells generate confined microenvironments that control protective T cell immunity. PMID:26921107

  19. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-2 Contributes to the Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor-Induced Neuronal Differentiation in Canine Bone Marrow Stromal Cells via Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Akt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Rei; Edamura, Kazuya; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Narita, Takanori; Okabayashi, Ken; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are considered as candidates for regenerative therapy and a useful model for studying neuronal differentiation. The role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in neuronal differentiation has been previously studied; however, the signaling pathway involved in this process remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathway in the bFGF-induced neuronal differentiation of canine BMSCs. bFGF induced the mRNA expression of the neuron marker, microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP2) and the neuron-like morphological change in canine BMSCs. In the presence of inhibitors of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt, i.e., SU5402, LY294002, and MK2206, respectively, bFGF failed to induce the MAP2 mRNA expression and the neuron-like morphological change. bFGF induced Akt phosphorylation, but it was attenuated by the FGFR inhibitor SU5402 and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. In canine BMSCs, expression of FGFR-1 and FGFR-2 was confirmed, but only FGFR-2 activation was detected by cross-linking and immunoprecipitation analysis. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of FGFR-2 in canine BMSCs resulted in the attenuation of bFGF-induced Akt phosphorylation. These results suggest that the FGFR-2/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in the bFGF-induced neuronal differentiation of canine BMSCs. PMID:26523832

  20. Stromal Fibroblasts Induce CCL20 through IL6/C/EBPβ to Support the Recruitment of Th17 Cells during Cervical Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Walch-Rückheim, Barbara; Mavrova, Russalina; Henning, Melanie; Vicinus, Benjamin; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Juhasz-Böss, Ingolf; Solomayer, Erich-Franz; Smola, Sigrun

    2015-12-15

    Cervical cancer is a consequence of persistent infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Progression to malignancy is linked to an inflammatory microenvironment comprising T-helper-17 (Th17) cells, a T-cell subset with protumorigenic properties. Neoplastic cells express only low endogenous levels of the Th17 chemoattractant CCL20, and therefore, it is unclear how Th17 cells are recruited to the cervical cancer tissue. In this study, we demonstrate that CCL20 was predominantly expressed in the stroma of cervical squamous cell carcinomas in situ. This correlated with stromal infiltration of CD4(+)/IL17(+) cells and with advancing International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage. Furthermore, we show that cervical cancer cells instructed primary cervical fibroblasts to produce high levels of CCL20 and to attract CD4/IL17/CCR6-positive cells, generated in vitro, in a CCL20/CCR6-dependent manner. Further mechanistic investigations identified cervical cancer cell-derived IL6 as an important mediator of paracrine CCL20 induction at the promoter, mRNA, and protein level in fibroblasts. CCL20 was upregulated through the recently described CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) pathway as shown with a dominant-negative version of C/EBPβ and through siRNA-mediated knockdown. In summary, our study defines a novel molecular mechanism by which cervical neoplastic cells shape their local microenvironment by instructing fibroblasts to support Th17 cell infiltration in a paracrine IL6/C/EBPβ-dependent manner. Th17 cells may in turn maintain chronic inflammation within high-grade cervical lesions to further promote cancer progression. PMID:26631268

  1. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) eye drops stimulates scarless regeneration compared to autologous serum in the ocular surface stromal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Anitua, E; de la Fuente, M; Muruzabal, F; Riestra, A; Merayo-Lloves, J; Orive, G

    2015-06-01

    Autologous serum (AS) eye drops was the first blood-derived product used for the treatment of corneal pathologies but nowadays PRGF arises as a novel interesting alternative to this type of diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the biological outcomes of autologous serum eye drops or Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) eye drops on corneal stromal keratocytes (HK) and conjunctival fibroblasts (HConF). To address this, blood from healthy donors was collected and processed to obtain autologous serum (AS) eye drops and plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) eye drops. Blood-derivates were aliquoted and stored at -80°C until use. PDGF-AB, VEGF, EGF, FGFb and TGF-β1 were quantified. The potential of PRGF and AS in promoting wound healing was evaluated by means of proliferation and migration assays in HK and HConF. Fibroblast cells were induced to myofibroblast differentiation after treatment with 2.5ng/mL of TGF-β1. The capability of PRGF and AS to prevent and inhibit TGF-β1-induced differentiation was evaluated. Results showed significant higher levels of all growth factors analyzed in PRGF eye drops compared to AS. Moreover, PRGF eye drops enhanced significantly the biological outcomes of both HK and HConF, and reduced TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast differentiation in contrast to autologous serum eye drops (AS). In summary, these results suggest that PRGF exerts enhanced biological outcomes than AS. PRGF may improve the treatment of ocular surface wound healing minimizing the scar formation compared to AS. Results obtained herein suggest that PRGF protects and reverses the myofibroblast phenotype while promotes cell proliferation and migration. PMID:25708868

  2. Expression of the E-cadherin repressors Snail, Slug and Zeb1 in urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder: relation to stromal fibroblast activation and invasive behaviour of carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Julia; Weidig, Michaela; Balzer, Philipp; Richter, Petra; Franz, Marcus; Junker, Kerstin; Gajda, Mieczyslaw; Friedrich, Karlheinz; Wunderlich, Heiko; Östman, Arne; Petersen, Iver; Berndt, Alexander

    2012-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is regulated by interaction of carcinoma and stromal cells and crucial for progression of urinary bladder carcinoma (UBC). Therefore, the influence of activated fibroblasts on the expression of E-cadherin repressors as well as EMT and invasion in UBC was investigated. A correlative analysis of the immunohistochemical expression of fibroblast (ASMA, S100A4, FAP, SDF1, PDGFRβ) and EMT (Snail, Slug, Zeb1, E-cadherin) markers was performed on 49 UBC cases of different stages. The impact of distinguishable growth factor stimulated fibroblasts on invasion, EMT, and E-cadherin repressor expression was investigated in an invasion model. In situ, invasiveness was significantly correlated to the loss of membranous E-cadherin (E-cad_m) and increased Snail, Slug, Zeb1 in tumour cells, as well as to increased ASMA, S100A4, and PDGFRβ in stromal cells. A significant correlation to nodal metastasis could be evidenced for the loss of E-Cad_m, and for an increase in S100A4 and PDGFRβ. Comparison of stromal and EMT markers revealed significant correlations of ASMA to Snail and Slug; of S100A4 to the loss of E-cad_m and Zeb1; and of PDGFRβ to the loss of E-Cad_m, Slug and Zeb1. In vitro, TGFβ1 induced myofibroblasts were the strongest attractants, while aFGF or TGFβ1/aFGF stimulated fibroblasts were the most potent EMT inductors. As shown here for the first time, distinct sub-populations of fibroblasts are to various extents associated with EMT and tumour progression in UBC. These relevant findings might be the basis for the identification of new diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets selectively affecting tumour supporting CAF effects. PMID:22820858

  3. Enhancement of osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells cultured by selective combination of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2).

    PubMed

    Maegawa, Naoki; Kawamura, Kenji; Hirose, Motohiro; Yajima, Hiroshi; Takakura, Yoshinori; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that bone marrow contains mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which can show osteoblastic differentiation when cultured in osteogenic medium containing ascorbic acid, beta-glycerophosphate and dexamethasone. The differentiation results in the appearance of osteoblasts, together with the formation of bone matrix; thus, in vitro cultured bone (osteoblasts/bone matrix) could be fabricated by MSC culture. This type of cultured bone has already been used in clinical cases involving orthopaedic problems. To improve the therapeutic effect of the cultured bone, we investigated the culture conditions that contributed to extensive osteoblastic differentiation. Rat bone marrow was primarily cultured to expand the number of MSCs and further cultured in osteogenic medium for 12 days. The culture was also conducted in a medium supplemented with either bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) or fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), or with sequential combinations of both supplements. Among them, the sequential supplementation of FGF-2 followed by BMP-2 showed high alkaline phosphatase activity, sufficient bone-specific osteocalcein expression and abundant bone matrix formation of the MSC culture. These data implied that the number of responding cells or immature osteoblasts was increased by the supplementation of FGF-2 in the early phase of the culture and that these cells can show osteoblastic differentiation, of which capability was augmented by BMP-2 in the late phase. The sequential supplementation of these cytokines into MSC culture might be suitable for the fabrication of ideal cultured bone for use in bone tissue engineering. PMID:18038421

  4. Effect of Metformin on Viability, Morphology, and Ultrastructure of Mouse Bone Marrow-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Balb/3T3 Embryonic Fibroblast Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Czyrek, Aleksandra; Basinska, Katarzyna; Trynda, Justyna; Skaradzińska, Aneta; Siudzińska, Anna; Marędziak, Monika; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Metformin, a popular drug used to treat diabetes, has recently gained attention as a potentially useful therapeutic agent for treating cancer. In our research metformin was added to in vitro cultures of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) and Balb/3T3 fibroblast at concentration of 1 mM, 5 mM, and 10 mM. Obtained results indicated that metformin negatively affected proliferation activity of investigated cells. The drug triggered the formation of autophagosomes and apoptotic bodies in all tested cultures. Additionally, we focused on determination of expression of genes involved in insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) signaling pathway. The most striking finding was that the mRNA level of IGF2 was constant in both BMSCs and Balb/3T3. Further, the analysis of IGF2 concentration in cell supernatants showed that it decreased in BMSC cultures after 5 and 10 mM metformin treatments. In case of Balb/3T3 the concentration of IGF2 in culture supernatants decreased after 1 and 5 mM and increased after 10 mM of metformin. Our results suggest that metformin influences the cytophysiology of somatic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner causing inhibition of proliferation and abnormalities of their morphology and ultrastructure. PMID:26064951

  5. Effect of Metformin on Viability, Morphology, and Ultrastructure of Mouse Bone Marrow-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Balb/3T3 Embryonic Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Czyrek, Aleksandra; Basinska, Katarzyna; Trynda, Justyna; Skaradzińska, Aneta; Siudzińska, Anna; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Metformin, a popular drug used to treat diabetes, has recently gained attention as a potentially useful therapeutic agent for treating cancer. In our research metformin was added to in vitro cultures of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) and Balb/3T3 fibroblast at concentration of 1 mM, 5 mM, and 10 mM. Obtained results indicated that metformin negatively affected proliferation activity of investigated cells. The drug triggered the formation of autophagosomes and apoptotic bodies in all tested cultures. Additionally, we focused on determination of expression of genes involved in insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) signaling pathway. The most striking finding was that the mRNA level of IGF2 was constant in both BMSCs and Balb/3T3. Further, the analysis of IGF2 concentration in cell supernatants showed that it decreased in BMSC cultures after 5 and 10 mM metformin treatments. In case of Balb/3T3 the concentration of IGF2 in culture supernatants decreased after 1 and 5 mM and increased after 10 mM of metformin. Our results suggest that metformin influences the cytophysiology of somatic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner causing inhibition of proliferation and abnormalities of their morphology and ultrastructure. PMID:26064951

  6. Tumor suppression by stromal TIMPs.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Masayuki; Jackson, Hartland W; Khokha, Rama

    2016-05-01

    The tumor stroma has the capacity to drive cancer progression, although the mechanisms governing these effects are incompletely understood. Recently, we reported that deletion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (Timps) in fibroblasts unleashes the function of cancer-associated fibroblasts and identifies a novel mode of stromal-tumor communication that activates key oncogenic pathways invoving Notch and ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) via stromal exosomes. PMID:27314104

  7. Endometrial stromal fibroblasts from women with polycystic ovary syndrome have impaired progesterone-mediated decidualization, aberrant cytokine profiles and promote enhanced immune cell migration in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Piltonen, T.T.; Chen, J.C.; Khatun, M.; Kangasniemi, M.; Liakka, A.; Spitzer, T.; Tran, N.; Huddleston, H.; Irwin, J.C.; Giudice, L.C.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do endometrial stromal fibroblasts (eSF) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) (eSFpcos) exhibit altered estrogen and/or progesterone (P4) responses, which may explain some of the adverse reproductive outcomes and endometrial pathologies in these women? SUMMARY ANSWER In vitro, eSF from women with PCOS exhibit an aberrant decidualization response and concomitant changes in pro-inflammatory cytokine, chemokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) release and immune cell chemoattraction. In vivo these aberrations may result in suboptimal implantation and predisposition to endometrial cancer. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The endometrium in women with PCOS has several abnormalities including progesterone (P4) resistance at the gene expression level, likely contributing to subfertility, pregnancy complications and increased endometrial cancer risk in PCOS women. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Prospective, university-based, case–control, in vitro study. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Cultures of eSFPCOS (n = 12, Rotterdam and NIH criteria) and eSFControl (Ctrl) (n = 6, regular cycle length, no signs of hyperandrogenism) were treated with vehicle, estradiol (E2, 10 nM) or E2P4 (10 nM/1 μM) for 14 days. Progesterone receptor (PGR) mRNA was assessed with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT–PCR) and eSF decidualization was confirmed by insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) transcript and protein expression. Fractalkine (CX3CL1), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL) 6, 8 and 11, macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP) 1 and 3, CCL5 (RANTES) and MMPs (MMP1, 2, 3, 7, 9, 10 and 12) were measured in conditioned media by Luminex multiplex assays, and chemotactic activity of the conditioned media was tested in a migration assay using CD14+ monocyte and CD4+ T-cell migration assay. Effects of IL-6 (0.02, 0.2, 2 or 20 ng/ml) or IL-8 (0.04, 0.4, 4, or 40 ng/ml) or combination (0.2 ng/ml IL-6 and 4.0 ng

  8. Fibroblast biology in pterygia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Woo; Park, Soo Hyun; Kim, Jae Chan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of fibroblasts is a vital process during wound healing. However, if prolonged and exaggerated, profibrotic pathways lead to tissue fibrosis or scarring and further organ malfunction. Although the pathogenesis of pterygium is known to be multi-factorial, additional studies are needed to better understand the pathways initiated by fibroblast activation for the purpose of therapeutic translation. Regarding pterygium as a possible systemic disorder, we discuss the different cell types that pterygium fibroblasts originate from. These may include bone marrow-derived progenitor cells, cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and local resident stromal cells. We also describe how pterygium fibroblasts can be activated and perpetuate profibrotic signaling elicited by various proliferative drivers, immune-inflammation, and novel factors such as stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) as well as a known key fibrotic factor, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β). Finally, epigenetic modification is discussed to explain inherited susceptibility to pterygium. PMID:26675401

  9. Stromal androgen receptor regulates the composition of the microenvironment to influence prostate cancer outcome.

    PubMed

    Leach, Damien A; Need, Eleanor F; Toivanen, Roxanne; Trotta, Andrew P; Palethorpe, Helen M; Palenthorpe, Helen M; Tamblyn, David J; Kopsaftis, Tina; England, Georgina M; Smith, Eric; Drew, Paul A; Pinnock, Carole B; Lee, Peng; Holst, Jeff; Risbridger, Gail P; Chopra, Samarth; DeFranco, Donald B; Taylor, Renea A; Buchanan, Grant

    2015-06-30

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling in stromal cells is important in prostate cancer, yet the mechanisms underpinning stromal AR contribution to disease development and progression remain unclear. Using patient-matched benign and malignant prostate samples, we show a significant association between low AR levels in cancer associated stroma and increased prostate cancer-related death at one, three and five years post-diganosis, and in tissue recombination models with primary prostate cancer cells that low stromal AR decreases castration-induced apoptosis. AR-regulation was found to be different in primary human fibroblasts isolated from adjacent to cancerous and non-cancerous prostate epithelia, and to represent altered activation of myofibroblast pathways involved in cell cycle, adhesion, migration, and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Without AR signaling, the fibroblast-derived ECM loses the capacity to promote attachment of both myofibroblasts and cancer cells, is less able to prevent cell-matrix disruption, and is less likely to impede cancer cell invasion. AR signaling in prostate cancer stroma appears therefore to alter patient outcome by maintaining an ECM microenvironment inhibitory to cancer cell invasion. This paper provides comprehensive insight into AR signaling in the non-epithelial prostate microenvironment, and a resource from which the prognostic and therapeutic implications of stromal AR levels can be further explored. PMID:25965833

  10. Stromal androgen receptor regulates the composition of the microenvironment to influence prostate cancer outcome

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Damien A.; Need, Eleanor F.; Toivanen, Roxanne; Trotta, Andrew P.; Palenthorpe, Helen M.; Tamblyn, David J.; Kopsaftis, Tina; England, Georgina M.; Smith, Eric; Drew, Paul A.; Pinnock, Carole B.; Lee, Peng; Holst, Jeff; Risbridger, Gail P.; Chopra, Samarth; DeFranco, Donald B.; Taylor, Renea A.; Buchanan, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling in stromal cells is important in prostate cancer, yet the mechanisms underpinning stromal AR contribution to disease development and progression remain unclear. Using patient-matched benign and malignant prostate samples, we show a significant association between low AR levels in cancer associated stroma and increased prostate cancer-related death at one, three and five years post-diganosis, and in tissue recombination models with primary prostate cancer cells that low stromal AR decreases castration-induced apoptosis. AR-regulation was found to be different in primary human fibroblasts isolated from adjacent to cancerous and non-cancerous prostate epithelia, and to represent altered activation of myofibroblast pathways involved in cell cycle, adhesion, migration, and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Without AR signaling, the fibroblast-derived ECM loses the capacity to promote attachment of both myofibroblasts and cancer cells, is less able to prevent cell-matrix disruption, and is less likely to impede cancer cell invasion. AR signaling in prostate cancer stroma appears therefore to alter patient outcome by maintaining an ECM microenvironment inhibitory to cancer cell invasion. This paper provides comprehensive insight into AR signaling in the non-epithelial prostate microenvironment, and a resource from which the prognostic and therapeutic implications of stromal AR levels can be further explored. PMID:25965833

  11. Prognostic Impact of Reduced Connexin43 Expression and Gap Junction Coupling of Neoplastic Stromal Cells in Giant Cell Tumor of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Peter; Maros, Mate Elod; Barna, Gabor; Antal, Imre; Papp, Gergo; Sapi, Zoltan; Athanasou, Nicholas Anthony; Benassi, Maria Serena; Picci, Pierro; Krenacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations of the GJA1 gene encoding the gap junction channel protein connexin43 (Cx43) cause bone malformations resulting in oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD), while GJA1 null and ODDD mutant mice develop osteopenia. In this study we investigated Cx43 expression and channel functions in giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), a locally aggressive osteolytic lesion with uncertain progression. Cx43 protein levels assessed by immunohistochemistry were correlated with GCTB cell types, clinico-radiological stages and progression free survival in tissue microarrays of 89 primary and 34 recurrent GCTB cases. Cx43 expression, phosphorylation, subcellular distribution and gap junction coupling was also investigated and compared between cultured neoplastic GCTB stromal cells and bone marow stromal cells or HDFa fibroblasts as a control. In GCTB tissues, most Cx43 was produced by CD163 negative neoplastic stromal cells and less by CD163 positive reactive monocytes/macrophages or by giant cells. Significantly less Cx43 was detected in α-smooth muscle actin positive than α-smooth muscle actin negative stromal cells and in osteoclast-rich tumor nests than in the adjacent reactive stroma. Progressively reduced Cx43 production in GCTB was significantly linked to advanced clinico-radiological stages and worse progression free survival. In neoplastic GCTB stromal cell cultures most Cx43 protein was localized in the paranuclear-Golgi region, while it was concentrated in the cell membranes both in bone marrow stromal cells and HDFa fibroblasts. In Western blots, alkaline phosphatase sensitive bands, linked to serine residues (Ser369, Ser372 or Ser373) detected in control cells, were missing in GCTB stromal cells. Defective cell membrane localization of Cx43 channels was in line with the significantly reduced transfer of the 622 Da fluorescing calcein dye between GCTB stromal cells. Our results show that significant downregulation of Cx43 expression and gap junction coupling in

  12. Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Synergistically Activate Apoptosis in a p21-Dependent Mechanism in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 Cancer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dzobo, Kevin; Vogelsang, Matjaz; Thomford, Nicholas E.; Dandara, Collet; Kallmeyer, Karlien; Pepper, Michael S.; Parker, M. Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment plays a crucial role in tumour progression and comprises tumour stroma which is made up of different cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are part of the tumour stroma and may have conflicting effects on tumour growth. In this study we investigated the effect of Wharton's Jelly-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs) and a fibroblast-derived ECM (fd-ECM) on esophageal (WHCO1) and breast (MDA MB 231) cancer cells in vitro. Both WJ-MSCs and the fd-ECM, alone or in combination, downregulate PCNA, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and MMPs and upregulate p53 and p21. p21 induction resulted in G2 phase cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in vitro. Our data suggest that p21 induction is via p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 cells, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor, Akt, and Nodal pathways were downregulated in cancer cells cocultured with WJ-MSCs. We also demonstrate that WJ-MSCs effects on cancer cells appear to be short-lived whilst the fd-ECM effect is long-lived. This study shows the influence of tumour microenvironment on cancer cell behaviour and provides alternative therapeutic targets for potential regulation of tumour cells. PMID:26880967

  13. Periostin expression in intra-tumoral stromal cells is prognostic and predictive for colorectal carcinoma via creating a cancer-supportive niche

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaojie; Ding, Yibo; Luo, Yanxin; Cai, Hui; Liu, Yan; Gao, Xianhua; Liu, Qizhi; Yu, Yongwei; Du, Yan; Wang, Hao; Ma, Liye; Wang, Jianping; Chen, Kun; Ding, Yanqing; Fu, Chuangang; Cao, Guangwen

    2016-01-01

    Periostin (POSTN) expression in cancer cells and circulation has been related to poor prognosis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). However, the role of POSTN expressed in intra-tumoral stroma on CRC progression remains largely unknown. This study enrolled 1098 CRC patients who received surgical treatment in Shanghai and Guangzhou, Mainland China. In Shanghai cohort, immunohistochemistry score of stromal POSTN expression increased consecutively from adjacent mucosa, primary CRC tissues, to metastatic CRC tissues (P < 0.001), while medium- and high-stromal POSTN expression, rather than epithelial POSTN expression, independently predicted unfavorable prognoses of CRC, adjusted for covariates including TNM stage and postoperative chemotherapy in multivariate Cox models. The results in Shanghai cohort were faithfully replicated in Guangzhou cohort. Stromal POSTN expression dose-dependently predicted an unfavorable prognosis of stage III CRC patients with postoperative chemotherapy in both cohorts. POSTN derived from colonic fibroblasts or recombinant POSTN significantly promoted proliferation, anchorage independent growth, invasion, and chemo-resistance of CRC cells; whereas these effects were counteracted via targeting to PI3K/Akt or Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. CRC cell RKO-derived factor(s) significantly induced POSTN production in colonic fibroblasts and autocrine POSTN promoted proliferation, migration, and anchorage independent growth of fibroblasts. Conclusively, stromal POSTN is prognostic and predictive for CRC via creating a niche to facilitate cancer progression. Targeting POSTN-induced signaling pathways may be therapeutic options for metastatic or chemoresistant CRC. PMID:26556874

  14. Cancer-associated fibroblasts and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chiarugi, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation, which is now recognized as an hallmark of cancer, is intimately linked to the reactivity of stromal fibroblasts. Accumulating evidence indicate that cancer-associated fibroblasts not only drive the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metabolically sustain the growth of cancer cells, but also engage in a reciprocal relationship with M2 macrophages that dramatically boost malignancy. PMID:24319632

  15. Palladin Mediates Stiffness-Induced Fibroblast Activation in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    McLane, Joshua S.; Ligon, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment have emerged as key factors in tumor progression. It has been proposed that increased tissue stiffness can transform stromal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. However, it is unclear whether the three to five times increase in stiffness seen in tumor-adjacent stroma is sufficient for fibroblast activation. In this study we developed a three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel model with precisely tunable stiffness and show that a physiologically relevant increase in stiffness is sufficient to lead to fibroblast activation. We found that soluble factors including CC-motif chemokine ligand (CCL) chemokines and fibronectin are necessary for this activation, and the combination of C-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CCR4) chemokine receptors and β1 and β3 integrins are necessary to transduce these chemomechanical signals. We then show that these chemomechanical signals lead to the gene expression changes associated with fibroblast activation via a network of intracellular signaling pathways that include focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Finally, we identify the actin-associated protein palladin as a key node in these signaling pathways that result in fibroblast activation. PMID:26200861

  16. Co-culture of 3D tumor spheroids with fibroblasts as a model for epithelial–mesenchymal transition in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun Kyung; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-07-15

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) acts as a facilitator of metastatic dissemination in the invasive margin of malignant tumors where active tumor–stromal crosstalks take place. Co-cultures of cancer cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are often used as in vitro models of EMT. We established a tumor–fibroblast proximity co-culture using HT-29 tumor spheroids (TSs) with CCD-18co fibroblasts. When co-cultured with TSs, CCD-18co appeared activated, and proliferative activity as well as cell migration increased. Expression of fibronectin increased whereas laminin and type I collagen decreased in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to TSs alone, closely resembling the margin of in vivo xenograft tissue. Active TGFβ1 in culture media significantly increased in TS co-cultures but not in 2D co-cultures of cancer cells–fibroblasts, indicating that 3D context-associated factors from TSs may be crucial to crosstalks between cancer cells and fibroblasts. We also observed in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts increased expression of α-SMA, EGFR and CTGF; reduced expression of membranous β-catenin and E-cadherin, together suggesting an EMT-like changes similar to a marginal region of xenograft tissue in vivo. Overall, our in vitro TS–fibroblast proximity co-culture mimics the EMT-state of the invasive margin of in vivo tumors in early metastasis. - Highlights: • An adjacent co-culture of tumor spheroids and fibroblasts is presented as EMT model. • Activation of fibroblasts and increased cell migration were shown in co-culture. • Expression of EMT-related factors in co-culture was similar to that in tumor tissue. • Crosstalk between spheroids and fibroblasts was demonstrated by secretome analysis.

  17. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C.; Miller, Crispin J.; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRASG12D) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRASG12D signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRASG12D engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRASG12D. Consequently, reciprocal KRASG12D produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRASG12D alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. Video Abstract PMID:27087446

  18. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation.

    PubMed

    Tape, Christopher J; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M; Worboys, Jonathan D; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C; Miller, Crispin J; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-05-01

    Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRAS(G12D)) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRAS(G12D) signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRAS(G12D) engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRAS(G12D). Consequently, reciprocal KRAS(G12D) produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRAS(G12D) alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27087446

  19. Generation and characterization of novel stromal specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    HALDER, Sapna; HARDIE, Debbie L.; SCHEEL-TOELLNER, Dagmar; SALMON, Mike; BUCKLEY, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts were used as an immunogen to produce monoclonal antibodies selected for their reactivity with stromal cell antigens. Mice were immunised with low passage whole cell preparations and the subsequent hybridomas were screened by immunohistochemistry on rheumatoid synovium and tonsil sections. The aim was to identify those antibodies that recognised antigens that were restricted to stromal cells and were not expressed on CD45 positive leucocytes. A significant number of antibodies detected antigen that identified endothelial cells. These antibodies were further characterised to determine whether the vessels identified by these antibodies were vascular or lymphatic. From five fusions clones were identified with predominant reactivity with: 1) fibroblasts and endothelial cells; or 2) broad stromal elements (fibroblast, endothelium, epithelium, follicular dendritic cells). A fibroblast-specific antibody that did not also identify vessels was not generated. Examples of each reactivity pattern are discussed. PMID:16212881

  20. Isolation of Murine Lymph Node Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lagarde, Nadège; Rossi, Simona W.

    2014-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs including lymph nodes are composed of stromal cells that provide a structural environment for homeostasis, activation and differentiation of lymphocytes. Various stromal cell subsets have been identified by the expression of the adhesion molecule CD31 and glycoprotein podoplanin (gp38), T zone reticular cells or fibroblastic reticular cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, blood endothelial cells and FRC-like pericytes within the double negative cell population. For all populations different functions are described including, separation and lining of different compartments, attraction of and interaction with different cell types, filtration of the draining fluidics and contraction of the lymphatic vessels. In the last years, different groups have described an additional role of stromal cells in orchestrating and regulating cytotoxic T cell responses potentially dangerous for the host. Lymph nodes are complex structures with many different cell types and therefore require a appropriate procedure for isolation of the desired cell populations. Currently, protocols for the isolation of lymph node stromal cells rely on enzymatic digestion with varying incubation times; however, stromal cells and their surface molecules are sensitive to these enzymes, which results in loss of surface marker expression and cell death. Here a short enzymatic digestion protocol combined with automated mechanical disruption to obtain viable single cells suspension of lymph node stromal cells maintaining their surface molecule expression is proposed. PMID:25178108

  1. Differential regulation of extracellular matrix protein expression in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts by TGF-β1 regulates cancer cell spreading but not adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Van Bockstal, Mieke; Lambein, Kathleen; Van Gele, Mireille; De Vlieghere, Elly; Limame, Ridha; Braems, Geert; Van den Broecke, Rudy; Cocquyt, Veronique; Denys, Hannelore; Bracke, Marc; Libbrecht, Louis; De Wever, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Cancer progression is characterized by a complex reciprocity between neoplastic epithelium and adjacent stromal cells. In ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast, both reduced stromal decorin expression and myxoid stroma are correlated with increased recurrence risk. In this study, we aimed to investigate paracrine regulation of expression of decorin and related extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was identified as a competent ECM modulator, as it reduced decorin and strongly enhanced versican, biglycan and type I collagen expression. Similar but less pronounced effects were observed when fibroblasts were treated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Despite this concerted ECM modulation, TGF-β1 and bFGF differentially regulated alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, which is often proposed as a CAF-marker. Cancer cell-derived secretomes induced versican and biglycan expression in fibroblasts. Immunohistochemistry on twenty DCIS specimens showed a trend toward periductal versican overexpression in DCIS with myxoid stroma. Cancer cell adhesion was inhibited by decorin, but not by CAF-derived matrices. Cancer cells presented significantly enhanced spreading when seeded on matrices derived from TGF-β1-treated CAF. Altogether these data indicate that preinvasive cancerous lesions might modulate the composition of surrounding stroma through TGF-β1 release to obtain an invasion-permissive microenvironment. PMID:25593993

  2. Abrogation of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity attenuates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jonathan D; Valianou, Matthildi; Canutescu, Adrian A; Jaffe, Eileen K; Lee, Hyung-Ok; Wang, Hao; Lai, Jack H; Bachovchin, William W; Weiner, Louis M

    2005-03-01

    Tumor-associated fibroblasts are functionally and phenotypically distinct from normal fibroblasts that are not in the tumor microenvironment. Fibroblast activation protein is a 95 kDa cell surface glycoprotein expressed by tumor stromal fibroblasts, and has been shown to have dipeptidyl peptidase and collagenase activity. Site-directed mutagenesis at the catalytic site of fibroblast activation protein, Ser624 --> Ala624, resulted in an approximately 100,000-fold loss of fibroblast activation protein dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) activity. HEK293 cells transfected with wild-type fibroblast activation protein, enzymatic mutant (S624A) fibroblast activation protein, or vector alone, were inoculated subcutaneously into immunodeficient mouse to assess the contribution of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity to tumor growth. Overexpression of wild-type fibroblast activation protein showed growth potentiation and enhanced tumorigenicity compared with both fibroblast activation protein S624A and vector-transfected HEK293 xenografts. HEK293 cells transfected with fibroblast activation protein S624A showed tumor growth rates and tumorigenicity potential similar only to vector-transfected HEK293. In vivo assessment of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity of these tumors showed enhanced enzymatic activity of wild-type fibroblast activation protein, with only baseline levels of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity in either fibroblast activation protein S624A or vector-only xenografts. These results indicate that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein is necessary for fibroblast activation protein-driven tumor growth in the HEK293 xenograft model system. This establishes the proof-of-principle that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein plays an important role in the promotion of tumor growth, and provides an attractive target for therapeutics designed to alter fibroblast activation protein-induced tumor growth by targeting

  3. Correlation of vascular endothelial growth factor expression with fibroblast growth factor-8 expression and clinico-pathologic parameters in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    West, A F; O'Donnell, M; Charlton, R G; Neal, D E; Leung, H Y

    2001-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mediates neo-angiogenesis during tumour progression and is known to cooperate with the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system to facilitate angiogenesis in a synergistic manner. In view of this, we have investigated VEGF expression in 67 cases of prostate cancer previously characterized for fibroblast growth factor-8 (FGF-8) expression. Cytoplasmic VEGF staining was detected in malignant cells in 45 out of 67 cases. Cytoplasmic staining was found in adjacent stromal cells in 32 cases, being particularly strong around nests of invasive tumour. Positive VEGF immunoreactivity in benign glands was restricted to basal epithelium. A significant association was observed between tumour VEGF and FGF-8 expression (P = 0.004). We identified increased VEGF immunoreactivity in both malignant epithelium and adjacent stroma and both were found to be significantly associated with high tumour stage (P = 0.0047 and P = 0.0002, respectively). VEGF expression also correlated with increased serum PSA levels (P = 0.01). Among positively stained tumours, VEGF expression showed a significant association with Gleason score (P = 0.04). Cases showing positive VEGF immunoreactivity in the stroma had a significantly reduced survival rate compared to those with negative staining (P = 0.037). Cases with tumours expressing both FGF-8 in the malignant epithelium and VEGF in the adjacent stroma had a significantly worse survival rate than those with tumours negative for both, or only expressing one of the two growth factors (P = 0.029). Cox multivariate regression analysis of survival demonstrated that stromal VEGF and tumour stage were the most significant independent predictors of survival. In conclusion, we report for the first time a correlation of both tumour and stromal VEGF expression in prostate cancer with clinical parameters as well as its correlation to FGF-8 expression. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11506499

  4. Mammary fibroblasts regulate morphogenesis of normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cells by mechanical and paracrine signals

    PubMed Central

    Lühr, Inke; Friedl, Andreas; Overath, Thorsten; Tholey, Andreas; Kunze, Thomas; Hilpert, Felix; Sebens, Susanne; Arnold, Norbert; Rösel, Frank; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Maass, Nicolai; Mundhenke, Christoph; Jonat, Walter; Bauer, Maret

    2013-01-01

    Stromal factors play a critical role in the development of the mammary gland. Using a three dimensional-coculture model we demonstrate a significant role for stromal fibroblasts in the regulation of normal mammary epithelial morphogenesis and the control of tumor growth. Both soluble factors secreted by fibroblasts and fibroblast-derived modifications of the matrix compliance contribute to the regulation of epithelial cell morphogenesis. Readjustment of matrix tension by fibroblasts can even induce a phenotypic reversion of breast carcinoma cells. These data offer a basis to develop new strategies for the normalization of the tumor stroma as an innovative target in cancer therapy. PMID:22776560

  5. Know thy neighbor: stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.; Hein, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    Although the stroma within carcinogenic lesions is known to be supportive and responsive to tumors, new data increasingly show that the stroma also has a more active, oncogenic role in tumorigenesis. Stromal cells and their products can transform adjacent tissues in the absence of pre-existing tumor cells by inciting phenotypic and genomic changes in the epithelial cells. The oncogenic action of distinctive stromal components has been demonstrated through a variety of approaches, which provide clues about the cellular pathways involved.

  6. The role of stromal cells in the persistence of chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, A J; Filer, A; Buckley, C D

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is an unstable state; it either resolves or persists. Inflammatory reactions often have a propensity for specific anatomical sites. Why inflammation persists with specific tissue tropism remains obscure. Increasing evidence suggests that stromal cells which define tissue architecture are the key cells involved, and therefore make attractive therapeutic targets. Research on stromal cells in general and fibroblasts in particular has so far been hampered by a lack of fibroblast-specific cell markers. This review highlights our increasing understanding of the role of fibroblasts in inflammation, and suggests that these cells provide the cellular basis for site specific chronic inflammation. PMID:23199320

  7. Influence of Cancer-Associated Endometrial Stromal Cells on Hormone-Driven Endometrial Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, M. J.; Lu, Z.; Cao, D.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts have been shown to inhibit or stimulate tumor growth depending on stage, grade, and tumor type. It remains unclear, however, the effect of endometrial-cancer-associated fibroblasts on hormone-driven responses in endometrial cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of normal and cancer-associated stromal cells from patients with and without endometrial cancer on endometrial tumor growth in response to estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4). Compared to benign endometrial stromal cells, the low-grade and high-grade cancer-associated stromal cells exhibited a blunted hormone response for proliferation as well as IGFBP1 secretion. Additional analysis of the influence of stromal cells on hormone-driven tumor growth was done by mixing stromal cells from benign, low-grade, or high-grade tumors, with Ishikawa cells for subcutaneous tumor formation. The presence of both benign and high-grade cancer-associated stromal cells increased estradiol-driven xenografted tumor growth compared to Ishikawa cells alone. Low-grade cancer-associated stromal cells did not significantly influence hormone-regulated tumor growth. Addition of P4 attenuated tumor growth in Ishikawa + benign or high-grade stromal cells, but not in Ishikawa cells alone or with low-grade stromal cells. Using an angiogenesis focused real-time array TGFA, TGFB2 and TGFBR1 and VEGFC were identified as potential candidates for hormone-influenced growth regulation of tumors in the presence of benign and high-grade stromal cells. In summary, endometrial-cancer-associated cells responded differently to in vitro hormone treatment compared to benign endometrial stromal cells. Additionally, presence of stromal cells differentially influenced hormone-driven xenograft growth in vivo depending on the disease status of the stromal cells. PMID:25976290

  8. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Stromal Evolution and Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Cammarota, Francesca; Laukkanen, Mikko O.

    2016-01-01

    The study of cancer biology has mainly focused on malignant epithelial cancer cells, although tumors also contain a stromal compartment, which is composed of stem cells, tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs), endothelial cells, immune cells, adipocytes, cytokines, and various types of macromolecules comprising the extracellular matrix (ECM). The tumor stroma develops gradually in response to the needs of epithelial cancer cells during malignant progression initiating from increased local vascular permeability and ending to remodeling of desmoplastic loosely vascularized stromal ECM. The constant bidirectional interaction of epithelial cancer cells with the surrounding microenvironment allows damaged stromal cell usage as a source of nutrients for cancer cells, maintains the stroma renewal thus resembling a wound that does not heal, and affects the characteristics of tumor mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). Although MSCs have been shown to coordinate tumor cell growth, dormancy, migration, invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance, recently they have been successfully used in treatment of hematopoietic malignancies to enhance the effect of total body irradiation-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy. Hence, targeting the stromal elements in combination with conventional chemotherapeutics and usage of MSCs to attenuate graft-versus-host disease may offer new strategies to overcome cancer treatment failure and relapse of the disease. PMID:26798356

  9. Decellularization of human stromal refractive lenticules for corneal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Yusoff, Nur Zahirah Binte M; Goh, Tze-Wei; Setiawan, Melina; Lee, Xiao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Chi; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2016-01-01

    Small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) becomes a procedure to correct myopia. The extracted lenticule can be used for other clinical scenarios. To prepare for allogeneic implantation, lenticule decellularization with preserved optical property, stromal architecture and chemistry would be necessary. We evaluated different methods to decellularize thin human corneal stromal lenticules created by femtosecond laser. Treatment with 0.1% sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) followed by extensive washes was the most efficient protocol to remove cellular and nuclear materials. Empty cell space was found inside the stroma, which displayed aligned collagen fibril architecture similar to native stroma. The SDS-based method was superior to other treatments with hyperosmotic 1.5 M sodium chloride, 0.1% Triton X-100 and nucleases (from 2 to 10 U/ml DNase and RNase) in preserving extracellular matrix content (collagens, glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans). The stromal transparency and light transmittance was indifferent to untreated lenticules. In vitro recellularization showed that the SDS-treated lenticules supported corneal stromal fibroblast growth. In vivo re-implantation into a rabbit stromal pocket further revealed the safety and biocompatibility of SDS-decellularized lenticules without short- and long-term rejection risk. Our results concluded that femtosecond laser-derived human stromal lenticules decellularized by 0.1% SDS could generate a transplantable bioscaffold with native-like stromal architecture and chemistry. PMID:27210519

  10. Decellularization of human stromal refractive lenticules for corneal tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Yusoff, Nur Zahirah Binte M.; Goh, Tze-Wei; Setiawan, Melina; Lee, Xiao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Chi; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) becomes a procedure to correct myopia. The extracted lenticule can be used for other clinical scenarios. To prepare for allogeneic implantation, lenticule decellularization with preserved optical property, stromal architecture and chemistry would be necessary. We evaluated different methods to decellularize thin human corneal stromal lenticules created by femtosecond laser. Treatment with 0.1% sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) followed by extensive washes was the most efficient protocol to remove cellular and nuclear materials. Empty cell space was found inside the stroma, which displayed aligned collagen fibril architecture similar to native stroma. The SDS-based method was superior to other treatments with hyperosmotic 1.5 M sodium chloride, 0.1% Triton X-100 and nucleases (from 2 to 10 U/ml DNase and RNase) in preserving extracellular matrix content (collagens, glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans). The stromal transparency and light transmittance was indifferent to untreated lenticules. In vitro recellularization showed that the SDS-treated lenticules supported corneal stromal fibroblast growth. In vivo re-implantation into a rabbit stromal pocket further revealed the safety and biocompatibility of SDS-decellularized lenticules without short- and long-term rejection risk. Our results concluded that femtosecond laser-derived human stromal lenticules decellularized by 0.1% SDS could generate a transplantable bioscaffold with native-like stromal architecture and chemistry. PMID:27210519

  11. Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Julie A; Li, Fu; Balakrishnan, Subhasree; Cantemir-Stone, Carmen Z; Pecot, Thierry; Martin, Chelsea; Kladney, Raleigh D; Sharma, Sudarshana M; Trimboli, Anthony J; Fernandez, Soledad A; Yu, Lianbo; Rosol, Thomas J; Stromberg, Paul C; Lesurf, Robert; Hallett, Michael; Park, Morag; Leone, Gustavo; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Tumor fibroblasts are active partners in tumor progression, but the genes and pathways that mediate this collaboration are ill-defined. Previous work demonstrates that Ets2 function in stromal cells significantly contributes to breast tumor progression. Conditional mouse models were used to study the function of Ets2 in both mammary stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Conditional inactivation of Ets2 in stromal fibroblasts in PyMT and ErbB2 driven tumors significantly reduced tumor growth, however deletion of Ets2 in epithelial cells in the PyMT model had no significant effect. Analysis of gene expression in fibroblasts revealed a tumor- and Ets2-dependent gene signature that was enriched in genes important for ECM remodeling, cell migration, and angiogenesis in both PyMT and ErbB2 driven-tumors. Consistent with these results, PyMT and ErbB2 tumors lacking Ets2 in fibroblasts had fewer functional blood vessels, and Ets2 in fibroblasts elicited changes in gene expression in tumor endothelial cells consistent with this phenotype. An in vivo angiogenesis assay revealed the ability of Ets2 in fibroblasts to promote blood vessel formation in the absence of tumor cells. Importantly, the Ets2-dependent gene expression signatures from both mouse models were able to distinguish human breast tumor stroma from normal stroma, and correlated with patient outcomes in two whole tumor breast cancer data sets. The data reveals a key function for Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts in signaling to endothelial cells to promote tumor angiogenesis. The results highlight the collaborative networks that orchestrate communication between stromal cells and tumor cells, and suggest that targeting tumor fibroblasts may be an effective strategy for developing novel anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:23977064

  12. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts: orchestrating the composition of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Gascard, Philippe; Tlsty, Thea D

    2016-05-01

    The tumor stroma is no longer seen solely as physical support for mutated epithelial cells but as an important modulator and even a driver of tumorigenicity. Within the tumor stromal milieu, heterogeneous populations of fibroblast-like cells, collectively termed carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), are key players in the multicellular, stromal-dependent alterations that contribute to malignant initiation and progression. This review focuses on novel insights into the contributions of CAFs to disease progression, emergent events leading to the generation of CAFs, identification of CAF-specific biomarkers predictive of disease outcome, and recent therapeutic approaches aimed at blunting or reverting detrimental protumorigenic phenotypes associated with CAFs. PMID:27151975

  13. The Casitas B lineage lymphoma (Cbl) mutant G306E enhances osteogenic differentiation in human mesenchymal stromal cells in part by decreased Cbl-mediated platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha and fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Sévère, Nicolas; Miraoui, Hichem; Marie, Pierre J

    2011-07-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into several cell types including osteoblasts and are therefore an important cell source for bone tissue regeneration. A crucial issue is to identify mechanisms that trigger hMSC osteoblast differentiation to promote osteogenic potential. Casitas B lineage lymphoma (Cbl) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates and targets several molecules for degradation. We hypothesized that attenuation of Cbl-mediated degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) may promote osteogenic differentiation in hMSCs. We show here that specific inhibition of Cbl interaction with RTKs using a Cbl mutant (G306E) promotes expression of osteoblast markers (Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, type 1 collagen, osteocalcin) and increases osteogenic differentiation in clonal bone marrow-derived hMSCs and primary hMSCs. Analysis of molecular mechanisms revealed that the Cbl mutant increased PDGF receptor α and FGF receptor 2 but not EGF receptor expression in hMSCs, resulting in increased ERK1/2 and PI3K signaling. Pharmacological inhibition of FGFR or PDGFR abrogated in vitro osteogenesis induced by the Cbl mutant. The data reveal that specific inhibition of Cbl interaction with RTKs promotes the osteogenic differentiation program in hMSCs in part by decreased Cbl-mediated PDGFRα and FGFR2 ubiquitination, providing a novel mechanistic approach targeting Cbl to promote the osteogenic capacity of hMSCs. PMID:21596750

  14. Fibroblast spheroids as a model to study sustained fibroblast quiescence and their crosstalk with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Salmenperä, Pertteli; Karhemo, Piia-Riitta; Räsänen, Kati; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Vaheri, Antti

    2016-07-01

    Stromal fibroblasts have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Normal and quiescent fibroblasts have been shown to restrict and control cancer cell growth, while cancer-associated, i. e. activated fibroblasts have been shown to enhance proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. In this study we describe generation of quiescent fibroblasts in multicellular spheroids and their effects on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth in soft-agarose and xenograft models. Quiescent phenotype of fibroblasts was determined by global down-regulation of expression of genes related to cell cycle and increased expression of p27. Interestingly, microarray analysis showed that fibroblast quiescence was associated with similar secretory phenotype as seen in senescence and they expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase. Quiescent fibroblasts spheroids also restricted the growth of RT3 SCC cells both in soft-agarose and xenograft models unlike proliferating fibroblasts. Restricted tumor growth was associated with marginally increased tumor cell senescence and cellular differentiation, showed with senescence-associated-β-galactosidase and cytokeratin 7 staining. Our results show that the fibroblasts spheroids can be used as a model to study cellular quiescence and their effects on cancer cell progression. PMID:27177832

  15. Nkx2-5+Islet1+ mesenchymal precursors generate distinct spleen stromal cell subsets and participate in restoring stromal network integrity

    PubMed Central

    Castagnaro, Laura; Lenti, Elisa; Maruzzelli, Sara; Spinardi, Laura; Migliori, Edoardo; Farinello, Diego; Sitia, Giovanni; Harrelson, Zachary; Evans, Sylvia; Guidotti, Luca G.; Harvey, Richard P.; Brendolan, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Lymphoid organ stromal cells comprise different subsets whose origin remains unknown. Herein, we exploit a genetic lineage-tracing approach to show that splenic fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), marginal reticular cells (MRCs), and mural cells, but not endothelial cells, originated from embryonic mesenchymal progenitors of the Nkx2-5+Islet1+ lineage. This lineage included embryonic mesenchymal cells with lymphoid tissue organizer (LTo) activity capable of supporting ectopic lymphoid-like structures, and a subset of resident spleen stromal cells that proliferated and regenerated the splenic stromal microenvironment following resolution of a viral infection. These findings identify progenitor cells that generate stromal diversity in spleen development and repair, and suggest the existence of multipotent stromal progenitors in the adult spleen with regenerative capacity. PMID:23601687

  16. High EMT Signature Score of Invasive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Cells Correlates with NFκB Driven Colony-Stimulating Factor 2 (CSF2/GM-CSF) Secretion by Neighboring Stromal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Rudisch, Albin; Dewhurst, Matthew Richard; Horga, Luminita Gabriela; Kramer, Nina; Harrer, Nathalie; Dong, Meng; van der Kuip, Heiko; Wernitznig, Andreas; Bernthaler, Andreas; Dolznig, Helmut; Sommergruber, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    We established co-cultures of invasive or non-invasive NSCLC cell lines and various types of fibroblasts (FBs) to more precisely characterize the molecular mechanism of tumor-stroma crosstalk in lung cancer. The HGF-MET-ERK1/2-CREB-axis was shown to contribute to the onset of the invasive phenotype of Calu-1 with HGF being secreted by FBs. Differential expression analysis of the respective mono- and co-cultures revealed an upregulation of NFκB-related genes exclusively in co-cultures with Calu-1. Cytokine Array- and ELISA-based characterization of the “cytokine fingerprints” identified CSF2 (GM-CSF), CXCL1, CXCL6, VEGF, IL6, RANTES and IL8 as being specifically upregulated in various co-cultures. Whilst CXCL6 exhibited a strictly FB-type-specific induction profile regardless of the invasiveness of the tumor cell line, CSF2 was only induced in co-cultures of invasive cell lines regardless of the partnered FB type. These cultures revealed a clear link between the induction of CSF2 and the EMT signature of the cancer cell line. The canonical NFκB signaling in FBs, but not in tumor cells, was shown to be responsible for the induced and constitutive CSF2 expression. In addition to CSF2, cytokine IL6, IL8 and IL1B, and chemokine CXCL1 and CXCL6 transcripts were also shown to be increased in co-cultured FBs. In contrast, their induction was not strictly dependent on the invasiveness of the co-cultured tumor cell. In a multi-reporter assay, additional signaling pathways (AP-1, HIF1-α, KLF4, SP-1 and ELK-1) were found to be induced in FBs co-cultured with Calu-1. Most importantly, no difference was observed in the level of inducibility of these six signaling pathways with regard to the type of FBs used. Finally, upon tumor fibroblast interaction the massive induction of chemokines such as CXCL1 and CXCL6 in FBs might be responsible for increased recruitment of a monocytic cell line (THP-1) in a transwell assay. PMID:25919140

  17. Fibroblast-induced switching to the mesenchymal-like phenotype and PI3K/mTOR signaling protects melanoma cells from BRAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Seip, Kotryna; Nygaard, Vigdis; Haugen, Mads H.; Engesæter, Birgit Ø.; Mælandsmo, Gunhild M.; Prasmickaite, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge on how tumor-associated stroma influences efficacy of anti-cancer therapy just started to emerge. Here we show that lung fibroblasts reduce melanoma sensitivity to the BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) vemurafenib only if the two cell types are in close proximity. In the presence of fibroblasts, the adjacent melanoma cells acquire de-differentiated mesenchymal-like phenotype. Upon treatment with BRAFi, such melanoma cells maintain high levels of phospho ribosomal protein S6 (pS6), i.e. active mTOR signaling, which is suppressed in the BRAFi sensitive cells without stromal contacts. Inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR in combination with BRAFi eradicate pS6high cell subpopulations and potentiate anti-cancer effects in melanoma protected by the fibroblasts. mTOR and BRAF co-inhibition also delayed the development of early-stage lung metastases in vivo. In conclusion, we demonstrate that upon influence from fibroblasts, melanoma cells undergo a phenotype switch to the mesenchymal state, which can support PI3K/mTOR signaling. The lost sensitivity to BRAFi in such cells can be overcome by co-targeting PI3K/mTOR. This knowledge could be explored for designing BRAFi combination therapies aiming to eliminate both stroma-protected and non-protected counterparts of metastases. PMID:26918352

  18. Reversing the aging stromal phenotype prevents carcinoma initiation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Davina A; Travers, Jeffrey B; Machado, Christiane; Somani, Ally-Khan; Spandau, Dan F

    2011-04-01

    The accumulation of senescent stromal cells in aging tissue changes the local microenvironment from normal to a state similar to chronic inflammation. This inflammatory microenvironment can stimulate the proliferation of epithelial cells containing DNA mutations which can ultimately lead to cancer. Using geriatric skin as a model, we demonstrated that senescent fibroblasts also alter how epithelial keratinocytes respond to genotoxic stress, due to the silencing of IGF-1 expression in geriatric fibroblasts. These data indicate that in addition to promoting epithelial tumor growth, senescent fibroblasts also can promote carcinogenic initiation. We hypothesized that commonly used therapeutic stromal wounding therapies can reduce the percentage of senescent fibroblasts and consequently prevent the formation of keratinocytes proliferating with DNA mutations following acute genotoxic (UVB) stress. Sun-protected skin on the lower back of geriatric human volunteers was wounded by dermabrasion and the skin was allowed to heal for three months. In geriatric skin, we found that dermabrasion wounding decreases the proportion of senescent fibroblasts found in geriatric dermis, increases the expression of IGF-1, and restores the appropriate UVB response to epidermal keratinocytes in geriatric skin. Therefore, dermal rejuvenation therapies may play a significant role in preventing the initiation of skin cancer in geriatric patients. PMID:21515933

  19. [Mammary hamartoma with atypical stromal cells: a potential diagnostic dilemma].

    PubMed

    Agabiti, S; Gurrera, A; Amico, P; Vasquez, E; Magro, G

    2007-12-01

    Hamartoma of the breast is a pseudotumoural lesion that does not usually pose diagnostic problems for the pathologist. Although atypical stromal cell (ASCs) can be encountered in several benign and malignant breast lesions, their occurrence in hamartoma has not been reported to date. The authors report a case of breast hamartoma containing numerous atypical mono- or multinucleated stromal cells within the fibro-fatty component. This unusual feature raised differential diagnostic problems with pleomorphic lipoma, well-differentiated liposarcoma and malignant phylloid tumour with a lipomatous heterologous component. Immunohistochemistry, showing positivity to vimentin and CD34, revealed that ASCs are fibroblastic in nature, and thus are likely to represent a morphological variant of the fibroblasts of the native mammary stroma. PMID:18416336

  20. Tumor-associated stromal cells as key contributors to the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bussard, Karen M; Mutkus, Lysette; Stumpf, Kristina; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Marini, Frank C

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a heterogeneous population of cells consisting of the tumor bulk plus supporting cells. It is becoming increasingly evident that these supporting cells are recruited by cancer cells from nearby endogenous host stroma and promote events such as tumor angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, as well as mediate mechanisms of therapeutic resistance. In addition, recruited stromal cells range in type and include vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, adipocytes, fibroblasts, and bone-marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. During normal wound healing and inflammatory processes, local stromal cells change their phenotype to become that of reactive stroma. Under certain conditions, however, tumor cells can co-opt these reactive stromal cells and further transition them into tumor-associated stromal cells (TASCs). These TASCs express higher levels of proteins, including alpha-smooth muscle actin, fibroblast activating protein, and matrix metalloproteinases, compared with their normal, non-reactive counterparts. TASCs are also known to secrete many pro-tumorigenic factors, including IL-6, IL-8, stromal-derived factor-1 alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, tenascin-C, and matrix metalloproteinases, among others, which recruit additional tumor and pro-tumorigenic cells to the developing microenvironment. Here, we review the current literature pertaining to the origins of recruited host stroma, contributions toward tumor progression, tumor-associated stromal cells, and mechanisms of crosstalk between endogenous host stroma and tumor cells. PMID:27515302

  1. Ex Vivo Propagation of Human Corneal Stromal "Activated Keratocytes" for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Yusoff, Nur Zahirah Binte M; Kadaba, Aishwarya; Tian, Dechao; Myint, Htoon Hla; Beuerman, Roger W; Zhou, Lei; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus is a corneal disorder characterized by a thinning of stromal tissue, and the affected patients have induced astigmatism and visual impairment. It is associated with a loss of corneal stromal keratocytes (CSKs). Hence, reconstructing stromal tissue with autologous CSK replacement can be a viable alternative to corneal transplantation, which is restricted by the global donor material shortage and graft rejection. Human CSKs are normally quiescent and express unique markers, like aldehyde dehydrogenases and keratocan. In serum culture, they proliferate, but lose their characteristic phenotype and become stromal fibroblasts. Here we report a novel culture cocktail to ex vivo propagate and maintain CSKs. Primary human CSKs were obtained from adult donors and cultured with soluble human amnion stromal extract (ASE), rho-associated coiled-coil-forming protein serine/threonine kinase inhibitor Y-27632, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (collectively named as ERI). Protein profiling using mass spectrometry followed by MetaCore™ pathway analysis predicted that ASE proteins might participate in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling and fibroblast development, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodeling, and immune response. In culture with 0.5% fetal bovine serum and ERI, the population of "activated keratocytes" was expanded. They had much lowered expression of both keratocyte and fibroblast markers, suppressed TGF-β-mediated Smad2/3 activation, and lacked fibroblast-mediated collagen contractibility. These "activated keratoctyes" could be propagated for six to eight passages ex vivo, and they regained CSK-specific dendritic morphology and gene marker expression, including aldehyde dehydrogenases, lumican, and keratocan biosynthesis, expression, and secretion when returned to serum-depleted ERI condition. This novel cocktail maintained human CSKs in both adherent and suspension cultures with proper keratocyte features and without the

  2. Cellular and extracellular matrix modulation of corneal stromal opacity.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Andre A M; Wilson, Steven E

    2014-12-01

    Stromal transparency is a critical factor contributing to normal function of the visual system. Corneal injury, surgery, disease and infection elicit complex wound healing responses that serve to protect against insults and maintain the integrity of the cornea, and subsequently to restore corneal structure and transparency. However, in some cases these processes result in prolonged loss of corneal transparency and resulting diminished vision. Corneal opacity is mediated by the complex actions of many cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines produced by the epithelial cells, stromal cells, bone marrow-derived cells, lacrimal tissues, and nerves. Myofibroblasts, and the disorganized extracellular matrix produced by these cells, are critical determinants of the level and persistence of stromal opacity after corneal injury. Decreases in corneal crystallins in myofibroblasts and corneal fibroblasts contribute to cellular opacity in the stroma. Regeneration of a fully functional epithelial basement membrane (BM) appears to have a critical role in the maintenance of corneal stromal transparency after mild injuries and recovery of transparency when opacity is generated after severe injuries. The epithelial BM likely has a regulatory function whereby it modulates epithelium-derived growth factors such as transforming growth factor (TGF) β and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) that drive the development and persistence of myofibroblasts from precursor cells. The purpose of this article is to review the factors involved in the maintenance of corneal transparency and to highlight the mechanisms involved in the appearance, persistency and regression of corneal opacity after stromal injury. PMID:25281830

  3. Distinct effects of SIRT1 in cancer and stromal cells on tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Choi, Yong-Joon; Jin, Peng; Yoon, Haejin; Chun, Yang-Sook; Shin, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Ja-Eun; Park, Jong-Wan

    2016-04-26

    The lysyl deacetylase SIRT1 acts as a metabolic sensor in adjusting metabolic imbalance. To explore the role of SIRT1 in tumor-stroma interplay, we designed an in vivo tumor model using SIRT1-transgenic mice. B16F10 mouse melanoma grew more quickly in SIRT1-transgenic mice than in wild-type mice, whereas SIRT1-overexpressing one grew slowly in both mice. Of human tumors, SIRT1 expression in stromal fibroblasts was found to correlate with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer. B16F10 and human ovarian cancer (SKOV3 and SNU840) cells were more proliferative in co-culture with SIRT1-overexpressiong fibroblasts. In contrast, SIRT1 within cancer cells has a negative effect on cell proliferation. In conditioned media from SIRT1-overexpressing fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) was identified in cytokine arrays to be secreted from fibroblasts SIRT1-dependently. Fibroblast-derived MMP3 stimulated cancer cell proliferation, and such a role of MMP3 was also demonstrated in cancer/fibroblast co-grafts. In conclusion, SIRT1 plays differential roles in cancer and stromal cells. SIRT1 in stromal cells promotes cancer growth by producing MMP3, whereas SIRT1 in cancer cells inhibits growth via an intracellular event. The present study provides a basis for setting new anticancer strategies targeting SIRT1. PMID:26992208

  4. The corneal fibrosis response to epithelial-stromal injury.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Andre A M; Santhanam, Abirami; Wu, Jiahui; Singh, Vivek; Wilson, Steven E

    2016-01-01

    The corneal wound healing response, including the development of stromal opacity in some eyes, is a process that often leads to scarring that occurs after injury, surgery or infection to the cornea. Immediately after epithelial and stromal injury, a complex sequence of processes contributes to wound repair and regeneration of normal corneal structure and function. In some corneas, however, often depending on the type and extent of injury, the response may also lead to the development of mature vimentin+ α-smooth muscle actin+ desmin+ myofibroblasts. Myofibroblasts are specialized fibroblastic cells generated in the cornea from keratocyte-derived or bone marrow-derived precursor cells. The disorganized extracellular matrix components secreted by myofibroblasts, in addition to decreased expression of corneal crystallins in these cells, are central biological processes that result in corneal stromal fibrosis associated with opacity or "haze". Several factors are associated with myofibroblast generation and haze development after PRK surgery in rabbits, a reproducible model of scarring, including the amount of tissue ablated, which may relate to the extent of keratocyte apoptosis in the early response to injury, irregularity of stromal surface after surgery, and changes in corneal stromal proteoglycans, but normal regeneration of the epithelial basement membrane (EBM) appears to be a critical factor determining whether a cornea heals with relative transparency or vision-limiting stromal opacity. Structural and functional abnormalities of the regenerated EBM facilitate prolonged entry of epithelium-derived growth factors such as transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) into the stroma that both drive development of mature myofibroblasts from precursor cells and lead to persistence of the cells in the anterior stroma. A major discovery that has contributed to our understanding of haze development is that keratocytes and corneal

  5. Combined CSL and p53 downregulation promotes cancer-associated fibroblast activation

    PubMed Central

    Procopio, Maria-Giuseppina; Laszlo, Csaba; Labban, Dania Al; Kim, Dong Eun; Bordignon, Pino; Jo, Seunghee; Goruppi, Sandro; Menietti, Elena; Ostano, Paola; Ala, Ugo; Provero, Paolo; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Neel, Victor; Kilarski, Witek; Swartz, Melody A.; Brisken, Cathrin; Lefort, Karine; Dotto, G. Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Stromal fibroblast senescence has been linked to aging-associated cancer risk. However, density and proliferation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are frequently increased. Loss or down-modulation of the Notch effector CSL/RBP-Jκ in dermal fibroblasts is sufficient for CAF activation and ensuing keratinocyte-derived tumors. We report that CSL silencing induces senescence of primary fibroblasts from dermis, oral mucosa, breast and lung. CSL functions in these cells as direct repressor of multiple senescence- and CAF-effector genes. It also physically interacts with p53, repressing its activity. CSL is down-modulated in stromal fibroblasts of premalignant skin actinic keratosis lesions and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), while p53 expression and function is down-modulated only in the latter, with paracrine FGF signaling as likely culprit. Concomitant loss of CSL and p53 overcomes fibroblast senescence, enhances expression of CAF effectors and promotes stromal and cancer cell expansion. The findings support a CAF activation/stromal co-evolution model under convergent CSL/p53 control. PMID:26302407

  6. Fibroblast nemosis induces angiogenic responses of endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Enzerink, Anna; Rantanen, Ville; Vaheri, Antti

    2010-03-10

    Increasing evidence points to a central link between inflammation and activation of the stroma, especially of fibroblasts therein. However, the mechanisms leading to such activation mostly remain undescribed. We have previously characterized a novel type of fibroblast activation (nemosis) where clustered fibroblasts upregulated the production of cyclooxygenase-2, secretion of prostaglandins, proteinases, chemotactic cytokines, and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and displayed activated nuclear factor-{kappa}B. Now we show that nemosis drives angiogenic responses of endothelial cells. In addition to HGF, nemotic fibroblasts secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and conditioned medium from spheroids promoted sprouting and networking of human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVEC). The response was partly inhibited by function-blocking antibodies against HGF and VEGF. Conditioned nemotic fibroblast medium promoted closure of HUVEC and human dermal microvascular endothelial cell monolayer wounds, by increasing the motility of the endothelial cells. Wound closure in HUVEC cells was partly inhibited by the antibodies against HGF. The stromal microenvironment regulates wound healing responses and often promotes tumorigenesis. Nemosis offers clues to the activation process of stromal fibroblasts and provides a model to study the part they play in angiogenesis-related conditions, as well as possibilities for therapeutical approaches desiring angiogenesis in tissue.

  7. Modulation of TNF-induced macrophage polarization by synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Donlin, Laura T; Jayatilleke, Arundathi; Giannopoulou, Eugenia G; Kalliolias, George D; Ivashkiv, Lionel B

    2014-09-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells have emerged as powerful modulators of the immune system. In this study, we explored how the human macrophage response to TNF is regulated by human synovial fibroblasts, the representative stromal cell type in the synovial lining of joints that become activated during inflammatory arthritis. We found that synovial fibroblasts strongly suppressed TNF-mediated induction of an IFN-β autocrine loop and downstream expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), including chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 that are characteristic of classical macrophage activation. TNF induced the production of soluble synovial fibroblast factors that suppressed the macrophage production of IFN-β, and cooperated with TNF to limit the responsiveness of macrophages to IFN-β by suppressing activation of Jak-STAT signaling. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis showed that cocultured synovial fibroblasts modulate the expression of approximately one third of TNF-regulated genes in macrophages, including genes in pathways important for macrophage survival and polarization toward an alternatively activated phenotype. Pathway analysis revealed that gene expression programs regulated by synovial fibroblasts in our coculture system were also regulated in rheumatoid arthritis synovial macrophages, suggesting that these fibroblast-mediated changes may contribute to rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis. This work furthers our understanding of the interplay between innate immune and stromal cells during an inflammatory response, one that is particularly relevant to inflammatory arthritis. Our findings also identify modulation of macrophage phenotype as a new function for synovial fibroblasts that may prove to be a contributing factor in arthritis pathogenesis. PMID:25057003

  8. Inhibition of tumor-stromal interaction through HGF/Met signaling by valproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yohsuke; Motoki, Takahiro; Kubota, Satoshi; Takigawa, Masaharu; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Gohda, Eiichi

    2008-02-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which is produced by surrounding stromal cells, including fibroblasts and endothelial cells, has been shown to be a significant factor responsible for cancer cell invasion mediated by tumor-stromal interactions. We found in this study that the anti-tumor agent valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, strongly inhibited tumor-stromal interaction. VPA inhibited HGF production in fibroblasts induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} without any appreciable cytotoxic effect. Other HDAC inhibitors, including butyric acid and trichostatin A (TSA), showed similar inhibitory effects on HGF production stimulated by various inducers. Up-regulations of HGF gene expression induced by PMA and EGF were also suppressed by VPA and TSA. Furthermore, VPA significantly inhibited HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. VPA, however, did not affect the increases in phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in HGF-treated HepG2 cells. These results demonstrated that VPA inhibited two critical processes of tumor-stromal interaction, induction of fibroblastic HGF production and HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 cells, and suggest that those activities serve for other anti-tumor mechanisms of VPA besides causing proliferation arrest, differentiation, and/or apoptosis of tumor cells.

  9. Reprogramming of the tumour microenvironment by stromal PTEN-regulated miR-320.

    PubMed

    Bronisz, A; Godlewski, J; Wallace, J A; Merchant, A S; Nowicki, M O; Mathsyaraja, H; Srinivasan, R; Trimboli, A J; Martin, C K; Li, F; Yu, L; Fernandez, S A; Pécot, T; Rosol, T J; Cory, S; Hallett, M; Park, M; Piper, M G; Marsh, C B; Yee, L D; Jimenez, R E; Nuovo, G; Lawler, S E; Chiocca, E A; Leone, G; Ostrowski, M C

    2012-02-01

    PTEN (Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) expression in stromal fibroblasts suppresses epithelial mammary tumours, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Using proteomic and expression profiling, we show that Pten loss from mammary stromal fibroblasts activates an oncogenic secretome that orchestrates the transcriptional reprogramming of other cell types in the microenvironment. Downregulation of miR-320 and upregulation of one of its direct targets, ETS2 (v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2) are critical events in Pten-deleted stromal fibroblasts responsible for inducing this oncogenic secretome, which in turn promotes tumour angiogenesis and tumour-cell invasion. Expression of the Pten-miR-320-Ets2-regulated secretome distinguished human normal breast stroma from tumour stroma and robustly correlated with recurrence in breast cancer patients. This work reveals miR-320 as a critical component of the Pten tumour-suppressor axis that acts in stromal fibroblasts to reprogramme the tumour microenvironment and curtail tumour progression. PMID:22179046

  10. Adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  11. [Nonadhesive populations in cultures of mesenchymal stromal cells from hematopoietic organs in mouse and rat].

    PubMed

    Byeverova, E I; Bragina, E V; Molchanova, E A

    2008-01-01

    The study of adhesive properties of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells evaluated from fibroblast colony-forming units in the bone marrow of adult mice and rats in populations of cells attached and unattached to plastic substrate after 2 h to 7 days in culture demonstrated both similarities and differences. The increase in the fibroblast colony-forming units in the adhesive population peaked on day 7 of in vitro culture in both cases; however, nearly no fibroblast colony-forming units were observed in the nonadhesive population from the mouse bone marrow in this period. Conversely, the number of colonies from the rat bone marrow nonadhesive population on day 7 of culture considerably increased, and this nonadhesive population in long-term culture became the source for subsequent nonadhesive subpopulations containing fibroblast colony-forming units. After 7 days of in vitro culture, the suspension of cells isolated from the liver of 17-day-old rat fetuses also contained a fraction of unattached fibroblast colony-forming units. In the nonadhesive subpopulations from the bone marrow and fetal liver, fibroblast colony-forming units were observed up to day 48 and 30, respectively. Stromal cell precursors of nonadhesive subpopulations from the rat bone marrow featured a period of colony formation reduced to 7 days (i.e., they were formed 1.5-2 times faster compared to the primary culture). The total number of fibroblast colony-forming units from all nonadhesive subpopulations was roughly 6 and 7.4 times that of the adhesive population of the primary culture from the bone marrow and fetal liver, respectively. Considering that the mammalian bone marrow remains the preferred source of mesenchymal stromal cells, using nonadhesive subpopulations in the presented culture system can considerably increase the yield of stromal precursor cells. PMID:19137707

  12. Loss of Stromal Caveolin-1 Expression: A Novel Tumor Microenvironment Biomarker That Can Predict Poor Clinical Outcomes for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Tao; Lu, Hongwei; Ji, Hong; Li, Yiming; Guo, Jian; Chen, Xi; Wu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Aims Cancer development and progression is not only associated with the tumor cell proliferation but also depends on the interaction between tumor cells and the stromal microenvironment. A new understanding of the role of the tumor microenvironment suggests that the loss of stromal caveolin-1 (Cav-1) as a key regulator may become a potential therapy target. This study aims to elucidate whether stromal Cav-1 expression in pancreatic cancer can be a strong prognosis biomarker. Methods Tissue samples from 45 pancreatic cancer patients were studied. Parenchyma and stroma were separated and purified using laser capture microdissection. Stromal Cav-1 expression was measured from pancreatic cancer, paraneoplastic, and normal tissue using immunohistochemistry. We analyzed the correlation of stromal Cav-1 expression with clinicopathologic features and prognostic indicators, such as tumor marker HER-2/neu gene. Results Specimens from six patients (13.3%) showed high levels of stromal Cav-1 staining, those from eight patients (17.8%) showed a lower, intermediate level of staining, whereas those from 31 patients (68.9%) showed an absence of staining. Cav-1 expression in cancer-associated fibroblasts was lower than that in paracancer-associated and in normal fibroblasts. Stromal Cav-1 loss was associated with TNM stage (P = 0.018), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.014), distant metastasis (P = 0.027), and HER-2/neu amplification (P = 0.007). The relationships of age, sex, histological grade, and tumor size with stromal Cav-1 expression were not significant (P>0.05). A negative correlation was found between circulating tumor cells and stromal Cav-1 expression (P<0.05). Conclusion The loss of stromal Cav-1 in pancreatic cancer was an independent prognostic indicator, thus suggesting that stromal Cav-1 may be an effective therapeutic target for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:24949874

  13. Acidic extracellular pH of tumors induces octamer-binding transcription factor 4 expression in murine fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Som, Avik; Bloch, Sharon; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT-4) is an important marker of cellular de-differentiation that can be induced by environmental stressors, such as acidity. Here we demonstrate that chronic acidic stress in solid tumors induced OCT-4 expression in fibroblasts and other stromal cells in four tumor models. The results have implications for how tumors utilize pH modulation to recruit associated stromal cells, induce partial reprogramming of tumor-associated stromal cells, and respond to therapy. PMID:27302093

  14. Tumor-associated fibroblasts predominantly come from local and not circulating precursors.

    PubMed

    Arina, Ainhoa; Idel, Christian; Hyjek, Elizabeth M; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Wang, Ying; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Schreiber, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Fibroblasts are common cell types in cancer stroma and lay down collagen required for survival and growth of cancer cells. Although some cancer therapy strategies target tumor fibroblasts, their origin remains controversial. Multiple publications suggest circulating mesenchymal precursors as a source of tumor-associated fibroblasts. However, we show by three independent approaches that tumor fibroblasts derive primarily from local, sessile precursors. First, transplantable tumors developing in a mouse expressing green fluorescent reporter protein (EGFP) under control of the type I collagen (Col-I) promoter (COL-EGFP) had green stroma, whereas we could not find COL-EGFP(+) cells in tumors developing in the parabiotic partner lacking the fluorescent reporter. Lack of incorporation of COL-EGFP(+) cells from the circulation into tumors was confirmed in parabiotic pairs of COL-EGFP mice and transgenic mice developing autochthonous intestinal adenomas. Second, transplantable tumors developing in chimeric mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells from COL-EGFP mice very rarely showed stromal fibroblasts expressing EGFP. Finally, cancer cells injected under full-thickness COL-EGFP skin grafts transplanted in nonreporter mice developed into tumors containing green stromal cells. Using multicolor in vivo confocal microscopy, we found that Col-I-expressing fibroblasts constituted approximately one-third of the stromal mass and formed a continuous sheet wrapping the tumor vessels. In summary, tumors form their fibroblastic stroma predominantly from precursors present in the local tumor microenvironment, whereas the contribution of bone marrow-derived circulating precursors is rare. PMID:27317748

  15. Fibroblast migration on fibronectin requires three distinct functional domains.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard A F; An, Jian-Qiang; Greiling, Doris; Khan, Azim; Schwarzbauer, Jean E

    2003-10-01

    Mesenchymal cell movement is normally constrained; however, fibronectin can provide a pathway for stromal cell migration during embryogenesis, morphogenesis, and wound healing. Cells can adhere to fibronectin via integrin and nonintegrin receptors, which bind multiple unique peptide sequences. Synthetic peptides and recombinant proteins were used to delineate the functional domains needed for human fibroblast migration over fibronectin. The 9th and 10th fibronectin type III repeats, which contain RGD and PHSRN synergy cell attachment sequences, support almost maximal fibroblast attachment, but not migration of primary dermal fibroblasts. Specific sequences within the heparin domain and the IIICS region are also required for migration. These findings predict and additional data confirm the necessity for the cooperation of multiple integrin and nonintegrin receptors for fibroblast migration on fibronectin. Such stringency of migration most likely imposes an immense constraint on normal mesenchymal cell mobility in unperturbed tissue. Loss of such restraint may be critical for the migration cancer cells through the extracellular matrix. PMID:14632184

  16. Marginal reticular cells: a stromal subset directly descended from the lymphoid tissue organizer

    PubMed Central

    Katakai, Tomoya

    2012-01-01

    The architecture of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) is supported by several non-hematopoietic stromal cells. Currently it is established that two distinct stromal subsets, follicular dendritic cells and fibroblastic reticular cells, play crucial roles in the formation of tissue compartments within SLOs, i.e., the follicle and T zone, respectively. Although stromal cells in the anlagen are essential for SLO development, the relationship between these primordial cells and the subsets in adulthood remains poorly understood. In addition, the roles of stromal cells in the entry of antigens into the compartments through some tissue structures peculiar to SLOs remain unclear. A recently identified stromal subset, marginal reticular cells (MRCs), covers the margin of SLOs that are primarily located in the outer edge of follicles and construct a unique reticulum. MRCs are closely associated with specialized endothelial or epithelial structures for antigen transport. The similarities in marker expression profiles and successive localization during development suggest that MRCs directly descend from organizer stromal cells in the anlagen. Therefore, MRCs are thought to be a crucial stromal component for the organization and function of SLOs. PMID:22807928

  17. Insidious Changes in Stromal Matrix Fuel Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Fayth L.

    2014-01-01

    Reciprocal interactions between tumor and stromal cells propel cancer progression and metastasis. An understanding of the complex contributions of the tumor stroma to cancer progression necessitates a careful examination of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is largely synthesized and modulated by Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs). This structurally supportive meshwork serves as a signaling scaffold for a myriad of biological processes and responses favoring tumor progression. The ECM is a repository for growth factors and cytokines that promote tumor growth, proliferation, and metastasis through diverse interactions with soluble and insoluble ECM components. Growth factors activated by proteases are involved in the initiation of cell signaling pathways essential to invasion and survival. Various transmembrane proteins produced by the cancer stroma bind the collagen and fibronectin-rich matrix to induce proliferation, adhesion and migration of cancer cells, as well as protease activation. Integrins are critical liaisons between tumor cells and the surrounding stroma, and with their mechano-sensing ability induce cell signaling pathways associated with contractility and migration. Proteoglycans also bind and interact with various matrix proteins in the tumor microenvironment to promote cancer progression. Together, these components function to mediate crosstalk between tumor cells and fibroblasts ultimately to promote tumor survival and metastasis. These stromal factors, which may be expressed differentially according to cancer stage, have prognostic utility and potential. In this review, we examine changes in the ECM of cancer associated fibroblasts induced through carcinogenesis, and the implications of these changes on cancer progression. PMID:24452359

  18. Stromal cells differentially regulate neutrophil and lymphocyte recruitment through the endothelium

    PubMed Central

    McGettrick, Helen M; Buckley, Christopher D; Filer, Andrew; Ed Rainger, G; Nash, Gerard B

    2010-01-01

    Stromal fibroblasts modify the initial recruitment of leucocytes by endothelial cells (EC), but their effects on subsequent transendothelial migration remain unclear. Here, EC and dermal or synovial fibroblasts were cultured on opposite surfaces of 3-μm pore filters and incorporated in static or flow-based migration assays. Fibroblasts had little effect on tumour necrosis factor-α-induced transendothelial migration of neutrophils, but tended to increase the efficiency of migration away from the endothelium. Surprisingly, similar close contact between EC and fibroblasts strongly reduced lymphocyte migration in static assays, and nearly abolished stable lymphocyte adhesion from flow. Fibroblasts did not alter endothelial surface expression of adhesion molecules or messenger RNA for chemokines. Inhibition of attachment did not occur when EC-fibroblast contact was restricted by using 0·4-μm pore filters, but under these conditions pre-treatment with heparinase partially inhibited adhesion. In the 3-μm pore co-cultures, inhibition of metalloproteinase activity partially recovered lymphocyte adhesion, but addition of CXCL12 (SDF-1α) to the endothelial surface did not. Hence, the ability of EC to present activating chemokines for lymphocytes may have been enzymatically inhibited by direct contact with fibroblasts. To avoid contact, we cultured EC and fibroblasts on separate 3-μm pore filters one above the other. Here, fibroblasts promoted the transendothelial migration of lymphocytes. Fibroblasts generate CXCL12, but blockade of CXCL12 receptor had no effect on lymphocyte migration. While stromal cells can provide signal(s) promoting leucocyte migration away from the sub-endothelial space, direct cell contact (which might occur in damaged tissue) may cause disruption of chemokine signalling, specifically inhibiting lymphocyte rather than neutrophil recruitment. PMID:20518822

  19. Epigenetic Classification of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Danilo Candido; Ferreira, Marcelo R P; Franzen, Julia; Weidner, Carola I; Frobel, Joana; Zenke, Martin; Costa, Ivan G; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    Standardization of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is hampered by the lack of a precise definition for these cell preparations; for example, there are no molecular markers to discern MSCs and fibroblasts. In this study, we followed the hypothesis that specific DNA methylation (DNAm) patterns can assist classification of MSCs. We utilized 190 DNAm profiles to address the impact of tissue of origin, donor age, replicative senescence, and serum supplements on the epigenetic makeup. Based on this, we elaborated a simple epigenetic signature based on two CpG sites to classify MSCs and fibroblasts, referred to as the Epi-MSC-Score. Another two-CpG signature can distinguish between MSCs from bone marrow and adipose tissue, referred to as the Epi-Tissue-Score. These assays were validated by site-specific pyrosequencing analysis in 34 primary cell preparations. Furthermore, even individual subclones of MSCs were correctly classified by our epigenetic signatures. In summary, we propose an alternative concept to use DNAm patterns for molecular definition of cell preparations, and our epigenetic scores facilitate robust and cost-effective quality control of MSC cultures. PMID:26862701

  20. Epigenetic Classification of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Danilo Candido; Ferreira, Marcelo R.P.; Franzen, Julia; Weidner, Carola I.; Frobel, Joana; Zenke, Martin; Costa, Ivan G.; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Summary Standardization of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is hampered by the lack of a precise definition for these cell preparations; for example, there are no molecular markers to discern MSCs and fibroblasts. In this study, we followed the hypothesis that specific DNA methylation (DNAm) patterns can assist classification of MSCs. We utilized 190 DNAm profiles to address the impact of tissue of origin, donor age, replicative senescence, and serum supplements on the epigenetic makeup. Based on this, we elaborated a simple epigenetic signature based on two CpG sites to classify MSCs and fibroblasts, referred to as the Epi-MSC-Score. Another two-CpG signature can distinguish between MSCs from bone marrow and adipose tissue, referred to as the Epi-Tissue-Score. These assays were validated by site-specific pyrosequencing analysis in 34 primary cell preparations. Furthermore, even individual subclones of MSCs were correctly classified by our epigenetic signatures. In summary, we propose an alternative concept to use DNAm patterns for molecular definition of cell preparations, and our epigenetic scores facilitate robust and cost-effective quality control of MSC cultures. PMID:26862701

  1. PTCH1+/− Dermal Fibroblasts Isolated from Healthy Skin of Gorlin Syndrome Patients Exhibit Features of Carcinoma Associated Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Thomas; Ripoche, Hugues; Brellier, Florence; Chevallier-Lagente, Odile; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Magnaldo, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Gorlin's or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) causes predisposition to basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the commonest cancer in adult human. Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PTCH1 are responsible for this autosomal dominant syndrome. In NBCCS patients, as in the general population, ultraviolet exposure is a major risk factor for BCC development. However these patients also develop BCCs in sun-protected areas of the skin, suggesting the existence of other mechanisms for BCC predisposition in NBCCS patients. As increasing evidence supports the idea that the stroma influences carcinoma development, we hypothesized that NBCCS fibroblasts could facilitate BCC occurence of the patients. WT (n = 3) and NBCCS fibroblasts bearing either nonsense (n = 3) or missense (n = 3) PTCH1 mutations were cultured in dermal equivalents made of a collagen matrix and their transcriptomes were compared by whole genome microarray analyses. Strikingly, NBCCS fibroblasts over-expressed mRNAs encoding pro-tumoral factors such as Matrix Metalloproteinases 1 and 3 and tenascin C. They also over-expressed mRNA of pro-proliferative diffusible factors such as fibroblast growth factor 7 and the stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha, known for its expression in carcinoma associated fibroblasts. These data indicate that the PTCH1+/− genotype of healthy NBCCS fibroblasts results in phenotypic traits highly reminiscent of those of BCC associated fibroblasts, a clue to the yet mysterious proneness to non photo-exposed BCCs in NBCCS patients. PMID:19287498

  2. Stromal interactions as regulators of tumor growth and therapeutic response: A potential target for photodynamic therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Celli, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    It has become increasingly widely recognized that the stroma plays several vital roles in tumor growth and development and that tumor-stroma interactions can in many cases account poor therapeutic response. Inspired by an emerging body of literature, we consider the potential role of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for targeting interactions with stromal fibroblasts and mechano-sensitive signaling with the extracellular matrix as a means to drive tumors toward a more therapeutically responsive state and synergize with other treatments. This concept is particularly relevant for cancer of the pancreas, which is characterized by tumors with a profoundly dense, rigid fibrous stroma. Here we introduce new in vitro systems to model interactions between pancreatic tumors and their mechanical microenvironment and restore signaling with stromal fibroblasts. Using one such model as a test bed it is shown here that PDT treatment is able to destroy fibroblasts in an in vitro 3D pancreatic tumor-fibroblast co-culture. These results and the literature suggest the further development of PDT as a potential modality for stromal depletion. PMID:23457416

  3. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Intercellular Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kalabis, Jiri; Rustgi, Anil K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Huff, Janice L.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Its development is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. An association with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. It is also seen as a secondary malignancy in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely curable. The stromal microenvironment plays an essential role in the maintenance and modulation of normal epithelial cell growth and differentiation and cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibroblasts (Okawa et al., Genes & Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how radiation treatment of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. Chemotactic and haptotactic migration of epithelial cells stimulated by conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts was measured using assays conducted in Transwell cell culture chambers. Our results using

  4. Multicomponent Coculture System of Cancer Cells and Two Types of Stromal Cells for In Vitro Evaluation of Anticancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Hironori; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Kobayashi, Hisayuki

    2016-01-01

    In vitro evaluation of anticancer drugs using cancer cells has long been performed for the development of novel drugs and the selection of effective drugs for different patients. Recent studies have suggested that tumor stromal cells affect the drug sensitivity of cancer cells; however, most conventional culture systems for drug evaluation lack stromal cells. In this study, we fabricated a multicomponent coculture system that takes account of cancer-stroma interactions for drug evaluation. In this system, small-cell and nonsmall-cell lung cancer cells embedded in collagen gel were cocultured with two types of stromal cells, including stromal fibroblasts and proinflammatory cytokine-secreting monocytes, thus recreating the in vivo cancer microenvironment. Cancer drug sensitivity was significantly altered by the presence of stromal cells. Fibroblasts induced resistance of cancer cells to anticancer drugs. Monocytes induced the upregulation of thymidine phosphorylase in cancer cells, promoting the conversion of an anticancer prodrug to a cytotoxic drug, and consequently enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to the anticancer prodrug. These results clearly show the importance of incorporating stromal cells into culture systems for drug evaluation. Our system will help to improve the accuracy of in vitro drug evaluation and provide useful information for the in vitro recreation of cancer microenvironments. PMID:26421875

  5. CollagenVI-Cre mice: A new tool to target stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Prados, Alejandro; Kollias, George; Koliaraki, Vasiliki

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are non-hematopoietic cells involved in the regulation of adaptive immune responses. Three major stromal populations have been identified in adult SLOs: fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and marginal reticular cells (MRCs). The properties of these individual populations are not clearly defined, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic tools, especially for MRCs. Here, we analyzed stromal cell targeting in SLOs from a transgenic mouse strain that expresses Cre recombinase under the CollagenVI promoter, using lineage tracing approaches. We show that these mice target specifically MRCs and FDCs, but not FRCs in Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles in the intestine. In contrast, stromal cells in lymph nodes and the spleen do not express the transgene, which renders ColVI-cre mice ideal for the specific targeting of stromal cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). This funding further supports the hypothesis of organ-specific stromal precursors in SLOs. Interestingly, in all tissues analyzed, there was also high specificity for perivascular cells, which have been proposed to act as FDC precursors. Taken together, ColVI-Cre mice are a useful new tool for the dissection of MRC- and FDC-specific functions and plasticity in the GALT. PMID:27604178

  6. CollagenVI-Cre mice: A new tool to target stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Alejandro; Kollias, George; Koliaraki, Vasiliki

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are non-hematopoietic cells involved in the regulation of adaptive immune responses. Three major stromal populations have been identified in adult SLOs: fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and marginal reticular cells (MRCs). The properties of these individual populations are not clearly defined, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic tools, especially for MRCs. Here, we analyzed stromal cell targeting in SLOs from a transgenic mouse strain that expresses Cre recombinase under the CollagenVI promoter, using lineage tracing approaches. We show that these mice target specifically MRCs and FDCs, but not FRCs in Peyer’s patches and isolated lymphoid follicles in the intestine. In contrast, stromal cells in lymph nodes and the spleen do not express the transgene, which renders ColVI-cre mice ideal for the specific targeting of stromal cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). This funding further supports the hypothesis of organ-specific stromal precursors in SLOs. Interestingly, in all tissues analyzed, there was also high specificity for perivascular cells, which have been proposed to act as FDC precursors. Taken together, ColVI-Cre mice are a useful new tool for the dissection of MRC- and FDC-specific functions and plasticity in the GALT. PMID:27604178

  7. Perspective of Targeting Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linli; Yang, Kun; Andl, Thomas; Wickett, R Randall; Zhang, Yuhang

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is known as an exceptionally aggressive and treatment-resistant human cancer. Although a great deal of progress has been made in the past decade, including the development of immunotherapy using immune checkpoint inhibitors and targeted therapy using BRAF, MEK or KIT inhibitors, treatment for unresectable stage III, stage IV, and recurrent melanoma is still challenging with limited response rate, severe side effects and poor prognosis, highlighting an urgent need for discovering and designing more effective approaches to conquer melanoma. Melanoma is not only driven by malignant melanocytes, but also by the altered communication between neoplastic cells and non-malignant cell populations, including fibroblasts, endothelial and inflammatory cells, in the tumor stroma. Infiltrated and surrounding fibroblasts, also known as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), exhibit both phenotypical and physiological differences compared to normal dermal fibroblasts. They acquire properties of myofibroblasts, remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM) and architecture of the diseased tissue and secrete chemical factors, which all together promote the transformation process by encouraging tumor growth, angiogenesis, inflammation and metastasis and contribute to drug resistance. A number of in vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that stromal fibroblasts promote melanoma cell proliferation and they have been targeted to suppress tumor growth effectively. Evidently, a combination therapy co-targeting tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts may provide promising strategies to improve therapeutic outcomes and overcome treatment resistance. A significant benefit of targeting CAFs is that the approach aims to create a tumor-resistant environment that inhibits growth of melanomas carrying different genetic mutations. However, the origin of CAFs and precise mechanisms by which CAFs contribute to melanoma progression and drug resistance remain poorly understood. In this review, we

  8. Perspective of Targeting Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linli; Yang, Kun; Andl, Thomas; Wickett, R. Randall; Zhang, Yuhang

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is known as an exceptionally aggressive and treatment-resistant human cancer. Although a great deal of progress has been made in the past decade, including the development of immunotherapy using immune checkpoint inhibitors and targeted therapy using BRAF, MEK or KIT inhibitors, treatment for unresectable stage III, stage IV, and recurrent melanoma is still challenging with limited response rate, severe side effects and poor prognosis, highlighting an urgent need for discovering and designing more effective approaches to conquer melanoma. Melanoma is not only driven by malignant melanocytes, but also by the altered communication between neoplastic cells and non-malignant cell populations, including fibroblasts, endothelial and inflammatory cells, in the tumor stroma. Infiltrated and surrounding fibroblasts, also known as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), exhibit both phenotypical and physiological differences compared to normal dermal fibroblasts. They acquire properties of myofibroblasts, remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM) and architecture of the diseased tissue and secrete chemical factors, which all together promote the transformation process by encouraging tumor growth, angiogenesis, inflammation and metastasis and contribute to drug resistance. A number of in vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that stromal fibroblasts promote melanoma cell proliferation and they have been targeted to suppress tumor growth effectively. Evidently, a combination therapy co-targeting tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts may provide promising strategies to improve therapeutic outcomes and overcome treatment resistance. A significant benefit of targeting CAFs is that the approach aims to create a tumor-resistant environment that inhibits growth of melanomas carrying different genetic mutations. However, the origin of CAFs and precise mechanisms by which CAFs contribute to melanoma progression and drug resistance remain poorly understood. In this review, we

  9. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Heikki; Hohenberger, Peter; Corless, Christopher L

    2013-09-14

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms that arise in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. They can occur at any age, the median age being 60-65 years, and typically cause bleeding, anaemia, and pain. GISTs have variable malignant potential, ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. Most tumours stain positively for the mast/stem cell growth factor receptor KIT and anoctamin 1 and harbour a kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or PDGFRA. Tumours without such mutations could have alterations in genes of the succinate dehydrogenase complex or in BRAF, or rarely RAS family genes. About 60% of patients are cured by surgery. Adjuvant treatment with imatinib is recommended for patients with a substantial risk of recurrence, if the tumour has an imatinib-sensitive mutation. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors substantially improve survival in advanced disease, but secondary drug resistance is common. PMID:23623056

  10. Cancer exosomes trigger fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Webber, Jason; Steadman, Robert; Mason, Malcolm D; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Clayton, Aled

    2010-12-01

    There is a growing interest in the cell-cell communication roles in cancer mediated by secreted vesicles termed exosomes. In this study, we examined whether exosomes produced by cancer cells could transmit information to normal stromal fibroblasts and trigger a cellular response. We found that some cancer-derived exosomes could trigger elevated α-smooth muscle actin expression and other changes consistent with the process of fibroblast differentiation into myofibroblasts. We show that TGF-β is expressed at the exosome surface in association with the transmembrane proteoglycan betaglycan. Although existing in a latent state, this complex was fully functional in eliciting SMAD-dependent signaling. Inhibiting either signaling or betaglycan expression attenuated differentiation. While the kinetics and overall magnitude of the response were similar to that achieved with soluble TGF-β, we identified important qualitative differences unique to the exosomal route of TGF-β delivery, as exemplified by a significant elevation in fibroblast FGF2 production. This hitherto unknown trigger for instigating cellular differentiation in a distinctive manner has major implications for mechanisms underlying cancer-recruited stroma, fibrotic diseases, and wound-healing responses. PMID:21098712

  11. Fibroblast activation protein predicts prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    López, José I; Errarte, Peio; Erramuzpe, Asier; Guarch, Rosa; Cortés, Jesús M; Angulo, Javier C; Pulido, Rafael; Irazusta, Jon; Llarena, Roberto; Larrinaga, Gorka

    2016-08-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is a complex disease with only partial response to therapy and scarce reliable clinical parameters indicative of progression and survival. Fibroblast activation protein expression has been correlated with prognosis in several malignancies but never in renal cancer. We aim to analyze the immunohistochemical expression of fibroblast activation protein in 208 clear cell renal cell carcinomas and to evaluate its impact on the prognosis and survival. A positive cytoplasmic immunostaining of this protein in the stromal fibroblasts associated to cancer cells is associated with large tumor diameter (≥4cm), high-grade (G3/4) tumors, and high-stage (≥pT3) tumors. Fibroblast activation protein-positive cases had significantly shorter survivals after 5 (P=.00015), 10 (P=.0000042), and 15 (P=.000043) years of follow-up, with a hazard ratio of 0.31. Multivariate analysis showed that fibroblast activation protein (P=.00117) was stronger than grade and stage in predicting clinical aggressiveness in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. This study confirms the usefulness of fibroblast activation protein detection in the stromal fibroblast associated to cancer in clear cell renal cell carcinoma and adds a new immunohistochemical marker to predict clinical behavior in these patients. PMID:27063470

  12. Distinct function of estrogen receptor α in smooth muscle and fibroblast cells in prostate development.

    PubMed

    Vitkus, Spencer; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Hsu, Iawen; Yu, Jiangzhou; Chen, Ming; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen signaling, through estrogen receptor (ER)α, has been shown to cause hypertrophy in the prostate. Our recent report has shown that epithelial ERα knockout (KO) will not affect the normal prostate development or homeostasis. However, it remains unclear whether ERα in different types of stromal cells has distinct roles in prostate development. This study proposed to elucidate how KO of ERα in the stromal smooth muscle or fibroblast cells may interrupt cross talk between prostate stromal and epithelial cells. Smooth muscle ERαKO (smERαKO) mice showed decreased glandular infolding with the proximal area exhibiting a significant decrease. Fibroblast ERαKO mouse prostates did not exhibit this phenotype but showed a decrease in the number of ductal tips. Additionally, the amount of collagen observed in the basement membrane was reduced in smERαKO prostates. Interestingly, these phenotypes were found to be mutually exclusive among smERαKO or fibroblast ERαKO mice. Compound KO of ERα in both fibroblast and smooth muscle showed combined phenotypes from each of the single KO. Further mechanistic studies showed that IGF-I and epidermal growth factor were down-regulated in prostate smooth muscle PS-1 cells lacking ERα. Together, our results indicate the distinct functions of fibroblast vs. smERα in prostate development. PMID:23204329

  13. Characteristic Gene Expression Profiles of Human Fibroblasts and Breast Cancer Cells in a Newly Developed Bilateral Coculture System

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Takayuki; Utsumi, Jun; Toi, Masakazu; Shimizu, Kazuharu

    2015-01-01

    The microenvironment of cancer cells has been implicated in cancer development and progression. Cancer-associated fibroblast constitutes a major stromal component of the microenvironment. To analyze interaction between cancer cells and fibroblasts, we have developed a new bilateral coculture system using a two-sided microporous collagen membrane. Human normal skin fibroblasts were cocultured with three different human breast cancer cell lines: MCF-7, SK-BR-3, and HCC1937. After coculture, mRNA was extracted separately from cancer cells and fibroblasts and applied to transcriptomic analysis with microarray. Top 500 commonly up- or downregulated genes were characterized by enrichment functional analysis using MetaCore Functional Analysis. Most of the genes upregulated in cancer cells were downregulated in fibroblasts while most of the genes downregulated in cancer cells were upregulated in fibroblasts, indicating that changing patterns of mRNA expression were reciprocal between cancer cells and fibroblasts. In coculture, breast cancer cells commonly increased genes related to mitotic response and TCA pathway while fibroblasts increased genes related to carbohydrate metabolism including glycolysis, glycogenesis, and glucose transport, indicating that fibroblasts support cancer cell proliferation by supplying energy sources. We propose that the bilateral coculture system using collagen membrane is useful to study interactions between cancer cells and stromal cells by mimicking in vivo tumor microenvironment. PMID:26171396

  14. Characterization of the in vitro stromal microenvironment of human bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Strobel, E S; Gay, R E; Greenberg, P L

    1986-09-01

    Utilizing long-term in vitro culture techniques, we characterized the cellular composition and functional attributes of the human in vitro bone marrow stromal microenvironment. Morphologic, specific cytochemical and immunologic methods demonstrated that the marrow stromal adherent layer (AL) reached confluency at two to three weeks, and was comprised of 60%-70% fibroblastic cells, 10%-20% endothelial cells, 10%-20% monocyte/macrophages and 5%-10% fat-laden adherent cells. These proportions of cell types persisted for at least three months concomitant with proliferation of CFU-gm and BFU-e. In contrast, umbilical cord blood cells did not form a stromal AL despite persistence of hemopoietic progenitor cell proliferation. These findings provide a basis for improved understanding of cellular interactions regulating hemopoiesis. PMID:3534110

  15. Response of hemopoietic, progenitor, and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells to administration of ketanserin during pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Skurikhin, E G; Pershina, O V; Stepanova, I E; Khmelevskaya, E S; Ermakova, N N; Reztsova, A M; Krupin, V A; Reikhart, D V; Goldberg, V E

    2014-11-01

    We studied the effect of ketanserin on hemopoietic progenitor cells (Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)CD34- and Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)CD34(+)), progenitor hemopoietic cells (Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+)), and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (CD45(-)CD73(+)CD106(+)) in C57Bl/6 mice during pulmonary fibrosis. It was shown that the blocker of 5-HT2A receptors lowers the activity of bleomycin-induced inflammation in the lungs and prevents the infiltration of alveolar interstitium and alveolar ducts by hemopoietic stem and hemopoietic progenitor cells; in this case, they are more numerous in the bone marrow of sick animals. Ketanserin reduces the capacity for self-renewal of lung multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the fibrotic phase of the disease and inhibits their differentiation into stromal cell lines (adipocytes, chondrocytes, and fibroblasts) simultaneously with the decrease in the percentage of connective tissue in the lung parenchyma. PMID:25403389

  16. Very late antigen-5 facilitates stromal progenitor cell differentiation into myofibroblast.

    PubMed

    Sen, Namita; Weingarten, Mark; Peter, Yakov

    2014-11-01

    Fibrotic disease is associated with abrogated stromal cell proliferation and activity. The precise identity of the cells that drive fibrosis remains obscure, in part because of a lack of information on their lineage development. To investigate the role of an early stromal progenitor cell (SPC) on the fibrotic process, we selected for, and monitored the stages of, fibroblast development from a previously reported free-floating anchorage-independent cell (AIC) progenitor population. Our findings demonstrate that organotypic pulmonary, cardiac, and renal fibroblast commitment follows a two-step process of attachment and remodeling in culture. Cell differentiation was confirmed by the inability of SPCs to revert to the free-floating state and functional mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) differentiation into osteoblast, adipocyte, chondrocyte, and fibroblastic lineages. The myofibroblastic phenotype was reflected by actin stress-fiber formation, α-smooth muscle production, and a greater than threefold increase in proliferative activity compared with that of the progenitors. SPC-derived pulmonary myofibroblasts demonstrated a more than 300-fold increase in fibronectin-1 (Fn1), collagen, type 1, α1, integrin α-5 (Itga5), and integrin β-1 (Itgb1) transcript levels. Very late antigen-5 (ITGA5/ITGB1) protein cluster formations were also prevalent on the differentiated cells. Normalized SPC-derived myofibroblast expression patterns reflected those of primary cultured lung myofibroblasts. Intratracheal implantation of pulmonary AICs into recipient mouse lungs resulted in donor cell FN1 production and evidence of epithelial derivation. SPC derivation into stromal tissue in vitro and in vivo and the observation that MSC and fibroblast lineages share a common ancestor could potentially lead to personalized antifibrotic therapies. PMID:25273539

  17. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo. PMID:26924503

  18. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo. PMID:26924503

  19. Understanding tumor-stroma interplays for targeted therapies by armed mesenchymal stromal progenitors: the Mesenkillers

    PubMed Central

    Grisendi, Giulia; Bussolari, Rita; Veronesi, Elena; Piccinno, Serena; Burns, Jorge S; De Santis, Giorgio; Loschi, Pietro; Pignatti, Marco; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Ballarin, Roberto; Di Gregorio, Carmela; Guarneri, Valentina; Piccinini, Lino; Horwitz, Edwin M; Paolucci, Paolo; Conte, PierFranco; Dominici, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A tumor represents a complex structure containing malignant cells strictly coupled with a large variety of surrounding cells constituting the tumor stroma (TS). In recent years, the importance of TS for cancer initiation, development, local invasion and metastases has become increasingly clear allowing the identification of TS as one of the possible ways to indirectly target tumors. Inside the heterogeneous stromal cell population, tumor associated fibroblasts (TAF) play a crucial role providing both functional and supportive environments. During both tumor and stroma development, several findings suggest that TAF could be recruited from different sources such as locally derived host fibroblasts, via epithelial/endothelial mesenchymal transitions or from circulating pools of fibroblasts deriving form mesenchymal progenitors, namely mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC). These insights prompted scientists to identify multimodal approaches to target TS by biomolecules, monoclonal antibodies, and more recently via cell based strategies. These latter strategies appear extremely promising, although still associated with debated and unclear findings. This review discusses crosstalk between cancers and their stroma, dissecting specific tumor types, such as sarcoma, pancreatic and breast carcinoma, where stroma plays distinct paradigmatic roles. The recognition of these distinct stromal functions may help in planning effective and safer approaches aimed either to eradicate or to substitute TS by novel compounds and/or MSC having specific killing activities. PMID:22016827

  20. Genetics Home Reference: gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in the gastrointestinal tract and patches of dark skin on various areas of the body. Some ... Cancer Society: Treating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Cancer.Net: Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor--Diagnosis Genetic Testing Registry: Gastrointestinal ...

  1. The Disintegrin-like and Cysteine-rich domains of ADAM-9 Mediate Interactions between Melanoma Cells and Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Zigrino, Paola; Nischt, Roswitha; Mauch, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    A characteristic of malignant cells is their capacity to invade their surrounding and to metastasize to distant organs. During these processes, proteolytic activities of tumor and stromal cells modify the extracellular matrix to produce a microenvironment suitable for their growth and migration. In recent years the family of ADAM proteases has been ascribed important roles in these processes. ADAM-9 is expressed in human melanoma at the tumor-stroma border where direct or indirect interactions between tumor cells and fibroblasts occur. To analyze the role of ADAM-9 for the interaction between melanoma cells and stromal fibroblasts, we produced the recombinant disintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domain of ADAM-9 (DC-9). Melanoma cells and human fibroblasts adhered to immobilized DC-9 in a Mn2+-dependent fashion suggesting an integrin-mediated process. Inhibition studies showed that adhesion of fibroblasts was mediated by several β1 integrin receptors independent of the RGD and ECD recognition motif. Furthermore, interaction of fibroblasts and high invasive melanoma cells with soluble recombinant DC-9 resulted in enhanced expression of MMP-1 and MMP-2. Silencing of ADAM-9 in melanoma cells significantly reduced cell adhesion to fibroblasts. Ablation of ADAM-9 in fibroblasts almost completely abolished these cellular interactions and melanoma cell invasion in vitro. In summary, these results suggest that ADAM-9 expression plays an important role in mediating cell-cell contacts between fibroblasts and melanoma cells and that these interactions contribute to proteolytic activities required during invasion of melanoma cells. PMID:21135106

  2. Irradiated fibroblasts promote epithelial–mesenchymal transition and HDGF expression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Ci-Hang; Wang, Xin-Tong; Ma, Wei; Wang, Na-Na; Nesa, Effat un; Wang, Jian-Bo; Wang, Cong; Jia, Yi-Bin; Wang, Kai; Tian, Hui; Cheng, Yu-Feng

    2015-03-06

    Recent evidence suggested that nonirradiated cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) promoted aggressive phenotypes of cancer cells through epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is a radiosensitive gene of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). This study aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated fibroblasts on EMT and HDGF expression of ESCC. Our study demonstrated that coculture with nonirradiated fibroblasts significantly increased the invasive ability of ESCC cells and the increased invasiveness was further accelerated when they were cocultured with irradiated fibroblasts. Scattering of ESCC cells was also accelerated by the supernatant from irradiated fibroblasts. Exposure of ESCC cells to supernatant from irradiated fibroblasts resulted in decreased E-cadherin, increased vimentin in vitro and β-catenin was demonstrated to localize to the nucleus in tumor cells with irradiated fibroblasts in vivo models. The expression of HDGF and β-catenin were increased in both fibroblasts and ESCC cells of irradiated group in vitro and in vivo models. Interestingly, the tumor cells adjoining the stromal fibroblasts displayed strong nuclear HDGF immunoreactivity, which suggested the occurrence of a paracrine effect of fibroblasts on HDGF expression. These data suggested that irradiated fibroblasts promoted invasion, growth, EMT and HDGF expression of ESCC. - Highlights: • Irradiated CAFs accelerated invasiveness and scattering of ESCC cell lines. • Irradiated CAFs promoted EMT of ESCC cells. • Irradiated fibroblasts induced nuclear β-catenin relocalization in ESCC cells. • Irradiated fibroblasts increased HDGF expression in vitro and in vivo.

  3. TSPAN12 is a critical factor for cancer-fibroblast cell contact-mediated cancer invasion.

    PubMed

    Otomo, Ryo; Otsubo, Chihiro; Matsushima-Hibiya, Yuko; Miyazaki, Makoto; Tashiro, Fumio; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Kohno, Takashi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Yokota, Jun; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Taya, Yoichi; Enari, Masato

    2014-12-30

    Communication between cancer cells and their microenvironment controls cancer progression. Although the tumor suppressor p53 functions in a cell-autonomous manner, it has also recently been shown to function in a non-cell-autonomous fashion. Although functional defects have been reported in p53 in stromal cells surrounding cancer, including mutations in the p53 gene and decreased p53 expression, the role of p53 in stromal cells during cancer progression remains unclear. We herein show that the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), was increased by the ablation of p53 in lung fibroblasts. CAFs enhanced the invasion and proliferation of lung cancer cells when cocultured with p53-depleted fibroblasts and required contact between cancer and stromal cells. A comprehensive analysis using a DNA chip revealed that tetraspanin 12 (TSPAN12), which belongs to the tetraspanin protein family, was derepressed by p53 knockdown. TSPAN12 knockdown in p53-depleted fibroblasts inhibited cancer cell proliferation and invasion elicited by coculturing with p53-depleted fibroblasts in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. It also decreased CXC chemokine ligand 6 (CXCL6) secretion through the β-catenin signaling pathway, suggesting that cancer cell contact with TSPAN12 in fibroblasts transduced β-catenin signaling into fibroblasts, leading to the secretion of CXCL6 to efficiently promote invasion. These results suggest that stroma-derived p53 plays a pivotal role in epithelial cancer progression and that TSPAN12 and CXCL6 are potential targets for lung cancer therapy. PMID:25512506

  4. CDCP1 Identifies a CD146 Negative Subset of Marrow Fibroblasts Involved with Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Mineo; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Wayner, Elizabeth A.; Carter, William G.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro expanded bone marrow stromal cells contain at least two populations of fibroblasts, a CD146/MCAM positive population, previously reported to be critical for establishing the stem cell niche and a CD146-negative population that expresses CUB domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1)/CD318. Immunohistochemistry of marrow biopsies shows that clusters of CDCP1+ cells are present in discrete areas distinct from areas of fibroblasts expressing CD146. Using a stromal cell line, HS5, which approximates primary CDCP1+ stromal cells, we show that binding of an activating antibody against CDCP1 results in tyrosine-phosphorylation of CDCP1, paralleled by phosphorylation of Src Family Kinases (SFKs) Protein Kinase C delta (PKC-δ). When CDCP1 expression is knocked-down by siRNA, the expression and secretion of myelopoietic cytokines is increased. These data suggest CDCP1 expression can be used to identify a subset of marrow fibroblasts functionally distinct from CD146+ fibroblasts. Furthermore the CDCP1 protein may contribute to the defining function of these cells by regulating cytokine expression. PMID:25275584

  5. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Grugan, Katharine; Rustgi, Anil; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide and is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. A connection with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Esophageal carcinomas are also seen as secondary malignancies in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely responsive to treatment. In normal epithelium, the stromal microenvironment is essential for the maintenance and modulation of cell growth and differentiation. Cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibrob-lasts (Okawa et al., Genes Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how irradiation of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. These assays were conducted in modified Boyden chambers using conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts. Our results using low LET gamma radiation showed a dose-dependent increase in migration of epithelial

  6. Lung Extracellular Matrix and Fibroblast Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a tissue-specific macromolecular structure that provides physical support to tissues and is essential for normal organ function. In the lung, ECM plays an active role in shaping cell behavior both in health and disease by virtue of the contextual clues it imparts to cells. Qualities including dimensionality, molecular composition, and intrinsic stiffness all promote normal function of the lung ECM. Alterations in composition and/or modulation of stiffness of the focally injured or diseased lung ECM microenvironment plays a part in reparative processes performed by fibroblasts. Under conditions of remodeling or in disease states, inhomogeneous stiffening (or softening) of the pathologic ECM may both precede modifications in cell behavior and be a result of disease progression. The ability of ECM to stimulate further ECM production by fibroblasts and drive disease progression has potentially significant implications for mesenchymal stromal cell–based therapies; in the setting of pathologic ECM stiffness or composition, the therapeutic intent of progenitor cells may be subverted. Taken together, current data suggest that lung ECM actively contributes to health and disease; thus, mediators of cell–ECM signaling or factors that influence ECM stiffness may represent viable therapeutic targets in many lung disorders. PMID:25830832

  7. Characterizing natural hydrogel for reconstruction of three-dimensional lymphoid stromal network to model T-cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiwon; Wu, Biming; Niedzielski, Steven M; Hill, Matthew T; Coleman, Rhima M; Ono, Akira; Shikanov, Ariella

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogels have been used in regenerative medicine because they provide a three-dimensional environment similar to soft tissues, allow diffusion of nutrients, present critical biological signals, and degrade via endogenous enzymatic mechanisms. Herein, we developed in vitro system mimicking cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs). Existing in vitro culture systems cannot accurately represent the complex interactions happening between T-cells and stromal cells in immune response. To model T-cell interaction in SLOs in vitro, we encapsulated stromal cells in fibrin, collagen, or fibrin-collagen hydrogels and studied how different mechanical and biological properties affect stromal network formation. Overall, fibrin supplemented with aprotinin was superior to collagen and fibrin-collagen in terms of network formation and promotion of T-cell penetration. After 8 days of culture, stromal networks formed through branching and joining with other adjacent cell populations. T-cells added to the newly formed stromal networks migrated and attached to stromal cells, similar to the T-cell zones of the lymph nodes in vivo. Our results suggest that the constructed three-dimensional lymphoid stromal network can mimic the in vivo environment and allow the modeling of T-cell interaction in SLOs. PMID:25649205

  8. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Neonatal Tracheal Aspirates Demonstrate a Pattern of Lung-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bozyk, Paul D.; Popova, Antonia P.; Bentley, John Kelley; Goldsmith, Adam M.; Linn, Marisa J.; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously isolated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the tracheal aspirates of premature neonates with respiratory distress. Although isolation of MSCs correlates with the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, the physiologic role of these cells remains unclear. To address this, we further characterized the cells, focusing on the issues of gene expression, origin, and cytokine expression. Microarray comparison of early passage neonatal lung MSC gene expression to cord blood MSCs and human fetal and neonatal lung fibroblast lines demonstrated that the neonatal lung MSCs differentially expressed 971 gene probes compared with cord blood MSCs, including the transcription factors Tbx2, Tbx3, Wnt5a, FoxF1, and Gli2, each of which has been associated with lung development. Compared with lung fibroblasts, 710 gene probe transcripts were differentially expressed by the lung MSCs, including IL-6 and IL-8/CXCL8. Differential chemokine expression was confirmed by protein analysis. Further, neonatal lung MSCs exhibited a pattern of Hox gene expression distinct from cord blood MSCs but similar to human fetal lung fibroblasts, consistent with a lung origin. On the other hand, limiting dilution analysis showed that fetal lung fibroblasts form colonies at a significantly lower rate than MSCs, and fibroblasts failed to undergo differentiation along adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. In conclusion, MSCs isolated from neonatal tracheal aspirates demonstrate a pattern of lung-specific gene expression, are distinct from lung fibroblasts, and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:21341990

  9. Lipopolysaccharide activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway of fibroblasts from uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Zheng, Lihua; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Yang, Weihong; Qu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mingmin; Cheng, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are the most common benign tumor of the female reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to explore the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on stromal fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of UF. Here, TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway was more activated in UF, and UF cells (UFC) and UF derived fibroblasts (TAF) than in smooth muscle tissues, smooth muscle cell (SMC) and myometrial fibroblasts (fib) respectively. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, the activity of fib was enhanced, characterized by the increased expression of fibroblast activation protein (FAP), and increased secretion of collagen I and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, TLR4 inhibitor (VIPER) and siTLR4 can represses LPS-activated fibroblasts and TLR4/NF-κB signaling transduction pathways in fib and UFC cells. Co-cultured with LPS-activated fibroblast enhanced fibroblast activation and TLR4/NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, LPS treatment activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on fibroblasts, which may involve in the development of UF. Our study indicated reproductive tract infection may be associated with fibroid pathogenesis through TLR4/NF-κB signaling. Targeting NF-κB with inhibitors may hold promises of treating uterine fibroid. PMID:26617709

  10. Lipopolysaccharide activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway of fibroblasts from uterine fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Zheng, Lihua; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Yang, Weihong; Qu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mingmin; Cheng, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are the most common benign tumor of the female reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to explore the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on stromal fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of UF. Here, TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway was more activated in UF, and UF cells (UFC) and UF derived fibroblasts (TAF) than in smooth muscle tissues, smooth muscle cell (SMC) and myometrial fibroblasts (fib) respectively. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, the activity of fib was enhanced, characterized by the increased expression of fibroblast activation protein (FAP), and increased secretion of collagen I and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, TLR4 inhibitor (VIPER) and siTLR4 can represses LPS-activated fibroblasts and TLR4/NF-κB signaling transduction pathways in fib and UFC cells. Co-cultured with LPS-activated fibroblast enhanced fibroblast activation and TLR4/NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, LPS treatment activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on fibroblasts, which may involve in the development of UF. Our study indicated reproductive tract infection may be associated with fibroid pathogenesis through TLR4/NF-κB signaling. Targeting NF-κB with inhibitors may hold promises of treating uterine fibroid. PMID:26617709

  11. Shaping of the tumor microenvironment: Stromal cells and vessels.

    PubMed

    Blonska, Marzenna; Agarwal, Nitin K; Vega, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    Lymphomas develop and progress in a specialized tissue microenvironment such as bone marrow as well as secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph node and spleen. The lymphoma microenvironment is characterized by a heterogeneous population of stromal cells, including fibroblastic reticular cells, nurse-like cells, mesenchymal stem cells, follicular dendritic cells, and inflammatory cells such as macrophages, T- and B-cells. These cell populations interact with the lymphoma cells to promote lymphoma growth, survival and drug resistance through multiple mechanisms. Angiogenesis is also recognized as an important factor associated with lymphoma progression. In recent years, we have learned that the interaction between the malignant and non-malignant cells is bidirectional and resembles, at least in part, the pattern seen between non-neoplastic lymphoid cells and the normal microenvironment of lymphoid organs. A summary of the current knowledge of lymphoma microenvironment focusing on the cellular components will be reviewed here. PMID:25794825

  12. Melanoma educates mesenchymal stromal cells towards vasculogenic mimicry

    PubMed Central

    VARTANIAN, AMALIA; KARSHIEVA, SAIDA; DOMBROVSKY, VLADISLAV; BELYAVSKY, ALEXANDER

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor, and promote tumor development and growth. The present study was performed to investigate the communication between aggressive melanoma and MSCs in vasculogenic mimicry (VM). Normal human MSCs plated on Matrigel were unable to form capillary-like structures (CLSs). By contrast, MSCs co-cultured with aggressive melanoma cell lines, namely, Mel Cher, Mel Kor and Mel P, generated CLSs. Significantly, MSCs co-cultured with poorly aggressive melanoma cells, namely, Mel Me, failed to form CLSs. To identify factors responsible for VM, the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), pro-epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and stromal cell-derived factor 1α on the formation of CLSs by MSCs were tested. VM was induced by the addition of VEGFA, whereas other cytokines were inefficient. To confirm the hypothesis that aggressive tumor cells can increase the vasculogenic ability of MSCs, a standard B16/F10 mouse melanoma test system was used. MSCs isolated from the adipose tissues of C57BL/6 mice with melanoma formed a vascular-like network on Matrigel, whereas MSCs from healthy mice failed to form such structures. This study provides the first direct evidence that melanoma tumors educate MSCs to engage in VM. The education may occur distantly. These findings offer promise for novel therapeutic directions in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:27313776

  13. Anchored and soluble gangliosides contribute to myelosupportivity of stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ziulkoski, Ana L.; Santos, Aline X.S. dos; Andrade, Claudia M.B.; Trindade, Vera M.T.; Daniotti, Jose Luis; Borojevic, Radovan; Guma, Fatima C.R.

    2009-10-09

    Stroma-mediated myelopoiesis depends upon growth factors and an appropriate intercellular microenvironment. Previous studies have demonstrated that gangliosides, produced by hepatic stromal cell types, are required for optimal myelosupportive function. Here, we compared the mielossuportive functions of a bone marrow stroma (S17) and skin fibroblasts (SF) regarding their ganglioside pattern of synthesis and shedding. The survival and proliferation of a myeloid precursor cell (FDC-P1) were used as reporter. Although the ganglioside synthesis of the two stromal cells was similar, their relative content and shedding were distinct. The ganglioside requirement for mielossuportive function was confirmed by the decreased proliferation of FDC-P1 cells in ganglioside synthesis-inhibited cultures and in presence of an antibody to GM3 ganglioside. The distinct mielossuportive activities of the S17 and SF stromata may be related to differences on plasma membrane ganglioside concentrations or to differences on the gangliosides shed and their subsequent uptake by myeloid cells, specially, GM3 ganglioside.

  14. Differentiation of tumour-promoting stromal myofibroblasts by cancer exosomes.

    PubMed

    Webber, J P; Spary, L K; Sanders, A J; Chowdhury, R; Jiang, W G; Steadman, R; Wymant, J; Jones, A T; Kynaston, H; Mason, M D; Tabi, Z; Clayton, A

    2015-01-15

    Activation of myofibroblast rich stroma is a rate-limiting step essential for cancer progression. The responsible factors are not fully understood, but TGFβ1 is probably critical. A proportion of TGFβ1 is associated with extracellular nano-vesicles termed exosomes, secreted by carcinoma cells, and the relative importance of soluble and vesicular TGFβ in stromal activation is presented. Prostate cancer exosomes triggered TGFβ1-dependent fibroblast differentiation, to a distinctive myofibroblast phenotype resembling stromal cells isolated from cancerous prostate tissue; supporting angiogenesis in vitro and accelerating tumour growth in vivo. Myofibroblasts generated using soluble TGFβ1 were not pro-angiogenic or tumour-promoting. Cleaving heparan sulphate side chains from the exosome surface had no impact on TGFβ levels yet attenuated SMAD-dependent signalling and myofibroblastic differentiation. Eliminating exosomes from the cancer cell secretome, targeting Rab27a, abolished differentiation and lead to failure in stroma-assisted tumour growth in vivo. Exosomal TGFβ1 is therefore required for the formation of tumour-promoting stroma. PMID:24441045

  15. Rapid Selection of Mesenchymal Stem and Progenitor Cells in Primary Prostate Stromal Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Brennen, W. Nathaniel; Kisteman, L. Nelleke; Isaacs, John T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a dominant component of the tumor microenvironment with pro-tumorigenic properties. Despite this knowledge, their physiologic origins remain poorly understood. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be recruited from the bone marrow to areas of tissue damage and inflammation, including prostate cancer. MSCs can generate and have many overlapping properties with CAFs in preclinical models. METHODS Multiparameter flow cytometry and multipotent differentiation assays used to define MSCs in primary prostate stromal cultures derived from young (>25 yrs) organ donors and prostate cancer patients compared with bone marrow-derived stromal cultures. Population doubling times, population doublings, cell size, and differentiation potential determined under multiple culture conditions, including normoxia, hypoxia, and a variety of media. TGF-β measured by ELISA. RESULTS MSCs and stromal progenitors are not only present in normal and malignant prostate tissue, but are quickly selected for in primary stromal cultures derived from these tissues; becoming the dominant population within just a few passages. Growth potential inversely associated with TGF-β concentrations. All conditions generated populations with an average cell diameter >15 μm. All cultures tested had the ability to undergo osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation, but unlike bone marrow-derived MSCs, primary stromal cultures derived from normal prostate tissue lack adipogenic differentiation potential. In contrast, a subset of stromal cultures derived from prostate cancer patients retain the ability to differentiate into adipocytes; a property that is significantly suppressed under hypoxic conditions in both bone marrow- and prostate-derived MSCs. CONCLUSIONS Primary prostate stromal cultures are highly enriched in cells with an MSC or stromal progenitor phenotype. The use of primary cultures such as these to study CAFs raises interesting implications when

  16. Stromal β-catenin overexpression contributes to the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Felix J; Sarin, Sanjay; Dabas, Pari; Karolak, Michele; Oxburgh, Leif; Bridgewater, Darren

    2016-06-01

    Renal dysplasia, the leading cause of renal failure in children, is characterized by disrupted branching of the collecting ducts and primitive tubules, with an expansion of the stroma, yet a role for the renal stroma in the genesis of renal dysplasia is not known. Here, we demonstrate that expression of β-catenin, a key transcriptional co-activator in renal development, is markedly increased in the expanded stroma in human dysplastic tissue. To understand its contribution to the genesis of renal dysplasia, we generated a mouse model that overexpresses β-catenin specifically in stromal progenitors, termed β-cat(GOF-S) . Histopathological analysis of β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed a marked expansion of fibroblast cells surrounding primitive ducts and tubules, similar to defects observed in human dysplastic kidneys. Characterization of the renal stroma in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed altered stromal cell differentiation in the expanded renal stroma demonstrating that this is not renal stroma but instead a population of stroma-like cells. These cells overexpress ectopic Wnt4 and Bmp4, factors necessary for endothelial cell migration and blood vessel formation. Characterization of the renal vasculature demonstrated disrupted endothelial cell migration, organization, and vascular morphogenesis in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice. Analysis of human dysplastic tissue demonstrated a remarkably similar phenotype to that observed in our mouse model, including altered stromal cell differentiation, ectopic Wnt4 expression in the stroma-like cells, and disrupted endothelial cell migration and vessel formation. Our findings demonstrate that the overexpression of β-catenin in stromal cells is sufficient to cause renal dysplasia. Further, the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia is one of disrupted stromal differentiation and vascular morphogenesis. Taken together, this study demonstrates for the first time the contribution of stromal β-catenin overexpression to the genesis of renal

  17. Dupuytren's Contracture: Fibroblast Contraction?

    PubMed Central

    Gabbiani, Giulio; Majno, Guido

    1972-01-01

    In 6 cases of Dupuytren's disease and 1 of Ledderhose's disease, the nodules of the palmar and plantar aponeurosis were examined by light and electron microscopy. The cells composing these nodules, presumably fibroblasts, showed three significant ultrastructural features: (1) a fibrillar system similar to that of smooth muscle cells; (2) nuclear deformations such as are found in contracted cells, the severest being recognizable by light microscopy (cross-banded nuclei); (3) cell-to-cell and cell-to-stroma attachments. Based on these data and on recent information about the biology of the fibroblasts, it is suggested that these cells are fibroblasts that have modulated into contractile cells (myofibroblasts), and that their contraction plays a role in the pathogenesis of the contracture observed clinically. ImagesFig 10Fig 5Fig 11Fig 6 and 7Fig 8Fig 1Fig 2Fig 9Fig 3Fig 4 PMID:5009249

  18. What Are the Key Statistics about Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for gastrointestinal stromal tumors? What are the key statistics about gastrointestinal stromal tumors? Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) ... They are slightly more common in men. Survival statistics for GIST are discussed in “ Survival rates for ...

  19. What's New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for gastrointestinal stromal tumor What’s new in gastrointestinal stromal tumor research and treatment? There ... GIST) Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Research? Other Resources ...

  20. Pancreatic cancer-secreted miR-155 implicates in the conversion from normal fibroblasts to cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wenjing; Su, Jiaojiao; Wang, Yalei; Feng, Hui; Dai, Xin; Yuan, Yaozong; Chen, Xi; Yao, Weiyan

    2015-10-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are a major constituent of the pancreatic cancer microenvironment and that the meaning is as intended. Pancreatic cancer cells can induce normal fibroblasts to convert into CAF and, reciprocally, CAF promote tumor invasions and proliferations. The mechanism of the conversion from normal fibroblasts (NF) to CAF remains unclear. MicroRNA are short non-coding RNA involved in the post-transcription gene regulation, which have been defined as an imperative controller in tumor invasions, proliferations and colony formations. Microvesicles (MV) have been proved to be an important mediator of intercellular communication and can selectively transport secreted microRNA from a donor cell into a recipient cell. In this study, we isolated primary pancreatic fibroblasts from wild type C57 mice and co-cultured them with pancreatic cancer cell lines, BxPC-3 and SW1990, and observed the conversion from NF to CAF, or at least CAF-like cells. This phenomenon could also be replicated in primary fibroblasts treated with MV separated from a cancer cell media. We identified that miR-155 was upregulated in PaC-derived MV and we confirmed that normal fibroblasts could convert into CAF after MV containing miR-155 had been taken up. TP53INP1 is a target of miR-155 in fibroblasts and a downregulation of TP53INP1 protein levels could contribute to the fibroblasts' activation. These results indicated that pancreatic cancer cells might reprogram normal adjacent fibroblasts into CAF by means of secreted MV containing miR-155. Targeting the circulating microRNA might be a potential therapy for malignant tumors. PMID:26195069

  1. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Virk, Renu K; Khan, Ashraf

    2010-07-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign, proliferative mesenchymal lesion with possible hormonal etiology. It typically affects women in the reproductive age group. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia is frequently an incidental histologic finding in breast biopsies performed for other benign or malignant lesions. Rarely, it can present as a firm, painless breast mass, which has been referred to as nodular or tumorous PASH. Grossly, tumorous PASH is a well-circumscribed, firm, rubbery mass with solid, homogenous, gray-white cut surface. On histologic examination, it is characterized by the presence of open slitlike spaces in dense collagenous stroma. The spaces are lined by a discontinuous layer of flat, spindle-shaped myofibroblasts with bland nuclei. The spindle cells express progesterone receptors and are positive for vimentin, actin, and CD34. The most important differential diagnosis on histopathology is angiosarcoma. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia discovered incidentally does not require any additional specific treatment. Tumorous PASH is treated by local surgical excision with clear margins and the prognosis is excellent, with minimal risk of recurrence after adequate surgical excision. PMID:20586640

  2. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa; Nagai, Mami; Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi; Roeder, Robert G.; Asano, Shigetaka; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  3. GPR30 Promotes Prostate Stromal Cell Activation via Suppression of ERα Expression and Its Downstream Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jia, Bona; Gao, Yu; Li, Mingming; Shi, Jiandang; Peng, Yanfei; Du, Xiaoling; Klocker, Helmut; Sampson, Natalie; Shen, Yongmei; Liu, Mengyang; Zhang, Ju

    2016-08-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a vital role in malignant transformation and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and accumulating evidence suggests an enhancing effect of estrogens on PCa. The present study aimed to investigate the possible origin of prostate CAFs and the effects of estrogen receptors, G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) and estrogen receptor (ER)-α, on stromal cell activation. High expression of fibroblast activation protein (FAP), CD44, and nonmuscle myosin heavy chain B (SMemb) accompanied by low expression of smooth muscle differentiation markers was found in the stromal cells of PCa tissues and in cultured human prostate CAFs. Additionally, SMemb expression, which is coupled to cell phenotype switching and proliferation, was coexpressed with FAP, a marker of activated stromal cells, and with the stem cell marker CD44 in the stromal cells of PCa tissue. Prostate CAFs showed high GPR30 and low ERα expression. Moreover, GPR30 was coexpressed with FAP, CD44, and SMemb. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that the overexpression of GPR30 or the knockdown of ERα in prostate stromal cells induced the up-regulation of FAP, CD44, Smemb, and the down-regulation of smooth muscle markers. The conditioned medium from these cells promoted the proliferation and migration of LNCaP and PC3 PCa cells. GPR30 knockdown or ERα overexpression showed opposite effects. Finally, we present a novel mechanism whereby GPR30 limits ERα expression via inhibition of the cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway. These results suggest that stem-like cells within the stroma are a possible source of prostate CAFs and that the negative regulation of ERα expression by GPR30 is centrally involved in prostate stromal cell activation. PMID:27163843

  4. Proteomic identification of prognostic tumour biomarkers, using chemotherapy-induced cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Smith, Duncan L.; Győrffy, Balázs; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells grow in highly complex stromal microenvironments, which through metabolic remodelling, catabolism, autophagy and inflammation nurture them and are able to facilitate metastasis and resistance to therapy. However, these changes in the metabolic profile of stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts and their impact on cancer initiation, progression and metastasis are not well-known. This is the first study to provide a comprehensive proteomic portrait of the azathioprine and taxol-induced catabolic state on human stromal fibroblasts, which comprises changes in the expression of metabolic enzymes, myofibroblastic differentiation markers, antioxidants, proteins involved in autophagy, senescence, vesicle trafficking and protein degradation, and inducers of inflammation. Interestingly, many of these features are major contributors to the aging process. A catabolic stroma signature, generated with proteins found differentially up-regulated in taxol-treated fibroblasts, strikingly correlates with recurrence, metastasis and poor patient survival in several solid malignancies. We therefore suggest the inhibition of the catabolic state in healthy cells as a novel approach to improve current chemotherapy efficacies and possibly avoid future carcinogenic processes. PMID:26539730

  5. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) with a thousand faces: atypical manifestations and causes of misdiagnosis on imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, S W; Kim, H C; Yang, D M; Won, K Y

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) can lead to emergency situations, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, intestinal obstruction, and tumoural rupture with haemoperitoneum or peritonitis. In addition, if a GIST grows exophytically to a large size, it is often misdiagnosed as a tumour arising from adjacent organs. Sometimes, the atypical appearance of GISTs on imaging causes diagnostic confusion. In this article, we illustrate a variety of GISTs with atypical presentations and also discuss the important diagnostic clues for differentiating GISTs from other lesions. PMID:26646370

  6. Genetic Deletion of the Stromal Cell Marker CD248 (Endosialin) Protects against the Development of Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stuart William; Croft, Adam Paul; Morris, Hannah Louise; Naylor, Amy Jane; Huso, David Leonard; Isacke, Clare Marie; Savage, Caroline Olivia Susan; Buckley, Christopher Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Background Tissue fibrosis and microvascular rarefaction are hallmarks of progressive renal disease. CD248 is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed by key effector cells within the stroma of fibrotic kidneys including pericytes, myofibroblasts and stromal fibroblasts. In human disease, increased expression of CD248 by stromal cells predicts progression to end-stage renal failure. We therefore, hypothesized that the genetic deletion of the CD248 gene would protect against fibrosis following kidney injury. Methods Using the unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model of renal fibrosis, we investigated the effect of genetic deletion of CD248 on post obstructive kidney fibrosis. Results CD248 null mice were protected from fibrosis and microvascular rarefaction following UUO. Although the precise mechanism is not known, this may to be due to a stabilizing effect of pericytes with less migration and differentiation of pericytes toward a myofibroblast phenotype in CD248-/- mice. CD248-/- fibroblasts also proliferated less and deposited less collagen in vitro. Conclusion These studies suggest that CD248 stromal cells have a pathogenic role in renal fibrosis and that targeting CD248 is effective at inhibiting both microvascular rarefaction and renal fibrosis through modulation of pericyte and stromal cell function. PMID:26633297

  7. Stromal Activation by Tumor Cells: An in Vitro Study in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Merlino, Giuseppe; Miodini, Patrizia; Paolini, Biagio; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Gennaro, Massimiliano; Dugo, Matteo; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Cappelletti, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Background: The tumor microenvironment participates in the regulation of tumor progression and influences treatment sensitivity. In breast cancer, it also may play a role in determining the fate of non-invasive lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a non-obligate precursor of invasive diseases, which is aggressively treated despite its indolent nature in many patients since no biomarkers are available to predict the progression of DCIS to invasive disease. In vitro models of stromal activation by breast tumor cells might provide clues as to specific stromal genes crucial for the transition from DCIS to invasive disease. Methods: normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) were treated under serum-free conditions with cell culture media conditioned by breast cancer cell lines (SkBr3, MDA-MB-468, T47D) for 72 h and subjected to gene expression profiling with Illumina platform. Results: TGM2, coding for a tissue transglutaminase, was identified as candidate gene for stromal activation. In public transcriptomic datasets of invasive breast tumors TGM2 expression proved to provide prognostic information. Conversely, its role as an early biosensor of tumor invasiveness needs to be further investigated by in situ analyses. Conclusion: Stromal TGM2 might probably be associated with precancerous evolution at earlier stages compared to DCIS. PMID:27600076

  8. A molecular classification of human mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Rohart, Florian; Mason, Elizabeth A.; Matigian, Nicholas; Mosbergen, Rowland; Korn, Othmar; Chen, Tyrone; Butcher, Suzanne; Patel, Jatin; Atkinson, Kerry; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Fisk, Nicholas M.; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are widely used for the study of mesenchymal tissue repair, and increasingly adopted for cell therapy, despite the lack of consensus on the identity of these cells. In part this is due to the lack of specificity of MSC markers. Distinguishing MSC from other stromal cells such as fibroblasts is particularly difficult using standard analysis of surface proteins, and there is an urgent need for improved classification approaches. Transcriptome profiling is commonly used to describe and compare different cell types; however, efforts to identify specific markers of rare cellular subsets may be confounded by the small sample sizes of most studies. Consequently, it is difficult to derive reproducible, and therefore useful markers. We addressed the question of MSC classification with a large integrative analysis of many public MSC datasets. We derived a sparse classifier (The Rohart MSC test) that accurately distinguished MSC from non-MSC samples with >97% accuracy on an internal training set of 635 samples from 41 studies derived on 10 different microarray platforms. The classifier was validated on an external test set of 1,291 samples from 65 studies derived on 15 different platforms, with >95% accuracy. The genes that contribute to the MSC classifier formed a protein-interaction network that included known MSC markers. Further evidence of the relevance of this new MSC panel came from the high number of Mendelian disorders associated with mutations in more than 65% of the network. These result in mesenchymal defects, particularly impacting on skeletal growth and function. The Rohart MSC test is a simple in silico test that accurately discriminates MSC from fibroblasts, other adult stem/progenitor cell types or differentiated stromal cells. It has been implemented in the www.stemformatics.org resource, to assist researchers wishing to benchmark their own MSC datasets or data from the public domain. The code is available from the CRAN

  9. A molecular classification of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Rohart, Florian; Mason, Elizabeth A; Matigian, Nicholas; Mosbergen, Rowland; Korn, Othmar; Chen, Tyrone; Butcher, Suzanne; Patel, Jatin; Atkinson, Kerry; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Fisk, Nicholas M; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh; Wells, Christine A

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are widely used for the study of mesenchymal tissue repair, and increasingly adopted for cell therapy, despite the lack of consensus on the identity of these cells. In part this is due to the lack of specificity of MSC markers. Distinguishing MSC from other stromal cells such as fibroblasts is particularly difficult using standard analysis of surface proteins, and there is an urgent need for improved classification approaches. Transcriptome profiling is commonly used to describe and compare different cell types; however, efforts to identify specific markers of rare cellular subsets may be confounded by the small sample sizes of most studies. Consequently, it is difficult to derive reproducible, and therefore useful markers. We addressed the question of MSC classification with a large integrative analysis of many public MSC datasets. We derived a sparse classifier (The Rohart MSC test) that accurately distinguished MSC from non-MSC samples with >97% accuracy on an internal training set of 635 samples from 41 studies derived on 10 different microarray platforms. The classifier was validated on an external test set of 1,291 samples from 65 studies derived on 15 different platforms, with >95% accuracy. The genes that contribute to the MSC classifier formed a protein-interaction network that included known MSC markers. Further evidence of the relevance of this new MSC panel came from the high number of Mendelian disorders associated with mutations in more than 65% of the network. These result in mesenchymal defects, particularly impacting on skeletal growth and function. The Rohart MSC test is a simple in silico test that accurately discriminates MSC from fibroblasts, other adult stem/progenitor cell types or differentiated stromal cells. It has been implemented in the www.stemformatics.org resource, to assist researchers wishing to benchmark their own MSC datasets or data from the public domain. The code is available from the CRAN

  10. Keratinocyte Microvesicles Regulate the Expression of Multiple Genes in Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Bi, Jiarui; Owen, Gethin R; Chen, Weimin; Rokka, Anne; Koivisto, Leeni; Heino, Jyrki; Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles released from cells regulate many normal and pathological conditions. Little is known about the role of epidermal keratinocyte microvesicles (KC-MVs) in epithelial-stromal interaction that is essential for wound healing. We investigated, therefore, whether MV-like structures are present in human wounds and whether they affect wound healing-associated gene expression in dermal fibroblasts. In human wounds, MV-like vesicles were observed during active epithelial migration and early granulation tissue formation. When KC-MVs derived from keratinocyte-like cells (HaCaT) were added to fibroblast cultures, expression of 21 genes was significantly regulated (P<0.05) out of 80 genes investigated, including matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -3, interleukin-6 and -8, and genes associated with transforming growth factor-β signaling. Similar changes were observed at the protein level. MVs from normal epidermal keratinocytes showed similar response to HaCaT cells. KC-MVs activated ERK1/2, JNK, Smad, and p38 signaling pathways in fibroblasts with ERK1/2 signaling having the most prominent role in the MV-induced gene expression changes. KC-MVs stimulated fibroblast migration and induced fibroblast-mediated endothelial tube formation but did not affect collagen gel contraction by fibroblasts. The results demonstrate that keratinocyte microvesicles have a strong and a specific regulatory effect on fibroblasts that may modulate several aspects of wound healing. PMID:26288358

  11. Large mesenteric gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moschos, John; Tzilves, Dimitrios; Paikos, Dimitrios; Tagarakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Antonopoulos, Zissis; Kadis, Savvas; Katsos, Ioannis; Tarpagos, Anestis

    2006-06-01

    We report a case of a 30-year-old man who presented with severe debilitation, anemia and diarrhea over two months. Colonoscopy revealed many (>100) polyps (familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome). Abdominal CT scan showed a large mass at the left upper abdomen in conjunction with the splenic flexure. Total colectomy with mesenteric mass and adjacent small bowel removal and ileoanal pouch was performed. Examination of the resected mesenteric mass showed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) with scarce mitosis and infiltration of the adjacent small bowel. We describe for the first time in medical literature the coexistence of familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome and GIST in a 30-year-old man. PMID:16855925

  12. Identification of a distinct subpopulation of fibroblasts from murine dermis: CD73(-) CD105(+) as potential marker of dermal fibroblasts subset with multipotency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Bum; Shim, Sehwan; Kim, Min-Jung; Shin, Hye-Yun; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Jin, Young-Woo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo

    2016-09-01

    Skin dermis includes various types of multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) and a subpopulation of dermal fibroblasts that exhibit the ability to differentiate. However, characterization of this dermal fibroblast subtype remains less understood. In this study, we isolated dermal cells from the skin of newborn C57/B6 mice and investigated their characteristics. Isolated murine dermal cells exhibited a fibroblast phenotype as judged by accepted criteria including a lack of MSC-related antigens and the differentiation potential of MSCs, and the positive expression of fibroblast markers. A comparative analysis demonstrated that CD73(-) CD105(+) but not CD73(-) CD105(-) dermal fibroblasts exhibited some of the functional properties of MSCs. Furthermore, the multipotent phenotype of CD73(-) CD105(+) cells was diminished by treatment of CD105 siRNA and shRNA, indicating that CD105 expression was critical for the retention of differentiation potential of those cells. Overall, these results suggest that CD73(-) CD105(+) cells are a distinct subset of dermal fibroblasts with multipotency and that their surface antigens could help to classify this subpopulation. These cells may contribute to the regeneration of damaged tissue. PMID:27170595

  13. Cell mates: paracrine and stromal targets for prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sluka, Pavel; Davis, Ian D

    2013-08-01

    After many years of limited treatment options for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), multiple systemic therapies are now available, providing patients with significant improvements in survival, symptom control and bone health. Most of the recent advances in this area have been based on better understanding of mCRPC biology, particularly with respect to the key role of androgen receptor signalling. However, most therapies are targeted towards the malignant epithelial cell component of the cancer and it should not be forgotten that cancer cells exist in close and symbiotic relationships with other components of the tumour. Paracrine and stromal signals are often critical to the growth of the cancer and represent new potential therapeutic targets that are separate from the malignant epithelial cells. The stroma produces numerous growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor family members, platelet-derived growth factors and fibroblast growth factors, which are all critical for tumour growth. Targeting prostate-cancer-associated fibroblasts in order to destroy the physical and functional scaffold of a cancer is also a logical approach. The interaction between prostate cancer and the immune system remains an active topic of basic and clinical research, with cytokines, chemokines and growth factors being potential targets for therapy. The biology of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and of circulating tumour cells might also provide insight into new therapeutic targets. PMID:23857181

  14. Fibroblasts from different sites may promote or inhibit recruitment of flowing lymphocytes by endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    McGettrick, Helen M; Smith, Emily; Filer, Andrew; Kissane, Stephen; Salmon, Michael; Buckley, Christopher D; Rainger, G Ed; Nash, Gerard B

    2009-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that stromal fibroblasts modulate the ability of endothelial cells (EC) to recruit lymphocytes in a site-specific manner. PBL were perfused over HUVEC that had been cultured with fibroblasts isolated from the inflamed synovium or the skin of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis, or from normal synovium, with or without exposure to the inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha+IFN-gamma. Fibroblasts from inflamed synovium, but no others, caused unstimulated HUVEC to bind flowing lymphocytes. This adhesion was supported by alpha(4)beta(1)-VCAM-1 interaction and stabilised by activation of PBL through CXCR4-CXCL12. Antibody neutralisation of IL-6 during co-culture effectively abolished the ability of EC to bind lymphocytes. Cytokine-stimulated EC supported high levels of lymphocyte adhesion, through the presentation of VCAM-1, E-selectin and chemokine(s) acting through CXCR3. Interestingly, co-culture with dermal fibroblasts caused a marked reduction in cytokine-induced adhesion, while synovial fibroblasts had variable effects depending on their source. In the dermal co-cultures, neutralisation of IL-6 or TGF-beta caused partial recovery of cytokine-induced lymphocyte adhesion; this was complete when both were neutralised. Exogenous IL-6 was also found to inhibit response to TNF-alpha+IFN-gamma. Normal stromal fibroblasts appear to regulate the cytokine-sensitivity of vascular endothelium, while fibroblasts associated with chronic inflammation bypass this and develop a directly inflammatory phenotype. Actions of IL-6 might be pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory, depending on the local milieu. PMID:19130557

  15. O-GlcNAcylation Negatively Regulates Cardiomyogenic Fate in Adult Mouse Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Zafir, Ayesha; Bradley, James A; Long, Bethany W; Muthusamy, Senthilkumar; Li, Qianhong; Hill, Bradford G; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Bolli, Roberto; Jones, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    In both preclinical and clinical studies, cell transplantation of several cell types is used to promote repair of damaged organs and tissues. Nevertheless, despite the widespread use of such strategies, there remains little understanding of how the efficacy of cell therapy is regulated. We showed previously that augmentation of a unique, metabolically derived stress signal (i.e., O-GlcNAc) improves survival of cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells; however, it is not known whether enhancing O-GlcNAcylation affects lineage commitment or other aspects of cell competency. In this study, we assessed the role of O-GlcNAc in differentiation of cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells. Exposure of these cells to routine differentiation protocols in culture increased markers of the cardiomyogenic lineage such as Nkx2.5 and connexin 40, and augmented the abundance of transcripts associated with endothelial and fibroblast cell fates. Differentiation significantly decreased the abundance of O-GlcNAcylated proteins. To determine if O-GlcNAc is involved in stromal cell differentiation, O-GlcNAcylation was increased pharmacologically during the differentiation protocol. Although elevated O-GlcNAc levels did not significantly affect fibroblast and endothelial marker expression, acquisition of cardiomyocyte markers was limited. In addition, increasing O-GlcNAcylation further elevated smooth muscle actin expression. In addition to lineage commitment, we also evaluated proliferation and migration, and found that increasing O-GlcNAcylation did not significantly affect either; however, we found that O-GlcNAc transferase--the protein responsible for adding O-GlcNAc to proteins--is at least partially required for maintaining cellular proliferative and migratory capacities. We conclude that O-GlcNAcylation contributes significantly to cardiac mesenchymal stromal cell lineage and function. O-GlcNAcylation and pathological conditions that may affect O-GlcNAc levels (such as diabetes) should be

  16. Bizarre Stromal Cells in an Endometrial Polyp.

    PubMed

    Heller, Debra; Barrett, Theodore

    2016-06-01

    Bizarre stromal cells have been reported in vulvovaginal polyps, as well as in nongynecologic sites, with caution not to mistake them for malignancy. Similar atypical stromal cells have only rarely been reported in the endometrium. We present a case found incidentally in a postmenopausal woman, and review the literature. PMID:26888957

  17. Stromal uptake and transmission of acid is a pathway for venting cancer cell-generated acid.

    PubMed

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Black, Nicholas; Hsia, Lin-Ting; Wilding, Jennifer; Bodmer, Walter F; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-09-01

    Proliferation and invasion of cancer cells require favorable pH, yet potentially toxic quantities of acid are produced metabolically. Membrane-bound transporters extrude acid from cancer cells, but little is known about the mechanisms that handle acid once it is released into the poorly perfused extracellular space. Here, we studied acid handling by myofibroblasts (colon cancer-derived Hs675.T, intestinal InMyoFib, embryonic colon-derived CCD-112-CoN), skin fibroblasts (NHDF-Ad), and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells (HCT116, HT29) grown in monoculture or coculture. Expression of the acid-loading transporter anion exchanger 2 (AE2) (SLC4A2 product) was detected in myofibroblasts and fibroblasts, but not in CRC cells. Compared with CRC cells, Hs675.T and InMyoFib myofibroblasts had very high capacity to absorb extracellular acid. Acid uptake into CCD-112-CoN and NHDF-Ad cells was slower and comparable to levels in CRC cells, but increased alongside SLC4A2 expression under stimulation with transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), a cytokine involved in cancer-stroma interplay. Myofibroblasts and fibroblasts are connected by gap junctions formed by proteins such as connexin-43, which allows the absorbed acid load to be transmitted across the stromal syncytium. To match the stimulatory effect on acid uptake, cell-to-cell coupling in NHDF-Ad and CCD-112-CoN cells was strengthened with TGFβ1. In contrast, acid transmission was absent between CRC cells, even after treatment with TGFβ1. Thus, stromal cells have the necessary molecular apparatus for assembling an acid-venting route that can improve the flow of metabolic acid through tumors. Importantly, the activities of stromal AE2 and connexin-43 do not place an energetic burden on cancer cells, allowing resources to be diverted for other activities. PMID:27543333

  18. Endometrial Stromal Nodule: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Fdili Alaoui, F. Z.; Chaara, H.; Bouguern, H.; Melhouf, M. A.; Fatemi, H.; Belmlih, A.; Amarti, A.

    2011-01-01

    Endometrial stromal nodule (ESN) is the least common of the endometrial stromal tumors. They are rare neoplasms which are diagnosed in most instances by light microscopy. Although such nodules are benign, hysterectomy has been considered the treatment of choice to determine the margins of the tumor required for diagnosis and to differentiate it from invasive stromal sarcoma Whose prognosis is totally different. We report a case of a 45 years old woman, with presurgical diagnosis of adnexal mass or uterine tumor. She underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy. Pathologic examination revealed an endometrial stromal nodule. Through this observation, we insist on the fact that the ESNs are rare and benign entities which must be differentiated from the other invasive malignant stromal tumors; this can change the final prognosis. PMID:21423543

  19. Endometrial stromal nodule: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fdili Alaoui, F Z; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Melhouf, M A; Fatemi, H; Belmlih, A; Amarti, A

    2011-01-01

    Endometrial stromal nodule (ESN) is the least common of the endometrial stromal tumors. They are rare neoplasms which are diagnosed in most instances by light microscopy. Although such nodules are benign, hysterectomy has been considered the treatment of choice to determine the margins of the tumor required for diagnosis and to differentiate it from invasive stromal sarcoma Whose prognosis is totally different. We report a case of a 45 years old woman, with presurgical diagnosis of adnexal mass or uterine tumor. She underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy. Pathologic examination revealed an endometrial stromal nodule. Through this observation, we insist on the fact that the ESNs are rare and benign entities which must be differentiated from the other invasive malignant stromal tumors; this can change the final prognosis. PMID:21423543

  20. Tumour cell-derived Wnt7a recruits and activates fibroblasts to promote tumour aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Avgustinova, Alexandra; Iravani, Marjan; Robertson, David; Fearns, Antony; Gao, Qiong; Klingbeil, Pamela; Hanby, Andrew M.; Speirs, Valerie; Sahai, Erik; Calvo, Fernando; Isacke, Clare M.

    2016-01-01

    Stromal fibroblast recruitment to tumours and activation to a cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) phenotype has been implicated in promoting primary tumour growth and progression to metastatic disease. However, the mechanisms underlying the tumour:fibroblast crosstalk that drive the intertumoural stromal heterogeneity remain poorly understood. Using in vivo models we identify Wnt7a as a key factor secreted exclusively by aggressive breast tumour cells, which induces CAF conversion. Functionally, this results in extracellular matrix remodelling to create a permissive environment for tumour cell invasion and promotion of distant metastasis. Mechanistically, Wnt7a-mediated fibroblast activation is not dependent on classical Wnt signalling. Instead, we demonstrate that Wnt7a potentiates TGFβ receptor signalling both in 3D in vitro and in vivo models, thus highlighting the interaction between two of the key signalling pathways in development and disease. Importantly, in clinical breast cancer cohorts, tumour cell Wnt7a expression correlates with a desmoplastic, poor-prognosis stroma and poor patient outcome. PMID:26777421

  1. Differential expression of epithelial basement membrane components nidogens and perlecan in corneal stromal cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Abirami; Torricelli, Andre A. M.; Wu, Jiahui; Marino, Gustavo K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of corneal epithelial basement membrane (EBM) components in different corneal stromal cell types. In vitro model systems were used to explore the expression of EBM components nidogen-1, nidogen-2, and perlecan that are the primary components in the lamina lucida and the lamina densa that defectively regenerate in corneas with stromal opacity after in −9.0 D photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Methods Primary rabbit corneal stromal cells were cultured using varying serum concentrations and exogenous growth factors, including fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, to optimize the growth of each cell type of interest. The expression of the keratocyte-specific marker keratocan and the myofibroblast-specific marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were analyzed with real-time PCR, western blot, and immunocytochemical staining to evaluate the specificity of the cell types and select optimal conditions (high keratocan and low α-SMA for keratocytes; low keratocan and high α-SMA for myofibroblasts; low keratocan and low α-SMA for corneal fibroblasts). The expression of the EBM components nidogen-1, nidogen-2, and perlecan was evaluated in each corneal cell type using real-time PCR, immunostaining, and western blotting. In agreement with previous studies, serum-free DMEM was found to be optimal for keratocytes, DMEM with 10% serum and 40 ng/ml FGF-2 yielded the best marker profile for corneal fibroblasts, and DMEM with 1% serum and 2 ng/ml TGF-β1 was found to be optimal for myofibroblasts. Results Nidogen-1 and nidogen-2 mRNAs were highly expressed in keratocytes, whereas perlecan was highly expressed in myofibroblasts. In keratocytes, nidogen-2 and perlecan proteins were expressed predominantly in intracellular compartments, whereas in myofibroblasts expression of both EBM components was observed diffusely throughout the cell. Although the perlecan mRNA levels were high

  2. Characterization of a corneal endothelium engineered on a self-assembled stromal substitute.

    PubMed

    Bourget, Jean-Michel; Proulx, Stéphanie

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunctions are the first indication for allogeneic corneal transplantation. Development of a tissue-engineered posterior cornea could be an alternative to the use of native allogeneic tissues. In this paper, we used the self-assembly approach to form a cellularized stromal substitute that served as a carrier for the engineering of an endothelium. This endothelialized stromal substitute was then characterized using alizarin red staining, histology, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, as well as mass spectrometry and immunodetection of collagens and function-related proteins. We report the engineering of a monolayer of flattened endothelial cells with a cell density of 966 ± 242 cells/mm(2) (mean ± SD). Endothelial interdigitations were present between cells. The stromal fibroblasts deposited a dense and cohesive collagenous matrix. Collagen fibrils had a diameter of 39.1 ± 11.3 nm, and a mean center to center interfibrillar space of 50.9 ± 10.9 nm. The stromal substitute was composed of collagen types I, V, VI and XII, as well as lumican and decorin. Type IV collagen was also present underneath the endothelium. The endothelium expressed both the sodium/potassium (Na(+)/K(-)) ATPase and sodium/bicarbonate (Na(+)/ [Formula: see text] ) cotransporter pumps. These results indicate that the self-assembled stromal substitute is able to support the expression of endothelial cell functionality markers and therefore, is a suitable carrier for the engineering of an endothelium that could be used for the treatment of endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:26658713

  3. Integrin alpha 11 regulates IGF2 expression in fibroblasts to enhance tumorigenicity of human non-small-cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chang-Qi; Popova, Svetlana N; Brown, Ewan R S; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Navab, Roya; Shih, Warren; Li, Ming; Lu, Ming; Jurisica, Igor; Penn, Linda Z; Gullberg, Donald; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2007-07-10

    Integrin alpha11 (ITGA11/alpha11) is localized to stromal fibroblasts and commonly overexpressed in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). We hypothesized that stromal alpha11 could be important for the tumorigenicity of NSCLC cells. SV40 immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts established from wild-type (WT) and Itga11-deficient [knockout (KO)] mice were tested for their tumorigenicity in immune-deficient mice when implanted alone or coimplanted with the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. A549 coimplanted with the fibroblasts showed a markedly enhanced tumor growth rate compared with A549, WT, or KO, which alone formed only small tumors. Importantly, the growth was significantly greater for A549+WT compared with A549+KO tumors. Reexpression of human alpha11 cDNA in KO cells rescued a tumor growth rate to that comparable with the A549+WT tumors. These findings were validated in two other NSCLC cell lines, NCI-H460 and NCI-H520. Gene expression profiling indicated that IGF2 mRNA expression level was >200 times lower in A549+KO compared with A549+WT tumors. Stable short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) down-regulation of IGF2 in WT (WT(shIGF2)) fibroblasts resulted in a decreased growth rate of A549+WT(shIGF2), compared with A549+WT tumors. The results indicate that alpha11 is an important stromal factor in NSCLC and propose a paradigm for carcinoma-stromal interaction indirectly through interaction between the matrix collagen and stromal fibroblasts to stimulate cancer cell growth. PMID:17600088

  4. PDGFRβ Is a Novel Marker of Stromal Activation in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rong; Haines, Paul; Gallagher, George; Noonan, Vikki; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Monti, Stefano; Trojanowska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) form the main constituents of tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor growth and invasion. The presence of CAFs is a strong predictor of poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite significant progress in determining the role of CAFs in tumor progression, the mechanisms contributing to their activation remain poorly characterized, in part due to fibroblast heterogeneity and the scarcity of reliable fibroblast surface markers. To search for such markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), we applied a novel approach that uses RNA-sequencing data derived from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Specifically, our strategy allowed for an unbiased identification of genes whose expression was closely associated with a set of bona fide stroma-specific transcripts, namely the interstitial collagens COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL3A1. Among the top hits were genes involved in cellular matrix remodeling and tumor invasion and migration, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ), which was found to be the highest-ranking receptor protein genome-wide. Similar analyses performed on ten additional TCGA cancer datasets revealed that other tumor types shared CAF markers with OSCC, including PDGFRβ, which was found to significantly correlate with the reference collagen expression in ten of the 11 cancer types tested. Subsequent immunostaining of OSCC specimens demonstrated that PDGFRβ was abundantly expressed in stromal fibroblasts of all tested cases (12/12), while it was absent in tumor cells, with greater specificity than other known markers such as alpha smooth muscle actin or podoplanin (3/11). Overall, this study identified PDGFRβ as a novel marker of stromal activation in OSCC, and further characterized a list of promising candidate CAF markers that may be relevant to other carcinomas. Our novel approach provides for a fast and accurate method to identify CAF markers without the need for

  5. PDGFRβ Is a Novel Marker of Stromal Activation in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kartha, Vinay K; Stawski, Lukasz; Han, Rong; Haines, Paul; Gallagher, George; Noonan, Vikki; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Monti, Stefano; Trojanowska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) form the main constituents of tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor growth and invasion. The presence of CAFs is a strong predictor of poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite significant progress in determining the role of CAFs in tumor progression, the mechanisms contributing to their activation remain poorly characterized, in part due to fibroblast heterogeneity and the scarcity of reliable fibroblast surface markers. To search for such markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), we applied a novel approach that uses RNA-sequencing data derived from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Specifically, our strategy allowed for an unbiased identification of genes whose expression was closely associated with a set of bona fide stroma-specific transcripts, namely the interstitial collagens COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL3A1. Among the top hits were genes involved in cellular matrix remodeling and tumor invasion and migration, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ), which was found to be the highest-ranking receptor protein genome-wide. Similar analyses performed on ten additional TCGA cancer datasets revealed that other tumor types shared CAF markers with OSCC, including PDGFRβ, which was found to significantly correlate with the reference collagen expression in ten of the 11 cancer types tested. Subsequent immunostaining of OSCC specimens demonstrated that PDGFRβ was abundantly expressed in stromal fibroblasts of all tested cases (12/12), while it was absent in tumor cells, with greater specificity than other known markers such as alpha smooth muscle actin or podoplanin (3/11). Overall, this study identified PDGFRβ as a novel marker of stromal activation in OSCC, and further characterized a list of promising candidate CAF markers that may be relevant to other carcinomas. Our novel approach provides for a fast and accurate method to identify CAF markers without the need for

  6. The influence of stromal cells on the pigmentation of tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Thomas; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Klar, Agnieszka S; Widmer, Daniel S; Pontiggia, Luca; Weber, Andreas D; Weber, Daniel M; Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2015-03-01

    It has been shown in vitro that melanocyte proliferation and function in palmoplantar skin is regulated by mesenchymal factors derived from fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated in vivo the influence of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in human tissue-engineered skin substitutes reconstructed from palmar- and nonpalmoplantar-derived fibroblasts. Tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal analogs based on collagen type I hydrogels were populated with either human palmar or nonpalmoplantar fibroblasts and seeded with human nonpalmoplantar-derived melanocytes and keratinocytes. These skin substitutes were transplanted onto full-thickness skin wounds of immunoincompetent rats. Four weeks after transplantation the development of skin color was measured and grafts were excised and analyzed with regard to epidermal characteristics, in particular melanocyte number and function. Skin substitutes containing palmar-derived fibroblasts in comparison to nonpalmoplantar-derived fibroblasts showed (a) a significantly lighter pigmentation; (b) a reduced amount of epidermal melanin granules; and (c) a distinct melanosome expression. However, the number of melanocytes in the basal layer remained similar in both transplantation groups. These findings demonstrate that human palmar fibroblasts regulate the function of melanocytes in human pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes after transplantation, whereas the number of melanocytes remains constant. This underscores the influence of site-specific stromal cells and their importance when constructing skin substitutes for clinical application. PMID:25300246

  7. The Influence of Stromal Cells on the Pigmentation of Tissue-Engineered Dermo-Epidermal Skin Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Biedermann, Thomas; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Klar, Agnieszka S.; Widmer, Daniel S.; Pontiggia, Luca; Weber, Andreas D.; Weber, Daniel M.; Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown in vitro that melanocyte proliferation and function in palmoplantar skin is regulated by mesenchymal factors derived from fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated in vivo the influence of mesenchymal–epithelial interactions in human tissue-engineered skin substitutes reconstructed from palmar- and nonpalmoplantar-derived fibroblasts. Tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal analogs based on collagen type I hydrogels were populated with either human palmar or nonpalmoplantar fibroblasts and seeded with human nonpalmoplantar-derived melanocytes and keratinocytes. These skin substitutes were transplanted onto full-thickness skin wounds of immunoincompetent rats. Four weeks after transplantation the development of skin color was measured and grafts were excised and analyzed with regard to epidermal characteristics, in particular melanocyte number and function. Skin substitutes containing palmar-derived fibroblasts in comparison to nonpalmoplantar-derived fibroblasts showed (a) a significantly lighter pigmentation; (b) a reduced amount of epidermal melanin granules; and (c) a distinct melanosome expression. However, the number of melanocytes in the basal layer remained similar in both transplantation groups. These findings demonstrate that human palmar fibroblasts regulate the function of melanocytes in human pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes after transplantation, whereas the number of melanocytes remains constant. This underscores the influence of site-specific stromal cells and their importance when constructing skin substitutes for clinical application. PMID:25300246

  8. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sashidharan, Palankezhe; Matele, Apoorva; Matele, Usha; Al Felahi, Nowfel; Kassem, Khalid F.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the identification of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, its molecular and immunohiostochemical basis, and its management have been a watershed in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. This paradigm shift occurred over the last two decades and gastrointestinal stromal tumors have now come to be understood as rare gastrointestinal tract tumors with predictable behavior and outcome, replacing the older terminologies like leiomyoma, schwannoma or leiomyosarcoma. This report presents a case of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor operated recently in a 47-year-old female patient and the outcome, as well as literature review of the pathological identification, sites of origin, and factors predicting its behavior, prognosis and treatment. PMID:24715944

  9. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (gist) of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfar, Shahriyar; Sial, Khadim S; Quraishy, M S

    2007-06-01

    This is a report of a rare gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the duodenum in a 75 years old man who presented with recurrent episodes of intestinal obstruction and melena. The patient underwent successful Whipple's procedure. PMID:17623589

  10. Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of cancer-associated fibroblast within the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Genichiro; Ochiai, Atsushi; Neri, Shinya

    2016-04-01

    Cancer microenvironment is created not only by malignant epithelial cells, but also by several kinds of stromal cells. Since Paget proposed the "seed and soil" hypothesis, the biological importance of the cancer microenvironment has come to be widely accepted. The main compartment of host stromal cells are fibroblasts (Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts; CAFs), which are the main source of the collagen-producing cells. CAFs directly communicate with the cancer cells and other types of stromal cells to acquire a specific biological phenotype. CAFs play important roles in several aspects of the tumor progression process and the chemotherapeutic process. However, CAFs have heterogeneous origins, phenotypes, and functions under these conditions. A crucial challenge is to understand how much of this heterogeneity serves different biological responses to cancer cells. In this review, we highlight the issue of how diverse and heterogeneous functions given by CAFs can exert potent influences on tumor progression and therapeutic response. Furthermore, we also discuss the current advances in the development of novel therapeutic strategies against CAFs. PMID:26278673

  11. Zfp423 Promotes Adipogenic Differentiation of Bovine Stromal Vascular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Das, Arun Kr; Yang, Qi-Yuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Du, Min

    2012-01-01

    Intramuscular fat or marbling is critical for the palatability of beef. In mice, very recent studies show that adipocytes and fibroblasts share a common pool of progenitor cells, with Zinc finger protein 423 (Zfp423) as a key initiator of adipogenic differentiation. To evaluate the role of Zfp423 in intramuscular adipogenesis and marbling in beef cattle, we sampled beef muscle for separation of stromal vascular cells. These cells were immortalized with pCI neo-hEST2 and individual clones were selected by G418. A total of 288 clones (3×96 well plates) were isolated and induced to adipogenesis. The presence of adipocytes was assessed by Oil-Red-O staining. Three clones with high and low adipogenic potential respectively were selected for further analyses. In addition, fibro/adipogenic progenitor cells were selected using a surface marker, platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) α. The expression of Zfp423 was much higher (307.4±61.9%, P<0.05) in high adipogenic cells, while transforming growth factor (TGF)-β was higher (156.1±48.7%, P<0.05) in low adipogenic cells. Following adipogenic differentiation, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) were much higher (239.4±84.1% and 310.7±138.4%, respectively, P<0.05) in high adipogenic cells. Over-expression of Zfp423 in stromal vascular cells and cloned low adipogenic cells dramatically increased their adipogenic differentiation, accompanied with the inhibition of TGF-β expression. Zfp423 knockdown by shRNA in high adipogenic cells largely prevented their adipogenic differentiation. The differential regulation of Zfp423 and TGF-β between low and high adipogenic cells is associated with the DNA methylation in their promoters. In conclusion, data show that Zfp423 is a critical regulator of adipogenesis in stromal vascular cells of bovine muscle, and Zfp423 may provide a molecular target for enhancing intramuscular adipogenesis

  12. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Masannat, Yazan A; Whitehead, Stephen; Hawley, Ian; Apthorp, Lesley; Shah, Elizabeth F

    2010-01-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a rare benign proliferating breast condition. It was first reported in 1986 when Vuitch, Rosen, and Erlandson described nine cases of benign well-circumscribed, breast masses that simulated vascular lesions consisting of mammary stromal proliferations (Vuitch et al. (1986)). Since then there have been few reported cases of PASH in the literature (Taira et al. (2005)). We describe a large PASH, mimicking inflammatory carcinoma in a young lady that was excised with excellent cosmetic results. PMID:21318179

  13. Doxazosin treatment alters stromal cell behavior and increases elastic system fibers deposition in rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Delella, Flávia Karina; Felisbino, Sérgio Luis

    2010-10-01

    Doxazosin (DOX), an α-adrenoceptor antagonist, induces the relaxation of smooth muscle cell tonus and reduces the clinical symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, the effects of DOX in the prostate stromal microenvironment are not fully known. In a previous study, we showed that DOX treatment for 30 days increased deposition of collagen fibers in the three rat prostatic lobes. Herein, we investigated the effects of DOX on stromal cell ultrastructure and elastic fiber deposition. Adult Wistar rats were treated with DOX (25 mg/kg/day); and the ventral, dorsal, and anterior prostates were excised at 30 days of treatment. The prostatic lobes were submitted to histochemical and stereological-morphometric analyze and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Histochemical staining plus stereological analysis of the elastic fiber system showed that DOX-treated prostatic lobes presented more elaunin and elastic fibers than controls, mainly in the ventral lobe. Ultrastructural analysis showed that fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells from DOX-treated prostates presented active synthetic phenotypes, evidenced by enlarged rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus cisterns, and confirmed the observation of thickened elaunin fibers. Our findings suggest that, under α-adrenergic blockade by DOX, the fibroblasts become more active and smooth muscle cells shift from a predominantly contractile to a more synthetic phenotype. The deposition of collagen and elastic system fibers in the prostatic stroma may counterbalance the absence of smooth muscle tone during α-blockers treatment. PMID:20155861

  14. The Role of the Transcriptional Regulation of Stromal Cells in Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Valin, Alvaro; Pablos, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a common process connecting pathologies that vary in their etiology and pathogenesis such as cancer, autoimmune diseases, and infections. The response of the immune system to tissue damage involves a carefully choreographed series of cellular interactions between immune and non-immune cells. In recent years, it has become clear that stromal resident cells have an essential role perpetuating the inflammatory environment and dictating in many cases the outcome of inflammatory based pathologies. Signal transduction pathways remain the main focus of study to understand how stimuli contribute to perpetuating the inflammatory response, mainly due to their potential role as therapeutic targets. However, molecular events orchestrated in the nucleus by transcription factors add additional levels of complexity and may be equally important for understanding the phenotypic differences of activated stromal components during the chronic inflammatory process. In this review, we focus on the contribution of transcription factors to the selective regulation of inducible proinflammatory genes, with special attention given to the regulation of the stromal fibroblastic cell function and response. PMID:26501341

  15. Loss of stromal JUNB does not affect tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Braun, Jennifer; Strittmatter, Karin; Nübel, Tobias; Komljenovic, Dorde; Sator-Schmitt, Melanie; Bäuerle, Tobias; Angel, Peter; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina

    2014-03-15

    The transcription factor AP-1 subunit JUNB has been shown to play a pivotal role in angiogenesis. It positively controls angiogenesis by regulating Vegfa as well as the transcriptional regulator Cbfb and its target Mmp13. In line with these findings, it has been demonstrated that tumor cell-derived JUNB promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis. In contrast to JUNB's function in tumor cells, the role of host-derived stromal JUNB has not been elucidated so far. Here, we show that ablation of Junb in stromal cells including endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and fibroblasts does not affect tumor growth in two different syngeneic mouse models, the B16-F1 melanoma and the Lewis lung carcinoma model. In-depth analyses of the tumors revealed that tumor angiogenesis remains unaffected as assessed by measurements of the microvascular density and relative blood volume in the tumor. Furthermore, we could show that the maturation status of the tumor vasculature, analyzed by the SMC marker expression, α-smooth muscle actin and Desmin, as well as the attachment of pericytes to the endothelium, is not changed upon ablation of Junb. Taken together, these results indicate that the pro-angiogenic functions of stromal JUNB are well compensated with regard to tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. PMID:24027048

  16. Targeting Stromal-Cancer Cell Crosstalk Networks in Ovarian Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Tsz-Lun; Leung, Cecilia S.; Li, Fuhai; Wong, Stephen T. C.; Mok, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a histologically, clinically, and molecularly diverse disease with a five-year survival rate of less than 30%. It has been estimated that approximately 21,980 new cases of epithelial ovarian cancer will be diagnosed and 14,270 deaths will occur in the United States in 2015, making it the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Ovarian tumor tissue is composed of cancer cells and a collection of different stromal cells. There is increasing evidence that demonstrates that stromal involvement is important in ovarian cancer pathogenesis. Therefore, stroma-specific signaling pathways, stroma-derived factors, and genetic changes in the tumor stroma present unique opportunities for improving the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the major components of the tumor stroma that have demonstrated supportive roles in tumor progression. In this review, we highlight various types of signaling crosstalk between ovarian cancer cells and stromal cells, particularly with CAFs. In addition to evaluating the importance of signaling crosstalk in ovarian cancer progression, we discuss approaches that can be used to target tumor-promoting signaling crosstalk and how these approaches can be translated into potential ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26751490

  17. Demineralized bone promotes chondrocyte or osteoblast differentiation of human marrow stromal cells cultured in collagen sponges.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuanhu; Yates, Karen E; Eid, Karim; Glowacki, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Demineralized bone implants have been used for many types of craniomaxillofacial, orthopedic, periodontal, and hand reconstruction procedures. In previous studies, we showed that demineralized bone powder (DBP) induces chondrogenesis of human dermal fibroblasts in a DBP/collagen sponge system that optimized interactions between particles of DBP and target cells in cell culture. In this study, we test the hypothesis that DBP promotes chondrogenesis or osteogenesis of human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) in 3-D collagen sponge culture, depending upon the culture conditions. We first confirmed that hMSCs have chondrogenic potential when treated with TGF-beta, either in 2-D monolayer cultures or in 3-D porous collagen sponges. Second, we found that DBP markedly enhanced chondrogenesis in hMSCs in 3-D sponges, as assessed by metachromasia and expression of chondrocyte-specific genes AGGRECAN, COL II, and COL X. Human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) were used to define mechanisms of chondroinduction because unlike hMSCs they have no inherent chondrogenic potential. In situ hybridization revealed that hDFs vicinal to DBPs express chondrocyte-specific genes AGGRECAN or COL II. Macroarray analysis showed that DBP activates TGF-beta/BMP signaling pathway genes in hDFs. Finally, DBP induced hMSCs to express the osteoblast phenotype when cultured with osteogenic supplements. These studies show how culture conditions can influence the differentiation pathway that human marrow stromal cells follow when stimulated by DBP. These results support the potential to engineer cartilage or bone in vitro by using human bone marrow stromal cells and DBP/collagen scaffolds. PMID:15735899

  18. Conjunctival Interleukin-13 Expression in Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid and Functional Effects of Interleukin-13 on Conjunctival Fibroblasts in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Valerie P.J.; Offiah, Ifeoma; Dart, Robin J.; Galatowicz, Grazyna; Dart, John K.G.; Daniels, Julie T.; Calder, Virginia L.

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-13 (IL-13) is the dominant effector cytokine of fibrosis in pulmonary and liver disease. Excessive conjunctival fibrosis in the immunobullous disease ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) causes blindness; the pathogenesis of scarring in this disease is incompletely understood. To determine whether IL-13 is involved in conjunctival fibrosis in MMP, we studied the expression of IL-13 in ocular MMP patients before and after systemic immunosuppression and examined the effects of IL-13 on normal human conjunctival fibroblasts. We found high stromal cell expression of IL-13 in active ocular MMP by immunohistochemistry; 80% of these cells were CD3-positive T cells. Following immunosuppression, in clinically uninflamed, treated, ocular MMP patients, the number of IL-13 positive cells was significantly reduced, but this was still fourfold greater than in normal conjunctiva. IL-13 stimulated collagen lattice contraction and migration, and decreased production of mmp-3 and mmp-10 by human conjunctival fibroblasts. The addition of T cell culture supernatant to IL-13 synergistically augmented fibroblast migration. IL-13 also up-regulated surface expression of HLA-DR, CD80, CD40, and CD154 by conjunctival fibroblasts, suggesting a potential mechanism for fibroblast-T cell cross talk, via which fibroblasts may actively engage in perpetuating chronic inflammation and continued fibrosis. Together, these findings suggest that IL-13 is involved in conjunctival fibrosis in MMP, and that IL-13 has both profibrotic and pro-inflammatory effects on human conjunctival fibroblasts. PMID:19910508

  19. Marrow stromal cells as a source of progenitor cells for nonhematopoietic tissues in transgenic mice with a phenotype of osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Ruth F.; O’Hara, Michael D.; Laptev, Alexey V.; Halford, Kenneth W.; Pollard, Marea D.; Class, Reiner; Simon, Daniela; Livezey, Kristin; Prockop, Darwin J.

    1998-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells from wild-type mice were infused into transgenic mice that had a phenotype of fragile bones resembling osteogenesis imperfecta because they expressed a human minigene for type I collagen. In mice that were irradiated with potentially lethal levels (700 cGy) or sublethal levels (350 cGy), DNA from the donor marrow stromal cells was detected consistently in marrow, bone, cartilage, and lung either 1 or 2.5 mo after the infusions. The DNA also was detected but less frequently in the spleen, brain, and skin. There was a small but statistically significant increase in both collagen content and mineral content of bone 1 mo after the infusion. Similar results were obtained with infusion of relatively large amounts of wild-type whole marrow cells into the transgenic mice. In experiments in which male marrow stromal cells were infused into a female osteogenesis imperfecta-transgenic mouse, fluorescense in situ hybridization assays for the Y chromosome indicated that, after 2.5 mo, donor male cells accounted for 4–19% of the fibroblasts or fibroblast-like cells obtained in primary cultures of the lung, calvaria, cartilage, long bone, tail, and skin. In a parallel experiment in which whole marrow cells from a male mouse were infused into a female immunodeficient rag-2 mouse, donor male cells accounted for 4–6% of the fibroblasts or fibroblast-like cells in primary cultures. The results support previous suggestions that marrow stromal cells or related cells in marrow serve as a source for continual renewal of cells in a number of nonhematopoietic tissues. PMID:9448299

  20. Targeting Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts Within the Tumor Stroma With a Fibroblast Activation Protein-Activated Prodrug

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibroblasts undergo a morphological transformation to a reactive phenotype in the tumor microenvironment characterized by the expression of proteins such as fibroblast activation protein (FAP), a post-prolyl endopeptidase with expression largely restricted to carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. Thapsigargin (TG) is a highly toxic natural plant product that triggers a rise in intracellular calcium levels and apoptosis. FAP is therefore a provocative target for the activation of prodrugs consisting of a FAP-specific peptide coupled to a potent cytotoxic analog of TG. Methods The efficacy of FAP-activated peptidyl-TG prodrugs was tested in vitro in cell proliferation assays and effects on intracellular calcium in human cancer cell lines. The effects of FAP-activated prodrugs on tumor growth and host toxicity were tested in Balb-C nude MCF-7 and LNCaP xenograft mice (n = 9–11 per group). P values were calculated using permutation tests based on 50 000 permutations. Mixed effects models were used to account for correlations among replicate measures. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results FAP-activated prodrugs killed human cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations (MCF-7 cells: IC50 = 3.5nM). Amino acid-12ADT analogs from FAP-cleaved prodrugs, but not uncleaved prodrugs, produced a rapid rise in intracellular calcium within minutes of exposure. Immunohistochemical analysis of xenografts exposed to FAP-prodrugs documented stromal-selective cell death of fibroblasts, pericytes, and endothelial cells of sufficient magnitude to inhibit growth of MCF-7 and LNCaP xenografts with minimal systemic toxicity, whereas non-FAP cleavable prodrugs were inactive. MCF-7 and LNCaP xenografts treated with a FAP-activated prodrug had maximal treated-to-control tumor volume ratios of 0.36 (treated: mean = 0.206mm3, 95% CI = 0.068 to 0.344mm3; control: mean = 0.580mm3, 95% CI = 0.267 to 0.893mm3) and 0.24 (treated: mean = 0.131mm3, 95% CI = 0.09 to 0.180mm3; control

  1. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  2. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  3. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  4. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  5. Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells Modulate Chemokine Expression and Hyaluronan Synthesis in Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Inga; Freudenberger, Till; Twarock, Sören; Yamaguchi, Yu; Grandoch, Maria; Fischer, Jens W

    2016-02-19

    The aim of this study was to characterize the interaction of KYSE-410, an esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line, and fibroblasts with respect to the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan (HA) and chemokine expression. KYSE-410 cells induced the mRNA expression of HA synthase 2 (Has2) in normal skin fibroblasts (SF) only in direct co-cultures. Parallel to Has2 mRNA, Has2 antisense RNA (Has2os2) was up-regulated in co-cultures. Knockdown of LEF1, a downstream target of Wnt signaling, abrogated Has2 and Has2os2 induction. After knockdown of Has2 in SF, significantly less α-smooth muscle actin expression was detected in co-cultures. Moreover, it was investigated whether the phenotype of KYSE-410 was affected in co-culture with SF and whether Has2 knockdown in SF had an impact on KYSE-410 cells in co-culture. However, no effects on epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers, proliferation, and migration were detected. In addition to Has2 mRNA, the chemokine CCL5 was up-regulated and CCL11 was down-regulated in SF in co-culture. Furthermore, co-cultures of KYSE-410 cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) were investigated. Similar to SF, Has2 and Ccl5 were up-regulated and Ccl11 was down-regulated in CAF in co-culture. Importantly and in contrast to SF, inhibiting HA synthesis by 4-methylumbelliferone abrogated the effect of co-culture on Ccl5 in CAF. Moreover, HA was found to promote adhesion of CD4(+) but not CD8(+) cells to xenogaft tumor tissues. In conclusion, direct co-culture of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and fibroblasts induced stromal HA synthesis via Wnt/LEF1 and altered the chemokine profile of stromal fibroblasts, which in turn may affect the tumor immune response. PMID:26699196

  6. Comparative proteomic analysis of normal and tumor stromal cells by tissue on chip based mass spectrometry (toc-MS)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In carcinoma tissues, genetic and metabolic changes not only occur at the tumor cell level, but also in the surrounding stroma. This carcinoma-reactive stromal tissue is heterogeneous and consists e.g. of non-epithelial cells such as fibroblasts or fibrocytes, inflammatory cells and vasculature-related cells, which promote carcinoma growth and progression of carcinomas. Nevertheless, there is just little knowledge about the proteomic changes from normal connective tissue to tumor stroma. In the present study, we acquired and analysed specific protein patterns of small stromal sections surrounding head and neck cell complexes in comparison to normal subepithelial connective tissue. To gain defined stromal areas we used laser-based tissue microdissection. Because these stromal areas are limited in size we established the highly sensitive 'tissue on chip based mass spectrometry' (toc-MS). Therefore, the dissected areas were directly transferred to chromatographic arrays and the proteomic profiles were subsequently analysed with mass spectrometry. At least 100 cells were needed for an adequate spectrum. The locating of differentially expressed proteins enables a precise separation of normal and tumor stroma. The newly described toc-MS technology allows an initial insight into proteomic differences between small numbers of exactly defined cells from normal and tumor stroma. PMID:20205871

  7. Downregulation of caveolin-1 upregulates the expression of growth factors and regulators in co-culture of fibroblasts with cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, XIAO-YU; XIONG, LI-XIA; XIAO, LIANG; MENG, CHUANG; QI, GUAN-YUN; LI, WEN-LIN

    2016-01-01

    Reduced expression levels of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in tumor stromal fibroblasts influences the occurrence and progression of tumors, particularly in breast cancer, but the relevant molecular mechanism is unclear. The present study aimed to clarify the potential mechanism underlying the promotion of tumor growth by reduced Cav-1 expression levels, by investigating Cav-1-targeted molecules in fibroblasts and breast cancer cells. The expression of growth factors in the ESF fibroblast cell line transfected with Cav-1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) was examined. The expression of apoptotic regulators in the BT474 breast cancer cell line that was co-cultured with the fibroblasts, was also investigated. The transfection of Cav-1-targeting siRNA in ESF cells resulted in efficient and specific inhibition of Cav-1 expression. The downregulation of Cav-1 increased the expression and secretion of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) in ESF cells. This resulted in the accelerated proliferation of the breast cancer cells. Tumor protein 53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR) was upregulated in the BT474 cells under the condition of co-culture with Cav-1 siRNA fibroblasts, while levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were decreased, resulting in apoptosis inhibition in the breast cancer cells. These results demonstrated that the downregulation of Cav-1 promoted the growth of breast cancer cells through increasing SDF-1, EGF and FSP-1 in tumor stromal fibroblasts, and TIGAR levels in breast cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, the present study supports the hypothesis that Cav-1 possesses tumor-suppressor properties, with the mechanism of Cav-1-dependent signaling involving the regulation of SDF-1, EGF, FSP-1 and TIGAR. PMID:26647977

  8. Cancer: An Oxidative Crosstalk between Solid Tumor Cells and Cancer Associated Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Arcucci, Alessandro; Ruocco, Maria Rosaria; Granato, Giuseppina; Sacco, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Redox balance is associated with the regulation of several cell signalling pathways and functions. In fact, under physiological conditions, cells maintain a balance between oxidant and antioxidant systems, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as second messengers to regulate cell proliferation, cell death, and other physiological processes. Cancer tissues usually contain higher levels of ROS than normal tissues, and this ROS overproduction is associated with tumor development. Neoplastic tissues are very heterogeneous systems, composed of tumor cells and microenvironment that has a critical role in tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent the main cell type of tumor microenvironment, and they contribute to tumor growth by undergoing an irreversible activation process. It is known that ROS can be transferred from cancer cells to fibroblasts. In particular, ROS affect the behaviour of CAFs by promoting the conversion of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts that support tumor progression and dissemination. Furthermore, the wrecking of redox homeostasis in cancer cells and tumor microenvironment induces a metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts, giving advantage to cancer growth. This review describes the role of ROS in tumor growth, by focusing on CAFs activation and metabolic interactions between cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. PMID:27595103

  9. Cancer: An Oxidative Crosstalk between Solid Tumor Cells and Cancer Associated Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Arcucci, Alessandro; Ruocco, Maria Rosaria; Granato, Giuseppina; Sacco, Anna Maria; Montagnani, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Redox balance is associated with the regulation of several cell signalling pathways and functions. In fact, under physiological conditions, cells maintain a balance between oxidant and antioxidant systems, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as second messengers to regulate cell proliferation, cell death, and other physiological processes. Cancer tissues usually contain higher levels of ROS than normal tissues, and this ROS overproduction is associated with tumor development. Neoplastic tissues are very heterogeneous systems, composed of tumor cells and microenvironment that has a critical role in tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent the main cell type of tumor microenvironment, and they contribute to tumor growth by undergoing an irreversible activation process. It is known that ROS can be transferred from cancer cells to fibroblasts. In particular, ROS affect the behaviour of CAFs by promoting the conversion of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts that support tumor progression and dissemination. Furthermore, the wrecking of redox homeostasis in cancer cells and tumor microenvironment induces a metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts, giving advantage to cancer growth. This review describes the role of ROS in tumor growth, by focusing on CAFs activation and metabolic interactions between cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. PMID:27595103

  10. Fibroblasts from phenotypically normal palmar fascia exhibit molecular profiles highly similar to fibroblasts from active disease in Dupuytren's Contracture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dupuytren's contracture (DC) is a fibroproliferative disorder characterized by the progressive development of a scar-like collagen-rich cord that affects the palmar fascia of the hand and leads to digital flexion contractures. DC is most commonly treated by surgical resection of the diseased tissue, but has a high reported recurrence rate ranging from 27% to 80%. We sought to determine if the transcriptomic profiles of fibroblasts derived from DC-affected palmar fascia, adjacent phenotypically normal palmar fascia, and non-DC palmar fascial tissues might provide mechanistic clues to understanding the puzzle of disease predisposition and recurrence in DC. Methods To achieve this, total RNA was obtained from fibroblasts derived from primary DC-affected palmar fascia, patient-matched unaffected palmar fascia, and palmar fascia from non-DC patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (6 patients in each group). These cells were grown on a type-1 collagen substrate (to better mimic their in vivo environments). Microarray analyses were subsequently performed using Illumina BeadChip arrays to compare the transcriptomic profiles of these three cell populations. Data were analyzed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM v3.02), hierarchical clustering, concordance mapping and Venn diagram. Results We found that the transcriptomic profiles of DC-disease fibroblasts and fibroblasts from unaffected fascia of DC patients exhibited a much greater overlap than fibroblasts derived from the palmar fascia of patients undergoing carpal tunnel release. Quantitative real time RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of select genes validating the microarray data analyses. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that predisposition and recurrence in DC may stem, at least in part, from intrinsic similarities in the basal gene expression of diseased and phenotypically unaffected palmar fascia fibroblasts. These data also demonstrate that a collagen

  11. The Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Is Critical for Human Endometrial Stromal Cell Decidualization

    PubMed Central

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Szwarc, Maria M.; Vasquez, Yasmin M.; Peavey, Mary C.; Mazur, Erik C.; Gibbons, William E.; Lanz, Rainer B.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone, via the progesterone receptor (PGR), is essential for endometrial stromal cell decidualization, a cellular transformation event in which stromal fibroblasts differentiate into decidual cells. Uterine decidualization supports embryo implantation and placentation as well as subsequent events, which together ensure a successful pregnancy. Accordingly, impaired decidualization results not only in implantation failure or early fetal miscarriage, but also may lead to potential adverse outcomes in all three pregnancy trimesters. Transcriptional reprogramming on a genome-wide scale underlies progesterone dependent decidualization of the human endometrial stromal cell (hESC). However, identification of the functionally essential signals encoded by these global transcriptional changes remains incomplete. Importantly, this knowledge-gap undercuts future efforts to improve diagnosis and treatment of implantation failure based on a dysfunctional endometrium. By integrating genome-wide datasets derived from decidualization of hESCs in culture, we reveal that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) transcription factor is rapidly induced by progesterone and that this induction is indispensable for progesterone-dependent decidualization. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) identified at least ten progesterone response elements within the PLZF gene, indicating that PLZF may act as a direct target of PGR signaling. The spatiotemporal expression profile for PLZF in both the human and mouse endometrium offers further support for stromal PLZF as a mediator of the progesterone decidual signal. To identify functional targets of PLZF, integration of PLZF ChIP-Seq and RNA Pol II RNA-Seq datasets revealed that the early growth response 1 (EGR1) transcription factor is a PLZF target for which its level of expression must be reduced to enable progesterone dependent hESC decidualization. Apart from furnishing essential insights

  12. Bioengineering Organized, Multilamellar Human Corneal Stromal Tissue by Growth Factor Supplementation on Highly Aligned Synthetic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Du, Yiqin; Mann, Mary M.; Yang, Enzhi; Funderburgh, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Recapitulating the microstructure of the native human corneal stromal tissue is believed to be a key feature in successfully engineering the corneal tissue. The stratified multilayered collagen fibril lamellae with orthogonal orientation determine the robust biomechanical properties of this tissue, and the uniform collagen fibril size and interfibrillar spacing are critical to its optical transparency. The objective of this investigation was to develop a highly organized collagen-fibril construct secreted by human corneal stromal stem cells (hCSSCs) to mimic the human corneal stromal tissue. In culture on a highly aligned fibrous substrate made from poly(ester urethane) urea, the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2, 10 ng/mL) and transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-β3, 0.1 ng/mL) impacted the organization and abundance of the secreted collagen fibril matrix. hCSSCs differentiated into keratocytes with significant upregulation of the typical gene markers, including KERA, B3GnT7, and CHST6. FGF-2 treatment stimulated hCSSCs to secrete collagen fibrils strongly aligned in a single direction, whereas TGF-β3 induced collagenous layers with orthogonal fibril orientation. The combination of FGF-2 and TGF-β3 induced multilayered lamellae with orthogonally oriented collagen fibrils, in a pattern mimicking the human corneal stromal tissue. The constructs were 60–70 μm thick and had an increased content of cornea-specific extracellular matrix components, including keratan sulfate, lumican, and keratocan. The approach of combining substrate cues with growth factor augmentation offers a new means to engineer well-organized, collagen-based constructs with an appropriate nanoscale structure for corneal repair and regeneration. PMID:23557404

  13. The Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Is Critical for Human Endometrial Stromal Cell Decidualization.

    PubMed

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Szwarc, Maria M; Vasquez, Yasmin M; Peavey, Mary C; Mazur, Erik C; Gibbons, William E; Lanz, Rainer B; DeMayo, Francesco J; Lydon, John P

    2016-04-01

    Progesterone, via the progesterone receptor (PGR), is essential for endometrial stromal cell decidualization, a cellular transformation event in which stromal fibroblasts differentiate into decidual cells. Uterine decidualization supports embryo implantation and placentation as well as subsequent events, which together ensure a successful pregnancy. Accordingly, impaired decidualization results not only in implantation failure or early fetal miscarriage, but also may lead to potential adverse outcomes in all three pregnancy trimesters. Transcriptional reprogramming on a genome-wide scale underlies progesterone dependent decidualization of the human endometrial stromal cell (hESC). However, identification of the functionally essential signals encoded by these global transcriptional changes remains incomplete. Importantly, this knowledge-gap undercuts future efforts to improve diagnosis and treatment of implantation failure based on a dysfunctional endometrium. By integrating genome-wide datasets derived from decidualization of hESCs in culture, we reveal that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) transcription factor is rapidly induced by progesterone and that this induction is indispensable for progesterone-dependent decidualization. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) identified at least ten progesterone response elements within the PLZF gene, indicating that PLZF may act as a direct target of PGR signaling. The spatiotemporal expression profile for PLZF in both the human and mouse endometrium offers further support for stromal PLZF as a mediator of the progesterone decidual signal. To identify functional targets of PLZF, integration of PLZF ChIP-Seq and RNA Pol II RNA-Seq datasets revealed that the early growth response 1 (EGR1) transcription factor is a PLZF target for which its level of expression must be reduced to enable progesterone dependent hESC decidualization. Apart from furnishing essential insights

  14. Multicentric malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shailaja; Singh, Sanjeet K; Pujani, Mukta

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare type of sarcoma that is found in the digestive system, most often in the wall of the stomach. Multiple GISTs are extremely rare and usually associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis and familial GIST.We report here a case of a 70-year-old woman who reported pain in the abdomen, loss of appetite, and weight loss for six months. Ultrasound examination showed a small bowel mass along with multiple peritoneal deposits and a mass within the liver. Barium studies were suggestive of a neoplastic pathology of the distal ileum. A differential diagnosis of adenocarcinoma/lymphoma with metastases was entertained. Perioperative findings showed two large growths arising from the jejunum and the distal ileum, along with multiple smaller nodules on the serosal surface and adjoining mesentery of the involved bowel segments. Segmental resection of the involved portions of the intestine was performed. Histopathological features were consistent with those of multicentric malignant GIST-not otherwise specified (GIST-NOS). Follow-up examination three months after surgery showed no evidence of recurrence. PMID:19568556

  15. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Possible Culprits in Solid Tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Johann, Pascal David; Müller, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The clinical use of bone marrow derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in different settings ranging from tissue engineering to immunotherapies has prompted investigations on the properties of these cells in a variety of other tissues. Particularly the role of MSCs in solid tumors has been the subject of many experimental approaches. While a clear phenotypical distinction of tumor associated fibroblasts (TAFs) and MSCs within the tumor microenvironment is still missing, the homing of bone marrow MSCs in tumor sites has been extensively studied. Both, tumor-promoting and tumor-inhibiting effects of BM-MSCs have been described in this context. This ambiguity requires a reappraisal of the different studies and experimental methods employed. Here, we review the current literature on tumor-promoting and tumor-inhibiting effects of BM-MSCs with a particular emphasis on their interplay with components of the immune system and also highlight a potential role of MSCs as cell of origin for certain mesenchymal tumors. PMID:26273308

  16. Dependency of colorectal cancer on a TGF-beta-driven programme in stromal cells for metastasis initiation

    PubMed Central

    Calon, Alexandre; Espinet, Elisa; Palomo-Ponce, Sergio; Tauriello, Daniele V. F.; Iglesias, Mar; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Sevillano, Marta; Nadal, Cristina; Jung, Peter; Zhang, Xiang H.-F.; Byrom, Daniel; Riera, Antoni; Rossell, David; Mangues, Ramón; Massague, Joan; Sancho, Elena; Batlle, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A large proportion of colorectal cancers (CRCs) display mutational inactivation of the TGF-beta pathway yet paradoxically, they are characterized by elevated TGF-beta production. Here, we unveil a prometastatic programme induced by TGF-beta in the microenvironment that associates with a high-risk of CRC relapse upon treatment. The activity of TGF-beta on stromal cells increases the efficiency of organ colonization by CRC cells whereas mice treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of TGFBR1 are resilient to metastasis formation. Secretion of IL11 by TGF-beta-stimulated cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) triggers GP130/STAT3 signalling in tumour cells. This crosstalk confers a survival advantage to metastatic cells. The dependency on the TGF-beta stromal programme for metastasis initiation could be exploited to improve the diagnosis and treatment of CRC. PMID:23153532

  17. FAP-overexpressing fibroblasts produce an extracellular matrix that enhances invasive velocity and directionality of pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Alterations towards a permissive stromal microenvironment provide important cues for tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. In this study, Fibroblast activation protein (FAP), a serine protease selectively produced by tumor-associated fibroblasts in over 90% of epithelial tumors, was used as a platform for studying tumor-stromal interactions. We tested the hypothesis that FAP enzymatic activity locally modifies stromal ECM (extracellular matrix) components thus facilitating the formation of a permissive microenvironment promoting tumor invasion in human pancreatic cancer. Methods We generated a tetracycline-inducible FAP overexpressing fibroblastic cell line to synthesize an in vivo-like 3-dimensional (3D) matrix system which was utilized as a stromal landscape for studying matrix-induced cancer cell behaviors. A FAP-dependent topographical and compositional alteration of the ECM was characterized by measuring the relative orientation angles of fibronectin fibers and by Western blot analyses. The role of FAP in the matrix-induced permissive tumor behavior was assessed in Panc-1 cells in assorted matrices by time-lapse acquisition assays. Also, FAP+ matrix-induced regulatory molecules in cancer cells were determined by Western blot analyses. Results We observed that FAP remodels the ECM through modulating protein levels, as well as through increasing levels of fibronectin and collagen fiber organization. FAP-dependent architectural/compositional alterations of the ECM promote tumor invasion along characteristic parallel fiber orientations, as demonstrated by enhanced directionality and velocity of pancreatic cancer cells on FAP+ matrices. This phenotype can be reversed by inhibition of FAP enzymatic activity during matrix production resulting in the disorganization of the ECM and impeded tumor invasion. We also report that the FAP+ matrix-induced tumor invasion phenotype is β1-integrin/FAK mediated. Conclusion Cancer cell invasiveness can be affected by

  18. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastrointestinal stromal tumors? What should you ask your doctor about gastrointestinal stromal tumors? As you cope with ... we encourage you to talk openly with your doctor, nurse, and cancer care team. You should feel ...

  19. What Are the Risk Factors for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... what causes gastrointestinal stromal tumors? What are the risk factors for gastrointestinal stromal tumors? A risk factor is ... disease like cancer. Different cancers have different risk factors. Some risk factors, like smoking, can be changed. Others, like ...

  20. Stromal cell-based immunotherapy in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Ronald; Lu, Lina; Qian, Shiguang; Fung, John J

    2012-01-01

    Organs are composed of parenchymal cells that characterize organ function and nonparenchymal cells that are composed of cells in transit, as well as tissue connective tissue, also referred to as tissue stromal cells. It was originally thought that these tissue stromal cells provided only structural and functional support for parenchymal cells and were relatively inert. However, we have come to realize that tissue stromal cells, not restricted to in the thymus and lymphoid organs, also play an active role in modulating the immune system and its response to antigens. The recognition of these elements and the elucidation of their mechanisms of action have provided valuable insight into peripheral immune regulation. Extrapolation of these principles may allow us to utilize their potential for clinical application. In this article, we will summarize a number of tissue stromal elements/cell types that have been shown to induce hyporesponsiveness to transplants. We will also discuss the mechanisms by which these stromal cells create a tolerogenic environment, which in turn results in long-term allograft survival. PMID:22091683

  1. SU-E-J-105: Stromal-Epithelial Responses to Fractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Qayyum, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The stromal-epithelial-cell interactions that are responsible for directing normal breast-tissue development and maintenance play a central role in the progression of breast cancer. In the present study, we developed three-dimensional (3-D) cell co-cultures used to study cancerous mammary cell responses to fractionated radiotherapy. In particular, we focused on the role of the reactive stroma in determining the therapeutic ratio for postsurgical treatment. Methods: Cancerous human mammary epithelial cells were cultured in a 3-D collagen matrix with human fibroblasts stimulated by various concentrations of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). These culture samples were designed to model the post-lumpectomy mammary stroma in the presence of residual cancer cells. We tracked over time the changes in medium stiffness, fibroblast-cell activation (conversion to cancer activated fibroblasts (CAF)), and proliferation of both cell types under a variety of fractionated radiotherapy protocols. Samples were exposed to 6 MV X-rays from a linear accelerator in daily fraction sizes of 90, 180 and 360 cGy over five days in a manner consistent with irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. Results: We found in fractionation studies with fibroblasts and CAF that higher doses per fraction may be more effective early on in deactivating cancer-harboring cellular environments. Higher-dose fraction schemes inhibit contractility in CAF and prevent differentiation of fibroblasts, thereby metabolically uncoupling tumor cells from their surrounding stroma. Yet, over a longer time period, the higher dose fractions may slow wound healing and increase ECM stiffening that could stimulate proliferation of surviving cancer cells. Conclusion: The findings suggest that dose escalation to the region with residual disease can deactivate the reactive stroma, thus minimizing the cancer promoting features of the cellular environment. Large-fraction irradiation may be used to sterilize

  2. Corneal Fibroblast Migration Patterns During Intrastromal Wound Healing Correlate With ECM Structure and Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Petroll, W. Matthew; Kivanany, Pouriska B.; Hagenasr, Daniela; Graham, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess keratocyte backscattering, alignment, morphology, and connectivity in vivo following a full-thickness corneal injury using the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph Rostock Cornea Module (HRT-RCM), and to correlate these findings with en bloc three-dimensional (3-D) confocal fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. Methods Rabbit corneas were scanned in vivo both before and 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after transcorneal freeze injury (FI), which damages all corneal cell layers. Corneal tissue was also fixed and labeled for f-actin and nuclei en bloc, and imaged using 3-D confocal fluorescence microscopy and SHG imaging. Results Using the modified HRT-RCM, full-thickness scans of all cell layers were consistently obtained. Following FI, stromal cells repopulating the damaged tissue assumed an elongated fibroblastic morphology, and a significant increase in cellular light scattering was measured. This stromal haze gradually decreased as wound healing progressed. Parallel, interconnected streams of aligned corneal fibroblasts were observed both in vivo (from HRT-RCM reflection images) and ex vivo (from f-actin and nuclear labeling) during wound healing, particularly in the posterior cornea. Second harmonic generation imaging demonstrated that these cells were aligned parallel to the collagen lamellae. Conclusions The modified HRT-RCM allows in vivo measurements of sublayer thickness, assessment of cell morphology, alignment and connectivity, and estimation of stromal backscatter during wound healing. In this study, these in vivo observations led to the novel finding that the pattern of corneal fibroblast alignment is highly correlated with lamellar organization, suggesting contact guidance of intrastromal migration that may facilitate more rapid wound repopulation. PMID:26562169

  3. RalA Function in Dermal Fibroblasts is Required for the Progression of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Sowalsky, Adam G.; Alt-Holland, Addy; Shamis, Yulia; Garlick, Jonathan A.; Feig, Larry A.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of evidence has shown that stromal cells play a significant role in determining the fate of neighboring tumor cells through the secretion of various cytokines. How cytokine secretion by stromal cells is regulated in this context is poorly understood. In this study, we used a bioengineered human tissue model of skin squamous cell carcinoma progression to reveal that RalA function in dermal fibroblasts is required for tumor progression of neighboring neoplastic keratinocytes. This conclusion is based on the observations that suppression of RalA expression in dermal fibroblasts blocked tumorigenic keratinocytes from invading into the dermal compartment of engineered tissues, and suppressed more advanced tumor progression after these tissues were transplanted onto the dorsum of mice. RalA executes this tumor-promoting function of dermal fibroblasts, at least in part, by mediating HGF secretion through its effector proteins, the Sec5 and Exo84 subunits of the exocyst complex. These findings reveal a new level of HGF regulation and highlight the RalA signaling cascade in dermal fibroblasts as a potential anti-cancer target. PMID:21159665

  4. Cathelicidin suppresses colon cancer development by inhibition of cancer associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Michelle; Ho, Samantha; Yoo, Jun Hwan; Tran, Deanna Hoang-Yen; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Su, Bowei; Tran, Diana Hoang-Ngoc; Kubota, Yuzu; Ichikawa, Ryan; Koon, Hon Wai

    2015-01-01

    Background Cathelicidin (LL-37 in humans and mCRAMP in mice) represents a family of endogenous antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides. Cancer-associated fibroblasts can promote the proliferation of colon cancer cells and growth of colon cancer tumors. Methods We examined the role of cathelicidin in the development of colon cancer, using subcutaneous human HT-29 colon-cancer-cell-derived tumor model in nude mice and azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-mediated colon cancer model in C57BL/6 mice. We also determined the indirect antitumoral mechanism of cathelicidin via the inhibition of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) of colon cancer cells and fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Results Intravenous administration of cathelicidin expressing adeno-associated virus significantly reduced the size of tumors, tumor-derived collagen expression, and tumor-derived fibroblast expression in HT-29-derived subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. Enema administration of the mouse cathelicidin peptide significantly reduced the size and number of colonic tumors in azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-treated mice without inducing apoptosis in tumors and the adjacent normal colonic tissues. Cathelicidin inhibited the collagen expression and vimentin-positive fibroblast expression in colonic tumors. Cathelicidin did not directly affect HT-29 cell viability, but did significantly reduce tumor growth factor-β1-induced EMT of colon cancer cells. Media conditioned by the human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts promoted human colon cancer HT-29 cell proliferation. Cathelicidin pretreatment inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation mediated by media conditioned by human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts. Cathelicidin disrupted tubulin distribution in colonic fibroblasts. Disruption of tubulin in fibroblasts reduced fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Conclusion Cathelicidin effectively inhibits colon cancer development by interfering with EMT and fibroblast

  5. Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of bone marrow stromal cell surface gene, BST2, that may be involved in pre-B-cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Jun; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Tomizawa, Hitoshi

    1995-04-10

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate B-cell growth and development through their surface molecules and cytokines. In this study, we generated a mAb, RS38, that recognized a novel human membrane protein, BST-2, expressed on bone marrow stromal cell lines and synovial cell lines. We cloned a cDNA encoding BST-2 from a rheumatoid arthritis-derived synovial cell line. BST-2 is a 30- to 36-kDa type II transmembrane protein, consisting of 180 amino acids. The BST-2 gene (HGMW-approved symbol BST2) is located on chromosome 19p13.2. BST-2 is expressed not only on certain bone marrow stromal cell lines but also on various normal tissues, although its expression pattern is different from that of another bone marrow stromal cell surface molecule, BST-1. BST-2 surface expression on fibroblast cell lines facilitated the stromal cell-dependent growth of a murine bone marrow-derived pre-B-cell line, DW34. The results suggest that BST-2 may be involved in pre-B-cell growth. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Antigen Presenting Cells and Stromal Cells Trigger Human Natural Killer Lymphocytes to Autoreactivity: Evidence for the Involvement of Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors (NCR) and NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Alessandro; Zocchi, Maria Raffaella

    2006-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) lymphocytes should not damage autologous cells due to the engagement of inhibitory receptor superfamily (IRS) members by HLA-I. Nevertheless, NK cells kill self cells expressing low levels or lacking HLA-I, as it may occur during viral infections (missing-self hypothesis). Herein, we show that human NK cells can be activated upon binding with self antigen presenting cells or stromal cells despite the expression of HLA-I. Indeed, NK cells can kill and produce pro-inflammatory and regulating cytokines as IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL10 during interaction with autologous dendritic cells or bone marrow stromal cells or skin fibroblasts. The killing of antigen presenting and stromal cells is dependent on LFA1/ICAM1 interaction. Further, the natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCR) NKp30 and NKp46 are responsible for the delivery of lethal hit to DC, whereas NKG2D activating receptor, the ligand of the MHC-related molecule MIC-A and the UL16 binding protein, is involved in stromal cell killing. These findings indicate that different activating receptors are involved in cell to self cell interaction. Finally, NK cells can revert the veto effect of stromal cells on mixed lymphocyte reaction further supporting the idea that NK cells may alter the interaction between T lymphocytes and microenvironment leading to autoreactivity. PMID:17162374

  7. Colorectal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts are Genotypically Distinct

    PubMed Central

    Mrazek, Amy A.; Carmical, Joseph R.; Wood, Thomas G.; Hellmich, Mark R.; Eltorky, Mahmoud; Bohanon, Frederick J.; Chao, Celia

    2014-01-01

    Cells in the stromal microenvironment facilitate colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and “co-evolve” with the epithelial cancer cells. Genetic and epigenetic differences between normal colorectal mucosa fibroblasts (NF) and carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are not known. The aim of this study is to identify differentially expressed genes and promoter methylation between NF and CAF in human CRC. RNA and DNA were extracted from cultured NF and CAF from CRC resections. Genome-wide gene expression and methylation analyses were performed using the Illumina Human HT-12 v4.0 Expression and Illumina Human Methylation 27 BeadChips. Gene expression values between NF and CAF were compared and correlated with methylation patterns. Data was analyzed using Partek Genomics Suite using one-way ANOVA and p<0.05 as significant. Ingenuity iReport™ was performed to identify potential differences in biological functions and pathways between the NF and CAF. Paired methylation and gene expression analyses from 11 NF and 10 CAF colorectal samples are reported. Unsupervised analysis of differentially expressed genes using iReport™ identified “Top Diseases” as “Cancer” and “Colorectal Cancer”. Previous genome wide studies have focused on the cancer cells. We have identified differentially expressed genes and differentially methylated promoter regions that are CAF-specific in CRC. PMID:25530743

  8. Surgical Treatment of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract and is most frequently developed in the stomach in the form of submucosal tumor. The incidence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is estimated to be as high as 25% of the population when all small and asymptomatic tumors are included. Because gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is not completely distinguished from other submucosal tumors, a surgical excisional biopsy is recommended for tumors >2 cm. The surgical principles of gastrointestinal stromal tumor are composed of an R0 resection with a normal mucosa margin, no systemic lymph node dissection, and avoidance of perforation, which results in peritoneal seeding even in cases with otherwise low risk profiles. Laparoscopic surgery has been indicated for gastrointestinal stromal tumors <5 cm, and the indication for laparoscopic surgery is expanded to larger tumors if the above mentioned surgical principles can be maintained. A simple exogastric resection and various transgastric resection techniques are used for gastrointestinal stromal tumors in favorable locations (the fundus, body, greater curvature side). For a lesion at the gastroesophageal junction in the posterior wall of the stomach, enucleation techniques have been tried preserve the organ's function. Those methods have a theoretical risk of seeding a ruptured tumor, but this risk has not been evaluated by well-designed clinical trials. While some clinical trials are still on-going, neoadjuvant imatinib is suggested when marginally unresectable or multiorgan resection is anticipated to reduce the extent of surgery and the chance of incomplete resection, rupture or bleeding. PMID:23610714

  9. Heparin fragments modulate the collagen phenotype of fibroblasts from radiation-induced subcutaneous fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    el Nabout, R.; Martin, M.; Remy, J.; Robert, L.; Lafuma, C. )

    1989-10-01

    Acute local gamma irradiation of porcine skin induces, as in human skin, an extensive and mutilating sclerosis characterized by continuous expansion of the fibrosis invading the adjacent muscle and by accumulation of the macromolecular components of the extracellular matrix. Collagen synthesis, content, and types were studied in the presence of heparin fragments (100 micrograms/10(6) cells) in the culture medium, by measuring the incorporation of the radiolabeled precursor (3H)proline into confluent primary cultures of porcine fibroblasts obtained from normal and irradiated fibrotic dermis. Enhancement in collagen biosynthesis and deposition and preferential increase in collagen type III synthesis were observed in fibrotic fibroblast cultures when compared to those in normal dermis fibroblasts. The total collagen synthesis and the rate of collagen hydroxylation appear unmodified by heparin fragments both in normal and in fibrotic fibroblast cultures. But heparin fragments induce a 10- and 2-fold decrease, respectively, in collagen type III and type V syntheses by fibrosis fibroblasts. As only minor effects upon collagen type III and V are observed in cultures of normal dermis fibroblasts, these results highly suggest that heparin fragments are capable of specifically modulating the collagen phenotype of fibroblasts derived from radiation-induced dermis fibrosis and thus are able to regulate the fibrotic process.

  10. ASF-4-1 fibroblast-rich culture increases chemoresistance and mTOR expression of pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 cells at the invasive front in vitro, and promotes tumor growth and invasion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    FUJIWARA, MASAYA; KANAYAMA, KAZUKI; HIROKAWA, YOSHIFUMI S.; SHIRAISHI, TAIZO

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer develops dense stromal tissue through the desmoplastic reaction. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of a fibroblast-rich environment on the malignant potential of pancreatic cancer. Cells from the human pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3 were mixed at a ratio of 1:3 (fibroblast-rich) or 1:1 (fibroblast-poor) with cells from the human skin fibroblast line ASF-4-1. In the fibroblast-rich co-culture, tumor budding was observed and BxPC-3 cells were found to be more resistant to gemcitabine than those in the fibroblast-poor co-culture. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin was increased at the invasive front of fibroblast-rich co-cultures. In addition, in mouse xenografts of fibroblast-rich co-cultures, tumors were larger and had a higher Ki-67 index compared with that of the fibroblast-poor co-culture xenografts. These results indicate that fibroblast-rich co-cultures may promote the malignant potential of the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27073551

  11. Interaction between Macrophages and Fibroblasts during Wound Healing of Burn Injuries in Rats.

    PubMed

    Oka, Takeshi; Ohta, Keisuke; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the structural changes and cell-to-cell interactions occurring during wound healing of burn injuries is essential to elucidate the morphological characteristics of the reconstitution of tissue architecture. However, conventional approaches do not provide sufficient information with respect to cell-to-cell interactions during wound healing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction between bone marrow-derived cells and resident stromal cells throughout the wound healing of burn injuries, using immunohistochemistry and focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography. We induced third-degree burn injuries on the backs of Wistar rats with a heated cylindrical aluminum block (2.0 cm in diameter). At 7 and 14 days after the burn injuries, the burned skin was immunostained with anti-Iba1 and anti-HSP47 antibodies for visualization of bone marrow-derived cells/macrophages and resident stromal cells/fibroblasts, respectively. Normal skin tissue was used as a control. Double-staining immunohistochemistry revealed frequent contacts between macrophages and fibroblasts and a higher contact ratio in the 3 normal skin compared with burned skin, particularly in the areas of granuloma. Three-dimensional ultrastructural analysis with focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography revealed that macrophages and fibroblasts were located closer together in the normal skin than in the burned skin, confirming the analysis by light microscopic observations and ultrastructural analysis from single sections. These results highlight the importance of contact between macrophages and fibroblasts in the maintenance of skin tissue structure and during wound healing. PMID:27237937

  12. Stromal platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) provides a therapeutic target independent of tumor cell PDGFRα expression in lung cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, David E.; Gupta, Puja; Dellinger, Michael T.; Toombs, Jason E.; Peyton, Michael; Duignan, Inga; Malaby, Jennifer; Bailey, Timothy; Burns, Colleen; Brekken, Rolf A.; Loizos, Nick

    2012-01-01

    In lung cancer, platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) is expressed frequently by tumor-associated stromal cells and by cancer cells in a subset of tumors. We sought to determine the effect of targeting stromal PDGFRα in preclinical lung tumor xenograft models (human tumor, mouse stroma). Effects of anti-human (IMC-3G3) and anti-mouse (1E10) PDGFRα mAbs on proliferation and PDGFRα signaling were evaluated in lung cancer cell lines and mouse fibroblasts. Therapy studies were performed using established PDGFRα-positive H1703 cells and PDGFRα-negative Calu-6, H1993, and A549 subcutaneous tumors in immunocompromised mice treated with vehicle, anti-PDGFRα mAbs, chemotherapy, or combination therapy. Tumors were analyzed for growth and levels of growth factors. IMC-3G3 inhibited PDGFRα activation and the growth of H1703 cells in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, but had no effect on PDGFRα-negative cell lines or mouse fibroblasts. 1E10 inhibited growth and PDGFRα activation of mouse fibroblasts, but had no effect on human cancer cell lines in vitro. In vivo, 1E10-targeted inhibition of murine PDGFRα reduced tumor growth as single-agent therapy in Calu-6 cells and enhanced the effect of chemotherapy in xenografts derived from A549 cells. We also identified that low expression cancer cell expression of VEGF-A and elevated expression of PDGF-AA were associated with response to stromal PDGFRα targeting. We conclude that stromal PDGFRα inhibition represents a means for enhancing control of lung cancer growth in some cases, independent of tumor cell PDGFRα expression. PMID:22933705

  13. Treatment for Stromal Tumors of the Ovary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Ovarian Cancer » Detailed Guide » Treatment for stromal tumors of the ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Ovarian Cancer + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » Treating Ovarian ...

  14. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH): a brief review.

    PubMed

    Jaunoo, S S; Thrush, S; Dunn, P

    2011-01-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a benign entity of the breast and typically found incidentally. It warrants thorough investigation in order to exclude more sinister pathology masquerading as this form of benign breast disease and can often be managed expectantly without the need for surgical intervention. We provide a brief review of the literature on PASH, discussing its clinicopathological features and management. PMID:20887819

  15. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...-managing agencies on adjacent lands (both public and private)....

  16. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...-managing agencies on adjacent lands (both public and private)....

  17. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of off-road vehicle use on Reclamation lands will...

  18. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...-managing agencies on adjacent lands (both public and private)....

  19. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  20. Experimental Models for Investigating Intra-Stromal Migration of Corneal Keratocytes, Fibroblasts and Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Petroll, Walter Matthew; Lakshman, Neema; Ma, Lisha

    2012-01-01

    Following laser vision correction, corneal keratocytes must repopulate areas of cell loss by migrating through the intact corneal stroma, and this can impact corneal shape and transparency. In this study, we evaluate 3D culture models for simulating this process in vitro. Buttons (8 mm diameter) were first punched out of keratocyte populated compressed collagen matrices, exposed to a 3 mm diameter freeze injury, and cultured in serum-free media (basal media) or media supplemented with 10% FBS, TGFβ1 or PDGF BB. Following freeze injury, a region of cell death was observed in the center of the constructs. Although cells readily migrated on top of the matrices to cover the wound area, a limited amount of cell migration was observed within the constructs. We next developed a novel “sandwich” model, which better mimics the native lamellar architecture of the cornea. Using this model, significant migration was observed under all conditions studied. In both models, cells in TGFβ and 10% FBS developed stress fibers; whereas cells in PDGF were more dendritic. PDGF stimulated the most inter-lamellar migration in the sandwich construct. Overall, these models provide insights into the complex interplay between growth factors, cell mechanical phenotypes and the structural properties of the ECM. PMID:23482859

  1. Stromal Cells Positively and Negatively Modulate the Growth of Cancer Cells: Stimulation via the PGE2-TNFα-IL-6 Pathway and Inhibition via Secreted GAPDH-E-Cadherin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Manabu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ohba, Shun-ichi; Yoshida, Junjiro; Masuda, Tohru; Yamasaki, Manabu; Usami, Ihomi; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Abe, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takumi; Yamori, Takao; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Nomoto, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast-like stromal cells modulate cancer cells through secreted factors and adhesion, but those factors are not fully understood. Here, we have identified critical stromal factors that modulate cancer growth positively and negatively. Using a cell co-culture system, we found that gastric stromal cells secreted IL-6 as a growth and survival factor for gastric cancer cells. Moreover, gastric cancer cells secreted PGE2 and TNFα that stimulated IL-6 secretion by the stromal cells. Furthermore, we found that stromal cells secreted glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Extracellular GAPDH, or its N-terminal domain, inhibited gastric cancer cell growth, a finding confirmed in other cell systems. GAPDH bound to E-cadherin and downregulated the mTOR-p70S6 kinase pathway. These results demonstrate that stromal cells could regulate cancer cell growth through the balance of these secreted factors. We propose that negative regulation of cancer growth using GAPDH could be a new anti-cancer strategy. PMID:25785838

  2. Differential Mechanical Response of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Fibroblasts to Tumor-Secreted Soluble Factors

    PubMed Central

    McGrail, Daniel J.; Ghosh, Deepraj; Quach, Nhat D.; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2012-01-01

    The progression of neoplastic malignancies is a complex process resulting not only from the accumulation of mutations within tumor cells, but also modulation of the tumor microenvironment. Recent advances have shown that the recruitment and subsequent heterotypic interactions of stromal cells—including fibroblasts and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)—are crucial for carcinogenesis. Though extensive work has been done analyzing the signals that recruit these cells, the governing mechanical properties have not been fully investigated. Here, we report that despite their initial similarities, MSCs respond not only faster but also more dramatically to pro-migratory tumor-secreted soluble factors. Utilizing multiple particle tracking microrheology to probe the cytoskeletal mechanical properties, we show that MSCs stiffen completely within one hour, three times faster than fibroblasts. In addition, unlike fibroblasts, MSCs exposed to tumor-secreted soluble factors display a functionally different phenotype characterized by morphological elongation, decreased actin stress fiber density, and decreased adhesion. Quantitative real-time PCR indicates these phenomena occur based on differential expression of small GTPases RhoA and Cdc42, but not Rac1. These findings demonstrate a fundamental difference in the recruitment of fibroblasts and MSCs. PMID:22438903

  3. Differential mechanical response of mesenchymal stem cells and fibroblasts to tumor-secreted soluble factors.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Daniel J; Ghosh, Deepraj; Quach, Nhat D; Dawson, Michelle R

    2012-01-01

    The progression of neoplastic malignancies is a complex process resulting not only from the accumulation of mutations within tumor cells, but also modulation of the tumor microenvironment. Recent advances have shown that the recruitment and subsequent heterotypic interactions of stromal cells--including fibroblasts and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)--are crucial for carcinogenesis. Though extensive work has been done analyzing the signals that recruit these cells, the governing mechanical properties have not been fully investigated. Here, we report that despite their initial similarities, MSCs respond not only faster but also more dramatically to pro-migratory tumor-secreted soluble factors. Utilizing multiple particle tracking microrheology to probe the cytoskeletal mechanical properties, we show that MSCs stiffen completely within one hour, three times faster than fibroblasts. In addition, unlike fibroblasts, MSCs exposed to tumor-secreted soluble factors display a functionally different phenotype characterized by morphological elongation, decreased actin stress fiber density, and decreased adhesion. Quantitative real-time PCR indicates these phenomena occur based on differential expression of small GTPases RhoA and Cdc42, but not Rac1. These findings demonstrate a fundamental difference in the recruitment of fibroblasts and MSCs. PMID:22438903

  4. Impaired Capacity of Fibroblasts to Support Airway Epithelial Progenitors in Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Su-Bei; Sun, Xin; Wu, Qi; Wu, Jun-Ping; Chen, Huai-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) often develops in transplant patients and results in injury to the respiratory and terminal airway epithelium. Owing to its rising incidence, the pathogenesis of BOS is currently an area of intensive research. Studies have shown that injury to the respiratory epithelium results in dysregulation of epithelial repair. Airway epithelial regeneration is supported by stromal cells, including fibroblasts. This study aimed to investigate whether the supportive role of lung fibroblasts is altered in BOS. Methods: Suspensions of lung cells were prepared by enzyme digestion. Lung progenitor cells (LPCs) were separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Lung fibroblasts from patients with BOS or healthy controls were mixed with sorted mouse LPCs to compare the colony-forming efficiency of LPCs by counting the number of colonies with a diameter of ≥50 μm in each culture. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS 17.0 software (SPSS Inc., USA). The paired Student's t-test was used to test for statistical significance. Results: LPCs were isolated with the surface phenotype of CD31- CD34- CD45- EpCAM+ Sca-1+. The colony-forming efficiency of LPCs was significantly reduced when co-cultured with fibroblasts isolated from patients with BOS. The addition of SB431542 increased the colony-forming efficiency of LPCs to 1.8%; however, it was still significantly less than that in co-culture with healthy control fibroblasts (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The epithelial-supportive capacity of fibroblasts is impaired in the development of BOS and suggest that inefficient repair of airway epithelium could contribute to persistent airway inflammation in BOS. PMID:27569228

  5. Defining Essential Stem Cell Characteristics in Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Extracted from Distinct Anatomical Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Patrick C.; Francis, Michael P.; Zhao, Min; Brumelle, Jenni; Rao, Raj R.; Elmore, Lynne W.; Holt, Shawn E.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) has created many opportunities for the development of patient-specific cell-based replacement therapies. We have isolated multiple cell strains of ASCs from various anatomical sites (abdomen, arms/legs, breast, buttocks), indicating wide-spread distribution of ASCs throughout the body. Unfortunately, there exists a general lack of agreement in the literature as to their “stem cell” characteristics. We find that telomerase activity and expression of its catalytic subunit in ASCs are both below the levels of detection, independent of age and culturing conditions. ASCs also undergo telomere attrition and eventually senesce, while maintaining a stable karyotype without the development of spontaneous tumor-associated abnormalities. Using a set of cell surface markers that have been promoted to identify ASCs, we find that they failed to distinguish ASCs from normal fibroblasts, as both are positive for CD29, CD73, and CD105 and negative for CD14, CD31, and CD45. All of the ASC isolates are multipotent, capable of differentiating into osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, while fibroblasts show no differentiation potential. Our ASC strains also show elevated expression of genes associated with pluripotent cells, Oct-4, SOX2, and NANOG when compared to fibroblasts and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), although the levels were lower than induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). Together, our data suggest that while the cell surface profile of ASCs does not distinguish them from normal fibroblasts, their differentiation capacity and the expression of genes closely linked to pluripotency clearly define ASCs as multipotent stem cells, regardless of tissue isolation location. PMID:22628159

  6. Expression and targeting of human fibroblast activation protein in a human skin/severe combined immunodeficient mouse breast cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Tahtis, Kiki; Lee, Fook-Thean; Wheatley, Jennifer M; Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Park, John E; Smyth, Fiona E; Obata, Yuichi; Stockert, Elisabeth; Hall, Cathrine M; Old, Lloyd J; Rettig, Wolfgang J; Scott, Andrew M

    2003-08-01

    Antigens and receptors that are highly expressed on tumor stromal cells, such as fibroblast activation protein (FAP), are attractive targets for antibody-based therapies because the supporting stroma and vessel network is essential for a solid neoplasm to grow beyond a size of 1-2 mm. The in vivo characterization of antibodies targeting human stromal or vessel antigens is hindered by the lack of an appropriate mouse model system because xenografts in standard mouse models express stromal and vessels elements of murine origin. This limitation may be overcome by the development of a human skin/mouse chimeric model, which is established by transplanting human foreskin on to the lateral flank of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The subsequent inoculation of breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells within the dermis of the transplanted human skin resulted in the production of xenografts expressing stromal and vessel elements of human origin. Widespread expression of human FAP-positive reactive stromal fibroblasts within xenografts was seen up to 2 months posttransplantation and postinjection of cells. Human blood vessel antigen expression also persisted at 2 months posttransplantation and postinjection of cells with murine vessels coexisting with the human vascular supply. The model was subsequently used to evaluate the biodistribution properties of an iodine-131-labeled humanized anti-FAP monoclonal antibody (BIBH-7). The results showed high specific targeting of the stromal compartment of the xenograft, indicating that the model provides a useful and novel approach for the in vivo assessment of the immunotherapeutic potential of molecules targeting human stroma and angiogenic systems. PMID:12939462

  7. Stromal elements act to restrain, rather than support, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rhim, Andrew D.; Oberstein, Paul E.; Thomas, Dafydd H.; Mirek, Emily T.; Palermo, Carmine F.; Sastra, Steve A.; Dekleva, Erin N.; Saunders, Tyler; Becerra, Claudia P; Tattersall, Ian W.; Westphalen, C. Benedikt; Kitajewski, Jan; Fernandez-Barrena, Maite G.; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Iacobuzzio-Donahue, Christine; Olive, Kenneth P.; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a soluble ligand overexpres sed by neoplastic cells in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), drives formation of a fibroblast-rich desmoplastic stroma. To better understand its role in malignant progression, we deleted Shh in a well-defined mouse model of PDAC. As predicted, Shh-deficient tumors had reduced stromal content. Surprisingly, such tumors were more aggressive and exhibited undifferentiated histology, increased vascularity, and heightened proliferation – features that were fully recapitulated in control mice treated with a Smoothened inhibitor. Furthermore, administration of VEGFR blocking antibody selectively improved survival of Shh-deficient tumors, indicating that Hedgehog-driven stroma suppresses tumor growth in part by restraining tumor angiogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that some components of the tumor stroma can act to restrain tumor growth. PMID:24856585

  8. Characteristics of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Isolated from Human Endometrium and Endometriosis Lesions.

    PubMed

    Savilova, A M; Yushina, M N; Rudimova, Yu V; Khabas, G N; Chuprynin, V D; Sukhikh, G T

    2016-08-01

    Cell cultures isolated from endometriosis lesions by enzymatic dissociation consisted of fibroblast-like cells expressing CD90, CD73, and CD105; cell viability in these cultures was >90%, but this parameter decreased by passage 3. Zero passage cultures contained 10-25% epithelial cells expressing cytokeratin-7, but by passage 2, the cultures became more homogeneous and epithelial cells disappeared. The proportion of proliferating cells and population doubling level increased from passage 1 to passage 3. The cultures from the endometrium were induced to adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. The cultures derived from ectopic endometrium have properties of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells that exhibited in vitro similarities and differences from cell cultures from eutopic endometrium, which allows using this cell model for the search and testing of new drugs and technologies aimed at suppression of the growth and spread of endometriosis lesions. PMID:27590769

  9. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stromal cells contribute to periodontal regeneration in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinbo; Ge, Shaohua; Chen, Shulan; Xu, Quanchen; Zhang, Jin; Guo, Hongmei; Yang, Pishan

    2013-01-01

    Gingiva-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (GMSCs) have been considered as a promising alternative strategy for periodontal regeneration based on their potential for multilineage differentiation in vitro and the ability to form new bone in vivo. In order to investigate the capacity of GMSCs for periodontal regeneration and the fate of GMSCs during periodontal tissue repair, enhanced green fluorescent protein-labeled GMSCs were transplanted into class III furcation defects created in beagle dogs. The results showed that the transplanted GMSCs significantly enhanced the regeneration of the damaged periodontal tissue, including the alveolar bone, cementum and functional periodontal ligament (PDL). Moreover, GMSCs were able to differentiate into osteoblasts, cementoblasts and PDL fibroblasts in vivo. These findings indicate that GMSCs represent a novel cell source for periodontal tissue reconstruction. PMID:24777155

  10. Unilateral gynecomastia and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia in neurofibromatosis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Akihide; Shimajiri, Shohei; Sasaguri, Takakazu; Yamada, Sohsuke; Wang, Ke-Yong; Guo, Xin; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2012-05-15

    In this article, we describe unilateral gynecomastia and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) in a case of type-1 neurofibromatosis (NF-1). It is important to distinguish PASH from fibroadenoma clinically, and from true blood capillaries and angiosarcoma histologically. In the present case, giant multinucleated cells lined the pseudovascular spaces, which was markedly different from that of conventional breast PASH. The origin of PASH has been reported to be either the fibroblast or the myofibroblast phenotype and may be affected by endocrine signaling because many cases have been reported in premenopausal women, and cases are often estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) positive. However, previous reports have identified PASH in NF-1 in juvenile males only, and the cases were negative for α-SMA, ER and PR. The cause and prognosis of PASH in NF-1 may be distinguished from that of conventional PASH, and mast cells, histiocytes and CD54 may play roles. PMID:22520406

  11. Conditioned Media From Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Accelerates Healing in 3-Dimensional Skin Cultures.

    PubMed

    Collawn, Sherry S; Mobley, James A; Banerjee, N Sanjib; Chow, Louise T

    2016-04-01

    Wound healing involves a number of factors that results in the production of a "closed" wound. Studies have shown, in animal models, acceleration of wound healing with the addition of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSC). The cause for the positive effect which these cells have on wound healing has not been elucidated. We have previously shown that addition of ADSC to the dermal equivalent in 3-dimensional skin cultures accelerates reepithelialization. We now demonstrate that conditioned media (CM) from cultured ADSC produced a similar rate of healing. This result suggests that a feedback from the 3-dimensional epithelial cultures to ADSC was not necessary to effect the accelerated reepithelialization. Mass spectrometry of CM from ADSC and primary human fibroblasts revealed differences in secretomes, some of which might have roles in the accelerating wound healing. Thus, the use of CM has provided some preliminary information on a possible mode of action. PMID:26954733

  12. Human liver myofibroblasts during development and diseases with a focus on portal (myo)fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lepreux, Sébastien; Desmoulière, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are stromal cells mainly involved in tissue repair. These cells present contractile properties and play a major role in extracellular matrix deposition and remodeling. In liver, myofibroblasts are found in two critical situations. First, during fetal liver development, especially in portal tracts, myofibroblasts surround vessels and bile ducts during their maturation. After complete development of the liver, myofibroblasts disappear and are replaced in portal tracts by portal fibroblasts. Second, during liver injury, myofibroblasts re-appear principally deriving from the activation of local stromal cells such as portal fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells or can sometimes emerge by an epithelial-mesenchymal transition process. After acute injury, myofibroblasts play also a major role during liver regeneration. While myofibroblastic precursor cells are well known, the spectrum of activation and the fate of myofibroblasts during disease evolution are not fully understood. Some data are in accordance with a possible deactivation, at least partial, or a disappearance by apoptosis. Despite these shadows, liver is definitively a pertinent model showing that myofibroblasts are pivotal cells for extracellular matrix control during morphogenesis, repair and fibrous scarring. PMID:26157391

  13. P2X7 receptors mediate deleterious renal epithelial-fibroblast cross talk.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Murugavel; Ma, Li; Gong, Rujun; Pang, Maoyin; Chin, Y Eugene; Zhuang, Shougang

    2011-01-01

    Peritubular fibroblasts in the kidney are the major erythropoietin-producing cells and also contribute to renal repair following acute kidney injury (AKI). Although few fibroblasts were observed in the interstitium adjacent to damaged tubular epithelium in the early phase of AKI, the underlying mechanism by which their numbers were reduced remains unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that damaged renal epithelial cells directly induce renal interstitial fibroblast death by releasing intracellular ATP and activating purinergic signaling. Exposure of a cultured rat renal interstitial fibroblast cell line (NRK-49F) to necrotic renal proximal tubular cells (RPTC) lysate or supernatant induced NRK-49F cell death by apoptosis and necrosis. Depletion of ATP with apyrase or inhibition of the P2X purinergic receptor with pyridoxal phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid blocked the deleterious effect of necrotic RPTC supernatant. The P2X7 receptor, an ATP-sensitive purinergic receptor, was not detected in cultured NRK-49F cells but was inducible by necrotic RPTC supernatant. Treatment with A438079, a highly selective P2X7 receptor inhibitor, or knockdown of the P2X7 receptor with small interference RNA diminished renal fibroblast death induced by necrotic RPTC supernatant. Conversely, overexpression of the P2X7 receptor potentiated this response. Collectively, these findings provide strong evidence that damaged renal epithelial cells can directly induce the death of renal interstitial fibroblasts by ATP activation of the P2X7 receptor. PMID:20861083

  14. Leptin as a mediator of tumor-stromal interactions promotes breast cancer stem cell activity.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Cinzia; Chemi, Francesca; Panza, Salvatore; Barone, Ines; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Lanzino, Marilena; Cordella, Angela; Campana, Antonella; Hashim, Adnan; Rizza, Pietro; Leggio, Antonella; Győrffy, Balázs; Simões, Bruno M; Clarke, Robert B; Weisz, Alessandro; Catalano, Stefania; Andò, Sebastiano

    2016-01-12

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) play crucial roles in tumor initiation, metastasis and therapeutic resistance. A strict dependency between BCSCs and stromal cell components of tumor microenvironment exists. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies aimed to target the crosstalk between activated microenvironment and BCSCs have the potential to improve clinical outcome. Here, we investigated how leptin, as a mediator of tumor-stromal interactions, may affect BCSC activity using patient-derived samples (n = 16) and breast cancer cell lines, and determined the potential benefit of targeting leptin signaling in these model systems. Conditioned media (CM) from cancer-associated fibroblasts and breast adipocytes significantly increased mammosphere formation in breast cancer cells and depletion of leptin from CM completely abrogated this effect. Mammosphere cultures exhibited increased leptin receptor (OBR) expression and leptin exposure enhanced mammosphere formation. Microarray analyses revealed a similar expression profile of genes involved in stem cell biology among mammospheres treated with CM and leptin. Interestingly, leptin increased mammosphere formation in metastatic breast cancers and expression of OBR as well as HSP90, a target of leptin signaling, were directly correlated with mammosphere formation in metastatic samples (r = 0.68/p = 0.05; r = 0.71/p = 0.036, respectively). Kaplan-Meier survival curves indicated that OBR and HSP90 expression were associated with reduced overall survival in breast cancer patients (HR = 1.9/p = 0.022; HR = 2.2/p = 0.00017, respectively). Furthermore, blocking leptin signaling by using a full leptin receptor antagonist significantly reduced mammosphere formation in breast cancer cell lines and patient-derived samples. Our results suggest that leptin/leptin receptor signaling may represent a potential therapeutic target that can block the stromal-tumor interactions driving BCSC-mediated disease progression. PMID:26556856

  15. Functional differences in mesenchymal stromal cells from human dental pulp and periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Vasandan, Anoop Babu; Shankar, Shilpa Rani; Prasad, Priya; Sowmya Jahnavi, Vulugundam; Bhonde, Ramesh Ramachandra; Jyothi Prasanna, Susarla

    2014-02-01

    Clinically reported reparative benefits of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are majorly attributed to strong immune-modulatory abilities not exactly shared by fibroblasts. However, MSCs remain heterogeneous populations, with unique tissue-specific subsets, and lack of clear-cut assays defining therapeutic stromal subsets adds further ambiguity to the field. In this context, in-depth evaluation of cellular characteristics of MSCs from proximal oro-facial tissues: dental pulp (DPSCs) and periodontal ligament (PDLSCs) from identical donors provides an opportunity to evaluate exclusive niche-specific influences on multipotency and immune-modulation. Exhaustive cell surface profiling of DPSCs and PDLSCs indicated key differences in expression of mesenchymal (CD105) and pluripotent/multipotent stem cell-associated cell surface antigens: SSEA4, CD117, CD123 and CD29. DPSCs and PDLSCs exhibited strong chondrogenic potential, but only DPSCs exhibited adipogenic and osteogenic propensities. PDLSCs expressed immuno-stimulatory/immune-adhesive ligands like HLA-DR and CD50, upon priming with IFNγ, unlike DPSCs, indicating differential response patterns to pro-inflammatory cytokines. Both DPSCs and PDLSCs were hypo-immunogenic and did not elicit robust allogeneic responses despite exposure to IFNγ or TNFα. Interestingly, only DPSCs attenuated mitogen-induced lympho-proliferative responses and priming with either IFNγ or TNFα enhanced immuno-modulation capacity. In contrast, primed or unprimed PDLSCs lacked the ability to suppress polyclonal T cell blast responses. This study indicates that stromal cells from even topographically related tissues do not necessarily share identical MSC properties and emphasizes the need for a thorough functional testing of MSCs from diverse sources with respect to multipotency, immune parameters and response to pro-inflammatory cytokines before translational usage. PMID:24393246

  16. Ultrastructural study of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells induced towards osteogenic direction.

    PubMed

    Tsupykov, Oleg; Ustymenko, Alina; Kyryk, Vitaliy; Smozhanik, Ekaterina; Yatsenko, Kateryna; Butenko, Gennadii; Skibo, Galina

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the ultrastructural characteristics of mouse adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs) induced towards osteogenic lineage. ASCs were isolated from adipose tissue of FVB-Cg-Tg(GFPU)5Nagy/J mice and expanded in monolayer culture. Flow cytometry, histochemical staining, and electron microscopy techniques were used to characterize the ASCs with respect to their ability for osteogenic differentiation capacity. Immunophenotypically, ASCs were characterized by high expression of the CD44 and CD90 markers, while the relative content of cells expressing CD45, CD34 and CD117 markers was <2%. In assays of differentiation, the positive response to osteogenic differentiation factors was observed and characterized by deposition of calcium in the extracellular matrix and alkaline phosphatase production. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that undifferentiated ASCs had a rough endoplasmic reticulum with dilated cisterns and elongated mitochondria. At the end of the osteogenic differentiation, the ASCs transformed from their original fibroblast-like appearance to having a polygonal osteoblast-like morphology. Ultrastructurally, these cells were characterized by large euchromatic nucleus and numerous cytoplasm containing elongated mitochondria, a very prominent rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and intermediate filament bundles. Extracellular matrix vesicles of variable size similar to the calcification nodules were observed among collagen fibrils. Our data provide the ultrastructural basis for further studies on the cellular mechanisms involved in osteogenic differentiation of mouse adipose-derived stem/stromal cells. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:557-564, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27087359

  17. Visualizing stromal cell dynamics in different tumor microenvironments by spinning disk confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Egeblad, Mikala; Ewald, Andrew J.; Askautrud, Hanne A.; Truitt, Morgan L.; Welm, Bryan E.; Bainbridge, Emma; Peeters, George; Krummel, Matthew F.; Werb, Zena

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The tumor microenvironment consists of stromal cells and extracellular factors that evolve in parallel with carcinoma cells. To gain insights into the activities of stromal cell populations, we developed and applied multicolor imaging techniques to analyze the behavior of these cells within different tumor microenvironments in the same live mouse. We found that regulatory T-lymphocytes (Tregs) migrated in proximity to blood vessels. Dendritic-like cells, myeloid cells and carcinoma-associated fibroblasts all exhibited higher motility in the microenvironment at the tumor periphery than within the tumor mass. Since oxygen levels differ between tumor microenvironments, we tested if acute hypoxia could account for the differences in cell migration. Direct visualization revealed that Tregs ceased migration under acute systemic hypoxia, whereas myeloid cells continued migrating. In the same mouse and microenvironment, we experimentally subdivided the myeloid cell population and revealed that uptake of fluorescent dextran defined a low-motility subpopulation expressing markers of tumor-promoting, alternatively activated macrophages. In contrast, fluorescent anti-Gr1 antibodies marked myeloid cells patrolling inside tumor vessels and in the stroma. Our techniques allow real-time combinatorial analysis of cell populations based on spatial location, gene expression, behavior and cell surface molecules within intact tumors. The techniques are not limited to investigations in cancer, but could give new insights into cell behavior more broadly in development and disease. PMID:19048079

  18. Tumor-Promoting Desmoplasia Is Disrupted by Depleting FAP-Expressing Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Lo, Albert; Wang, Liang-Chuan S; Scholler, John; Monslow, James; Avery, Diana; Newick, Kheng; O'Brien, Shaun; Evans, Rebecca A; Bajor, David J; Clendenin, Cynthia; Durham, Amy C; Buza, Elizabeth L; Vonderheide, Robert H; June, Carl H; Albelda, Steven M; Puré, Ellen

    2015-07-15

    Malignant cells drive the generation of a desmoplastic and immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Cancer-associated stromal cells (CASC) are a heterogeneous population that provides both negative and positive signals for tumor cell growth and metastasis. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a marker of a major subset of CASCs in virtually all carcinomas. Clinically, FAP expression serves as an independent negative prognostic factor for multiple types of human malignancies. Prior studies established that depletion of FAP(+) cells inhibits tumor growth by augmenting antitumor immunity. However, the potential for immune-independent effects on tumor growth have not been defined. Herein, we demonstrate that FAP(+) CASCs are required for maintenance of the provisional tumor stroma because depletion of these cells, by adoptive transfer of FAP-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, reduced extracellular matrix proteins and glycosaminoglycans. Adoptive transfer of FAP-CAR T cells also decreased tumor vascular density and restrained growth of desmoplastic human lung cancer xenografts and syngeneic murine pancreatic cancers in an immune-independent fashion. Adoptive transfer of FAP-CAR T cells also restrained autochthonous pancreatic cancer growth. These data distinguish the function of FAP(+) CASCs from other CASC subsets and provide support for further development of FAP(+) stromal cell-targeted therapies for the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:25979873

  19. Isolation, Culture, and Characterization of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Bieback, Karen; Netsch, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (CB) is considered one of the youngest available sources of adult stem cells. Besides hematopoietic stem cells, CB has been shown to contain endothelial progenitor cells as well as mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC). To isolate MSC from cord blood, CB is collected into a sterile bag containing the anticoagulant citrate-phosphate-dextrose (CPD). The CB is then processed by density-gradient centrifugation to obtain mononuclear cells (MNC). These are cultured until the outgrowth of fibroblastoid cell colonies appears. After reaching a subconfluent stage, cells are harvested, expanded, and characterized as cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells (CB-MSC) according to standard criteria: plastic adherence, fibroblast morphology, CFU-f assay, proliferation potential, immune phenotype, and differentiation potential.Apparently, the frequency of MSC in CB is extremely low. Thus, not every CB unit will provide adequate MSC isolation yields. Different strategies have been proposed aiming to optimize the isolation success by selecting CB units of optimal quality. It is commonly agreed on that a high CB volume, a high cellular content, and a short time frame between birth and MSC isolation are criteria that will enhance the MSC isolation success.The procedures in this chapter are standardized protocols that were established and optimized in the authors' research laboratory; however, various modifications of the protocols are possible. PMID:27236676

  20. Stromal modulation and its role in the diagnosis of papillary patterned thyroid lesions.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Sahar Aly; Esmail, Reham Shehab El Nemr; Hareedy, Amal Ahmed; Khalil, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The papillary patterned lesion of thyroid may be challenging with many diagnostic pitfalls. Tumor stroma plays an important part in the determination of the tumor phenotype. CD34 is thought to be involved in the modulation of cell adhesion and signal transduction as CD34(+) fibrocytes are potent antigen-presenting cells. Smooth muscle actin (SMA) positivity could be diagnostic for fibroblast activation during tumorigenesis. We aimed to examine the expression of CD34 and alphaSMA in the stroma of papillary thyroid hyperplasia, papillary thyroid carcinoma and papillary tumors of uncertain malignant potential in order to elucidate their possible differential distribution and roles. A total number of 54 cases with papillary thyroid lesions were studied by routine HandE staining, CD34 and ASMA immunostaining. ASMA was not expressed in benign papillary hyperplastic lesions while it was expressed in papillary carcinoma, indicating that tumors have modulated stroma. Although the stroma was not well developed in papillary lesions with equivocal features of uncertain potentiality, CD34 was notable in such cases with higher incidence in malignant cases. So ASMA as well as CD34 could predict neoplastic behavior, pointing to the importance of the stromal role. Differences between groups suggest that the presence of CD34 + stromal cells is an early event in carcinogensis and is associated with neoplasia, however ASMA+ cells are more likely to be associated with malignant behavior and metastatic potential adding additional tools to the light microscopic picture helping in diagnosis of problematic cases with HandE. PMID:25921136

  1. Stromal SLIT2 impacts on pancreatic cancer-associated neural remodeling.

    PubMed

    Secq, V; Leca, J; Bressy, C; Guillaumond, F; Skrobuk, P; Nigri, J; Lac, S; Lavaut, M-N; Bui, T-T; Thakur, A K; Callizot, N; Steinschneider, R; Berthezene, P; Dusetti, N; Ouaissi, M; Moutardier, V; Calvo, E; Bousquet, C; Garcia, S; Bidaut, G; Vasseur, S; Iovanna, J L; Tomasini, R

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a critical health issue in the field of cancer, with few therapeutic options. Evidence supports an implication of the intratumoral microenvironment (stroma) on PDA progression. However, its contribution to the role of neuroplastic changes within the pathophysiology and clinical course of PDA, through tumor recurrence and neuropathic pain, remains unknown, neglecting a putative, therapeutic window. Here, we report that the intratumoral microenvironment is a mediator of PDA-associated neural remodeling (PANR), and we highlight factors such as 'SLIT2' (an axon guidance molecule), which is expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), that impact on neuroplastic changes in human PDA. We showed that 'CAF-secreted SLIT2' increases neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia neurons as well as from Schwann cell migration/proliferation by modulating N-cadherin/β-catenin signaling. Importantly, SLIT2/ROBO signaling inhibition disrupts this stromal/neural connection. Finally, we revealed that SLIT2 expression and CAFs are correlated with neural remodeling within human and mouse PDA. All together, our data demonstrate the implication of CAFs, through the secretion of axon guidance molecule, in PANR. Furthermore, it provides rationale to investigate the disruption of the stromal/neural compartment connection with SLIT2/ROBO inhibitors for the treatment of pancreatic cancer recurrence and pain. PMID:25590802

  2. Stromal SLIT2 impacts on pancreatic cancer-associated neural remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Secq, V; Leca, J; Bressy, C; Guillaumond, F; Skrobuk, P; Nigri, J; Lac, S; Lavaut, M-N; Bui, T-t; Thakur, A K; Callizot, N; Steinschneider, R; Berthezene, P; Dusetti, N; Ouaissi, M; Moutardier, V; Calvo, E; Bousquet, C; Garcia, S; Bidaut, G; Vasseur, S; Iovanna, J L; Tomasini, R

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a critical health issue in the field of cancer, with few therapeutic options. Evidence supports an implication of the intratumoral microenvironment (stroma) on PDA progression. However, its contribution to the role of neuroplastic changes within the pathophysiology and clinical course of PDA, through tumor recurrence and neuropathic pain, remains unknown, neglecting a putative, therapeutic window. Here, we report that the intratumoral microenvironment is a mediator of PDA-associated neural remodeling (PANR), and we highlight factors such as ‘SLIT2' (an axon guidance molecule), which is expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), that impact on neuroplastic changes in human PDA. We showed that ‘CAF-secreted SLIT2' increases neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia neurons as well as from Schwann cell migration/proliferation by modulating N-cadherin/β-catenin signaling. Importantly, SLIT2/ROBO signaling inhibition disrupts this stromal/neural connection. Finally, we revealed that SLIT2 expression and CAFs are correlated with neural remodeling within human and mouse PDA. All together, our data demonstrate the implication of CAFs, through the secretion of axon guidance molecule, in PANR. Furthermore, it provides rationale to investigate the disruption of the stromal/neural compartment connection with SLIT2/ROBO inhibitors for the treatment of pancreatic cancer recurrence and pain. PMID:25590802

  3. Sequential cultivation of human epidermal keratinocytes and dermal mesenchymal like stromal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mahabal, Shyam; Konala, Vijay Bhaskar Reddy; Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Kanafi, Mohammad Mahboob; Mishra, Suniti; Shankar, Krupa; Pal, Rajarshi; Bhonde, Ramesh

    2016-08-01

    Human skin has continuous self-renewal potential throughout adult life and serves as first line of defence. Its cellular components such as human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) and dermal mesenchymal stromal cells (DMSCs) are valuable resources for wound healing applications and cell based therapies. Here we show a simple, scalable and cost-effective method for sequential isolation and propagation of HEKs and DMSCs under defined culture conditions. Human skin biopsy samples obtained surgically were cut into fine pieces and cultured employing explant technique. Plated skin samples attached and showed outgrowth of HEKs. Gross microscopic examination displayed polygonal cells with a granular cytoplasm and H&E staining revealed archetypal HEK morphology. RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry authenticated the presence of key HEK markers including trans-membrane protein epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin), keratins and cytokeratin. After collection of HEKs by trypsin-EDTA treatment, mother explants were left intact and cultured further. Interestingly, we observed the appearance of another cell type with fibroblastic or stromal morphology which were able to grow up to 15 passages in vitro. Growth pattern, expression of cytoskeletal protein vimentin, surface proteins such as CD44, CD73, CD90, CD166 and mesodermal differentiation potential into osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes confirmed their bonafide mesenchymal stem cell like status. These findings albeit preliminary may open up significant opportunities for novel applications in wound healing. PMID:25698160

  4. Tumor and Stromal-Based Contributions to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Markwell, Steven M.; Weed, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is typically diagnosed at advanced stages with evident loco-regional and/or distal metastases. The prevalence of metastatic lesions directly correlates with poor patient outcome, resulting in high patient mortality rates following metastatic development. The progression to metastatic disease requires changes not only in the carcinoma cells, but also in the surrounding stromal cells and tumor microenvironment. Within the microenvironment, acellular contributions from the surrounding extracellular matrix, along with contributions from various infiltrating immune cells, tumor associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells facilitate the spread of tumor cells from the primary site to the rest of the body. Thus far, most attempts to limit metastatic spread through therapeutic intervention have failed to show patient benefit in clinic trails. The goal of this review is highlight the complexity of invasion-promoting interactions in the HNSCC tumor microenvironment, focusing on contributions from tumor and stromal cells in order to assist future therapeutic development and patient treatment. PMID:25734659

  5. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 expression in baboon endometrial stromal cells: regulation by filamentous actin and requirement for de novo protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, J J; Jaffe, R C; Fazleabas, A T

    1999-02-01

    Stromal fibroblasts in the primate endometrium undergo dramatic morphological and biochemical changes in response to pregnancy. This transformation is characterized by the expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1). Stromal cells from the baboon endometrium of nonpregnant animals were cultured and subsequently treated with cytochalasin D to disrupt actin filaments. In response to cytochalasin D treatment, cells contracted and became rounded as early as 10 min after the initiation of treatment. When cytochalasin D was removed, cells reverted back to their original fibroblastic shape within 1 h. After cells were treated with cytochalasin D for 5 h, addition of (Bu)2cAMP and/or hormones (estradiol, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and relaxin) resulted in the expression of IGFBP-1 messenger RNA and protein within 24 h. Cells with an intact cytoskeleton did not express detectable levels of IGFBP-1 in response to hormones and/or (Bu)2cAMP. Furthermore, the addition of cycloheximide inhibited expression of IGFBP-1 in cytochalasin D-treated cells. Stromal cells were also isolated from early pregnant and simulated pregnant animals. Within 48 h, cells from both the pregnant and simulated pregnant animals produced IGFBP-1 in response to hormones and/or (Bu)2cAMP. In these studies, IGFBP-1 expression was also inhibited by cycloheximide. These studies suggest that induction of IGFBP-1 requires an intermediary protein and that alterations in the cytoskeleton may be involved. PMID:9927334

  6. Integrin α11β1 regulates cancer stromal stiffness and promotes tumorigenicity and metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Navab, R; Strumpf, D; To, C; Pasko, E; Kim, K S; Park, C J; Hai, J; Liu, J; Jonkman, J; Barczyk, M; Bandarchi, B; Wang, Y H; Venkat, K; Ibrahimov, E; Pham, N-A; Ng, C; Radulovich, N; Zhu, C-Q; Pintilie, M; Wang, D; Lu, A; Jurisica, I; Walker, G C; Gullberg, D; Tsao, M-S

    2016-01-01

    Integrin α11β1 is a stromal cell-specific receptor for fibrillar collagens and is overexpressed in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). We have investigated its direct role in cancer progression by generating severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice deficient in integrin α11 (α11) expression. The growth of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells and two patient-derived non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) xenografts in these α11 knockout (α11−/−) mice was significantly impeded, as compared with wild-type (α11+/+) SCID mice. Orthotopic implantation of a spontaneously metastatic NCI-H460SM cell line into the lungs of α11−/− and α11+/+ mice showed significant reduction in the metastatic potential of these cells in the α11−/− mice. We identified that collagen cross-linking is associated with stromal α11 expression, and the loss of tumor stromal α11 expression was correlated with decreased collagen reorganization and stiffness. This study shows the role of integrin α11β1, a receptor for fibrillar collagen in differentiation of fibroblasts into CAFs. Furthermore, our data support an important role for α11 signaling pathway in CAFs, promoting tumor growth and metastatic potential of NSCLC cells and being closely associated with collagen cross-linking and the organization and stiffness of fibrillar collagen matrices. PMID:26148229

  7. Transit of normal rat uterine stromal cells through G1 phase of the cell cycle requires progesterone-growth factor interactions.

    PubMed

    Jones, S R; Kimler, B F; Justice, W M; Rider, V

    2000-02-01

    Understanding of cell cycle regulation in hormonally responsive cells lags behind studies in other systems because few models have been available to identify the role of steroid hormones and their receptors in this process. This study investigates progesterone-dependent effects on the progression of normal uterine stromal cells through early G1 phase of the cell cycle. Quiescent rat uterine stromal cells were stimulated to reenter the cell cycle by adding serum-free medium containing medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF). [3H]thymidine incorporation increased significantly (P = 0.025) in cells stimulated with both FGF alone and MPA plus FGF compared with the control cells. Moreover, cells stimulated with MPA plus FGF incorporated significantly more (P = 0.01) [3H]thymidine than cells treated with FGF alone, suggesting requisite interactions between progesterone and FGF for stromal cell entry into S phase. Flow cytometric analysis of stimulated stromal cells showed FGF alone and MPA plus FGF increased significantly (P = 0.002) the percentage of cells in S phase at 12 h. Incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into stromal cell nuclei indicated that FGF alone and MPA plus FGF increased the percentage of cells entering S phase at 18 and 24 h compared with the control cells. In addition, MPA plus FGF increased significantly (P = 0.001) the number of cells entering S phase at 24 h compared with FGF alone and sustained S phase entry compared with FGF alone, MPA alone, or the control cells. Stromal cells inhibited from G1 reentry by inhibition of mitosis showed accelerated entry into S phase in response to MPA plus FGF compared with FGF alone. Cyclin D1 messenger RNA increased in stromal cells treated with MPA plus FGF at 9, 12, and 15 h. Addition of RU 486 to cells stimulated with MPA plus FGF for 9 h reduced cyclin D1 messenger RNA accumulation by 40%. Western blot analysis of cyclin D1 immunoprecipitates indicated complex formation with

  8. Bone Marrow-Derived Multipotent Stromal Cells Promote Myocardial Fibrosis and Reverse Remodeling of the Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Fatkhudinov, Timur; Bolshakova, Galina; Arutyunyan, Irina; Elchaninov, Andrey; Makarov, Andrey; Kananykhina, Evgeniya; Khokhlova, Oksana; Murashev, Arkady; Glinkina, Valeria; Goldshtein, Dmitry; Sukhikh, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is increasingly recognized as a beneficial practice in various cardiac conditions, but its fundamentals remain largely unclear. The fates of transplanted multipotent stromal cells in postinfarction cardiac microenvironments are particularly understudied. To address this issue, labeled multipotent stromal cells were infused into rat myocardium at day 30 after myocardial infarction, against the background of postinfarction cardiosclerosis. Therapeutic effects of the transplantation were assessed by an exercise tolerance test. Histological examination at 14 or 30 days after the transplantation was conducted by means of immunostaining and quantitative image analysis. An improvement in the functional status of the cardiovascular system was observed after both the autologous and the allogeneic transplantations. Location of the label-positive cells within the heart was restricted to the affected part of myocardium. The transplanted cells could give rise to fibroblasts or myofibroblasts but not to cardiac myocytes or blood vessel cells. Both types of transplantation positively influenced scarring processes, and no expansion of fibrosis to border myocardium was observed. Left ventricular wall thickening associated with reduced dilatation index was promoted by transplantation of the autologous cells. According to the results, multipotent stromal cell transplantation prevents adverse remodeling and stimulates left ventricular reverse remodeling. PMID:25685158

  9. Long-term maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells does not require contact with embryo-derived stromal cells in cocultures.

    PubMed

    Oostendorp, Robert A J; Robin, Catherine; Steinhoff, Christine; Marz, Stefanie; Bräuer, Rosalinde; Nuber, Ulrike A; Dzierzak, Elaine A; Peschel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    We recently established that two midgestation-derived stromal clones--UG26-1B6, urogenital ridge-derived, and EL08-1D2, embryonic liver-derived--support the maintenance of murine adult bone marrow and human cord blood hematopoietic repopulating stem cells (HSCs). In this study, we investigate whether direct HSC-stroma contact is required for this stem cell maintenance. Adult bone marrow ckit+ Ly-6C- side population (K6-SP) cells and stromal cells were cocultured under contact or noncontact conditions. These experiments showed that HSCs were maintained for at least 4 weeks in culture and that direct contact between HSCs and stromal cells was not required. To find out which factors might be involved in HSC maintenance, we compared the gene expression profile of EL08-1D2 and UG26-1B6 with four HSC-nonsupportive clones. We found that EL08-1D2 and UG26-1B6 both expressed 21 genes at a higher level, including the putative secreted factors fibroblast growth factor-7, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins 3 and 4, pleiotrophin, pentaxin-related, and thrombospondin 2, whereas 11 genes, including GPX-3 and HSP27, were expressed at a lower level. In summary, we show for the first time long-term maintenance of adult bone marrow HSCs in stroma noncontact cultures and identify some secreted molecules that may be involved in this support. PMID:15917480

  10. Corneal Lymphangiogenesis in Herpetic Stromal Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Paul J; Chang, Michael; Garg, Nitin; Zhu, Jimmy; Chang, Jin-Hong; Shukla, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Corneal lymphangiogenesis is the extension of lymphatic vessels into the normally alymphatic cornea, a process that compromises the cornea’s immune privileged state and facilitates herpetic stromal keratitis (HSK). HSK results most commonly from infection by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and is characterized by immune- and inflammation-mediated damage to the deep layers of the cornea. Current research demonstrates the potential of anti-lymphangiogenic therapy to decrease and prevent herpes-induced lymphangiogenesis. PMID:25444520

  11. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the rectum.

    PubMed

    Hama, Y; Okizuka, H; Odajima, K; Hayakawa, M; Kusano, S

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized by remarkable variability in their differentiation potential, but most of these lesions do not display convincing smooth muscle or neuronal differentiation. The GISTs arising from the rectum or anal canal are extremely uncommon. We present a case of immunohistochemically proven GIST of the rectum, which was characterized by homogenous isointensity mass without necrosis or hemorrhage on T2-weighted image and by enhancement on gadolinium-enhanced study. PMID:11218017

  12. Skull metastasis from rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Gil-Arnaiz, Irene; Martínez-Trufero, Javier; Pazo-Cid, Roberto Antonio; Felipo, Francesc; Lecumberri, María José; Calderero, Verónica

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Rectum localisation is infrequent for these neoplasms, accounting for about 5% of all cases. Distant metastases of GIST are also rare. We present a patient with special features: the tumour is localised in rectum and it has an uncommon metastatic site, the skull, implying a complex differential diagnosis approach. PMID:19776004

  13. Stromal reengineering to treat pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stromnes, Ingunn M.; DelGiorno, Kathleen E.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Hingorani, Sunil R.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma co-opts multiple cellular and extracellular mechanisms to create a complex cancer organ with an unusual proclivity for metastasis and resistance to therapy. Cell-autonomous events are essential for the initiation and maintenance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, but recent studies have implicated critical non-cell autonomous processes within the robust desmoplastic stroma that promote disease pathogenesis and resistance. Thus, non-malignant cells and associated factors are culprits in tumor growth, immunosuppression and invasion. However, even this increasing awareness of non-cell autonomous contributions to disease progression is tempered by the conflicting roles stromal elements can play. A greater understanding of stromal complexity and complicity has been aided in part by studies in highly faithful genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Insights gleaned from such studies are spurring the development of therapies designed to reengineer the pancreas cancer stroma and render it permissive to agents targeting cell-autonomous events or to reinstate immunosurveillance. Integrating conventional and immunological treatments in the context of stromal targeting may provide the key to a durable clinical impact on this formidable disease. PMID:24908682

  14. Progression of genotype-specific oral cancer leads to senescence of cancer-associated fibroblasts and is mediated by oxidative stress and TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Hassona, Yazan; Cirillo, Nicola; Lim, Kue Peng; Herman, Andrew; Mellone, Max; Thomas, Gareth J; Pitiyage, Gayani N; Parkinson, E Ken; Prime, Stephen S

    2013-06-01

    Keratinocyte senescence acts as a barrier to tumor progression but appears to be lost in late pre-malignancy to yield genetically unstable oral squamous cell carcinomas (GU-OSCC); a subset of OSCC possessing wild-type p53 and are genetically stable (GS-OSCC). In this study, fibroblasts from GU-OSCC were senescent relative to fibroblasts from GS-OSCC, epithelial dysplastic tissues or normal oral mucosa, as demonstrated by increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-Gal) activity and overexpression of p16(INK4A). Keratinocytes from GU-OSCC produced high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and this was associated with an increase in the production of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and TGF-β2 in stromal fibroblasts. Treatment of normal fibroblasts with keratinocyte conditioned media (CM) from GU-OSCC, but not GS-OSCC or dysplastic keratinocytes with dysfunctional p53, induced fibroblast senescence. This phenomenon was inhibited by antioxidants and anti-TGF-β antibodies. Fibroblast activation by TGF-β1 preceded cellular senescence and was associated with increased ROS levels; antioxidants inhibited this reaction. Senescent fibroblasts derived from GU-OSCC or normal fibroblasts treated with CM from GU-OSCC or hydrogen peroxide, but not non-senescent fibroblasts derived from GS-OSCC, promoted invasion of keratinocytes in vitro. Epithelial invasion was stimulated by fibroblast activation and amplified further by fibroblast senescence. The data demonstrate that malignant keratinocytes from GU-OSCC, but not their pre-malignant counterparts, produce high levels of ROS, which, in turn, increase TGF-β1 expression and induce fibroblast activation and senescence in a p5-independent manner. Fibroblasts from GU-OSCC were particularly susceptible to oxidative DNA damage because of high levels of ROS production, downregulation of antioxidant genes and upregulation of pro-oxidant genes. The results demonstrate the functional diversity of cancer

  15. Stromal Effects on Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Bryony S.; Werb, Zena

    2002-05-01

    Breast cancer manifests itself in the mammary epithelium, yet there is a growing recognition that mammary stromal cells also play an important role in tumorigenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer, and many of the stromal factors necessary for mammary development also promote or protect against breast cancer. Here we review our present knowledge of the specific factors and cell types that contribute to epithelial-stromal crosstalk during mammary development. To find cures for diseases like breast cancer that rely on epithelial-stromal crosstalk, we must understand how these different cell types communicate with each other.

  16. Lymphoid Tissue Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Development and Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are sites that facilitate cell-cell interactions required for generating adaptive immune responses. Nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to play a critical role in SLO function, organization, and tissue homeostasis. The stromal microenvironment undergoes profound remodeling to support immune responses. However, chronic inflammatory conditions can promote uncontrolled stromal cell activation and aberrant tissue remodeling including fibrosis, thus leading to tissue damage. Despite recent advancements, the origin and role of mesenchymal stromal cells involved in SLO development and remodeling remain unclear. PMID:27190524

  17. Lymphoid Tissue Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Development and Tissue Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Luca; Brendolan, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are sites that facilitate cell-cell interactions required for generating adaptive immune responses. Nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to play a critical role in SLO function, organization, and tissue homeostasis. The stromal microenvironment undergoes profound remodeling to support immune responses. However, chronic inflammatory conditions can promote uncontrolled stromal cell activation and aberrant tissue remodeling including fibrosis, thus leading to tissue damage. Despite recent advancements, the origin and role of mesenchymal stromal cells involved in SLO development and remodeling remain unclear. PMID:27190524

  18. Specific profiles of ion channels and ionotropic receptors define adipose- and bone marrow derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Forostyak, Oksana; Butenko, Olena; Anderova, Miroslava; Forostyak, Serhiy; Sykova, Eva; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Dayanithi, Govindan

    2016-05-01

    Adherent, fibroblastic cells from different tissues are thought to contain subsets of tissue-specific stem/progenitor cells (often called mesenchymal stem cells). These cells display similar cell surface characteristics based on their fibroblastic nature, but also exhibit differences in molecular phenotype, growth rate, and their ability to differentiate into various cell phenotypes. The mechanisms underlying these differences remain poorly understood. We analyzed Ca(2+) signals and membrane properties in rat adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in basal conditions, and then following a switch into medium that contains factors known to modify their character. Modified ADSCs (mADSCs) expressed L-type Ca(2+) channels whereas both L- and P/Q- channels were operational in mBMSCs. Both mADSCs and mBMSCs possessed functional endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) stores, expressed ryanodine receptor-1 and -3, and exhibited spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations. The mBMSCs expressed P2X7 purinoceptors; the mADSCs expressed both P2X (but not P2X7) and P2Y (but not P2Y1) receptors. Both types of stromal cells exhibited [Ca(2+)]i responses to vasopressin (AVP) and expressed V1 type receptors. Functional oxytocin (OT) receptors were, in contrast, expressed only in modified ADSCs and BMSCs. AVP and OT-induced [Ca(2+)]i responses were dose-dependent and were blocked by their respective specific receptor antagonists. Electrophysiological data revealed that passive ion currents dominated the membrane conductance in ADSCs and BMSCs. Medium modification led to a significant shift in the reversal potential of passive currents from -40 to -50mV in cells in basal to -80mV in modified cells. Hence membrane conductance was mediated by non-selective channels in cells in basal conditions, whereas in modified medium conditions, it was associated with K(+)-selective channels. Our results indicate that modification of ADSCs and BMSCs by alteration in medium

  19. Genetic comparison of mouse lung telocytes with mesenchymal stem cells and fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yonghua; Zhang, Miaomiao; Qian, Mengjia; Wang, Lingyan; Cismasiu, V B; Bai, Chunxue; Popescu, L M; Wang, Xiangdong

    2013-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are interstitial cells with telopodes – very long prolongations that establish intercellular contacts with various types of cells. Telocytes have been found in many organs and various species and have been characterized ultrastructurally, immunophenotypically and electrophysiologically (http://www.telocytes.com). Telocytes are distributed through organ stroma forming a three-dimensional network in close contacts with blood vessels, nerve bundles and cells of the local immune system. Moreover, it has been shown that TCs express a broad range of microRNAs, such as pro-angiogenic and stromal-specific miRs. In this study, the gene expression profile of murine lung TCs is compared with other differentiated interstitial cells (fibroblasts) and with stromal stem/progenitor cells. More than 2000 and 4000 genes were found up- or down-regulated, respectively, in TCs as compared with either MSCs or fibroblasts. Several components or regulators of the vascular basement membrane are highly expressed in TCs, such as Nidogen, Collagen type IV and Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3). Given that TCs locate in close vicinity of small vessels and capillaries, the data suggest the implication of TCs in vascular branching. Telocytes express also matrix metalloproteases Mmp3 and Mmp10, and thus could regulate extracellular matrix during vascular branching and de novo vessel formation. In conclusion, our data show that TCs are not fibroblasts, as the ultrastructure, immunocytochemistry and microRNA assay previously indicated. Gene expression profile demonstrates that TCs are functionally distinct interstitial cells with specific roles in cell signalling, tissue remodelling and angiogenesis. PMID:23621815

  20. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, James R.; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J.; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX). Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment. In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  1. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T

    2016-04-12

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX).Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment.In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  2. Functional TRPV1 expression in human corneal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanquan; Yang, Hua; Wang, Zheng; Mergler, Stefan; Wolosin, J Mario; Reinach, Peter S

    2013-02-01

    Corneal wound healing in mice subsequent to an alkali burn results in dysregulated inflammation and opacification. Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) channel activation in all tissue layers by endogenous ligands contributes to this sight compromising outcome since in TRPV1 knockout mice wound healing results instead in tissue transparency restoration. However, it is not known if primary human stromal fibroblasts exhibit such expression even though functional TRPV1 expression is evident in an immortalized human corneal epithelial cell line. In primary human corneal fibroblasts (HCF), TRPV1 gene expression and localization were identified based on the results of quantitative RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Western blot analysis identified a 100 kD protein corresponding to TRPV1 protein expression in a positive control. Single-cell fluorescence imaging detected in fura2-AM loaded cells Ca(2+) transients that rose 1.8-fold above the baseline induced by a selective TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin (CAP), which were blocked by a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (CPZ) or exposure to a Ca(2+) free medium. The whole-cell mode of the planar patch-clamp technique identified TRPV1-induced currents that rose 1.76-fold between -60 and +130 mV. CAP-induced time dependent changes in the phosphorylation status of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling mediators that led to a 2.5-fold increase in IL-6 release after 24 h. This rise did not occur either in TRPV1 siRNA gene silenced cells or during exposure to SB203580 (10 μM), a selective p38 MAPK inhibitor. Taken together, identification of functional TRPV1 expression in HCF suggests that in vivo its activation by injury contributes to corneal opacification and inflammation during wound healing. These undesirable effects may result in part from increases in IL-6 expression mediated by p-p38 MAPK signaling. PMID:23232207

  3. MMP13 as a stromal mediator in controlling persistent angiogenesis in skin carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lederle, Wiltrud; Hartenstein, Bettina; Meides, Alice; Kunzelmann, Heike; Werb, Zena; Angel, Peter; Mueller, Margareta M.

    2010-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP13 promote tumour growth and progression by mediating extracellular matrix (ECM) reorganization and regulating the biological activity of cytokines. Using Mmp13−/− mice, we demonstrate an essential role of this single collagenase for highly malignant and invasive growth in skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Lack of host MMP13 strongly impaired tumour growth of malignant SCC cells, leading to small, mostly avascular cysts. While initial stromal activation in tumour transplants of Mmp13+/+ and Mmp13−/− animals was similar, MMP13 was essential for maintenance of angiogenesis and for invasion. MMP13 was induced in fibroblasts of the wild-type animals at the onset of invasion and correlated with a strong increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein and its association with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 on endothelial cells in invasive areas. In contrast, VEGF protein in the stroma was barely detectable and tumour invasion was downregulated in Mmp13−/− animals, despite ongoing VEGF messenger RNA expression. Taken together with in vitro data showing the release of VEGF from the ECM by MMP13 expressing fibroblasts, these data strongly suggest a crucial role of MMP13 in promoting angiogenesis via releasing VEGF from the ECM and thus allowing the invasive growth of the SCC cells. PMID:19892798

  4. MMP13 as a stromal mediator in controlling persistent angiogenesis in skin carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lederle, Wiltrud; Hartenstein, Bettina; Meides, Alice; Kunzelmann, Heike; Werb, Zena; Angel, Peter; Mueller, Margareta M

    2010-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP13 promote tumour growth and progression by mediating extracellular matrix (ECM) reorganization and regulating the biological activity of cytokines. Using Mmp13-/- mice, we demonstrate an essential role of this single collagenase for highly malignant and invasive growth in skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Lack of host MMP13 strongly impaired tumour growth of malignant SCC cells, leading to small, mostly avascular cysts. While initial stromal activation in tumour transplants of Mmp13+/+ and Mmp13-/- animals was similar, MMP13 was essential for maintenance of angiogenesis and for invasion. MMP13 was induced in fibroblasts of the wild-type animals at the onset of invasion and correlated with a strong increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein and its association with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 on endothelial cells in invasive areas. In contrast, VEGF protein in the stroma was barely detectable and tumour invasion was downregulated in Mmp13-/- animals, despite ongoing VEGF messenger RNA expression. Taken together with in vitro data showing the release of VEGF from the ECM by MMP13 expressing fibroblasts, these data strongly suggest a crucial role of MMP13 in promoting angiogenesis via releasing VEGF from the ECM and thus allowing the invasive growth of the SCC cells. PMID:19892798

  5. Brief report: The potential role of epigenetics on multipotent cell differentiation capacity of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Yannarelli, Gustavo; Pacienza, Natalia; Cuniberti, Luis; Medin, Jeffrey; Davies, John; Keating, Armand

    2013-01-01

    Human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) are a readily available source of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for cell therapy. We were interested in understanding how differences from human bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs might yield insights into MSC biology. We found that HUCPVCs exhibited increased telomerase activity and longer telomeres compared with BM-MSCs. We also observed enhanced expression of the pluripotency factors OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG in HUCPVCs. The methylation of OCT4 and NANOG promoters was similar in both cell types, indicating that differences in the expression of pluripotency factors between the MSCs were not associated with epigenetic changes. MSC methylation at these loci is greater than reported for embryonic stem cells but less than in dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that multipotentiality of MSCs is epigenetically restricted. These results are consistent with the notion that the MSC population (whether BM- or HUCPV-derived) exhibits higher proliferative capacity and contains more progenitor cells than do dermal fibroblasts. PMID:23097343

  6. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  7. TGF-β signaling deficient fibroblasts enhance Hepatocyte Growth Factor signaling in mammary carcinoma cells to promote scattering and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Nikki; Chytil, Anna; Shyr, Yu; Joly, Alison; Moses, Harold L.

    2009-01-01

    Fibroblasts are major cellular components of the tumor microenvironment, regulating tumor cell behavior in part through secretion of extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors and angiogenic factors. In previous studies, conditional deletion of the type II TGF-β receptor in fibroblasts (Tgfbr2FspKO) was shown to promote mammary tumor metastasis in fibroblast: epithelial cell co-transplantation studies in mice, correlating with increased expression of HGF. Here, we advance our findings to show that Tgfbr2FspKO fibroblasts enhance HGF/c-Met and HGF/Ron signaling to promote scattering and invasion of mammary carcinoma cells. Blockade of c-Met and Ron by siRNA silencing and pharmacologic inhibitors significantly reduced mammary carcinoma cell scattering and invasion caused by Tgfbr2FspKO fibroblasts. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies to c-Met and Ron significantly inhibited HGF-induced cell scattering and invasion correlating with reduced Stat3 and p42/44MAPK phosphorylation. Investigation of the Stat3 and MAPK signaling pathways by pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA silencing revealed a cooperative interaction between the two pathways to regulate HGF- induced invasion, scattering and motility of mammary tumor cells. Furthermore, while c-Met was found to regulate both the Stat3 and MAPK signaling pathways, Ron was found to regulate Stat3, but not MAPK signaling in mammary carcinoma cells. These studies demonstrate a tumor suppressive role for TGF-β signaling in fibroblasts, in part by suppressing HGF signaling between mammary fibroblasts and epithelial cells. These studies characterize complex functional roles for HGF and TGF-β signaling in mediating tumor: stromal interactions during mammary tumor cell scattering and invasion, with important implications in the metastatic process. PMID:18922968

  8. Role of Nanog in the maintenance of marrow stromal stem cells during post natal bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Bais, Manish V.; Shabin, Zabrina M.; Young, Megan; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Gerstnefeld, Louis C.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is related to marrow stromal stem cell maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing Nanog expression is seen during post natal surgical bone repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog knockdown decreases post surgical bone regeneration. -- Abstract: Post natal bone repair elicits a regenerative mechanism that restores the injured tissue to its pre-injury cellular composition and structure and is believed to recapitulate the embryological processes of bone formation. Prior studies showed that Nanog, a central epigenetic regulator associated with the maintenance of embryonic stem cells (ESC) was transiently expressed during fracture healing, Bais et al. . In this study, we show that murine bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) before they are induced to undergo osteogenic differentiation express {approx}50 Multiplication-Sign the background levels of Nanog seen in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and the W20-17 murine marrow stromal cell line stably expresses Nanog at {approx}80 Multiplication-Sign the MEF levels. Nanog expression in this cell line was inhibited by BMP7 treatment and Nanog lentivrial shRNA knockdown induced the expression of the terminal osteogenic gene osteocalcin. Lentivrial shRNA knockdown or lentiviral overexpression of Nanog in bone MSCs had inverse effects on proliferation, with knockdown decreasing and overexpression increasing MSC cell proliferation. Surgical marrow ablation of mouse tibia by medullary reaming led to a {approx}3-fold increase in Nanog that preceded osteogenic differentiation during intramembranous bone formation. Lentiviral shRNA knockdown of Nanog after surgical ablation led to an initial overexpression of osteogenic gene expression with no initial effect on bone formation but during subsequent remodeling of the newly formed bone a {approx}50% decrease was seen in the expression of terminal osteogenic gene expression and a {approx}50% loss in trabecular bone mass. This

  9. Stromal Expression of Heat-Shock Protein 27 Is Associated with Worse Clinical Outcome in Patients with Colorectal Cancer Lung Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Thomas; Nikolowsky, Christoph; Starlinger, Patrick; Traxler, Denise; Zimmermann, Matthias; Birner, Peter; Hegedüs, Balazs; Dome, Balazs; Bergmann, Michael; Mildner, Michael; Klepetko, Walter; Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary metastases are common in patients with primary colorectal cancer (CRC). Heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is upregulated in activated fibroblasts during wound healing and systemically elevated in various diseases. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are also thought to play a role as prognostic and predictive markers in various malignancies including CRC. Surprisingly, the expression of Hsp27 has never been assessed in CAFs. Therefore we aimed to investigate the expression level of Hsp27 in CAFs and its clinical implications in patients with CRC lung metastases. Methods FFPE tissue samples from 51 pulmonary metastases (PMs) and 33 paired primary tumors were evaluated for alpha-SMA, CD31, Hsp27 and vimentin expression by immunohistochemistry and correlated with clinicopathological variables. 25 liver metastases served as control group. Moreover, serum samples (n=10) before and after pulmonary metastasectomy were assessed for circulating phospho-Hsp27 and total Hsp27 by ELISA. Results Stromal expression of Hsp27 was observed in all PM and showed strong correlation with alpha-SMA (P<0.001) and vimentin (P<0.001). Strong stromal Hsp27 was associated with higher microvessel density in primary CRC and PM. Moreover, high stromal Hsp27 and αSMA expression were associated with decreased recurrence-free survival after pulmonary metastasectomy (P=0.018 and P=0.008, respectively) and overall survival (P=0.031 and P=0.017, respectively). Serum levels of phospho- and total Hsp27 dropped after metastasectomy to levels comparable to healthy controls. Conclusions Herein we describe for the first time that Hsp27 is highly expressed in tumor stroma of CRC. Stromal α-SMA and Hsp27 expressions correlate with the clinical outcome after pulmonary metastasectomy. Moreover, serum Hsp27 might pose a future marker for metastatic disease in CRC. PMID:25793600

  10. Notch and TGF-β/Smad3 pathways are involved in the interaction between cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yuan; Li, Dan; Jing, Shanghua

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that cancer-associated stromal fibroblasts (CAFs) contribute to tumor growth by actively communicating with cancer cells. Our aim was to identify the signaling pathways that are involved in tumor-stromal cell interactions in human papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Immunohistochemical analyses were performed with 127 archived formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded thyroid tissue samples that included 70 cases of PTC, 35 cases of nodular goiter (NG), and 22 cases of normal thyroid tissues. The results showed that the expression levels of Notch1, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β1), and p-Smad3 in PTC cells and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the stroma of PTC were all significantly higher than in NG and normal thyroid tissues. Further analysis showed that in PTC, higher expression levels of Notch1 and TGF-β1 were closely related with lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05), whereas for α-SMA and p-Smad3, the percent expression increased significantly with advanced tumor stages (P < 0.05). Correlation analysis revealed that TGF-β1 expression increased with increased Notch1 and p-Smad3 levels in PTC cells (P < 0.05). Moreover, a significant correlation was found between higher TGF-β1 expression in PTC cells and increased α-SMA levels in the fibroblasts surrounding the cancer cells (P < 0.05). We identified TGF-β1 as an important factor from PTC cells that act in a paracrine manner to influence the activation of stromal fibroblasts. These data suggest that the activation of Notch and TGF-β/Smad3 pathways in cancer cells influence tumor growth. Moreover, cancer cell-derived-TGF-β ligands also affect stromal cells in a paracrine fashion and enhance tumor growth. PMID:23918305

  11. Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia: A Rare Cause of Idiopathic Gigantomastia

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mélissa; Lee, James; Aldekhayel, Salah

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Gigantomastia remains a rare clinical diagnosis with significant physical and psychological impacts on patients. We present the case of a 40-year-old woman with idiopathic breast enlargement. Further histological analysis of the breast tissue revealed pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. This is the first reported case of diffuse breast enlargement resulting from pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. PMID:26495214

  12. Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia: A Rare Cause of Idiopathic Gigantomastia.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mélissa; Lee, James; Aldekhayel, Salah; Dionisopoulos, Tassos

    2015-09-01

    Gigantomastia remains a rare clinical diagnosis with significant physical and psychological impacts on patients. We present the case of a 40-year-old woman with idiopathic breast enlargement. Further histological analysis of the breast tissue revealed pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. This is the first reported case of diffuse breast enlargement resulting from pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. PMID:26495214

  13. Hematopoietic progenitor cells grow on 3T3 fibroblast monolayers that overexpress growth arrest-specific gene-6 (GAS6).

    PubMed

    Dormady, S P; Zhang, X M; Basch, R S

    2000-10-24

    Pluripotential hematopoietic stem cells grow in close association with bone marrow stromal cells, which play a critical role in sustaining hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures. The mechanisms through which stromal cells act to support pluripotential hematopoietic stem cells are largely unknown. This study demonstrates that growth arrest-specific gene-6 (GAS6) plays an important role in this process. GAS6 is a ligand for the Axl (Ufo/Ark), Sky (Dtk/Tyro3/Rse/Brt/Tif), and Mer (Eyk) family of tyrosine kinase receptors and binds to these receptors via tandem G domains at its C terminus. After translation, GAS6 moves to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is extensively gamma-carboxylated. The carboxylation process is vitamin K dependent, and current evidence suggests that GAS6 must be gamma-carboxylated to bind and activate any of the cognate tyrosine kinase receptors. Here, we show that expression of GAS6 is highly correlated with the capacity of bone marrow stromal cells to support hematopoiesis in culture. Nonsupportive stromal cell lines express little to no GAS6, whereas supportive cell lines express high levels of GAS6. Transfection of the cDNA encoding GAS6 into 3T3 fibroblasts is sufficient to render this previously nonsupportive cell line capable of supporting long-term hematopoietic cultures. 3T3 cells, genetically engineered to stably express GAS6 (GAS6-3T3), produce a stromal layer that supports the generation of colony-forming units in culture (CFU-c) for up to 6 wk. Hematopoietic support by genetically engineered 3T3 is not vitamin K dependent, and soluble recombinant GAS6 does not substitute for coculturing the hematopoietic progenitors with genetically modified 3T3 cells. PMID:11050245

  14. Transformation of human mesenchymal cells and skin fibroblasts into hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Harris, David M; Hazan-Haley, Inbal; Coombes, Kevin; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Liu, Jie; Liu, Zhiming; Li, Ping; Ravoori, Murali; Abruzzo, Lynne; Han, Lin; Singh, Sheela; Sun, Michael; Kundra, Vikas; Kurzrock, Razelle; Estrov, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    Patients with prolonged myelosuppression require frequent platelet and occasional granulocyte transfusions. Multi-donor transfusions induce alloimmunization, thereby increasing morbidity and mortality. Therefore, an autologous or HLA-matched allogeneic source of platelets and granulocytes is needed. To determine whether nonhematopoietic cells can be reprogrammed into hematopoietic cells, human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and skin fibroblasts were incubated with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (Aza) and the growth factors (GF) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and stem cell factor. This treatment transformed MSCs to round, non-adherent cells expressing T-, B-, myeloid-, or stem/progenitor-cell markers. The transformed cells engrafted as hematopoietic cells in bone marrow of immunodeficient mice. DNA methylation and mRNA array analysis suggested that Aza and GF treatment demethylated and activated HOXB genes. Indeed, transfection of MSCs or skin fibroblasts with HOXB4, HOXB5, and HOXB2 genes transformed them into hematopoietic cells. Further studies are needed to determine whether transformed MSCs or skin fibroblasts are suitable for therapy. PMID:21731684

  15. Notch1 Pathway Activity Determines the Regulatory Role of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in Melanoma Growth and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hongwei; Kong, Ranran; Ferrari, Massimiliano L.; Radtke, Freddy; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Liu, Zhao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) play a crucial role in regulating cancer progression, yet the molecular determinant that governs the tumor regulatory role of CAF remains unknown. Using a mouse melanoma model in which exogenous melanoma cells were grafted on the skin of two lines of mice where the genetic activation or inactivation of Notch1 signaling specifically occurs in natural host stromal fibroblasts, we demonstrated that Notch1 pathway activity could determine the tumor-promoting or tumor-suppressing phenotype in CAF. CAF carrying elevated Notch1 activity significantly inhibited melanoma growth and invasion, while those with a null Notch1 promoted melanoma invasion. These findings identify the Notch1 pathway as a molecular determinant that controls the regulatory role of CAF in melanoma skin growth and invasion, unveiling Notch1 signaling as a potential therapeutic target for melanoma and potentially other solid tumors. PMID:26562315

  16. Transformable Peptide Nanocarriers for Expeditious Drug Release and Effective Cancer Therapy via Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Activation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Tianjiao; Zhao, Ying; Ding, Yanping; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Ruifang; Lang, Jiayan; Qin, Hao; Liu, Xiaoman; Shi, Jian; Tao, Ning; Qin, Zhihai; Nie, Guangjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2016-01-18

    A novel cleavable amphiphilic peptide (CAP) was designed to be specifically responsive to fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α), a protease specifically expressed on the surface of cancer-associated fibroblasts. The CAP self-assembled into fiber-like nanostructures in solution, while the presence of hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drugs readily transformed the assemblies into drug-loaded spherical nanoparticles. The disassembly of these nanoparticles (CAP-NPs) upon FAP-α cleavage resulted in rapid and efficient release of the encapsulated drugs specifically at tumor sites. This Transformers-like drug delivery strategy could allow them to disrupt the stromal barrier and enhance local drug accumulation. Therapeutic results suggested that drug-loaded CAP-NPs hold promising tumor specificity and therapeutic efficacy for various solid tumor models, confirming its potential utility and versatility in antitumor therapy. PMID:26283097

  17. Modeling Stromal-Epithelial Interactions in Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Douglas W.; Hayward, Simon W.

    2014-01-01

    The role of tumor stroma in progression to malignancy has become the subject of intense experimental and clinical interest. The stromal compartment of organs is composed of all the non-epithelial cell types and maintains the proper architecture and nutrient levels required for epithelial and, ultimately, organ function. The composition of the reactive stroma surrounding tumors is vastly different from normal stromal tissue. Stromal phenotype can be correlated with, and predictive of, disease recurrence. In addition, the stroma is now seen as a legitimate target for therapeutic intervention. Although much has been learned about the role of the stromal compartment in development and disease in recent years, a number of key questions remain. Here we review how some of these questions are beginning to be addressed using new models of stromal-epithelial interaction. PMID:20587339

  18. Stromal cell contribution to human follicular lymphoma pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mourcin, Frédéric; Pangault, Céline; Amin-Ali, Rada; Amé-Thomas, Patricia; Tarte, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the prototypical model of indolent B cell lymphoma displaying a strong dependence on a specialized cell microenvironment mimicking normal germinal center. Within malignant cell niches in invaded lymph nodes and bone marrow, external stimuli provided by infiltrating stromal cells make a pivotal contribution to disease development, progression, and drug resistance. The crosstalk between FL B cells and stromal cells is bidirectional, causing activation of both partners. In agreement, FL stromal cells exhibit specific phenotypic, transcriptomic, and functional properties. This review highlights the critical pathways involved in the direct tumor-promoting activity of stromal cells but also their role in the organization of FL cell niche through the recruitment of accessory immune cells and their polarization to a B cell supportive phenotype. Finally, deciphering the interplay between stromal cells and FL cells provides potential new therapeutic targets with the aim to mobilize malignant cells outside their protective microenvironment and increase their sensitivity to conventional treatment. PMID:22973275

  19. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a ‘more clinically relevant’ tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  20. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a 'more clinically relevant' tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  1. Combined Therapy of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Piotr; Hompes, Daphne

    2016-10-01

    Radical surgery is the mainstay of therapy for primary resectable, localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Nevertheless, approximately 40% to 50% of patients with potentially curative resections develop recurrent or metastatic disease. The introduction of imatinib mesylate has revolutionized the therapy of advanced (inoperable and/or metastatic) GIST and has become the standard of care in treatment of patients with advanced GIST. This article discusses the proper selection of candidates for adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in locally advanced GIST, exploring the available evidence behind the combination of preoperative imatinib and surgery. PMID:27591496

  2. Stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of studies of neoplastic transformation have focused attention on events that occur within transformed cells. These cell autonomous events result in the disruption of molecular pathways that regulate basic activities of the cells such as proliferation, death, movement and genomic integrity. Other studies have addressed the microenvironment of tumor cells and documented its importance in supporting tumor progression. Recent work has begun to expand on these initial studies of tumor microenvironment and now provide novel insights into the possible initiation and progression of malignant cells. This review will address the transforming effect of stromal cells on epithelial components. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. SOLIDS TRANSPORT BETWEEN ADJACENT CAFB FLUIDIZED BEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an experimental investigation of a pulsed, dense-phase pneumatic transport system for controlled circulation between adjacent fluidized beds. A model was developed to predict performance. The program provides technical support for EPA's program to demo...

  4. Border separation for adjacent orthogonal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, B.L.; Khan, F.M.; Sharma, S.C.; Lee, C.K.; Kim, T.H. )

    1991-06-01

    Field border separations for adjacent orthogonal fields can be calculated geometrically, given the validity of some important assumptions such as beam alignment and field uniformity. Thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) measurements were used to investigate dose uniformity across field junctions as a function of field separation and, in particular, to review the CCSG recommendation for the treatment of medulloblastoma with separate head and spine fields.

  5. Columnar cell lesions and pseudoangiomatous hyperplasia like stroma: is there an epithelial-stromal interaction?

    PubMed

    Recavarren, Rosemary A; Chivukula, Mamatha; Carter, Gloria; Dabbs, David J

    2009-01-01

    The significance of association between cancer and its microenvironment has been increasingly recognized. It has been shown in animal models that interaction between neoplastic epithelial cells and adjacent stroma can modulate tumor behavior. Carcinoma associated stromal cells can transform normal epithelial cells into neoplastic cells. In breast, columnar cell lesions are non-obligate precursors of low grade ductal carcinoma in situ. Columnar cell lesions can be seen intimately associated with PASH-like-stroma, a lesion we termed as CCPLS. Our aim is to investigate epithelial-stromal interactions in CCPLS and compare them to PASH without columnar cell lesions in breast core needle biopsies. Normal terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU) epithelium was seen in association with columnar cell lesions as well as PASH. Eight (8) cases of each category were examined by a panel of immunostains: CD117 (C-kit), CD34, CD105, bFGF, AR, ER-beta, MIB-1. We observed a markedly decreased expression of c-kit in columnar cell lesions compared to TDLU-epithelium. CD105 showed a quantitative increase in activated vessels in CCPLS compared to PASH. A subset of CCPLS and PASH were androgen receptor positive. A strong nuclear positivity for ER-beta is observed in the epithelium and stroma of all CCPLS cases. We conclude that (1) activated blood vessels predominate in CCPLS; (2) A molecular alteration is signified by c-kit loss in columnar cell lesions; (3) ER-beta and androgen receptor positivity indicate CCPLS are hormonally responsive lesions. Our study suggests an intimate vascular and hormone dependent epithelial-stromal interaction exists in CCPLS lesions. PMID:19918332

  6. Lamellar Spacing in Cuboid Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds Regulates Bone Formation by Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Afghani, Shahrzad; Franco, Jaime; Launey, Max; Marshall, Sally; Marshall, Grayson W.; Nissenson, Robert; Lee, Janice; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Saiz, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Background A major goal in bone engineering is the creation of large volume constructs (scaffolds and stem cells) that bear load. The scaffolds must satisfy two competing requirements—they need be sufficiently porous to allow nutrient flow to maintain cell viability, yet sufficiently dense to bear load. We studied the effect of scaffold macroporosity on bone formation and scaffold strength, for bone formed by human bone marrow stromal cells. Methods Rigid cubical hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate scaffolds were produced by robo-casting. The ceramic line thickness was held constant, but the distance between adjacent lines was either 50, 100, 200, 500, or 1000 μm. Cultured human bone marrow stromal cells were combined with the scaffolds in vitro; transplants were placed into the subcutis of immunodeficient mice. Transplants were harvested 9, 18, 23, 38, or 50 weeks later. Bone formation and scaffold strength were analyzed using histology and compression testing. Results Sixty transplants were evaluated. Cortical bone increased with transplant age, and was greatest among 500 μm transplants. In contrast, maximum transplant strength was greatest among 200 μm transplants. Conclusions Lamellar spacing within scaffolds regulates the extent of bone formation; 500 μm yields the most new bone, whereas 200 μm yields the strongest transplants. PMID:21294634

  7. SLITRK3 expression correlation to gastrointestinal stromal tumor risk rating and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Jie; Zhang, Zi-Zhen; Xu, Jia; Wang, Ming; Zhao, Wen-Yi; Tu, Lin; Zhuang, Chun; Liu, Qiang; Shen, Yan-Yin; Cao, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the influence of SLIT and NTRK-like family member 3 (SLITRK3) on the prognosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and determine whether SLITRK3 can help improve current risk stratification systems. METHODS: We hypothesized that SLITRK3 could be used as a prognostic molecular biomarker for GIST. 35 fresh tumor samples and 417 paraffin-embedded specimens from GIST patients were utilized. SLITRK3 mRNA expression in GIST tumor tissue was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and SLITRK3 protein levels were estimated by immunohistochemistry. The correlation of SLITRK3 expression with various tumor clinicopathological characteristics and follow-up data were analyzed. RESULTS: GIST tumors had high expression of SLITRK3 compared with adjacent normal tissues and the expression level gradually increased with risk grade. SLITRK3 protein expression was closely associated with gastrointestinal bleeding, tumor site, tumor size, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health (NIH) classification. Survival analysis showed that SLITRK3 expression was closely correlated with overall survival and disease-free survival of GIST patients. Multivariate analysis also identified SLITRK3 expression, mitotic index, and NIH stage as significant risk factors of GIST recurrence. CONCLUSION: SLITRK3 expression is a highly significant predictor of GIST recurrence and metastasis. Combinations of SLITRK3 and NIH stage have strong predictive and prognostic value, and are feasible markers for clinical practice in gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PMID:26217092

  8. In vitro quantitation of lethal and physiologic effects of total body irradiation on stromal and hematopoietic stem cells in continuous bone marrow cultures from Rf mice

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberger, J.S.; Eckner, R.J.; Otten, J.A.; Tennant, R.W.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of in vivo total body irradiation (TBI) and interval from TBI to explant of marrow on: stromal cell proliferation in vitro; stromal cell support of hematopoiesis in continuous bone marrow culture; and generation of WEHI-3 growth factor (GF)-dependent lines of hematopoietic progenitor cells were evaluated. Explant of marrow at 2, 4, 5, or 6 months after single fraction TBI (300-800 rad) was associated with decreased longevity of hemopoiesis and a decrease in the proliferative capacity of fibroblastic adherent-stromal colony forming cells (CFUf) as measured by colony size at 14 days and number of colonies per 10/sup 6/ cells plated. In contrast, explant of marrow 8 to 24 months after TBI produced cultures with longevity that was indistinguishable from age-matched control cultures (19-24 weeks). Marrow from irradiated first and second generation recipients of serially transferred marrow demonstrated a similar 7-month in vivo recovery period; however, the plateau maximum duration of hemopoiesis did not return to control levels. Purified stromal cell cultures were prepared by corticosteroid-deprivation of explanted marrow for 28 days and were then engrafted in vitro with marrow from C57BL/6J or RfM/UN mice that had been irradiated 1 month previously. Hemopoiesis in these cultures was restored, and they produced GM-CFUc and granulocytes for 15-24 weeks. Thus, healthy stroma supported growth of recently irradiated hemopoietic cells in vitro. Indirect effects of x-irradiation on hemopoietic stem cells through damage and repair in the stromal cell compartment can be effectively studied with the present bone marrow culture system. (JMT)

  9. Stromal expression of SPARC in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï; Cros, Jérôme; Faivre, Sandrine; Hammel, Pascal; Raymond, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) stands as the poorest prognostic tumor of the digestive tract, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Therapeutic options for unresectable PDAC are extremely limited and there is a pressing need for expanded therapeutic approaches to improve current options available with gemcitabine-based regimens. With PDAC displaying one of the most prominent desmoplastic stromal reactions of all carcinomas, recent research has focused on the microenvironment surrounding PDAC cells. Secreted protein acid and rich in cysteine (SPARC), which is overexpressed in PDAC, may display tumor suppressor functions in several cancers (e.g., in colorectal, ovarian, prostate cancers, and acute myelogenous leukemia) but also appears to be overexpressed in other tumor types (e.g., breast cancer, melanoma, and glioblastoma). The apparent contradictory functions of SPARC may yield inhibition of angiogenesis via inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor, while promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion through matrix metalloprotease expression. This feature is of particular interest in PDAC where SPARC overexpression in the stroma stands along with inhibition of angiogenesis and promotion of cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Several therapeutic strategies to deplete stromal tissue have been developed. In this review, we focused on key preclinical and clinical data describing the role of SPARC in PDAC biology, the properties, and mechanisms of delivery of drugs that interact with SPARC and discuss the proof-of-concept clinical trials using nab-paclitaxel. PMID:23690170

  10. Benign Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Human Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Alexei; Downey, Robert J.; Healey, John; Moreira, Andre L.; Lou, Emil; Leung, Roland; Edgar, Mark; Singer, Samuel; LaQuaglia, Michael; Maki, Robert G.; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Recent evidence suggests that at least some sarcomas arise through aberrant differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), but MSCs have never been isolated directly from human sarcoma specimens. Experimental Design We examined human sarcoma cell lines and primary adherent cultures derived from human sarcoma surgical samples for features of MSCs. We further characterized primary cultures as either benign or malignant by the presence of tumor-defining genetic lesions and tumor formation in immunocompromised mice. Results We show that a dedifferentiated liposarcoma cell line DDLS8817 demonstrates fat, bone and cartilage trilineage differentiation potential characteristic of MSCs. Primary sarcoma cultures have the morphology, surface immunophenotype and differentiation potential characteristic of MSCs. Surprisingly, many of these cultures are benign as they do not form tumors in mice and lack sarcoma-defining genetic lesions. Consistent with the recently proposed pericyte origin of MSCs in normal human tissues, sarcoma-derived benign MSCs express markers of pericytes and cooperate with endothelial cells in tube formation assays. In human sarcoma specimens, a subset of CD146-positive microvascular pericytes express CD105, an MSC marker, while malignant cells largely do not. In an in vitro co-culture model, sarcoma-derived benign MSCs as well as normal human pericytes markedly stimulate the growth of sarcoma cell lines. Conclusions Sarcoma-derived benign MSCs/pericytes represent a previously undescribed stromal cell type in sarcoma which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:21138865

  11. Anti-tumor effects of DNA vaccine targeting human fibroblast activation protein α by producing specific immune responses and altering tumor microenvironment in the 4T1 murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qiu; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Geng, Fei; Liu, Chen-Lu; Xu, Ping; Lu, Zhen-Zhen; Yu, Bin; Wu, Hui; Wu, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Hai-Hong; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xiang-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα) is a tumor stromal antigen overexpressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). CAFs are genetically more stable compared with the tumor cells and immunosuppressive components of the tumor microenvironment, rendering them excellent targets for cancer immunotherapy. DNA vaccines are widely applied due to their safety. To specifically destroy CAFs, we constructed and examined the immunogenicity and anti-tumor immune mechanism of a DNA vaccine expressing human FAPα. This vaccine successfully reduced 4T1 tumor growth through producing FAPα-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses which could kill CAFs, and the decrease in FAPα-expressing CAFs resulted in markedly attenuated expression of collagen I and other stromal factors that benefit the tumor progression. Based on these results, a DNA vaccine targeting human FAPα may be an attractive and effective cancer immunotherapy strategy. PMID:27020681

  12. Viscoelastic response of fibroblasts to tension transmitted through adherens junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Ragsdale, G K; Phelps, J; Luby-Phelps, K

    1997-01-01

    Cytoplasmic deformation was monitored by observing the displacements of 200-nm green fluorescent beads microinjected into the cytoplasm of Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. We noted a novel protrusion of nonruffling cell margins that was accompanied by axial flow of beads and cytoplasmic vesicles as far as 50 microm behind the protruding plasma membrane. Fluorescent analog cytochemistry and immunofluorescence localization of F-actin, alpha-actinin, N-cadherin, and beta-catenin showed that the protruding margins of deforming cells were mechanically coupled to neighboring cells by adherens junctions. Observations suggested that protrusion resulted from passive linear deformation in response to tensile stress exerted by centripetal contraction of the neighboring cell. The time dependence of cytoplasmic strain calculated from the displacements of beads and vesicles was fit quantitatively by a Kelvin-Voight model for a viscoelastic solid with a mean limiting strain of 0.58 and a mean strain rate of 4.3 x 10(-3) s(-1). In rare instances, the deforming cell and its neighbor spontaneously became uncoupled, and recoil of the protruding margin was observed. The time dependence of strain during recoil also fit a Kelvin-Voight model with similar parameters, suggesting that the kinetics of deformation primarily reflect the mechanical properties of the deformed cell rather than the contractile properties of its neighbor. The existence of mechanical coupling between adjacent fibroblasts through adherens junctions and the viscoelastic responses of cells to tension transmitted directly from cell to cell are factors that must be taken into account to fully understand the role of fibroblasts in such biological processes as wound closure and extracellular matrix remodeling during tissue development. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:9370474

  13. Pediatric Fibroblastic and Myofibroblastic Tumors: A Pictorial Review.

    PubMed

    Sargar, Kiran M; Sheybani, Elizabeth F; Shenoy, Archana; Aranake-Chrisinger, John; Khanna, Geetika

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors are a relatively common group of soft-tissue proliferations that are associated with a wide spectrum of clinical behavior. These tumors have been divided into the following categories on the basis of their biologic behavior: benign (eg, myositis ossificans, myofibroma, fibromatosis colli), intermediate-locally aggressive (eg, lipofibromatosis, desmoid fibroma), intermediate-rarely metastasizing (eg, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, infantile fibrosarcoma, low-grade myofibroblastic sarcoma), and malignant (eg, fibromyxoid sarcoma, adult fibrosarcoma). Imaging has a key role in the evaluation of lesion origin, extent, and involvement with adjacent structures, and in the treatment management and postresection surveillance of these tumors. The imaging findings of these tumors are often nonspecific. However, certain imaging features, such as low or intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images and extension along fascial planes, support the diagnosis of a fibroblastic or myofibroblastic tumor. In addition, certain tumors have characteristic imaging findings (eg, multiple subcutaneous or intramuscular lesions in infantile myofibromatosis, plaquelike growth pattern of Gardner fibroma, presence of adipose tissue in lipofibromatosis) or characteristic clinical manifestations (eg, great toe malformations in fibrodysplasia ossificans fibroma, neonatal torticollis in fibromatosis colli) that suggest the correct diagnosis. Knowledge of the syndrome associations of some of these tumors-for example, the association between familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome and both Gardner fibroma and desmoid fibromatosis, and that between nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome and cardiac fibroma-further facilitate a diagnosis. The recognition of key imaging findings can help guide treatment management and help avoid unnecessary intervention in cases of benign lesions such as myositis ossificans and fibromatosis

  14. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  15. Direct Melanoma Cell Contact Induces Stromal Cell Autocrine Prostaglandin E2-EP4 Receptor Signaling That Drives Tumor Growth, Angiogenesis, and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Inada, Masaki; Takita, Morichika; Yokoyama, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kenta; Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Hirata, Michiko; Maru, Yoshiro; Maruyama, Takayuki; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Narumiya, Shuh; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Murphy, Gillian; Nagase, Hideaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2015-12-11

    The stromal cells associated with tumors such as melanoma are significant determinants of tumor growth and metastasis. Using membrane-bound prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPges1(-/-)) mice, we show that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by host tissues is critical for B16 melanoma growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis to both bone and soft tissues. Concomitant studies in vitro showed that PGE2 production by fibroblasts is regulated by direct interaction with B16 cells. Autocrine activity of PGE2 further regulates the production of angiogenic factors by fibroblasts, which are key to the vascularization of both primary and metastatic tumor growth. Similarly, cell-cell interactions between B16 cells and host osteoblasts modulate mPGES-1 activity and PGE2 production by the osteoblasts. PGE2, in turn, acts to stimulate receptor activator of NF-κB ligand expression, leading to osteoclast differentiation and bone erosion. Using eicosanoid receptor antagonists, we show that PGE2 acts on osteoblasts and fibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment through the EP4 receptor. Metastatic tumor growth and vascularization in soft tissues was abrogated by an EP4 receptor antagonist. EP4-null Ptger4(-/-) mice do not support B16 melanoma growth. In vitro, an EP4 receptor antagonist modulated PGE2 effects on fibroblast production of angiogenic factors. Our data show that B16 melanoma cells directly influence host stromal cells to generate PGE2 signals governing neoangiogenesis and metastatic growth in bone via osteoclast erosive activity as well as angiogenesis in soft tissue tumors. PMID:26475855

  16. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  17. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  18. Immunological hallmarks of stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Turley, Shannon J; Cremasco, Viviana; Astarita, Jillian L

    2015-11-01

    A dynamic and mutualistic interaction between tumour cells and the surrounding stroma promotes the initiation, progression, metastasis and chemoresistance of solid tumours. Far less understood is the relationship between the stroma and tumour-infiltrating leukocytes; however, emerging evidence suggests that the stromal compartment can shape antitumour immunity and responsiveness to immunotherapy. Thus, there is growing interest in elucidating the immunomodulatory roles of the stroma that evolve within the tumour microenvironment. In this Review, we discuss the evidence that stromal determinants interact with leukocytes and influence antitumour immunity, with emphasis on the immunological attributes of stromal cells that may foster their protumorigenic function. PMID:26471778

  19. Prostate stromal cell proteomics analysis discriminates normal from tumour reactive stromal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Jason P.; Spary, Lisa K.; Mason, Malcolm D.; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Brewis, Ian A.; Clayton, Aled

    2016-01-01

    Changes within interstitial stromal compartments often accompany carcinogenesis, and this is true of prostate cancer. Typically, the tissue becomes populated by myofibroblasts that can promote progression. Not all myofibroblasts exhibit the same negative influence, however, and identifying the aggressive form of myofibroblast may provide useful information at diagnosis. A means of molecularly defining such myofibroblasts is unknown. We compared protein profiles of normal and diseased stroma isolated from prostate cancer patients to identify discriminating hallmarks of disease-associated stroma. We included the stimulation of normal stromal cells with known myofibroblast inducers namely soluble TGFβ and exosome-associated-TGFβ and compared the function and protein profiles arising. In all 6-patients examined, diseased stroma exhibited a pro-angiogenic influence on endothelial cells, generating large multicellular vessel-like structures. Identical structures were apparent following stimulation of normal stroma with exosomes (5/6 patients), but TGFβ-stimulation generated a non-angiogenic stroma. Proteomics highlighted disease-related cytoskeleton alterations such as elevated Transgelin (TAGLN). Many of these were also changed following TGFβ or exosome stimulation and did not well discriminate the nature of the stimulus. Soluble TGFβ, however triggered differential expression of proteins related to mitochondrial function including voltage dependent ion channels VDAC1 and 2, and this was not found in the other stromal types studied. Surprisingly, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH1A1), a stem-cell associated protein was detected in normal stromal cells and found to decrease in disease. In summary, we have discovered a set of proteins that contribute to defining disease-associated myofibroblasts, and emphasise the similarity between exosome-generated myofibroblasts and those naturally arising in situ. PMID:26934553

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Blepharitis Associated with Multiple Corneal Stromal Microabscess, Stromal Edema, and Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Boto-de-los-Bueis, Ana; del Hierro Zarzuelo, Almudena; García Perea, Adela; de Pablos, Manuela; Pastora, Natalia; Noval, Susana

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of an immunocompetent woman with atypical marginal keratitis. She presented with recurrent episodes of multiples microabscess distributed in a triangular pattern associated with stromal oedema and anterior chamber uveitis, affecting both eyes, but not simultaneously. The episodes responded to steroid drops, corneal inflammation was coincidental with a worsening of her blepharitis in the affected eye and S. aureus was isolated from the lids. PMID:24410378

  1. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumors. A case of small intestine stromal tumor (SIST) with an uncertain biological aspect].

    PubMed

    Quaglino, F; Borello, M; Cumbo, P; Pietribiasi, F; Poma, A; Seglie, E; Do, D

    2000-05-01

    Tumors of the small intestine are relatively rare. The diagnosis is difficult to establish because the symptoms are vague and non-specific. Although the small intestine constitutes 75% of the length and over 90% of the mucosal surface area of the gastrointestinal tract, only 1 to 2% of gastrointestinal malignancies occur in this segment. Metastases are usually present at the time of diagnosis. The outcome of these patients can be improved if the possibility of a malignant small bowel tumor is considered in all cases of unexplained abdominal pain or gastrointestinal bleeding, especially in younger age. Malignant tumors occur with increasing frequency in distal small bowel with a preponderance of malignant lesions in the ileum compared with the jejunum and the duodenum. Adenocarcinoma is the most common tumor of the primary malignant small bowel tumors, followed by carcinoid, lymphoma and leiomyosarcoma. Mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, traditionally regarded as smooth muscle tumors, have demonstrated different cellular differentiations based on immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features. Therefore the terms leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma have been replaced by a more encompassing term, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The majority of GISTs occurs in the stomach; stromal tumors involving the small intestine (SISTs) are far less common but seem to have greater malignant potential. The clinical a case of a small intestinal stromal tumor (SIST), localised in the jejunum and characterised by an uncertain histological aspect, is presented and a review of the literature is made. PMID:10953571

  2. Understanding the Impact of 2D and 3D Fibroblast Cultures on In Vitro Breast Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyung Eun; Su, Xiaojing; Berthier, Erwin; Pehlke, Carolyn; Friedl, Andreas; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The utilization of 3D, physiologically relevant in vitro cancer models to investigate complex interactions between tumor and stroma has been increasing. Prior work has generally focused on the cancer cells and, the role of fibroblast culture conditions on tumor-stromal cell interactions is still largely unknown. Here, we focus on the stroma by comparing functional behaviors of human mammary fibroblasts (HMFs) cultured in 2D and 3D and their effects on the invasive progression of breast cancer cells (MCF10DCIS.com). We identified increased levels of several paracrine factors from HMFs cultured in 3D conditions that drive the invasive transition. Using a microscale co-culture model with improved compartmentalization and sensitivity, we demonstrated that HMFs cultured in 3D intensify the promotion of the invasive progression through the HGF/c-Met interaction. This study highlights the importance of the 3D stromal microenvironment in the development of multiple cell type in vitro cancer models. PMID:24124550

  3. [Soft tissue sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

    PubMed

    Reichardt, P

    2016-03-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare tumors that represent a major challenge due to varying clinical presentations and often interdisciplinary treatment concepts. Gold standard for the treatment of localized resectable soft tissue sarcomas is complete surgical removal. In metastatic soft tissue sarcoma, systemic therapy is the treatment of choice. The most active drugs are anthracyclines and ifosfamide. Combination chemotherapy has improved both response rate and progression-free survival at the cost of increased toxicity. Imatinib at a dose of 400 mg/day is the gold standard for patients with advanced or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). In patients with a mutation in KIT exon 9, 800 mg/day is the recommended dose. In imatinib refractory or intolerant patients, sunitinib is recommended. Regorafenib has been approved for third-line therapy. PMID:26907871

  4. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor – An Evolving Concept

    PubMed Central

    Tornillo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with RTK inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan) the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other “entities,” have been discovered (e.g., succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, and mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway). The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data. PMID:25593916

  5. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: May Mimic Adnexal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Nilay; Akpak, Yaşam Kemal; Tatar, Zeynep; Batmaz, Gonca; Erken, Aslihan

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs occur in the entire gastrointestinal tract and may also arise from the retroperitoneum, omentum and mesenteries. They are originated from gastrointestinal pacemaker cells (Cajal’s interstitial cells) and range from benign tumors to sarcomas at all sites of occurrence. Diagnosis of GIST could be deceptive because of their similarity in appearance to gynecological neoplasms. We would like to present a case of a woman with GIST in the small intestine giving a imprint of an adnexal mass was diagnosed correctly during surgery. The diagnosis and treatment of GIST has been reformed over the past years. It is crucial to separate GISTs from possible misdiagnosis because their prognosis and treatment could be unlike clearly. The purpose of this case is to evaluate this rarely seen clinical entity, and thus, make some contribution to the literature. PMID:26383211

  6. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia causing massive breast enlargement.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Tiang, Stephen; Harvey, Nathan; McClure, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign mesenchymal proliferative process, initially described by Vuitch et al. We report an unusual case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with a 6-week history of bilateral massive, asymmetrical, painful enlargement of her breasts, without a history of trauma. On clinical examination, both breasts were markedly enlarged and oedematous, but there were no discrete palpable masses. Preoperative image-guided core biopsies and surgery showed PASH. PASH is increasingly recognised as an incidental finding on image-guided core biopsy performed for screen detected lesions. There are a few reported cases of PASH presenting as rapid breast enlargement. In our case, the patient presented with painful, asymmetrical, massive breast enlargement. Awareness needs to be raised of this entity as a differential diagnosis in massive, painful breast enlargement. PMID:26475873

  7. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: May Mimic Adnexal Mass.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Nilay; Akpak, Yasam Kemal; Tatar, Zeynep; Batmaz, Gonca; Erken, Aslihan

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs occur in the entire gastrointestinal tract and may also arise from the retroperitoneum, omentum and mesenteries. They are originated from gastrointestinal pacemaker cells (Cajal's interstitial cells) and range from benign tumors to sarcomas at all sites of occurrence. Diagnosis of GIST could be deceptive because of their similarity in appearance to gynecological neoplasms. We would like to present a case of a woman with GIST in the small intestine giving a imprint of an adnexal mass was diagnosed correctly during surgery. The diagnosis and treatment of GIST has been reformed over the past years. It is crucial to separate GISTs from possible misdiagnosis because their prognosis and treatment could be unlike clearly. The purpose of this case is to evaluate this rarely seen clinical entity, and thus, make some contribution to the literature. PMID:26383211

  8. Ex vivo expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Maria Ester; Cometa, Angela Maria; Pagliara, Daria; Vinti, Luciana; Rossi, Francesca; Cristantielli, Rosaria; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Locatelli, Franco

    2011-03-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent cells that can be isolated from several human tissues. MSCs represent a novel and attractive tool in strategies of cellular therapy. For in vivo use, MSCs have to be ex vivo expanded in order to reach the numbers suitable for their clinical application. Despite being efficacious, the use of fetal calf serum for MSC ex vivo expansion for clinical purposes raises concerns related to immunization and transmission of zoonoses; the standardization of expansion methods, possibly devoid of animal components, such as those based on platelet lysate, are discussed in this paper. Moreover, this review focuses on the search of novel markers for the prospective identification/isolation of MSCs and on the potential risks connected with ex vivo expansion of MSCs, in particular that of their malignant transformation. Available tests to study the genetic stability of ex vivo expanded MSCs are also analyzed. PMID:21396595

  9. Are mesenchymal stromal cells immune cells?

    PubMed

    Hoogduijn, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered to be promising agents for the treatment of immunological disease. Although originally identified as precursor cells for mesenchymal lineages, in vitro studies have demonstrated that MSCs possess diverse immune regulatory capacities. Pre-clinical models have shown beneficial effects of MSCs in multiple immunological diseases and a number of phase 1/2 clinical trials carried out so far have reported signs of immune modulation after MSC infusion. These data indicate that MSCs play a central role in the immune response. This raises the academic question whether MSCs are immune cells or whether they are tissue precursor cells with immunoregulatory capacity. Correct understanding of the immunological properties and origin of MSCs will aid in the appropriate and safe use of the cells for clinical therapy. In this review the whole spectrum of immunological properties of MSCs is discussed with the aim of determining the position of MSCs in the immune system. PMID:25880839

  10. Aberrant DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Vizoso, Miguel; Puig, Marta; Carmona, F.Javier; Maqueda, María; Velásquez, Adriana; Gómez, Antonio; Labernadie, Anna; Lugo, Roberto; Gabasa, Marta; Rigat-Brugarolas, Luis G.; Trepat, Xavier; Ramírez, Josep; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, Enrique; Reguart, Noemí; Perera, Alexandre; Esteller, Manel; Alcaraz, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic changes through altered DNA methylation have been implicated in critical aspects of tumor progression, and have been extensively studied in a variety of cancer types. In contrast, our current knowledge of the aberrant genomic DNA methylation in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs) or other stromal cells that act as critical coconspirators of tumor progression is very scarce. To address this gap of knowledge, we conducted genome-wide DNA methylation profiling on lung TAFs and paired control fibroblasts (CFs) from non-small cell lung cancer patients using the HumanMethylation450 microarray. We found widespread DNA hypomethylation concomitant with focal gain of DNA methylation in TAFs compared to CFs. The aberrant DNA methylation landscape of TAFs had a global impact on gene expression and a selective impact on the TGF-β pathway. The latter included promoter hypermethylation-associated SMAD3 silencing, which was associated with hyperresponsiveness to exogenous TGF-β1 in terms of contractility and extracellular matrix deposition. In turn, activation of CFs with exogenous TGF-β1 partially mimicked the epigenetic alterations observed in TAFs, suggesting that TGF-β1 may be necessary but not sufficient to elicit such alterations. Moreover, integrated pathway-enrichment analyses of the DNA methylation alterations revealed that a fraction of TAFs may be bone marrow-derived fibrocytes. Finally, survival analyses using DNA methylation and gene expression datasets identified aberrant DNA methylation on the EDARADD promoter sequence as a prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Our findings shed light on the unique origin and molecular alterations underlying the aberrant phenotype of lung TAFs, and identify a stromal biomarker with potential clinical relevance. PMID:26449251

  11. Aberrant DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vizoso, Miguel; Puig, Marta; Carmona, F Javier; Maqueda, María; Velásquez, Adriana; Gómez, Antonio; Labernadie, Anna; Lugo, Roberto; Gabasa, Marta; Rigat-Brugarolas, Luis G; Trepat, Xavier; Ramírez, Josep; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, Enrique; Reguart, Noemí; Perera, Alexandre; Esteller, Manel; Alcaraz, Jordi

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetic changes through altered DNA methylation have been implicated in critical aspects of tumor progression, and have been extensively studied in a variety of cancer types. In contrast, our current knowledge of the aberrant genomic DNA methylation in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs) or other stromal cells that act as critical coconspirators of tumor progression is very scarce. To address this gap of knowledge, we conducted genome-wide DNA methylation profiling on lung TAFs and paired control fibroblasts (CFs) from non-small cell lung cancer patients using the HumanMethylation450 microarray. We found widespread DNA hypomethylation concomitant with focal gain of DNA methylation in TAFs compared to CFs. The aberrant DNA methylation landscape of TAFs had a global impact on gene expression and a selective impact on the TGF-β pathway. The latter included promoter hypermethylation-associated SMAD3 silencing, which was associated with hyperresponsiveness to exogenous TGF-β1 in terms of contractility and extracellular matrix deposition. In turn, activation of CFs with exogenous TGF-β1 partially mimicked the epigenetic alterations observed in TAFs, suggesting that TGF-β1 may be necessary but not sufficient to elicit such alterations. Moreover, integrated pathway-enrichment analyses of the DNA methylation alterations revealed that a fraction of TAFs may be bone marrow-derived fibrocytes. Finally, survival analyses using DNA methylation and gene expression datasets identified aberrant DNA methylation on the EDARADD promoter sequence as a prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Our findings shed light on the unique origin and molecular alterations underlying the aberrant phenotype of lung TAFs, and identify a stromal biomarker with potential clinical relevance. PMID:26449251

  12. Stromal-epithelial dynamics in response to fractionated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, Muqeem Abdul

    effective at treating the reactive stroma. We can kill the cancer cells at the standard rate (180 cGy/fraction), but we have found the larger fractions specifically inhibit wound healing mechanisms by inactivating stromal fibroblasts. The long term goal would be to reduce recurrence rates for early stage breast cancer by treating postsurgical regions most likely to harbor residual tumor cells. Ionizing radiation stress and its effect on ECM mediated cellular functions continues to be an evolving area of research. This study is an initial step in my career plans to study stromal modulation of epithelial tumors. It is also my career goal to integrate basic science experiments and engineering tools into clinical practice.

  13. Exosome-mediated delivery of miR-9 induces cancer-associated fibroblast-like properties in human breast fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Baroni, S; Romero-Cordoba, S; Plantamura, I; Dugo, M; D'Ippolito, E; Cataldo, A; Cosentino, G; Angeloni, V; Rossini, A; Daidone, M G; Iorio, M V

    2016-01-01

    It is established that the interaction between microenvironment and cancer cells has a critical role in tumor development, given the dependence of neoplastic cells on stromal support. However, how this communication promotes the activation of normal (NFs) into cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) is still not well understood. Most microRNA (miRNA) studies focused on tumor cell, but there is increasing evidence of their involvement in reprogramming NFs into CAFs. Here we show that miR-9, upregulated in various breast cancer cell lines and identified as pro-metastatic miRNA, affects the properties of human breast fibroblasts, enhancing the switch to CAF phenotype, thus contributing to tumor growth. Expressed at higher levels in primary triple-negative breast CAFs versus NFs isolated from patients, miR-9 improves indeed migration and invasion capabilities when transfected in immortalized NFs; viceversa, these properties are strongly impaired in CAFs upon miR-9 inhibition. We also demonstrate that tumor-secreted miR-9 can be transferred via exosomes to recipient NFs and this uptake results in enhanced cell motility. Moreover, we observed that this miRNA is also secreted by fibroblasts and in turn able to alter tumor cell behavior, by modulating its direct target E-cadherin, and NFs themselves. Consistently with the biological effects observed, gene expression profiles of NFs upon transient transfection with miR-9 show the modulation of genes mainly involved in cell motility and extracellular matrix remodeling pathways. Finally, we were able to confirm the capability of NFs transiently transfected with miR-9 to promote in vivo tumor growth. Taken together, these data provide new insights into the role of miR-9 as an important player in the cross-talk between cancer cells and stroma. PMID:27468688

  14. Exosome-mediated delivery of miR-9 induces cancer-associated fibroblast-like properties in human breast fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, S; Romero-Cordoba, S; Plantamura, I; Dugo, M; D'Ippolito, E; Cataldo, A; Cosentino, G; Angeloni, V; Rossini, A; Daidone, M G; Iorio, M V

    2016-01-01

    It is established that the interaction between microenvironment and cancer cells has a critical role in tumor development, given the dependence of neoplastic cells on stromal support. However, how this communication promotes the activation of normal (NFs) into cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) is still not well understood. Most microRNA (miRNA) studies focused on tumor cell, but there is increasing evidence of their involvement in reprogramming NFs into CAFs. Here we show that miR-9, upregulated in various breast cancer cell lines and identified as pro-metastatic miRNA, affects the properties of human breast fibroblasts, enhancing the switch to CAF phenotype, thus contributing to tumor growth. Expressed at higher levels in primary triple-negative breast CAFs versus NFs isolated from patients, miR-9 improves indeed migration and invasion capabilities when transfected in immortalized NFs; viceversa, these properties are strongly impaired in CAFs upon miR-9 inhibition. We also demonstrate that tumor-secreted miR-9 can be transferred via exosomes to recipient NFs and this uptake results in enhanced cell motility. Moreover, we observed that this miRNA is also secreted by fibroblasts and in turn able to alter tumor cell behavior, by modulating its direct target E-cadherin, and NFs themselves. Consistently with the biological effects observed, gene expression profiles of NFs upon transient transfection with miR-9 show the modulation of genes mainly involved in cell motility and extracellular matrix remodeling pathways. Finally, we were able to confirm the capability of NFs transiently transfected with miR-9 to promote in vivo tumor growth. Taken together, these data provide new insights into the role of miR-9 as an important player in the cross-talk between cancer cells and stroma. PMID:27468688

  15. Extra gonadal sclerosing stromal tumour in the transverse mesocolon.

    PubMed

    Mensah, Samuel; Kyei, Ishmael; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Adjei, Ernest

    2016-03-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumour (SST) is a rare benign sex cord stromal tumour of the ovary. We report a case of sclerosing stromal tumour of the mesentery in a 32-year-old Para one who presented with intra abdominal mass, menstrual irregularity and secondary infertility. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the completely excised tumour was consistent with sclerosing stromal tumour, immunoreactive only to vimentin. No ovarian tissue was found in the sectioned tumour. Her menses became regular and she conceived 3 months after complete excision and delivered after 9 months. Hormonal assay was not done because SST was least suspected. From literature this is the first case of SST in the transverse mesocolon reported in the West African subregion, and may probably be one of the rare cases of hormonally active SST. PMID:27605726

  16. Tumoral Immune Suppression by Macrophages Expressing Fibroblast Activation Protein-Alpha and Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, James N.; Magiera, Lukasz; Kraman, Matthew; Fearon, Douglas T.

    2013-01-01

    The depletion of tumor stromal cells that are marked by their expression of the membrane protein fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP) overcomes immune suppression and allows an anti-cancer cell immune response to control tumor growth. In subcutaneous tumors established with immunogenic Lewis lung carcinoma cells expressing ovalbumin (LL2/OVA), the FAP+ population comprises CD45+ and CD45− cells. In the present study, we further characterize the tumoral FAP+/CD45+ population as a minor sub-population of F4/80hi/CCR2+/CD206+ M2 macrophages. Using bone marrow chimeric mice in which the primate diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) is restricted either to the FAP+/CD45+ or to the FAP+/CD45− subset, we demonstrate by conditionally depleting each subset that both independently contribute to the immune suppressive tumor microenvironment. A basis for the function of the FAP+/CD45+ subset is shown to be the immune inhibitory enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). The FAP+/CD45+ cells are the major tumoral source of HO-1, and an inhibitor of HO-1, Sn mesoporphyrin, causes the same extent of immune-dependent arrest of LL2/OVA tumor growth as does the depletion of these cells. Since this observation of immune suppression by HO-1 expressed by the FAP+/CD45+ stromal cell is replicated in a transplanted model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, we conclude that pharmacologically targeting this enzyme may improve cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24778275

  17. Reconstructing genome mixtures from partial adjacencies.

    PubMed

    Mahmoody, Ahmad; Kahn, Crystal L; Raphael, Benjamin J

    2012-01-01

    Many cancer genome sequencing efforts are underway with the goal of identifying the somatic mutations that drive cancer progression. A major difficulty in these studies is that tumors are typically heterogeneous, with individual cells in a tumor having different complements of somatic mutations. However, nearly all DNA sequencing technologies sequence DNA from multiple cells, thus resulting in measurement of mutations from a mixture of genomes. Genome rearrangements are a major class of somatic mutations in many tumors, and the novel adjacencies (i.e. breakpoints) resulting from these rearrangements are readily detected from DNA sequencing reads. However, the assignment of each rearrangement, or adjacency, to an individual cancer genome in the mixture is not known. Moreover, the quantity of DNA sequence reads may be insufficient to measure all rearrangements in all genomes in the tumor. Motivated by this application, we formulate the k-minimum completion problem (k-MCP). In this problem, we aim to reconstruct k genomes derived from a single reference genome, given partial information about the adjacencies present in the mixture of these genomes. We show that the 1-MCP is solvable in linear time in the cases where: (i) the measured, incomplete genome has a single circular or linear chromosome; (ii) there are no restrictions on the chromosomal content of the measured, incomplete genome. We also show that the k-MCP problem, for k ≥ 3 in general, and the 2-MCP problem with the double-cut-and-join (DCJ) distance are NP-complete, when there are no restriction on the chromosomal structure of the measured, incomplete genome. These results lay the foundation for future algorithmic studies of the k-MCP and the application of these algorithms to real cancer sequencing data. PMID:23282028

  18. Tensional Homeostasis in Single Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Kevin D.; Ng, Win Pin; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Adherent cells generate forces through acto-myosin contraction to move, change shape, and sense the mechanical properties of their environment. They are thought to maintain defined levels of tension with their surroundings despite mechanical perturbations that could change tension, a concept known as tensional homeostasis. Misregulation of tensional homeostasis has been proposed to drive disorganization of tissues and promote progression of diseases such as cancer. However, whether tensional homeostasis operates at the single cell level is unclear. Here, we directly test the ability of single fibroblast cells to regulate tension when subjected to mechanical displacements in the absence of changes to spread area or substrate elasticity. We use a feedback-controlled atomic force microscope to measure and modulate forces and displacements of individual contracting cells as they spread on a fibronectin-patterned atomic-force microscope cantilever and coverslip. We find that the cells reach a steady-state contraction force and height that is insensitive to stiffness changes as they fill the micropatterned areas. Rather than maintaining a constant tension, the fibroblasts altered their contraction force in response to mechanical displacement in a strain-rate-dependent manner, leading to a new and stable steady-state force and height. This response is influenced by overexpression of the actin crosslinker α-actinin, and rheology measurements reveal that changes in cell elasticity are also strain- rate-dependent. Our finding of tensional buffering, rather than homeostasis, allows cells to transition between different tensional states depending on how they are displaced, permitting distinct responses to slow deformations during tissue growth and rapid deformations associated with injury. PMID:24988349

  19. Stromal Integrin α11β1 Affects RM11 Prostate and 4T1 Breast Xenograft Tumors Differently

    PubMed Central

    Skogstrand, Trude; Sortland, Kristina; Schmid, Marei Caroline; Reed, Rolf K.; Stuhr, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It has been implied that the collagen binding integrin α11β1 plays a role in carcinogenesis. As still relatively little is known about how the stromal integrin α11β1 affects different aspects of tumor development, we wanted to examine the direct effects on primary tumor growth, fibrosis, tumor interstitial fluid pressure (PIF) and metastasis in murine 4T1 mammary and RM11 prostate tumors, using an in vivo SCID integrin α11-deficient mouse model. Methods Tumor growth was measured using a caliper, PIF by the wick-in-needle technique, activated fibroblasts by α-SMA immunofluorescence staining and fibrosis by transmission electron microscopy and picrosirius-red staining. Metastases were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. Results RM11 tumor growth was significantly reduced in the SCID integrin α11-deficient (α11-KO) compared to in SCID integrin α11 wild type (WT) mice, whereas there was no similar effect in the 4T1 tumor model. The 4T1 model demonstrated an alteration in collagen fibril diameter in the integrin α11-KO mice compared to WT, which was not found in the RM11 model. There were no significant differences in the amount of activated fibroblasts, total collagen content, collagen organization or PIF in the tumors in integrin α11-deficient mice compared to WT mice. There was also no difference in lung metastases between the two groups. Conclusion Deficiency of stromal integrin α11β1 showed different effects on tumor growth and collagen fibril diameter depending on tumor type, but no effect on tumor PIF or development of lung metastasis. PMID:26990302

  20. A case for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) with reference to its ultrastructure and 'gain-of-function' mutation.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Toshiyuki; Takayama, Ichiro; Zai, Hiroaki; Sekido, Yasutomo; Kijima, Hiroshi; Ogoshi, Kyoji; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu; Shirai, Takayuki; Mine, Tetsuya

    2003-07-01

    A case for primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is described with reference to its ultrastructural characteristics and mutation within the exon 11 of c-kit gene. A forty-seven years old woman complaining of dysphasia was examined by endoscopy, which depicted a submucosal tumor (70 mm in diameter) with ulcerations at the fundus of the stomach. Histopathologically, the tumor cells had large nuclei and eosinophilic cytoplasm and were frequently during mitosis phase. The tumor cells were immunopositive for KIT, CD 34 and vimentin, suggesting their fibroblast-like characteristics. In contrast, desmin and S-100, a smooth muscle and an enteroglial marker, were not immunopositive within the cells. At least 30 % of the tumor cells possessed MIB-I and 20 % of them possessed p53, which are compatible with fast development of the tumor. By electron microscopy, the tumor cells possessed large oval nuclei, abundant mitochondria, caveolae and smooth endoplasmic reticulums, while no gap junctions were seen on the cells: The tumor cells thus possessed interstitial cells-like characteristics at least in part. DNA mutation search for the tumor cells however realized no gain-of-function mutation within the exon 11 of the c-kit gene, suggesting existence of other mechanism for neoplasmic growth of the tumor cells classified as gastrointestinal stromal tumors. PMID:14714834

  1. Fibroblast sources: Where can we get them?

    PubMed

    Fernandes, I R; Russo, F B; Pignatari, G C; Evangelinellis, M M; Tavolari, S; Muotri, A R; Beltrão-Braga, P C B

    2016-03-01

    Fibroblasts are cells widely used in cell culture, both for transient primary cell culture or permanent as transformed cell lines. Lately, fibroblasts become cell sources for use in disease modeling after cell reprogramming because it is easily accessible in the body. Fibroblasts in patients will maintain all genetic background during reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem cells. In spite of their large use, fibroblasts are obtained after an invasive procedure, a superficial punch skin biopsy, collected under patient's local anesthesia. Taking into consideration the minimum patient's discomfort during and after the biopsy procedure, as well as the aesthetics aspect, it is essential to reflect on the best site of the body for the biopsy procedure combined with the success of getting robust fibroblast cultures in the lab. For this purpose, we compared the efficiency of four biopsy sites of the body (skin from eyelid, back of the ear, abdominal cesarean scar and groin). Cell proliferation assays and viability after cryopreservation were measured. Our results revealed that scar tissue provided fibroblasts with higher proliferative rates. Also, fibroblasts from scar tissues presented a higher viability after the thawing process. PMID:25060709

  2. Transcriptional control of cardiac fibroblast plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lighthouse, Janet K; Small, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts help maintain the normal architecture of the healthy heart and are responsible for scar formation and the healing response to pathological insults. Various genetic, biomechanical, or humoral factors stimulate fibroblasts to become contractile smooth muscle-like cells called myofibroblasts that secrete large amounts of extracellular matrix. Unfortunately, unchecked myofibroblast activation in heart disease leads to pathological fibrosis, which is a major risk factor for the development of cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control fibroblast plasticity and myofibroblast activation is essential to develop novel strategies to specifically target pathological cardiac fibrosis without disrupting the adaptive healing response. This review highlights the major transcriptional mediators of fibroblast origin and function in development and disease. The contribution of the fetal epicardial gene program will be discussed in the context of fibroblast origin in development and following injury, primarily focusing on Tcf21 and C/EBP. We will also highlight the major transcriptional regulatory axes that control fibroblast plasticity in the adult heart, including transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Smad signaling, the Rho/myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)/serum response factor (SRF) axis, and Calcineurin/transient receptor potential channel (TRP)/nuclear factor of activated T-Cell (NFAT) signaling. Finally, we will discuss recent strategies to divert the fibroblast transcriptional program in an effort to promote cardiomyocyte regeneration. This article is a part of a Special Issue entitled "Fibrosis and Myocardial Remodeling". PMID:26721596

  3. Cytotoxicity of silver dressings on diabetic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zou, Shi-Bo; Yoon, Won-Young; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Cui, Zheng-Jun; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2013-06-01

    A large number of silver-based dressings are commonly used in the management of chronic wounds that are at risk of infection, including diabetic foot ulcers. However, there are still controversies regarding the toxicity of silver dressings on wound healing. The purpose of this study was to objectively test the cytotoxicity of silver dressings on human diabetic fibroblasts. Human diabetic fibroblasts were obtained from the foot skin of four diabetic foot ulcer patients and cultured. The effect of five silver-containing dressing products (Aquacel Ag, Acticoat*Absorbent, Medifoam Ag, Biatain Ag and PolyMem Ag) and their comparable silver-free dressing products on morphology, proliferation and collagen synthesis of the cultured human diabetic fibroblasts were compared in vitro. In addition, extracts of each dressing were tested in order to examine the effect of other chemical components found in the dressings on cytotoxicity. The diabetic fibroblasts cultured with each silver-free dressing adopted the typical dendritic and fusiform shape. On the other hand, the diabetic fibroblasts did not adopt this typical morphology when treated with the different silver dressings. All silver dressings tested in the study reduced the viability of the diabetic fibroblasts and collagen synthesis by 54-70 and 48-68%, respectively, when compared to silver-free dressings. Silver dressings significantly changed the cell morphology and decreased cell proliferation and collagen synthesis of diabetic fibroblasts. Therefore, silver dressings should be used with caution when treating diabetic wounds. PMID:22533495

  4. Stromal-Based Signatures for the Classification of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Liu, Jiangang; Falcon, Beverly L; Iyer, Seema; Stewart, Julie; Celikkaya, Hilal; O'Mahony, Marguerita; Sevinsky, Christopher; Lowes, Christina; Douglass, Larry; Jeffries, Cynthia; Bodenmiller, Diane; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Fischl, Anthony; Gerald, Damien; Xue, Qi; Lee, Jee-Yun; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Sui, Yunxia; Desai, Keyur; Doman, Thompson; Aggarwal, Amit; Carter, Julia H; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Ginty, Fiona; Nasir, Aejaz; Nagy, Janice A; Dvorak, Harold F; Benjamin, Laura E

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of metastatic gastric cancer typically involves chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies targeting HER2 (ERBB2) and VEGFR2 (KDR). However, reliable methods to identify patients who would benefit most from a combination of treatment modalities targeting the tumor stroma, including new immunotherapy approaches, are still lacking. Therefore, we integrated a mouse model of stromal activation and gastric cancer genomic information to identify gene expression signatures that may inform treatment strategies. We generated a mouse model in which VEGF-A is expressed via adenovirus, enabling a stromal response marked by immune infiltration and angiogenesis at the injection site, and identified distinct stromal gene expression signatures. With these data, we designed multiplexed IHC assays that were applied to human primary gastric tumors and classified each tumor to a dominant stromal phenotype representative of the vascular and immune diversity found in gastric cancer. We also refined the stromal gene signatures and explored their relation to the dominant patient phenotypes identified by recent large-scale studies of gastric cancer genomics (The Cancer Genome Atlas and Asian Cancer Research Group), revealing four distinct stromal phenotypes. Collectively, these findings suggest that a genomics-based systems approach focused on the tumor stroma can be used to discover putative predictive biomarkers of treatment response, especially to antiangiogenesis agents and immunotherapy, thus offering an opportunity to improve patient stratification. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2573-86. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197264

  5. Neutrophils trigger a NF-κB dependent polarization of tumor-supportive stromal cells in germinal center B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Murielle; Guilloton, Fabien; Pangault, Céline; Mourcin, Frédéric; Sok, Phaktra; Latour, Maelle; Amé-Thomas, Patricia; Flecher, Erwan; Fest, Thierry; Tarte, Karin

    2015-06-30

    Both tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN) and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) display specific phenotypic and functional features and contribute to tumor cell niche. However, their bidirectional crosstalk has been poorly studied, in particular in the context of hematological malignancies. Follicular lymphomas (FL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) are two germinal center-derived lymphomas where various cell components of infiltrating microenvironment, including TAN and CAFs, have been demonstrated to favor directly and indirectly malignant B-cell survival, growth, and drug resistance. We show here that, besides a direct and contact-dependent supportive effect of neutrophils on DLBCL B-cell survival, mediated through the BAFF/APRIL pathway, neutrophils and stromal cells cooperate to sustain FL B-cell growth. This cooperation relies on an overexpression of IL-8 by lymphoma-infiltrating stromal cells that could thereafter efficiently promote neutrophil survival and prime them to neutrophil extracellular trap. Conversely, neutrophils are able to activate stromal cells in a NF-κB-dependent manner, inducing their commitment towards an inflammatory lymphoid stroma phenotype associated with an increased capacity to trigger malignant B-cell survival, and to recruit additional monocytes and neutrophils through the release of CCL2 and IL-8, respectively. Altogether, a better understanding of the lymphoma-supporting effects of neutrophils could be helpful to design new anti-tumor therapeutic strategies. PMID:26158216

  6. Fibroblast heterogeneity in the cancer wound

    PubMed Central

    Öhlund, Daniel; Elyada, Ela

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblasts regulate the structure and function of healthy tissues, participate transiently in tissue repair after acute inflammation, and assume an aberrant stimulatory role during chronic inflammatory states including cancer. Such cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) modulate the tumor microenvironment and influence the behavior of neoplastic cells in either a tumor-promoting or tumor-inhibiting manner. These pleiotropic functions highlight the inherent plasticity of fibroblasts and may provide new avenues to understand and therapeutically intervene in malignancies. We discuss the emerging themes of CAF biology in the context of tumorigenesis and therapy. PMID:25071162

  7. Fibroblast heterogeneity in the cancer wound.

    PubMed

    Öhlund, Daniel; Elyada, Ela; Tuveson, David

    2014-07-28

    Fibroblasts regulate the structure and function of healthy tissues, participate transiently in tissue repair after acute inflammation, and assume an aberrant stimulatory role during chronic inflammatory states including cancer. Such cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) modulate the tumor microenvironment and influence the behavior of neoplastic cells in either a tumor-promoting or tumor-inhibiting manner. These pleiotropic functions highlight the inherent plasticity of fibroblasts and may provide new avenues to understand and therapeutically intervene in malignancies. We discuss the emerging themes of CAF biology in the context of tumorigenesis and therapy. PMID:25071162

  8. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones modulation on corneal fibroblast motility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsan-Chi; Tsai, Tzu-Yun; Chang, Shu-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Topical fluoroquinolones are widely used to prevent ocular infections after ophthalmic surgery. However, they have been shown to affect the corneal cell motility, whose mechanism remains indefinite. The purpose of this study was to investigate how fluoroquinolones affect corneal stromal cell motility. Human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs) were incubated in ciprofloxacin (CIP), levofloxacin (LEV), or moxifloxacin (MOX) at 0, 10, 50, and 100 μg/ml for up to 3 days. Effect of CIP, LEV, or MOX on HCF migration was monitored using migration assay. HCF viability was determined by WST-1 assay. Expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin (PXN), and their phosphorylated forms were analyzed by immunoblotting. Binding affinity between FAK and PXN was determined by co-immunoprecipitation. Our results revealed that CIP and MOX, but not LEV, noticeably retarded HCF migration. HCF proliferation was significantly reduced by CIP (38.2%), LEV (29.5%), and MOX (21.3%), respectively (p = 0.002). CIP and MOX suppressed the phosphorylation of PXN at tyrosines (10.2 ± 4.3%, p < 0.001; 11.7 ± 2.4%, p < 0.001, respectively), including tyrosine 118 (33.3 ± 5.2%, p < 0.001; 34.0 ± 4.4%, p < 0.001, respectively). CIP and MOX diminished the binding affinity between FAK and PXN (8.2 ± 1.8%, p < 0.001; 9.0 ± 4.5%, p < 0.001, respectively). Nevertheless, tyrosine dephosphorylation and FAK dissociation of PXN were not found in LEV-treated HCFs. None of these fluoroquinolones affect phosphorylation of FAK-Y397. We conclude that CIP and MOX, but not LEV, might delay corneal fibroblast migration via interfering with recruitment of PXN to focal adhesions and dephosphorylation of PXN at the tyrosines. PMID:26546726

  9. Isolation of hormone responsive uterine stromal cells: an in vitro model for stromal cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rider, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    The female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone stimulate proliferation and differentiation of human and rodent uterine cells. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a method for isolating hormone-responsive rat uterine stromal cell lines that can be used to study steroid control of the cell cycle. Uteri from ovariectomized rats are differentially digested with trypsin to separate epithelial and stromal cells. The stromal cells are cultured in a standard growth medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum. After several passages, the purity of the stromal cell lines is determined using immunocytochemistry. Cell proliferation is studied by culturing the stromal cells in serum-free medium containing sex steroids and other mitogens. Cell cycle progression is assessed by flow cytometry, 3H-thymidine and BrdU incorporation, whereas proliferation is monitored using the MTT assay. Cell cycle regulators are visualized by Northern and Western blotting whereas cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase activity is monitored using immune complex kinase assays. Uterine stromal cell lines isolated using the methods reported in this chapter provide a suitable model system to investigate the signal transduction events that stimulate hormone-dependent control of the cell cycle. PMID:16251733

  10. KIT and PDGFRA mutations and PDGFRA immunostaining in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Barreca, Antonella; Fornari, Alessandro; Bonello, Lisa; Tondat, Fabrizio; Chiusa, Luigi; Lista, Patrizia; Pich, Achille

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the association of PDGFRA and KIT mutations as well as PDGFRA immunohistochemical expression with clinicopathologic features and prognosis in a series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Tumor DNA from 40 GISTs was sequenced for the presence of mutations in KIT exons 9, 11, 13 and 17, and in PDGFRA exons 12 and 18. Tissue sections were stained with polyclonal anti-PDGFRA antibody. KIT mutations occurred in 26 cases. There were 13 deletions, 6 substitutions, 3 deletion-substitutions, 3 duplications and 1 insertion. Tumors with KIT deletions/insertion were large with a high mitotic index (MI), and were associated with a high rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs, distant metastasis, relapse and a short disease-free survival (DFS). PDGFRA mutations occurred in 6 gastric GISTs. There were 4 deletions and 2 substitutions. Tumors with PDGFRA mutations were small, with a low MI and Ki67 score, and were associated with a very low rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs and distant metastasis. PDGFRA immunopositivity was found in 23 cases: a peculiar 'dotlike' staining was found in 5 out of 6 PDGFRA mutated cases. Patients with positive PDGFRA immunostaining had a longer DFS than those with negative staining. Our data confirm that the type of KIT mutation is associated with various clinicopathologic features of GISTs, and indicate that PDGFRA mutations are associated with rather indolent tumors. PDGFRA immunopositivity reflects PDGFRA mutational status and is associated with a favorable outcome. PMID:21461555

  11. Targeting Disease Persistence in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zörnig, Martin; Hayashi, Yujiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent 20%–40% of human sarcomas. Although approximately half of GISTs are cured by surgery, prognosis of advanced disease used to be poor due to the high resistance of these tumors to conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. The introduction of molecularly targeted therapy (e.g., with imatinib mesylate) following the discovery of the role of oncogenic mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinases KIT and platelet-derived growth factor α (PDGFRA) significantly increased patient survival. However, GIST cells persist in 95%–97% of imatinib-treated patients who eventually progress and die of the disease because of the emergence of clones with drug-resistant mutations. Because these secondary mutations are highly heterogeneous, even second- and third-line drugs that are effective against certain genotypes have only moderately increased progression-free survival. Consequently, alternative strategies such as targeting molecular mechanisms underlying disease persistence should be considered. We reviewed recently discovered cell-autonomous and microenvironmental mechanisms that could promote the survival of GIST cells in the presence of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. We particularly focused on the potential role of adult precursors for interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), the normal counterpart of GISTs. ICC precursors share phenotypic characteristics with cells that emerge in a subset of patients treated with imatinib and in young patients with GIST characterized by loss of succinate dehydrogenase complex proteins and lack of KIT or PDGFRA mutations. Eradication of residual GIST cells and cure of GIST will likely require individualized combinations of several approaches tailored to tumor genotype and phenotype. Significance Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are one of the most common connective tissue cancers. Most GISTs that cannot be cured by surgery respond to molecularly targeted therapy (e.g., with imatinib

  12. Exchange coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets.

    PubMed

    Dey, H; Csaba, G; Bernstein, G H; Porod, W

    2016-09-30

    We experimentally demonstrate exchange-coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets. Our results show that two neighboring nanomagnets that are each antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled to a common ferromagnetic bottom layer can be brought into strong ferromagnetic interaction. Simulations show that interlayer exchange coupling effectively promotes ferromagnetic alignment between the two nanomagnets, as opposed to antiferromagnetic alignment due to dipole-coupling. In order to experimentally demonstrate the proposed scheme, we fabricated arrays of pairs of elongated, single-domain nanomagnets. Magnetic force microscopy measurements show that most of the pairs are ferromagnetically ordered. The results are in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. The presented scheme can achieve coupling strengths that are significantly stronger than dipole coupling, potentially enabling far-reaching applications in Nanomagnet Logic, spin-wave devices and three-dimensional storage and computing. PMID:27535227

  13. Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Panahi, Behrouz M.

    2006-03-23

    So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

  14. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  15. Identification of selective and potent inhibitors of fibroblast activation protein and prolyl oligopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Poplawski, Sarah E; Lai, Jack H; Li, Youhua; Jin, Zhiping; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Wengen; Wu, Yong; Zhou, Yuhong; Sudmeier, James L; Sanford, David G; Bachovchin, William W

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine protease selectively expressed on reactive stromal fibroblasts of epithelial carcinomas. It is widely believed to play a role in tumor invasion and metastasis and therefore to represent a potential new drug target for cancer. Investigation into its biological function, however, has been hampered by the current unavailability of selective inhibitors. The challenge has been in identifying inhibitors that are selective for FAP over both the dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs), with which it shares exopeptidase specificity, and prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP), with which it shares endopeptidase specificity. Here, we report the first potent FAP inhibitor with selectivity over both the DPPs and PREP, N-(pyridine-4-carbonyl)-d-Ala-boroPro (ARI-3099, 6). We also report a similarly potent and selective PREP inhibitor, N-(pyridine-3-carbonyl)-Val-boroPro (ARI-3531, 22). Both are boronic acid based inhibitors, demonstrating that high selectivity can be achieved using this electrophile. The inhibitors are stable, easy to synthesize, and should prove to be useful in helping to elucidate the biological functions of these two unique and interesting enzymes, as well as their potential as drug targets. PMID:23594271

  16. Identification of Selective and Potent Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein and Prolyl Oligopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Poplawski, Sarah E.; Lai, Jack H.; Li, Youhua; Jin, Zhiping; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Wengen; Wu, Yong; Zhou, Yuhong; Sudmeier, James L.; Sanford, David G.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine protease selectively expressed on reactive stromal fibroblasts of epithelial carcinomas. It is widely believed to play a role in tumor invasion and metastasis and therefore to represent a potential new drug target for cancer. Investigation into its biological function, however, has been hampered by the current unavailability of selective inhibitors. The challenge has been in identifying inhibitors that are selective for FAP over both the dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs), with which it shares exopeptidase specificity, and prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP), with which it shares endopeptidase specificity. Here, we report the first potent FAP inhibitor with selectivity over both the DPPs and PREP, N-(pyridine-4-carbonyl)-d-Ala-boroPro (ARI-3099, 6). We also report a similarly potent and selective PREP inhibitor, N-(pyridine-3-carbonyl)-Val-boroPro (ARI-3531, 22). Both are boronic acid based inhibitors, demonstrating that high selectivity can be achieved using this electrophile. The inhibitors are stable, easy to synthesize, and should prove to be useful in helping to elucidate the biological functions of these two unique and interesting enzymes, as well as their potential as drug targets. PMID:23594271

  17. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts: Their Characteristics and Their Roles in Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Kazuyoshi; Hara, Masayasu; Nagasaki, Takaya; Sato, Takafumi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-01

    Cancer tissues are composed of cancer cells and the surrounding stromal cells (e.g., fibroblasts, vascular endothelial cells, and immune cells), in addition to the extracellular matrix. Most studies investigating carcinogenesis and the progression, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis of cancer have focused on alterations in cancer cells, including genetic and epigenetic changes. Recently, interactions between cancer cells and the stroma have attracted considerable attention, and increasing evidence has accumulated on this. Several researchers have gradually clarified the origins, features, and roles of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), a major component of the cancer stroma. CAFs function in a similar manner to myofibroblasts during wound healing. We previously reported the relationship between CAFs and angiogenesis. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a multifunctional cytokine, plays a central role in regulating inflammatory and immune responses, and important roles in the progression, including proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis, of several cancers. We showed that CAFs are an important IL-6 source and that anti-IL-6 receptor antibody suppressed angiogenesis and inhibited tumor-stroma interactions. Furthermore, CAFs contribute to drug-resistance acquisition in cancer cells. The interaction between cancer cells and the stroma could be a potential target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26690480

  18. Morphological Characterization of Organized Extracellular Matrix Deposition by Ascorbic Acid-Stimulated Human Corneal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Hutcheon, Audrey E. K.; Melotti, Suzanna A.; Zieske, James D.; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the structure and morphology of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesized by untransformed, cultured human corneal fibroblasts in long-term cultures. Methods Human corneal stromal keratocytes were expanded in transwell culture in the presence of fetal bovine serum and a stable derivative of Vitamin C. The cells were allowed to synthesize a fibrillar ECM for up to five weeks. Constructs were assessed via light (phase contrast and differential interference contrast) and transmission (standard and quick freeze/deep etch) microscopy. Results Electron micrographs revealed stratified constructs with multiple parallel layers of cells and an extracellular matrix comprising parallel arrays of small, polydisperse fibrils (27–51 nm) which often alternate in direction. Differential interference contrast images demonstrated oriented ECM fibril arrays parallel to the plane of the construct while quick-freeze deep etch micrographs showed the details of the matrix interaction with fibroblasts via arrays of membrane surface structures. Conclusions Human keratocytes, cultured in a stable Vitamin C derivative, are capable of assembling extracellular matrix which comprise parallel arrays of ECM fibrils. The resulting constructs, which are highly cellular, exhibit morphology similar to the developing mammalian stroma where organized matrix is derived. The appearance of arrays of structures on the cell membranes suggest a role in the local organization of synthesized ECM. This model could provide critical insight into the fundamental processes which govern the genesis of organized connective tissues such as the cornea and may provide a scaffolding suitable for tissue-engineering a biomimetic stroma. PMID:17724187

  19. A potent immunotoxin targeting fibroblast activation protein for treatment of breast cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jinxu; Xiao, Liang; Joo, Kye-Il; Liu, Yarong; Zhang, Chupei; Liu, Shuanglong; Conti, Peter S; Li, Zibo; Wang, Pin

    2016-02-15

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is highly expressed in the tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs) of most human epithelial cancers. FAP plays a critical role in tumorigenesis and cancer progression, which makes it a promising target for novel anticancer therapy. However, mere abrogation of FAP enzymatic activity by small molecules is not very effective in inhibiting tumor growth. In this study, we have evaluated a novel immune-based approach to specifically deplete FAP-expressing TAFs in a mouse 4T1 metastatic breast cancer model. Depletion of FAP-positive stromal cells by FAP-targeting immunotoxin αFAP-PE38 altered levels of various growth factors, cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases, decreased the recruitment of tumor-infiltrating immune cells in the tumor microenvironment and suppressed tumor growth. In addition, combined treatment with αFAP-PE38 and paclitaxel potently inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Our findings highlight the potential use of immunotoxin αFAP-PE38 to deplete FAP-expressing TAFs and thus provide a rationale for the use of this immunotoxin in cancer therapy. PMID:26334777

  20. Localization of tropomyosin in mouse embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, A O; Subrahmanyan, L; Kalnins, V I

    1975-04-01

    Antiserum to chick skeletal muscle tropomyosin was used to localize tropomyosin in mouse embryo fibroblasts by the indirect fluorescein labeled antibody technique. Specific staining was observed cytoplasmic fibers, which extended out into the cell processes. The staining pattern in these cells is similar to that previously described by others for actin. This observation suggests that in fibroblasts tropomyosin, like actin, is localized in fibers in the cytoplasm. PMID:50726

  1. 30 CFR 56.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 56.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  2. 30 CFR 57.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 57.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  3. 30 CFR 56.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 56.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  4. 30 CFR 57.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 57.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  5. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  6. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  7. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  9. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  10. FIBROBLAST MECHANICS IN 3D COLLAGEN MATRICES

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sangmyung; Grinnell, Frederick

    2007-01-01

    Connective tissues provide mechanical support and frameworks for the other tissues of the body. Type 1 collagen is the major protein component of ordinary connective tissue, and fibroblasts are the cell type primarily responsible for its biosynthesis and remodeling. Research on fibroblasts interacting with collagen matrices explores all four quadrants of cell mechanics: pro-migratory vs. pro-contractile growth factor environments on one axis; high tension vs. low tension cell-matrix interactions on the other. The dendritic fibroblast – probably equivalent to the resting tissue fibroblast – can be observed only in the low tension quadrant and generally has not been appreciated from research on cells incubated with planar culture surfaces. Fibroblasts in the low tension quadrant require microtubules for formation of dendritic extensions, whereas fibroblasts in the high tension quadrant require microtubules for polarization but not for spreading. Ruffling of dendritic extensions rather than their overall protrusion or retraction provides the mechanism for remodeling of floating collagen matrices, and floating matrix remodeling likely reflects a model of tissue mechanical homeostasis. PMID:17825456

  11. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (<100 cells). As a proof of concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced

  12. LAPAROSCOPIC RESECTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    LOUREIRO, Marcelo de Paula; de ALMEIDA, Rômulo Augusto Andrade; CLAUS, Christiano Marlo Paggi; BONIN, Eduardo Aimoré; CURY-FILHO,, Antônio Moris; DIMBARRE, Daniellson; da COSTA, Marco Aurélio Raeder; VITAL, Marcílio Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal mesenchymal or stromal tumors (GIST) are lesions originated on digestive tract walls, which are treated by surgical resection. Several laparoscopic techniques, from gastrectomies to segmental resections, have been used successfully. Aim Describe a single center experience on laparoscopic GIST resection. Method Charts of 15 operated patients were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen had gastric lesions, of which ten were sub epithelial, ranging from 2-8 cm; and three were pure exofitic growing lesions. The remaining two patients had small bowel lesions. Surgical laparoscopic treatment consisted of two distal gastrectomies, 11 wedge gastric resections and two segmental enterectomies. Mechanical suture was used in the majority of patients except on six, which underwent resection and closure using manual absorbable sutures. There were no conversions to open technique. Results Mean operative time was 1h 29 min±92 (40-420 min). Average lenght of hospital stay was three days (2-6 days). There were no leaks, postoperative bleeding or need for reintervention. Mean postoperative follow-up was 38±17 months (6-60 months). Three patients underwent adjuvant Imatinib treatment, one for recurrence five months postoperatively and two for tumors with moderate risk for recurrence . Conclusion Laparoscopic GIST resection, not only for small lesions but also for tumors above 5 cm, is safe and acceptable technique. PMID:27120729

  13. Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Gu, Meng-Li; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. However, there are still 10%-15% of GISTs lacking KIT and PDGFRA mutations, called wild-type GISTs (WT GISTs). Among these so-called WT GISTs, a small subset is associated with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) deficiency, known as SDH-deficient GISTs. In addition, GISTs that occur in Carney triad and Carney-Stratakis syndrome represent specific examples of SDH-deficient GISTs. SDH-deficient GISTs locate exclusively in the stomach, showing predilection for children and young adults with female preponderance. The tumor generally pursues an indolent course and exhibits primary resistance to imatinib therapy in most cases. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B expression and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) are common features of SDH-deficient GISTs. In WT GISTs without succinate dehydrogenase activity, upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α may lead to increased growth signaling through IGF1R and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). As a result, IGF1R and VEGFR are promising to be the novel therapeutic targets of GISTs. This review will update the current knowledge on characteristics of SDH-deficient GISTs and further discuss the possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis and clinical management of SDH-deficient GISTs. PMID:25741136

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cells for sphincter regeneration.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gerd; Hart, Melanie L; Brinchmann, Jan E; Rolauffs, Bernd; Stenzl, Arnulf; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2015-03-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), defined as the involuntary loss of considerable amounts of urine during increased abdominal pressure (exertion, effort, sneezing, coughing, etc.), is a severe problem to the individuals affected and a significant medical, social and economic challenge. SUI is associated with pelvic floor debility, absence of detrusor contraction, or a loss of control over the sphincter muscle apparatus. The pathology includes an increasing loss of muscle cells, replacement of muscular tissue with fibrous tissue, and general aging associated processes of the sphincter complex. When current therapies fail to cure or improve SUI, application of regeneration-competent cells may be an alternative therapeutic option. Here we discuss different aspects of the biology of mesenchymal stromal cells, which are relevant to their clinical applications and for regenerating the sphincter complex. However, there are reports in favor of and against cell-based therapies. We therefore summarize the potential and the risks of cell-based therapies for the treatment of SUI. PMID:25451135

  15. Tumoral pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia of the breast.

    PubMed

    Wieman, Stephanie M; Landercasper, Jeffrey; Johnson, Jeanne M; Ellis, Richard L; Wester, Susan M; Lambert, Pamela J; Ross, Lauren A

    2008-12-01

    Tumoral pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a rare benign proliferative disease of the breast. The majority of the literature reports of PASH have not contained detailed descriptions of the imaging characteristics of PASH. A 10-year retrospective study of patients with tumoral PASH and a 20-year Ovid MEDLINE search were performed to determine whether specific imaging and needle biopsy results could characterize PASH preoperatively. We identified 22 patients with tumoral PASH. Seventeen (77%) of 22 women had a palpable lump and 14 (72%) of 21 had a density on mammography. Ultrasound (US) findings included mixed or hypoechoic echogenicity in 83 per cent and ill-defined borders in 62 per cent. Eight (36%) patients had lesions with a Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification of 4 or 5. The sensitivity of preoperative core needle biopsy (CNB) to identify PASH was 83 per cent. A review of the literature revealed that 90 per cent of patients with PASH had some malignant imaging characteristics and 95 per cent had a mass on mammography. The imaging characteristics of PASH exhibited marked variability. Excision of PASH after CNB may be considered for patients with symptoms, enlarging lesions, or lesions classified as BI-RADS 4 or 5. PASH diagnosed by CNB allows selected patients to avoid excision. PMID:19097540

  16. Pancreatic cancer stromal biology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dacheng; Xie, Keping

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies. Significant progresses have been made in understanding of pancreatic cancer pathogenesis, including appreciation of precursor lesions or premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), description of sequential transformation from normal pancreatic tissue to invasive pancreatic cancer and identification of major genetic and epigenetic events and the biological impact of those events on malignant behavior. However, the currently used therapeutic strategies targeting tumor epithelial cells, which are potent in cell culture and animal models, have not been successful in the clinic. Presumably, therapeutic resistance of pancreatic cancer is at least in part due to its drastic desmoplasis, which is a defining hallmark for and circumstantially contributes to pancreatic cancer development and progression. Improved understanding of the dynamic interaction between cancer cells and the stroma is important to better understanding pancreatic cancer biology and to designing effective intervention strategies. This review focuses on the origination, evolution and disruption of stromal molecular and cellular components in pancreatic cancer, and their biological effects on pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26114155

  17. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins. PMID:19968734

  18. Drug repurposing for gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Pessetto, Ziyan Y; Weir, Scott J; Sethi, Geetika; Broward, Melinda A; Godwin, Andrew K

    2013-07-01

    Despite significant treatment advances over the past decade, metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) remains largely incurable. Rare diseases, such as GIST, individually affect small groups of patients but collectively are estimated to affect 25 to 30 million people in the United States alone. Given the costs associated with the discovery, development, and registration of new drugs, orphan diseases such as GIST are often not pursued by mainstream pharmaceutical companies. As a result, "drug repurposing" or "repositioning," has emerged as an alternative to the traditional drug development process. In this study, we screened 796 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs and found that two of these compounds, auranofin (Ridaura) and fludarabine phosphate, effectively and selectively inhibited the proliferation of GISTs, including imatinib-resistant cells. One of the most notable drug hits, auranofin, an oral, gold-containing agent approved by the FDA in 1985 for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, was found to inhibit thioredoxin reductase activity and induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to dramatic inhibition of GIST cell growth and viability. Importantly, the anticancer activity associated with auranofin was independent of imatinib-resistant status, but was closely related to the endogenous and inducible levels of ROS. Coupled with the fact that auranofin has an established safety profile in patients, these findings suggest for the first time that auranofin may have clinical benefit for patients with GIST, particularly in those suffering from imatinib-resistant and recurrent forms of this disease. PMID:23657945

  19. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  20. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-05-27

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  1. Hypoxia-inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) Promotes Extracellular Matrix Remodeling under Hypoxic Conditions by Inducing P4HA1, P4HA2, and PLOD2 Expression in Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, Daniele M.; Bajpai, Saumendra; Chaturvedi, Pallavi; Wirtz, Denis; Semenza, Gregg L.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) composition, organization, and compliance provide both architectural and chemical cues that modulate tissue structure and function. ECM produced by stromal fibroblasts plays a key role in breast cancer invasion and metastasis, which are also stimulated by intratumoral hypoxia. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a critical regulator of ECM remodeling by fibroblasts under hypoxic conditions. HIF-1 activates expression of genes encoding collagen prolyl (P4HA1 and P4HA2) and lysyl (PLOD2) hydroxylases. P4HA1 and P4HA2 are required for collagen deposition, whereas PLOD2 is required for ECM stiffening and collagen fiber alignment. Together P4HA1, P4HA2, and PLOD2 mediate remodeling of ECM composition, alignment, and mechanical properties in response to hypoxia. HIF-1-dependent ECM remodeling by hypoxic fibroblasts induces changes in breast cancer cell morphology, adhesion, and motility that promote invasion and metastasis. PMID:23423382

  2. Spatial development of the cultivation of a bone marrow stromal cell line in porous carriers.

    PubMed

    Takagi, M; Sasaki, T; Yoshida, T

    1999-11-01

    The spatial development of the cultivation of a bone marrow stromal cell line (SR-4987) in porous carriers was investigated in order to construct a three-dimensional hematopoietic culture system. Low-rate continuous agitation, 20 rpm, was an appropriate method to achieve initial adhesion of cells onto a cellulose porous beads (CPB, 100 mum pore diameter) in a spinner bottle, compared with other methods such as centrifugation and intermittent agitation. Cell growth with continuous agitation at 70 rpm after initial cell adhesion was not inferior to that at 20 rpm. A 2- and 10-fold increase in the inoculum cell concentration for CPB and another type of porous cellulose beads (Micro-cube (MC), 500 mum pore diameter) resulted in a 1.2- and 2-fold increase in final cell concentrationm, respectively. Cells attached to the MC beads and a polyester nonwoven dic (Fibra-cell (FC)) could grow and spread well on the carriers and a fibroblast-like shape was observed under scanning electron microscopy while the cells on CPB were globular. The flatness and inner surface area of these carriers may be the reason for the differences in cell morphology. PMID:19003146

  3. Characterization and Comparison of Canine Multipotent Stromal Cells Derived from Liver and Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Malagola, Ermanno; Teunissen, Michelle; van der Laan, Luc J.W.; Verstegen, Monique M.A.; Schotanus, Baukje A.; van Steenbeek, Frank G.; Penning, Louis C.; van Wolferen, Monique E.; Tryfonidou, Marianna A.

    2016-01-01

    Liver-derived multipotent stromal cells (L-MSCs) may prove preferable for treatment strategies of liver diseases, in comparison to the widely studied bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). Canines are a large animal model, in which the pathologies of liver diseases are similar to man. This study further promotes the implementation of canine models in MSC-based treatments of liver diseases. L-MSCs were characterized and compared to BM-MSCs from the same individual. Both cell types demonstrated a spindle-shaped fibroblast-like morphology, possessed the same growth potential, and demonstrated similar immunomodulation gene expression of CD274, PTGS-1, and PTGS-2. Marked differences in cell surface markers, CD105 and CD146, distinguished these two cell populations, and L-MSCs retained a liver-specific imprinting, observed by expression of CK18 and CK19. Finally, both populations differentiated toward the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage; however, L-MSCs failed to differentiate into the chondrogenic lineage. In conclusion, characterization of canine L-MSCs and BM-MSCs demonstrated that the two cell type populations are highly comparable. Although it is still unclear which cell source is preferred for clinical application in liver treatment strategies, this study provides a foundation for future controlled studies with MSC therapy in various liver diseases in dogs before their application in man. PMID:26462417

  4. Mechanisms of tumor escape from immune system: role of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Alessandro; Musso, Alessandra; Dapino, Irene; Zocchi, Maria Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment represents the site where the tumor tries to survive and escape from immune system-mediated recognition. Indeed, to proliferate tumor cells can divert the immune response inducing the generation of myeloid derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells which can limit the efficiency of effector antitumor lymphocytes in eliminating neoplastic cells. Many components of the tumor microenvironment can serve as a double sword for the tumor and the host. Several types of fibroblast-like cells, which herein we define mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), secrete extracellular matrix components and surrounding the tumor mass can limit the expansion of the tumor. On the other hand, MSC can interfere with the immune recognition of tumor cells producing immunoregulatory cytokines as transforming growth factor (TGF)ß, releasing soluble ligands of the activating receptors expressed on cytolytic effector cells as decoy molecules, affecting the correct interaction among lymphocytes and tumor cells. MSC can also serve as target for the same anti-tumor effector lymphocytes or simply impede the interaction between these lymphocytes and neoplastic cells. Thus, several evidences point out the role of MSC, both in epithelial solid tumors and hematological malignancies, in regulating tumor cell growth and immune response. Herein, we review these evidences and suggest that MSC can be a suitable target for a more efficient anti-tumor therapy. PMID:24657523

  5. Single Cell Analysis of Complex Thymus Stromal Cell Populations: Rapid Thymic Epithelia Preparation Characterizes Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kirsten M.; Mella, Heather; Lucas, Philip J.; Williams, Joy A.; Telford, William; Gress, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and dendritic cells are essential for the maintenance of thymopoiesis. Because these stromal elements define the progenitor niche, provide critical survival signals and growth factors, and direct positive and negative selection, detailed study of these populations is necessary to understand important elements for thymic renewal after cytotoxic injury. Study of TEC is currently hindered by lengthy enzymatic separation techniques with decreased viability. We present a new rapid separation technique that yields consistent viable TEC numbers in a quarter of the prior preparation time. Using this new procedure, we identify changes in stroma populations following total body irradiation (TBI). By flow cytometry, we show that TBI significantly depletes UEA+ medullary TEC, while sparing Ly51+ CD45− cells. Further characterization of the Ly51+ subset reveals enrichment of fibroblasts (CD45− Ly51+ MHCII−), while cortical TECs (CD45− Ly51+ MHCII+) were markedly reduced. Dendritic cells (CD11lc+ CD45+) were also decreased following TBI. These data suggest that cytotoxic preparative regimens may impair thymic renewal by reducing critical populations of cortical and medullary TEC, and that such thymic damage can be assessed by this new rapid separation technique, thereby providing a means of assessing optimal conditioning pretransplantfor enhancing thymic-dependent immune reconstitution posttranspiant. PMID:19750208

  6. Making surrogate β-cells from mesenchymal stromal cells: perspectives and future endeavors.

    PubMed

    Bhonde, Ramesh R; Sheshadri, Preethi; Sharma, Shikha; Kumar, Anujith

    2014-01-01

    Generation of surrogate β-cells is the need of the day to compensate the short supply of islets for transplantation to diabetic patients requiring daily shots of insulin. Over the years several sources of stem cells have been claimed to cater to the need of insulin producing cells. These include human embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, human perinatal tissues such as amnion, placenta, umbilical cord and postnatal tissues involving adipose tissue, bone marrow, blood monocytes, cord blood, dental pulp, endometrium, liver, labia minora dermis-derived fibroblasts and pancreas. Despite the availability of such heterogonous sources, there is no substantial breakthrough in selecting and implementing an ideal source for generating large number of stable insulin producing cells. Although the progress in derivation of β-cell like cells from embryonic stem cells has taken a greater leap, their application is limited due to controversy surrounding the destruction of human embryo and immune rejection. Since multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells are free of ethical and immunological complications, they could provide unprecedented opportunity as starting material to derive insulin secreting cells. The main focus of this review is to discuss the merits and demerits of MSCs obtained from human peri- and post-natal tissue sources to yield abundant glucose responsive insulin producing cells as ideal candidates for prospective stem cell therapy to treat diabetes. PMID:24275096

  7. Adult rat bone marrow stromal cells express genes associated with dopamine neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Brian C.; Woodbury, Dale . E-mail: WOODBURYDL@AOL.COM; Black, Ira B.

    2006-05-19

    An intensive search is underway to identify candidates to replace the cells that degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). To date, no suitable substitute has been found. We have recently found that adult rat bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be induced to assume a neuronal phenotype in vitro. These findings may have particular relevance to the treatment of PD. We now report that adult MSCs express multiple dopaminergic genes, suggesting that they are potential candidates for cell therapy. Using RT-PCR, we have examined families of genes that are associated with the development and/or survival of dopaminergic neurons. MSCs transcribe a variety of dopaminergic genes including patched and smoothened (components of the Shh receptor), Gli-1 (downstream mediator of Shh), and Otx-1, a gene associated with formation of the mesencephalon during development. Furthermore, Shh treatment elicits a 1.5-fold increase in DNA synthesis in cultured MSCs, suggesting the presence of a functional Shh receptor complex. We have also found that MSCs transcribe and translate Nurr-1, a nuclear receptor essential for the development of dopamine neurons. In addition, MSCs express a variety of growth factor receptors including the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored ligand-binding subunit of the GDNF receptor, GFR{alpha}1, as well as fibroblast growth factor receptors one and four. The expression of genes that are associated with the development and survival of dopamine neurons suggests a potential role for these cells in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  8. Rationale for the potential use of mesenchymal stromal cells in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vandermeulen, Morgan; Grégoire, Céline; Briquet, Alexandra; Lechanteur, Chantal; Beguin, Yves; Detry, Olivier

    2014-11-28

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and self-renewing cells that reside essentially in the bone marrow as a non-hematopoietic cell population, but may also be isolated from the connective tissues of most organs. MSCs represent a heterogeneous population of adult, fibroblast-like cells characterized by their ability to differentiate into tissues of mesodermal lineages including adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteocytes. For several years now, MSCs have been evaluated for their in vivo and in vitro immunomodulatory and 'tissue reconstruction' properties, which could make them interesting in various clinical settings, and particularly in organ transplantation. This paper aims to review current knowledge on the properties of MSCs and their use in pre-clinical and clinical studies in solid organ transplantation, and particularly in the field of liver transplantation. The first available clinical data seem to show that MSCs are safe to use, at least in the medium-term, but more time is needed to evaluate the potential adverse effects of long-term use. Many issues must be resolved on the correct use of MSCs. Intensive in vitro and pre-clinical research are the keys to a better understanding of the way that MSCs act, and to eventually lead to clinical success. PMID:25469010

  9. [Disorders of the extracellular matrix in epithelial-stromal and stromal corneal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Varkoly, Gréta; Bencze, János; Módis, László; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-08-01

    The human cornea is rich in extracellular matrix. The stroma constitutes the main thickness of the cornea, which consists of collagens and proteoglycans mainly. The epithelial-stromal and stromal dystrophies of the cornea are either autosomal dominant or recessive inherited disorders, which are unrelated to inflammation or trauma. The diseases can manifest in each layer of the cornea, but in most cases the corneal stroma is affected. Generally, they develop in childhood or young adulthood but the diagnosis is only possible when clinical signs (epithelial erosions, decreased visual acuity, photophobia) develop. The different protein aggregates (hyaline, amyloid, crystalline) deposited in the corneal layers result in mild or advanced corneal opacity and loss of the corneal transparency due to disorganisation of the extracellular matrix. In some of the corneal dystrophies the keratane sulphate proteoglycan looses its function which results in a loss of the regular interfibrillar spacing. Due to the severe corneal opacity patients may need corneal transplantation. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1299-1303. PMID:27523312

  10. CD90/THY1 is over-expressed in prostate cancer-associated fibroblasts and could serve as a cancer biomarker

    SciTech Connect

    True, Lawrence D.; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Mingliang; Huang, Chung-Ying; Nelson, Peter S.; Von Haller, Priska D.; Tjoelker, Larry W.; Kim, Jong Seo; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Ellis, William J.; Liebeskind, Emily S.; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2010-10-01

    A by-product in the processing of prostate tissue for cell sorting by collagenase digestion is the media supernatant that remains after the cells are harvested. These supernatants contain proteins made by the cells within the tissue. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Nglycosylated proteins detected an increased amount of CD90/THY1 in cancer supernatants compared to non-cancer supernatants. Immunohistochemistry showed that in all carcinomas, regardless of Gleason grade, a layer of CD90-positive stromal fibroblastic cells, approximately 5-to-10 cells deep, was localized to tumor glands. In contrast, a no more than 1-cell wide girth of CD90-positive stromal cells was found around benign glands. The increased number of CD90-positive stromal cells in cancer correlated with overexpression of CD90 mRNA detected by gene expression analysis of stromal cells obtained by laser-capture microdissection. There is increasing evidence that cancer-associated stroma plays a role in both tumor progression and carcinogenesis. Most experiments to identify cancer biomarkers have focused on the cancer cells. CD90, being a marker for prostate cancer-associated stroma, might be a potential biomarker for this cancer. A non-invasive test could be provided by a urine test. Proteomic analysis of urine from patients with prostate cancer identified CD90; conversely, CD90 was not detected in the urine of post-prostatectomy patients. Furthermore, this urinary CD90 protein was a variant CD90 protein not known to be expressed by such cells as lymphocytes that express CD90. These CD90 results were obtained from ~90 cases consisting of proteomic analysis of tissue and urine, immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis of tissue media, flow cytometry of cells from digested tissue, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis of isolated stromal cells.

  11. Local binary patterns for stromal area removal in histology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomari, Raja S.; Ghosh, Subarna; Chaudhary, Vipin; Al-Kadi, Omar

    2012-03-01

    Nuclei counting in epithelial cells is an indication for tumor proliferation rate which is useful to rank tumors and select an appropriate treatment schedule for the patient. However, due to the high interand intra- observer variability in nuclei counting, pathologists seek a deterministic proliferation rate estimate. Histology tissue contains epithelial and stromal cells. However, nuclei counting is clinically restricted to epithelial cells because stromal cells do not become cancerous themselves since they remain genetically normal. Counting nuclei existing within the stromal tissue is one of the major causes of the proliferation rate non-deterministic estimation. Digitally removing stromal tissue will eliminate a major cause in pathologist counting variability and bring the clinical pathologist a major step closer toward a deterministic proliferation rate estimation. To that end, we propose a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system for eliminating stromal cells from digital histology images based on the local binary patterns, entropy measurement, and statistical analysis. We validate our CAD system on a set of fifty Ki-67-stained histology images. Ki-67-stained histology images are among the clinically approved methods for proliferation rate estimation. To test our CAD system, we prove that the manual proliferation rate estimation performed by the expert pathologist does not change before and after stromal removal. Thus, stromal removal does not affect the expert pathologist estimation clinical decision. Hence, the successful elimination of the stromal area highly reduces the false positive nuclei which are the major confusing cause for the less experienced pathologists and thus accounts for the non-determinism in the proliferation rate estimation. Our experimental setting shows statistical insignificance (paired student t-test shows ρ = 0.74) in the manual nuclei counting before and after our automated stromal removal. This means that the clinical decision of

  12. Suppression of Tumor Growth in Mice by Rationally Designed Pseudopeptide Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein and Prolyl Oligopeptidase1

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kenneth W.; Christiansen, Victoria J.; Yadav, Vivek R.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Zhang, Roy R.; McKee, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments (TMEs) are composed of cancer cells, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix, microvessels, and endothelial cells. Two prolyl endopeptidases, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and prolyl oligopeptidase (POP), are commonly overexpressed by epithelial-derived malignancies, with the specificity of FAP expression by cancer stromal fibroblasts suggesting FAP as a possible therapeutic target. Despite overexpression in most cancers and having a role in angiogenesis, inhibition of POP activity has received little attention as an approach to quench tumor growth. We developed two specific and highly effective pseudopeptide inhibitors, M83, which inhibits FAP and POP proteinase activities, and J94, which inhibits only POP. Both suppressed human colon cancer xenograft growth > 90% in mice. By immunohistochemical stains, M83- and J94-treated tumors had fewer microvessels, and apoptotic areas were apparent in both. In response to M83, but not J94, disordered collagen accumulations were observed. Neither M83- nor J94-treated mice manifested changes in behavior, weight, or gastrointestinal function. Tumor growth suppression was more extensive than noted with recently reported efforts by others to inhibit FAP proteinase function or reduce FAP expression. Diminished angiogenesis and the accompanying profound reduction in tumor growth suggest that inhibition of either FAP or POP may offer new therapeutic approaches that directly target TMEs. PMID:25622898

  13. Changes in compartments of hemospoietic and stromal marrow progenitor cells after continuous low dose gamma-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, E.; Starostin, V.

    The low dose continuous gamma-irradiation chosen corresponded with that affected the organisms onboard a spacecraft (Mitrikas, Tsetlin, 2000). F1 (CBAxC57Bl/6) male and female mice were used at 3 4 months of age. Experimental mice were- irradiated during 10 days to a total dose of 15 mGy (Co60 gamma-sources, mean dose rate of 1.5-2.0 mGy/day). Another group of intact mice served as control. Younger and advanced hemopoietic progenitors measured at day 11 (i.e. CFU -S-11) and day 7 (i.e. CFU-S-7), respectively, after transplantation of test donor cells were assayed by the method of Till and McCulloch (1961). Stromal changes were evaluated by estimation of in vitro fibroblastic colony-forming units (CFU -F ) content and by the ability of ectopically grafted (under renal capsule) stroma to regenerate the new bone marrow organ. CFU-S-11 number increased of 40% as compared with control and almost 2-fold higher than that of CFU-S-7. The CFU-F content increased almost of 3-fold. Size of ectopic marrow transplants was estimated at day 70 following grafting by counting myelokariocyte and CFU -S number that repopulated the newly formed bone marrow organ. It was found more than 2-fold increase of myelokariocytes in transplants produced by marrow stroma of irradiated donors. CFU -S contents in transplants increased strikingly in comparison to control level. CFU-S-7 and CFU-S-11 increased of 7.5- and of 3.7-fold, respectively, i.e. the rate of advanced CFU - S predominated. It should be noted a good correlation between number of stromal progenitor cells (CFU-F) and ectopic transplant sizes evaluated as myelokaryocyte counts when irradiated donors used. In the same time, if sizes of transplants was measured as CFU-S-7 and CFU - S-11 numbers, their increases were more pronounced. Therefore, continuous low dose gamma- irradiation augments significantly both hemopoietic and stromal progenitor cell number in bone marrow. Additionally, the ratio of distinct CFU -S subpopulations

  14. Rbbp7 Is Required for Uterine Stromal Decidualization in Mice.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Kong, Shuangbo; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Shuang; Jiang, Yaling; Liao, Yixin; Jiang, Yufei; Li, Qian; Wang, Bingyan; Zhou, Zuomin; Wang, Haibin; Huo, Ran

    2015-07-01

    Uterine stromal cells undergo extensive proliferation and differentiation during postimplantation development, a process known as decidualization. While a range of signaling molecules have been demonstrated to play essential roles in this event, its potential epigenetic regulatory mechanisms remain largely unknown. Retinoblastoma binding protein 7 (Rbbp7) is a protein reported as a core component of many histone modification and chromatin remodeling complexes. In the present study, our in situ hybridization and immunochemistry analysis first reveals a spatiotemporal expression of Rbbp7 in the uterus during the peri-implantation period. Observations of remarkable induction of Rbbp7 expression in uterine stromal cells in response to progesterone-nuclear receptor PR signaling point to its potential physiological significance during postimplantation uterine development. Employing a stealth RNA knockdown approach, combined with primary murine uterine stromal cell culture and an in vitro-induced decidualization model, we further demonstrate that Rbbp7 silencing compromises stromal cell decidualization via attenuating histone H4 acetylation and cyclin D3 expression. The results collectively suggest that Rbbp7 is a potentially functional player regulating normal histone acetylation modification and cyclin D3 expression in stromal cells during postimplantation decidual development. PMID:26040671

  15. Stromal cells and stem cells in clinical bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Warren L.; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Martin, Elizabeth; Frazier, Trivia; Hung, Ben P.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Stem-cell-mediated bone repair has been used in clinical trials for the regeneration of large craniomaxillofacial defects, to slow the process of bone degeneration in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head and for prophylactic treatment of distal tibial fractures. Successful regenerative outcomes in these investigations have provided a solid foundation for wider use of stromal cells in skeletal repair therapy. However, employing stromal cells to facilitate or enhance bone repair is far from being adopted into clinical practice. Scientific, technical, practical and regulatory obstacles prevent the widespread therapeutic use of stromal cells. Ironically, one of the major challenges lies in the limited understanding of the mechanisms via which transplanted cells mediate regeneration. Animal models have been used to provide insight, but these models largely fail to reproduce the nuances of human diseases and bone defects. Consequently, the development of targeted approaches to optimize cell-mediated outcomes is difficult. In this Review, we highlight the successes and challenges reported in several clinical trials that involved the use of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal or adipose-tissue-derived stromal cells. We identify several obstacles blocking the mainstream use of stromal cells to enhance skeletal repair and highlight technological innovations or areas in which novel techniques might be particularly fruitful in continuing to advance the field of skeletal regenerative medicine. PMID:25560703

  16. Stromal senescence establishes an immunosuppressive microenvironment that drives tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ruhland, Megan K.; Loza, Andrew J.; Capietto, Aude-Helene; Luo, Xianmin; Knolhoff, Brett L.; Flanagan, Kevin C.; Belt, Brian A.; Alspach, Elise; Leahy, Kathleen; Luo, Jingqin; Schaffer, Andras; Edwards, John R.; Longmore, Gregory; Faccio, Roberta; DeNardo, David G.; Stewart, Sheila A.

    2016-01-01

    Age is a significant risk factor for the development of cancer. However, the mechanisms that drive age-related increases in cancer remain poorly understood. To determine if senescent stromal cells influence tumorigenesis, we develop a mouse model that mimics the aged skin microenvironment. Using this model, here we find that senescent stromal cells are sufficient to drive localized increases in suppressive myeloid cells that contributed to tumour promotion. Further, we find that the stromal-derived senescence-associated secretory phenotype factor interleukin-6 orchestrates both increases in suppressive myeloid cells and their ability to inhibit anti-tumour T-cell responses. Significantly, in aged, cancer-free individuals, we find similar increases in immune cells that also localize near senescent stromal cells. This work provides evidence that the accumulation of senescent stromal cells is sufficient to establish a tumour-permissive, chronic inflammatory microenvironment that can shelter incipient tumour cells, thus allowing them to proliferate and progress unabated by the immune system. PMID:27272654

  17. Stromal senescence establishes an immunosuppressive microenvironment that drives tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Ruhland, Megan K; Loza, Andrew J; Capietto, Aude-Helene; Luo, Xianmin; Knolhoff, Brett L; Flanagan, Kevin C; Belt, Brian A; Alspach, Elise; Leahy, Kathleen; Luo, Jingqin; Schaffer, Andras; Edwards, John R; Longmore, Gregory; Faccio, Roberta; DeNardo, David G; Stewart, Sheila A

    2016-01-01

    Age is a significant risk factor for the development of cancer. However, the mechanisms that drive age-related increases in cancer remain poorly understood. To determine if senescent stromal cells influence tumorigenesis, we develop a mouse model that mimics the aged skin microenvironment. Using this model, here we find that senescent stromal cells are sufficient to drive localized increases in suppressive myeloid cells that contributed to tumour promotion. Further, we find that the stromal-derived senescence-associated secretory phenotype factor interleukin-6 orchestrates both increases in suppressive myeloid cells and their ability to inhibit anti-tumour T-cell responses. Significantly, in aged, cancer-free individuals, we find similar increases in immune cells that also localize near senescent stromal cells. This work provides evidence that the accumulation of senescent stromal cells is sufficient to establish a tumour-permissive, chronic inflammatory microenvironment that can shelter incipient tumour cells, thus allowing them to proliferate and progress unabated by the immune system. PMID:27272654

  18. Role of estrogen receptor alpha in human cervical cancer-associated fibroblasts: a transcriptomic study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mahesh M; Davuluri, Sravanthi; Poojar, Sridhar; Mukherjee, Geetashree; Bajpai, Akhilesh Kumar; Bafna, Uttam Dungarmal; Devi, Uma K; Kallur, Pramod P R; Kshitish, Acharya K; Jayshree, R S

    2016-04-01

    Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) are crucial in genesis and progression of tumors; however, cervical CAFs (C-CAFs) are not well characterized. Estradiol (E2) has been implicated as a cofactor in human papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated cervical cancer (CxCa), both in animal models and in women using oral contraceptives; however, the exact role of the hormone is unclear. Human C-CAFs have recently been shown to express estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α). We investigated gene expression patterns in ex vivo cultured early and late stage C-CAFs in the context of E2. CAFs were isolated from four patients with early and two patients with late stage CxCa. ER-α expression in CxCa tissues was localized to stromal fibroblast-like cells and confirmed in ex vivo cultured C-CAFs. Two ER antagonists (ICI 182,780 and Methyl Piperidino Pyrazole) were used to unravel ER signaling in CAFs. Microarray technology was used for expression profiling and validated by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. The transcriptomes of C-CAFs across stages indicated their activated state. C-CAFs had gene expression patterns associated with both pro-tumorigenic and pro-inflammatory signaling. Late-stage C-CAFs compared to those of early stage appeared to be more actively metabolizing and cycling but expressed fewer genes related to immune function. We report differential expression profiles between C-CAFs: early vs. late stage and in the presence of ER antagonists. Both ER antagonists seemed to modulate C-CAF function by down regulating genes associated with cell cycle and metabolism, affecting angiogenesis and cancer progression. This study characterized C-CAFs from early and late stage disease, and experiments with ER inhibitors emphasized the probable importance of canonical ER-α signaling. Interfering with paracrine signaling through fibroblast ER-α is worth exploiting as a targeted therapy in CxCa management. PMID:26499945

  19. Impact of Nanotopography, Heparin Hydrogel Microstructures, and Encapsulated Fibroblasts on Phenotype of Primary Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocytes, the main epithelial cell type in the liver, perform most of the biochemical functions of the liver. Thus, maintenance of a primary hepatocyte phenotype is crucial for investigations of in vitro drug metabolism, toxicity, and development of bioartificial liver constructs. Here, we report the impact of topographic cues alone and in combination with soluble signals provided by encapsulated feeder cells on maintenance of the primary hepatocyte phenotype. Topographic features were 300 nm deep with pitches of either 400, 1400, or 4000 nm. Hepatocyte cell attachment, morphology and function were markedly better on 400 nm pitch patterns compared with larger scale topographies or planar substrates. Interestingly, topographic features having biomimetic size scale dramatically increased cell adhesion whether or not substrates had been precoated with collagen I. Albumin production in primary hepatocytes cultured on 400 nm pitch substrates without collagen I was maintained over 10 days and was considerably higher compared to albumin synthesis on collagen-coated flat substrates. In order to investigate the potential interaction of soluble cytoactive factors supplied by feeder cells with topographic cues in determining cell phenotype, bioactive heparin-containing hydrogel microstructures were molded (100 μm spacing, 100 μm width) over the surface of the topographically patterned substrates. These hydrogel microstructures either carried encapsulated fibroblasts or were free of cells. Hepatocytes cultured on nanopatterned substrates next to fibroblast carrying hydrogel microstructures were significantly more functional than hepatocytes cultured on nanopatterned surfaces without hydrogels or stromal cells significantly elevated albumin expression and cell junction formation compared to cells provided with topographic cues only. The simultaneous presentation of topographic biomechanical cues along with soluble signaling molecules provided by encapsulated fibroblasts

  20. Stromal matrix metalloproteinase-11 is involved in the mammary gland postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Tan, J; Buache, E; Alpy, F; Daguenet, E; Tomasetto, C-L; Ren, G-S; Rio, M-C

    2014-07-31

    MMP-11 is a bad prognosis paracrine factor in invasive breast cancers. However, its mammary physiological function remains largely unknown. In the present study we have investigated MMP-11 function during postnatal mammary gland development and function using MMP-11-deficient (MMP-11-/-) mice. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses as well as whole-mount mammary gland staining show alteration of the mammary gland in the absence of MMP-11, where ductal tree, alveolar structures and milk production are reduced. Moreover, a series of transplantation experiments allowed us to demonstrate that MMP-11 exerts an essential local paracrine function that favors mammary gland branching and epithelial cell outgrowth and invasion through adjacent connective tissues. Indeed, MMP-11-/- cleared fat pads are not permissive for wild-type epithelium development, whereas MMP-11-/- epithelium transplants grow normally when implanted in wild-type cleared fat pads. In addition, using primary mammary epithelial organoids, we show in vitro that this MMP-11 pro-branching effect is not direct, suggesting that MMP-11 acts via production/release of stroma-associated soluble factor(s). Finally, the lack of MMP-11 leads to decreased periductal collagen content, suggesting that MMP-11 has a role in collagen homeostasis. Thus, local stromal MMP-11 might also regulate mammary epithelial cell behavior mechanically by promoting extracellular matrix stiffness. Collectively, the present data indicate that MMP-11 is a paracrine factor involved during postnatal mammary gland morphogenesis, and support the concept that the stroma strongly impact epithelial cell behavior. Interestingly, stromal MMP-11 has previously been reported to favor malignant epithelial cell survival and promote cancer aggressiveness. Thus, MMP-11 has a paracrine function during mammary gland development that might be harnessed to promote tumor progression, exposing a new link between development and malignancy. PMID:24141782

  1. Leiomyoma of the gastrointestinal tract with interstitial cells of Cajal: a mimic of gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Anita; Nelson, Dylan; Corless, Christopher L; Deshpande, Vikram; O'Brien, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Leiomyomas (LMs) of the gastrointestinal tract arise within the muscularis mucosae (superficial) and muscularis propria (deep). There are isolated reports of KIT-positive cells, presumed interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), within gastrointestinal LMs. We have encountered esophageal LMs with a high proportion of KIT-positive and DOG1-positive spindle-shaped cells, an appearance that mimicked gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Our aim was to explore the prevalence of ICCs in LMs of the gastrointestinal tract and the etiopathogenic significance of these cells in this benign neoplasm. We identified 34 esophageal LMs (28 deep, 6 superficial), 8 gastric LMs, and 5 small-bowel LMs (all lesions in muscularis propria). We performed immunohistochemical staining studies for desmin, DOG1, and KIT on these neoplasms. We also evaluated 12 superficial colonic LMs. ICCs were distinguished from mast cells on the basis of morphology (elongated and occasionally branching spindle-shaped cells) and the presence of DOG1 reactivity. Four cases were screened for mutations in PDGFRA exons 12, 14, and 18 and KIT exons 9, 11, 13, and 17. ICCs were identified in all deep esophageal LMs and constituted an average of 20% of the lesional cells; focally, these cells comprised >50% of cells. The density of these cells was significantly higher than the background muscularis propria, and hyperplasia of ICCs was not identified in the adjacent muscle. ICCs were identified in 6 of 8 gastric LMs and 1 of 5 small-bowel LMs and were entirely absent in all superficial esophageal and colonic/rectal LMs. There were no mutations in KIT or PDGFRA. ICCs are universally present in deep esophageal LMs, and thus these neoplasms could be mistaken for gastrointestinal stromal tumors, particularly on biopsy samples, an error associated with adverse clinical consequences. ICCs are also identified in gastric and intestinal LMs, albeit in a smaller proportion of cases. Colonization and hyperplasia by non-neoplastic ICCs

  2. Interaction between adjacent lightning discharges in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanhui; Zhang, Guangshu; Zhang, Tong; Li, Yajun; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Tinglong

    2013-07-01

    Using a 3D lightning radiation source locating system (LLS), three pairs of associated lightning discharges (two or more adjacent lightning discharges following an arbitrary rule that their space-gap was less than 10 km and their time-gap was less than 800 ms) were observed, and the interaction between associated lightning discharges was analyzed. All these three pairs of associated lightning discharges were found to involve three or more charge regions (the ground was considered as a special charge region). Moreover, at least one charge region involved two lightning discharges per pair of associated lightning discharges. Identified from electric field changes, the subsequent lightning discharges were suppressed by the prior lightning discharges. However, it is possible that the prior lightning discharge provided a remaining discharge channel to facilitate the subsequent lightning discharge. The third case provided evidence of this possibility. Together, the results suggested that, if the charges in the main negative charge region can be consumed using artificial lightning above the main negative charge regions, lightning accidents on the ground could be greatly reduced, on the condition that the height of the main negative charge region and the charge intensity of the lower positive charge region are suitable.

  3. Defining the role of mesenchymal stromal cells on the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in skeletal muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sassoli, Chiara; Nosi, Daniele; Tani, Alessia; Chellini, Flaminia; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Quercioli, Franco; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Formigli, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) transplantation improves healing of injured and diseased skeletal muscle, although the mechanisms of benefit are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether MSCs and/or their trophic factors were able to regulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity in different cells of the muscle tissue. MSCs in co-culture with C2C12 cells or their conditioned medium (MSC-CM) up-regulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and function in the myoblastic cells; these effects were concomitant with the down-regulation of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and -2 and with increased cell motility. In the single muscle fiber experiments, MSC-CM administration increased MMP-2/9 expression in Pax-7{sup +} satellite cells and stimulated their mobilization, differentiation and fusion. The anti-fibrotic properties of MSC-CM involved also the regulation of MMPs by skeletal fibroblasts and the inhibition of their differentiation into myofibroblasts. The treatment with SB-3CT, a potent MMP inhibitor, prevented in these cells, the decrease of α-smooth actin and type-I collagen expression induced by MSC-CM, suggesting that MSC-CM could attenuate the fibrogenic response through mechanisms mediated by MMPs. Our results indicate that growth factors and cytokines released by these cells may modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle repair/regeneration. - Highlights: • MSC-CM contains paracrine factors that up-regulate MMP expression and function in different skeletal muscle cells. • MSC-CM promotes myoblast and satellite cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. • MSC-CM negatively interferes with fibroblast-myoblast transition in primary skeletal fibroblasts. • Paracrine factors from MSCs modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle regeneration.

  4. AND-34, a novel p130Cas-binding thymic stromal cell protein regulated by adhesion and inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Cai, D; Clayton, L K; Smolyar, A; Lerner, A

    1999-08-15

    We have characterized a novel cDNA whose steady state mRNA levels rise in the thymus 2 to 6 h following the induction of CD4+CD8+ thymocyte apoptosis by in vivo cross-linking of CD3 epsilon. This cDNA, AND-34-1, contains an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein with an amino-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and a carboxyl-terminal domain homologous to GDP-exchange factors (GEFs). Northern analysis demonstrates widespread expression of the AND-34 gene. Anti-CD3 epsilon treatment induces up-regulation of the AND-34 mRNA levels in total thymic RNA but not in RNA from purified thymocytes, suggesting that this transcript is derived from a thymic stromal cell population. IL-1 and TNF increase AND-34 transcript levels in thymic cortical reticular, thymic nurse, and fibroblast cell lines. In the thymic cortical reticular cell line, IL-1 and TNF induce a protein of the predicted 93-kDa size reactive with anti-AND-34 peptide antisera. Fifteen minutes of serum stimulation of vanadate-pretreated AND-34-1-transfected NIH3T3 fibroblasts induces tyrosine phosphorylation of AND-34 as well as coprecipitating 95-, 125-, and 130-kDa proteins. One of these tyrosine phosphorylated proteins is identified as p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate), a signaling molecule previously known to bind to a GDP-exchange factor (C3G) and inducibly associate with the focal adhesion complex. Consistent with such an association, AND-34 tyrosine phosphorylation is induced following adherence of trypsinized fibroblasts to fibronectin or poly-L -lysine-coated surfaces. PMID:10438950

  5. Ovarian hemangioma associated with concomitant stromal luteinization and ascites.

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, T; Hirai, Y; Takeshima, N; Hasumi, K

    1996-06-01

    A 62-year-old female presented with a pelvic mass and ascites. The Papanicolaou vaginal smear showed an unusual maturation, maturation index being 0/80/20. The serum level of estradiol was 48.7 pg/ml. The preoperative checkup suggested a pelvic malignancy with a differential diagnosis of hormone-secreting ovarian tumor. On surgical exploration, she had a hemangioma of the ovary without malignant cytology in the ascitic fluid. Histologically, this tumor was associated with stromal luteinization. This is the first case, reported in the literature, possessing ovarian hemangioma with stromal luteinization accompanying massive ascites. It should be noted that an ovarian hemangioma can be associated with stromal luteinization and ascites, and that MR imaging is sometimes of value for making a preoperative diagnosis of ovarian hemangioma. PMID:8641629

  6. Sex cord-gonadal stromal tumor of the rete testis.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Kamran P; Dalton, Rory R; Brown, James A

    2009-01-01

    A 34-year-old tetraplegic patient with suppurative epididymitis was found on follow-up examination and ultrasonography to have a testicular mass. The radical orchiectomy specimen contained an undifferentiated spindled sex cord-stromal tumor arising in the rete testis. Testicular sex cord-stromal tumors are far less common than germ cell neoplasms and are usually benign. The close relationship between sex cords and ductules of the rete testis during development provides the opportunity for these uncommon tumors to arise anatomically within the rete tesis. This undifferentiated sex cord-stromal tumor, occurring in a previously unreported location, is an example of an unusual lesion mimicking an intratesticular malignant neoplasm. PMID:19125206

  7. Sex Cord-Gonadal Stromal Tumor of the Rete Testis

    PubMed Central

    Sajadi, Kamran P.; Dalton, Rory R.; Brown, James A.

    2009-01-01

    A 34-year-old tetraplegic patient with suppurative epididymitis was found on follow-up examination and ultrasonography to have a testicular mass. The radical orchiectomy specimen contained an undifferentiated spindled sex cord-stromal tumor arising in the rete testis. Testicular sex cord-stromal tumors are far less common than germ cell neoplasms and are usually benign. The close relationship between sex cords and ductules of the rete testis during development provides the opportunity for these uncommon tumors to arise anatomically within the rete tesis. This undifferentiated sex cord-stromal tumor, occurring in a previously unreported location, is an example of an unusual lesion mimicking an intratesticular malignant neoplasm. PMID:19125206

  8. Drug Repurposing for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Pessetto, Ziyan Y.; Weir, Scott J.; Sethi, Geetika; Broward, Melinda A.; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant treatment advances over the past decade, metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) remains largely incurable. Rare diseases, such as GIST, individually affect small groups of patients but collectively are estimated to affect 25–30 million people in the U.S. alone. Given the costs associated with the discovery, development and registration of new drugs, orphan diseases such as GIST are often not pursued by mainstream pharmaceutical companies. As a result, “drug repurposing” or “repositioning”, has emerged as an alternative to the traditional drug development process. In this study we screened 796 FDA-approved drugs and found that two of these compounds, auranofin and fludarabine phosphate, effectively and selectively inhibited the proliferation of GISTs including imatinib-resistant cells. One of the most notable drug hits, auranofin (Ridaura®), an oral, gold-containing agent approved by the FDA in 1985 for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), was found to inhibit thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity and induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to dramatic inhibition of GIST cell growth and viability. Importantly, the anti-cancer activity associated with auranofin was independent of IM resistant status, but was closely related to the endogenous and inducible levels of ROS, therefore is prior to IM response. Coupled with the fact auranofin has an established safety profile in patients, these findings suggest for the first time that auranofin may have clinical benefit for GIST patients, particularly in those suffering from imatinib-resistant and recurrent forms of this disease. PMID:23657945

  9. Tumeur stromale rectale: à propos d'une observation

    PubMed Central

    Rejab, Haitham; Kridis, Wala Ben; Ben Ameur, Hazem; Feki, Jihene; Frikha, Mounir; Beyrouti, Mohamed Issam

    2014-01-01

    Les tumeurs stromales gastro-intestinales sont des tumeurs mésenchymateuses peu fréquentes. Elles sont localisées préférentiellement eu niveau de l'estomac. La localisation rectale reste rare. A un nouveau cas de tumeur stromale du rectum ainsi qu'une bref revue de la littérature, on se propose d’étudier les particularités cliniques, radiologiques et thérapeutiques de cette entité rare. PMID:25120863

  10. Ovarian signet-ring stromal tumor: a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Shaco-Levy, Ruthy; Kachko, Leonid; Mazor, Moshe; Piura, Benjamin

    2008-04-01

    Signet-ring stromal tumor is a rare ovarian neoplasm with only 10 reported cases in the literature. We report an unusual case of ovarian signet-ring stromal tumor in a 69-year-old woman who presented with right adnexal mass and underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The diagnosis was based on histological, histochemical, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopy characteristics. The main significance is to differentiate this benign tumor from the highly malignant Krukenberg tumor, and this differential diagnosis is discussed. PMID:18417676

  11. Stromal vascular progenitors in adult human adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Donnenberg, Vera S.; Pfeifer, Melanie E.; Meyer, E. Michael; Péault, Bruno; Rubin, J. Peter; Donnenberg, Albert D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The in vivo progenitor of culture-expanded mesenchymal-like adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) remains elusive, owing in part to the complex organization of stromal cells surrounding the small vessels, and the rapidity with which adipose stromal vascular cells adopt a mesenchymal phenotype in vitro. Methods Immunohistostaining of intact adipose tissue was used to identify 3 markers (CD31, CD34, CD146) which together unambiguously discriminate histologically distinct inner and outer rings of vessel-associated stromal cells, as well as capillary and small vessel endothelial cells. These markers were used in multiparameter flow cytometry in conjunction with stem/progenitor markers (CD90, CD117) to further characterize stromal vascular fraction (SVF) subpopulations. Two mesenchymal and two endothelial populations were isolated by high speed flow cytometric sorting, expanded in short term culture and tested for adipogenesis. Results The inner layer of stromal cells in contact with small vessel endothelium (pericytes) was CD146+/α-SMA+/CD90±/CD34−/CD31−; the outer adventitial stromal ring (designated supra adventitial-adipose stromal cells, SA-ASC) was CD146−/α-SMA−/CD90+/CD34+/CD31−. Capillary endothelial cells were CD31+/CD34+/CD90+ (endothelial progenitor), while small vessel endothelium was CD31+/CD34−/CD90− (endothelial mature). Flow cytometry confirmed these expression patterns and revealed a CD146+/CD90+/CD34+/CD31− pericyte subset that may be transitional between pericytes and SA-ASC. Pericytes had the most potent adipogenic potential, followed by the more numerous SA-ASC. Endothelial populations had significantly reduced adipogenic potential compared to unsorted expanded SVF cells. Conclusions In adipose tissue perivascular stromal cells are organized in two discrete layers, the innermost consisting of CD146+/CD34− pericytes, and the outermost of CD146−/CD34+ SA-ASC, both of which have adipogenic potential in culture. A CD146+/CD

  12. Petroleum basins of Sakhalin and adjacent shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Mavrinski, Y.; Koblov, E. )

    1993-09-01

    Sixty-seven oil and gas fields have been discovered on Sakhalin and the adjacent shelf but the distribution of fields is uneven in north Sakhalin, south Sakhalin, and the Tatar basins. The sedimentary cover is composed of sandy, clayey, and siliceous rocks, with volcanogenic and coal-bearing deposits of Upper Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neogene 8-12 km thick. Marine clayey and siliceous oil source rocks are regionally developed in the section at different stratigraphic levels; the organic matter is of mixed type and the content varies from 0.5 to 1.5%. The upper Oligocene and middle-upper Miocene source rocks in the north Sakhalin basin are typical, and the organic carbon content ranges from 1 to 5%. The level of organic matter catagenesis and conversion into hydrocarbons is high because of the high differential geothermal gradient in the basins, 30-50[degrees]C per km. Porous sandstones in the Miocene form the reservoirs in all fields with the exception of Okruzhnoye, where the pay zone is a siliceous claystone. Growth-fault rollovers and anticlines form the main traps ranging in area from 5 to 300 km[sup 2], with amplitudes between 100 and 600 m. both stratigraphic and structural traps have been identified. Considerable volumes of reserves are associated with the Miocene deposits of north Sakhalin, which are characterized by an optimum combination of oil source rocks, focused migration paths, and thick sequences of reservoirs and cap rocks. Six large fields have been discovered in the past 15 yr. Oil and condensate reserves stand at over 300 million MT, and gas reserves are about 900 billion m[sup 3].

  13. Markers of fibroblast-rich tumor stroma and perivascular cells in serous ovarian cancer: Inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity and impact on survival

    PubMed Central

    Corvigno, Sara; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Mezheyeuski, Artur; van der Zee, Ate G.J.; Nijman, Hans W.; Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Östman, Arne; Dahlstrand, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Inter- and intra-patient variations in tumor microenvironment of serous ovarian cancer are largely unexplored. We aimed to explore potential co-regulation of tumor stroma characteristics, analyze their concordance in primary and metastatic lesions, and study their impact on survival. A tissue microarray (TMA) with 186 tumors and 91 matched metastases was subjected to immunohistochemistry double staining with endothelial cell marker CD34 and fibroblast and pericyte markers α-SMA, PDGFβR and desmin. Images were digitally analyzed to yield “metrics” related to vasculature and stroma features. Intra-case analyses showed that PDGFβR in perivascular cells and fibroblasts were strongly correlated. Similar findings were observed concerning α-SMA. Most stroma characteristics showed large variations in intra-case comparisons of primary tumors and metastasis. Large PDGFβR-positive stroma fraction and high PDGFβFR positive perivascular intensity were both significantly associated with shorter survival in uni- and multi-variate analyses (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.5; HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.8). In conclusion, we found PDGFβR- and α-SMA-expression to be largely independent of each other but concordantly activated in perivascular cells and in fibroblasts within the primary tumor. Stromal characteristics differed between primary tumors and metastases. PDGFβR in perivascular cells and in fibroblasts may be novel prognostic markers in serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26918345

  14. Increased Expression of Chemerin in Squamous Esophageal Cancer Myofibroblasts and Role in Recruitment of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J. Dinesh; Holmberg, Chris; Kandola, Sandhir; Steele, Islay; Hegyi, Peter; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Jenkins, Rosalind; Beynon, Robert J.; Peeney, David; Giger, Olivier T.; Alqahtani, Ahlam; Wang, Timothy C.; Charvat, Trevor T.; Penfold, Mark; Dockray, Graham J.; Varro, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Stromal cells such as myofibroblasts influence tumor progression. The mechanisms are unclear but may involve effects on both tumor cells and recruitment of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) which then colonize tumors. Using iTRAQ and LC-MS/MS we identified the adipokine, chemerin, as overexpressed in esophageal squamous cancer associated myofibroblasts (CAMs) compared with adjacent tissue myofibroblasts (ATMs). The chemerin receptor, ChemR23, is expressed by MSCs. Conditioned media (CM) from CAMs significantly increased MSC cell migration compared to ATM-CM; the action of CAM-CM was significantly reduced by chemerin-neutralising antibody, pretreatment of CAMs with chemerin siRNA, pretreatment of MSCs with ChemR23 siRNA, and by a ChemR23 receptor antagonist, CCX832. Stimulation of MSCs by chemerin increased phosphorylation of p42/44, p38 and JNK-II kinases and inhibitors of these kinases and PKC reversed chemerin-stimulated MSC migration. Chemerin stimulation of MSCs also induced expression and secretion of macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF) that tended to restrict migratory responses to low concentrations of chemerin but not higher concentrations. In a xenograft model consisting of OE21 esophageal cancer cells and CAMs, homing of MSCs administered i.v. was inhibited by CCX832. Thus, chemerin secreted from esophageal cancer myofibroblasts is a potential chemoattractant for MSCs and its inhibition may delay tumor progression. PMID:25127029

  15. Fibroblast involvement in soft connective tissue calcification

    PubMed Central

    Ronchetti, Ivonne; Boraldi, Federica; Annovi, Giulia; Cianciulli, Paolo; Quaglino, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Soft connective tissue calcification is not a passive process, but the consequence of metabolic changes of local mesenchymal cells that, depending on both genetic and environmental factors, alter the balance between pro- and anti-calcifying pathways. While the role of smooth muscle cells and pericytes in ectopic calcifications has been widely investigated, the involvement of fibroblasts is still elusive. Fibroblasts isolated from the dermis of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) patients and of patients exhibiting PXE-like clinical and histopathological findings offer an attractive model to investigate the mechanisms leading to the precipitation of mineral deposits within elastic fibers and to explore the influence of the genetic background and of the extracellular environment on fibroblast-associated calcifications, thus improving the knowledge on the role of mesenchymal cells on pathologic mineralization. PMID:23467434

  16. Testosterone metabolism of fibroblasts grown from prostatic carcinoma, benign prostatic hyperplasia and skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikert, H.U.; Hein, H.J.; Romijn, J.C.; Schroeder, F.H.

    1982-02-01

    The metabolism of (1,2,6,7-3H)testosterone was assessed in fibroblast monolayers derived from tissue of 5 prostates with benign hyperplasia (BPH), 4 prostates with carcinoma (PC), and 3 biopsy samples of skin, 2 nongenital skin (NG) and 1 genital skin. The following metabolites could be identified: androstanedione androstenedione, dihydrotestosterone, androsterone, epiandrosterone, androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol and androstane-3 beta, 17 beta-diol. Testosterone was metabolized much more rapidly in fibroblasts originating from prostatic tissue than in fibroblasts derived from NG. A significantly higher formation of 5 alpha-androstanes and 3 alpha-hydroxysteroids could be observed in fibroblasts from BPH as compared to PC. 17-ketosteroid formation exceeded 5 alpha-androstane formation in BPH, whereas 5 alpha-reduction was the predominant pathway in fibroblasts grown from PC and NG. Since testosterone metabolism in fibroblasts of prostatic origin therefore resembles in many aspects that in whole prostatic tissue, fibroblasts grown from prostatic tissues might be a valuable tool for further investigation of the pathogenesis of human BPH and PC.

  17. Quiescent Fibroblasts Exhibit High Metabolic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemons, Johanna M. S.; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Bennett, Bryson D.; Legesse-Miller, Aster; Johnson, Elizabeth L.; Raitman, Irene; Pollina, Elizabeth A.; Rabitz, Herschel A.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Coller, Hilary A.

    2010-01-01

    Many cells in mammals exist in the state of quiescence, which is characterized by reversible exit from the cell cycle. Quiescent cells are widely reported to exhibit reduced size, nucleotide synthesis, and metabolic activity. Much lower glycolytic rates have been reported in quiescent compared with proliferating lymphocytes. In contrast, we show here that primary human fibroblasts continue to exhibit high metabolic rates when induced into quiescence via contact inhibition. By monitoring isotope labeling through metabolic pathways and quantitatively identifying fluxes from the data, we show that contact-inhibited fibroblasts utilize glucose in all branches of central carbon metabolism at rates similar to those of proliferating cells, with greater overflow flux from the pentose phosphate pathway back to glycolysis. Inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway resulted in apoptosis preferentially in quiescent fibroblasts. By feeding the cells labeled glutamine, we also detected a “backwards” flux in the tricarboxylic acid cycle from α-ketoglutarate to citrate that was enhanced in contact-inhibited fibroblasts; this flux likely contributes to shuttling of NADPH from the mitochondrion to cytosol for redox defense or fatty acid synthesis. The high metabolic activity of the fibroblasts was directed in part toward breakdown and resynthesis of protein and lipid, and in part toward excretion of extracellular matrix proteins. Thus, reduced metabolic activity is not a hallmark of the quiescent state. Quiescent fibroblasts, relieved of the biosynthetic requirements associated with generating progeny, direct their metabolic activity to preservation of self integrity and alternative functions beneficial to the organism as a whole. PMID:21049082

  18. Transforming growth factor-β synthesized by stromal cells and cancer cells participates in bone resorption induced by oral squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kayamori, Kou; Oue, Erika; Sakamoto, Kei; Harada, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2015-03-20

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) plays a significant role in the regulation of the tumor microenvironment. To explore the role of TGF-β in oral cancer-induced bone destruction, we investigated the immunohistochemical localization of TGF-β and phosphorylated Smad2 (p-Smad2) in 12 surgical specimens of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). These studies revealed TGF-β and p-Smad2 expression in cancer cells in all tested cases. Several fibroblasts located between cancer nests and resorbing bone expressed TGF-β in 10 out of 12 cases and p-Smad2 in 11 out of 12 cases. Some osteoclasts also exhibited p ∼ Smad2 expression. The OSCC cell line, HSC3, and the bone marrow-derived fibroblastic cell line, ST2, synthesized substantial levels of TGF-β. Culture media derived from HSC3 cells could stimulate Tgf-β1 mRNA expression in ST2 cells. Recombinant TGF-β1 could stimulate osteoclast formation induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in RAW264 cells. TGF-β1 could upregulate the expression of p-Smad2 in RAW264 cells, and this action was suppressed by the addition of a neutralizing antibody against TGF-β or by SB431542. Transplantation of HSC3 cells onto the calvarial region of athymic mice caused bone destruction, associated with the expression of TGF-β and p-Smad2 in both cancer cells and stromal cells. The bone destruction was substantially inhibited by the administration of SB431542. The present study demonstrated that TGF-β synthesized by both cancer cells and stromal cells participates in the OSCC-induced bone destruction. - Highlights: • Cancer cell, fibroblastic cells, and osteoclasts at bone resorbing area by oral cancer exhibited TGF-β and p-Smad2. • TGF-β1 stimulated osteoclastogenesis induced by RAKL in RAW264 cell. • Xenograft model of oral cancer-induced bone resorption was substantially inhibited by SB431542. • TGF-β synthesized by both cancer cells and stromal cells participates in the OSCC

  19. The Nf1 Tumor Suppressor Regulates Mouse Skin Wound Healing, Fibroblast Proliferation, and Collagen Deposited by Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Atit, Radhika P.; Crowe, Maria J.; Greenhalgh, David G.; Wenstrup, Richard J.; Ratner, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 patients develop peripheral nerve tumors (neurofibromas) composed mainly of Schwann cells and fibroblasts, in an abundant collagen matrix produced by fibroblasts. Trauma has been proposed to trigger neurofibroma formation. To test if loss of the neurofibromatosis type 1 gene (Nf1) compromises fibroblast function in vivo following trauma, skin wounding was performed in Nf1 knockout mice. The pattern and amount of collagen-rich granulation bed tissue, manufactured by fibroblasts, was grossly abnormal in 60% of Nf1+/− wounds. Nf1 mutant fibroblasts showed cell autonomous abnormalities in collagen deposition in vitro that were not mimicked by Ras activation in fibroblasts, even though some Nf1 effects are mediated through Ras. Nf1+/− skin wound fibroblasts also proliferated past the normal wound maturation phase; this in vivo effect was potentiated by muscle injury. In vitro, Nf1+/− fibroblasts showed higher proliferation in 10% serum than Nf1+/+ fibroblasts. Macrophage-conditioned media or epidermal growth factor potentiated Nf1+/− fibroblast proliferation in vitro, demonstrating abnormal response of mutant fibroblasts to wound cytokines. Thus Nf1 is a key regulator of fibroblast responses to injury, and Nf1 mutation in mouse fibroblasts causes abnormalities characteristic of human neurofibromas. PMID:10383727

  20. Human Adipose Stromal Vascular Cell Delivery in a Fibrin Spray

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Rubin, J. Peter; Pfeifer, Melanie E.; Moore, L.R.; Donnenberg, Vera S.; Donnenberg, Albert D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue represents a practical source of autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and vascular-endothelial progenitor cells, available for regenerative therapy without in vitro expansion. One of the problems confronting the therapeutic application of such cells is how to immobilize them at the wound site. Here, we evaluated in vitro the growth and differentiation of human adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells after delivery using a fibrin spray system. Methods SVF cells were harvested from four human adult patients undergoing elective abdominoplasty using the LipiVage™ system. After collagenase digestion, mesenchymal and endothelial progenitor cells (pericytes, supra-adventitial stromal cells, endothelial progenitors) were quantified by flow cytometry before culture. SVF cells were applied to culture vessels using the Tisseel™ fibrin spray system. SVF cell growth and differentiation was documented by immunofluorescence staining and photomicrography. Results SVF cells remained viable following application and were expanded up to three weeks, when they reached confluence and adipogenic differentiation. Under angiogenic conditions, SVF cells formed endothelial (vWF+, CD31+ and CD34+) tubules surrounded by CD146+ and α-SMA+ perivascular/stromal cells. Discussion Human adipose tissue is a rich source of autologous stem cells, which are readily available for regenerative applications such as wound healing, without in vitro expansion. Our results indicate that mesenchymal and endothelial progenitor cells, prepared in a closed system from unpassaged lipoaspirate samples, retain their growth and differentiation capacity when applied and immobilized on a substrate using a clinically approved fibrin sealant spray system. PMID:23260090

  1. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast: intraductal appearance.

    PubMed

    Gur, Akif Serhat; Unal, Bulent; Edington, Howard; Kanbour-Shakir, Amal; Soran, Atilla

    2009-08-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a benign proliferative lesion of breast stroma. The diagnosis of PASH can be made using imaging techniques such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance or mammography. Ductoscopy is a relatively new technique which is used for imaging the intraductal surface. We report a patient with PASH in whom ductoscopy was performed successfully. PMID:19751351

  2. Therapy Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xinchun; Hu, Jinxia; Cui, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and major cause of disability worldwide. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to improve functional outcome after stroke. In this review, we will focus on the protective effects of BMSCs on ischemic brain and the relative molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of BMSCs on stroke. PMID:27069533

  3. Free bone graft reconstruction of irradiated facial tissue: Experimental effects of basic fibroblast growth factor stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, B.L.; Connolly, D.T.; Winkelmann, T.; Sadove, A.M.; Heuvelman, D.; Feder, J. )

    1991-07-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the potential utility of basic fibroblast growth factor in the induction of angiogenesis and osseous healing in bone previously exposed to high doses of irradiation. Thirty New Zealand rabbits were evaluated by introducing basic fibroblast growth factor into irradiated mandibular resection sites either prior to or simultaneous with reconstruction by corticocancellous autografts harvested from the ilium. The fate of the free bone grafts was then evaluated at 90 days postoperatively by microangiographic, histologic, and fluorochrome bone-labeling techniques. Sequestration, necrosis, and failure to heal to recipient osseous margins was observed both clinically and histologically in all nontreated irradiated graft sites as well as those receiving simultaneous angiogenic stimulation at the time of graft placement. No fluorescent activity was seen in these graft groups. In the recipient sites pretreated with basic fibroblast growth factor prior to placement of the graft, healing and reestablishment of mandibular contour occurred in nearly 50 percent of the animals. Active bone formation was evident at cortical margins adjacent to the recipient sites but was absent in the more central cancellous regions of the grafts.

  4. Tumor associated fibroblasts enhance head and neck squamous cell carcinoma proliferation, invasion, and metastasis in preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Sarah Elizabeth; Shi, Huifang; Lin, Fangchen; Dasari, Sumana; Bednash, Joseph; Thorne, Stephen; Watkins, Simon; Joshi, Radhika; Thomas, Sufi Mary

    2014-01-01

    Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has had little improvement in mortality rates in decades. A clearer understanding of the HNSCC tumor microenvironment will aid in finding more effective targeted therapies for this disease. Tumor associated fibroblasts (TAFs) are the largest stromal cellular components of the tumor microenvironment in HNSCC. Methods We isolated TAFs from clinical HNSCC cases and propagated in vitro. The effects of TAF secreted paracrine factors on in vitro HNSCC migration, invasion and proliferation was assessed. The effect of TAFs on HNSCC growth and metastases was determined in an orthotopic floor of mouth tumor model. Results TAF conditioned media increased HNSCC cell migration, invasion and proliferation. TAFs increased HNSCC tumor growth and metastases in vivo. Conclusions TAFs play a major role in increasing tumor growth and metastasis in HNSCC. Targeting the tumor stroma may be important to reduce the rate of HNSCC metastasis. PMID:23728942

  5. Biased Allelic Expression in Human Primary Fibroblast Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santoni, Federico; Delaneau, Olivier; Fort, Alexandre; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Guipponi, Michel; Padioleau, Ismael; Carninci, Piero; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of gene expression in mammalian single cells via genomic technologies now provides the possibility to investigate the patterns of allelic gene expression. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to detect the allele-specific mRNA level in 203 single human primary fibroblasts over 133,633 unique heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (hetSNVs). We observed that at the snapshot of analyses, each cell contained mostly transcripts from one allele from the majority of genes; indeed, 76.4% of the hetSNVs displayed stochastic monoallelic expression in single cells. Remarkably, adjacent hetSNVs exhibited a haplotype-consistent allelic ratio; in contrast, distant sites located in two different genes were independent of the haplotype structure. Moreover, the allele-specific expression in single cells correlated with the abundance of the cellular transcript. We observed that genes expressing both alleles in the majority of the single cells at a given time point were rare and enriched with highly expressed genes. The relative abundance of each allele in a cell was controlled by some regulatory mechanisms given that we observed related single-cell allelic profiles according to genes. Overall, these results have direct implications in cellular phenotypic variability. PMID:25557783

  6. ANT2-defective fibroblasts exhibit normal mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Dolly; Goldstein, Amy C.; El-Khoury, Riyad; Rak, Malgorzata; Edmunds, Lia; Rustin, Pierre; Vockley, Jerry; Schiff, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase 2 (ANT2) transports glycolytic ATP across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Patients with ANT2 deletion were recently reported. We aimed at characterizing mitochondrial functions in ANT2-defective fibroblasts. In spite of ANT2 expression in fibroblasts, we observed no difference between ANT2-defective and control fibroblasts for mitochondrial respiration, respiratory chain activities, mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP levels. This indicates that ANT2 insufficiency does not alter fibroblast basal mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:26000237

  7. Ius Chasma Tributary Valleys and Adjacent Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image covers valley tributaries of Ius Chasma, as well as the plains adjacent to the valleys. Ius Chasma is one of several canyons that make up the Valles Marineris canyon system. Valles Marineris likely formed by extension associated with the growth of the large volcanoes and topographic high of Tharsis to the northwest. As the ground was pulled apart, large and deep gaps resulted in the valleys seen in the top and bottom of this HiRISE image. Ice that was once in the ground could have also melted to create additional removal of material in the formation of the valleys. HiRISE is able to see the rocks along the walls of both these valleys and also impact craters in the image. Rock layers that appear lower down in elevation appear rougher and are shedding boulders. Near the top of the walls and also seen in patches along the smooth plains are brighter layers. These brighter layers are not shedding boulders so they must represent a different kind of rock formed in a different kind of environment than those further down the walls. Because they are highest in elevation, the bright layers are youngest in age. HiRISE is able to see dozens of the bright layers, which are perhaps only a meter in thickness. Darker sand dunes and ripples cover most of the plains and fill the floors of impact craters.

    Image PSP_001351_1715 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 9, 2006. The complete image is centered at -8.3 degrees latitude, 275.4 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 254.3 km (158.9 miles). At this distance the image scale ranges from 25.4 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) to 101.8 cm/pixel (with 4 x 4 binning). The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 3:32 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 59 degrees, thus the sun was about

  8. Human resident CD34+ stromal cells/telocytes have progenitor capacity and are a source of αSMA+ cells during repair.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, L; Gutiérrez, R; García, M P; González, M; Sáez, F J; Aparicio, F; Díaz-Flores, L; Madrid, J F

    2015-05-01

    We studied the progenitor capacity of human resident CD34+ stromal cells/telocytes (SC/TCs) in the enteric wall affected by inflammatory/repair processes (appendicitis, diverticulitis of large bowel and Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum) at different stages of evolution (inflammatory, proliferative and remodelling). In these conditions, CD34+ SC/TCs are activated, showing changes, which include the following overlapping events: 1) separation from adjacent structures (e.g., from vascular walls) and location in oedematous spaces, 2) morphological modifications (in cell shape and size) with presence of transitional cell forms between quiescent and activated CD34+ SC/TCs, 3) rapid proliferation and 4) loss of CD34 expression and gain of αSMA expression. These events mainly occur in the inflammatory and proliferative stages. During the loss of CD34 expression, the following findings are observed: a) irregular cell labelling intensity for anti-CD34, b) co-localization of CD34 and actin, c) concurrent irregular labelling intensity for αSMA and d) αSMA expression in all stromal cells, with total loss of CD34 expression. While CD34 expression was conserved, a high proliferative capacity (Ki-67 expression) was observed and vice versa. In the segments of the ileum affected by Crohn's disease, the stromal cells around fissures were αSMA+ and, in the transitional zones with normal enteric wall, activated CD34+ SC/TCs were observed. In conclusion, human resident CD34+ SC/TCs in the enteric wall have progenitor capacity and are activated with or without differentiation into αSMA+ stromal cells during inflammatory/repair processes. PMID:25500909

  9. Biocompatibility of Textile Titanium Nickel Implants with Fibroblast Culture.

    PubMed

    Kokorev, O V; Khodorenko, V N; Anikeev, S G; Gunther, V E

    2015-05-01

    The parameters of biocompatibility of titanium nickel implants of different design with fibroblast culture are studied. Colonization of textile and mesh implants with fibroblasts and tissue development depend on the size of mesh cells and thread diameter. Titanium nickel implants of different constructions do not inhibit the growth of fibroblast culture. PMID:26028231

  10. Stiffening of Human Skin Fibroblasts with Age

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Christian; Wetzel, Franziska; Kueper, Thomas; Malsen, Anke; Muhr, Gesa; Jaspers, Soeren; Blatt, Thomas; Wittern, Klaus-Peter; Wenck, Horst; Käs, Josef A.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in mechanical properties are an essential characteristic of the aging process of human skin. Previous studies attribute these changes predominantly to the altered collagen and elastin organization and density of the extracellular matrix. Here, we show that individual dermal fibroblasts also exhibit a significant increase in stiffness during aging in vivo. With the laser-based optical cell stretcher we examined the viscoelastic biomechanics of dermal fibroblasts isolated from 14 human donors aged 27 to 80. Increasing age was clearly accompanied by a stiffening of the investigated cells. We found that fibroblasts from old donors exhibited an increase in rigidity of ∼60% with respect to cells of the youngest donors. A FACS analysis of the content of the cytoskeletal polymers shows a shift from monomeric G-actin to polymerized, filamentous F-actin, but no significant changes in the vimentin and microtubule content. The rheological analysis of fibroblast-populated collagen gels demonstrates that cell stiffening directly results in altered viscoelastic properties of the collagen matrix. These results identify a new mechanism that may contribute to the age-related impairment of elastic properties in human skin. The altered mechanical behavior might influence cell functions involving the cytoskeleton, such as contractility, motility, and proliferation, which are essential for reorganization of the extracellular matrix. PMID:20959083

  11. Cancer-associated fibroblast-targeted strategy enhances antitumor immune responses in dendritic cell-based vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ohshio, Yasuhiko; Teramoto, Koji; Hanaoka, Jun; Tezuka, Noriaki; Itoh, Yasushi; Asai, Tohru; Daigo, Yataro; Ogasawara, Kazumasa

    2015-01-01

    Given the close interaction between tumor cells and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME), TME-targeted strategies would be promising for developing integrated cancer immunotherapy. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the dominant stromal component, playing critical roles in generation of the pro-tumorigenic TME. We focused on the immunosuppressive trait of CAFs, and systematically explored the alteration of tumor-associated immune responses by CAF-targeted therapy. C57BL/6 mice s.c. bearing syngeneic E.G7 lymphoma, LLC1 Lewis lung cancer, or B16F1 melanoma were treated with an anti-fibrotic agent, tranilast, to inhibit CAF function. The infiltration of immune suppressor cell types, including regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, in the TME was effectively decreased through reduction of stromal cell-derived factor-1, prostaglandin E2, and transforming growth factor-β. In tumor-draining lymph nodes, these immune suppressor cell types were significantly decreased, leading to activation of tumor-associated antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. In addition, CAF-targeted therapy synergistically enhanced multiple types of systemic antitumor immune responses such as the cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response, natural killer activity, and antitumor humoral immunity in combination with dendritic cell-based vaccines; however, the suppressive effect on tumor growth was not observed in tumor-bearing SCID mice. These data indicate that systemic antitumor immune responses by various immunologic cell types are required to bring out the efficacy of CAF-targeted therapy, and these effects are enhanced when combined with effector-stimulatory immunotherapy such as dendritic cell-based vaccines. Our mouse model provides a novel rationale with TME-targeted strategy for the development of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25483888

  12. Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) with Microelectrode Arrays for Investigation of Cancer Cell – Fibroblasts Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Trong Binh; Baek, Changyoon; Min, Junhong

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, including stromal cells, surrounding blood vessels and extracellular matrix components, has been defined as a crucial factor that influences the proliferation, drug-resistance, invasion and metastasis of malignant epithelial cells. Among other factors, the communications and interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells have been reported to play pivotal roles in cancer promotion and progression. To investigate these relationships, an on-chip co-culture model was developed to study the cellular interaction between A549—human lung carcinoma cells and MRC-5—human lung epithelial cells in both normal proliferation and treatment conditions. In brief, a co-culture device consisting of 2 individual fluidic chambers in parallel, which were separated by a 100 μm fence was utilized for cell patterning. Microelectrodes arrays were installed within each chamber including electrodes at various distances away from the confrontation line for the electrochemical impedimetric sensing assessment of cell-to-cell influence. After the fence was removed and cell-to-cell contact occurred, by evaluating the impedance signal responses representing cell condition and behavior, both direct and indirect cell-to-cell interactions through conditioned media were investigated. The impact of specific distances that lead to different influences of fibroblast cells on cancer cells in the co-culture environment was also defined. PMID:27088611

  13. Enumeration of the colony-forming units–fibroblast from mouse and human bone marrow in normal and pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Mankani, Mahesh H.; Bianco, Paolo; Robey, Pamela G.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell populations, containing a subset of multipotential skeletal stem cells, are increasingly contemplated for use in tissue engineering and stem cell therapy, whereas their involvement in the pathogenetic mechanisms of skeletal disorders is far less recognized. We compared the concentrations of stromal clonogenic cells, colony forming units–fibroblast (CFU-Fs), in norm and pathology. Initially, culture conditions were optimized by demonstrating that fetal bovine serum heat inactivation could significantly repress colony formation. Using non-heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum, the concentration of CFU-Fs (colony-forming efficiency, CFE) ranged from 3.5 ± 1.0 to 11.5 ± 4.0 per 1 × 105 nucleated cells in five inbred mouse strains. In four transgenic lines with profound bone involvement, CFE was either significantly reduced or increased compared to wild-type littermates. In normal human donors, CFE decreased slightly with age and averaged 52.2 ± 4.1 for children and 32.3 ± 3.0 for adults. CFE was significantly altered in patients with several skeletal, metabolic, and hematological disorders: reduced in congenital generalized lipodystrophy, achondroplasia (SADDAN), pseudoachondroplasia, and Paget disease of bone and elevated in alcaptonuria and sickle cell anemia. Our findings indicate that under appropriate culture conditions, CFE values may provide useful insights into bone/bone marrow pathophysiology. PMID:19383412

  14. View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, bottom cut off by fringed buildings, view facing south-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Learning Non-Adjacent Regularities at Age 0 ; 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F.

    2013-01-01

    One important mechanism suggested to underlie the acquisition of grammar is rule learning. Indeed, infants aged 0 ; 7 are able to learn rules based on simple identity relations (adjacent repetitions, ABB: "wo fe fe" and non-adjacent repetitions, ABA: "wo fe wo", respectively; Marcus et al., 1999). One unexplored issue is…

  16. Delayed Acquisition of Non-Adjacent Vocalic Distributional Regularities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compute non-adjacent regularities is key in the acquisition of a new language. In the domain of phonology/phonotactics, sensitivity to non-adjacent regularities between consonants has been found to appear between 7 and 10 months. The present study focuses on the emergence of a posterior-anterior (PA) bias, a regularity involving two…

  17. Enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 expression levels and metalloproteinase 2 and 9 activation by Hexachlorobenzene in human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Florencia; Bastón, Juan Ignacio; Vaccarezza, Agustina; Singla, José Javier; Pontillo, Carolina; Miret, Noelia; Farina, Mariana; Meresman, Gabriela; Randi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is an organochlorine pesticide that induces toxic reproductive effects in laboratory animals. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of functional endometrial tissues outside the uterine cavity. Experimental studies indicate that exposure to organochlorines can interfere with both hormonal regulation and immune function to promote endometriosis. Altered expression of metalloproteinases (MMPs) in patients with endometriosis, suggests that MMPs may play a critical role. In the endometriotic lesions, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) produced by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), binds to its EP4 receptor (EP4), and via c-Src kinase induces MMPs activation, promoting endometriosis. We examined the HCB action on MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities and expression, COX-2 levels, PGE2 signaling, and the AhR involvement in HCB-induced effects. We have used different in vitro models: (1) human endometrial stromal cell line T-HESC, (2) primary cultures of Human Uterine Fibroblast (HUF), and (3) primary cultures of endometrial stromal cells from eutopic endometrium of control (CESC) and subjects with endometriosis (EESC). Our results show that HCB enhances MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in T-HESC, HUF and ESC cells. The MMP-9 levels were elevated in all models, while the MMP-2 expression only increased in ESC cells. HCB enhanced COX-2 and EP4 expression, PGE2 secretion and the c-Src kinase activation in T-HESC. Besides, we observed that AhR is implicated in these HCB-induced effects. In conclusion, our results show that HCB exposure could contribute to endometriosis development, affecting inflammation and invasion parameters of human endometrial cells. PMID:27038655

  18. CD90(+) stromal cells are the major source of IL-6, which supports cancer stem-like cells and inflammation in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Phuong T; Beswick, Ellen J; Coronado, Yun A; Johnson, Paul; O'Connell, Malaney R; Watts, Tammara; Singh, Pomila; Qiu, Suimin; Morris, Katherine; Powell, Don W; Pinchuk, Irina V

    2016-04-15

    IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine increased in CRC and known to directly promote tumor growth. Colonic myofibroblasts/fibroblasts (CMFs or stromal cells) are CD90(+) innate immune cells representing up to 30% of normal colonic mucosal lamina propria cells. They are expanded in CRC tumor stroma, where they also known as a cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Cells of mesenchymal origin, such as normal myofibroblasts/fibroblasts, are known to secrete IL-6; however, their contribution to the increase in IL-6 in CRC and to tumor-promoting inflammation is not well defined. Using in situ, ex vivo and coculture analyses we have demonstrated that the number of IL-6 producing CMFs is increased in CRC (C-CMFs) and they represent the major source of IL-6 in T2-T3 CRC tumors. Activity/expression of stem cell markers-aldehyde dehydrogenase and LGR5- was significantly up-regulated in colon cancer cells (SW480, Caco-2 or HT29) cultured in the presence of conditioned medium from tumor isolated C-CMFs in an IL-6 dependent manner. C-CMF and its derived condition medium, but not normal CMF isolated from syngeneic normal colons, induced differentiation of tumor promoting inflammatory T helper 17 cells (Th17) cell responses in an IL-6 dependent manner. Our study suggests that CD90(+) fibroblasts/myofibroblasts may be the major source of IL-6 in T2-T3 CRC tumors, which supports the stemness of tumor cells and induces an immune adaptive inflammatory response (a.k.a. Th17) favoring tumor growth. Taken together our data supports the notion that IL-6 producing CAFs (a.k.a. C-CMFs) may provide a useful target for treating or preventing CRCs. PMID:26595254

  19. Oral fibroblasts produce more HGF and KGF than skin fibroblasts in response to co-culture with keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Grøn, Birgitte; Stoltze, Kaj; Andersson, Anders; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2002-12-01

    The production of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) in subepithelial fibroblasts from buccal mucosa, periodontal ligament, and skin was determined after co-culture with keratinocytes. The purpose was to detect differences between the fibroblast subpopulations that could explain regional variation in epithelial growth and wound healing. Normal human fibroblasts were cultured on polystyrene or maintained in collagen matrix and stimulated with keratinocytes cultured on membranes. The amount of HGF and KGF protein in the culture medium was determined every 24 h for 5 days by ELISA. When cultured on polystyrene, the constitutive level of KGF and HGF in periodontal fibroblasts was higher than the level in buccal and skin fibroblasts. In the presence of keratinocytes, all three types of fibroblasts in general increased their HGF and KGF production 2-3 times. When cells were maintained in collagen, the level of HGF and KGF was decreased mainly in skin cultures. However, in oral fibroblasts, induction after stimulation was at a similar level in collagen compared to on polystyrene. Skin fibroblasts maintained in collagen produced almost no HGF whether with or without stimulation. The results demonstrate that the secretion of KGF and HGF in both unstimulated fibroblasts and in fibroblasts co-cultured with keratinocytes is dependent on the type of fibroblasts. In general, the periodontal fibroblasts had the highest level of cytokine production. This high level of growth factor production may influence the proliferation and the migration of junctional epithelium and thereby influence the development of periodontal disease. PMID:12645668

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Increased Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1 Expression Enhanced Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chih-Yuan; Hua, Jia; Coathup, Melanie; Kalia, Priya; Blunn, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of critical size bone defects pose a challenge in orthopedics. Stem cell therapy together with cytokines has the potential to improve bone repair as they cause the migration and homing of stem cells to the defect site. However, the engraftment, participation, and recruitment of other cells within the regenerating tissue are important. To enhance stem cell involvement, this study investigated overexpression of stem cells with stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) using an adenovirus. We hypothesized that these engineered cells would effectively increase the migration of native cells to the site of fracture, enhancing bone repair. Before implantation, we showed that SDF-1 secreted by transfected cells increased the migration of nontransfected cells. In a rat defect bone model, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing SDF-1 showed significantly (p=0.003) more new bone formation within the gap and less bone mineral loss at the area adjacent to the defect site during the early bone healing stage. In conclusion, SDF-1 was shown to play an important role in accelerating fracture repair and contributing to bone repair in rat models, by recruiting more host stem cells to the defect site and encouraging osteogenic differentiation and production of bone. PMID:25251779

  1. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in myofibroblasts differs from lipofibroblasts during alveolar septation in mice.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Stephen E; McCoy, Diann M

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary alveolar fibroblasts produce extracellular matrix in a temporally and spatially regulated pattern to yield a durable yet pliable gas-exchange surface. Proliferation ensures a sufficient complement of cells, but they must differentiate into functionally distinct subtypes: contractile myofibroblasts (MF), which generate elastin and regulate air-flow at the alveolar ducts, and, in mice and rats, lipofibroblasts (LF), which store neutral lipids. PDGF-A is required but acts in conjunction with other differentiation factors arising from adjacent epithelia or within fibroblasts. We hypothesized that FGF receptor (FGFR) expression and function vary for MF and LF and contributes to their divergent differentiation. Whereas approximately half of the FGFR3 was extracellular in MF, FGFR2 and FGFR4 were primarily intracellular. Intracellular FGFR3 localized to the multivesicular body, and its abundance may be modified by Sprouty and interaction with heat shock protein-90. FGF18 mRNA is more abundant in MF, whereas FGF10 mRNA predominated in LF, which also express FGFR1 IIIb, a receptor for FGF10. FGF18 diminished fibroblast proliferation and was chemotactic for cultured fibroblasts. Although PDGF receptor-α (PDGFR-α) primarily signals through phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Akt, p42/p44 MAP kinase (Erk1/2), a major signaling pathway for FGFRs, influenced the abundance of cell-surface PDGFR-α. Observing different FGFR and ligand profiles in MF and LF is consistent with their divergent differentiation although both subpopulations express PDGFR-α. These studies also emphasize the importance of particular cellular locations of FGFR3 and PDGFR-α, which may modify their effects during alveolar development or repair. PMID:26138642

  2. BMP12 induces tenogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua; Gelberman, Richard H.; Silva, Matthew J.; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are pluripotent cells that have the capacity to differentiate into tendon fibroblasts (TFs). They are abundant in adults, easy to access, and are therefore an ideal cell source for tendon tissue engineering. Despite this potential, the molecular cues necessary for tenogenic differentiation of ASCs are unknown. Unlike other bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), BMP12, BMP13, and BMP14 have been reported to be less osteo-chondrogenic and to induce tendon rather than bone formation in vivo. This study investigated the effects of BMP12 and BMP14 on ASC differentiation in vitro. In canine ASCs, BMP12 effectively increased the expression of the tendon markers scleraxis and tenomodulin at both mRNA and protein levels. Consistent with these results, BMP12 induced scleraxis promoter driven-GFP and tenomodulin protein expression in mouse ASCs. Although BMP12 also enhanced the expression of the cartilage matrix gene aggrecan in ASCs, the resulting levels remained considerably lower than those detected in tendon fibroblasts. In addition, BMP12 reduced expression of the bone marker osteocalcin, but not the osteogenic transcription factor runx-2. BMP14 exhibited similar, but marginally less potent and selective effects, compared to BMP12. BMPs are known to signal through the canonical Smad pathway and the non-canonical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. BMP12 triggered robust phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 but not Smad2/3 or p38 MAPK in ASCs. The effect was likely conveyed by type I receptors ALK2/3/6, as phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 was blocked by the ALK2/3/6 inhibitor LDN-193189 but not by the ALK4/5/7 inhibitor SB-505124. Moreover, ALK6 was found to be the most abundant type I receptor in ASCs, with mRNA expression 100 to 10,000 times that of any other type I receptor. Collectively, results support the conclusion that BMP12 induces tenogenic differentiation of ASCs via the Smad1/5/8 pathway. PMID:24155967

  3. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit extensive developmental and phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Prabhat K.; Sassi, Slim; Lan, Lan; Au, Patrick; Halvorsen, Stefan C.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.; Seed, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of embryonic fibroblasts from GFP reporter mice indicates that the fibroblast cell type harbors a large collection of developmentally and phenotypically heterogeneous subtypes. Some of these cells exhibit multipotency, whereas others do not. Multiparameter flow cytometry analysis shows that a large number of distinct populations of fibroblast-like cells can be found in cultures initiated from different embryonic organs, and cells sorted according to their surface phenotype typically retain their characteristics on continued propagation in culture. Similarly, surface phenotypes of individual cloned fibroblast-like cells exhibit significant variation. The fibroblast cell class appears to contain a very large number of denumerable subtypes. PMID:26699463

  4. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit extensive developmental and phenotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Prabhat K; Sassi, Slim; Lan, Lan; Au, Patrick; Halvorsen, Stefan C; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Seed, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of embryonic fibroblasts from GFP reporter mice indicates that the fibroblast cell type harbors a large collection of developmentally and phenotypically heterogeneous subtypes. Some of these cells exhibit multipotency, whereas others do not. Multiparameter flow cytometry analysis shows that a large number of distinct populations of fibroblast-like cells can be found in cultures initiated from different embryonic organs, and cells sorted according to their surface phenotype typically retain their characteristics on continued propagation in culture. Similarly, surface phenotypes of individual cloned fibroblast-like cells exhibit significant variation. The fibroblast cell class appears to contain a very large number of denumerable subtypes. PMID:26699463

  5. Transforming growth factor-β synthesized by stromal cells and cancer cells participates in bone resorption induced by oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kayamori, Kou; Oue, Erika; Sakamoto, Kei; Harada, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2015-03-20

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) plays a significant role in the regulation of the tumor microenvironment. To explore the role of TGF-β in oral cancer-induced bone destruction, we investigated the immunohistochemical localization of TGF-β and phosphorylated Smad2 (p-Smad2) in 12 surgical specimens of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). These studies revealed TGF-β and p-Smad2 expression in cancer cells in all tested cases. Several fibroblasts located between cancer nests and resorbing bone expressed TGF-β in 10 out of 12 cases and p-Smad2 in 11 out of 12 cases. Some osteoclasts also exhibited p ∼ Smad2 expression. The OSCC cell line, HSC3, and the bone marrow-derived fibroblastic cell line, ST2, synthesized substantial levels of TGF-β. Culture media derived from HSC3 cells could stimulate Tgf-β1 mRNA expression in ST2 cells. Recombinant TGF-β1 could stimulate osteoclast formation induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in RAW264 cells. TGF-β1 could upregulate the expression of p-Smad2 in RAW264 cells, and this action was suppressed by the addition of a neutralizing antibody against TGF-β or by SB431542. Transplantation of HSC3 cells onto the calvarial region of athymic mice caused bone destruction, associated with the expression of TGF-β and p-Smad2 in both cancer cells and stromal cells. The bone destruction was substantially inhibited by the administration of SB431542. The present study demonstrated that TGF-β synthesized by both cancer cells and stromal cells participates in the OSCC-induced bone destruction. PMID:25681764

  6. Interleukin-1β modulates endochondral ossification by human adult bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Mumme, Marcus; Scotti, Celeste; Papadimitropoulos, Adam; Todorov, Athanas; Hoffmann, Waldemar; Bocelli-Tyndall, Chiara; Jakob, Marcel; Wendt, David; Martin, Ivan; Barbero, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines present in the milieu of the fracture site are important modulators of bone healing. Here we investigated the effects of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) on the main events of endochondral bone formation by human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC), namely cell proliferation, differentiation and maturation/remodelling of the resulting hypertrophic cartilage. Low doses of IL-1β (50 pg/mL) enhanced colony-forming units-fibroblastic (CFU-f) and -osteoblastic (CFU-o) number (up to 1.5-fold) and size (1.2-fold) in the absence of further supplements and glycosaminoglycan accumulation (1.4-fold) upon BM-MSC chondrogenic induction. In osteogenically cultured BM-MSC, IL-1β enhanced calcium deposition (62.2-fold) and BMP-2 mRNA expression by differential activation of NF-κB and ERK signalling. IL-1β-treatment of BM-MSC generated cartilage resulted in higher production of MMP-13 (14.0-fold) in vitro, mirrored by an increased accumulation of the cryptic cleaved fragment of aggrecan, and more efficient cartilage remodelling/resorption after 5 weeks in vivo (i.e., more TRAP positive cells and bone marrow, less cartilaginous areas), resulting in the formation of mature bone and bone marrow after 12 weeks. In conclusion, IL-1β finely modulates early and late events of the endochondral bone formation by BM-MSC. Controlling the inflammatory environment could enhance the success of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of fractures by resident MSC and as well as improve the engineering of implantable tissues. PMID:23007908

  7. Stromal Expression of MicroRNA-21 in Advanced Colorectal Cancer Patients with Distant Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Sang; Nam, Soo Kyung; Koh, Jiwon; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choe, Gheeyoung; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the regional heterogeneity and clinicopathological significance of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with distant metastasis. Methods: miR-21 expression was investigated by using locked nucleic acid– fluorescence in situ hybridization in the center and periphery of the primary cancer and in distant metastasis from 170 patients with advanced CRC. In addition, α-smooth muscle actin and desmin were evaluated to identify cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) by using immunohistochemistry. Results: The miR-21 signal was observed in the cancer stroma. The expression of miR-21 (a score of 1–4) in the center and periphery of the primary cancer and in distant metastasis was observed in specimens from 133 (78.2%), 105 (61.8%), and 91 (53.5%) patients, respectively. miR-21 expression was heterogeneous in advanced CRC. Discordance between miR-21 expression in the center of the primary cancer and either the periphery of the primary cancer or distant metastasis was 31.7% or 44.7%, respectively. miR-21 stromal expression in the periphery of the primary cancer was significantly associated with a better prognosis (p=.004). miR-21 expression was significantly associated with CAFs in the center of the primary cancer (p=.001) and distant metastases (p=.041). Conclusions: miR-21 expression is observed in cancer stroma related to the CAF quantity and frequently presents regional heterogeneity in CRC. Our findings indicate that the role of miR-21 in predicting prognosis may be controversial but provide a new perspective of miR-21 level measurement in cancer specimens. PMID:27240857

  8. Adipose-derived stromal cells inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation inducing apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Takahara, Kiyoshi; Ii, Masaaki; Inamoto, Teruo; Komura, Kazumasa; Ibuki, Naokazu; Minami, Koichiro; Uehara, Hirofumi; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kiyama, Satoshi; Asahi, Michio; Azuma, Haruhito

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • AdSC transplantation exhibits inhibitory effect on tumor progressions of PCa cells. • AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway. • High expression of the TGF-β1 gene in AdSCs. - Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in the field of regenerative medicine. Adipose-derived stromal cells (AdSCs) are known to exhibit extensive proliferation potential and can undergo multilineage differentiation, sharing similar characteristics to bone marrow-derived MSCs. However, as the effect of AdSCs on tumor growth has not been studied sufficiently, we assessed the degree to which AdSCs affect the proliferation of prostate cancer (PCa) cell. Human AdSCs exerted an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of androgen-responsive (LNCaP) and androgen-nonresponsive (PC3) human PCa cells, while normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) did not, and in fact promoted PCa cell proliferation to a degree. Moreover, AdSCs induced apoptosis of LNCaP cells and PC3 cells, activating the caspase3/7 signaling pathway. cDNA microarray analysis suggested that AdSC-induced apoptosis in both LNCaP and PC3 cells was related to the TGF-β signaling pathway. Consistent with our in vitro observations, local transplantation of AdSCs delayed the growth of tumors derived from both LNCaP- and PC3-xenografts in immunodeficient mice. This is the first preclinical study to have directly demonstrated that AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway, irrespective of androgen-responsiveness. Since autologous AdSCs can be easily isolated from adipose tissue without any ethical concerns, we suggest that therapy with these cells could be a novel approach for patients with PCa.

  9. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Promotes Fibrosis and Activates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in MRC-5 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Tang, Su; Tang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening hypoxemic respiratory disorder with high incidence and mortality. ALI usually manifests as widespread inflammation and lung fibrosis with the accumulation of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic factors and collagen. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has a significant role in regulation of inflammation but little is known about its roles in lung fibrosis or ALI. This study aimed to define the role and possible regulatory mechanism of TSLP in lung fibrosis. Material/Methods We cultured human lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells and overexpressed or inhibited TSLP by the vector or small interfering RNA transfection. Then, the pro-fibrotic factors skeletal muscle actin alpha (α-SMA) and collagen I, and the 4 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) – MAPK7, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) – were detected by Western blot. Results Results showed that TSLP promoted the production of α-SMA and collagen I (P<0.001), suggesting that it can accelerate MRC-5 cell fibrosis. It also activated the expression of MAPK7, p-p38, p-ERK1, and p-JNK1, but the total MAPK7, p-38, ERK1, and JNK1 protein levels were mostly unchanged, indicating the activated MAPK pathways that might contribute to the promotion of cell fibrosis. Conclusions This study shows the pro-fibrotic role of TSLP in MRC-5 cells, suggesting TSLP is a potential therapeutic target for treating lung fibrosis in ALI. It possibly functions via activating MAPKs. These findings add to our understanding of the mechanism of fibrosis. PMID:27385084

  10. Bone Marrow Regeneration Promoted by Biophysically Sorted Osteoprogenitors From Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Zhiyong; Lee, Wong Cheng; Guan, Guofeng; Nyan, Lin Myint; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue repair deficiencies can be supplemented through strategies to isolate, expand in vitro, and reimplant regenerative cells that supplant damaged cells or stimulate endogenous repair mechanisms. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), a subset of which is described as mesenchymal stem cells, are leading candidates for cell-mediated bone repair and wound healing, with hundreds of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. An outstanding key challenge for successful clinical translation of MSCs is the capacity to produce large quantities of cells in vitro with uniform and relevant therapeutic properties. By leveraging biophysical traits of MSC subpopulations and label-free microfluidic cell sorting, we hypothesized and experimentally verified that MSCs of large diameter within expanded MSC cultures were osteoprogenitors that exhibited significantly greater efficacy over other MSC subpopulations in bone marrow repair. Systemic administration of osteoprogenitor MSCs significantly improved survival rates (>80%) as compared with other MSC subpopulations (0%) for preclinical murine bone marrow injury models. Osteoprogenitor MSCs also exerted potent therapeutic effects as “cell factories” that secreted high levels of regenerative factors such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenetic protein 2, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 1, and angiopoietin-1; this resulted in increased cell proliferation, vessel formation, and reduced apoptosis in bone marrow. This MSC subpopulation mediated rescue of damaged marrow tissue via restoration of the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, as well as subsequent hematopoiesis. Together, the capabilities described herein for label-freeisolation of regenerative osteoprogenitor MSCs can markedly improve the efficacy of MSC-based therapies. PMID:25411477

  11. Chick embryo xenograft model reveals a novel perineural niche for human adipose-derived stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Ingrid R.; Lopes, Daiana V.; Abreu, José G.; Carneiro, Katia; Rossi, Maria I. D.; Brito, José M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSC) are a heterogeneous cell population that contains adult multipotent stem cells. Although it is well established that hADSC have skeletal potential in vivo in adult organisms, in vitro assays suggest further differentiation capacity, such as into glia. Thus, we propose that grafting hADSC into the embryo can provide them with a much more instructive microenvironment, allowing the human cells to adopt diverse fates or niches. Here, hADSC spheroids were grafted into either the presumptive presomitic mesoderm or the first branchial arch (BA1) regions of chick embryos. Cells were identified without previous manipulations via human-specific Alu probes, which allows efficient long-term tracing of heterogeneous primary cultures. When grafted into the trunk, in contrast to previous studies, hADSC were not found in chondrogenic or osteogenic territories up to E8. Surprisingly, 82.5% of the hADSC were associated with HNK1+ tissues, such as peripheral nerves. Human skin fibroblasts showed a smaller tropism for nerves. In line with other studies, hADSC also adopted perivascular locations. When grafted into the presumptive BA1, 74.6% of the cells were in the outflow tract, the final goal of cardiac neural crest cells, and were also associated with peripheral nerves. This is the first study showing that hADSC could adopt a perineural niche in vivo and were able to recognize cues for neural crest cell migration of the host. Therefore, we propose that xenografts of human cells into chick embryos can reveal novel behaviors of heterogeneous cell populations, such as response to migration cues. PMID:26319582

  12. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells inhibit Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Meagan; Sueblinvong, Viranuj; Eisenhauer, Philip; Ziats, Nicholas P; LeClair, Laurie; Poynter, Matthew E; Steele, Chad; Rincon, Mercedes; Weiss, Daniel J

    2011-07-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) mitigate inflammation in mouse models of acute lung injury. However, specific mechanisms of BMSC actions on CD4 T lymphocyte-mediated inflammation in vivo remain poorly understood. Limited data suggests promotion of Th2 phenotype in models of Th1-mediated diseases. However, whether this might alleviate or worsen Th2-mediated diseases such as allergic asthma is unknown. To ascertain the effects of systemic administration of BMSCs in a mouse model of Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation, ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airways inflammation was induced in wild-type C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice as well as in interferon-γ (IFNγ) receptor null mice. Effects of systemic administration during antigen sensitization of either syngeneic or allogeneic BMSC on airways hyperreactivity, lung inflammation, antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocytes, and serum immunoglobulins were assessed. Both syngeneic and allogeneic BMSCs inhibited airways hyperreactivity and lung inflammation through a mechanism partly dependent on IFNγ. However, contrary to existing data, BMSCs did not affect antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocyte proliferation but rather promoted Th1 phenotype in vivo as assessed by both OVA-specific CD4 T lymphocyte cytokine production and OVA-specific circulating immunoglobulins. BMSCs treated to prevent release of soluble mediators and a control cell population of primary dermal skin fibroblasts only partly mimicked the BMSC effects and in some cases worsened inflammation. In conclusion, BMSCs inhibit Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation by influencing antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocyte differentiation. Promotion of a Th1 phenotype in antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocytes by BMSCs is sufficient to inhibit Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation through an IFNγ-dependent process. PMID:21544902

  13. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Promotes Fibrosis and Activates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in MRC-5 Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Tang, Su; Tang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening hypoxemic respiratory disorder with high incidence and mortality. ALI usually manifests as widespread inflammation and lung fibrosis with the accumulation of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic factors and collagen. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has a significant role in regulation of inflammation but little is known about its roles in lung fibrosis or ALI. This study aimed to define the role and possible regulatory mechanism of TSLP in lung fibrosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS We cultured human lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells and overexpressed or inhibited TSLP by the vector or small interfering RNA transfection. Then, the pro-fibrotic factors skeletal muscle actin alpha (α-SMA) and collagen I, and the 4 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) - MAPK7, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) - were detected by Western blot. RESULTS Results showed that TSLP promoted the production of α-SMA and collagen I (P<0.001), suggesting that it can accelerate MRC-5 cell fibrosis. It also activated the expression of MAPK7, p-p38, p-ERK1, and p-JNK1, but the total MAPK7, p-38, ERK1, and JNK1 protein levels were mostly unchanged, indicating the activated MAPK pathways that might contribute to the promotion of cell fibrosis. CONCLUSIONS This study shows the pro-fibrotic role of TSLP in MRC-5 cells, suggesting TSLP is a potential therapeutic target for treating lung fibrosis in ALI. It possibly functions via activating MAPKs. These findings add to our understanding of the mechanism of fibrosis. PMID:27385084

  14. Stromal Palladin Expression Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Daisuke; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Mitsuhashi, Tomoko; Hatanaka, Yutaka; Marukawa, Katsuji; Morooka, Asami; Nakamura, Toru; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    It has been clear that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the tumor microenvironment play an important role in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) progression. However, how CAFs relate to the patients’ prognosis and the effects of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has not been fully investigated. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) representing 167 resected PDACs without preoperative treatment were used for immunohistochemical studies (IHC) of palladin, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), and podoplanin. Correlations between the expression levels of these markers and clinicopathological findings were analyzed statistically. Whole sections of surgical specimens from PDACs with and without preoperative CRT, designated as the chemotherapy-first group (CF, n = 19) and the surgery-first group (SF, n = 21), respectively, were also analyzed by IHC. In TMAs, the disease-specific survival rate (DSS) at 5 years for all 167 cases was 23.1%. Seventy cases (41.9%) were positive for palladin and had significantly lower DSS (p = 0.0430). α-SMA and podoplanin were positive in 167 cases (100%) and 131 cases (78.4%), respectively, and they were not significantly associated with DSS. On multivariable analysis, palladin expression was an independent poor prognostic factor (p = 0.0243, risk ratio 1.60). In the whole section study, palladin positivity was significantly lower (p = 0.0037) in the CF group (5/19) with a significantly better DSS (p = 0.0144) than in the SF group (16/22), suggesting that stromal palladin expression is a surrogate indicator of the treatment effect after chemoradiation therapy. PMID:27023252

  15. Modes of Antigen Presentation by Lymph Node Stromal Cells and Their Immunological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hirosue, Sachiko; Dubrot, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is no longer the exclusive domain of cells of hematopoietic origin. Recent works have demonstrated that lymph node stromal cell (LNSC) populations, such as fibroblastic reticular cells, lymphatic and blood endothelial cells, not only provide a scaffold for lymphocyte interactions but also exhibit active immunomodulatory roles that are critical to mounting and resolving effective immune responses. Importantly, LNSCs possess the ability to present antigens and establish antigen-specific interactions with T cells. One example is the expression of peripheral tissue antigens, which are presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I molecules with tolerogenic consequences on T cells. Additionally, exogenous antigens, including self and tumor antigens, can be processed and presented on MHC-I complexes, which result in dysfunctional activation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. While MHC-I is widely expressed on cells of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origins, antigen presentation via MHC-II is more precisely regulated. Nevertheless, LNSCs are capable of endogenously expressing, or alternatively, acquiring MHC-II molecules. Transfer of antigen between LNSC and dendritic cells in both directions has been recently suggested to promote tolerogenic roles of LNSCs on the CD4+ T cell compartment. Thus, antigen presentation by LNSCs is thought to be a mechanism that promotes the maintenance of peripheral tolerance as well as generates a pool of diverse antigen-experienced T cells for protective immunity. This review aims to integrate the current and emerging literature to highlight the importance of LNSCs in immune responses, and emphasize their role in antigen trafficking, retention, and presentation. PMID:26441957

  16. Activated human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells suppress metastatic features of MDA-MB-231 cells by secreting IFN-β.

    PubMed

    Yoon, N; Park, M S; Shigemoto, T; Peltier, G; Lee, R H

    2016-01-01

    Our recent study showed that human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs) are activated to express tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) by exposure to TNF-α and these activated hMSCs effectively induce apoptosis in triple-negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 (MDA) cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we further demonstrated that activated hMSCs not only induced apoptosis of MDA cells but also reduced metastatic features in MDA cells. These activated hMSC-exposed MDA cells showed reduced tumorigenicity and suppressed formation of lung metastasis when implanted in the mammary fat pad. Surprisingly, the activated hMSC-exposed MDA cells increased TRAIL expression, resulting in apoptosis in MDA cells. Interestingly, upregulation of TRAIL in MDA cells was mediated by interferon-beta (IFN-β) secreted from activated hMSCs. Furthermore, IFN-β in activated hMSCs was induced by RNA and DNA released from apoptotic MDA cells in absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) and IFN induced with helicase C domain 1 (IFIH1)-dependent manners. These observations were only seen in the TRAIL-sensitive breast cancer cell lines but not in the TRAIL-resistant breast cancer cell lines. Consistent with these results, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis also showed that lack of innate sensors detecting DNA or RNA is strongly associated with poor survival in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients. In addition, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) isolated from a breast cancer patient were also able to express TRAIL and IFN-β upon DNA and RNA stimulation. Therefore, our results suggest that the crosstalk between TRAIL-sensitive cancer cells and stromal cells creates a tumor-suppressive microenvironment and further provide a novel therapeutic approach to target stromal cells within cancer microenvironment for TRAIL sensitive cancer treatment. PMID:27077807

  17. Activated human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells suppress metastatic features of MDA-MB-231 cells by secreting IFN-β

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, N; Park, M S; Shigemoto, T; Peltier, G; Lee, R H

    2016-01-01

    Our recent study showed that human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs) are activated to express tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) by exposure to TNF-α and these activated hMSCs effectively induce apoptosis in triple-negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 (MDA) cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we further demonstrated that activated hMSCs not only induced apoptosis of MDA cells but also reduced metastatic features in MDA cells. These activated hMSC-exposed MDA cells showed reduced tumorigenicity and suppressed formation of lung metastasis when implanted in the mammary fat pad. Surprisingly, the activated hMSC-exposed MDA cells increased TRAIL expression, resulting in apoptosis in MDA cells. Interestingly, upregulation of TRAIL in MDA cells was mediated by interferon-beta (IFN-β) secreted from activated hMSCs. Furthermore, IFN-β in activated hMSCs was induced by RNA and DNA released from apoptotic MDA cells in absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) and IFN induced with helicase C domain 1 (IFIH1)-dependent manners. These observations were only seen in the TRAIL-sensitive breast cancer cell lines but not in the TRAIL-resistant breast cancer cell lines. Consistent with these results, Kaplan–Meier survival analysis also showed that lack of innate sensors detecting DNA or RNA is strongly associated with poor survival in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients. In addition, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) isolated from a breast cancer patient were also able to express TRAIL and IFN-β upon DNA and RNA stimulation. Therefore, our results suggest that the crosstalk between TRAIL-sensitive cancer cells and stromal cells creates a tumor-suppressive microenvironment and further provide a novel therapeutic approach to target stromal cells within cancer microenvironment for TRAIL sensitive cancer treatment. PMID:27077807

  18. CD105 expression on CD34-negative spindle-shaped stromal cells of primary tumor is an unfavorable prognostic marker in early breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Leandro Marcelo; Labovsky, Vivian; Calcagno, María de Luján; Davies, Kevin Mauro; Garcia Rivello, Hernán; Rivello, Hernán Garcia; Bianchi, Maria Silvia; Wernicke, Alejandra; Vallone, Valeria Beatriz Fernández; Fernández Vallone, Valeria Beatriz; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have confirmed that the breast tumor microenvironment drives cancer progression and metastatic development. The aim of our research was to investigate the prognostic significance of the breast tumor microenvironment in untreated early breast cancer patients. Therefore, we analyzed the association of the expression of α-SMA, FSP, CD105 and CD146 in CD34-negative spindle-shaped stromal cells, not associated with the vasculature, in primary breast tumors with classical prognostic marker levels, metastatic recurrence, local relapse, disease-free survival, metastasis-free survival and the overall survival of patients. In the same way, we evaluated the association of the amount of intra-tumor stroma, fibroblasts, collagen deposition, lymphocytic infiltration and myxoid changes in these samples with the clinical-pathological data previously described. This study is the first to demonstrate the high CD105 expression in this stromal cell type as a possible independent marker of unfavorable prognosis in early breast cancer patients. Our study suggests that this new finding can be useful prognostic marker in the clinical-pathological routine. PMID:25803686

  19. Low molecular weight hyaluronan mediated CD44 dependent induction of IL-6 and chemokines in human dermal fibroblasts potentiates innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Vistejnova, Lucie; Safrankova, Barbora; Nesporova, Kristina; Slavkovsky, Rastislav; Hermannova, Martina; Hosek, Petr; Velebny, Vladimir; Kubala, Lukas

    2014-12-01

    Complex regulation of the wound healing process involves multiple interactions among stromal tissue cells, inflammatory cells, and the extracellular matrix. Low molecular weight hyaluronan (LMW HA) derived from the degradation of high molecular weight hyaluronan (HMW HA) is suggested to activate cells involved in wound healing through interaction with HA receptors. In particular, receptor CD44 is suggested to mediate cell response to HA of different MW, being the main cell surface HA receptor in stromal tissue and immune cells. However, the response of dermal fibroblasts, the key players in granulation tissue formation within the wound healing process, to LMW HA and their importance for the activation of immune cells is unclear. In this study we show that LMW HA (4.3kDa) induced pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and chemokines IL-8, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL6 and CCL8 gene expression in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) that was further confirmed by increased levels of IL-6 and IL-8 in cell culture supernatants. Conversely, NHDF treated by HMW HA revealed a tendency to decrease the gene expression of these cytokine and chemokines when compared to untreated control. The blockage of CD44 expression by siRNA resulted in the attenuation of IL-6 and chemokines expression in LMW HA treated NHDF suggesting the involvement of CD44 in LMW HA mediated NHDF activation. The importance of pro-inflammatory mediators produced by LMW HA triggered NHDF was evaluated by significant activation of blood leukocytes exhibited as increased production of IL-6 and TNF-α. Conclusively, we demonstrated a pro-inflammatory response of dermal fibroblasts to LMW HA that was transferred to leukocytes indicating the significance of LMW HA in the inflammatory process development during the wound healing process. PMID:25126764

  20. Thermoelastic response of thin metal films and their adjacent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, J.; Kim, W.

    2013-01-14

    A pulsed laser beam applied to a thin metal film is capable of launching an acoustic wave due to thermal expansion. Heat transfer from the thin metal film to adjacent materials can also induce thermal expansion; thus, the properties of these adjacent materials (as well as the thin metal film) should be considered for a complete description of the thermoelastic response. Here, we show that adjacent materials with a small specific heat and large thermal expansion coefficient can generate an enhanced acoustic wave and we demonstrate a three-fold increase in the peak pressure of the generated acoustic wave on substitution of parylene for polydimethylsiloxane.

  1. Evidence for the involvement of fibroblast growth factor 10 in lipofibroblast formation during embryonic lung development.

    PubMed

    Al Alam, Denise; El Agha, Elie; Sakurai, Reiko; Kheirollahi, Vahid; Moiseenko, Alena; Danopoulos, Soula; Shrestha, Amit; Schmoldt, Carole; Quantius, Jennifer; Herold, Susanne; Chao, Cho-Ming; Tiozzo, Caterina; De Langhe, Stijn; Plikus, Maksim V; Thornton, Matthew; Grubbs, Brendan; Minoo, Parviz; Rehan, Virender K; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-12-01

    Lipid-containing alveolar interstitial fibroblasts (lipofibroblasts) are increasingly recognized as an important component of the epithelial stem cell niche in the rodent lung. Although lipofibroblasts were initially believed merely to assist type 2 alveolar epithelial cells in surfactant production during neonatal life, recent evidence suggests that these cells are indispensable for survival and growth of epithelial stem cells during adulthood. Despite increasing interest in lipofibroblast biology, little is known about their cellular origin or the molecular pathways controlling their formation during embryonic development. Here, we show that a population of lipid-droplet-containing stromal cells emerges in the developing mouse lung between E15.5 and E16.5. This is accompanied by significant upregulation, in the lung mesenchyme, of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (master switch of lipogenesis), adipose differentiation-related protein (marker of mature lipofibroblasts) and fibroblast growth factor 10 (previously shown to identify a subpopulation of lipofibroblast progenitors). We also demonstrate that although only a subpopulation of total embryonic lipofibroblasts derives from Fgf10(+) progenitor cells, in vivo knockdown of Fgfr2b ligand activity and reduction in Fgf10 expression lead to global reduction in the expression levels of lipofibroblast markers at E18.5. Constitutive Fgfr1b knockouts and mutants with conditional partial inactivation of Fgfr2b in the lung mesenchyme reveal the involvement of both receptors in lipofibroblast formation and suggest a possible compensation between the two receptors. We also provide data from human fetal lungs to demonstrate the relevance of our discoveries to humans. Our results reveal an essential role for Fgf10 signaling in the formation of lipofibroblasts during late lung development. PMID:26511927

  2. Biomechanical and biochemical remodeling of stromal extracellular matrix in cancer.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ruchi; Lelkes, Peter I; Cukierman, Edna

    2015-04-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural and biochemical signals that regulate cell function. A well-controlled balance between cells and surroundings (i.e., dynamic reciprocity) is crucial for regulating ECM architecture. During cancer progression, epithelial cells undergo genetic alterations which, together with stromal changes including ECM remodeling, disturb the homeostatic dynamics of the epithelium. A parallel organization of stromal ECM fibrils is associated with tumorigenic responses. In an emerging paradigm, continuous and progressive regulation via mechanical forces and aberrant signaling are believed to be responsible for tumor-associated ECM remodeling. In this review we discuss the discrete biomechanical and biochemical mechanisms that underlie these architectural changes and highlight their particular relevance to the regulation of the alignment of ECM in the mesenchymal stroma. PMID:25708906

  3. BIOMECHANICAL and BIOCHEMICAL REMODELING of STROMAL EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ruchi; Lelkes, Peter I; Cukierman, Edna

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural and biochemical signals that regulate cell function. A well-controlled balance between cells and surroundings (i.e., Dynamic Reciprocity) is crucial for regulating ECM architecture. During cancer progression, epithelial cells undergo genetic alterations, which together with stromal changes, including ECM remodeling, disturb the homeostatic dynamics of the epithelium. A parallel organization of stromal ECM fibrils is associated with tumorigenic responses. In an emerging paradigm, continuous and progressive regulation via mechanical forces and aberrant signaling are believed to be responsible for tumor-associated ECM remodeling. In this review, we discuss the discrete biomechanical and biochemical mechanisms that underlie these architectural changes and highlight their particular relevance to the regulation of the alignment of ECM in the mesenchymal stroma. PMID:25708906

  4. Rapidly growing bilateral pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia of the breast.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Eun Mi; Whang, In Yong; Chang, Eun Deok

    2010-01-01

    A tumoral pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) that causes huge breast enlargement is very rare. Only two cases of huge tumoral PASHs have been reported in the English medical literature. We report here on a surgically confirmed case of bilateral huge tumoral PASH in a 47-year-old woman, and we present the imaging and histopathology findings. We also review the relevant medical literature. PMID:20461190

  5. Sphingosine kinase 1 is required for TGF-β mediated fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Dong-Joo; Lawrenson, Kate; Agadjanian, Hasmik; Walsh, Christine S.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1), the enzyme that produces sphingosine 1 phosphate (S1P), is known to be highly expressed in many cancers. However, the role of SPHK1 in cells of the tumor stroma remains unclear. Here, we show that SPHK1 is highly expressed in the tumor stroma of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC), and is required for the differentiation and tumor promoting function of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Knockout or pharmacological inhibition of SPHK1 in ovarian fibroblasts attenuated TGF-β-induced expression of CAF markers, and reduced their ability to promote ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion in a coculture system. Mechanistically, we determined that SPHK1 mediates TGF-β signaling via the transactivation of S1P receptors (S1PR2 and S1PR3), leading to p38 MAPK phosphorylation. The importance of stromal SPHK1 in tumorigenesis was confirmed in vivo, by demonstrating a significant reduction of tumor growth and metastasis in SPHK1 knockout mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of SPHK1 inhibition as a novel stroma-targeted therapy in HGSC. PMID:26716409

  6. Characterization of human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts in three-dimensional in vitro co-culture model

    SciTech Connect

    Horie, Masafumi; Saito, Akira; Mikami, Yu; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Nakajima, Jun; Kohyama, Tadashi; Nagase, Takahide

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established three patient-paired sets of CAFs and NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs and NFs were analyzed using three-dimensional co-culture experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs showed higher {alpha}-SMA expression than NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs were implicated in invasion and differentiation of lung cancer cells. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play crucial roles in carcinogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of non-small cell lung carcinoma, and targeting of CAFs could be a novel strategy for cancer treatment. However, the characteristics of human CAFs still remain to be better defined. In this study, we established patient-matched CAFs and normal fibroblasts (NFs), from tumoral and non-tumoral portions of resected lung tissue from lung cancer patients. CAFs showed higher {alpha}-smooth muscle actin ({alpha}-SMA) expression than NFs, and CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Furthermore, we employed three-dimensional co-culture assay with A549 lung cancer cells, where CAFs were more potent in inducing collagen gel contraction. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of co-cultured collagen gel revealed that CAFs had the potential to increase invasion of A549 cells compared to NFs. These observations provide evidence that lung CAFs have the tumor-promoting capacity distinct from NFs.

  7. A subset of myofibroblastic cancer-associated fibroblasts regulate collagen fiber elongation, which is prognostic in multiple cancers.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Christopher J; Noble, Fergus; Ward, Matthew; Bullock, Marc; Drifka, Cole; Mellone, Massimiliano; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E; Hayden, Annette; Thirdborough, Steve; Liu, Yuming; Smith, David M; Mellows, Toby; Kao, W John; Garbis, Spiros D; Mirnezami, Alex; Underwood, Tim J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Thomas, Gareth J

    2016-02-01

    Collagen structure has been shown to influence tumor cell invasion, metastasis and clinical outcome in breast cancer. However, it remains unclear how it affects other solid cancers. Here we utilized multi-photon laser scanning microscopy and Second Harmonic Generation to identify alterations to collagen fiber structure within the tumor stroma of head & neck, esophageal and colorectal cancers. Image segmentation algorithms were then applied to quantitatively characterize these morphological changes, showing that elongated collagen fibers significantly correlated with poor clinical outcome (Log Rank p < 0.05). We used TGF-β treatment to model fibroblast conversion to smooth muscle actin SMA-positive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and found that these cells induce the formation of elongated collagen fibers in vivo. However, proteomic/transcriptomic analysis of SMA-positive CAFs cultured ex-vivo showed significant heterogeneity in the expression of genes with collagen fibril organizing gene ontology. Notably, stratifying patients according to stromal SMA-positivity and collagen fiber elongation was found to provide a highly significant correlation with poor survival in all 3 cancer types (Log Rank p ≤ 0.003). In summary, we show that increased collagen fiber length correlates with poor patient survival in multiple tumor types and that only a sub-set of SMA-positive CAFs can mediate the formation of this collagen structure. PMID:26716418

  8. mir-1-mediated paracrine effect of cancer-associated fibroblasts on lung cancer cell proliferation and chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianmin; Guan, Jing; Long, Xiaoping; Wang, Yang; Xiang, Xudong

    2016-06-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in humans worldwide. Moreover, the overall 5-year survival rate is only 15%. Pathologically almost 80% of all lung cancer cases are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) have been found to exist in a large number of NSCLCs. CAFs have been proven to promote tumor progression, metastasis and resistance to therapy through paracrine effects in most solid tumors. In the present study, firstly we isolated CAFs from patient tissues and demonstrated that they promoted cell proliferation and chemoresistance to cisplatin in the lung cancer cell lines A549 and 95D in a paracrine manner. Secondly, using ELISA and quantative PCR, we found that a higher amount of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) existed in the CAFs rather than that observed in the normal fibroblasts (NFs). Thirdly, we detected that SDF-1 facilitated lung cancer cell proliferation and drug resistance via the CXCR4-mediated signaling pathway which involved NF-κB and Bcl-xL. Moreover, we also confirmed that the expression level of SDF-1 in the CAFs was negatively regulated by microRNA mir-1 through microRNA overexpression and quantitative PCR. Overall, our data provide one explanation for the effects of CAFs on lung cancer cells. Meanwhile, our results also suggest CAFs as a potential therapeutic target in tumor treatment. PMID:27035564

  9. A subset of myofibroblastic cancer-associated fibroblasts regulate collagen fiber elongation, which is prognostic in multiple cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Christopher J.; Noble, Fergus; Ward, Matthew; Bullock, Marc; Drifka, Cole; Mellone, Massimiliano; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E.; Hayden, Annette; Thirdborough, Steve; Liu, Yuming; Smith, David M.; Mellows, Toby; Kao, W. John; Garbis, Spiros D.; Mirnezami, Alex; Underwood, Tim J.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen structure has been shown to influence tumor cell invasion, metastasis and clinical outcome in breast cancer. However, it remains unclear how it affects other solid cancers. Here we utilized multi-photon laser scanning microscopy and Second Harmonic Generation to identify alterations to collagen fiber structure within the tumor stroma of head & neck, esophageal and colorectal cancers. Image segmentation algorithms were then applied to quantitatively characterize these morphological changes, showing that elongated collagen fibers significantly correlated with poor clinical outcome (Log Rank p < 0.05). We used TGF-β treatment to model fibroblast conversion to smooth muscle actin SMA-positive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and found that these cells induce the formation of elongated collagen fibers in vivo. However, proteomic/transcriptomic analysis of SMA-positive CAFs cultured ex-vivo showed significant heterogeneity in the expression of genes with collagen fibril organizing gene ontology. Notably, stratifying patients according to stromal SMA-positivit