Science.gov

Sample records for adjacent stromal fibroblasts

  1. miR-146b-5p mediates p16-dependent repression of IL-6 and suppresses paracrine procarcinogenic effects of breast stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ansari, Mysoon M.; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence support the critical roles of active stromal fibroblasts in breast cancer development and spread. However, the mediators and the mechanisms of regulation are still not well defined. We have shown here that the tumor suppressor p16INK4A protein inhibits the pro-carcinogenic effects of breast stromal fibroblasts through repressing the expression/secretion of IL-6. Indeed, p16INK4A suppresses IL-6 at the mRNA and protein levels. This effect is mediated trough miR-146b-5p, which inhibits IL-6 expression through a specific sequence at the IL-6 3′UTR. In addition, we present clear evidence that miR-146b-5p inhibition is sufficient to transactivate breast stromal fibroblasts, which promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition in breast cancer cells in a paracrine manner. By contrast, ectopic expression of miR-146b-5p in active fibroblasts abrogated their pro-carcinogenic effects. The physiological importance of miR-146b-5p inhibition was revealed by showing that the levels of pre-miR-146b-5p as well as its mature form are reduced in cancer-associated fibroblasts as compared with their normal adjacent counterparts from cancer-free tissues isolated from the same patients. Interestingly, treatment of active breast stromal fibroblasts with curcumin increased the level of the p16INK4A coding CDKN2A mRNA and miR-146b-5p and suppressed IL-6, which confirms the repressive effect of these two tumor suppressor molecules on IL-6, and shows the possible “normalization” of cancer-related active fibroblasts. These results show that miR-146b-5p has non-cell-autonomous tumor suppressor function through inhibition of IL-6, suggesting that targeting this microRNA in breast stromal fibroblasts could be of great therapeutic value. PMID:26338965

  2. Immunohistological study of the endometrial stromal fibroblasts in the opossum, Monodelphis domestica: evidence for homology with eutherian stromal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kin, Koryu; Maziarz, Jamie; Wagner, Günter P

    2014-05-01

    Molecular phylogenetic studies suggest that the hemochorial placentation and decidualization are ancestral traits of eutherian mammals. While the origin of the placental tissue is well understood, the origin of the decidual cells is unclear. Here we address the origin of decidual cells by examining the expression patterns of six transcription factors (TFs) as well as four structural proteins in the endometrium of a marsupial, Monodelphis domestica, and compared them with the patterns known from eutherian species. We found a mesenchymal cell population in the subepithelial compartment of the opossum endometrium. These cells express a set of TFs, such as homeobox A11 (HOXA11), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB), and progesterone receptor (PGR), that are important for eutherian endometrial stromal cells. On the other hand, we did not find the expression of a decidual cell marker desmin (DES) or of TFs that are important for decidual cell differentiation, such as forkhead box O1 (FOXO1), in those cells. Based on these results, we propose that opossum has cells homologous to eutherian endometrial fibroblasts but no decidual cells. In addition, we describe cellular changes associated with the progression of pregnancy: nuclear localization of CEBPB in luminal epithelial cells as early as 8 days postcoitum, expansion of endometrial glands, nuclear localization of FOXO1 in glandular epithelial cells, and expression of smooth muscle actin in luminal epithelial cells. These data show that the luminal and glandular epithelium react to the presence of the preplacentation conceptus and suggest a limited form of pregnancy recognition.

  3. Activation of Notch1 signaling in stromal fibroblasts inhibits melanoma growth by upregulating WISP-1.

    PubMed

    Shao, H; Cai, L; Grichnik, J M; Livingstone, A S; Velazquez, O C; Liu, Z-J

    2011-10-20

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as an important target for cancer therapy. Fibroblasts (Fbs) within the tumor stroma are critically involved in promoting tumor growth and angiogenesis through secretion of soluble factors, synthesis of extracellular matrix and direct cell-cell interaction. In this work, we aim to alter the biological activity of stromal Fbs by modulating the Notch1 signaling pathway. We show that Fbs engineered to constitutively activate the Notch1 pathway significantly inhibit melanoma growth and tumor angiogenesis. We determine that the inhibitory effect of 'Notch-engineered' Fbs is mediated by increased secretion of Wnt-induced secreted protein-1 (WISP-1) as the effects of Notch1 activation in Fbs are reversed by shRNA-mediated blockade of WISP-1. When 'Notch-engineered' Fbs are co-grafted with melanoma cells in SCID mice, shRNA-mediated blockade of WISP-1 reverses the tumor-suppressive phenotype of the 'Notch-engineered' Fbs, significantly increases melanoma growth and tumor angiogenesis. Consistent with these findings, supplement of recombinant WISP-1 protein inhibits melanoma cell growth in vitro. In addition, WISP-1 is modestly expressed in melanoma-activated Fbs but highly expressed in inactivated Fbs. Evaluation of human melanoma skin biopsies indicates that expression of WISP-1 is significantly lower in melanoma nests and surrounding areas filled with infiltrated immune cells than in the adjacent dermis unaffected by the melanoma. Overall, our study shows that constitutive activation of the Notch1 pathway confers Fbs with a suppressive phenotype to melanoma growth, partially through WISP-1. Thus, targeting tumor stromal Fbs by activating Notch signaling and/or increasing WISP-1 may represent a novel therapeutic approach to combat melanoma.

  4. Stromal fibroblasts derived from mammary gland of bovine with mastitis display inflammation-specific changes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing; He, Guiliang; Zhang, Wenyao; Xu, Tong; Qi, Hongliang; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yong; Gao, Ming-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblasts are predominant components of mammary stromal cells and play crucial roles in the development and involution of bovine mammary gland; however, whether these cells contribute to mastitis has not been demonstrated. Thus, we have undertaken biological and molecular characterization of inflammation-associated fibroblasts (INFs) extracted from bovine mammary glands with clinical mastitis and normal fibroblasts (NFs) from slaughtered dairy cows because of fractured legs during lactation. The functional contributions of INFs to normal epithelial cells were also investigated by using an in vitro co-culture model. We present evidence that the INFs were activated fibroblasts and showed inflammation-related features. Moreover, INFs significantly inhibited the proliferation and β-casein secretion of epithelial cells, as well as upregulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 in epithelial cells. These findings indicate that functional alterations can occur in stromal fibroblasts within the bovine mammary gland during mastitis, demonstrating the importance of stromal fibroblasts in bovine mastitis and its treatment. PMID:27272504

  5. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) from stromal fibroblasts stimulates the progression of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Hiroaki; Yashiro, Masakazu; Kinoshita, Haruhito; Fukuoka, Tatsunari; Morisaki, Tamami; Masuda, Go; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kubo, Naoshi; Ohira, Masaichi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2014-11-28

    The aim of this study was to clarify the role of fibroblast-derived Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) in the development of gastric cancer. The correlation between the clinicopathological features of 548 primary gastric carcinomas and LOXL2 expression in stromal cells was examined by immunohistochemistry. Two gastric cancer cell lines, OCUM-12 and NUGC-3, and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) were used in this in vitro study. The effect of fibroblast-derived LOXL2 on the motility of gastric cancer cells was analyzed by using a wound-healing assay, a double-chamber invasion assay, and western blot. LOXL2 expression in stromal cells was significantly associated with tumor invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, and peritoneal dissemination. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that LOXL2 expression in stromal cells could be an independent predictive parameter for the overall survival of patients. CAFs significantly stimulated the migration and invasion of OCUM-12 and NUGC-3 cells. This motility-stimulating ability of CAFs was inhibited by LOXL2 siRNA. Western blot analysis indicated that phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in cancer cells was increased by the conditioned medium from CAFs, and was decreased by the conditioned medium from LOXL2 siRNA-treated CAFs. LOXL2 expression in stromal cells may be a useful prognostic factor for patients with gastric cancer. Fibroblast-derived LOXL2 may stimulate the motility of gastric cancer cells.

  6. p53 status in stromal fibroblasts modulates tumor growth in an SDF1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Addadi, Yoseph; Moskovits, Neta; Granot, Dorit; Lozano, Guillermina; Carmi, Yaron; Apte, Ron N.; Neeman, Michal; Oren, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor exerts a variety of cell-autonomous effects that are aimed to thwart tumor development. In addition, however, there is growing evidence for cell non-autonomous tumor suppressor effects of p53. In the present study, we investigated the impact of stromal p53 on tumor growth. Specifically, we found that ablation of p53 in fibroblasts enabled them to promote more efficiently the growth of tumors initiated by PC3 prostate cancer-derived cells. This stimulatory effect was dependent on the increased expression of the chemokine SDF-1 in the p53-deficient fibroblasts. Notably, fibroblasts harboring mutant p53 protein were more effective than p53-null fibroblasts in promoting tumor growth. The presence of either p53-null or p53-mutant fibroblasts led also to a markedly elevated rate of metastatic spread of the PC3 tumors. These findings implicate p53 in a cell non-autonomous tumor suppressor role within stromal fibroblasts, through suppressing the production of tumor-stimulatory factors by these cells. Moreover, expression of mutant p53 by tumor stroma fibroblasts might exert a gain of function effect, further accelerating tumor development. PMID:20952507

  7. Heterogeneity of stromal cells in the human splenic white pulp. Fibroblastic reticulum cells, follicular dendritic cells and a third superficial stromal cell type

    PubMed Central

    Steiniger, Birte S; Wilhelmi, Verena; Seiler, Anja; Lampp, Katrin; Stachniss, Vitus

    2014-01-01

    At least three phenotypically and morphologically distinguishable types of branched stromal cells are revealed in the human splenic white pulp by subtractive immunohistological double-staining. CD271 is expressed in fibroblastic reticulum cells of T-cell zones and in follicular dendritic cells of follicles. In addition, there is a third CD271− and CD271+/− stromal cell population surrounding T-cell zones and follicles. At the surface of follicles the third population consists of individually variable partially overlapping shells of stromal cells exhibiting CD90 (Thy-1), MAdCAM-1, CD105 (endoglin), CD141 (thrombomodulin) and smooth muscle α-actin (SMA) with expression of CD90 characterizing the broadest shell and SMA the smallest. In addition, CXCL12, CXCL13 and CCL21 are also present in third-population stromal cells and/or along fibres. Not only CD27+ and switched B lymphocytes, but also scattered IgD++ B lymphocytes and variable numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes often occur close to the third stromal cell population or one of its subpopulations at the surface of the follicles. In contrast to human lymph nodes, neither podoplanin nor RANKL (CD254) were detected in adult human splenic white pulp stromal cells. The superficial stromal cells of the human splenic white pulp belong to a widespread cell type, which is also found at the surface of red pulp arterioles surrounded by a mixed T-cell/B-cell population. Superficial white pulp stromal cells differ from fibroblastic reticulum cells and follicular dendritic cells not only in humans, but apparently also in mice and perhaps in rats. However, the phenotype of white pulp stromal cells is species-specific and more heterogeneous than described so far. PMID:24890772

  8. Fibroblast Activation Protein Expression by Stromal Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Julia, Tchou; Zhang Paul, J; Yingtao, Bi; Celine, Satija; Rajrupa, Marjumdar; Stephen, TL; Lo, A; Haiying, Chen; Carolyn, Mies; June, Carl H; Jose, Conejo-Garcia; Ellen, Puré

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) has long been known to be expressed in the stroma of breast cancer. However, very little is known if the magnitude of FAP expression within the stroma may have prognostic value and reflect the heterogeneous biology of the tumor cell. An earlier study had suggested that stromal FAP expression in breast cancer was inversely proportional to prognosis. We, therefore, hypothesized that stromal FAP expression may correlate with clinicopathologic variables and may serve as an adjunct prognostic factor in breast cancer. We evaluated the expression of FAP in a panel of breast cancer tissues (n=52) using a combination of immunostain analyses at the tissue and single cell level using freshly frozen or freshly digested human breast tumor samples respectively. Our results showed that FAP expression was abundantly expressed in the stroma across all breast cancer subtypes without significant correlation with clinicopathologic factors. We further identified a subset of FAP positive or FAP+ stromal cells that also expressed CD45, a pan-leukocyte marker. Using freshly dissociated human breast tumor specimens (n=5), we demonstrated that some of these FAP+ CD45+ cells were CD11b+CD14+MHC-II+ indicating that they were likely tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). Although FAP+CD45+ cells have been demonstrated in the mouse tumor stroma, our results demonstrating that human breast TAMs expressed FAP was novel and suggested that existing and future FAP directed therapy may have dual therapeutic benefits targeting both stromal mesenchymal cells and immune cells such as TAMs. More work is needed to explore the role of FAP as a potential targetable molecule in breast cancer treatment. PMID:24074532

  9. Stromal fibroblasts support dendritic cells to maintain IL-23/Th17 responses after exposure to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Malecka, Anna; Wang, Qunwei; Shah, Sabaria; Sutavani, Ruhcha V.; Spendlove, Ian; Ramage, Judith M.; Greensmith, Julie; Franks, Hester A.; Gough, Michael J.; Saalbach, Anja; Patel, Poulam M.; Jackson, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell function is modulated by stromal cells, including fibroblasts. Although poorly understood, the signals delivered through this crosstalk substantially alter dendritic cell biology. This is well illustrated with release of TNF-α/IL-1β from activated dendritic cells, promoting PGE2 secretion from stromal fibroblasts. This instructs dendritic cells to up-regulate IL-23, a key Th17-polarizing cytokine. We previously showed that ionizing radiation inhibited IL-23 production by human dendritic cells in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the hypothesis that dendritic cell-fibroblast crosstalk overcomes the suppressive effect of ionizing radiation to support appropriately polarized Th17 responses. Radiation (1–6 Gy) markedly suppressed IL-23 secretion by activated dendritic cells (P < 0.0001) without adversely impacting their viability and consequently, inhibited the generation of Th17 responses. Cytokine suppression by ionizing radiation was selective, as there was no effect on IL-1β, -6, -10, and -27 or TNF-α and only a modest (11%) decrease in IL-12p70 secretion. Coculture with fibroblasts augmented IL-23 secretion by irradiated dendritic cells and increased Th17 responses. Importantly, in contrast to dendritic cells, irradiated fibroblasts maintained their capacity to respond to TNF-α/IL-1β and produce PGE2, thus providing the key intermediary signals for successful dendritic cell-fibroblasts crosstalk. In summary, stromal fibroblasts support Th17-polarizing cytokine production by dendritic cells that would otherwise be suppressed in an irradiated microenvironment. This has potential ramifications for understanding the immune response to local radiotherapy. These findings underscore the need to account for the impact of microenvironmental factors, including stromal cells, in understanding the control of immunity. PMID:27049023

  10. Melanoma Cells Can Adopt the Phenotype of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages by Spontaneous Cell Fusion in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kemény, Lajos V.; Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Jakab, Ádám; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    After the removal of primary cutaneous melanoma some patients develop local recurrences, even after having histologically tumor-free re-excision. A potential explanation behind this phenomenon is that tumor cells switch their phenotype, making their recognition via standard histopathological assessments extremely difficult. Tumor-stromal cell fusion has been proposed as a potential mechanism for tumor cells to acquire mesenchymal traits; therefore, we hypothesized that melanoma cells could acquire fibroblast- and macrophage-like phenotypes via cell fusion. We show that melanoma cells spontaneously fuse with human dermal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The hybrid cells’ nuclei contain chromosomes from both parental cells and are indistinguishable from the parental fibroblasts or macrophages based on their morphology and immunophenotype, as they could lose the melanoma specific MART1 marker, but express the fibroblast marker smooth muscle actin or the macrophage marker CD68. Our results suggest that, by spontaneous cell fusion in vitro, tumor cells can adopt the morphology and immunophenotype of stromal cells while still carrying oncogenic, tumor-derived genetic information. Therefore, melanoma–stromal cell fusion might play a role in missing tumor cells by routine histopathological assessments. PMID:27271591

  11. Mesenchymal stromal cells reverse hypoxia-mediated suppression of α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Faulknor, Renea A.; Olekson, Melissa A.; Nativ, Nir I.; Ghodbane, Mehdi; Gray, Andrea J.; Berthiaume, François

    2015-02-27

    During wound healing, fibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix that guides angiogenesis and supports the migration and proliferation of cells that eventually form the scar. They also promote wound closure via differentiation into α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-expressing myofibroblasts, which cause wound contraction. Low oxygen tension typical of chronic nonhealing wounds inhibits fibroblast collagen production and differentiation. It has been suggested that hypoxic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete factors that promote wound healing in animal models; however, it is unclear whether these factors are equally effective on the target cells in a hypoxic wound environment. Here we investigated the impact of MSC-derived soluble factors on the function of fibroblasts cultured in hypoxic fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs). Hypoxia alone significantly decreased FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression. MSC-conditioned medium restored hypoxic FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression to levels similar to normoxic FPCLs. (SB431542), an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β{sub 1} (TGF-β{sub 1})-mediated signaling, blocked most of the MSC effect on FPCL contraction, while exogenous TGF-β{sub 1} at levels similar to that secreted by MSCs reproduced the MSC effect. These results suggest that TGF-β{sub 1} is a major paracrine signal secreted by MSCs that can restore fibroblast functions relevant to the wound healing process and that are impaired in hypoxia. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts were cultured in collagen lattices (FPCLs) as model contracting wounds. • Hypoxia decreased FPCL contraction and fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. • Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) restored function of hypoxic fibroblasts. • MSCs regulate fibroblast function mainly via secreted transforming growth factor-β{sub 1}.

  12. Mesenchymal stromal cells, colony-forming unit fibroblasts, from bone marrow of untreated advanced breast and lung cancer patients suppress fibroblast colony formation from healthy marrow.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Erica Leonor; Labovsky, Vivian; La Russa, Vincent; Vallone, Valeria Fernández; Honegger, Alba Elizabeth; Belloc, Carlos Gabriel; Wen, Huei Chi; Bordenave, Raúl Horacio; Bullorsky, Eduardo Oscar; Feldman, Leonardo; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra

    2010-03-01

    We have shown that bone marrow (BM) from untreated advanced lung and breast cancer patients (LCP and BCP) have a reduced number of colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Factors that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of CFU-F are produced by the patients' BM microenvironment. We have now examined whether conditioned media (CM) from patients' CFU-F-derived stromal cells also inhibits the colony-forming efficiency (CFE) of CFU-F in primary cultures from healthy volunteers (HV)-BM. Thus the number and proliferation potential of HV-CFU-F were also found to be decreased and similar to colony numbers and colony size of patients' CFU-F. Stromal cells from both of these types of colonies appeared relatively larger and lacked the characteristic spindle morphology typically seen in healthy stromal cells. We developed an arbitrary mesenchymal stromal cell maturational index by taking three measures consisting of stromal cell surface area, longitudinal and horizontal axis. All stromal indices derived from HV-CFU-F grown in patients' CM were similar to those from stromal elements derived from patients' CFU-F. These indices were markedly higher than stromal indices typical of HV-CFU-F cultured in healthy CM or standard medium [alpha-medium plus 20% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (FBS)]. Patients' CM had increased concentrations of the CFU-F inhibitor, GM-CSF, and low levels of bFGF and Dkk-1, strong promoters of self-renewal of MSCs, compared to the levels quantified in CM from HV-CFU-F. Moreover, the majority of patients' MSCs were unresponsive in standard medium and healthy CM to give CFU-F, indicating that the majority of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients' CFU-F are locked in maturational arrest. These results show that alterations of GM-CSF, bFGF, and Dkk-1 are associated with deficient cloning and maturation arrest of CFU-F. Defective autocrine and paracrine mechanisms may be involved in the BM microenvironments of

  13. Stromal Fibroblast in Age-Related Cancer: Role in Tumorigenesis and Potential as Novel Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Elkhattouti, Abdelouahid; Hassan, Mohamed; Gomez, Christian R.

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of most common cancers increases with age due to accumulation of damage to cells and tissues. Stroma, the structure close to the basement membrane, is gaining increased attention from clinicians and researchers due to its increasingly, yet incompletely understood role in the development of age-related cancer. With advanced age, stroma generates a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment, exemplified by the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Components of the SASP, such as cytokines, chemokines, and high energy metabolites are main drivers of age-related cancer initiation and sustain its progression. Our purpose is to provide insight into the mechanistic role of the stroma, with particular emphasis on stromal fibroblasts, on the development of age-related tumors. We also present evidence of the potential of the stroma as target for tumor therapy. Likewise, a rationale for age-related antitumor therapy targeting the stroma is presented. We expect to foster debate on the underlining basis of age-related cancer pathobiology. We also would like to promote discussion on novel stroma-based anticancer therapeutic strategies tailored to treat the elderly. PMID:26284191

  14. Stromal Fibroblast in Age-Related Cancer: Role in Tumorigenesis and Potential as Novel Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Elkhattouti, Abdelouahid; Hassan, Mohamed; Gomez, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of most common cancers increases with age due to accumulation of damage to cells and tissues. Stroma, the structure close to the basement membrane, is gaining increased attention from clinicians and researchers due to its increasingly, yet incompletely understood role in the development of age-related cancer. With advanced age, stroma generates a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment, exemplified by the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Components of the SASP, such as cytokines, chemokines, and high energy metabolites are main drivers of age-related cancer initiation and sustain its progression. Our purpose is to provide insight into the mechanistic role of the stroma, with particular emphasis on stromal fibroblasts, on the development of age-related tumors. We also present evidence of the potential of the stroma as target for tumor therapy. Likewise, a rationale for age-related antitumor therapy targeting the stroma is presented. We expect to foster debate on the underlining basis of age-related cancer pathobiology. We also would like to promote discussion on novel stroma-based anticancer therapeutic strategies tailored to treat the elderly. PMID:26284191

  15. TGF-β in jaw tumor fluids induces RANKL expression in stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Chiaki; Aikawa, Tomonao; Okuno, Emi; Miyagawa, Kazuaki; Amano, Katsuhiko; Takahata, Sosuke; Kimata, Masaaki; Okura, Masaya; Iida, Seiji; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors and cysts, arising in the jawbones, grow by resorption and destruction of the jawbones. However, mechanisms underlying bone resorption by odontogenic tumors/cysts remain unclear. Odontogenic tumors/cysts comprise odontogenic epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts, which originate from the developing tooth germ. It has been demonstrated that odontogenic epithelial cells of the developing tooth germ induce osteoclastogenesis to prevent the tooth germ from invading the developing bone to maintain its structure in developing bones. Thus, we hypothesized that odontogenic epithelial cells of odontogenic tumors/cysts induce osteoclast formation, which plays potential roles in tumor/cyst outgrowth into the jawbone. The purpose of this study was to examine osteoclastogenesis by cytokines, focusing on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), produced by odontogenic epithelial cells. We observed two pathways for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) induction by keratocystic odontogenic tumor fluid: the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) pathway through interleukin-1α (IL-1α) signaling and non-COX-2/PGE2 pathway through TGF-β receptor signaling. TGF-β1 and IL-1α produced by odontogenic tumors/cysts induced osteoclastogenesis directly in the osteoclast precursor cells and indirectly via increased RANKL induction in the stroma. PMID:27279422

  16. Exosomes released by chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells induce the transition of stromal cells into cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Paggetti, Jerome; Haderk, Franziska; Seiffert, Martina; Janji, Bassam; Distler, Ute; Ammerlaan, Wim; Kim, Yeoun Jin; Adam, Julien; Lichter, Peter; Solary, Eric; Berchem, Guy; Moussay, Etienne

    2015-08-27

    Exosomes derived from solid tumor cells are involved in immune suppression, angiogenesis, and metastasis, but the role of leukemia-derived exosomes has been less investigated. The pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is stringently associated with a tumor-supportive microenvironment and a dysfunctional immune system. Here, we explore the role of CLL-derived exosomes in the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which malignant cells create this favorable surrounding. We show that CLL-derived exosomes are actively incorporated by endothelial and mesenchymal stem cells ex vivo and in vivo and that the transfer of exosomal protein and microRNA induces an inflammatory phenotype in the target cells, which resembles the phenotype of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). As a result, stromal cells show enhanced proliferation, migration, and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, contributing to a tumor-supportive microenvironment. Exosome uptake by endothelial cells increased angiogenesis ex vivo and in vivo, and coinjection of CLL-derived exosomes and CLL cells promoted tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. Finally, we detected α-smooth actin-positive stromal cells in lymph nodes of CLL patients. These findings demonstrate that CLL-derived exosomes actively promote disease progression by modulating several functions of surrounding stromal cells that acquire features of cancer-associated fibroblasts.

  17. The Transcriptomic Evolution of Mammalian Pregnancy: Gene Expression Innovations in Endometrial Stromal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kin, Koryu; Maziarz, Jamie; Chavan, Arun R.; Kamat, Manasi; Vasudevan, Sreelakshmi; Birt, Alyssa; Emera, Deena; Lynch, Vincent J.; Ott, Troy L.; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Wagner, Günter P.

    2016-01-01

    The endometrial stromal fibroblast (ESF) is a cell type present in the uterine lining of therian mammals. In the stem lineage of eutherian mammals, ESF acquired the ability to differentiate into decidual cells in order to allow embryo implantation. We call the latter cell type “neo-ESF” in contrast to “paleo-ESF” which is homologous to eutherian ESF but is not able to decidualize. In this study, we compare the transcriptomes of ESF from six therian species: Opossum (Monodelphis domestica; paleo-ESF), mink, rat, rabbit, human (all neo-ESF), and cow (secondarily nondecidualizing neo-ESF). We find evidence for strong stabilizing selection on transcriptome composition suggesting that the expression of approximately 5,600 genes is maintained by natural selection. The evolution of neo-ESF from paleo-ESF involved the following gene expression changes: Loss of expression of genes related to inflammation and immune response, lower expression of genes opposing tissue invasion, increased markers for proliferation as well as the recruitment of FOXM1, a key gene transiently expressed during decidualization. Signaling pathways also evolve rapidly and continue to evolve within eutherian lineages. In the bovine lineage, where invasiveness and decidualization were secondarily lost, we see a re-expression of genes found in opossum, most prominently WISP2, and a loss of gene expression related to angiogenesis. The data from this and previous studies support a scenario, where the proinflammatory paleo-ESF was reprogrammed to express anti-inflammatory genes in response to the inflammatory stimulus coming from the implanting conceptus and thus paving the way for extended, trans-cyclic gestation. PMID:27401177

  18. The Transcriptomic Evolution of Mammalian Pregnancy: Gene Expression Innovations in Endometrial Stromal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kin, Koryu; Maziarz, Jamie; Chavan, Arun R; Kamat, Manasi; Vasudevan, Sreelakshmi; Birt, Alyssa; Emera, Deena; Lynch, Vincent J; Ott, Troy L; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Wagner, Günter P

    2016-01-01

    The endometrial stromal fibroblast (ESF) is a cell type present in the uterine lining of therian mammals. In the stem lineage of eutherian mammals, ESF acquired the ability to differentiate into decidual cells in order to allow embryo implantation. We call the latter cell type "neo-ESF" in contrast to "paleo-ESF" which is homologous to eutherian ESF but is not able to decidualize. In this study, we compare the transcriptomes of ESF from six therian species: Opossum (Monodelphis domestica; paleo-ESF), mink, rat, rabbit, human (all neo-ESF), and cow (secondarily nondecidualizing neo-ESF). We find evidence for strong stabilizing selection on transcriptome composition suggesting that the expression of approximately 5,600 genes is maintained by natural selection. The evolution of neo-ESF from paleo-ESF involved the following gene expression changes: Loss of expression of genes related to inflammation and immune response, lower expression of genes opposing tissue invasion, increased markers for proliferation as well as the recruitment of FOXM1, a key gene transiently expressed during decidualization. Signaling pathways also evolve rapidly and continue to evolve within eutherian lineages. In the bovine lineage, where invasiveness and decidualization were secondarily lost, we see a re-expression of genes found in opossum, most prominently WISP2, and a loss of gene expression related to angiogenesis. The data from this and previous studies support a scenario, where the proinflammatory paleo-ESF was reprogrammed to express anti-inflammatory genes in response to the inflammatory stimulus coming from the implanting conceptus and thus paving the way for extended, trans-cyclic gestation. PMID:27401177

  19. CD34+ stromal cells/fibroblasts/fibrocytes/telocytes as a tissue reserve and a principal source of mesenchymal cells. Location, morphology, function and role in pathology.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, L; Gutiérrez, R; García, M P; Sáez, F J; Díaz-Flores, L; Valladares, F; Madrid, J F

    2014-07-01

    We review the morphofunctional characteristics of CD34+ stromal fibroblastic/fibrocytic cells (CD34+ SFCs) and report our observations. We consider the following aspects of CD34+ SFCs: A) The confusing terms applied to this cell type, often combining the prefix CD34 with numerous names, including fibroblasts, fibrocytes, dendrocytes, keratocytes, telocytes and stromal, dendritic, adventitial, supraadventitial, perivascular, paravascular and delimiting cells; B) Changes in their immunophenotype, e.g., loss of CD34 expression and gain of other markers, such as those defining mesenchymal and derivate cells (myofibroblasts, osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes); C) Morphology (elongated or triangular cell body and thin, moniliform, bipolar or multipolar cytoplasmic processes), immunohistochemistry (co-expression of and changes in molecular expression) and structure (characteristics of nucleus and cytoplasmic organelles, and points of contact and junctions in quiescent and activated stages by light and electron microscopy); D) Location and distribution in the vessels (adventitia or external layer), in the tissues (connective, adipose, blood, muscle and nervous) and in the organs and systems (skin, oral cavity and oropharynx, respiratory, digestive, urinary, male, female, endocrine and lymphoid systems, serosal and synovial membranes, heart, eye and meninges); E) Origin from the mesoderm and cranial neural crest in the embryo, and from stem cells (themselves or other cells) and/or peripheral blood pluripotent stem cells (circulating progenitor cells) in post-natal life; F) Functions, such as synthesis of different molecules, progenitor of mesenchymal cells, immunomodulation, parenchymal regulation (growth, maturation and differentiation of adjacent cells), induction of angiogenesis, scaffolding support of other cells and phagocytic properties. Since CD34+ SFCs are the main reservoir of tissue mesenchymal cells (great mesenchymal potential, probably higher than that

  20. Identification of stromally expressed molecules in the prostate by tag-profiling of cancer-associated fibroblasts, normal fibroblasts and fetal prostate

    PubMed Central

    Orr, B; Riddick, A C P; Stewart, G D; Anderson, R A; Franco, O E; Hayward, S W; Thomson, A A

    2012-01-01

    The stromal microenvironment has key roles in prostate development and cancer, and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) stimulate tumourigenesis via several mechanisms including the expression of pro-tumourigenic factors. Mesenchyme (embryonic stroma) controls prostate organogenesis, and in some circumstances can re-differentiate prostate tumours. We have applied next-generation Tag profiling to fetal human prostate, normal human prostate fibroblasts (NPFs) and CAFs to identify molecules expressed in prostatic stroma. Comparison of gene expression profiles of a patient-matched pair of NPFs vs CAFs identified 671 transcripts that were enriched in CAFs and 356 transcripts whose levels were decreased, relative to NPFs. Gene ontology analysis revealed that CAF-enriched transcripts were associated with prostate morphogenesis and CAF-depleted transcripts were associated with cell cycle. We selected mRNAs to follow-up by comparison of our data sets with published prostate cancer fibroblast microarray profiles as well as by focusing on transcripts encoding secreted and peripheral membrane proteins, as well as mesenchymal transcripts identified in a previous study from our group. We confirmed differential transcript expression between CAFs and NPFs using QrtPCR, and defined protein localization using immunohistochemistry in fetal prostate, adult prostate and prostate cancer. We demonstrated that ASPN, CAV1, CFH, CTSK, DCN, FBLN1, FHL1, FN, NKTR, OGN, PARVA, S100A6, SPARC, STC1 and ZEB1 proteins showed specific and varied expression patterns in fetal human prostate and in prostate cancer. Colocalization studies suggested that some stromally expressed molecules were also expressed in subsets of tumour epithelia, indicating that they may be novel markers of EMT. Additionally, two molecules (ASPN and STC1) marked overlapping and distinct subregions of stroma associated with tumour epithelia and may represent new CAF markers. PMID:21804603

  1. The stromal cell-surface protease fibroblast activation protein-α localizes to lipid rafts and is recruited to invadopodia.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Julia D; Tholen, Stefan; Koczorowska, Maria M; De Wever, Olivier; Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAPα) is a cell surface protease expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts in the microenvironment of most solid tumors. As there is increasing evidence for proteases having non-catalytic functions, we determined the FAPα interactome in cancer-associated fibroblasts using the quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown (QUICK) method. Complex formation with adenosin deaminase, erlin-2, stomatin, prohibitin, Thy-1 membrane glycoprotein, and caveolin-1 was further validated by immunoblotting. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of the known stoichiometric FAPα binding partner dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV) corroborated the proteomic strategy. Reverse co-IPs validated the FAPα interaction with caveolin-1, erlin-2, and stomatin while co-IP upon RNA-interference mediated knock-down of DPPIV excluded adenosin deaminase as a direct FAPα interaction partner. Many newly identified FAPα interaction partners localize to lipid rafts, including caveolin-1, a widely-used marker for lipid raft localization. We hypothesized that this indicates a recruitment of FAPα to lipid raft structures. In density gradient centrifugation, FAPα co-fractionates with caveolin-1. Immunofluorescence optical sectioning microscopy of FAPα and lipid raft markers further corroborates recruitment of FAPα to lipid rafts and invadopodia. FAPα is therefore an integral component of stromal lipid rafts in solid tumors. In essence, we provide one of the first interactome analyses of a cell surface protease and translate these results into novel biological aspects of a marker protein for cancer-associated fibroblasts.

  2. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchigami, Takao; Kibe, Toshiro; Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio; Nishizawa, Yoshiaki; Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Ueda, Masahiro; Nakamura, Norifumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Kishida, Michiko

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between tumor cells and fibroblasts in ameloblastoma. • AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted significantly high IL-1α levels. • IL-1α derived from AM-3 cells promoted IL-6 and IL-8 secretion of fibroblasts. • IL-6 and IL-8 activated the cellular motility and proliferation of AM-3 cells. - Abstract: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave

  3. Polysome profiling shows the identity of human adipose-derived stromal/stem cells in detail and clearly distinguishes them from dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zych, Jaiesa; Spangenberg, Lucia; Stimamiglio, Marco A; Abud, Ana Paula R; Shigunov, Patrícia; Marchini, Fabricio K; Kuligovski, Crisciele; Cofré, Axel R; Schittini, Andressa V; Aguiar, Alessandra M; Senegaglia, Alexandra; Brofman, Paulo R S; Goldenberg, Samuel; Dallagiovanna, Bruno; Naya, Hugo; Correa, Alejandro

    2014-11-15

    Although fibroblasts and multipotent stromal/stem cells, including adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs), have been extensively studied, they cannot be clearly distinguished from each other. We, therefore, investigated the cellular and molecular characteristics of ADSCs and fibroblasts. ADSCs and fibroblasts share several morphological similarities and surface markers, but were clearly found to be different types of cells. Contrary to previous reports, fibroblasts were not able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, or chondrocytes. Polysome-bound mRNA profiling revealed that ∼ 1,547 genes were differentially expressed (DE) in the two cell types; the genes were related to cell adhesion, the extracellular matrix, differentiation, and proliferation. These findings were confirmed by functional analyses showing that ADSCs had a greater adhesion capacity than fibroblasts; the proliferation rate of fibroblasts was also higher than that of ADSCs. Importantly, 185 DE genes were integral to the plasma membrane and, thus, candidate markers for ADSC isolation and manipulation. We also observed that an established marker of fibroblasts and ADSCs, CD105, was overexpressed in ADSCs at both mRNA and protein levels. CD105 expression seemed to be related to differentiation capacity, at least for adipogenesis. This study shows that ADSCs and fibroblasts are distinct cell types. These findings should be taken into account when using these two cell types in basic and therapeutic studies.

  4. Activation of Robo1 signaling of breast cancer cells by Slit2 from stromal fibroblast restrains tumorigenesis via blocking PI3K/Akt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Po-Hao; Hwang-Verslues, Wendy W; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Chin; Hsiao, Michael; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chang, King-Jen; Lee, Eva Y-H P; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2012-09-15

    Tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in regulating tumor progression by secreting factors that mediate cancer cell growth. Stromal fibroblasts can promote tumor growth through paracrine factors; however, restraint of malignant carcinoma progression by the microenvironment also has been observed. The mechanisms that underlie this paradox remain unknown. Here, we report that the tumorigenic potential of breast cancer cells is determined by an interaction between the Robo1 receptor and its ligand Slit2, which is secreted by stromal fibroblasts. The presence of an active Slit2/Robo1 signal blocks the translocation of β-catenin into nucleus, leading to downregulation of c-myc and cyclin D1 via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Clinically, high Robo1 expression in the breast cancer cells correlates with increased survival in patients with breast cancer, and low Slit2 expression in the stromal fibroblasts is associated with lymph node metastasis. Together, our findings explain how a specific tumor microenvironment can restrain a given type of cancer cell from progression and show that both stromal fibroblasts and tumor cell heterogeneity affect breast cancer outcomes.

  5. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  6. Cell behavior observation and gene expression analysis of melanoma associated with stromal fibroblasts in a three-dimensional magnetic cell culture array.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Mina; Matsumura, Taku; Yamamoto, And Shuhei; Nakayama, Eiichi; Jimbow, Kowichi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroid culture array has been fabricated using a magnetic force-based cell patterning method, analyzing the effect of stromal fibroblast on the invasive capacity of melanoma. Formation of spheroids was observed when array-like multicellular patterns of melanoma were developed using a pin-holder device made of magnetic soft iron and an external magnet, which enables the assembly of the magnetically labeled cells on the collagen gel-coated surface as array-like cell patterns. The interaction of fibroblast on the invasion of melanoma was investigated using three types of cell interaction models: (i) fibroblasts were magnetically labeled and patterned together in array with melanoma spheroids (direct-interaction model), (ii) fibroblasts coexisting in the upper collagen gel (indirect-interaction model) of melanoma spheroids, and (iii) fibroblast-sheets coexisting under melanoma spheroids (fibroblast-sheet model). The fibroblast-sheet model has largely increased the invasive capacity of melanoma, and the promotion of adhesion, migration, and invasion were also observed. In the fibroblast-sheet model, the expression of IL-8 and MMP-2 increased by 24-fold and 2-fold, respectively, in real time RT-PCR compared to the absence of fibroblasts. The results presented in this study demonstrate the importance of fibroblast interaction to invasive capacity of melanoma in the 3D in vitro bioengineered tumor microenvironment.

  7. Lactate is a mediator of metabolic cooperation between stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts and glycolytic tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Rattigan, Yanique I.; Patel, Brijesh B.; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Sukenick, George; Koutcher, Jason A.; Glod, John W.; and others

    2012-02-15

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are bone marrow-derived stromal cells, which play a role in tumor progression. We have shown earlier that breast cancer cells secrete higher levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) under hypoxia, leading to the recruitment of hMSCs towards hypoxic tumor cells. We found that (i) MDA-MB-231 cells secrete significantly higher levels of lactate (3-fold more) under hypoxia (1% O{sub 2}) than under 20% O{sub 2} and (ii) lactate recruits hMSCs towards tumor cells by activating signaling pathways to enhance migration. The mRNA and protein expression of functional MCT1 in hMSCs is increased in response to lactate exposure. Thus, we hypothesized that hMSCs and stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the tumor microenvironment have the capacity to take up lactate expelled from tumor cells and use it as a source of energy. Our {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic measurements indicate that {sup 13}C-lactate is converted to {sup 13}C-alpha ketoglutarate in hMSCs and CAFs supporting this hypothesis. To our knowledge this is the first in vitro model system demonstrating that hMSCs and CAFs can utilize lactate produced by tumor cells.

  8. Stromal fibroblast activation and their potential association with uterine fibroids (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, LI-HUA; CAI, FENG-FENG; GE, ISABELL; BISKUP, EWELINA; CHENG, ZHONG-PING

    2014-01-01

    Uterine fibroids are the most common type of benign, gynecologic neoplasm and are the primary indication for performance of a hysterectomy, accounting for >200,000 hysterectomies annually in the USA. At present, females are younger and exhibit larger leiomyomas at the time of diagnosis. Cancer-associated fibroblasts in tumor microenvironments have emerged as an important target for cancer therapy. Repeated stimulation by infectious or non-infectious agents in the uterine tissues, including inflammation, mechanical forces or hypoxia, stimulate the resident fibroblasts to undergo specific activation and, thus, are significant in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, complex signaling pathways regulate the mechanisms of fibroblastic activation. The current review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of fibroblastic activation and the potential association with uterine leiomyoma pathogenesis, enabling an integrated pathogenic analysis for review of the therapeutic options. PMID:25013460

  9. Tracing CD34+ Stromal Fibroblasts in Palatal Mucosa and Periodontal Granulation Tissue as a Possible Cell Reservoir for Periodontal Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roman, Alexandra; Páll, Emőke; Mihu, Carmen M; Petruţiu, Adrian S; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Câmpian, Radu S; Florea, Adrian; Georgiu, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present research was to trace CD34+ stromal fibroblastic cells (CD34+ SFCs) in the palatal connective tissue harvested for muco-gingival surgical procedures and in granulation tissues from periodontal pockets using immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscopy. Immunohistochemical analysis targeted the presence of three antigens: CD31, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and CD34. In the palate, CD31 staining revealed a colored inner ring of the vessels representing the endothelium, α-SMA+ was located in the medial layer of the vasculature, and CD34 was intensely expressed by endothelial cells and artery adventitial cells (considered to be CD34+ SFCs). Granulation tissue showed the same pattern for CD31+ and α-SMA, but a different staining pattern for CD34. Ultrastructural examination of the palatal tissue highlighted perivascular cells with fibroblast-like characteristics and pericytes in close spatial relationship to endothelial cells. The ultrastructural evaluation of granulation tissue sections confirmed the presence of neovasculature and the inflammatory nature of this tissue. The present study traced the presence of CD34+ SFCs and of pericytes in the palatal connective tissue thus highlighting once more its intrinsic regenerative capabilities. The clinical and systemic factors triggering mobilization and influencing the fate of local CD34+SCFs and other progenitors are issues to be further investigated.

  10. Cell Surface Glycoprotein of Reactive Stromal Fibroblasts as a Potential Antibody Target in Human Epithelial Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Old, Lloyd J.; Rettig, Wolfgang J.

    1990-09-01

    The F19 antigen is a cell surface glycoprotein (M_r, 95,000) of human sarcomas and proliferating, cultured fibroblasts that is absent from resting fibroblasts in normal adult tissues. Normal and malignant epithelial cells are also F19^-. The present immunohistochemical study describes induction of F19 in the reactive mesenchyme of epithelial tumors. F19^+ fibroblasts were found in primary and metastatic carcinomas, including colorectal (18 of 18 cases studied), breast (14/14), ovarian (21/21), bladder (9/10), and lung carcinomas (13/13). In contrast, the stroma of benign colorectal adenomas, fibrocystic disease and fibroadenomas of breast, benign prostate hyperplasia, in situ bladder carcinomas, and benign ovarian tumors showed no or only moderate numbers of F19^+ fibroblasts. Analysis of dermal incision wounds revealed that F19 is strongly induced during scar formation. Comparison of F19 with the extracellular matrix protein tenascin, a putative marker of tumor mesenchyme, showed a cellular staining pattern for F19 vs. the extracellular matrix pattern for tenascin and widespread expression of tenascin in F19^- normal tissues and benign tumors. Our results suggest that the F19^+ phenotype correlates with specialized fibroblast functions in wound healing and malignant tumor growth. Because of its abundance in tumor mesenchyme, F19 may serve as a target for antibodies labeled with radioisotopes or toxic agents, or inflammatogenic antibodies, in carcinoma patients.

  11. The role of stromal fibroblasts in lung carcinogenesis: A target for chemoprevention?

    PubMed

    Mahale, Jagdish; Smagurauskaite, Gintare; Brown, Karen; Thomas, Anne; Howells, Lynne M

    2016-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment plays an essential role in the development and spread of cancers. Tumour cells interact with the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), embedded within which, are a variety of non-cancer cells including cells of the vasculature, immune system and fibroblasts. The essential role of fibroblasts in the cultivation and maintenance of an environment in which tumour cells are able to maintain their aggressive phenotypic traits is becoming increasingly well documented. Cancer-associated fibroblasts are able to secrete a vast array of ECM-modulating factors, meaning that they have potential for a functional role in every step of the carcinogenic process. In particular, they are likely to have a role in early tumour-initiating inflammatory events, and so may provide a potential target for chemopreventive intervention. This review summarises the known interactions between lung tumour cells and surrounding reactive fibroblasts, highlighting the need to further investigate cancer-associated fibroblasts as therapeutic targets in lung cancer chemoprevention strategies. PMID:25611701

  12. Stromal fibroblasts and the immune microenvironment: partners in mammary gland biology and pathology?

    PubMed

    Unsworth, Ashleigh; Anderson, Robin; Britt, Kara

    2014-07-01

    The microenvironment of a tumor has emerged recently as a critical contributor to the development of cancer. Within this environment, fibroblasts and immune cells are the cell lineages that seem to be active mediators of tumour development. The activated fibroblasts that are also present during wound healing and chronic inflammation have been studied extensively. Their activation leads to altered gene expression profiles that markedly increase growth factor and cytokine secretion, leading to major alterations in the immune cell microenvironment. To better understand normal tissue development, wound healing and the chronic inflammation that leads to cancer, we review here information available on the role of fibroblasts and immune cells in normal breast development and in cancer. We also discuss the immunogenicity of breast cancer compared to other cancers and the contribution of the immune microenvironment to the initiation, progression and metastasis of tumors. Also reviewed is the limited knowledge on the role of immune cells and fibroblasts in normal development and whether the risk of cancer increases when their control is not tightly regulated.

  13. Stromal fibroblasts in the microenvironment of gastric carcinomas promote tumor metastasis via upregulating TAGLN expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibroblasts play a critical role in tumorigenesis, tumor progression and metastasis. However, their detailed molecular characteristics and clinical significance are still elusive. TAGLN is an actin-binding protein that plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Results We investigated the interaction between cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment to determine how the fibroblasts from human gastric carcinoma facilitate tumorigenesis through TAGLN. QRT-PCR and Western blot indicated that TAGLN expression was upregulated in gastric carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) that promote gastric cancer cell migration and invasion. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), we found that CAFs enhanced tumor metastasis through upregulated TAGLN in vitro and in vivo. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was significantly lower after TAGLN knock-down by siRNA. TAGLN levels were elevated in human gastric cancer stroma than normal gastric stroma and associated with differentiation and lymph node metastasis of gastric cancer. Conclusion CAFs may promote gastric cancer cell migration and invasion via upregulating TAGLN and TAGLN induced MMP-2 production. PMID:23510049

  14. Benign serrated colorectal fibroblastic polyps/intramucosal perineuriomas are true mixed epithelial-stromal polyps (hybrid hyperplastic polyp/mucosal perineurioma) with frequent BRAF mutations.

    PubMed

    Agaimy, Abbas; Stoehr, Robert; Vieth, Michael; Hartmann, Arndt

    2010-11-01

    Colorectal fibroblastic polyp and intramucosal perineurioma are 2 synonyms for a recently described benign mucosal lesion with a predilection for the rectosigmoid colon. These lesions are characterized by aggregates of bland spindled cells separating and distorting mucosal crypts. The latter frequently showed a serrated architecture. The pathogenesis of fibroblastic polyp/intramucosal perineurioma and the nature of serrated crypts observed in them are poorly understood. We analyzed the clinicopathological features of 29 fibroblastic polyps and investigated them for the first time for mutations known to be involved in serrated colorectal epithelial polyps (BRAF, KRAS, and PIK3CA). Patients were 23 women and 6 men with a mean age of 64 years (range: 47 to 84 y). All lesions represented asymptomatic solitary polyps (mean size 3.5 mm) localized predominantly in the rectosigmoid colon (81%). Hyperplastic polyps, classical adenoma, and sessile serrated adenoma/lesion coexisted in 12 (44%), 12 (44%), and 5 (17%) patients, respectively. All lesions showed irregular aggregates of bland spindled cells separating and distorting mucosal crypts. Serrated (hyperplastic) crypts were observed on the top or contiguous with the lesion in all cases. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of at least one perineurial cell marker (epithelial membrane antigen, claudin-1, and glucose transporter-1) in 26 out of 27 lesions (96%), but expression of CD34 was less common (8 of 27; 30%). Immunostaining for hMLH1 showed a normal nuclear expression. Molecular analysis in 22 cases showed V600E BRAF mutation in 14 cases (63%) and KRAS mutation in 1 (4%). The remainder were wild-type for all 3 genes. Our results indicate that serrated fibroblastic polyps/intramucosal perineuriomas represent a unique type of mixed epithelial-stromal polyps (hybrid hyperplastic polyp/mucosal perineurioma). The perineurial stromal component might be derived from modified pericryptic fibroblasts as a consequence

  15. Cell–cell interaction between vocal fold fibroblasts and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in three-dimensional hyaluronan hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xia; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotential adult cells present in all tissues. Paracrine effects and differentiating ability make MSCs an ideal cell source for tissue regeneration. However, little is known about how interactions between implanted MSCs and native cells influence cellular growth, proliferation, and behaviour. By using an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) co-culture assay of normal or scarred human vocal fold fibroblasts (VFFs) and bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) in a uniquely suited hyaluronan hydrogel (HyStem–VF), we investigated cell morphology, survival rate, proliferation and protein and gene expression of VFFs and BM-MSCs. BM-MSCs inhibited cell proliferation of both normal and scarred VFFs without changes in VFF morphology or viability. BM-MSCs demonstrated decreased proliferation and survival rate after 7 days of co-culture with VFFs. Interactions between BM-MSCs and VFFs led to a significant increase in protein secretion of collagen I and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and a decrease of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). In particular, BM-MSCs significantly upregulated matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) and HGF gene expression for scarred VFFs compared to normal VFFs, indicating the potential for increases in extracellular matrix remodelling and tissue regeneration. Application of BM-MSCs-hydrogels may play a significant role in tissue regeneration, providing a therapeutic approach for vocal fold scarring. PMID:23653427

  16. Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Induces Chondrogenic Differentiation in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Dzobo, Kevin; Turnley, Taegyn; Wishart, Andrew; Rowe, Arielle; Kallmeyer, Karlien; van Vollenstee, Fiona A; Thomford, Nicholas E; Dandara, Collet; Chopera, Denis; Pepper, Michael S; Parker, M Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) represent an area being intensively researched for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. MSCs may provide the opportunity to treat diseases and injuries that currently have limited therapeutic options, as well as enhance present strategies for tissue repair. The cellular environment has a significant role in cellular development and differentiation through cell-matrix interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of adipose-derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) in the context of a cell-derived matrix so as to model the in vivo physiological microenvironment. The fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (fd-ECM) did not affect ad-MSC morphology, but reduced ad-MSC proliferation. Ad-MSCs cultured on fd-ECM displayed decreased expression of integrins α2 and β1 and subsequently lost their multipotency over time, as shown by the decrease in CD44, Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), SOX2, and NANOG gene expression. The fd-ECM induced chondrogenic differentiation in ad-MSCs compared to control ad-MSCs. Loss of function studies, through the use of siRNA and a mutant Notch1 construct, revealed that ECM-mediated ad-MSCs chondrogenesis requires Notch1 and β-catenin signaling. The fd-ECM also showed anti-senescence effects on ad-MSCs. The fd-ECM is a promising approach for inducing chondrogenesis in ad-MSCs and chondrogenic differentiated ad-MSCs could be used in stem cell therapy procedures. PMID:27527147

  17. Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Induces Chondrogenic Differentiation in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dzobo, Kevin; Turnley, Taegyn; Wishart, Andrew; Rowe, Arielle; Kallmeyer, Karlien; van Vollenstee, Fiona A.; Thomford, Nicholas E.; Dandara, Collet; Chopera, Denis; Pepper, Michael S.; Parker, M. Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) represent an area being intensively researched for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. MSCs may provide the opportunity to treat diseases and injuries that currently have limited therapeutic options, as well as enhance present strategies for tissue repair. The cellular environment has a significant role in cellular development and differentiation through cell–matrix interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of adipose-derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) in the context of a cell-derived matrix so as to model the in vivo physiological microenvironment. The fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (fd-ECM) did not affect ad-MSC morphology, but reduced ad-MSC proliferation. Ad-MSCs cultured on fd-ECM displayed decreased expression of integrins α2 and β1 and subsequently lost their multipotency over time, as shown by the decrease in CD44, Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), SOX2, and NANOG gene expression. The fd-ECM induced chondrogenic differentiation in ad-MSCs compared to control ad-MSCs. Loss of function studies, through the use of siRNA and a mutant Notch1 construct, revealed that ECM-mediated ad-MSCs chondrogenesis requires Notch1 and β-catenin signaling. The fd-ECM also showed anti-senescence effects on ad-MSCs. The fd-ECM is a promising approach for inducing chondrogenesis in ad-MSCs and chondrogenic differentiated ad-MSCs could be used in stem cell therapy procedures. PMID:27527147

  18. The Initiator Methionine tRNA Drives Secretion of Type II Collagen from Stromal Fibroblasts to Promote Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Cassie J.; Berg, Tracy J.; Birch, Joanna; Ennis, Darren; Mitchell, Louise; Cloix, Catherine; Campbell, Andrew; Sumpton, David; Nixon, Colin; Campbell, Kirsteen; Bridgeman, Victoria L.; Vermeulen, Peter B.; Foo, Shane; Kostaras, Eleftherios; Jones, J. Louise; Haywood, Linda; Pulleine, Ellie; Yin, Huabing; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen; Blyth, Karen; McNeish, Iain; Zanivan, Sara; Reynolds, Andrew R.; Norman, Jim C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Expression of the initiator methionine tRNA (tRNAiMet) is deregulated in cancer. Despite this fact, it is not currently known how tRNAiMet expression levels influence tumor progression. We have found that tRNAiMet expression is increased in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, implicating deregulated expression of tRNAiMet in the tumor stroma as a possible contributor to tumor progression. To investigate how elevated stromal tRNAiMet contributes to tumor progression, we generated a mouse expressing additional copies of the tRNAiMet gene (2+tRNAiMet mouse). Growth and vascularization of subcutaneous tumor allografts was enhanced in 2+tRNAiMet mice compared with wild-type littermate controls. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by fibroblasts from 2+tRNAiMet mice supported enhanced endothelial cell and fibroblast migration. SILAC mass spectrometry indicated that elevated expression of tRNAiMet significantly increased synthesis and secretion of certain types of collagen, in particular type II collagen. Suppression of type II collagen opposed the ability of tRNAiMet-overexpressing fibroblasts to deposit pro-migratory ECM. We used the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB) to determine whether collagen synthesis contributes to the tRNAiMet-driven pro-tumorigenic stroma in vivo. DHB had no effect on the growth of syngeneic allografts in wild-type mice but opposed the ability of 2+tRNAiMet mice to support increased angiogenesis and tumor growth. Finally, collagen II expression predicts poor prognosis in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. Taken together, these data indicate that increased tRNAiMet levels contribute to tumor progression by enhancing the ability of stromal fibroblasts to synthesize and secrete a type II collagen-rich ECM that supports endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. PMID:26948875

  19. The Response of Vocal Fold Fibroblasts and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells to Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Joel; Quinchia Rios, Beatriz; Bartlett, Rebecca; Berchtold, Craig; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Illumination of cellular changes caused by mechanical forces present within the laryngeal microenvironment may well guide strategies for tissue engineering the vocal fold lamina propria. The purpose of this study was to compare the response of human vocal fold fibroblasts (hVFF) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) to vibratory stimulus. In order to study these effects, a bioreactor capable of vibrating two cell seeded substrates was developed. The cell seeded substrates contact each other as a result of the sinusoidal frequency, producing a motion similar to the movement of true vocal folds. Utilizing this bioreactor, hVFF and BM-MSC were subjected to 200 Hz vibration and 20% strain for 8 hours. Immunohistochemistry (Ki-67 and TUNEL) was performed to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis respectively, while semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to assess extracellular matrix related gene expression. HVFF significantly proliferated (p = 0.011) when subjected to 200 Hz vibration and 20% strain, while BM-MSC did not (p = 1.0). A statistically significant increase in apoptosis of BM-MSC (p = 0.0402) was observed under the experimental conditions; however high cell viability (96%) was maintained. HVFF did not have significantly altered apoptosis (p = 0.7849) when subjected to vibration and strain. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR results show no significant differences in expression levels of collagen I (BM-MSC p = 0.1951, hVFF p = v0.3629), fibronectin (BM-MSC p = 0.1951, hVFF p = 0.2513), and TGF-β1 (BM-MSC p = 0.2534, hVFF p = 0.6029) between vibratory and static conditions in either cell type. Finally, smooth muscle actin mRNA was not present in either vibrated or static samples, indicating that no myofibroblast differentiation occurred for either cell type. Together, these results demonstrate that BM-MSC may be a suitable alternative to hVFF for vocal fold tissue engineering. Further investigation into a larger number of

  20. Mitochondria “fuel” breast cancer metabolism: Fifteen markers of mitochondrial biogenesis label epithelial cancer cells, but are excluded from adjacent stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Sotgia, Federica; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Salem, Ahmed F.; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Lamb, Rebecca; Sneddon, Sharon; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present new genetic and morphological evidence that human tumors consist of two distinct metabolic compartments. First, re-analysis of genome-wide transcriptional profiling data revealed that > 95 gene transcripts associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation were significantly elevated in human breast cancer cells, as compared with adjacent stromal tissue. Remarkably, nearly 40 of these upregulated gene transcripts were mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs), functionally associated with mitochondrial translation of protein components of the OXPHOS complex. Second, during validation by immunohistochemistry, we observed that antibodies directed against 15 markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation (AKAP1, GOLPH3, GOLPH3L, MCT1, MRPL40, MRPS7, MRPS15, MRPS22, NRF1, NRF2, PGC1-α, POLRMT, TFAM, TIMM9 and TOMM70A) selectively labeled epithelial breast cancer cells. These same mitochondrial markers were largely absent or excluded from adjacent tumor stromal cells. Finally, markers of mitochondrial lipid synthesis (GOLPH3) and mitochondrial translation (POLRMT) were associated with poor clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. Thus, we conclude that human breast cancers contain two distinct metabolic compartments—a glycolytic tumor stroma, which surrounds oxidative epithelial cancer cells—that are mitochondria-rich. The co-existence of these two compartments is indicative of metabolic symbiosis between epithelial cancer cells and their surrounding stroma. As such, epithelial breast cancer cells should be viewed as predatory metabolic “parasites,” which undergo anabolic reprogramming to amplify their mitochondrial “power.” This notion is consistent with the observation that the anti-malarial agent chloroquine may be an effective anticancer agent. New anticancer therapies should be developed to target mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation in human cancer cells. PMID

  1. Functionally and Phenotypically Distinct Subpopulations of Marrow Stromal Cells Are Fibroblast in Origin and Induce Different Fates in Peripheral Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Mineo; Sandstrom, Richard S.; Delrow, Jeffrey J.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells constitute a heterogeneous population of cells, typically isolated after expansion in culture. In vivo, stromal cells often exist in close proximity or in direct contact with monocyte-derived macrophages, yet their interaction with monocytes is largely unexplored. In this report, isolated CD146+ and CD146− stromal cells, as well as immortalized cell lines representative of each (designated HS27a and HS5, respectively), were shown by global DNase I hypersensitive site mapping and principal coordinate analysis to have a lineage association with marrow fibroblasts. Gene expression profiles generated for the CD146+ and CD146− cell lines indicate significant differences in their respective transcriptomes, which translates into differences in secreted factors. Consequently, the conditioned media (CM) from these two populations induce different fates in peripheral blood monocytes. Monocytes incubated in CD146+ CM acquire a tissue macrophage phenotype, whereas monocytes incubated in CM from CD146− cells express markers associated with pre-dendritic cells. Importantly, when CD14+ monocytes are cultured in contact with the CD146+ cells, the combined cell populations, assayed as a unit, show increased levels of transcripts associated with organismal development and hematopoietic regulation. In contrast, the gene expression profile from cocultures of monocytes and CD146− cells does not differ from that obtained when monocytes are cultured with CD146− CM. These in vitro results show that the CD146+ marrow stromal cells together with monocytes increase the expression of genes relevant to hematopoietic regulation. In vivo relevance of these data is suggested by immunohistochemistry of marrow biopsies showing juxtaposed CD146+ cells and CD68+ cells associated with these upregulated proteins. PMID:24131213

  2. Seminal plasma induces global transcriptomic changes associated with cell migration, proliferation and viability in endometrial epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joseph C.; Johnson, Brittni A.; Erikson, David W.; Piltonen, Terhi T.; Barragan, Fatima; Chu, Simon; Kohgadai, Nargis; Irwin, Juan C.; Greene, Warner C.; Giudice, Linda C.; Roan, Nadia R.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION How does seminal plasma (SP) affect the transcriptome of human primary endometrial epithelial cells (eEC) and stromal fibroblasts (eSF)? SUMMARY ANSWER Exposure of eEC and eSF to SP in vitro increases expression of genes and secreted proteins associated with cellular migration, proliferation, viability and inhibition of cell death. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Studies in both humans and animals suggest that SP can access and induce physiological changes in the upper female reproductive tract (FRT), which may participate in promoting reproductive success. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This is a cross sectional study involving control samples versus treatment. SP (pooled from twenty donors) was first tested for dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effects on eEC and eSF (n = 4). As exposure of eEC or eSF to 1% SP for 6 h proved to be non-toxic, a second set of eEC/eSF samples (n = 4) was treated under these conditions for transcriptome, protein and functional analysis. With a third set of samples (n = 3), we further compared the transcriptional response of the cells to SP versus fresh semen. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS eEC and eSF were isolated from endometrial biopsies from women of reproductive age undergoing benign gynecologic procedures and maintained in vitro. RNA was isolated and processed for microarray studies to analyze global transcriptomic changes. Secreted factors in conditioned media from SP-treated cells were analyzed by Luminex and for the ability to stimulate migration of CD14+ monocytes and CD4+ T cells. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Pathway identifications were determined using the Z-scoring system in Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (Z scores ≥|1.5|). SP induced transcriptomic changes (P < 0.05) associated with promoting leukocyte and endothelial cell recruitment, and proliferation of eEC and eSF. Cell viability pathways were induced, while those associated with cell death were suppressed (P < 0.05). SP and fresh semen induced

  3. Central Nervous System Stromal Cells Control Local CD8(+) T Cell Responses during Virus-Induced Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Cupovic, Jovana; Onder, Lucas; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Weiler, Elke; Caviezel-Firner, Sonja; Perez-Shibayama, Christian; Rülicke, Thomas; Bechmann, Ingo; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2016-03-15

    Stromal cells generate a complex cellular scaffold that provides specialized microenvironments for lymphocyte activation in secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we assessed whether local activation of stromal cells in the central nervous system (CNS) is mandatory to transfer immune recognition from secondary lymphoid organs into the infected tissue. We report that neurotropic virus infection in mice triggered the establishment of such stromal cell niches in the CNS. CNS stromal cell activation was dominated by a rapid and vigorous production of CC-motif chemokine receptor (CCR) 7 ligands CCL19 and CCL21 by vascular endothelial cells and adjacent fibroblastic reticular cell (FRC)-like cells in the perivascular space. Moreover, CCR7 ligands produced by CNS stromal cells were crucial to support recruitment and local re-activation of antiviral CD8(+) T cells and to protect the host from lethal neuroinflammatory disease, indicating that CNS stromal cells generate confined microenvironments that control protective T cell immunity. PMID:26921107

  4. Ionizing radiation-mediated premature senescence and paracrine interactions with cancer cells enhance the expression of syndecan 1 in human breast stromal fibroblasts: the role of TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    Liakou, Eleni; Mavrogonatou, Eleni; Pratsinis, Harris; Rizou, Sophia; Evangelou, Konstantinos; Panagiotou, Petros N.; Karamanos, Nikos K.; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    The cell surface proteoglycan syndecan 1 (SDC1) is overexpressed in the malignant breast stromal fibroblasts, creating a favorable milieu for tumor cell growth. In the present study, we found that ionizing radiation, a well-established treatment in human breast cancer, provokes premature senescence of human breast stromal fibroblasts in vitro, as well as in the breast tissue in vivo. These senescent cells were found to overexpress SDC1 both in vitro and in vivo. By using a series of specific inhibitors and siRNA approaches, we showed that this SDC1 overexpression in senescent cells is the result of an autocrine action of Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) through the Smad pathway and the transcription factor Sp1, while the classical senescence pathways of p53 or p38 MAPK - NF-kB are not involved. In addition, the highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 (in contrast to the low-invasive MCF-7) can also enhance SDC1 expression, both in early-passage and senescent fibroblasts via a paracrine action of TGF-β. The above suggest that radiation-mediated premature senescence and invasive tumor cells, alone or in combination, enhance SDC1 expression in breast stromal fibroblasts, a poor prognostic factor for cancer growth, and that TGF-β plays a crucial role in this process. PMID:27434331

  5. Ionizing radiation-mediated premature senescence and paracrine interactions with cancer cells enhance the expression of syndecan 1 in human breast stromal fibroblasts: the role of TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Liakou, Eleni; Mavrogonatou, Eleni; Pratsinis, Harris; Rizou, Sophia; Evangelou, Konstantinos; Panagiotou, Petros N; Karamanos, Nikos K; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2016-08-01

    The cell surface proteoglycan syndecan 1 (SDC1) is overexpressed in the malignant breast stromal fibroblasts, creating a favorable milieu for tumor cell growth. In the present study, we found that ionizing radiation, a well-established treatment in human breast cancer, provokes premature senescence of human breast stromal fibroblasts in vitro, as well as in the breast tissue in vivo. These senescent cells were found to overexpress SDC1 both in vitro and in vivo. By using a series of specific inhibitors and siRNA approaches, we showed that this SDC1 overexpression in senescent cells is the result of an autocrine action of Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) through the Smad pathway and the transcription factor Sp1, while the classical senescence pathways of p53 or p38 MAPK - NF-kB are not involved. In addition, the highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 (in contrast to the low-invasive MCF-7) can also enhance SDC1 expression, both in early-passage and senescent fibroblasts via a paracrine action of TGF-β. The above suggest that radiation-mediated premature senescence and invasive tumor cells, alone or in combination, enhance SDC1 expression in breast stromal fibroblasts, a poor prognostic factor for cancer growth, and that TGF-β plays a crucial role in this process. PMID:27434331

  6. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-2 Contributes to the Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor-Induced Neuronal Differentiation in Canine Bone Marrow Stromal Cells via Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Akt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Rei; Edamura, Kazuya; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Narita, Takanori; Okabayashi, Ken; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are considered as candidates for regenerative therapy and a useful model for studying neuronal differentiation. The role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in neuronal differentiation has been previously studied; however, the signaling pathway involved in this process remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathway in the bFGF-induced neuronal differentiation of canine BMSCs. bFGF induced the mRNA expression of the neuron marker, microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP2) and the neuron-like morphological change in canine BMSCs. In the presence of inhibitors of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt, i.e., SU5402, LY294002, and MK2206, respectively, bFGF failed to induce the MAP2 mRNA expression and the neuron-like morphological change. bFGF induced Akt phosphorylation, but it was attenuated by the FGFR inhibitor SU5402 and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. In canine BMSCs, expression of FGFR-1 and FGFR-2 was confirmed, but only FGFR-2 activation was detected by cross-linking and immunoprecipitation analysis. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of FGFR-2 in canine BMSCs resulted in the attenuation of bFGF-induced Akt phosphorylation. These results suggest that the FGFR-2/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in the bFGF-induced neuronal differentiation of canine BMSCs. PMID:26523832

  7. Stromal Fibroblasts Induce CCL20 through IL6/C/EBPβ to Support the Recruitment of Th17 Cells during Cervical Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Walch-Rückheim, Barbara; Mavrova, Russalina; Henning, Melanie; Vicinus, Benjamin; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Juhasz-Böss, Ingolf; Solomayer, Erich-Franz; Smola, Sigrun

    2015-12-15

    Cervical cancer is a consequence of persistent infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Progression to malignancy is linked to an inflammatory microenvironment comprising T-helper-17 (Th17) cells, a T-cell subset with protumorigenic properties. Neoplastic cells express only low endogenous levels of the Th17 chemoattractant CCL20, and therefore, it is unclear how Th17 cells are recruited to the cervical cancer tissue. In this study, we demonstrate that CCL20 was predominantly expressed in the stroma of cervical squamous cell carcinomas in situ. This correlated with stromal infiltration of CD4(+)/IL17(+) cells and with advancing International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage. Furthermore, we show that cervical cancer cells instructed primary cervical fibroblasts to produce high levels of CCL20 and to attract CD4/IL17/CCR6-positive cells, generated in vitro, in a CCL20/CCR6-dependent manner. Further mechanistic investigations identified cervical cancer cell-derived IL6 as an important mediator of paracrine CCL20 induction at the promoter, mRNA, and protein level in fibroblasts. CCL20 was upregulated through the recently described CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) pathway as shown with a dominant-negative version of C/EBPβ and through siRNA-mediated knockdown. In summary, our study defines a novel molecular mechanism by which cervical neoplastic cells shape their local microenvironment by instructing fibroblasts to support Th17 cell infiltration in a paracrine IL6/C/EBPβ-dependent manner. Th17 cells may in turn maintain chronic inflammation within high-grade cervical lesions to further promote cancer progression. PMID:26631268

  8. Enhancement of osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells cultured by selective combination of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2).

    PubMed

    Maegawa, Naoki; Kawamura, Kenji; Hirose, Motohiro; Yajima, Hiroshi; Takakura, Yoshinori; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that bone marrow contains mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which can show osteoblastic differentiation when cultured in osteogenic medium containing ascorbic acid, beta-glycerophosphate and dexamethasone. The differentiation results in the appearance of osteoblasts, together with the formation of bone matrix; thus, in vitro cultured bone (osteoblasts/bone matrix) could be fabricated by MSC culture. This type of cultured bone has already been used in clinical cases involving orthopaedic problems. To improve the therapeutic effect of the cultured bone, we investigated the culture conditions that contributed to extensive osteoblastic differentiation. Rat bone marrow was primarily cultured to expand the number of MSCs and further cultured in osteogenic medium for 12 days. The culture was also conducted in a medium supplemented with either bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) or fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), or with sequential combinations of both supplements. Among them, the sequential supplementation of FGF-2 followed by BMP-2 showed high alkaline phosphatase activity, sufficient bone-specific osteocalcein expression and abundant bone matrix formation of the MSC culture. These data implied that the number of responding cells or immature osteoblasts was increased by the supplementation of FGF-2 in the early phase of the culture and that these cells can show osteoblastic differentiation, of which capability was augmented by BMP-2 in the late phase. The sequential supplementation of these cytokines into MSC culture might be suitable for the fabrication of ideal cultured bone for use in bone tissue engineering. PMID:18038421

  9. Effect of Metformin on Viability, Morphology, and Ultrastructure of Mouse Bone Marrow-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Balb/3T3 Embryonic Fibroblast Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Czyrek, Aleksandra; Basinska, Katarzyna; Trynda, Justyna; Skaradzińska, Aneta; Siudzińska, Anna; Marędziak, Monika; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Metformin, a popular drug used to treat diabetes, has recently gained attention as a potentially useful therapeutic agent for treating cancer. In our research metformin was added to in vitro cultures of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) and Balb/3T3 fibroblast at concentration of 1 mM, 5 mM, and 10 mM. Obtained results indicated that metformin negatively affected proliferation activity of investigated cells. The drug triggered the formation of autophagosomes and apoptotic bodies in all tested cultures. Additionally, we focused on determination of expression of genes involved in insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) signaling pathway. The most striking finding was that the mRNA level of IGF2 was constant in both BMSCs and Balb/3T3. Further, the analysis of IGF2 concentration in cell supernatants showed that it decreased in BMSC cultures after 5 and 10 mM metformin treatments. In case of Balb/3T3 the concentration of IGF2 in culture supernatants decreased after 1 and 5 mM and increased after 10 mM of metformin. Our results suggest that metformin influences the cytophysiology of somatic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner causing inhibition of proliferation and abnormalities of their morphology and ultrastructure. PMID:26064951

  10. Tumor suppression by stromal TIMPs.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Masayuki; Jackson, Hartland W; Khokha, Rama

    2016-05-01

    The tumor stroma has the capacity to drive cancer progression, although the mechanisms governing these effects are incompletely understood. Recently, we reported that deletion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (Timps) in fibroblasts unleashes the function of cancer-associated fibroblasts and identifies a novel mode of stromal-tumor communication that activates key oncogenic pathways invoving Notch and ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) via stromal exosomes. PMID:27314104

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Development of Horse Cloned Embryos Generated with iPSCs, Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Fetal or Adult Fibroblasts as Nuclear Donors

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Ramiro; Moro, Lucia Natalia; Jordan, Roberto; Luzzani, Carlos; Miriuka, Santiago; Radrizzani, Martin; Donadeu, F. Xavier; Vichera, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The demand for equine cloning as a tool to preserve high genetic value is growing worldwide; however, nuclear transfer efficiency is still very low. To address this issue, we first evaluated the effects of time from cell fusion to activation (<1h, n = 1261; 1-2h, n = 1773; 2-3h, n = 1647) on in vitro and in vivo development of equine embryos generated by cloning. Then, we evaluated the effects of using different nuclear donor cell types in two successive experiments: I) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) vs. adult fibroblasts (AF) fused to ooplasts injected with the pluripotency-inducing genes OCT4, SOX2, MYC and KLF4, vs. AF alone as controls; II) umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs) vs. fetal fibroblasts derived from an unborn cloned foetus (FF) vs. AF from the original individual. In the first experiment, both blastocyst production and pregnancy rates were higher in the 2-3h group (11.5% and 9.5%, respectively), respect to <1h (5.2% and 2%, respectively) and 1-2h (5.6% and 4.7%, respectively) groups (P<0.05). However, percentages of born foals/pregnancies were similar when intervals of 2-3h (35.2%) or 1-2h (35.7%) were used. In contrast to AF, the iPSCs did not generate any blastocyst-stage embryos. Moreover, injection of oocytes with the pluripotency-inducing genes did not improve blastocyst production nor pregnancy rates respect to AF controls. Finally, higher blastocyst production was obtained using UC-MSC (15.6%) than using FF (8.9%) or AF (9.3%), (P<0.05). Despite pregnancy rates were similar for these 3 groups (17.6%, 18.2% and 22%, respectively), viable foals (two) were obtained only by using FF. In summary, optimum blastocyst production rates can be obtained using a 2-3h interval between cell fusion and activation as well as using UC-MSCs as nuclear donors. Moreover, FF line can improve the efficiency of an inefficient AF line. Overall, 24 healthy foals were obtained from a total of 29 born foals. PMID:27732616

  12. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts drives lactate production, promoting breast cancer tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Balliet, Renee M; Capparelli, Claudia; Guido, Carmela; Pestell, Timothy G; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Chiavarina, Barbara; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Increasing chronological age is the most significant risk factor for cancer. Recently, we proposed a new paradigm for understanding the role of the aging and the tumor microenvironment in cancer onset. In this model, cancer cells induce oxidative stress in adjacent stromal fibroblasts. This, in turn, causes several changes in the phenotype of the fibroblast including mitochondrial dysfunction, hydrogen peroxide production and aerobic glycolysis, resulting in high levels of L-lactate production. L-lactate is then transferred from these glycolytic fibroblasts to adjacent epithelial cancer cells and used as “fuel” for oxidative mitochondrial metabolism. Here, we created a new pre-clinical model system to directly test this hypothesis experimentally. To synthetically generate glycolytic fibroblasts, we genetically-induced mitochondrial dysfunction by knocking down TFAM using an sh-RNA approach. TFAM is mitochondrial transcription factor A, which is important in functionally maintaining the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Interestingly, TFAM-deficient fibroblasts showed evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, with the loss of certain mitochondrial respiratory chain components, and the over-production of hydrogen peroxide and L-lactate. Thus, TFAM-deficient fibroblasts underwent metabolic reprogramming towards aerobic glycolysis. Most importantly, TFAM-deficient fibroblasts significantly promoted tumor growth, as assayed using a human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) xenograft model. These increases in glycolytic fibroblast driven tumor growth were independent of tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistically, TFAM-deficient fibroblasts increased the mitochondrial activity of adjacent epithelial cancer cells in a co-culture system, as seen using MitoTracker. Finally, TFAM-deficient fibroblasts also showed a loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a known breast cancer stromal biomarker. Loss of stromal fibroblast Cav-1 is associated with early tumor recurrence, metastasis

  13. Fibroblast biology in pterygia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Woo; Park, Soo Hyun; Kim, Jae Chan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of fibroblasts is a vital process during wound healing. However, if prolonged and exaggerated, profibrotic pathways lead to tissue fibrosis or scarring and further organ malfunction. Although the pathogenesis of pterygium is known to be multi-factorial, additional studies are needed to better understand the pathways initiated by fibroblast activation for the purpose of therapeutic translation. Regarding pterygium as a possible systemic disorder, we discuss the different cell types that pterygium fibroblasts originate from. These may include bone marrow-derived progenitor cells, cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and local resident stromal cells. We also describe how pterygium fibroblasts can be activated and perpetuate profibrotic signaling elicited by various proliferative drivers, immune-inflammation, and novel factors such as stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) as well as a known key fibrotic factor, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β). Finally, epigenetic modification is discussed to explain inherited susceptibility to pterygium. PMID:26675401

  14. Prognostic Impact of Reduced Connexin43 Expression and Gap Junction Coupling of Neoplastic Stromal Cells in Giant Cell Tumor of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Peter; Maros, Mate Elod; Barna, Gabor; Antal, Imre; Papp, Gergo; Sapi, Zoltan; Athanasou, Nicholas Anthony; Benassi, Maria Serena; Picci, Pierro; Krenacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations of the GJA1 gene encoding the gap junction channel protein connexin43 (Cx43) cause bone malformations resulting in oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD), while GJA1 null and ODDD mutant mice develop osteopenia. In this study we investigated Cx43 expression and channel functions in giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), a locally aggressive osteolytic lesion with uncertain progression. Cx43 protein levels assessed by immunohistochemistry were correlated with GCTB cell types, clinico-radiological stages and progression free survival in tissue microarrays of 89 primary and 34 recurrent GCTB cases. Cx43 expression, phosphorylation, subcellular distribution and gap junction coupling was also investigated and compared between cultured neoplastic GCTB stromal cells and bone marow stromal cells or HDFa fibroblasts as a control. In GCTB tissues, most Cx43 was produced by CD163 negative neoplastic stromal cells and less by CD163 positive reactive monocytes/macrophages or by giant cells. Significantly less Cx43 was detected in α-smooth muscle actin positive than α-smooth muscle actin negative stromal cells and in osteoclast-rich tumor nests than in the adjacent reactive stroma. Progressively reduced Cx43 production in GCTB was significantly linked to advanced clinico-radiological stages and worse progression free survival. In neoplastic GCTB stromal cell cultures most Cx43 protein was localized in the paranuclear-Golgi region, while it was concentrated in the cell membranes both in bone marrow stromal cells and HDFa fibroblasts. In Western blots, alkaline phosphatase sensitive bands, linked to serine residues (Ser369, Ser372 or Ser373) detected in control cells, were missing in GCTB stromal cells. Defective cell membrane localization of Cx43 channels was in line with the significantly reduced transfer of the 622 Da fluorescing calcein dye between GCTB stromal cells. Our results show that significant downregulation of Cx43 expression and gap junction coupling in

  15. Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Synergistically Activate Apoptosis in a p21-Dependent Mechanism in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Dzobo, Kevin; Vogelsang, Matjaz; Thomford, Nicholas E; Dandara, Collet; Kallmeyer, Karlien; Pepper, Michael S; Parker, M Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment plays a crucial role in tumour progression and comprises tumour stroma which is made up of different cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are part of the tumour stroma and may have conflicting effects on tumour growth. In this study we investigated the effect of Wharton's Jelly-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs) and a fibroblast-derived ECM (fd-ECM) on esophageal (WHCO1) and breast (MDA MB 231) cancer cells in vitro. Both WJ-MSCs and the fd-ECM, alone or in combination, downregulate PCNA, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and MMPs and upregulate p53 and p21. p21 induction resulted in G2 phase cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in vitro. Our data suggest that p21 induction is via p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 cells, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor, Akt, and Nodal pathways were downregulated in cancer cells cocultured with WJ-MSCs. We also demonstrate that WJ-MSCs effects on cancer cells appear to be short-lived whilst the fd-ECM effect is long-lived. This study shows the influence of tumour microenvironment on cancer cell behaviour and provides alternative therapeutic targets for potential regulation of tumour cells.

  16. Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Synergistically Activate Apoptosis in a p21-Dependent Mechanism in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Dzobo, Kevin; Vogelsang, Matjaz; Thomford, Nicholas E; Dandara, Collet; Kallmeyer, Karlien; Pepper, Michael S; Parker, M Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment plays a crucial role in tumour progression and comprises tumour stroma which is made up of different cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are part of the tumour stroma and may have conflicting effects on tumour growth. In this study we investigated the effect of Wharton's Jelly-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs) and a fibroblast-derived ECM (fd-ECM) on esophageal (WHCO1) and breast (MDA MB 231) cancer cells in vitro. Both WJ-MSCs and the fd-ECM, alone or in combination, downregulate PCNA, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and MMPs and upregulate p53 and p21. p21 induction resulted in G2 phase cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in vitro. Our data suggest that p21 induction is via p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 cells, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor, Akt, and Nodal pathways were downregulated in cancer cells cocultured with WJ-MSCs. We also demonstrate that WJ-MSCs effects on cancer cells appear to be short-lived whilst the fd-ECM effect is long-lived. This study shows the influence of tumour microenvironment on cancer cell behaviour and provides alternative therapeutic targets for potential regulation of tumour cells. PMID:26880967

  17. Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Synergistically Activate Apoptosis in a p21-Dependent Mechanism in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 Cancer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dzobo, Kevin; Vogelsang, Matjaz; Thomford, Nicholas E.; Dandara, Collet; Kallmeyer, Karlien; Pepper, Michael S.; Parker, M. Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment plays a crucial role in tumour progression and comprises tumour stroma which is made up of different cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are part of the tumour stroma and may have conflicting effects on tumour growth. In this study we investigated the effect of Wharton's Jelly-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs) and a fibroblast-derived ECM (fd-ECM) on esophageal (WHCO1) and breast (MDA MB 231) cancer cells in vitro. Both WJ-MSCs and the fd-ECM, alone or in combination, downregulate PCNA, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and MMPs and upregulate p53 and p21. p21 induction resulted in G2 phase cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in vitro. Our data suggest that p21 induction is via p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 cells, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor, Akt, and Nodal pathways were downregulated in cancer cells cocultured with WJ-MSCs. We also demonstrate that WJ-MSCs effects on cancer cells appear to be short-lived whilst the fd-ECM effect is long-lived. This study shows the influence of tumour microenvironment on cancer cell behaviour and provides alternative therapeutic targets for potential regulation of tumour cells. PMID:26880967

  18. Periostin expression in intra-tumoral stromal cells is prognostic and predictive for colorectal carcinoma via creating a cancer-supportive niche

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaojie; Ding, Yibo; Luo, Yanxin; Cai, Hui; Liu, Yan; Gao, Xianhua; Liu, Qizhi; Yu, Yongwei; Du, Yan; Wang, Hao; Ma, Liye; Wang, Jianping; Chen, Kun; Ding, Yanqing; Fu, Chuangang; Cao, Guangwen

    2016-01-01

    Periostin (POSTN) expression in cancer cells and circulation has been related to poor prognosis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). However, the role of POSTN expressed in intra-tumoral stroma on CRC progression remains largely unknown. This study enrolled 1098 CRC patients who received surgical treatment in Shanghai and Guangzhou, Mainland China. In Shanghai cohort, immunohistochemistry score of stromal POSTN expression increased consecutively from adjacent mucosa, primary CRC tissues, to metastatic CRC tissues (P < 0.001), while medium- and high-stromal POSTN expression, rather than epithelial POSTN expression, independently predicted unfavorable prognoses of CRC, adjusted for covariates including TNM stage and postoperative chemotherapy in multivariate Cox models. The results in Shanghai cohort were faithfully replicated in Guangzhou cohort. Stromal POSTN expression dose-dependently predicted an unfavorable prognosis of stage III CRC patients with postoperative chemotherapy in both cohorts. POSTN derived from colonic fibroblasts or recombinant POSTN significantly promoted proliferation, anchorage independent growth, invasion, and chemo-resistance of CRC cells; whereas these effects were counteracted via targeting to PI3K/Akt or Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. CRC cell RKO-derived factor(s) significantly induced POSTN production in colonic fibroblasts and autocrine POSTN promoted proliferation, migration, and anchorage independent growth of fibroblasts. Conclusively, stromal POSTN is prognostic and predictive for CRC via creating a niche to facilitate cancer progression. Targeting POSTN-induced signaling pathways may be therapeutic options for metastatic or chemoresistant CRC. PMID:26556874

  19. Differences in phenotype and gene expression of prostate stromal cells from patients of varying ages and their influence on tumour formation by prostate epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Chuan; Yu, Sheng-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Hai; Han, Bang-Min; Zhao, Fu-Jun; Zhu, Guang-Hui; Hong, Yan; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is an age-related disease, and the stromal microenvironment plays an important role in prostatic malignant progression. However, the differences in prostate stromal cells present in young and old tissue are still obscure. We established primary cultured stromal cells from normal prostatic peripheral zone (PZ) of donors of varying ages and found that cultured stromal cells from old donors (PZ-old) were more enlarged and polygonal than those from young donors (PZ-young). Furthermore, based on immunocytochemical and ultrastructural analysis, the components of stromal cells changed from a majority of fibroblasts to a mixture of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts with increasing donor age. Using a three-dimensional in vitro culture system, we found that PZ-old stromal cells could enhance the proliferation, migration and invasion of cocultured benign BPH-1 and PC-3 cells. Using an in vivo tissue recombination system, we also found that PZ-old stromal cells are more effective than PZ-young cells in promoting tumour formation by BPH-1 cells of high passage(>100) and PC-3 cells. To probe the possible mechanism of these effects, we performed cDNA microarray analysis and profiled 509 upregulated genes and 188 downregulated genes in PZ-old cells. Among the changed genes, we found genes coding for a subset of paracrine factors that are capable of influencing adjacent epithelial cells; these include hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF5), insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP4), IGFBP5 and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1). Changes in the expression of these genes were further confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Overall, our findings indicate that stromal cells from prostate PZ of old donors are more active than similar cells from young donors in promoting the malignant process of adjacent

  20. Palladin Mediates Stiffness-Induced Fibroblast Activation in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    McLane, Joshua S.; Ligon, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment have emerged as key factors in tumor progression. It has been proposed that increased tissue stiffness can transform stromal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. However, it is unclear whether the three to five times increase in stiffness seen in tumor-adjacent stroma is sufficient for fibroblast activation. In this study we developed a three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel model with precisely tunable stiffness and show that a physiologically relevant increase in stiffness is sufficient to lead to fibroblast activation. We found that soluble factors including CC-motif chemokine ligand (CCL) chemokines and fibronectin are necessary for this activation, and the combination of C-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CCR4) chemokine receptors and β1 and β3 integrins are necessary to transduce these chemomechanical signals. We then show that these chemomechanical signals lead to the gene expression changes associated with fibroblast activation via a network of intracellular signaling pathways that include focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Finally, we identify the actin-associated protein palladin as a key node in these signaling pathways that result in fibroblast activation. PMID:26200861

  1. Inductive role of fibroblastic cell lines in development of the mouse thymus anlage in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Itoi, M; Amagai, T

    1998-01-10

    Previously, we have shown that embryonic day 12 thymus anlage cultured alone cannot develop into the mature organ but degenerates. In the present study, we investigated the cause of this insufficient organogenesis of embryonic day 12 thymus anlage in organ culture. We cocultured embryonic day 12 thymus anlages with various cell lines as pellets formed by centrifugation. In coculture with fibroblastic cell lines, but not with thymic epithelial cell lines, embryonic day 12 thymus anlages developed to support full T cell differentiation, and expressed mature stromal cell markers, Ia and Kb. By pellet culture of thymus anlages and fibroblastic cell lines transfected with a beta-galactosidase expression vector, we analyzed the distribution of added fibroblastic cells in pellets. The added fibroblastic cells constituted neither thymic capsule nor septa but disappeared after about 2 weeks in culture. Moreover, immunohistochemical studies indicated that added fibroblastic cells were adjacent to mesenchymal cells of thymus anlage. Our results strongly suggest that added fibroblastic cells support the development of the thymus anlage through interaction with its mesenchymal cells.

  2. Co-culture of 3D tumor spheroids with fibroblasts as a model for epithelial–mesenchymal transition in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun Kyung; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-07-15

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) acts as a facilitator of metastatic dissemination in the invasive margin of malignant tumors where active tumor–stromal crosstalks take place. Co-cultures of cancer cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are often used as in vitro models of EMT. We established a tumor–fibroblast proximity co-culture using HT-29 tumor spheroids (TSs) with CCD-18co fibroblasts. When co-cultured with TSs, CCD-18co appeared activated, and proliferative activity as well as cell migration increased. Expression of fibronectin increased whereas laminin and type I collagen decreased in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to TSs alone, closely resembling the margin of in vivo xenograft tissue. Active TGFβ1 in culture media significantly increased in TS co-cultures but not in 2D co-cultures of cancer cells–fibroblasts, indicating that 3D context-associated factors from TSs may be crucial to crosstalks between cancer cells and fibroblasts. We also observed in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts increased expression of α-SMA, EGFR and CTGF; reduced expression of membranous β-catenin and E-cadherin, together suggesting an EMT-like changes similar to a marginal region of xenograft tissue in vivo. Overall, our in vitro TS–fibroblast proximity co-culture mimics the EMT-state of the invasive margin of in vivo tumors in early metastasis. - Highlights: • An adjacent co-culture of tumor spheroids and fibroblasts is presented as EMT model. • Activation of fibroblasts and increased cell migration were shown in co-culture. • Expression of EMT-related factors in co-culture was similar to that in tumor tissue. • Crosstalk between spheroids and fibroblasts was demonstrated by secretome analysis.

  3. Pancreatic fibroblasts smoothen their activities via AKT-GLI2-TGFα.

    PubMed

    Rustgi, Anil K

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic stromal fibroblasts provide structural support. Activated fibroblasts are critical in the tumor microenvironment. In this issue of Genes & Development, Liu and colleagues (pp. 1943-1955) unravel the finding that depletion of Smoothened (Smo) in pancreatic stromal fibroblasts results in AKT activation and noncanonical GLI2 activation with subsequent TGFα secretion, activation of EGFR in pancreatic epithelial cells, and augmentation of acinar-ductal metaplasia. Additionally, Smo-mediated signaling has proproliferative effects on pancreatic tumor cells. PMID:27664234

  4. Correlation of vascular endothelial growth factor expression with fibroblast growth factor-8 expression and clinico-pathologic parameters in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    West, A F; O'Donnell, M; Charlton, R G; Neal, D E; Leung, H Y

    2001-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mediates neo-angiogenesis during tumour progression and is known to cooperate with the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system to facilitate angiogenesis in a synergistic manner. In view of this, we have investigated VEGF expression in 67 cases of prostate cancer previously characterized for fibroblast growth factor-8 (FGF-8) expression. Cytoplasmic VEGF staining was detected in malignant cells in 45 out of 67 cases. Cytoplasmic staining was found in adjacent stromal cells in 32 cases, being particularly strong around nests of invasive tumour. Positive VEGF immunoreactivity in benign glands was restricted to basal epithelium. A significant association was observed between tumour VEGF and FGF-8 expression (P = 0.004). We identified increased VEGF immunoreactivity in both malignant epithelium and adjacent stroma and both were found to be significantly associated with high tumour stage (P = 0.0047 and P = 0.0002, respectively). VEGF expression also correlated with increased serum PSA levels (P = 0.01). Among positively stained tumours, VEGF expression showed a significant association with Gleason score (P = 0.04). Cases showing positive VEGF immunoreactivity in the stroma had a significantly reduced survival rate compared to those with negative staining (P = 0.037). Cases with tumours expressing both FGF-8 in the malignant epithelium and VEGF in the adjacent stroma had a significantly worse survival rate than those with tumours negative for both, or only expressing one of the two growth factors (P = 0.029). Cox multivariate regression analysis of survival demonstrated that stromal VEGF and tumour stage were the most significant independent predictors of survival. In conclusion, we report for the first time a correlation of both tumour and stromal VEGF expression in prostate cancer with clinical parameters as well as its correlation to FGF-8 expression. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11506499

  5. Know thy neighbor: stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.; Hein, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    Although the stroma within carcinogenic lesions is known to be supportive and responsive to tumors, new data increasingly show that the stroma also has a more active, oncogenic role in tumorigenesis. Stromal cells and their products can transform adjacent tissues in the absence of pre-existing tumor cells by inciting phenotypic and genomic changes in the epithelial cells. The oncogenic action of distinctive stromal components has been demonstrated through a variety of approaches, which provide clues about the cellular pathways involved.

  6. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Stromal Evolution and Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Cammarota, Francesca; Laukkanen, Mikko O.

    2016-01-01

    The study of cancer biology has mainly focused on malignant epithelial cancer cells, although tumors also contain a stromal compartment, which is composed of stem cells, tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs), endothelial cells, immune cells, adipocytes, cytokines, and various types of macromolecules comprising the extracellular matrix (ECM). The tumor stroma develops gradually in response to the needs of epithelial cancer cells during malignant progression initiating from increased local vascular permeability and ending to remodeling of desmoplastic loosely vascularized stromal ECM. The constant bidirectional interaction of epithelial cancer cells with the surrounding microenvironment allows damaged stromal cell usage as a source of nutrients for cancer cells, maintains the stroma renewal thus resembling a wound that does not heal, and affects the characteristics of tumor mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). Although MSCs have been shown to coordinate tumor cell growth, dormancy, migration, invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance, recently they have been successfully used in treatment of hematopoietic malignancies to enhance the effect of total body irradiation-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy. Hence, targeting the stromal elements in combination with conventional chemotherapeutics and usage of MSCs to attenuate graft-versus-host disease may offer new strategies to overcome cancer treatment failure and relapse of the disease. PMID:26798356

  7. Decellularization of human stromal refractive lenticules for corneal tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Yusoff, Nur Zahirah Binte M.; Goh, Tze-Wei; Setiawan, Melina; Lee, Xiao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Chi; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) becomes a procedure to correct myopia. The extracted lenticule can be used for other clinical scenarios. To prepare for allogeneic implantation, lenticule decellularization with preserved optical property, stromal architecture and chemistry would be necessary. We evaluated different methods to decellularize thin human corneal stromal lenticules created by femtosecond laser. Treatment with 0.1% sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) followed by extensive washes was the most efficient protocol to remove cellular and nuclear materials. Empty cell space was found inside the stroma, which displayed aligned collagen fibril architecture similar to native stroma. The SDS-based method was superior to other treatments with hyperosmotic 1.5 M sodium chloride, 0.1% Triton X-100 and nucleases (from 2 to 10 U/ml DNase and RNase) in preserving extracellular matrix content (collagens, glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans). The stromal transparency and light transmittance was indifferent to untreated lenticules. In vitro recellularization showed that the SDS-treated lenticules supported corneal stromal fibroblast growth. In vivo re-implantation into a rabbit stromal pocket further revealed the safety and biocompatibility of SDS-decellularized lenticules without short- and long-term rejection risk. Our results concluded that femtosecond laser-derived human stromal lenticules decellularized by 0.1% SDS could generate a transplantable bioscaffold with native-like stromal architecture and chemistry. PMID:27210519

  8. In vitro characterization of patches of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Roux, Stephan; Bodivit, Gwellaouen; Bartis, Widy; Lebouvier, Angélique; Chevallier, Nathalie; Fialaire-Legendre, Anne; Bierling, Philippe; Rouard, Helene

    2015-02-01

    Stem cells may represent an excellent strategy to improve the healing of skin ulcers. Today the administration mode of stem cells to skin defects remains unsatisfactory. Delivering stem cells with topical treatments represents a new strategy and answering the patients' need. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to improve wound healing of cutaneous lesions and amniotic membrane (AM) is known to represent a natural scaffold for cells. The aim of this study is to develop a tissue-engineered product combining MSC and AM for clinical use. In this work we investigated whether the stromal matrix of intact human AM could constitute a scaffold for human MSC derived from either bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue (AT). For this purpose, clinical-grade AM, MSC, and culture medium were used. We performed experiments of short-term adherence and proliferation for 15 days after the seeding of the cells. Morphological aspects and secretion profiles of MSC onto AM were studied, respectively, by scanning electron microscopy and Luminex analysis. Results demonstrated that the stromal matrix allow the adherence in much greater amount of MSC from BM or AT compared to 2D material. Experiments of proliferation showed that both kinds of MSC could proliferate on the stromal matrix and remain viable 15 days after the seeding of the cells. The 3D analysis of MSC culture demonstrated that both types of MSC invaded the stromal matrix and grew in multiple layers while retaining their fibroblastic morphology. By studying the secretion profile of MSC onto the stromal matrix, we found that both kinds of MSC secrete important cytokines and growth factors for wound healing of cutaneous lesions, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. In conclusion, these results suggest that the stromal matrix of AM seeded with MSC represents a bioactive scaffold that should be evaluated in patients with a nonhealing cutaneous wound.

  9. In Vitro Characterization of Patches of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Stephan; Bodivit, Gwellaouen; Bartis, Widy; Lebouvier, Angélique; Chevallier, Nathalie; Fialaire-Legendre, Anne; Bierling, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells may represent an excellent strategy to improve the healing of skin ulcers. Today the administration mode of stem cells to skin defects remains unsatisfactory. Delivering stem cells with topical treatments represents a new strategy and answering the patients' need. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to improve wound healing of cutaneous lesions and amniotic membrane (AM) is known to represent a natural scaffold for cells. The aim of this study is to develop a tissue-engineered product combining MSC and AM for clinical use. In this work we investigated whether the stromal matrix of intact human AM could constitute a scaffold for human MSC derived from either bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue (AT). For this purpose, clinical-grade AM, MSC, and culture medium were used. We performed experiments of short-term adherence and proliferation for 15 days after the seeding of the cells. Morphological aspects and secretion profiles of MSC onto AM were studied, respectively, by scanning electron microscopy and Luminex analysis. Results demonstrated that the stromal matrix allow the adherence in much greater amount of MSC from BM or AT compared to 2D material. Experiments of proliferation showed that both kinds of MSC could proliferate on the stromal matrix and remain viable 15 days after the seeding of the cells. The 3D analysis of MSC culture demonstrated that both types of MSC invaded the stromal matrix and grew in multiple layers while retaining their fibroblastic morphology. By studying the secretion profile of MSC onto the stromal matrix, we found that both kinds of MSC secrete important cytokines and growth factors for wound healing of cutaneous lesions, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. In conclusion, these results suggest that the stromal matrix of AM seeded with MSC represents a bioactive scaffold that should be evaluated in patients with a nonhealing cutaneous wound. PMID

  10. High EMT Signature Score of Invasive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Cells Correlates with NFκB Driven Colony-Stimulating Factor 2 (CSF2/GM-CSF) Secretion by Neighboring Stromal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Rudisch, Albin; Dewhurst, Matthew Richard; Horga, Luminita Gabriela; Kramer, Nina; Harrer, Nathalie; Dong, Meng; van der Kuip, Heiko; Wernitznig, Andreas; Bernthaler, Andreas; Dolznig, Helmut; Sommergruber, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    We established co-cultures of invasive or non-invasive NSCLC cell lines and various types of fibroblasts (FBs) to more precisely characterize the molecular mechanism of tumor-stroma crosstalk in lung cancer. The HGF-MET-ERK1/2-CREB-axis was shown to contribute to the onset of the invasive phenotype of Calu-1 with HGF being secreted by FBs. Differential expression analysis of the respective mono- and co-cultures revealed an upregulation of NFκB-related genes exclusively in co-cultures with Calu-1. Cytokine Array- and ELISA-based characterization of the "cytokine fingerprints" identified CSF2 (GM-CSF), CXCL1, CXCL6, VEGF, IL6, RANTES and IL8 as being specifically upregulated in various co-cultures. Whilst CXCL6 exhibited a strictly FB-type-specific induction profile regardless of the invasiveness of the tumor cell line, CSF2 was only induced in co-cultures of invasive cell lines regardless of the partnered FB type. These cultures revealed a clear link between the induction of CSF2 and the EMT signature of the cancer cell line. The canonical NFκB signaling in FBs, but not in tumor cells, was shown to be responsible for the induced and constitutive CSF2 expression. In addition to CSF2, cytokine IL6, IL8 and IL1B, and chemokine CXCL1 and CXCL6 transcripts were also shown to be increased in co-cultured FBs. In contrast, their induction was not strictly dependent on the invasiveness of the co-cultured tumor cell. In a multi-reporter assay, additional signaling pathways (AP-1, HIF1-α, KLF4, SP-1 and ELK-1) were found to be induced in FBs co-cultured with Calu-1. Most importantly, no difference was observed in the level of inducibility of these six signaling pathways with regard to the type of FBs used. Finally, upon tumor fibroblast interaction the massive induction of chemokines such as CXCL1 and CXCL6 in FBs might be responsible for increased recruitment of a monocytic cell line (THP-1) in a transwell assay. PMID:25919140

  11. Stromal microcalcification in prostate.

    PubMed

    Muezzinoglu, B; Gurbuz, Y

    2001-06-01

    Prostatic calcification is most commonly encountered as calculus or intraluminal calcifications within atypical small glandular proliferations. This study was undertaken to detect stromal microcalcifications in prostate tissue. All slides from 194 needle biopsies were retrospectively reviewed. Six cases (3.1%) had stromal microcalcifications constantly associated with mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate around the each focus. Association with prostatic glands was not seen in any of the microcalcification foci. Three cases had simultaneous adenocarcinoma and one had high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, all of which were apart from the microcalcification foci. In conclusion, stromal microcalcification is a dystrophic, inflammation-mediated, benign process.

  12. Stromal-cell and cancer-cell exosomes leading the metastatic exodus for the promised niche.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are thought to play an important role in metastasis. Luga and colleagues have described the production of exosomes by stromal cells such as cancer-associated fibroblasts that are taken up by breast cancer cells and are then loaded with Wnt 11, which is associated with stimulation of the invasiveness and metastasis of the breast cancer cells. Previous studies have shown that exosomes produced by breast cancer cells are taken up by stromal fibroblasts and other stromal cells, suggesting that exosomes are agents of cross-talk between cancer and stromal cells to stimulate metastasis. Imaging of exosomes by labeling with fluorescent proteins will enlighten the process by which exosomes enhance metastasis, including premetastatic niche formation.

  13. Reversing the aging stromal phenotype prevents carcinoma initiation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Davina A; Travers, Jeffrey B; Machado, Christiane; Somani, Ally-Khan; Spandau, Dan F

    2011-04-01

    The accumulation of senescent stromal cells in aging tissue changes the local microenvironment from normal to a state similar to chronic inflammation. This inflammatory microenvironment can stimulate the proliferation of epithelial cells containing DNA mutations which can ultimately lead to cancer. Using geriatric skin as a model, we demonstrated that senescent fibroblasts also alter how epithelial keratinocytes respond to genotoxic stress, due to the silencing of IGF-1 expression in geriatric fibroblasts. These data indicate that in addition to promoting epithelial tumor growth, senescent fibroblasts also can promote carcinogenic initiation. We hypothesized that commonly used therapeutic stromal wounding therapies can reduce the percentage of senescent fibroblasts and consequently prevent the formation of keratinocytes proliferating with DNA mutations following acute genotoxic (UVB) stress. Sun-protected skin on the lower back of geriatric human volunteers was wounded by dermabrasion and the skin was allowed to heal for three months. In geriatric skin, we found that dermabrasion wounding decreases the proportion of senescent fibroblasts found in geriatric dermis, increases the expression of IGF-1, and restores the appropriate UVB response to epidermal keratinocytes in geriatric skin. Therefore, dermal rejuvenation therapies may play a significant role in preventing the initiation of skin cancer in geriatric patients. PMID:21515933

  14. Reversing the aging stromal phenotype prevents carcinoma initiation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Davina A; Travers, Jeffrey B; Machado, Christiane; Somani, Ally-Khan; Spandau, Dan F

    2011-04-01

    The accumulation of senescent stromal cells in aging tissue changes the local microenvironment from normal to a state similar to chronic inflammation. This inflammatory microenvironment can stimulate the proliferation of epithelial cells containing DNA mutations which can ultimately lead to cancer. Using geriatric skin as a model, we demonstrated that senescent fibroblasts also alter how epithelial keratinocytes respond to genotoxic stress, due to the silencing of IGF-1 expression in geriatric fibroblasts. These data indicate that in addition to promoting epithelial tumor growth, senescent fibroblasts also can promote carcinogenic initiation. We hypothesized that commonly used therapeutic stromal wounding therapies can reduce the percentage of senescent fibroblasts and consequently prevent the formation of keratinocytes proliferating with DNA mutations following acute genotoxic (UVB) stress. Sun-protected skin on the lower back of geriatric human volunteers was wounded by dermabrasion and the skin was allowed to heal for three months. In geriatric skin, we found that dermabrasion wounding decreases the proportion of senescent fibroblasts found in geriatric dermis, increases the expression of IGF-1, and restores the appropriate UVB response to epidermal keratinocytes in geriatric skin. Therefore, dermal rejuvenation therapies may play a significant role in preventing the initiation of skin cancer in geriatric patients.

  15. Targeting stromal androgen receptor suppresses prolactin-driven benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    PubMed

    Lai, Kuo-Pao; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Fang, Lei-Ya; Izumi, Kouji; Lo, Chi-Wen; Wood, Ronald; Kindblom, Jon; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-10-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction plays a pivotal role to mediate the normal prostate growth, the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer development. Until now, the stromal androgen receptor (AR) functions in the BPH development, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we used a genetic knockout approach to ablate stromal fibromuscular (fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) AR in a probasin promoter-driven prolactin transgenic mouse model (Pb-PRL tg mice) that could spontaneously develop prostate hyperplasia to partially mimic human BPH development. We found Pb-PRL tg mice lacking stromal fibromuscular AR developed smaller prostates, with more marked changes in the dorsolateral prostate lobes with less proliferation index. Mechanistically, prolactin mediated hyperplastic prostate growth involved epithelial-stromal interaction through epithelial prolactin/prolactin receptor signals to regulate granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor expression to facilitate stromal cell growth via sustaining signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 activity. Importantly, the stromal fibromuscular AR could modulate such epithelial-stromal interacting signals. Targeting stromal fibromuscular AR with the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), led to the reduction of prostate size, which could be used in future therapy.

  16. Next generation sequencing-based expression profiling identifies signatures from benign stromal proliferations that define stromal components of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Multiple studies have shown that the tumor microenvironment (TME) of carcinomas can play an important role in the initiation, progression, and metastasis of cancer. Here we test the hypothesis that specific benign fibrous soft tissue tumor gene expression profiles may represent distinct stromal fibroblastic reaction types that occur in different breast cancers. The discovered stromal profiles could classify breast cancer based on the type of stromal reaction patterns in the TME. Methods Next generation sequencing-based gene expression profiling (3SEQ) was performed on formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples of 10 types of fibrous soft tissue tumors. We determined the extent to which these signatures could identify distinct subsets of breast cancers in four publicly available breast cancer datasets. Results A total of 53 fibrous tumors were sequenced by 3SEQ with an average of 29 million reads per sample. Both the gene signatures derived from elastofibroma (EF) and fibroma of tendon sheath (FOTS) demonstrated robust outcome results for survival in the four breast cancer datasets. The breast cancers positive for the EF signature (20-33% of the cohort) demonstrated significantly better outcome for survival. In contrast, the FOTS signature-positive breast cancers (11-35% of the cohort) had a worse outcome. Conclusions We defined and validated two new stromal signatures in breast cancer (EF and FOTS), which are significantly associated with prognosis. Our group has previously identified novel cancer stromal gene expression signatures associated with outcome differences in breast cancer by gene expression profiling of three soft tissue tumors, desmoid-type fibromatosis (DTF), solitary fibrous tumor (SFT), and tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT/CSF1), as surrogates for stromal expression patterns. By combining the stromal signatures of EF and FOTS, with our previously identified DTF and TGCT/CSF1 signatures we can now characterize clinically

  17. Tumor-associated stromal cells as key contributors to the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bussard, Karen M; Mutkus, Lysette; Stumpf, Kristina; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Marini, Frank C

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a heterogeneous population of cells consisting of the tumor bulk plus supporting cells. It is becoming increasingly evident that these supporting cells are recruited by cancer cells from nearby endogenous host stroma and promote events such as tumor angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, as well as mediate mechanisms of therapeutic resistance. In addition, recruited stromal cells range in type and include vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, adipocytes, fibroblasts, and bone-marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. During normal wound healing and inflammatory processes, local stromal cells change their phenotype to become that of reactive stroma. Under certain conditions, however, tumor cells can co-opt these reactive stromal cells and further transition them into tumor-associated stromal cells (TASCs). These TASCs express higher levels of proteins, including alpha-smooth muscle actin, fibroblast activating protein, and matrix metalloproteinases, compared with their normal, non-reactive counterparts. TASCs are also known to secrete many pro-tumorigenic factors, including IL-6, IL-8, stromal-derived factor-1 alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, tenascin-C, and matrix metalloproteinases, among others, which recruit additional tumor and pro-tumorigenic cells to the developing microenvironment. Here, we review the current literature pertaining to the origins of recruited host stroma, contributions toward tumor progression, tumor-associated stromal cells, and mechanisms of crosstalk between endogenous host stroma and tumor cells. PMID:27515302

  18. Ex Vivo Propagation of Human Corneal Stromal "Activated Keratocytes" for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Yusoff, Nur Zahirah Binte M; Kadaba, Aishwarya; Tian, Dechao; Myint, Htoon Hla; Beuerman, Roger W; Zhou, Lei; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus is a corneal disorder characterized by a thinning of stromal tissue, and the affected patients have induced astigmatism and visual impairment. It is associated with a loss of corneal stromal keratocytes (CSKs). Hence, reconstructing stromal tissue with autologous CSK replacement can be a viable alternative to corneal transplantation, which is restricted by the global donor material shortage and graft rejection. Human CSKs are normally quiescent and express unique markers, like aldehyde dehydrogenases and keratocan. In serum culture, they proliferate, but lose their characteristic phenotype and become stromal fibroblasts. Here we report a novel culture cocktail to ex vivo propagate and maintain CSKs. Primary human CSKs were obtained from adult donors and cultured with soluble human amnion stromal extract (ASE), rho-associated coiled-coil-forming protein serine/threonine kinase inhibitor Y-27632, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (collectively named as ERI). Protein profiling using mass spectrometry followed by MetaCore™ pathway analysis predicted that ASE proteins might participate in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling and fibroblast development, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodeling, and immune response. In culture with 0.5% fetal bovine serum and ERI, the population of "activated keratocytes" was expanded. They had much lowered expression of both keratocyte and fibroblast markers, suppressed TGF-β-mediated Smad2/3 activation, and lacked fibroblast-mediated collagen contractibility. These "activated keratoctyes" could be propagated for six to eight passages ex vivo, and they regained CSK-specific dendritic morphology and gene marker expression, including aldehyde dehydrogenases, lumican, and keratocan biosynthesis, expression, and secretion when returned to serum-depleted ERI condition. This novel cocktail maintained human CSKs in both adherent and suspension cultures with proper keratocyte features and without the

  19. Ex Vivo Propagation of Human Corneal Stromal "Activated Keratocytes" for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Yusoff, Nur Zahirah Binte M; Kadaba, Aishwarya; Tian, Dechao; Myint, Htoon Hla; Beuerman, Roger W; Zhou, Lei; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus is a corneal disorder characterized by a thinning of stromal tissue, and the affected patients have induced astigmatism and visual impairment. It is associated with a loss of corneal stromal keratocytes (CSKs). Hence, reconstructing stromal tissue with autologous CSK replacement can be a viable alternative to corneal transplantation, which is restricted by the global donor material shortage and graft rejection. Human CSKs are normally quiescent and express unique markers, like aldehyde dehydrogenases and keratocan. In serum culture, they proliferate, but lose their characteristic phenotype and become stromal fibroblasts. Here we report a novel culture cocktail to ex vivo propagate and maintain CSKs. Primary human CSKs were obtained from adult donors and cultured with soluble human amnion stromal extract (ASE), rho-associated coiled-coil-forming protein serine/threonine kinase inhibitor Y-27632, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (collectively named as ERI). Protein profiling using mass spectrometry followed by MetaCore™ pathway analysis predicted that ASE proteins might participate in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling and fibroblast development, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodeling, and immune response. In culture with 0.5% fetal bovine serum and ERI, the population of "activated keratocytes" was expanded. They had much lowered expression of both keratocyte and fibroblast markers, suppressed TGF-β-mediated Smad2/3 activation, and lacked fibroblast-mediated collagen contractibility. These "activated keratoctyes" could be propagated for six to eight passages ex vivo, and they regained CSK-specific dendritic morphology and gene marker expression, including aldehyde dehydrogenases, lumican, and keratocan biosynthesis, expression, and secretion when returned to serum-depleted ERI condition. This novel cocktail maintained human CSKs in both adherent and suspension cultures with proper keratocyte features and without the

  20. Stromal myofibroblasts in focal reactive overgrowths of the gingiva.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Leonardo Silveira; Gonçalves, Fernanda da Silva; Costa e Silva, Edson; Zenóbio, Elton Gonçalves; Souza, Paulo Eduardo Alencar; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello

    2012-01-01

    Focal reactive overgrowths are among the most common oral mucosal lesions. The gingiva is a significant site affected by these lesions, when triggered by chronic inflammation in response to microorganisms in dental plaque. Myofibroblasts are differentiated fibroblasts that actively participate in diseases characterized by tissue fibrosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of stromal myofibroblasts in the main focal reactive overgrowths of the gingiva: focal fibrous hyperplasia (FFH), peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF), pyogenic granuloma (PG), and peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG). A total of 10 FFHs, 10 POFs, 10 PGs, and 10 PGCGs from archival specimens were evaluated. Samples of gingival mucosa were used as negative controls for stromal myofibroblasts. Oral squamous cell carcinoma samples, in which stromal myofibroblasts have been previously detected, were used as positive controls. Myofibroblasts were identified by immunohistochemical detection of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-sma). Myofibroblast immunostaining was qualitatively classified as negative, scanty, or dense. Differences in the presence of myofibroblasts among FFH, POF, PG, and PGCG were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Stromal myofibroblasts were not detected in FFH, POF, PG, or PGCG. Consequently, no differences were observed in the presence of myofibroblasts among FFH, POF, PG, or PGCG (p > 0.05). In conclusion, stromal myofibroblasts were not detected in the focal reactive overgrowths of the gingiva that were evaluated, suggesting that these cells do not play a significant role in their pathogenesis.

  1. The corneal fibrosis response to epithelial-stromal injury.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Andre A M; Santhanam, Abirami; Wu, Jiahui; Singh, Vivek; Wilson, Steven E

    2016-01-01

    The corneal wound healing response, including the development of stromal opacity in some eyes, is a process that often leads to scarring that occurs after injury, surgery or infection to the cornea. Immediately after epithelial and stromal injury, a complex sequence of processes contributes to wound repair and regeneration of normal corneal structure and function. In some corneas, however, often depending on the type and extent of injury, the response may also lead to the development of mature vimentin+ α-smooth muscle actin+ desmin+ myofibroblasts. Myofibroblasts are specialized fibroblastic cells generated in the cornea from keratocyte-derived or bone marrow-derived precursor cells. The disorganized extracellular matrix components secreted by myofibroblasts, in addition to decreased expression of corneal crystallins in these cells, are central biological processes that result in corneal stromal fibrosis associated with opacity or "haze". Several factors are associated with myofibroblast generation and haze development after PRK surgery in rabbits, a reproducible model of scarring, including the amount of tissue ablated, which may relate to the extent of keratocyte apoptosis in the early response to injury, irregularity of stromal surface after surgery, and changes in corneal stromal proteoglycans, but normal regeneration of the epithelial basement membrane (EBM) appears to be a critical factor determining whether a cornea heals with relative transparency or vision-limiting stromal opacity. Structural and functional abnormalities of the regenerated EBM facilitate prolonged entry of epithelium-derived growth factors such as transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) into the stroma that both drive development of mature myofibroblasts from precursor cells and lead to persistence of the cells in the anterior stroma. A major discovery that has contributed to our understanding of haze development is that keratocytes and corneal

  2. Determination of stromal signatures in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    West, Robert B; Nuyten, Dimitry S A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Nielsen, Torsten O; Corless, Christopher L; Rubin, Brian P; Montgomery, Kelli; Zhu, Shirley; Patel, Rajiv; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Goldblum, John R; Brown, Patrick O; van de Vijver, Marc; van de Rijn, Matt

    2005-06-01

    Many soft tissue tumors recapitulate features of normal connective tissue. We hypothesize that different types of fibroblastic tumors are representative of different populations of fibroblastic cells or different activation states of these cells. We examined two tumors with fibroblastic features, solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) and desmoid-type fibromatosis (DTF), by DNA microarray analysis and found that they have very different expression profiles, including significant differences in their patterns of expression of extracellular matrix genes and growth factors. Using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization on a tissue microarray, we found that genes specific for these two tumors have mutually specific expression in the stroma of nonneoplastic tissues. We defined a set of 786 gene spots whose pattern of expression distinguishes SFT from DTF. In an analysis of DNA microarray gene expression data from 295 previously published breast carcinomas, we found that expression of this gene set defined two groups of breast carcinomas with significant differences in overall survival. One of the groups had a favorable outcome and was defined by the expression of DTF genes. The other group of tumors had a poor prognosis and showed variable expression of genes enriched for SFT type. Our findings suggest that the host stromal response varies significantly among carcinomas and that gene expression patterns characteristic of soft tissue tumors can be used to discover new markers for normal connective tissue cells.

  3. Distinct effects of SIRT1 in cancer and stromal cells on tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Choi, Yong-Joon; Jin, Peng; Yoon, Haejin; Chun, Yang-Sook; Shin, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Ja-Eun; Park, Jong-Wan

    2016-04-26

    The lysyl deacetylase SIRT1 acts as a metabolic sensor in adjusting metabolic imbalance. To explore the role of SIRT1 in tumor-stroma interplay, we designed an in vivo tumor model using SIRT1-transgenic mice. B16F10 mouse melanoma grew more quickly in SIRT1-transgenic mice than in wild-type mice, whereas SIRT1-overexpressing one grew slowly in both mice. Of human tumors, SIRT1 expression in stromal fibroblasts was found to correlate with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer. B16F10 and human ovarian cancer (SKOV3 and SNU840) cells were more proliferative in co-culture with SIRT1-overexpressiong fibroblasts. In contrast, SIRT1 within cancer cells has a negative effect on cell proliferation. In conditioned media from SIRT1-overexpressing fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) was identified in cytokine arrays to be secreted from fibroblasts SIRT1-dependently. Fibroblast-derived MMP3 stimulated cancer cell proliferation, and such a role of MMP3 was also demonstrated in cancer/fibroblast co-grafts. In conclusion, SIRT1 plays differential roles in cancer and stromal cells. SIRT1 in stromal cells promotes cancer growth by producing MMP3, whereas SIRT1 in cancer cells inhibits growth via an intracellular event. The present study provides a basis for setting new anticancer strategies targeting SIRT1. PMID:26992208

  4. Distinct effects of SIRT1 in cancer and stromal cells on tumor promotion

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Choi, Yong-Joon; Jin, Peng; Yoon, Haejin; Chun, Yang-Sook; Shin, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Ja-Eun; Park, Jong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    The lysyl deacetylase SIRT1 acts as a metabolic sensor in adjusting metabolic imbalance. To explore the role of SIRT1 in tumor-stroma interplay, we designed an in vivo tumor model using SIRT1-transgenic mice. B16F10 mouse melanoma grew more quickly in SIRT1-transgenic mice than in wild-type mice, whereas SIRT1-overexpressing one grew slowly in both mice. Of human tumors, SIRT1 expression in stromal fibroblasts was found to correlate with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer. B16F10 and human ovarian cancer (SKOV3 and SNU840) cells were more proliferative in co-culture with SIRT1-overexpressiong fibroblasts. In contrast, SIRT1 within cancer cells has a negative effect on cell proliferation. In conditioned media from SIRT1-overexpressing fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) was identified in cytokine arrays to be secreted from fibroblasts SIRT1-dependently. Fibroblast-derived MMP3 stimulated cancer cell proliferation, and such a role of MMP3 was also demonstrated in cancer/fibroblast co-grafts. In conclusion, SIRT1 plays differential roles in cancer and stromal cells. SIRT1 in stromal cells promotes cancer growth by producing MMP3, whereas SIRT1 in cancer cells inhibits growth via an intracellular event. The present study provides a basis for setting new anticancer strategies targeting SIRT1. PMID:26992208

  5. Combined CSL and p53 downregulation promotes cancer-associated fibroblast activation

    PubMed Central

    Procopio, Maria-Giuseppina; Laszlo, Csaba; Labban, Dania Al; Kim, Dong Eun; Bordignon, Pino; Jo, Seunghee; Goruppi, Sandro; Menietti, Elena; Ostano, Paola; Ala, Ugo; Provero, Paolo; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Neel, Victor; Kilarski, Witek; Swartz, Melody A.; Brisken, Cathrin; Lefort, Karine; Dotto, G. Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Stromal fibroblast senescence has been linked to aging-associated cancer risk. However, density and proliferation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are frequently increased. Loss or down-modulation of the Notch effector CSL/RBP-Jκ in dermal fibroblasts is sufficient for CAF activation and ensuing keratinocyte-derived tumors. We report that CSL silencing induces senescence of primary fibroblasts from dermis, oral mucosa, breast and lung. CSL functions in these cells as direct repressor of multiple senescence- and CAF-effector genes. It also physically interacts with p53, repressing its activity. CSL is down-modulated in stromal fibroblasts of premalignant skin actinic keratosis lesions and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), while p53 expression and function is down-modulated only in the latter, with paracrine FGF signaling as likely culprit. Concomitant loss of CSL and p53 overcomes fibroblast senescence, enhances expression of CAF effectors and promotes stromal and cancer cell expansion. The findings support a CAF activation/stromal co-evolution model under convergent CSL/p53 control. PMID:26302407

  6. Fibroblasts contribute to melanoma tumour growth and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Flach, Edward H.; Rebecca, Vito W.; Herlyn, Meenhard; Smalley, Keiran S. M.; Anderson, Alexander R. A.

    2011-01-01

    The role of tumour-stromal interactions in progression is generally well accepted but their role in initiation or treatment is less well understood. It is now generally agreed that rather than consisting solely of malignant cells, tumours consist of a complex dynamic mixture of cancer cells, host fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells that interact with each other and micro-environmental factors to drive tumour progression. We are particularly interested in stromal cells (for example fibroblasts) and stromal factors (for example fibronectin) as important players in tumour progression since they have also been implicated in drug resistance. Here we develop an integrated approach to understand the role of such stromal cells and factors in the growth and maintenance of tumours as well as their potential impact on treatment resistance, specifically in application to melanoma. Using a suite of experimental assays we show that melanoma cells can stimulate the recruitment of fibroblasts and activate them, resulting in melanoma cell growth by providing both structural (extra-cellular matrix proteins) and chemical support (growth factors). Motivated by these experimental results we construct a compartment model and use it to investigate the roles of both stromal activation and tumour aggressiveness in melanoma growth and progression. We utilise this model to investigate the role fibroblasts might play in melanoma treatment resistance and the clinically observed flare phenomena that is seen when a patient, who appears resistant to a targeted drug, is removed from that treatment. Our model makes the unexpected prediction that targeted therapies may actually hasten tumour progression once resistance has occurred. If confirmed experimentally, this provocative prediction may bring important new insights into how drug resistance could be managed clinically. PMID:22067046

  7. Fibroblast nemosis induces angiogenic responses of endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Enzerink, Anna; Rantanen, Ville; Vaheri, Antti

    2010-03-10

    Increasing evidence points to a central link between inflammation and activation of the stroma, especially of fibroblasts therein. However, the mechanisms leading to such activation mostly remain undescribed. We have previously characterized a novel type of fibroblast activation (nemosis) where clustered fibroblasts upregulated the production of cyclooxygenase-2, secretion of prostaglandins, proteinases, chemotactic cytokines, and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and displayed activated nuclear factor-{kappa}B. Now we show that nemosis drives angiogenic responses of endothelial cells. In addition to HGF, nemotic fibroblasts secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and conditioned medium from spheroids promoted sprouting and networking of human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVEC). The response was partly inhibited by function-blocking antibodies against HGF and VEGF. Conditioned nemotic fibroblast medium promoted closure of HUVEC and human dermal microvascular endothelial cell monolayer wounds, by increasing the motility of the endothelial cells. Wound closure in HUVEC cells was partly inhibited by the antibodies against HGF. The stromal microenvironment regulates wound healing responses and often promotes tumorigenesis. Nemosis offers clues to the activation process of stromal fibroblasts and provides a model to study the part they play in angiogenesis-related conditions, as well as possibilities for therapeutical approaches desiring angiogenesis in tissue.

  8. Inhibition of tumor-stromal interaction through HGF/Met signaling by valproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yohsuke; Motoki, Takahiro; Kubota, Satoshi; Takigawa, Masaharu; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Gohda, Eiichi

    2008-02-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which is produced by surrounding stromal cells, including fibroblasts and endothelial cells, has been shown to be a significant factor responsible for cancer cell invasion mediated by tumor-stromal interactions. We found in this study that the anti-tumor agent valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, strongly inhibited tumor-stromal interaction. VPA inhibited HGF production in fibroblasts induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} without any appreciable cytotoxic effect. Other HDAC inhibitors, including butyric acid and trichostatin A (TSA), showed similar inhibitory effects on HGF production stimulated by various inducers. Up-regulations of HGF gene expression induced by PMA and EGF were also suppressed by VPA and TSA. Furthermore, VPA significantly inhibited HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. VPA, however, did not affect the increases in phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in HGF-treated HepG2 cells. These results demonstrated that VPA inhibited two critical processes of tumor-stromal interaction, induction of fibroblastic HGF production and HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 cells, and suggest that those activities serve for other anti-tumor mechanisms of VPA besides causing proliferation arrest, differentiation, and/or apoptosis of tumor cells.

  9. Identification of a New Stromal Cell Type Involved in the Regulation of Inflamed B Cell Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Mionnet, Cyrille; Mondor, Isabelle; Jorquera, Audrey; Loosveld, Marie; Maurizio, Julien; Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Ruddle, Nancy H.; Nowak, Jonathan; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Luche, Hervé; Bajénoff, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Lymph node (LN) stromal cells provide survival signals and adhesive substrata to lymphocytes. During an immune response, B cell follicles enlarge, questioning how LN stromal cells manage these cellular demands. Herein, we used a murine fate mapping system to describe a new stromal cell type that resides in the T cell zone of resting LNs. We demonstrated that upon inflammation, B cell follicles progressively trespassed into the adjacent T cell zone and surrounded and converted these stromal cells into CXCL13 secreting cells that in return delineated the new boundaries of the growing follicle. Acute B cell ablation in inflamed LNs abolished CXCL13 secretion in these cells, while LT-β deficiency in B cells drastically affected this conversion. Altogether, we reveal the existence of a dormant stromal cell subset that can be functionally awakened by B cells to delineate the transient boundaries of their expanding territories upon inflammation. PMID:24130458

  10. Acidic extracellular pH of tumors induces octamer-binding transcription factor 4 expression in murine fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Som, Avik; Bloch, Sharon; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT-4) is an important marker of cellular de-differentiation that can be induced by environmental stressors, such as acidity. Here we demonstrate that chronic acidic stress in solid tumors induced OCT-4 expression in fibroblasts and other stromal cells in four tumor models. The results have implications for how tumors utilize pH modulation to recruit associated stromal cells, induce partial reprogramming of tumor-associated stromal cells, and respond to therapy. PMID:27302093

  11. Tumor-associated fibroblasts predominantly come from local and not circulating precursors.

    PubMed

    Arina, Ainhoa; Idel, Christian; Hyjek, Elizabeth M; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Wang, Ying; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Schreiber, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Fibroblasts are common cell types in cancer stroma and lay down collagen required for survival and growth of cancer cells. Although some cancer therapy strategies target tumor fibroblasts, their origin remains controversial. Multiple publications suggest circulating mesenchymal precursors as a source of tumor-associated fibroblasts. However, we show by three independent approaches that tumor fibroblasts derive primarily from local, sessile precursors. First, transplantable tumors developing in a mouse expressing green fluorescent reporter protein (EGFP) under control of the type I collagen (Col-I) promoter (COL-EGFP) had green stroma, whereas we could not find COL-EGFP(+) cells in tumors developing in the parabiotic partner lacking the fluorescent reporter. Lack of incorporation of COL-EGFP(+) cells from the circulation into tumors was confirmed in parabiotic pairs of COL-EGFP mice and transgenic mice developing autochthonous intestinal adenomas. Second, transplantable tumors developing in chimeric mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells from COL-EGFP mice very rarely showed stromal fibroblasts expressing EGFP. Finally, cancer cells injected under full-thickness COL-EGFP skin grafts transplanted in nonreporter mice developed into tumors containing green stromal cells. Using multicolor in vivo confocal microscopy, we found that Col-I-expressing fibroblasts constituted approximately one-third of the stromal mass and formed a continuous sheet wrapping the tumor vessels. In summary, tumors form their fibroblastic stroma predominantly from precursors present in the local tumor microenvironment, whereas the contribution of bone marrow-derived circulating precursors is rare.

  12. The reverse Warburg effect: aerobic glycolysis in cancer associated fibroblasts and the tumor stroma.

    PubMed

    Pavlides, Stephanos; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Castello-Cros, Remedios; Flomenberg, Neal; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Frank, Philippe G; Casimiro, Mathew C; Wang, Chenguang; Fortina, Paolo; Addya, Sankar; Pestell, Richard G; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2009-12-01

    Here, we propose a new model for understanding the Warburg effect in tumor metabolism. Our hypothesis is that epithelial cancer cells induce the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis) in neighboring stromal fibroblasts. These cancer-associated fibroblasts, then undergo myo-fibroblastic differentiation, and secrete lactate and pyruvate (energy metabolites resulting from aerobic glycolysis). Epithelial cancer cells could then take up these energy-rich metabolites and use them in the mitochondrial TCA cycle, thereby promoting efficient energy production (ATP generation via oxidative phosphorylation), resulting in a higher proliferative capacity. In this alternative model of tumorigenesis, the epithelial cancer cells instruct the normal stroma to transform into a wound-healing stroma, providing the necessary energy-rich micro-environment for facilitating tumor growth and angiogenesis. In essence, the fibroblastic tumor stroma would directly feed the epithelial cancer cells, in a type of host-parasite relationship. We have termed this new idea the "Reverse Warburg Effect." In this scenario, the epithelial tumor cells "corrupt" the normal stroma, turning it into a factory for the production of energy-rich metabolites. This alternative model is still consistent with Warburg's original observation that tumors show a metabolic shift towards aerobic glycolysis. In support of this idea, unbiased proteomic analysis and transcriptional profiling of a new model of cancer-associated fibroblasts (caveolin-1 (Cav-1) deficient stromal cells), shows the upregulation of both (1) myo-fibroblast markers and (2) glycolytic enzymes, under normoxic conditions. We validated the expression of these proteins in the fibroblastic stroma of human breast cancer tissues that lack stromal Cav-1. Importantly, a loss of stromal Cav-1 in human breast cancers is associated with tumor recurrence, metastasis, and poor clinical outcome. Thus, an absence of stromal Cav-1 may be a biomarker for the "Reverse

  13. Adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  14. Marginal reticular cells: a stromal subset directly descended from the lymphoid tissue organizer

    PubMed Central

    Katakai, Tomoya

    2012-01-01

    The architecture of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) is supported by several non-hematopoietic stromal cells. Currently it is established that two distinct stromal subsets, follicular dendritic cells and fibroblastic reticular cells, play crucial roles in the formation of tissue compartments within SLOs, i.e., the follicle and T zone, respectively. Although stromal cells in the anlagen are essential for SLO development, the relationship between these primordial cells and the subsets in adulthood remains poorly understood. In addition, the roles of stromal cells in the entry of antigens into the compartments through some tissue structures peculiar to SLOs remain unclear. A recently identified stromal subset, marginal reticular cells (MRCs), covers the margin of SLOs that are primarily located in the outer edge of follicles and construct a unique reticulum. MRCs are closely associated with specialized endothelial or epithelial structures for antigen transport. The similarities in marker expression profiles and successive localization during development suggest that MRCs directly descend from organizer stromal cells in the anlagen. Therefore, MRCs are thought to be a crucial stromal component for the organization and function of SLOs. PMID:22807928

  15. Marked reduction of alcohol dehydrogenase in keratoconus corneal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kanoff, J.M.; Shankardas, J.; Dimitrijevich, S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To identify differentially expressed genes in keratoconus (KC) corneal fibroblasts. Methods Stromal keratocytes (having a fibroblast morphology) from KC keratoplasty specimens and eye bank donor corneas were isolated and expanded using a serum containing medium. RNA was isolated from three KC fibroblast cultures and five eye bank donor cornea fibroblast cultures. The targets from the cultured fibroblasts were hybridized to the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Western blot analyses of cell lysates were performed to examine protein levels of interest in the two groups. Protein levels of select differentially expressed genes were further examined by immunohistochemistry. Keratocyte staining of archived KC keratoplasty specimens were graded using a 0 to 3+ scale and compared to five archived whole globes having normal corneas as well as to 10 Fuchs’ dystrophy keratoplasty specimens. Results Microarray analysis revealed up to a 212 fold reduction in the mRNA levels of alcohol dehydrogenase (class 1) beta polypeptide (ADH1B) in KC fibroblasts (p=0.04). Decreased alcohol dehydrogenase in KC fibroblasts was confirmed by western blot analysis of early passage primary keratocyte cell lysates. Immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) against human liver alcohol dehydrogenase revealed a dramatic difference in protein staining in the keratocytes of the KC group compared to the normal cornea group. Immunohistochemistry also showed decreased immunostaining against alcohol dehydrogenase in the KC stromal sections compared to those obtained from Fuchs’ endothelial corneal dystrophy samples. Conclusions Decreased alcohol dehydrogenase in KC corneal fibroblasts represents a strong marker and possible mediator of keratoconus. PMID:19365573

  16. Epigenetic Classification of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Danilo Candido; Ferreira, Marcelo R P; Franzen, Julia; Weidner, Carola I; Frobel, Joana; Zenke, Martin; Costa, Ivan G; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    Standardization of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is hampered by the lack of a precise definition for these cell preparations; for example, there are no molecular markers to discern MSCs and fibroblasts. In this study, we followed the hypothesis that specific DNA methylation (DNAm) patterns can assist classification of MSCs. We utilized 190 DNAm profiles to address the impact of tissue of origin, donor age, replicative senescence, and serum supplements on the epigenetic makeup. Based on this, we elaborated a simple epigenetic signature based on two CpG sites to classify MSCs and fibroblasts, referred to as the Epi-MSC-Score. Another two-CpG signature can distinguish between MSCs from bone marrow and adipose tissue, referred to as the Epi-Tissue-Score. These assays were validated by site-specific pyrosequencing analysis in 34 primary cell preparations. Furthermore, even individual subclones of MSCs were correctly classified by our epigenetic signatures. In summary, we propose an alternative concept to use DNAm patterns for molecular definition of cell preparations, and our epigenetic scores facilitate robust and cost-effective quality control of MSC cultures. PMID:26862701

  17. Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts Are a Promising Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Togo, Shinsaku; Polanska, Urszula M.; Horimoto, Yoshiya; Orimo, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Human carcinomas frequently exhibit significant stromal reactions such as the so-called “desmoplastic stroma” or “reactive stroma”, which is characterised by the existence of large numbers of stromal cells and extracellular matrix proteins. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), which are rich in activated fibroblast populations exemplified by myofibroblasts, are among the predominant cell types present within the tumour-associated stroma. Increased numbers of stromal myofibroblasts are often associated with high-grade malignancies with poor prognoses in humans. CAF myofibroblasts possess abilities to promote primary tumour development, growth and progression by stimulating the processes of neoangiogenesis as well as tumour cell proliferation, survival, migration and invasion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that CAFs serve as a niche supporting the metastatic colonisation of disseminated carcinoma cells in distant organs. Their contribution to primary and secondary malignancies makes these fibroblasts a potential therapeutic target and they also appear to be relevant to the development of drug resistance and tumour recurrence. This review summarises our current knowledge of tumour-promoting CAFs and discusses the therapeutic feasibility of targeting these cells as well as disrupting heterotypic interactions with other cell types in tumours that may improve the efficacy of current anti-tumour therapies. PMID:24216702

  18. Catecholamine regulation of stromal precursors and hemopoietic stem cells in cytostatic myelosuppression.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Khmelevskaya, E S; Skurikhin, E G; Pershina, O V; Andreeva, T V; Ermakova, N N

    2012-04-01

    Effects of a sympatholytic drug on bone marrow stromal and hemopoietic precursors were studied on the model of cyclophosphamide-induced myelosuppression. Sympatholytic treatment increased the content of hemopoietic stem cells of different classes in the bone marrow. Selective stimulation of differentiation of polypotent precursors into granulocyte-macrophage precursors was noted. Acceleration of proliferation and maturation of granulocytic precursors was observed at later terms during regeneration of the hemopoietic tissue. The sympatholytic inhibited proliferation of stromal precursors and reduced feeder activity of fibroblasts for granulocyte precursors.

  19. A novel bacterial artificial chromosome-transgenic podoplanin-cre mouse targets lymphoid organ stromal cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Onder, Lucas; Scandella, Elke; Chai, Qian; Firner, Sonja; Mayer, Christian T; Sparwasser, Tim; Thiel, Volker; Rülicke, Thomas; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Stromal cells provide the structural foundation of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs), and regulate leukocyte access and cell migration within the different compartments of spleen and lymph nodes (LNs). Furthermore, several stromal cell subsets have been implied in shaping of T cell responses through direct presentation of antigen. Despite significant gain of knowledge on the biology of different SLO-resident stromal cell subsets, their molecular and functional characterization has remained incomplete. To address this need, we have generated a bacterial artificial chromosome-transgenic mouse model that utilizes the podoplanin (pdpn) promoter to express the Cre-recombinase exclusively in stromal cells of SLOs. The characterization of the Pdpn-Cre mouse revealed transgene expression in subsets of fibroblastic reticular cells and lymphatic endothelial cells in LNs. Furthermore, the transgene facilitated the identification of a novel splenic perivascular stromal cell subpopulation that forms web-like structures around central arterioles. Assessment of the in vivo antigen expression in the genetically tagged stromal cells in Pdpn-Cre mice revealed activation of both MHC I and II-restricted TCR transgenic T cells. Taken together, stromal pdpn-Cre expression is well-suited to characterize the phenotype and to dissect the function of lymphoid organ stromal cells.

  20. Stromal interactions as regulators of tumor growth and therapeutic response: A potential target for photodynamic therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Celli, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    It has become increasingly widely recognized that the stroma plays several vital roles in tumor growth and development and that tumor-stroma interactions can in many cases account poor therapeutic response. Inspired by an emerging body of literature, we consider the potential role of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for targeting interactions with stromal fibroblasts and mechano-sensitive signaling with the extracellular matrix as a means to drive tumors toward a more therapeutically responsive state and synergize with other treatments. This concept is particularly relevant for cancer of the pancreas, which is characterized by tumors with a profoundly dense, rigid fibrous stroma. Here we introduce new in vitro systems to model interactions between pancreatic tumors and their mechanical microenvironment and restore signaling with stromal fibroblasts. Using one such model as a test bed it is shown here that PDT treatment is able to destroy fibroblasts in an in vitro 3D pancreatic tumor-fibroblast co-culture. These results and the literature suggest the further development of PDT as a potential modality for stromal depletion. PMID:23457416

  1. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Intercellular Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kalabis, Jiri; Rustgi, Anil K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Huff, Janice L.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Its development is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. An association with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. It is also seen as a secondary malignancy in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely curable. The stromal microenvironment plays an essential role in the maintenance and modulation of normal epithelial cell growth and differentiation and cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibroblasts (Okawa et al., Genes & Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how radiation treatment of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. Chemotactic and haptotactic migration of epithelial cells stimulated by conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts was measured using assays conducted in Transwell cell culture chambers. Our results using

  2. CollagenVI-Cre mice: A new tool to target stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Prados, Alejandro; Kollias, George; Koliaraki, Vasiliki

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are non-hematopoietic cells involved in the regulation of adaptive immune responses. Three major stromal populations have been identified in adult SLOs: fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and marginal reticular cells (MRCs). The properties of these individual populations are not clearly defined, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic tools, especially for MRCs. Here, we analyzed stromal cell targeting in SLOs from a transgenic mouse strain that expresses Cre recombinase under the CollagenVI promoter, using lineage tracing approaches. We show that these mice target specifically MRCs and FDCs, but not FRCs in Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles in the intestine. In contrast, stromal cells in lymph nodes and the spleen do not express the transgene, which renders ColVI-cre mice ideal for the specific targeting of stromal cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). This funding further supports the hypothesis of organ-specific stromal precursors in SLOs. Interestingly, in all tissues analyzed, there was also high specificity for perivascular cells, which have been proposed to act as FDC precursors. Taken together, ColVI-Cre mice are a useful new tool for the dissection of MRC- and FDC-specific functions and plasticity in the GALT. PMID:27604178

  3. CollagenVI-Cre mice: A new tool to target stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Prados, Alejandro; Kollias, George; Koliaraki, Vasiliki

    2016-09-08

    Stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are non-hematopoietic cells involved in the regulation of adaptive immune responses. Three major stromal populations have been identified in adult SLOs: fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and marginal reticular cells (MRCs). The properties of these individual populations are not clearly defined, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic tools, especially for MRCs. Here, we analyzed stromal cell targeting in SLOs from a transgenic mouse strain that expresses Cre recombinase under the CollagenVI promoter, using lineage tracing approaches. We show that these mice target specifically MRCs and FDCs, but not FRCs in Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles in the intestine. In contrast, stromal cells in lymph nodes and the spleen do not express the transgene, which renders ColVI-cre mice ideal for the specific targeting of stromal cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). This funding further supports the hypothesis of organ-specific stromal precursors in SLOs. Interestingly, in all tissues analyzed, there was also high specificity for perivascular cells, which have been proposed to act as FDC precursors. Taken together, ColVI-Cre mice are a useful new tool for the dissection of MRC- and FDC-specific functions and plasticity in the GALT.

  4. CollagenVI-Cre mice: A new tool to target stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Alejandro; Kollias, George; Koliaraki, Vasiliki

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are non-hematopoietic cells involved in the regulation of adaptive immune responses. Three major stromal populations have been identified in adult SLOs: fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and marginal reticular cells (MRCs). The properties of these individual populations are not clearly defined, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic tools, especially for MRCs. Here, we analyzed stromal cell targeting in SLOs from a transgenic mouse strain that expresses Cre recombinase under the CollagenVI promoter, using lineage tracing approaches. We show that these mice target specifically MRCs and FDCs, but not FRCs in Peyer’s patches and isolated lymphoid follicles in the intestine. In contrast, stromal cells in lymph nodes and the spleen do not express the transgene, which renders ColVI-cre mice ideal for the specific targeting of stromal cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). This funding further supports the hypothesis of organ-specific stromal precursors in SLOs. Interestingly, in all tissues analyzed, there was also high specificity for perivascular cells, which have been proposed to act as FDC precursors. Taken together, ColVI-Cre mice are a useful new tool for the dissection of MRC- and FDC-specific functions and plasticity in the GALT. PMID:27604178

  5. Stromal deletion of the APC tumor suppressor in mice triggers development of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanwar, Pradeep S.; Zhang, LiHua; Roberts, Drucilla J.; Teixeira, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of the stromal microenvironment to the progression of endometrial cancer (EC) has not been well explored. We have conditionally expressed a mutant allele of adenomatous polyposis coli (APCcKO) in murine uterine stroma cells to study its effect on uterine development and function. In addition to metrorrhagia, the mice develop complex atypical endometrial gland hyperplasia that progresses to endometrial carcinoma in situ and endometrial adenocarcinoma as evidenced by myometrial invasion. Stromal cells subjacent to the carcinoma cells express αSMA with fewer cells expressing PDGFR-α compared to normal stromal cells suggesting that the mutant stromal cells have acquired a more myofibroblastic phenotype, which have been described as cancer-associated fibroblasts and have been shown to induce carcinogenesis in other organ systems. Analyses of human EC specimens showed substantial αSMA expression in the stroma compared with normal endometrial stroma cells. We also show that APCcKO mutant uteri and human EC have decreased stromal levels of TGFβ and BMP activities and that the mutant uteri failed to respond to exogenous estradiol stimulation. The mutant stroma cells also had higher levels of VEGF and SDF signaling components and diminished expression of ERα and PR which is common in advanced stages of human EC and is an indicator of poor prognosis. Our results indicate that de novo mutation or loss of heterozygosity in stromal APC is sufficient to induce endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial carcinogenesis by mechanisms that are consistent with unopposed estrogen signaling in the endometrial epithelium. PMID:21363919

  6. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Changjun

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor has received a lot of attention over the last 10 years due to its unique biologic behavior, clinicopathological features, molecular mechanisms, and treatment implications. GIST is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm in the gastrointestinal tract and has emerged from a poorly understood and treatment resistant neoplasm to a well-defined tumor entity since the discovery of particular molecular abnormalities, KIT and PDGFRA gene mutations. The understanding of GIST biology at the molecular level promised the development of novel treatment modalities. Diagnosis of GIST depends on the integrity of histology, immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis. The risk assessment of the tumor behavior relies heavily on pathological evaluation and significantly impacts clinical management. In this review, historic review, epidemiology, pathogenesis and genetics, diagnosis, role of molecular analysis, prognostic factor and treatment strategies have been discussed. PMID:22943011

  7. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumor during Pregnacy.

    PubMed

    Gözükara, Ilay; Dilek, T U Kutlu; Durukan, Hüseyin; Düsmez Apa, Duygu; Kabil Kucur, Suna; Dilek, Saffet

    2012-01-01

    Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms without connection to the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and EGIST are similar according to their clinicopathologic and histomorphologic features. Both of them most often express immunoreactivity for CD-117, a c-kit proto-oncogene protein. The coexistence of GIST and pregnancy is very rare, with only two cases reported in the literature. In this paper, we presented the first EGIST case during pregnancy in the literature.

  8. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumor during Pregnacy

    PubMed Central

    Gözükara, Ilay; Dilek, T. U. Kutlu; Durukan, Hüseyin; Düsmez Apa, Duygu; Kabil Kucur, Suna; Dilek, Saffet

    2012-01-01

    Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms without connection to the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and EGIST are similar according to their clinicopathologic and histomorphologic features. Both of them most often express immunoreactivity for CD-117, a c-kit proto-oncogene protein. The coexistence of GIST and pregnancy is very rare, with only two cases reported in the literature. In this paper, we presented the first EGIST case during pregnancy in the literature. PMID:23119199

  9. WINGLESS (WNT) signaling is a progesterone target for rat uterine stromal cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Talbott, Alex; Bhusri, Anuradha; Krumsick, Zach; Foster, Sierra; Wormington, Joshua; Kimler, Bruce F

    2016-01-01

    Preparation of mammalian uterus for embryo implantation requires a precise sequence of cell proliferation. In rodent uterus, estradiol stimulates proliferation of epithelial cells. Progesterone operates as a molecular switch and redirects proliferation to the stroma by down-regulating glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and stimulating β-catenin accumulation in the periluminal stromal cells. In this study, the WNT signal involved in the progesterone-dependent proliferative switch was investigated. Transcripts of four candidate Wnt genes were measured in the uteri from ovariectomized (OVX) rats, progesterone-pretreated (3 days of progesterone, 2mg/daily) rats, and progesterone-pretreated rats given a single dose (0.2µg) of estradiol. The spatial distribution of the WNT proteins was determined in the uteri after the same treatments. Wnt5a increased in response to progesterone and the protein emerged in the periluminal stromal cells of progesterone-pretreated rat uteri. To investigate whether WNT5A was required for proliferation, uterine stromal cell lines were stimulated with progesterone (1µM) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF, 50ng/mL). Proliferating stromal cells expressed a two-fold increase in WNT5A protein at 12h post stimulation. Stimulated stromal cells were cultured with actinomycin D (25µg/mL) to inhibit new RNA synthesis. Relative Wnt5a expression increased at 4 and 6 h of culture, suggesting that progesterone plus FGF preferentially increased Wnt5a mRNA stability. Knockdown of Wnt5a in uterine stromal cell lines inhibited stromal cell proliferation and decreased Wnt5a mRNA. The results indicate that progesterone initiates and synchronizes uterine stromal cell proliferation by increasing WNT5A expression and signaling. PMID:26975616

  10. Comparative characterization of stromal vascular cells derived from three types of vascular wall and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Yang, Santsun; Eto, Hitomi; Kato, Harunosuke; Doi, Kentaro; Kuno, Shinichiro; Kinoshita, Kahori; Ma, Hsu; Tsai, Chi-Han; Chou, Wan-Ting; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2013-12-01

    Multipotent stem/progenitor cells localize perivascularly in many organs and vessel walls. These tissue-resident stem/progenitor cells differentiate into vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and other mesenchymal lineages, and participate in physiological maintenance and repair of vasculatures. In this study, we characterized stromal vascular cells obtained through the explant culture method from three different vessel walls in humans: arterial wall (ART; >500 μm in diameter), venous wall (VN; >500 μm in diameter), and small vessels in adipose tissue (SV; arterioles and venules, <100 μm in diameter). These were examined for functionality and compared with adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs). All stromal vascular cells of different origins presented fibroblast-like morphology and we could not visually discriminate one population from another. Flow cytometry showed that the cultured population heterogeneously expressed a variety of surface antigens associated with stem/progenitor cells, but CD105 was expressed by most cells in all groups, suggesting that the cells generally shared the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. Our histological and flow cytometric data suggested that the main population of vessel wall-derived stromal vascular cells were CD34(+)/CD31(-) and came from the tunica adventitia and areola tissue surrounding the adventitia. CD271 (p75NTR) was expressed by the vasa vasorum in the VN adventitia and by a limited population in the adventitia of SV. All three populations differentiated into multiple lineages as did ASCs. ART cells induced the largest quantity of calcium formation in the osteogenic medium, whereas ASCs showed the greatest adipogenic differentiation. SV and VN stromal cells had greater potency for network formation than did ART stromal cells. In conclusion, the three stromal vascular populations exhibited differential functional properties. Our results have clinical implications for vascular diseases such as

  11. BMPR2 loss in fibroblasts promotes mammary carcinoma metastasis via increased inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pickup, Michael W; Hover, Laura D; Polikowsky, Eleanor R; Chytil, Anna; Gorska, Agnieszka E; Novitskiy, Sergey V; Moses, Harold L; Owens, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) receptors mediate a diverse range of signals to regulate both development and disease. BMP activity has been linked to both tumor promoting and suppressive functions in both tumor cells and their surrounding microenvironment. We sought to investigate the requirement for BMPR2 in stromal fibroblasts during mammary tumor formation and metastasis. We utilized FSP1 (Fibroblast Specific Protein-1) promoter driven Cre to genetically delete BMPR2 in mice expressing the MMTV.PyVmT mammary carcinoma oncogene. We found that abrogation of stromal BMPR2 expression via FSP1 driven Cre resulted in increased tumor metastasis. Additionally, similar to epithelial BMPR2 abrogation, stromal loss of BMPR2 results in increased inflammatory cell infiltration. We proceeded to isolate and establish fibroblast cell lines without BMPR2 and found a cell autonomous increase in inflammatory cytokine secretion. Fibroblasts were co-implanted with syngeneic tumor cells and resulted in accelerated tumor growth and increased metastasis when fibroblasts lacked BMPR2. We observed that the loss of BMPR2 results in increased chemokine expression, which facilitates inflammation by a sustained increase in myeloid cells. The chemokines increased in BMPR2 deleted cells correlated with poor outcome in human breast cancer patients. We conclude that BMPR2 has tumor suppressive functions in the stroma by regulating inflammation.

  12. Response of hemopoietic, progenitor, and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells to administration of ketanserin during pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Skurikhin, E G; Pershina, O V; Stepanova, I E; Khmelevskaya, E S; Ermakova, N N; Reztsova, A M; Krupin, V A; Reikhart, D V; Goldberg, V E

    2014-11-01

    We studied the effect of ketanserin on hemopoietic progenitor cells (Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)CD34- and Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)CD34(+)), progenitor hemopoietic cells (Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+)), and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (CD45(-)CD73(+)CD106(+)) in C57Bl/6 mice during pulmonary fibrosis. It was shown that the blocker of 5-HT2A receptors lowers the activity of bleomycin-induced inflammation in the lungs and prevents the infiltration of alveolar interstitium and alveolar ducts by hemopoietic stem and hemopoietic progenitor cells; in this case, they are more numerous in the bone marrow of sick animals. Ketanserin reduces the capacity for self-renewal of lung multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the fibrotic phase of the disease and inhibits their differentiation into stromal cell lines (adipocytes, chondrocytes, and fibroblasts) simultaneously with the decrease in the percentage of connective tissue in the lung parenchyma. PMID:25403389

  13. Autophagy and mitochondrial remodelling in mouse mesenchymal stromal cells challenged with Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, Nikolai V; McDaniel, Dennis P; Zhai, Min; Liao, Pei-Jyun; Garrison, Bradley R; Kiang, Juliann G

    2015-05-01

    The bone marrow stroma constitutes the marrow-blood barrier, which sustains immunochemical homoeostasis and protection of the haematopoietic tissue in sequelae of systemic bacterial infections. Under these conditions, the bone marrow stromal cells affected by circulating bacterial pathogens shall elicit the adaptive stress-response mechanisms to maintain integrity of the barrier. The objective of this communication was to demonstrate (i) that in vitro challenge of mesenchymal stromal cells, i.e. colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-F), with Staphylococcus epidermidis can activate the autophagy pathway to execute antibacterial defence response, and (ii) that homoeostatic shift because of the bacteria-induced stress includes the mitochondrial remodelling and sequestration of compromised organelles via mitophagy. Implication of Drp1 and PINK1-PARK2-dependent mechanisms in the mitophagy turnover of the aberrant mitochondria in mesenchymal stromal cells is investigated and discussed.

  14. Autophagy and mitochondrial remodelling in mouse mesenchymal stromal cells challenged with Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, Nikolai V; McDaniel, Dennis P; Zhai, Min; Liao, Pei-Jyun; Garrison, Bradley R; Kiang, Juliann G

    2015-05-01

    The bone marrow stroma constitutes the marrow-blood barrier, which sustains immunochemical homoeostasis and protection of the haematopoietic tissue in sequelae of systemic bacterial infections. Under these conditions, the bone marrow stromal cells affected by circulating bacterial pathogens shall elicit the adaptive stress-response mechanisms to maintain integrity of the barrier. The objective of this communication was to demonstrate (i) that in vitro challenge of mesenchymal stromal cells, i.e. colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-F), with Staphylococcus epidermidis can activate the autophagy pathway to execute antibacterial defence response, and (ii) that homoeostatic shift because of the bacteria-induced stress includes the mitochondrial remodelling and sequestration of compromised organelles via mitophagy. Implication of Drp1 and PINK1-PARK2-dependent mechanisms in the mitophagy turnover of the aberrant mitochondria in mesenchymal stromal cells is investigated and discussed. PMID:25721260

  15. LIM domain only 2 over-expression in prostate stromal cells facilitates prostate cancer progression through paracrine of Interleukin-11

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Hai; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Xing-Jie; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Gao, Yuan; Hao, Kui-Yuan; Chen, Lei; Han, Bang-Min; Xia, Shu-Jie; Zhao, Fu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of stromal-epithelial crosstalk are essential for Prostate cancer (PCa) tumorigenesis and progression. Peripheral zone of the prostate gland possesses a stronger inclination for PCa than transition zone. We previously found a variety of genes that differently expressed among different prostate stromal cells, including LIM domain only 2 (LMO2) which highly expressed in peripheral zone derived stromal cells (PZSCs) and PCa associated fibroblasts (CAFs) compared to transition zone derived stromal cells (TZSCs). Studies on its role in tumors have highlighted LMO2 as an oncogene. Herein, we aim to study the potential mechanisms of stromal LMO2 in promoting PCa progression. The in vitro cells co-culture and in vivo cells recombination revealed that LMO2 over-expressed prostate stromal cells could promote the proliferation and invasiveness of either prostate epithelial or cancer cells. Further protein array screening confirmed that stromal LMO2 stimulated the secretion of Interleukin-11 (IL-11), which could promote proliferation and invasiveness of PCa cells via IL-11 receptor α (IL11Rα) – STAT3 signaling. Moreover, stromal LMO2 over-expression could suppress miR-204-5p which was proven to be a negative regulator of IL-11 expression. Taken together, results of our study demonstrate that prostate stromal LMO2 is capable of stimulating IL-11 secretion and by which activates IL11Rα – STAT3 signaling in PCa cells and then facilitates PCa progression. These results may make stromal LMO2 responsible for zonal characteristic of PCa and as a target for PCa microenvironment-targeted therapy. PMID:27028859

  16. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-02-29

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo.

  17. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo. PMID:26924503

  18. Imatinib mesylate inhibits proliferation and exerts an antifibrotic effect in human breast stroma fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gioni, Vassiliki; Karampinas, Theodoros; Voutsinas, Gerassimos; Roussidis, Andreas E; Papadopoulos, Savvas; Karamanos, Nikos K; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2008-05-01

    Tumor stroma plays an important role in cancer development. In a variety of tumors, such as breast carcinomas, a desmoplastic response, characterized by stromal fibroblast and collagen accumulation, is observed having synergistic effects on tumor progression. However, the effect of known anticancer drugs on stromal cells has not been thoroughly investigated. Imatinib mesylate is a selective inhibitor of several protein tyrosine kinases, including the receptor of platelet-derived growth factor, an important mediator of desmoplasia. Recently, we have shown that imatinib inhibits the growth and invasiveness of human epithelial breast cancer cells. Here, we studied the effect of imatinib on the proliferation and collagen accumulation in breast stromal fibroblasts. We have shown that it blocks the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt signaling pathways and up-regulates cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1), leading to the inhibition of fibroblast proliferation, by arresting them at the G(0)/G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Imatinib inhibits more potently the platelet-derived growth factor-mediated stimulation of breast fibroblast proliferation. By using specific inhibitors, we have found that this is due to the inhibition of the Akt pathway. In addition, imatinib inhibits fibroblast-mediated collagen accumulation. Conventional and quantitative PCR analysis, as well as gelatin zymography, indicates that this is due to the down-regulation of mRNA synthesis of collagen I and collagen III-the main collagen types in breast stroma-and not to the up-regulation or activation of collagenases matrix metalloproteinase 2 and matrix metalloproteinase 9. These data indicate that imatinib has an antifibrotic effect on human breast stromal fibroblasts that may inhibit desmoplastic reaction and thus tumor progression.

  19. Adipose-derived stromal cells for the reconstruction of a human vesical equivalent.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Alexandre; Fradette, Julie; Bernard, Geneviève; Gauvin, Robert; Laterreur, Véronique; Bolduc, Stéphane

    2015-11-01

    Despite a wide panel of tissue-engineering models available for vesical reconstruction, the lack of a differentiated urothelium remains their main common limitation. For the first time to our knowledge, an entirely human vesical equivalent, free of exogenous matrix, has been reconstructed using the self-assembly method. Moreover, we tested the contribution of adipose-derived stromal cells, an easily available source of mesenchymal cells featuring many potential advantages, by reconstructing three types of equivalent, named fibroblast vesical equivalent, adipose-derived stromal cell vesical equivalent and hybrid vesical equivalent--the latter containing both adipose-derived stromal cells and fibroblasts. The new substitutes have been compared and characterized for matrix composition and organization, functionality and mechanical behaviour. Although all three vesical equivalents displayed adequate collagen type I and III expression, only two of them, fibroblast vesical equivalent and hybrid vesical equivalent, sustained the development of a differentiated and functional urothelium. The presence of uroplakins Ib, II and III and the tight junction marker ZO-1 was detected and correlated with impermeability. The mechanical resistance of these tissues was sufficient for use by surgeons. We present here in vitro tissue-engineered vesical equivalents, built without the use of any exogenous matrix, able to sustain mechanical stress and to support the formation of a functional urothelium, i.e. able to display a barrier function similar to that of native tissue.

  20. Different patterns of stromal and cancer cell thymidine phosphorylase reactivity in non-small-cell lung cancer: impact on tumour neoangiogenesis and survival.

    PubMed Central

    Koukourakis, M. I.; Giatromanolaki, A.; Kakolyris, S.; O'Byrne, K. J.; Apostolikas, N.; Skarlatos, J.; Gatter, K. C.; Harris, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    Angiogenesis is recognized as an important step in tumour pathogenesis that is related to invasion and metastatic spread and which consequently results in poor clinical outcome. In this study, we have examined the role of tumour stroma-activated fibroblasts and macrophage infiltration in the development of the angiogenic and metastatic phenotype in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 141 cases of early stage I-II NSCLC treated with surgery alone were analysed. The JC-70 (anti-CD31) MAb was used for the assessment of vascular grade. The P-GF.44C MAb was used to assess thymidine phosphorylase (TP) reactivity in cancer cells, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. Cancer cell TP overexpression related to high vascular grade and to advanced T stage (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.02). Expression of TP in stromal fibroblasts also correlated with high angiogenesis (P = 0.01), but was independent of cancer cell expression. Fibroblast TP overexpression was related to abundant stroma (P = 0.003), suggesting that TP may be a marker of active stroma. Moreover, intense macrophage infiltration was associated with fibroblast TP reactivity, regardless of the amount of stroma, suggesting that macrophages may be a major contributor to TP expression in stroma. Survival analysis showed that cancer cell TP overexpression was related to poor prognosis (P = 0.005). Although stroma TP is related to angiogenesis, in the low vascular grade group it defined a group of patients with better prognosis (P = 0.02). It may be that fibroblast TP reactivity is an indirect marker of tumour infiltration by functional macrophages, which have an antitumour effect. We conclude that stromal macrophage and fibroblast TP reactivity may have an important role in non-small-cell lung cancer behaviour. Understanding the role of stromal fibroblasts and inflammatory cells and their interaction with oncoprotein expression is essential for the elucidation of lung cancer pathogenesis. Images Figure 1 PMID:9635852

  1. Malignant Potential of Murine Stromal Cells after Transplantation of Human Tumors into Nude Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenberg, David M.; Pavia, Rose A.

    1981-04-01

    Human malignant cancer tumors grafted into nude mice produce tumors containing both human cancer cells and the host's stromal cells. After short-term propagation of these tumors in vitro, the murine mesenchymal cells appear transformed and are tumorigenic in nude mice. However, established human cancer cell lines fail to similarly alter adjacent murine stromal cells when used to produce tumors in nude mice. These experiments suggest that cancer cells may recruit normal cells to become malignant, qualifying the view of the clonal (unicellular) origin of cancer.

  2. A continuous lineage of rat adenohypophysis stromal cells: characterisation and effects on GH(3)B(6) prolactin-secreting cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Alves, Leandro M; Werneck, Cláudio C; Martins Rd, Rita de Cássia L; Silva, Luiz Cláudio F; Taffarel, Marília; Borojevic, Radovan; Nasciutti, Luiz E

    2002-11-01

    Although some studies have shown a possible modulation of the stroma on the hormonal secretion, it is not clear as to what are the requirements for these cellular interactions. In the present work, a homogeneous and continuous lineage of rat adenohypophysis stromal cells (APS9 cells) obtained from rat adenohypophysis primary culture was established. Using immunocytochemical methods and electron microscopy, we have characterised APS9 cells as elongated fibroblastoid-like cells with intercellular contacts, expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin, type IV collagen and laminin. By biochemical procedures, higher amounts of chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate were found in the pericellular and extracellular compartments of APS9 cell culture. In order to evaluate the possible effects of APS9 cell on GH(3)B(6) prolactin-secreting cell survival and/or proliferation, we established co-culture and proliferation assays. When GH(3)B(6) cells were cultivated on APS9 cell substrate, they displayed an organisation of many cellular cords strongly attached and covering all the stromal cell area, establishing punctual interactions or extensive surface associations between adjacent cells. Prolactin immunoreactivity appeared to be more scattered throughout the cytoplasm and accumulated in its periphery. When plated on glass coverslips, on newborn rat skin fibroblasts, on murine haematopoietic bone marrow stroma cell line or on murine foetal liver stroma cell line, GH(3)B(6) cells changed their organisation and presented a decrease in cell number and adherence to the substrate. Our results showed that the APS9 cell/GH(3)B(6) cell interactions favour cell growth and probably PRL secretion, and raises questions about the specificity of different organs and/or animal species stromas on the hormone secretion.

  3. Irradiated fibroblasts promote epithelial–mesenchymal transition and HDGF expression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Ci-Hang; Wang, Xin-Tong; Ma, Wei; Wang, Na-Na; Nesa, Effat un; Wang, Jian-Bo; Wang, Cong; Jia, Yi-Bin; Wang, Kai; Tian, Hui; Cheng, Yu-Feng

    2015-03-06

    Recent evidence suggested that nonirradiated cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) promoted aggressive phenotypes of cancer cells through epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is a radiosensitive gene of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). This study aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated fibroblasts on EMT and HDGF expression of ESCC. Our study demonstrated that coculture with nonirradiated fibroblasts significantly increased the invasive ability of ESCC cells and the increased invasiveness was further accelerated when they were cocultured with irradiated fibroblasts. Scattering of ESCC cells was also accelerated by the supernatant from irradiated fibroblasts. Exposure of ESCC cells to supernatant from irradiated fibroblasts resulted in decreased E-cadherin, increased vimentin in vitro and β-catenin was demonstrated to localize to the nucleus in tumor cells with irradiated fibroblasts in vivo models. The expression of HDGF and β-catenin were increased in both fibroblasts and ESCC cells of irradiated group in vitro and in vivo models. Interestingly, the tumor cells adjoining the stromal fibroblasts displayed strong nuclear HDGF immunoreactivity, which suggested the occurrence of a paracrine effect of fibroblasts on HDGF expression. These data suggested that irradiated fibroblasts promoted invasion, growth, EMT and HDGF expression of ESCC. - Highlights: • Irradiated CAFs accelerated invasiveness and scattering of ESCC cell lines. • Irradiated CAFs promoted EMT of ESCC cells. • Irradiated fibroblasts induced nuclear β-catenin relocalization in ESCC cells. • Irradiated fibroblasts increased HDGF expression in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Grugan, Katharine; Rustgi, Anil; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide and is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. A connection with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Esophageal carcinomas are also seen as secondary malignancies in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely responsive to treatment. In normal epithelium, the stromal microenvironment is essential for the maintenance and modulation of cell growth and differentiation. Cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibrob-lasts (Okawa et al., Genes Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how irradiation of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. These assays were conducted in modified Boyden chambers using conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts. Our results using low LET gamma radiation showed a dose-dependent increase in migration of epithelial

  5. Stromal vascularization prevents corneal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Conn, H; Berman, M; Kenyon, K; Langer, R; Gage, J

    1980-04-01

    Experiments were performed with a model of focal, thermal-induced ulceration to test the clinical impression that vascularization prevents ulceration of the corneal stroma. Slow-release polymers containing a vasoproliferase agent (tumor angiogenesis factor) were placed in corneal pockets 2 mm central to the limbus of albino rabbits. These polymers elicited blood vessel ingrowth up to the implant. Control eyes received empty polymers which caused minimal to no vessel growth. Polymers were removed, and each cornea received a focal, thermal burn placed just central to the polymer site. All control corneas ulcerated: most (79%) developed deep stromal or perforating ulcers. Only 25% of prevascularized corneas developed stromal ulcers, and none was deep or perforating. After thermal burns, vessels in both groups grew at the same linear rate toward the burned area. There was a direct relationship between the distance separating the nearest blood vessel and the burned area at the time of burning and the maximum depth of stromal ulceration. Thus prevention of or less severe stromal ulceration is correlated with the earlier presence of vessels in the burned area.

  6. Characterizing natural hydrogel for reconstruction of three-dimensional lymphoid stromal network to model T-cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiwon; Wu, Biming; Niedzielski, Steven M; Hill, Matthew T; Coleman, Rhima M; Ono, Akira; Shikanov, Ariella

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogels have been used in regenerative medicine because they provide a three-dimensional environment similar to soft tissues, allow diffusion of nutrients, present critical biological signals, and degrade via endogenous enzymatic mechanisms. Herein, we developed in vitro system mimicking cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs). Existing in vitro culture systems cannot accurately represent the complex interactions happening between T-cells and stromal cells in immune response. To model T-cell interaction in SLOs in vitro, we encapsulated stromal cells in fibrin, collagen, or fibrin-collagen hydrogels and studied how different mechanical and biological properties affect stromal network formation. Overall, fibrin supplemented with aprotinin was superior to collagen and fibrin-collagen in terms of network formation and promotion of T-cell penetration. After 8 days of culture, stromal networks formed through branching and joining with other adjacent cell populations. T-cells added to the newly formed stromal networks migrated and attached to stromal cells, similar to the T-cell zones of the lymph nodes in vivo. Our results suggest that the constructed three-dimensional lymphoid stromal network can mimic the in vivo environment and allow the modeling of T-cell interaction in SLOs.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway of fibroblasts from uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Zheng, Lihua; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Yang, Weihong; Qu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mingmin; Cheng, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are the most common benign tumor of the female reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to explore the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on stromal fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of UF. Here, TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway was more activated in UF, and UF cells (UFC) and UF derived fibroblasts (TAF) than in smooth muscle tissues, smooth muscle cell (SMC) and myometrial fibroblasts (fib) respectively. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, the activity of fib was enhanced, characterized by the increased expression of fibroblast activation protein (FAP), and increased secretion of collagen I and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, TLR4 inhibitor (VIPER) and siTLR4 can represses LPS-activated fibroblasts and TLR4/NF-κB signaling transduction pathways in fib and UFC cells. Co-cultured with LPS-activated fibroblast enhanced fibroblast activation and TLR4/NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, LPS treatment activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on fibroblasts, which may involve in the development of UF. Our study indicated reproductive tract infection may be associated with fibroid pathogenesis through TLR4/NF-κB signaling. Targeting NF-κB with inhibitors may hold promises of treating uterine fibroid.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway of fibroblasts from uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Zheng, Lihua; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Yang, Weihong; Qu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mingmin; Cheng, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are the most common benign tumor of the female reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to explore the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on stromal fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of UF. Here, TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway was more activated in UF, and UF cells (UFC) and UF derived fibroblasts (TAF) than in smooth muscle tissues, smooth muscle cell (SMC) and myometrial fibroblasts (fib) respectively. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, the activity of fib was enhanced, characterized by the increased expression of fibroblast activation protein (FAP), and increased secretion of collagen I and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, TLR4 inhibitor (VIPER) and siTLR4 can represses LPS-activated fibroblasts and TLR4/NF-κB signaling transduction pathways in fib and UFC cells. Co-cultured with LPS-activated fibroblast enhanced fibroblast activation and TLR4/NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, LPS treatment activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on fibroblasts, which may involve in the development of UF. Our study indicated reproductive tract infection may be associated with fibroid pathogenesis through TLR4/NF-κB signaling. Targeting NF-κB with inhibitors may hold promises of treating uterine fibroid. PMID:26617709

  9. Lipopolysaccharide activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway of fibroblasts from uterine fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Zheng, Lihua; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Yang, Weihong; Qu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mingmin; Cheng, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are the most common benign tumor of the female reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to explore the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on stromal fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of UF. Here, TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway was more activated in UF, and UF cells (UFC) and UF derived fibroblasts (TAF) than in smooth muscle tissues, smooth muscle cell (SMC) and myometrial fibroblasts (fib) respectively. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, the activity of fib was enhanced, characterized by the increased expression of fibroblast activation protein (FAP), and increased secretion of collagen I and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, TLR4 inhibitor (VIPER) and siTLR4 can represses LPS-activated fibroblasts and TLR4/NF-κB signaling transduction pathways in fib and UFC cells. Co-cultured with LPS-activated fibroblast enhanced fibroblast activation and TLR4/NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, LPS treatment activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on fibroblasts, which may involve in the development of UF. Our study indicated reproductive tract infection may be associated with fibroid pathogenesis through TLR4/NF-κB signaling. Targeting NF-κB with inhibitors may hold promises of treating uterine fibroid. PMID:26617709

  10. Stromal issues in cervical cancer: a review of the role and function of basement membrane, stroma, immune response and angiogenesis in cervical cancer development.

    PubMed

    Sahebali, Shaira; Van den Eynden, Gert; Murta, Eddie F; Michelin, Marcia A; Cusumano, Pino; Petignat, Patrick; Bogers, Johannes J

    2010-05-01

    The carcinogenesis of cervical carcinoma implies an intricate interplay of neoplastic, human papillomavirus infected epithelial cells and stromal tissue, in which different factors have distinct but interacting influence. Persistent infection with an oncogenic human papillomavirus type may lead to epithelial dysplasia with progressive severity. To access the adjacent stromal tissue, tumour cells have to breach the basement membrane. The stroma partly controls tumour growth, invasion and angiogenesis. Last but not least there is considerable influence of the immune response. In this review we describe the importance of various stromal factors in carcinogenesis of cervical cancer.

  11. Melanoma educates mesenchymal stromal cells towards vasculogenic mimicry

    PubMed Central

    VARTANIAN, AMALIA; KARSHIEVA, SAIDA; DOMBROVSKY, VLADISLAV; BELYAVSKY, ALEXANDER

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor, and promote tumor development and growth. The present study was performed to investigate the communication between aggressive melanoma and MSCs in vasculogenic mimicry (VM). Normal human MSCs plated on Matrigel were unable to form capillary-like structures (CLSs). By contrast, MSCs co-cultured with aggressive melanoma cell lines, namely, Mel Cher, Mel Kor and Mel P, generated CLSs. Significantly, MSCs co-cultured with poorly aggressive melanoma cells, namely, Mel Me, failed to form CLSs. To identify factors responsible for VM, the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), pro-epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and stromal cell-derived factor 1α on the formation of CLSs by MSCs were tested. VM was induced by the addition of VEGFA, whereas other cytokines were inefficient. To confirm the hypothesis that aggressive tumor cells can increase the vasculogenic ability of MSCs, a standard B16/F10 mouse melanoma test system was used. MSCs isolated from the adipose tissues of C57BL/6 mice with melanoma formed a vascular-like network on Matrigel, whereas MSCs from healthy mice failed to form such structures. This study provides the first direct evidence that melanoma tumors educate MSCs to engage in VM. The education may occur distantly. These findings offer promise for novel therapeutic directions in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:27313776

  12. Anchored and soluble gangliosides contribute to myelosupportivity of stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ziulkoski, Ana L.; Santos, Aline X.S. dos; Andrade, Claudia M.B.; Trindade, Vera M.T.; Daniotti, Jose Luis; Borojevic, Radovan; Guma, Fatima C.R.

    2009-10-09

    Stroma-mediated myelopoiesis depends upon growth factors and an appropriate intercellular microenvironment. Previous studies have demonstrated that gangliosides, produced by hepatic stromal cell types, are required for optimal myelosupportive function. Here, we compared the mielossuportive functions of a bone marrow stroma (S17) and skin fibroblasts (SF) regarding their ganglioside pattern of synthesis and shedding. The survival and proliferation of a myeloid precursor cell (FDC-P1) were used as reporter. Although the ganglioside synthesis of the two stromal cells was similar, their relative content and shedding were distinct. The ganglioside requirement for mielossuportive function was confirmed by the decreased proliferation of FDC-P1 cells in ganglioside synthesis-inhibited cultures and in presence of an antibody to GM3 ganglioside. The distinct mielossuportive activities of the S17 and SF stromata may be related to differences on plasma membrane ganglioside concentrations or to differences on the gangliosides shed and their subsequent uptake by myeloid cells, specially, GM3 ganglioside.

  13. Targeting stromal-cancer cell interactions with siRNAs.

    PubMed

    Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Sioud, Mouldy; Lucas, Trevor; Abraham, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    Tumors are composed of both malignant and normal cells, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and inflammatory immune cells such as macrophages. These various stromal components interact with cancer cells to promote growth and metastasis. For example, macrophages, attracted by colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) produced by tumor cells, in turn produce various growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor, which supports the growth of tumor cells and their interaction with blood vessels leading to enhanced tumor cell spreading. The activation of autocrine and paracrine oncogenic signaling pathways by stroma-derived growth factors and cytokines has been implicated in promoting tumor cell proliferation and metastasis. Furthermore, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) derived from both tumor cells and the stromal compartment are regarded as major players assisting tumor cells during metastasis. Collectively, these recent findings indicate that targeting tumor-stroma interactions is a promising strategy in the search for novel treatment modalities in human cancer. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of the tumor microenvironment and highlights some potential targets for therapeutic intervention with small interfering RNAs.

  14. Genetic ablation of Smoothened in pancreatic fibroblasts increases acinar-ductal metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Pitarresi, Jason R; Cuitiño, Maria C; Kladney, Raleigh D; Woelke, Sarah A; Sizemore, Gina M; Nayak, Sunayana G; Egriboz, Onur; Schweickert, Patrick G; Yu, Lianbo; Trela, Stefan; Schilling, Daniel J; Halloran, Shannon K; Li, Maokun; Dutta, Shourik; Fernandez, Soledad A; Rosol, Thomas J; Lesinski, Gregory B; Shakya, Reena; Ludwig, Thomas; Konieczny, Stephen F; Leone, Gustavo; Wu, Jinghai; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    The contribution of the microenvironment to pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), a preneoplastic transition in oncogenic Kras-driven pancreatic cancer progression, is currently unclear. Here we show that disruption of paracrine Hedgehog signaling via genetic ablation of Smoothened (Smo) in stromal fibroblasts in a Kras(G12D) mouse model increased ADM. Smo-deleted fibroblasts had higher expression of transforming growth factor-α (Tgfa) mRNA and secreted higher levels of TGFα, leading to activation of EGFR signaling in acinar cells and increased ADM. The mechanism involved activation of AKT and noncanonical activation of the GLI family transcription factor GLI2. GLI2 was phosphorylated at Ser230 in an AKT-dependent fashion and directly regulated Tgfa expression in fibroblasts lacking Smo Additionally, Smo-deleted fibroblasts stimulated the growth of Kras(G12D)/Tp53(R172H) pancreatic tumor cells in vivo and in vitro. These results define a non-cell-autonomous mechanism modulating Kras(G12D)-driven ADM that is balanced by cross-talk between Hedgehog/SMO and AKT/GLI2 pathways in stromal fibroblasts. PMID:27633013

  15. Stromal β-catenin overexpression contributes to the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Felix J; Sarin, Sanjay; Dabas, Pari; Karolak, Michele; Oxburgh, Leif; Bridgewater, Darren

    2016-06-01

    Renal dysplasia, the leading cause of renal failure in children, is characterized by disrupted branching of the collecting ducts and primitive tubules, with an expansion of the stroma, yet a role for the renal stroma in the genesis of renal dysplasia is not known. Here, we demonstrate that expression of β-catenin, a key transcriptional co-activator in renal development, is markedly increased in the expanded stroma in human dysplastic tissue. To understand its contribution to the genesis of renal dysplasia, we generated a mouse model that overexpresses β-catenin specifically in stromal progenitors, termed β-cat(GOF-S) . Histopathological analysis of β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed a marked expansion of fibroblast cells surrounding primitive ducts and tubules, similar to defects observed in human dysplastic kidneys. Characterization of the renal stroma in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice revealed altered stromal cell differentiation in the expanded renal stroma demonstrating that this is not renal stroma but instead a population of stroma-like cells. These cells overexpress ectopic Wnt4 and Bmp4, factors necessary for endothelial cell migration and blood vessel formation. Characterization of the renal vasculature demonstrated disrupted endothelial cell migration, organization, and vascular morphogenesis in β-cat(GOF) (-S) mice. Analysis of human dysplastic tissue demonstrated a remarkably similar phenotype to that observed in our mouse model, including altered stromal cell differentiation, ectopic Wnt4 expression in the stroma-like cells, and disrupted endothelial cell migration and vessel formation. Our findings demonstrate that the overexpression of β-catenin in stromal cells is sufficient to cause renal dysplasia. Further, the pathogenesis of renal dysplasia is one of disrupted stromal differentiation and vascular morphogenesis. Taken together, this study demonstrates for the first time the contribution of stromal β-catenin overexpression to the genesis of renal

  16. What's New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for gastrointestinal stromal tumor What’s new in gastrointestinal stromal tumor research and treatment? There ... GIST) Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Research? Other Resources ...

  17. Prostatic Stromal Hyperplasia with Atypia

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Ryan C.; Wu, Kevin J.; Cheville, John C.; Thiel, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia (PSHA) is a rare histologic finding diagnosed incidentally on prostate biopsies, transurethral resection specimens, and radical prostatectomy specimens. PSHA has a bizarre histologic appearance and these lesions often raise concern for sarcoma; however, their clinical course is indolent and does not include extraprostatic progression. We discuss a case of PHSA discovered on prostate biopsy performed for an abnormal digital rectal examination and review the literature on this rare pathologic finding. PMID:23781384

  18. Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Ryan C; Wu, Kevin J; Cheville, John C; Thiel, David D

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia (PSHA) is a rare histologic finding diagnosed incidentally on prostate biopsies, transurethral resection specimens, and radical prostatectomy specimens. PSHA has a bizarre histologic appearance and these lesions often raise concern for sarcoma; however, their clinical course is indolent and does not include extraprostatic progression. We discuss a case of PHSA discovered on prostate biopsy performed for an abnormal digital rectal examination and review the literature on this rare pathologic finding. PMID:23781384

  19. Unclassified pediatric renal stromal tumor overlapping with metanephric stromal tumor and solitary fibrous tumor with diffuse S-100 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Brancato, Franca; Gurrera, Alessandra; Bisceglia, Michele; Alaggio, Rita; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo; Magro, Gaetano

    2011-11-15

    Metanephric stromal tumor (MST) is a rare pediatric neoplasm unique to the kidneys that is currently included in the spectrum of metanephric tumors, along with metanephric adenoma and adenofibroma. We herein report an unusual case of pediatric renal stromal tumor overlapping with MST and solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). Histologically, the tumor was composed of bland-looking spindle to stellate cells embedded in a fibro-sclerotic stroma that focally surrounded native entrapped renal tubules or blood vessels with abortive rings or collarettes. Alternating hypercellular and hypocellular areas and a focal hemangiopericytomatous-like vascular pattern imparted to the tumor a resemblance to SFT. Angiodysplasia of intratumoral arterioles was also observed, but juxtaglomerular cell hyperplasia was not a feature. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells showed a polyphenotypic profile, including diffuse expression of vimentin and CD34, and focal immunoreactivity for alpha-smooth muscle actin, EMA, and CD99. However, the most striking finding was diffuse nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of S-100 protein. Although this protein has been reported to stain the heterologous glial and/or cartilaginous components that can be occasionally encountered in MST, this marker has not been previously reported in the fibroblastic component of MST. Pathologist should be aware of similar unusual unclassified tumors to avoid potential confusion with other benign or malignant S-100 protein-positive tumors.

  20. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa; Nagai, Mami; Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi; Roeder, Robert G.; Asano, Shigetaka; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  1. Stromal ETS2 Regulates Chemokine Production and Immune Cell Recruitment during Acinar-to-Ductal Metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Pitarresi, Jason R; Liu, Xin; Sharma, Sudarshana M; Cuitiño, Maria C; Kladney, Raleigh D; Mace, Thomas A; Donohue, Sydney; Nayak, Sunayana G; Qu, Chunjing; Lee, James; Woelke, Sarah A; Trela, Stefan; LaPak, Kyle; Yu, Lianbo; McElroy, Joseph; Rosol, Thomas J; Shakya, Reena; Ludwig, Thomas; Lesinski, Gregory B; Fernandez, Soledad A; Konieczny, Stephen F; Leone, Gustavo; Wu, Jinghai; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical studies have suggested that the pancreatic tumor microenvironment both inhibits and promotes tumor development and growth. Here we establish the role of stromal fibroblasts during acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), an initiating event in pancreatic cancer formation. The transcription factor V-Ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2) was elevated in smooth muscle actin-positive fibroblasts in the stroma of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patient tissue samples relative to normal pancreatic controls. LSL-Kras(G12D/+); LSL-Trp53(R172H/+); Pdx-1-Cre (KPC) mice showed that ETS2 expression initially increased in fibroblasts during ADM and remained elevated through progression to PDAC. Conditional ablation of Ets-2 in pancreatic fibroblasts in a Kras(G12D)-driven mouse ADM model decreased the amount of ADM events. ADMs from fibroblast Ets-2-deleted animals had reduced epithelial cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Surprisingly, fibroblast Ets-2 deletion significantly altered immune cell infiltration into the stroma, with an increased CD8+ T-cell population, and decreased presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs), myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and mature macrophages. The mechanism involved ETS2-dependent chemokine ligand production in fibroblasts. ETS2 directly bound to regulatory sequences for Ccl3, Ccl4, Cxcl4, Cxcl5, and Cxcl10, a group of chemokines that act as potent mediators of immune cell recruitment. These results suggest an unappreciated role for ETS2 in fibroblasts in establishing an immune-suppressive microenvironment in response to oncogenic Kras(G12D) signaling during the initial stages of tumor development. PMID:27659014

  2. Loss of one Tgfbr2 allele in fibroblasts promotes metastasis in MMTV: polyoma middle T transgenic and transplant mouse models of mammary tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wei Bin; Jokar, Iman; Chytil, Anna; Moses, Harold L.; Abel, Ty; Cheng, Nikki

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of fibroblasts is a phenomenon that significantly correlates with formation of aggressive cancers. While studies have shown that the TGF-β signaling pathway is an important regulator of fibroblast activation, the functional contribution of TGF-β signaling in fibroblasts during multi-step tumor progression remains largely unclear. In previous studies, we used a sub-renal capsule transplantation model to demonstrate that homozygous knockout of the Tgfbr2 gene (Tgbr2FspKO) enhanced mammary tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we show for the first time a significant role for loss of one Tgfbr2 allele during multi-step mammary tumor progression. Heterozygous deletion of Tgfbr2 in stromal cells in MMTV–PyVmT transgenic mice (PyVmT/Tgfbr2hetFspKO mice) resulted in earlier tumor formation and increased stromal cell accumulation. In contrast to previous studies of Tgbr2FspKO fibroblasts, Tgfbr2hetFspKO fibroblasts did not significantly increase tumor growth, but enhanced lung metastasis in PyVmT transgenic mice and in co-transplantation studies with PyVmT mammary carcinoma cells. Furthermore, Tgfbr2hetFspKO fibroblasts enhanced mammary carcinoma cell invasiveness associated with expression of inflammatory cytokines including CXCL12 and CCL2. Analyses of Tgbr2FspKO and Tgfbr2hetFspKO fibroblasts revealed differences in the expression of factors associated with metastatic spread, indicating potential differences in the mechanism of action between homozygous and heterozygous deletion of Tgfbr2 in stromal cells. In summary, these studies demonstrate for the first time that loss of one Tgfbr2 allele in fibroblasts enhances mammary metastases in a multi-step model of tumor progression, and demonstrate the importance of clarifying the functional contribution of genetic alterations in stromal cells in breast cancer progression. PMID:21374085

  3. GPR30 Promotes Prostate Stromal Cell Activation via Suppression of ERα Expression and Its Downstream Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jia, Bona; Gao, Yu; Li, Mingming; Shi, Jiandang; Peng, Yanfei; Du, Xiaoling; Klocker, Helmut; Sampson, Natalie; Shen, Yongmei; Liu, Mengyang; Zhang, Ju

    2016-08-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a vital role in malignant transformation and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and accumulating evidence suggests an enhancing effect of estrogens on PCa. The present study aimed to investigate the possible origin of prostate CAFs and the effects of estrogen receptors, G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) and estrogen receptor (ER)-α, on stromal cell activation. High expression of fibroblast activation protein (FAP), CD44, and nonmuscle myosin heavy chain B (SMemb) accompanied by low expression of smooth muscle differentiation markers was found in the stromal cells of PCa tissues and in cultured human prostate CAFs. Additionally, SMemb expression, which is coupled to cell phenotype switching and proliferation, was coexpressed with FAP, a marker of activated stromal cells, and with the stem cell marker CD44 in the stromal cells of PCa tissue. Prostate CAFs showed high GPR30 and low ERα expression. Moreover, GPR30 was coexpressed with FAP, CD44, and SMemb. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that the overexpression of GPR30 or the knockdown of ERα in prostate stromal cells induced the up-regulation of FAP, CD44, Smemb, and the down-regulation of smooth muscle markers. The conditioned medium from these cells promoted the proliferation and migration of LNCaP and PC3 PCa cells. GPR30 knockdown or ERα overexpression showed opposite effects. Finally, we present a novel mechanism whereby GPR30 limits ERα expression via inhibition of the cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway. These results suggest that stem-like cells within the stroma are a possible source of prostate CAFs and that the negative regulation of ERα expression by GPR30 is centrally involved in prostate stromal cell activation. PMID:27163843

  4. Studies with 1,2-dithiole-3-thione as a chemoprotector of hydroquinone-induced toxicity to DBA/2-derived bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Twerdok, L E; Rembish, S J; Trush, M A

    1993-01-01

    Stromal cells from DBA/2 mouse bone marrow have been shown to be susceptible to cytotoxicity induced by several redox-active metabolites of benzene, including hydroquinone (HQ). Treatment with HQ also alters the composition of stromal cell populations by preferentially killing stromal macrophages compared to stromal fibroblasts. This cytotoxicity can be prevented by 1,2-dithiole-3-thione (DTT) as a result of the induction of quinone reductase (QR), a quinone-processing enzyme, and glutathione. The inductive activities of DTT protected stromal cells against HQ-induced cytotoxicity and against HQ-induced impairment of stromal cell ability to support myelopoiesis. In vivo feeding of DTT to DBA/2 mice increased QR activity within the bone marrow compartment and protected bone marrow stromal cells isolated from the DTT-fed animals from ex vivo HQ challenge. Thus, the inducibility of cellular defense mechanisms and xenobiotic-processing enzymes by chemoprotective agents such as DTT may be a useful strategy for protecting against chemically induced bone marrow toxicities. PMID:8354204

  5. Stromal Activation by Tumor Cells: An in Vitro Study in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Merlino, Giuseppe; Miodini, Patrizia; Paolini, Biagio; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Gennaro, Massimiliano; Dugo, Matteo; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Cappelletti, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Background: The tumor microenvironment participates in the regulation of tumor progression and influences treatment sensitivity. In breast cancer, it also may play a role in determining the fate of non-invasive lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a non-obligate precursor of invasive diseases, which is aggressively treated despite its indolent nature in many patients since no biomarkers are available to predict the progression of DCIS to invasive disease. In vitro models of stromal activation by breast tumor cells might provide clues as to specific stromal genes crucial for the transition from DCIS to invasive disease. Methods: normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) were treated under serum-free conditions with cell culture media conditioned by breast cancer cell lines (SkBr3, MDA-MB-468, T47D) for 72 h and subjected to gene expression profiling with Illumina platform. Results: TGM2, coding for a tissue transglutaminase, was identified as candidate gene for stromal activation. In public transcriptomic datasets of invasive breast tumors TGM2 expression proved to provide prognostic information. Conversely, its role as an early biosensor of tumor invasiveness needs to be further investigated by in situ analyses. Conclusion: Stromal TGM2 might probably be associated with precancerous evolution at earlier stages compared to DCIS. PMID:27600076

  6. Stromal Activation by Tumor Cells: An in Vitro Study in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Merlino, Giuseppe; Miodini, Patrizia; Paolini, Biagio; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Gennaro, Massimiliano; Dugo, Matteo; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Cappelletti, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Background: The tumor microenvironment participates in the regulation of tumor progression and influences treatment sensitivity. In breast cancer, it also may play a role in determining the fate of non-invasive lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a non-obligate precursor of invasive diseases, which is aggressively treated despite its indolent nature in many patients since no biomarkers are available to predict the progression of DCIS to invasive disease. In vitro models of stromal activation by breast tumor cells might provide clues as to specific stromal genes crucial for the transition from DCIS to invasive disease. Methods: normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) were treated under serum-free conditions with cell culture media conditioned by breast cancer cell lines (SkBr3, MDA-MB-468, T47D) for 72 h and subjected to gene expression profiling with Illumina platform. Results: TGM2, coding for a tissue transglutaminase, was identified as candidate gene for stromal activation. In public transcriptomic datasets of invasive breast tumors TGM2 expression proved to provide prognostic information. Conversely, its role as an early biosensor of tumor invasiveness needs to be further investigated by in situ analyses. Conclusion: Stromal TGM2 might probably be associated with precancerous evolution at earlier stages compared to DCIS.

  7. Genetic Deletion of the Stromal Cell Marker CD248 (Endosialin) Protects against the Development of Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stuart William; Croft, Adam Paul; Morris, Hannah Louise; Naylor, Amy Jane; Huso, David Leonard; Isacke, Clare Marie; Savage, Caroline Olivia Susan; Buckley, Christopher Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Background Tissue fibrosis and microvascular rarefaction are hallmarks of progressive renal disease. CD248 is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed by key effector cells within the stroma of fibrotic kidneys including pericytes, myofibroblasts and stromal fibroblasts. In human disease, increased expression of CD248 by stromal cells predicts progression to end-stage renal failure. We therefore, hypothesized that the genetic deletion of the CD248 gene would protect against fibrosis following kidney injury. Methods Using the unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model of renal fibrosis, we investigated the effect of genetic deletion of CD248 on post obstructive kidney fibrosis. Results CD248 null mice were protected from fibrosis and microvascular rarefaction following UUO. Although the precise mechanism is not known, this may to be due to a stabilizing effect of pericytes with less migration and differentiation of pericytes toward a myofibroblast phenotype in CD248-/- mice. CD248-/- fibroblasts also proliferated less and deposited less collagen in vitro. Conclusion These studies suggest that CD248 stromal cells have a pathogenic role in renal fibrosis and that targeting CD248 is effective at inhibiting both microvascular rarefaction and renal fibrosis through modulation of pericyte and stromal cell function. PMID:26633297

  8. A molecular classification of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Rohart, Florian; Mason, Elizabeth A; Matigian, Nicholas; Mosbergen, Rowland; Korn, Othmar; Chen, Tyrone; Butcher, Suzanne; Patel, Jatin; Atkinson, Kerry; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Fisk, Nicholas M; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh; Wells, Christine A

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are widely used for the study of mesenchymal tissue repair, and increasingly adopted for cell therapy, despite the lack of consensus on the identity of these cells. In part this is due to the lack of specificity of MSC markers. Distinguishing MSC from other stromal cells such as fibroblasts is particularly difficult using standard analysis of surface proteins, and there is an urgent need for improved classification approaches. Transcriptome profiling is commonly used to describe and compare different cell types; however, efforts to identify specific markers of rare cellular subsets may be confounded by the small sample sizes of most studies. Consequently, it is difficult to derive reproducible, and therefore useful markers. We addressed the question of MSC classification with a large integrative analysis of many public MSC datasets. We derived a sparse classifier (The Rohart MSC test) that accurately distinguished MSC from non-MSC samples with >97% accuracy on an internal training set of 635 samples from 41 studies derived on 10 different microarray platforms. The classifier was validated on an external test set of 1,291 samples from 65 studies derived on 15 different platforms, with >95% accuracy. The genes that contribute to the MSC classifier formed a protein-interaction network that included known MSC markers. Further evidence of the relevance of this new MSC panel came from the high number of Mendelian disorders associated with mutations in more than 65% of the network. These result in mesenchymal defects, particularly impacting on skeletal growth and function. The Rohart MSC test is a simple in silico test that accurately discriminates MSC from fibroblasts, other adult stem/progenitor cell types or differentiated stromal cells. It has been implemented in the www.stemformatics.org resource, to assist researchers wishing to benchmark their own MSC datasets or data from the public domain. The code is available from the CRAN

  9. Trans-differentiation of prostatic stromal cells leads to decreased glycoprotein hormone alpha production.

    PubMed

    Rumpold, Holger; Mascher, Katarina; Untergasser, Gerold; Plas, Eugen; Hermann, Martin; Berger, Peter

    2002-11-01

    Age-related development of benign prostatic hyperplasia is an important health issue in developed countries. The histopathogenetic hallmark of this disease is the increase in relative and absolute numbers of smooth muscle cells (SMC). Glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit (GPHalpha) is expressed in the human prostate, and, because of its structural similarities to other cystine knot growth factors, it has been considered to have growth regulatory functions of its own. Primary cell cultures allowing for selective cultivation of prostatic epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and SMC were established. Directed trans-differentiation and cellular homogeneity was pursued by confocal scanning laser microscopy with cell type-specific markers. GPHalpha production by these cells was assessed by immunofluorimetric assays. Its predominant source was young fibroblasts, whereas replicative senescent fibroblasts, SMC, and control fibroblasts from foreskin did not produce significant amounts. Functionally, GPHalpha reduced growth of stromal cells at concentrations of 10 and 100 nmol/liter as shown by cell viability assays. It is concluded that histogenetic reorganization over the adult lifetime, guided by endocrine factors like steroid hormones together with senescence of fibroblasts, leads to a decreased production of growth inhibitors, such as GPHalpha, favoring proliferation and the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  10. The role of fibroblast Tiam1 in tumor cell invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kun; Rajagopal, Soumitra; Klebba, Ina; Dong, Shumin; Ji, Yuxin; Liu, Jiewei; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Garlick, Jonathan A.; Naber, Stephen P.; Buchsbaum, Rachel J.

    2010-01-01

    The co-evolution of tumors and their microenvironment involves bidirectional communication between tumor cells and tumor-associated stroma. Various cell types are present in tumor-associated stroma, of which fibroblasts are the most abundant. The Rac exchange factor Tiam1 is implicated in multiple signaling pathways in epithelial tumor cells and lack of Tiam1 in tumor cells retards tumor growth in Tiam1 knock-out mouse models. Conversely, tumors arising in Tiam1 knock-out mice have increased invasiveness. We have investigated the role of Tiam1 in tumor-associated fibroblasts as a modulator of tumor cell invasion and metastasis, using retroviral delivery of short hairpin RNA to suppress Tiam1 levels in three different experimental models. In spheroid co-culture of mammary epithelial cells and fibroblasts, Tiam1 silencing in fibroblasts led to increased epithelial cell outgrowth into matrix. In tissue-engineered human skin, Tiam1 silencing in dermal fibroblasts led to increased invasiveness of epidermal keratinocytes with premalignant features. In a model of human breast cancer in mice, co-implantation of mammary fibroblasts inhibited tumor invasion and metastasis, which was reversed by Tiam1 silencing in co-injected fibroblasts. These results suggest that stromal Tiam1 may play a role in modulating the effects of the tumor microenvironment on malignant cell invasion and metastasis. This suggests a set of pathways for further investigation, with implications for future therapeutic targets. PMID:20802514

  11. Deep dermal fibroblast profibrotic characteristics are enhanced by bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Ma, Zengshuan; Shankowsky, Heather A; Medina, Abelardo; Tredget, Edward E

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars are a significant fibroproliferative disorder complicating deep injuries to the skin. We hypothesize that activated deep dermal fibroblasts are subject to regulation by bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), which leads to the development of excessive fibrosis following deep dermal injury. We found that the expression of fibrotic factors was higher in deep burn wounds compared with superficial burn wounds collected from burn patients with varying depth of skin injury. We characterized deep and superficial dermal fibroblasts, which were cultured from the deep and superficial dermal layers of normal uninjured skin obtained from abdominoplasty patients, and examined the paracrine effects of BM-MSCs on the fibrotic activities of the cells. In vitro, deep dermal fibroblasts were found higher in the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of type 1 collagen, alpha smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor beta, stromal cell-derived factor 1, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1, an inhibitor of collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase 1). As well, deep dermal fibroblasts had low matrix metalloproteinase 1 mRNA, produced more collagen, and contracted collagen lattices significantly greater than superficial fibroblasts. By co-culturing layered fibroblasts with BM-MSCs in a transwell insert system, BM-MSCs enhanced the fibrotic behavior of deep dermal fibroblasts, which suggests a possible involvement of BM-MSCs in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic scarring.

  12. Caveolin-1 is a modulator of fibroblast activation and a potential biomarker for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Hao; Tang, Gu-Sheng; Wang, Xu-Dong; Zheng, Rui; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Yan; Xue, Xu-Chao; Bi, Jian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Stromal fibroblasts play an important role in chronic cancer-related inflammation and the development as well as progression of malignant diseases. However, the difference and relationship between inflammation-associated fibroblasts (IAFs) and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are poorly understood. In this study, gastric cancer-associated fibroblasts (GCAFs) and their corresponding inflammation-associated fibroblasts (GIAFs) were isolated from gastric cancer (GC) with chronic gastritis and cultured in vitro. These activated fibroblasts exhibited distinct secretion and tumor-promoting behaviors in vitro. Using proteomics and bioinformatics techniques, caveolin-1 (Cav-1) was identified as a major network-centric protein of a sub-network consisting of 121 differentially expressed proteins between GIAFs and GCAFs. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry in a GC cohort showed significant difference in Cav-1 expression score between GIAFs and GCAFs and among patients with different grades of chronic gastritis. Moreover, silencing of Cav-1 in GIAFs and GCAFs using small interfering RNA increased the production of pro-inflammatory and tumor-enhancing cytokines and chemokines in conditioned mediums that elevated cell proliferation and migration when added to GC cell lines AGS and MKN45 in vitro. In addition, Cav-1 status in GIAFs and GCAFs independently predicted the prognosis of GC. Our findings indicate that Cav-1 loss contributes to the distinct activation statuses of fibroblasts in GC microenvironment and gastritis mucosa, and Cav-1 expression in both GCAFs and GIAFs may serve as a potential biomarker for GC progression. PMID:25798057

  13. O-GlcNAcylation Negatively Regulates Cardiomyogenic Fate in Adult Mouse Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zafir, Ayesha; Bradley, James A.; Long, Bethany W.; Muthusamy, Senthilkumar; Li, Qianhong; Hill, Bradford G.; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Bolli, Roberto; Jones, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    In both preclinical and clinical studies, cell transplantation of several cell types is used to promote repair of damaged organs and tissues. Nevertheless, despite the widespread use of such strategies, there remains little understanding of how the efficacy of cell therapy is regulated. We showed previously that augmentation of a unique, metabolically derived stress signal (i.e., O-GlcNAc) improves survival of cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells; however, it is not known whether enhancing O-GlcNAcylation affects lineage commitment or other aspects of cell competency. In this study, we assessed the role of O-GlcNAc in differentiation of cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells. Exposure of these cells to routine differentiation protocols in culture increased markers of the cardiomyogenic lineage such as Nkx2.5 and connexin 40, and augmented the abundance of transcripts associated with endothelial and fibroblast cell fates. Differentiation significantly decreased the abundance of O-GlcNAcylated proteins. To determine if O-GlcNAc is involved in stromal cell differentiation, O-GlcNAcylation was increased pharmacologically during the differentiation protocol. Although elevated O-GlcNAc levels did not significantly affect fibroblast and endothelial marker expression, acquisition of cardiomyocyte markers was limited. In addition, increasing O-GlcNAcylation further elevated smooth muscle actin expression. In addition to lineage commitment, we also evaluated proliferation and migration, and found that increasing O-GlcNAcylation did not significantly affect either; however, we found that O-GlcNAc transferase—the protein responsible for adding O-GlcNAc to proteins—is at least partially required for maintaining cellular proliferative and migratory capacities. We conclude that O-GlcNAcylation contributes significantly to cardiac mesenchymal stromal cell lineage and function. O-GlcNAcylation and pathological conditions that may affect O-GlcNAc levels (such as diabetes) should be

  14. Contribution of Fibroblast and Mast Cell (Afferent) and Tumor (Efferent) IL-6 Effects within the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Honor J; Lebret, Stephanie; Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Blick, Tony; Newgreen, Donald F; Thompson, Erik W; Ackland, M Leigh

    2012-04-01

    Hyperactive inflammatory responses following cancer initiation have led to cancer being described as a 'wound that never heals'. These inflammatory responses elicit signals via NFκB leading to IL-6 production, and IL-6 in turn has been shown to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cells in vitro, implicating a role for this cytokine in cancer cell invasion. We previously have shown that conditioned medium derived from cancer-associated fibroblasts induced an Epithelial to Mesenchymal transition (EMT) in PMC42-LA breast cancer cells and we have now identify IL-6 as present in this medium. We further show that IL-6 is expressed approximately 100 fold higher in a cancer-associated fibroblast line compared to normal fibroblasts. Comparison of mouse-specific (stroma) and human-specific (tumor) IL-6 mRNA expression from MCF-7, MDA MB 468 and MDA MB 231 xenografts also indicated the stroma rather than tumor as a significantly higher source of IL-6 expression. Mast cells (MCs) feature in inflammatory cancer-associated stroma, and activated MCs secrete IL-6. We observed a higher MC index (average number of mast cells per xenograft section/average tumor size) in MDA MB 468 compared to MDA MB 231 xenografts, where all MC were observed to be active (degranulating). This higher MC index correlated with greater mouse-specific IL-6 expression in the MDA MB 468 xenografts, implicating MC as an important source of stromal IL-6. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry on these xenografts for pSTAT3, which lies downstream of the IL-6 receptor indicated frequent correlations between pSTAT3 and mast cell positive cells. Analysis of publically available databases for IL-6 expression in patient tissue revealed higher IL-6 in laser capture microdissected stroma compared to adjacent tissue epithelium from patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and invasive non-inflammatory breast cancer (non-IBC) and we show that IL-6 expression was significantly higher in Basal

  15. Endometrial Stromal Nodule: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Fdili Alaoui, F. Z.; Chaara, H.; Bouguern, H.; Melhouf, M. A.; Fatemi, H.; Belmlih, A.; Amarti, A.

    2011-01-01

    Endometrial stromal nodule (ESN) is the least common of the endometrial stromal tumors. They are rare neoplasms which are diagnosed in most instances by light microscopy. Although such nodules are benign, hysterectomy has been considered the treatment of choice to determine the margins of the tumor required for diagnosis and to differentiate it from invasive stromal sarcoma Whose prognosis is totally different. We report a case of a 45 years old woman, with presurgical diagnosis of adnexal mass or uterine tumor. She underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy. Pathologic examination revealed an endometrial stromal nodule. Through this observation, we insist on the fact that the ESNs are rare and benign entities which must be differentiated from the other invasive malignant stromal tumors; this can change the final prognosis. PMID:21423543

  16. Endometrial stromal nodule: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fdili Alaoui, F Z; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Melhouf, M A; Fatemi, H; Belmlih, A; Amarti, A

    2011-01-01

    Endometrial stromal nodule (ESN) is the least common of the endometrial stromal tumors. They are rare neoplasms which are diagnosed in most instances by light microscopy. Although such nodules are benign, hysterectomy has been considered the treatment of choice to determine the margins of the tumor required for diagnosis and to differentiate it from invasive stromal sarcoma Whose prognosis is totally different. We report a case of a 45 years old woman, with presurgical diagnosis of adnexal mass or uterine tumor. She underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy. Pathologic examination revealed an endometrial stromal nodule. Through this observation, we insist on the fact that the ESNs are rare and benign entities which must be differentiated from the other invasive malignant stromal tumors; this can change the final prognosis. PMID:21423543

  17. Stromal uptake and transmission of acid is a pathway for venting cancer cell-generated acid.

    PubMed

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Black, Nicholas; Hsia, Lin-Ting; Wilding, Jennifer; Bodmer, Walter F; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-09-01

    Proliferation and invasion of cancer cells require favorable pH, yet potentially toxic quantities of acid are produced metabolically. Membrane-bound transporters extrude acid from cancer cells, but little is known about the mechanisms that handle acid once it is released into the poorly perfused extracellular space. Here, we studied acid handling by myofibroblasts (colon cancer-derived Hs675.T, intestinal InMyoFib, embryonic colon-derived CCD-112-CoN), skin fibroblasts (NHDF-Ad), and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells (HCT116, HT29) grown in monoculture or coculture. Expression of the acid-loading transporter anion exchanger 2 (AE2) (SLC4A2 product) was detected in myofibroblasts and fibroblasts, but not in CRC cells. Compared with CRC cells, Hs675.T and InMyoFib myofibroblasts had very high capacity to absorb extracellular acid. Acid uptake into CCD-112-CoN and NHDF-Ad cells was slower and comparable to levels in CRC cells, but increased alongside SLC4A2 expression under stimulation with transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), a cytokine involved in cancer-stroma interplay. Myofibroblasts and fibroblasts are connected by gap junctions formed by proteins such as connexin-43, which allows the absorbed acid load to be transmitted across the stromal syncytium. To match the stimulatory effect on acid uptake, cell-to-cell coupling in NHDF-Ad and CCD-112-CoN cells was strengthened with TGFβ1. In contrast, acid transmission was absent between CRC cells, even after treatment with TGFβ1. Thus, stromal cells have the necessary molecular apparatus for assembling an acid-venting route that can improve the flow of metabolic acid through tumors. Importantly, the activities of stromal AE2 and connexin-43 do not place an energetic burden on cancer cells, allowing resources to be diverted for other activities. PMID:27543333

  18. In vitro inhibitory effects of imatinib mesylate on stromal cells and hematopoietic progenitors from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Soares, P.B.; Jeremias, T.S.; Alvarez-Silva, M.; Licínio, M.A.; Santos-Silva, M.C.; Vituri, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) because it selectively inhibits tyrosine kinase, which is a hallmark of CML oncogenesis. Recent studies have shown that IM inhibits the growth of several non-malignant hematopoietic and fibroblast cells from bone marrow (BM). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of IM on stromal and hematopoietic progenitor cells, specifically in the colony-forming units of granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), using BM cultures from 108 1.5- to 2-month-old healthy Swiss mice. The results showed that low concentrations of IM (1.25 µM) reduced the growth of CFU-GM in clonogenic assays. In culture assays with stromal cells, fibroblast proliferation and α-SMA expression by immunocytochemistry analysis were also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner, with a survival rate of approximately 50% with a dose of 2.5 µM. Cell viability and morphology were analyzed using MTT and staining with acrydine orange/ethidium bromide. Most cells were found to be viable after treatment with 5 µM IM, although there was gradual growth inhibition of fibroblastic cells while the number of round cells (macrophage-like cells) increased. At higher concentrations (15 µM), the majority of cells were apoptotic and cell growth ceased completely. Oil red staining revealed the presence of adipocytes only in untreated cells (control). Cell cycle analysis of stromal cells by flow cytometry showed a blockade at the G0/G1 phases in groups treated with 5-15 µM. These results suggest that IM differentially inhibits the survival of different types of BM cells since toxic effects were achieved. PMID:23011404

  19. Stromal uptake and transmission of acid is a pathway for venting cancer cell-generated acid

    PubMed Central

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Black, Nicholas; Hsia, Lin-Ting; Wilding, Jennifer; Bodmer, Walter F.; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and invasion of cancer cells require favorable pH, yet potentially toxic quantities of acid are produced metabolically. Membrane-bound transporters extrude acid from cancer cells, but little is known about the mechanisms that handle acid once it is released into the poorly perfused extracellular space. Here, we studied acid handling by myofibroblasts (colon cancer-derived Hs675.T, intestinal InMyoFib, embryonic colon-derived CCD-112-CoN), skin fibroblasts (NHDF-Ad), and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells (HCT116, HT29) grown in monoculture or coculture. Expression of the acid-loading transporter anion exchanger 2 (AE2) (SLC4A2 product) was detected in myofibroblasts and fibroblasts, but not in CRC cells. Compared with CRC cells, Hs675.T and InMyoFib myofibroblasts had very high capacity to absorb extracellular acid. Acid uptake into CCD-112-CoN and NHDF-Ad cells was slower and comparable to levels in CRC cells, but increased alongside SLC4A2 expression under stimulation with transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), a cytokine involved in cancer–stroma interplay. Myofibroblasts and fibroblasts are connected by gap junctions formed by proteins such as connexin-43, which allows the absorbed acid load to be transmitted across the stromal syncytium. To match the stimulatory effect on acid uptake, cell-to-cell coupling in NHDF-Ad and CCD-112-CoN cells was strengthened with TGFβ1. In contrast, acid transmission was absent between CRC cells, even after treatment with TGFβ1. Thus, stromal cells have the necessary molecular apparatus for assembling an acid-venting route that can improve the flow of metabolic acid through tumors. Importantly, the activities of stromal AE2 and connexin-43 do not place an energetic burden on cancer cells, allowing resources to be diverted for other activities. PMID:27543333

  20. Management of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    von Mehren, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors had the reputation for poor outcomes because of their lack of response to nonsurgical interventions. The discovery of gain-of-function mutations involving receptor tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors altered the biological understanding and management. Beginning in 2000, management of these tumors has changed dramatically because of the availability of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The role of surgery continues to be refined. This article reviews how surgery and systemic therapy are being used, incorporating definitions of risk. Decisions on how to treat a patient is based on the risk of progression, pathologic characteristics, and tumor location. PMID:27542643

  1. Loss of stromal caveolin-1 expression predicts poor clinical outcome in triple negative and basal-like breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Dasgupta, Abhijit; Sammons, Sara; Er, Ozlem; Potoczek, Magdalena B; Guiles, Fran; Sotgia, Federica; Brody, Jonathan R; Mitchell, Edith P; Lisanti, Michael P

    2010-07-15

    Here, we investigated the possible predictive value of stromal caveolin-1 (Cav-1) as a candidate biomarker for clinical outcome in triple negative (TN) breast cancer patients. A cohort of 85 TN breast cancer patients was available, with the necessary annotation and nearly 12 years of follow-up data. Our primary outcome of interest in this study was overall survival. Interestingly, TN patients with high-levels of stromal Cav-1 had a good clinical outcome, with >50% of the patients remaining alive during the follow-up period. In contrast, the median survival for TN patients with moderate stromal Cav-1 staining was 33.5 months. Similarly, the median survival for TN patients with absent stromal Cav-1 staining was 25.7 months. A comparison of 5-year survival rates yields a similar pattern. TN patients with high stromal Cav-1 had a good 5-year survival rate, with 75.5% of the patients remaining alive. In contrast, TN patients with moderate or absent stromal Cav-1 levels had progressively worse 5-year survival rates, with 40 and 9.4% of the patients remaining alive. In contrast, in a parallel analysis, the levels of tumor epithelial Cav-1 had no prognostic significance. As such, the prognostic value of Cav-1 immunostaining in TN breast cancer patients is compartment-specific, and selective for an absence of Cav-1 staining in the stromal fibroblast compartment. A recursive-partitioning algorithm was used to assess which factors are most predictive of overall survival in TN breast cancer patients. In this analysis, we included tumor size, histologic grade, whether the patient received surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy, CK5/6, EGFR, p53 and Ki67 status, as well as the stromal Cav-1 score. This analysis indicated that stromal loss of Cav-1 expression was the most important prognostic factor for overall survival in TN breast cancer. Virtually identical results were obtained with CK5/6 (+) and/or EGFR (+) TN breast cancer cases, demonstrating that a loss of stromal Cav-1 is

  2. PDGFRβ Is a Novel Marker of Stromal Activation in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rong; Haines, Paul; Gallagher, George; Noonan, Vikki; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Monti, Stefano; Trojanowska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) form the main constituents of tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor growth and invasion. The presence of CAFs is a strong predictor of poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite significant progress in determining the role of CAFs in tumor progression, the mechanisms contributing to their activation remain poorly characterized, in part due to fibroblast heterogeneity and the scarcity of reliable fibroblast surface markers. To search for such markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), we applied a novel approach that uses RNA-sequencing data derived from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Specifically, our strategy allowed for an unbiased identification of genes whose expression was closely associated with a set of bona fide stroma-specific transcripts, namely the interstitial collagens COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL3A1. Among the top hits were genes involved in cellular matrix remodeling and tumor invasion and migration, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ), which was found to be the highest-ranking receptor protein genome-wide. Similar analyses performed on ten additional TCGA cancer datasets revealed that other tumor types shared CAF markers with OSCC, including PDGFRβ, which was found to significantly correlate with the reference collagen expression in ten of the 11 cancer types tested. Subsequent immunostaining of OSCC specimens demonstrated that PDGFRβ was abundantly expressed in stromal fibroblasts of all tested cases (12/12), while it was absent in tumor cells, with greater specificity than other known markers such as alpha smooth muscle actin or podoplanin (3/11). Overall, this study identified PDGFRβ as a novel marker of stromal activation in OSCC, and further characterized a list of promising candidate CAF markers that may be relevant to other carcinomas. Our novel approach provides for a fast and accurate method to identify CAF markers without the need for

  3. PDGFRβ Is a Novel Marker of Stromal Activation in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kartha, Vinay K; Stawski, Lukasz; Han, Rong; Haines, Paul; Gallagher, George; Noonan, Vikki; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Monti, Stefano; Trojanowska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) form the main constituents of tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor growth and invasion. The presence of CAFs is a strong predictor of poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite significant progress in determining the role of CAFs in tumor progression, the mechanisms contributing to their activation remain poorly characterized, in part due to fibroblast heterogeneity and the scarcity of reliable fibroblast surface markers. To search for such markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), we applied a novel approach that uses RNA-sequencing data derived from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Specifically, our strategy allowed for an unbiased identification of genes whose expression was closely associated with a set of bona fide stroma-specific transcripts, namely the interstitial collagens COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL3A1. Among the top hits were genes involved in cellular matrix remodeling and tumor invasion and migration, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ), which was found to be the highest-ranking receptor protein genome-wide. Similar analyses performed on ten additional TCGA cancer datasets revealed that other tumor types shared CAF markers with OSCC, including PDGFRβ, which was found to significantly correlate with the reference collagen expression in ten of the 11 cancer types tested. Subsequent immunostaining of OSCC specimens demonstrated that PDGFRβ was abundantly expressed in stromal fibroblasts of all tested cases (12/12), while it was absent in tumor cells, with greater specificity than other known markers such as alpha smooth muscle actin or podoplanin (3/11). Overall, this study identified PDGFRβ as a novel marker of stromal activation in OSCC, and further characterized a list of promising candidate CAF markers that may be relevant to other carcinomas. Our novel approach provides for a fast and accurate method to identify CAF markers without the need for

  4. The influence of stromal cells on the pigmentation of tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Thomas; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Klar, Agnieszka S; Widmer, Daniel S; Pontiggia, Luca; Weber, Andreas D; Weber, Daniel M; Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2015-03-01

    It has been shown in vitro that melanocyte proliferation and function in palmoplantar skin is regulated by mesenchymal factors derived from fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated in vivo the influence of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in human tissue-engineered skin substitutes reconstructed from palmar- and nonpalmoplantar-derived fibroblasts. Tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal analogs based on collagen type I hydrogels were populated with either human palmar or nonpalmoplantar fibroblasts and seeded with human nonpalmoplantar-derived melanocytes and keratinocytes. These skin substitutes were transplanted onto full-thickness skin wounds of immunoincompetent rats. Four weeks after transplantation the development of skin color was measured and grafts were excised and analyzed with regard to epidermal characteristics, in particular melanocyte number and function. Skin substitutes containing palmar-derived fibroblasts in comparison to nonpalmoplantar-derived fibroblasts showed (a) a significantly lighter pigmentation; (b) a reduced amount of epidermal melanin granules; and (c) a distinct melanosome expression. However, the number of melanocytes in the basal layer remained similar in both transplantation groups. These findings demonstrate that human palmar fibroblasts regulate the function of melanocytes in human pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes after transplantation, whereas the number of melanocytes remains constant. This underscores the influence of site-specific stromal cells and their importance when constructing skin substitutes for clinical application. PMID:25300246

  5. The Influence of Stromal Cells on the Pigmentation of Tissue-Engineered Dermo-Epidermal Skin Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Biedermann, Thomas; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Klar, Agnieszka S.; Widmer, Daniel S.; Pontiggia, Luca; Weber, Andreas D.; Weber, Daniel M.; Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown in vitro that melanocyte proliferation and function in palmoplantar skin is regulated by mesenchymal factors derived from fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated in vivo the influence of mesenchymal–epithelial interactions in human tissue-engineered skin substitutes reconstructed from palmar- and nonpalmoplantar-derived fibroblasts. Tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal analogs based on collagen type I hydrogels were populated with either human palmar or nonpalmoplantar fibroblasts and seeded with human nonpalmoplantar-derived melanocytes and keratinocytes. These skin substitutes were transplanted onto full-thickness skin wounds of immunoincompetent rats. Four weeks after transplantation the development of skin color was measured and grafts were excised and analyzed with regard to epidermal characteristics, in particular melanocyte number and function. Skin substitutes containing palmar-derived fibroblasts in comparison to nonpalmoplantar-derived fibroblasts showed (a) a significantly lighter pigmentation; (b) a reduced amount of epidermal melanin granules; and (c) a distinct melanosome expression. However, the number of melanocytes in the basal layer remained similar in both transplantation groups. These findings demonstrate that human palmar fibroblasts regulate the function of melanocytes in human pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes after transplantation, whereas the number of melanocytes remains constant. This underscores the influence of site-specific stromal cells and their importance when constructing skin substitutes for clinical application. PMID:25300246

  6. Stromal corneal scar following YAG capsulotomy.

    PubMed

    Bailey, L; Donzis, P B; Kastl, P R

    1988-05-01

    The case of a 70-year-old patient who suffered inadvertant YAG laser burns to the central corneal stroma is presented. Although focal stromal scarring resulted, no endothelial damage or corneal decompensation was noted, and the patient was asymptomatic.

  7. Contractile forces generated by striae distensae fibroblasts embedded in collagen lattices.

    PubMed

    Viennet, Céline; Bride, Jacqueline; Armbruster, Vincent; Aubin, François; Gabiot, Anne-Claude; Gharbi, Tijani; Humbert, Philippe

    2005-07-01

    Striae distensae are characterized by linear, smooth bands of atrophic-appearing skin that are reddish at first and finally white. They are due to stretching of the skin, as in rapid weight gain, or mechanical stress, as in weight lifting. The pathogenesis of striae distensae is unknown but probably relates to changes in the fibroblast phenotype. In order to characterize striae distensae fibroblasts, alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and contractile forces were studied. Five healthy women with early erythematous striae and five healthy women with older striae were selected. Paired biopsies were taken from the center of lesional striae and adjacent normal skin. Fibroblasts were obtained by an explant technique and expanded in vitro in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. Contractile forces generated by fibroblasts in collagen lattices were measured with the Glasbox device developed in our laboratory. Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression was studied by immunofluorescence labeling of cells and by flow cytometry. Fibroblasts from early striae distensae were the richest cells in alpha-smooth muscle actin filaments and generated the highest contractile forces. Their peak contractile force was 26% greater than normal fibroblasts. There was a 150% higher level of alpha-smooth muscle actin content in fibroblasts from early striae distensae compared with fibroblasts from normal skin. In contrast, there was no significant difference in force generation between old striae fibroblasts and normal fibroblasts with cells expressing no alpha-smooth muscle actin. The contractile properties of fibroblasts from striae distensae varies depending on the stage of the disease. In early striae distensae, fibroblasts acquire a more contractile phenotype, corresponding to that of myofibroblasts.

  8. Molecular biology of cancer-associated fibroblasts: can these cells be targeted in anti-cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Gonda, Tamas A; Varro, Andrea; Wang, Timothy C; Tycko, Benjamin

    2010-02-01

    It is increasingly recognized that the non-neoplastic stromal compartment in most solid cancers plays an active role in tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the most abundant cell types in the tumor stroma, and these cells are pro-tumorigenic. Evidence that CAFs are epigenetically and possibly also genetically distinct from normal fibroblasts is beginning to define these cells as potential targets of anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the cell-of-origin and molecular biology of CAFs, arguing that such knowledge provides a rational basis for designing therapeutic strategies to coordinately and synergistically target both the stromal and malignant epithelial component of human cancers.

  9. Zfp423 promotes adipogenic differentiation of bovine stromal vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Das, Arun Kr; Yang, Qi-Yuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Du, Min

    2012-01-01

    Intramuscular fat or marbling is critical for the palatability of beef. In mice, very recent studies show that adipocytes and fibroblasts share a common pool of progenitor cells, with Zinc finger protein 423 (Zfp423) as a key initiator of adipogenic differentiation. To evaluate the role of Zfp423 in intramuscular adipogenesis and marbling in beef cattle, we sampled beef muscle for separation of stromal vascular cells. These cells were immortalized with pCI neo-hEST2 and individual clones were selected by G418. A total of 288 clones (3×96 well plates) were isolated and induced to adipogenesis. The presence of adipocytes was assessed by Oil-Red-O staining. Three clones with high and low adipogenic potential respectively were selected for further analyses. In addition, fibro/adipogenic progenitor cells were selected using a surface marker, platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) α. The expression of Zfp423 was much higher (307.4±61.9%, P<0.05) in high adipogenic cells, while transforming growth factor (TGF)-β was higher (156.1±48.7%, P<0.05) in low adipogenic cells. Following adipogenic differentiation, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) were much higher (239.4±84.1% and 310.7±138.4%, respectively, P<0.05) in high adipogenic cells. Over-expression of Zfp423 in stromal vascular cells and cloned low adipogenic cells dramatically increased their adipogenic differentiation, accompanied with the inhibition of TGF-β expression. Zfp423 knockdown by shRNA in high adipogenic cells largely prevented their adipogenic differentiation. The differential regulation of Zfp423 and TGF-β between low and high adipogenic cells is associated with the DNA methylation in their promoters. In conclusion, data show that Zfp423 is a critical regulator of adipogenesis in stromal vascular cells of bovine muscle, and Zfp423 may provide a molecular target for enhancing intramuscular adipogenesis

  10. Doxazosin treatment alters stromal cell behavior and increases elastic system fibers deposition in rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Delella, Flávia Karina; Felisbino, Sérgio Luis

    2010-10-01

    Doxazosin (DOX), an α-adrenoceptor antagonist, induces the relaxation of smooth muscle cell tonus and reduces the clinical symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, the effects of DOX in the prostate stromal microenvironment are not fully known. In a previous study, we showed that DOX treatment for 30 days increased deposition of collagen fibers in the three rat prostatic lobes. Herein, we investigated the effects of DOX on stromal cell ultrastructure and elastic fiber deposition. Adult Wistar rats were treated with DOX (25 mg/kg/day); and the ventral, dorsal, and anterior prostates were excised at 30 days of treatment. The prostatic lobes were submitted to histochemical and stereological-morphometric analyze and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Histochemical staining plus stereological analysis of the elastic fiber system showed that DOX-treated prostatic lobes presented more elaunin and elastic fibers than controls, mainly in the ventral lobe. Ultrastructural analysis showed that fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells from DOX-treated prostates presented active synthetic phenotypes, evidenced by enlarged rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus cisterns, and confirmed the observation of thickened elaunin fibers. Our findings suggest that, under α-adrenergic blockade by DOX, the fibroblasts become more active and smooth muscle cells shift from a predominantly contractile to a more synthetic phenotype. The deposition of collagen and elastic system fibers in the prostatic stroma may counterbalance the absence of smooth muscle tone during α-blockers treatment.

  11. Stromal cells and integrins: conforming to the needs of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Alphonso, Aimee; Alahari, Suresh K

    2009-12-01

    The microenvironment of a tumor is constituted of a heterogenous population of stromal cells, extracellular matrix components, and secreted factors, all of which make the tumor microenvironment distinct from that of normal tissue. Unlike healthy cells, tumor cells require these unique surroundings to metastasize, spread, and form a secondary tumor at a distant site. In this review, we discuss that stromal cells such as fibroblasts and immune cells including macrophages, their secreted factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, and various chemokines, and the integrins that connect the various cell types play a particularly vital role in the survival of a growing tumor mass. Macrophages and fibroblasts are uniquely plastic cells because they are not only able to switch from tumor suppressing to tumor supporting phenotypes but also able to adopt various tumor-supporting functions based on their location within the microenvironment. Integrins serve as the backbone for all of these prometastatic operations because their function as cell-cell and cell-matrix signal transducers are important for the heterogenous components of the microenvironment to communicate.

  12. Isolation and enrichment of human adipose-derived stromal cells for enhanced osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zielins, Elizabeth R; Tevlin, Ruth; Hu, Michael S; Chung, Michael T; McArdle, Adrian; Paik, Kevin J; Atashroo, David; Duldulao, Christopher R; Luan, Anna; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Walmsley, Graham G; Wearda, Taylor; Longaker, Michael T; Wan, Derrick C

    2015-01-12

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) are considered the gold standard for stem cell-based tissue engineering applications. However, the process by which they must be harvested can be associated with significant donor site morbidity. In contrast, adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are more readily abundant and more easily harvested, making them an appealing alternative to BM-MSCs. Like BM-MSCs, ASCs can differentiate into osteogenic lineage cells and can be used in tissue engineering applications, such as seeding onto scaffolds for use in craniofacial skeletal defects. ASCs are obtained from the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of digested adipose tissue, which is a heterogeneous mixture of ASCs, vascular endothelial and mural cells, smooth muscle cells, pericytes, fibroblasts, and circulating cells. Flow cytometric analysis has shown that the surface marker profile for ASCs is similar to that for BM-MSCs. Despite several published reports establishing markers for the ASC phenotype, there is still a lack of consensus over profiles identifying osteoprogenitor cells in this heterogeneous population. This protocol describes how to isolate and use a subpopulation of ASCs with enhanced osteogenic capacity to repair critical-sized calvarial defects.

  13. The Role of the Transcriptional Regulation of Stromal Cells in Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Valin, Alvaro; Pablos, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a common process connecting pathologies that vary in their etiology and pathogenesis such as cancer, autoimmune diseases, and infections. The response of the immune system to tissue damage involves a carefully choreographed series of cellular interactions between immune and non-immune cells. In recent years, it has become clear that stromal resident cells have an essential role perpetuating the inflammatory environment and dictating in many cases the outcome of inflammatory based pathologies. Signal transduction pathways remain the main focus of study to understand how stimuli contribute to perpetuating the inflammatory response, mainly due to their potential role as therapeutic targets. However, molecular events orchestrated in the nucleus by transcription factors add additional levels of complexity and may be equally important for understanding the phenotypic differences of activated stromal components during the chronic inflammatory process. In this review, we focus on the contribution of transcription factors to the selective regulation of inducible proinflammatory genes, with special attention given to the regulation of the stromal fibroblastic cell function and response. PMID:26501341

  14. Loss of stromal JUNB does not affect tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Braun, Jennifer; Strittmatter, Karin; Nübel, Tobias; Komljenovic, Dorde; Sator-Schmitt, Melanie; Bäuerle, Tobias; Angel, Peter; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina

    2014-03-15

    The transcription factor AP-1 subunit JUNB has been shown to play a pivotal role in angiogenesis. It positively controls angiogenesis by regulating Vegfa as well as the transcriptional regulator Cbfb and its target Mmp13. In line with these findings, it has been demonstrated that tumor cell-derived JUNB promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis. In contrast to JUNB's function in tumor cells, the role of host-derived stromal JUNB has not been elucidated so far. Here, we show that ablation of Junb in stromal cells including endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and fibroblasts does not affect tumor growth in two different syngeneic mouse models, the B16-F1 melanoma and the Lewis lung carcinoma model. In-depth analyses of the tumors revealed that tumor angiogenesis remains unaffected as assessed by measurements of the microvascular density and relative blood volume in the tumor. Furthermore, we could show that the maturation status of the tumor vasculature, analyzed by the SMC marker expression, α-smooth muscle actin and Desmin, as well as the attachment of pericytes to the endothelium, is not changed upon ablation of Junb. Taken together, these results indicate that the pro-angiogenic functions of stromal JUNB are well compensated with regard to tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. PMID:24027048

  15. Targeting Stromal-Cancer Cell Crosstalk Networks in Ovarian Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Tsz-Lun; Leung, Cecilia S.; Li, Fuhai; Wong, Stephen T. C.; Mok, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a histologically, clinically, and molecularly diverse disease with a five-year survival rate of less than 30%. It has been estimated that approximately 21,980 new cases of epithelial ovarian cancer will be diagnosed and 14,270 deaths will occur in the United States in 2015, making it the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Ovarian tumor tissue is composed of cancer cells and a collection of different stromal cells. There is increasing evidence that demonstrates that stromal involvement is important in ovarian cancer pathogenesis. Therefore, stroma-specific signaling pathways, stroma-derived factors, and genetic changes in the tumor stroma present unique opportunities for improving the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the major components of the tumor stroma that have demonstrated supportive roles in tumor progression. In this review, we highlight various types of signaling crosstalk between ovarian cancer cells and stromal cells, particularly with CAFs. In addition to evaluating the importance of signaling crosstalk in ovarian cancer progression, we discuss approaches that can be used to target tumor-promoting signaling crosstalk and how these approaches can be translated into potential ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26751490

  16. Demineralized bone promotes chondrocyte or osteoblast differentiation of human marrow stromal cells cultured in collagen sponges.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuanhu; Yates, Karen E; Eid, Karim; Glowacki, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Demineralized bone implants have been used for many types of craniomaxillofacial, orthopedic, periodontal, and hand reconstruction procedures. In previous studies, we showed that demineralized bone powder (DBP) induces chondrogenesis of human dermal fibroblasts in a DBP/collagen sponge system that optimized interactions between particles of DBP and target cells in cell culture. In this study, we test the hypothesis that DBP promotes chondrogenesis or osteogenesis of human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) in 3-D collagen sponge culture, depending upon the culture conditions. We first confirmed that hMSCs have chondrogenic potential when treated with TGF-beta, either in 2-D monolayer cultures or in 3-D porous collagen sponges. Second, we found that DBP markedly enhanced chondrogenesis in hMSCs in 3-D sponges, as assessed by metachromasia and expression of chondrocyte-specific genes AGGRECAN, COL II, and COL X. Human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) were used to define mechanisms of chondroinduction because unlike hMSCs they have no inherent chondrogenic potential. In situ hybridization revealed that hDFs vicinal to DBPs express chondrocyte-specific genes AGGRECAN or COL II. Macroarray analysis showed that DBP activates TGF-beta/BMP signaling pathway genes in hDFs. Finally, DBP induced hMSCs to express the osteoblast phenotype when cultured with osteogenic supplements. These studies show how culture conditions can influence the differentiation pathway that human marrow stromal cells follow when stimulated by DBP. These results support the potential to engineer cartilage or bone in vitro by using human bone marrow stromal cells and DBP/collagen scaffolds. PMID:15735899

  17. Propagation and titration of murine cytomegalovirus in a continuous bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (M2-10B4).

    PubMed

    Lutarewych, M A; Quirk, M R; Kringstad, B A; Li, W; Verfaillie, C M; Jordan, M C

    1997-11-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) can only be propagated effectively in mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells. We demonstrate that MCMV replicates significantly better in M2-10B4 cells, a continuous line of murine bone marrow stromal cells. M2-10B4 cells were also comparable to MEF cells for detection of small amounts of MCMV reactivating from latently infected spleen explants. M2-10B4 cells will be very useful for studies of MCMV pathogenesis.

  18. Comparative proteomic analysis of normal and tumor stromal cells by tissue on chip based mass spectrometry (toc-MS)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In carcinoma tissues, genetic and metabolic changes not only occur at the tumor cell level, but also in the surrounding stroma. This carcinoma-reactive stromal tissue is heterogeneous and consists e.g. of non-epithelial cells such as fibroblasts or fibrocytes, inflammatory cells and vasculature-related cells, which promote carcinoma growth and progression of carcinomas. Nevertheless, there is just little knowledge about the proteomic changes from normal connective tissue to tumor stroma. In the present study, we acquired and analysed specific protein patterns of small stromal sections surrounding head and neck cell complexes in comparison to normal subepithelial connective tissue. To gain defined stromal areas we used laser-based tissue microdissection. Because these stromal areas are limited in size we established the highly sensitive 'tissue on chip based mass spectrometry' (toc-MS). Therefore, the dissected areas were directly transferred to chromatographic arrays and the proteomic profiles were subsequently analysed with mass spectrometry. At least 100 cells were needed for an adequate spectrum. The locating of differentially expressed proteins enables a precise separation of normal and tumor stroma. The newly described toc-MS technology allows an initial insight into proteomic differences between small numbers of exactly defined cells from normal and tumor stroma. PMID:20205871

  19. Two Hundred Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Lewis, Jonathan J.; Leung, Denis; Mudan, Satvinder S.; Woodruff, James M.; Brennan, Murray F.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To analyze the outcome of 200 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who were treated at a single institution and followed up prospectively. Summary Background Data A GIST is a visceral sarcoma that arises from the gastrointestinal tract. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment because adjuvant therapy is unproven. Methods Two hundred patients with malignant GIST were admitted and treated at Memorial Hospital during the past 16 years. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables were analyzed to identify patterns of tumor recurrence and factors that predict survival. Results Of the 200 patients, 46% had primary disease without metastasis, 47% had metastasis, and 7% had isolated local recurrence. In patients with primary disease who underwent complete resection of gross disease (n = 80), the 5-year actuarial survival rate was 54%, and survival was predicted by tumor size but not microscopic margins of resection. Recurrence of disease after resection was predominantly intraabdominal and involved the original tumor site, peritoneum, and liver. Conclusions GISTs are uncommon sarcomas. Tumor size predicts disease-specific survival in patients with primary disease who undergo complete gross resection. Tumor recurrence tends to be intraabdominal. Investigational protocols are indicated to reduce the rate of recurrence after resection and to improve the outcome for patients with GIST. PMID:10636102

  20. The Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Is Critical for Human Endometrial Stromal Cell Decidualization.

    PubMed

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Szwarc, Maria M; Vasquez, Yasmin M; Peavey, Mary C; Mazur, Erik C; Gibbons, William E; Lanz, Rainer B; DeMayo, Francesco J; Lydon, John P

    2016-04-01

    Progesterone, via the progesterone receptor (PGR), is essential for endometrial stromal cell decidualization, a cellular transformation event in which stromal fibroblasts differentiate into decidual cells. Uterine decidualization supports embryo implantation and placentation as well as subsequent events, which together ensure a successful pregnancy. Accordingly, impaired decidualization results not only in implantation failure or early fetal miscarriage, but also may lead to potential adverse outcomes in all three pregnancy trimesters. Transcriptional reprogramming on a genome-wide scale underlies progesterone dependent decidualization of the human endometrial stromal cell (hESC). However, identification of the functionally essential signals encoded by these global transcriptional changes remains incomplete. Importantly, this knowledge-gap undercuts future efforts to improve diagnosis and treatment of implantation failure based on a dysfunctional endometrium. By integrating genome-wide datasets derived from decidualization of hESCs in culture, we reveal that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) transcription factor is rapidly induced by progesterone and that this induction is indispensable for progesterone-dependent decidualization. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) identified at least ten progesterone response elements within the PLZF gene, indicating that PLZF may act as a direct target of PGR signaling. The spatiotemporal expression profile for PLZF in both the human and mouse endometrium offers further support for stromal PLZF as a mediator of the progesterone decidual signal. To identify functional targets of PLZF, integration of PLZF ChIP-Seq and RNA Pol II RNA-Seq datasets revealed that the early growth response 1 (EGR1) transcription factor is a PLZF target for which its level of expression must be reduced to enable progesterone dependent hESC decidualization. Apart from furnishing essential insights

  1. The Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Is Critical for Human Endometrial Stromal Cell Decidualization

    PubMed Central

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Szwarc, Maria M.; Vasquez, Yasmin M.; Peavey, Mary C.; Mazur, Erik C.; Gibbons, William E.; Lanz, Rainer B.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone, via the progesterone receptor (PGR), is essential for endometrial stromal cell decidualization, a cellular transformation event in which stromal fibroblasts differentiate into decidual cells. Uterine decidualization supports embryo implantation and placentation as well as subsequent events, which together ensure a successful pregnancy. Accordingly, impaired decidualization results not only in implantation failure or early fetal miscarriage, but also may lead to potential adverse outcomes in all three pregnancy trimesters. Transcriptional reprogramming on a genome-wide scale underlies progesterone dependent decidualization of the human endometrial stromal cell (hESC). However, identification of the functionally essential signals encoded by these global transcriptional changes remains incomplete. Importantly, this knowledge-gap undercuts future efforts to improve diagnosis and treatment of implantation failure based on a dysfunctional endometrium. By integrating genome-wide datasets derived from decidualization of hESCs in culture, we reveal that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) transcription factor is rapidly induced by progesterone and that this induction is indispensable for progesterone-dependent decidualization. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) identified at least ten progesterone response elements within the PLZF gene, indicating that PLZF may act as a direct target of PGR signaling. The spatiotemporal expression profile for PLZF in both the human and mouse endometrium offers further support for stromal PLZF as a mediator of the progesterone decidual signal. To identify functional targets of PLZF, integration of PLZF ChIP-Seq and RNA Pol II RNA-Seq datasets revealed that the early growth response 1 (EGR1) transcription factor is a PLZF target for which its level of expression must be reduced to enable progesterone dependent hESC decidualization. Apart from furnishing essential insights

  2. Human Dermis Harbors Distinct Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Vaculik, Christine; Schuster, Christopher; Bauer, Wolfgang; Iram, Nousheen; Pfisterer, Karin; Kramer, Gero; Reinisch, Andreas; Strunk, Dirk; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are found in a variety of adult tissues including human dermis. These MSCs are morphologically similar to bone marrow–derived MSCs, but are of unclear phenotype. To shed light on the characteristics of human dermal MSCs, this study was designed to identify and isolate dermal MSCs by a specific marker expression profile, and subsequently rate their mesenchymal differentiation potential. Immunohistochemical staining showed that MSC markers CD73/CD90/CD105, as well as CD271 and SSEA-4, are expressed on dermal cells in situ. Flow cytometric analysis revealed a phenotype similar to bone marrow–derived MSCs. Human dermal cells isolated by plastic adherence had a lower differentiation capacity as compared with bone marrow–derived MSCs. To distinguish dermal MSCs from differentiated fibroblasts, we immunoselected CD271+ and SSEA-4+ cells from adherent dermal cells and investigated their mesenchymal differentiation capacity. This revealed that cells with increased adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic potential were enriched in the dermal CD271+ population. The differentiation potential of dermal SSEA-4+ cells, in contrast, appeared to be limited to adipogenesis. These results indicate that specific cell populations with variable mesenchymal differentiation potential can be isolated from human dermis. Moreover, we identified three different subsets of dermal mesenchymal progenitor cells. PMID:22048731

  3. Human dermis harbors distinct mesenchymal stromal cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Vaculik, Christine; Schuster, Christopher; Bauer, Wolfgang; Iram, Nousheen; Pfisterer, Karin; Kramer, Gero; Reinisch, Andreas; Strunk, Dirk; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2012-03-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are found in a variety of adult tissues including human dermis. These MSCs are morphologically similar to bone marrow-derived MSCs, but are of unclear phenotype. To shed light on the characteristics of human dermal MSCs, this study was designed to identify and isolate dermal MSCs by a specific marker expression profile, and subsequently rate their mesenchymal differentiation potential. Immunohistochemical staining showed that MSC markers CD73/CD90/CD105, as well as CD271 and SSEA-4, are expressed on dermal cells in situ. Flow cytometric analysis revealed a phenotype similar to bone marrow-derived MSCs. Human dermal cells isolated by plastic adherence had a lower differentiation capacity as compared with bone marrow-derived MSCs. To distinguish dermal MSCs from differentiated fibroblasts, we immunoselected CD271(+) and SSEA-4(+) cells from adherent dermal cells and investigated their mesenchymal differentiation capacity. This revealed that cells with increased adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic potential were enriched in the dermal CD271(+) population. The differentiation potential of dermal SSEA-4(+) cells, in contrast, appeared to be limited to adipogenesis. These results indicate that specific cell populations with variable mesenchymal differentiation potential can be isolated from human dermis. Moreover, we identified three different subsets of dermal mesenchymal progenitor cells.

  4. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Possible Culprits in Solid Tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Johann, Pascal David; Müller, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The clinical use of bone marrow derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in different settings ranging from tissue engineering to immunotherapies has prompted investigations on the properties of these cells in a variety of other tissues. Particularly the role of MSCs in solid tumors has been the subject of many experimental approaches. While a clear phenotypical distinction of tumor associated fibroblasts (TAFs) and MSCs within the tumor microenvironment is still missing, the homing of bone marrow MSCs in tumor sites has been extensively studied. Both, tumor-promoting and tumor-inhibiting effects of BM-MSCs have been described in this context. This ambiguity requires a reappraisal of the different studies and experimental methods employed. Here, we review the current literature on tumor-promoting and tumor-inhibiting effects of BM-MSCs with a particular emphasis on their interplay with components of the immune system and also highlight a potential role of MSCs as cell of origin for certain mesenchymal tumors. PMID:26273308

  5. Fibroblastic Reticular Cells: Organization and Regulation of the T Lymphocyte Life Cycle1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Flavian D.; Turley, Shannon J.

    2014-01-01

    The connective tissue of any organ in the body is generally referred to as stroma. This complex network is commonly composed of leukocytes, extracellular matrix components, mesenchymal cells and a collection of nerves, blood and lymphoid vessels. Once viewed primarily as a structural entity, stromal cells of mesenchymal origin are now being intensely examined for their ability to directly regulate various components of immune cell function. There is particular interest in the ability of stromal cells to influence the homeostasis, activation and proliferation of T lymphocytes. One example of this regulation occurs in the lymph node (LN) where fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) support the maintenance of naïve T cells, induce antigen-specific tolerance and restrict the expansion of newly activated T cells. In an effort to highlight the varied immunoregulatory properties of FRCs, we have reviewed the most recent advances in this field and provide some insights into potential future directions. PMID:25663676

  6. Dependency of colorectal cancer on a TGF-beta-driven programme in stromal cells for metastasis initiation

    PubMed Central

    Calon, Alexandre; Espinet, Elisa; Palomo-Ponce, Sergio; Tauriello, Daniele V. F.; Iglesias, Mar; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Sevillano, Marta; Nadal, Cristina; Jung, Peter; Zhang, Xiang H.-F.; Byrom, Daniel; Riera, Antoni; Rossell, David; Mangues, Ramón; Massague, Joan; Sancho, Elena; Batlle, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A large proportion of colorectal cancers (CRCs) display mutational inactivation of the TGF-beta pathway yet paradoxically, they are characterized by elevated TGF-beta production. Here, we unveil a prometastatic programme induced by TGF-beta in the microenvironment that associates with a high-risk of CRC relapse upon treatment. The activity of TGF-beta on stromal cells increases the efficiency of organ colonization by CRC cells whereas mice treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of TGFBR1 are resilient to metastasis formation. Secretion of IL11 by TGF-beta-stimulated cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) triggers GP130/STAT3 signalling in tumour cells. This crosstalk confers a survival advantage to metastatic cells. The dependency on the TGF-beta stromal programme for metastasis initiation could be exploited to improve the diagnosis and treatment of CRC. PMID:23153532

  7. Cancer: An Oxidative Crosstalk between Solid Tumor Cells and Cancer Associated Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Arcucci, Alessandro; Ruocco, Maria Rosaria; Granato, Giuseppina; Sacco, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Redox balance is associated with the regulation of several cell signalling pathways and functions. In fact, under physiological conditions, cells maintain a balance between oxidant and antioxidant systems, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as second messengers to regulate cell proliferation, cell death, and other physiological processes. Cancer tissues usually contain higher levels of ROS than normal tissues, and this ROS overproduction is associated with tumor development. Neoplastic tissues are very heterogeneous systems, composed of tumor cells and microenvironment that has a critical role in tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent the main cell type of tumor microenvironment, and they contribute to tumor growth by undergoing an irreversible activation process. It is known that ROS can be transferred from cancer cells to fibroblasts. In particular, ROS affect the behaviour of CAFs by promoting the conversion of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts that support tumor progression and dissemination. Furthermore, the wrecking of redox homeostasis in cancer cells and tumor microenvironment induces a metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts, giving advantage to cancer growth. This review describes the role of ROS in tumor growth, by focusing on CAFs activation and metabolic interactions between cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. PMID:27595103

  8. Cancer: An Oxidative Crosstalk between Solid Tumor Cells and Cancer Associated Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Arcucci, Alessandro; Ruocco, Maria Rosaria; Granato, Giuseppina; Sacco, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Redox balance is associated with the regulation of several cell signalling pathways and functions. In fact, under physiological conditions, cells maintain a balance between oxidant and antioxidant systems, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as second messengers to regulate cell proliferation, cell death, and other physiological processes. Cancer tissues usually contain higher levels of ROS than normal tissues, and this ROS overproduction is associated with tumor development. Neoplastic tissues are very heterogeneous systems, composed of tumor cells and microenvironment that has a critical role in tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent the main cell type of tumor microenvironment, and they contribute to tumor growth by undergoing an irreversible activation process. It is known that ROS can be transferred from cancer cells to fibroblasts. In particular, ROS affect the behaviour of CAFs by promoting the conversion of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts that support tumor progression and dissemination. Furthermore, the wrecking of redox homeostasis in cancer cells and tumor microenvironment induces a metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts, giving advantage to cancer growth. This review describes the role of ROS in tumor growth, by focusing on CAFs activation and metabolic interactions between cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts.

  9. Cancer: An Oxidative Crosstalk between Solid Tumor Cells and Cancer Associated Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Arcucci, Alessandro; Ruocco, Maria Rosaria; Granato, Giuseppina; Sacco, Anna Maria; Montagnani, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Redox balance is associated with the regulation of several cell signalling pathways and functions. In fact, under physiological conditions, cells maintain a balance between oxidant and antioxidant systems, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as second messengers to regulate cell proliferation, cell death, and other physiological processes. Cancer tissues usually contain higher levels of ROS than normal tissues, and this ROS overproduction is associated with tumor development. Neoplastic tissues are very heterogeneous systems, composed of tumor cells and microenvironment that has a critical role in tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent the main cell type of tumor microenvironment, and they contribute to tumor growth by undergoing an irreversible activation process. It is known that ROS can be transferred from cancer cells to fibroblasts. In particular, ROS affect the behaviour of CAFs by promoting the conversion of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts that support tumor progression and dissemination. Furthermore, the wrecking of redox homeostasis in cancer cells and tumor microenvironment induces a metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts, giving advantage to cancer growth. This review describes the role of ROS in tumor growth, by focusing on CAFs activation and metabolic interactions between cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. PMID:27595103

  10. Stromal cell-based immunotherapy in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Ronald; Lu, Lina; Qian, Shiguang; Fung, John J

    2012-01-01

    Organs are composed of parenchymal cells that characterize organ function and nonparenchymal cells that are composed of cells in transit, as well as tissue connective tissue, also referred to as tissue stromal cells. It was originally thought that these tissue stromal cells provided only structural and functional support for parenchymal cells and were relatively inert. However, we have come to realize that tissue stromal cells, not restricted to in the thymus and lymphoid organs, also play an active role in modulating the immune system and its response to antigens. The recognition of these elements and the elucidation of their mechanisms of action have provided valuable insight into peripheral immune regulation. Extrapolation of these principles may allow us to utilize their potential for clinical application. In this article, we will summarize a number of tissue stromal elements/cell types that have been shown to induce hyporesponsiveness to transplants. We will also discuss the mechanisms by which these stromal cells create a tolerogenic environment, which in turn results in long-term allograft survival. PMID:22091683

  11. FAP-overexpressing fibroblasts produce an extracellular matrix that enhances invasive velocity and directionality of pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Alterations towards a permissive stromal microenvironment provide important cues for tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. In this study, Fibroblast activation protein (FAP), a serine protease selectively produced by tumor-associated fibroblasts in over 90% of epithelial tumors, was used as a platform for studying tumor-stromal interactions. We tested the hypothesis that FAP enzymatic activity locally modifies stromal ECM (extracellular matrix) components thus facilitating the formation of a permissive microenvironment promoting tumor invasion in human pancreatic cancer. Methods We generated a tetracycline-inducible FAP overexpressing fibroblastic cell line to synthesize an in vivo-like 3-dimensional (3D) matrix system which was utilized as a stromal landscape for studying matrix-induced cancer cell behaviors. A FAP-dependent topographical and compositional alteration of the ECM was characterized by measuring the relative orientation angles of fibronectin fibers and by Western blot analyses. The role of FAP in the matrix-induced permissive tumor behavior was assessed in Panc-1 cells in assorted matrices by time-lapse acquisition assays. Also, FAP+ matrix-induced regulatory molecules in cancer cells were determined by Western blot analyses. Results We observed that FAP remodels the ECM through modulating protein levels, as well as through increasing levels of fibronectin and collagen fiber organization. FAP-dependent architectural/compositional alterations of the ECM promote tumor invasion along characteristic parallel fiber orientations, as demonstrated by enhanced directionality and velocity of pancreatic cancer cells on FAP+ matrices. This phenotype can be reversed by inhibition of FAP enzymatic activity during matrix production resulting in the disorganization of the ECM and impeded tumor invasion. We also report that the FAP+ matrix-induced tumor invasion phenotype is β1-integrin/FAK mediated. Conclusion Cancer cell invasiveness can be affected by

  12. SU-E-J-105: Stromal-Epithelial Responses to Fractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Qayyum, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The stromal-epithelial-cell interactions that are responsible for directing normal breast-tissue development and maintenance play a central role in the progression of breast cancer. In the present study, we developed three-dimensional (3-D) cell co-cultures used to study cancerous mammary cell responses to fractionated radiotherapy. In particular, we focused on the role of the reactive stroma in determining the therapeutic ratio for postsurgical treatment. Methods: Cancerous human mammary epithelial cells were cultured in a 3-D collagen matrix with human fibroblasts stimulated by various concentrations of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). These culture samples were designed to model the post-lumpectomy mammary stroma in the presence of residual cancer cells. We tracked over time the changes in medium stiffness, fibroblast-cell activation (conversion to cancer activated fibroblasts (CAF)), and proliferation of both cell types under a variety of fractionated radiotherapy protocols. Samples were exposed to 6 MV X-rays from a linear accelerator in daily fraction sizes of 90, 180 and 360 cGy over five days in a manner consistent with irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. Results: We found in fractionation studies with fibroblasts and CAF that higher doses per fraction may be more effective early on in deactivating cancer-harboring cellular environments. Higher-dose fraction schemes inhibit contractility in CAF and prevent differentiation of fibroblasts, thereby metabolically uncoupling tumor cells from their surrounding stroma. Yet, over a longer time period, the higher dose fractions may slow wound healing and increase ECM stiffening that could stimulate proliferation of surviving cancer cells. Conclusion: The findings suggest that dose escalation to the region with residual disease can deactivate the reactive stroma, thus minimizing the cancer promoting features of the cellular environment. Large-fraction irradiation may be used to sterilize

  13. Corneal Fibroblast Migration Patterns During Intrastromal Wound Healing Correlate With ECM Structure and Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Petroll, W. Matthew; Kivanany, Pouriska B.; Hagenasr, Daniela; Graham, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess keratocyte backscattering, alignment, morphology, and connectivity in vivo following a full-thickness corneal injury using the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph Rostock Cornea Module (HRT-RCM), and to correlate these findings with en bloc three-dimensional (3-D) confocal fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. Methods Rabbit corneas were scanned in vivo both before and 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after transcorneal freeze injury (FI), which damages all corneal cell layers. Corneal tissue was also fixed and labeled for f-actin and nuclei en bloc, and imaged using 3-D confocal fluorescence microscopy and SHG imaging. Results Using the modified HRT-RCM, full-thickness scans of all cell layers were consistently obtained. Following FI, stromal cells repopulating the damaged tissue assumed an elongated fibroblastic morphology, and a significant increase in cellular light scattering was measured. This stromal haze gradually decreased as wound healing progressed. Parallel, interconnected streams of aligned corneal fibroblasts were observed both in vivo (from HRT-RCM reflection images) and ex vivo (from f-actin and nuclear labeling) during wound healing, particularly in the posterior cornea. Second harmonic generation imaging demonstrated that these cells were aligned parallel to the collagen lamellae. Conclusions The modified HRT-RCM allows in vivo measurements of sublayer thickness, assessment of cell morphology, alignment and connectivity, and estimation of stromal backscatter during wound healing. In this study, these in vivo observations led to the novel finding that the pattern of corneal fibroblast alignment is highly correlated with lamellar organization, suggesting contact guidance of intrastromal migration that may facilitate more rapid wound repopulation. PMID:26562169

  14. Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of bone marrow stromal cell surface gene, BST2, that may be involved in pre-B-cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Jun; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Tomizawa, Hitoshi

    1995-04-10

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate B-cell growth and development through their surface molecules and cytokines. In this study, we generated a mAb, RS38, that recognized a novel human membrane protein, BST-2, expressed on bone marrow stromal cell lines and synovial cell lines. We cloned a cDNA encoding BST-2 from a rheumatoid arthritis-derived synovial cell line. BST-2 is a 30- to 36-kDa type II transmembrane protein, consisting of 180 amino acids. The BST-2 gene (HGMW-approved symbol BST2) is located on chromosome 19p13.2. BST-2 is expressed not only on certain bone marrow stromal cell lines but also on various normal tissues, although its expression pattern is different from that of another bone marrow stromal cell surface molecule, BST-1. BST-2 surface expression on fibroblast cell lines facilitated the stromal cell-dependent growth of a murine bone marrow-derived pre-B-cell line, DW34. The results suggest that BST-2 may be involved in pre-B-cell growth. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Antigen Presenting Cells and Stromal Cells Trigger Human Natural Killer Lymphocytes to Autoreactivity: Evidence for the Involvement of Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors (NCR) and NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Alessandro; Zocchi, Maria Raffaella

    2006-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) lymphocytes should not damage autologous cells due to the engagement of inhibitory receptor superfamily (IRS) members by HLA-I. Nevertheless, NK cells kill self cells expressing low levels or lacking HLA-I, as it may occur during viral infections (missing-self hypothesis). Herein, we show that human NK cells can be activated upon binding with self antigen presenting cells or stromal cells despite the expression of HLA-I. Indeed, NK cells can kill and produce pro-inflammatory and regulating cytokines as IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL10 during interaction with autologous dendritic cells or bone marrow stromal cells or skin fibroblasts. The killing of antigen presenting and stromal cells is dependent on LFA1/ICAM1 interaction. Further, the natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCR) NKp30 and NKp46 are responsible for the delivery of lethal hit to DC, whereas NKG2D activating receptor, the ligand of the MHC-related molecule MIC-A and the UL16 binding protein, is involved in stromal cell killing. These findings indicate that different activating receptors are involved in cell to self cell interaction. Finally, NK cells can revert the veto effect of stromal cells on mixed lymphocyte reaction further supporting the idea that NK cells may alter the interaction between T lymphocytes and microenvironment leading to autoreactivity. PMID:17162374

  16. Surgical Treatment of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract and is most frequently developed in the stomach in the form of submucosal tumor. The incidence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is estimated to be as high as 25% of the population when all small and asymptomatic tumors are included. Because gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is not completely distinguished from other submucosal tumors, a surgical excisional biopsy is recommended for tumors >2 cm. The surgical principles of gastrointestinal stromal tumor are composed of an R0 resection with a normal mucosa margin, no systemic lymph node dissection, and avoidance of perforation, which results in peritoneal seeding even in cases with otherwise low risk profiles. Laparoscopic surgery has been indicated for gastrointestinal stromal tumors <5 cm, and the indication for laparoscopic surgery is expanded to larger tumors if the above mentioned surgical principles can be maintained. A simple exogastric resection and various transgastric resection techniques are used for gastrointestinal stromal tumors in favorable locations (the fundus, body, greater curvature side). For a lesion at the gastroesophageal junction in the posterior wall of the stomach, enucleation techniques have been tried preserve the organ's function. Those methods have a theoretical risk of seeding a ruptured tumor, but this risk has not been evaluated by well-designed clinical trials. While some clinical trials are still on-going, neoadjuvant imatinib is suggested when marginally unresectable or multiorgan resection is anticipated to reduce the extent of surgery and the chance of incomplete resection, rupture or bleeding. PMID:23610714

  17. RalA Function in Dermal Fibroblasts is Required for the Progression of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Sowalsky, Adam G.; Alt-Holland, Addy; Shamis, Yulia; Garlick, Jonathan A.; Feig, Larry A.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of evidence has shown that stromal cells play a significant role in determining the fate of neighboring tumor cells through the secretion of various cytokines. How cytokine secretion by stromal cells is regulated in this context is poorly understood. In this study, we used a bioengineered human tissue model of skin squamous cell carcinoma progression to reveal that RalA function in dermal fibroblasts is required for tumor progression of neighboring neoplastic keratinocytes. This conclusion is based on the observations that suppression of RalA expression in dermal fibroblasts blocked tumorigenic keratinocytes from invading into the dermal compartment of engineered tissues, and suppressed more advanced tumor progression after these tissues were transplanted onto the dorsum of mice. RalA executes this tumor-promoting function of dermal fibroblasts, at least in part, by mediating HGF secretion through its effector proteins, the Sec5 and Exo84 subunits of the exocyst complex. These findings reveal a new level of HGF regulation and highlight the RalA signaling cascade in dermal fibroblasts as a potential anti-cancer target. PMID:21159665

  18. Colorectal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts are Genotypically Distinct

    PubMed Central

    Mrazek, Amy A.; Carmical, Joseph R.; Wood, Thomas G.; Hellmich, Mark R.; Eltorky, Mahmoud; Bohanon, Frederick J.; Chao, Celia

    2014-01-01

    Cells in the stromal microenvironment facilitate colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and “co-evolve” with the epithelial cancer cells. Genetic and epigenetic differences between normal colorectal mucosa fibroblasts (NF) and carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are not known. The aim of this study is to identify differentially expressed genes and promoter methylation between NF and CAF in human CRC. RNA and DNA were extracted from cultured NF and CAF from CRC resections. Genome-wide gene expression and methylation analyses were performed using the Illumina Human HT-12 v4.0 Expression and Illumina Human Methylation 27 BeadChips. Gene expression values between NF and CAF were compared and correlated with methylation patterns. Data was analyzed using Partek Genomics Suite using one-way ANOVA and p<0.05 as significant. Ingenuity iReport™ was performed to identify potential differences in biological functions and pathways between the NF and CAF. Paired methylation and gene expression analyses from 11 NF and 10 CAF colorectal samples are reported. Unsupervised analysis of differentially expressed genes using iReport™ identified “Top Diseases” as “Cancer” and “Colorectal Cancer”. Previous genome wide studies have focused on the cancer cells. We have identified differentially expressed genes and differentially methylated promoter regions that are CAF-specific in CRC. PMID:25530743

  19. Cathelicidin suppresses colon cancer development by inhibition of cancer associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Michelle; Ho, Samantha; Yoo, Jun Hwan; Tran, Deanna Hoang-Yen; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Su, Bowei; Tran, Diana Hoang-Ngoc; Kubota, Yuzu; Ichikawa, Ryan; Koon, Hon Wai

    2015-01-01

    Background Cathelicidin (LL-37 in humans and mCRAMP in mice) represents a family of endogenous antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides. Cancer-associated fibroblasts can promote the proliferation of colon cancer cells and growth of colon cancer tumors. Methods We examined the role of cathelicidin in the development of colon cancer, using subcutaneous human HT-29 colon-cancer-cell-derived tumor model in nude mice and azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-mediated colon cancer model in C57BL/6 mice. We also determined the indirect antitumoral mechanism of cathelicidin via the inhibition of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) of colon cancer cells and fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Results Intravenous administration of cathelicidin expressing adeno-associated virus significantly reduced the size of tumors, tumor-derived collagen expression, and tumor-derived fibroblast expression in HT-29-derived subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. Enema administration of the mouse cathelicidin peptide significantly reduced the size and number of colonic tumors in azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-treated mice without inducing apoptosis in tumors and the adjacent normal colonic tissues. Cathelicidin inhibited the collagen expression and vimentin-positive fibroblast expression in colonic tumors. Cathelicidin did not directly affect HT-29 cell viability, but did significantly reduce tumor growth factor-β1-induced EMT of colon cancer cells. Media conditioned by the human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts promoted human colon cancer HT-29 cell proliferation. Cathelicidin pretreatment inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation mediated by media conditioned by human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts. Cathelicidin disrupted tubulin distribution in colonic fibroblasts. Disruption of tubulin in fibroblasts reduced fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Conclusion Cathelicidin effectively inhibits colon cancer development by interfering with EMT and fibroblast

  20. Heparin fragments modulate the collagen phenotype of fibroblasts from radiation-induced subcutaneous fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    el Nabout, R.; Martin, M.; Remy, J.; Robert, L.; Lafuma, C. )

    1989-10-01

    Acute local gamma irradiation of porcine skin induces, as in human skin, an extensive and mutilating sclerosis characterized by continuous expansion of the fibrosis invading the adjacent muscle and by accumulation of the macromolecular components of the extracellular matrix. Collagen synthesis, content, and types were studied in the presence of heparin fragments (100 micrograms/10(6) cells) in the culture medium, by measuring the incorporation of the radiolabeled precursor (3H)proline into confluent primary cultures of porcine fibroblasts obtained from normal and irradiated fibrotic dermis. Enhancement in collagen biosynthesis and deposition and preferential increase in collagen type III synthesis were observed in fibrotic fibroblast cultures when compared to those in normal dermis fibroblasts. The total collagen synthesis and the rate of collagen hydroxylation appear unmodified by heparin fragments both in normal and in fibrotic fibroblast cultures. But heparin fragments induce a 10- and 2-fold decrease, respectively, in collagen type III and type V syntheses by fibrosis fibroblasts. As only minor effects upon collagen type III and V are observed in cultures of normal dermis fibroblasts, these results highly suggest that heparin fragments are capable of specifically modulating the collagen phenotype of fibroblasts derived from radiation-induced dermis fibrosis and thus are able to regulate the fibrotic process.

  1. Characterization of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Vocal Fold Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Summer; Kim, Jaehyup; Quinchia Johnson, Beatriz H.; Bradley, Bridget; Breunig, Melissa; Hematti, Peiman; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective/Hypothesis Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) originally isolated from bone marrow, are fibroblast-looking cells that are now assumed to be present in the stromal component of many tissues. MSCs are characterized by a certain set of criteria including their growth culture characteristics, a combination of cell surface markers, and the ability to differentiate along multiple mesenchymal tissue lineages. We hypothesized that human vocal fold fibroblasts (hVFF) isolated from the lamina propria meet the criteria established to define MSCs and are functionally similar to MSCs derived from BM and adipose tissue. Study Design In vitro study Methods HVFF were previously derived from human vocal fold tissues. MSCs were derived from adipose tissue (AT), and BM of healthy donors, based on their attachment to culture dishes and their morphology, and expanded in culture. Cells were analyzed for standard cell surface markers identified on BM-derived MSCs as well as the ability to differentiate into cells of mesenchymal lineage, i.e. fat, bone and cartilage. We investigated the immunophenotype of these cells before and after interferon-γ (INF- γ) stimulation. Results HVFF displayed cell surface markers and multipotent differentiation capacity characteristic of MSCs. Furthermore, these cells exhibited similar patterns of expression of HLA and co-stimulatory molecules, after stimulation with INF- γ compared to MSCs derived from BM and AT. Conclusions Based on our findings hVFF derived from lamina propria have the same cell surface markers, immunophenotypic characteristics, and differentiation potential as BM- and AT-derived MSCs. We propose VF fibroblasts are MSCs resident in the vocal fold lamina propria. PMID:20131365

  2. Treatment for Stromal Tumors of the Ovary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Ovarian Cancer » Detailed Guide » Treatment for stromal tumors of the ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Ovarian Cancer + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » Treating Ovarian ...

  3. Phenotypic Characterization of Chicken Thymic Stromal Elements

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Trevor J.; Bean, Andrew G.; Ward, Harry A.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    1992-01-01

    Phenotypic profiles of the thymic stromal components provide an excellent approach to elucidating the nature of the microenvironment of this organ. To address this issue in chickens, we have produced an extensive panel of 18 mAb to the thymic stroma. These mAb have been extensively characterized with respect to their phenotypic specificities and reveal that the stromal cells are equally as complex as the T cells whose maturation they direct. They further demonstrate that, in comparison to the mammalian thymus, there is a remarkable degree of conservation in thymic architecture between phylogenetically diverse species. Eleven mAb reacted with thymic epithelial cells: MUI-73 was panepithelium, MUI-54 stained all cortical and medullary epithelium but only a minority of the subcapsule, MUI-52 was specific for isolated stellate cortical epithelial cells, MUI-62, -69, and -71 were specific for the medulla (including Hassall’s corpusclelike structures), MUI-51, -53, -70, and -75 reacted only with the type-I epithelium, or discrete regions therein, lining the subcapsular and perivascular regions and MUI-58 demonstrated the antigenic similarity between the subcapsule and the medulla. Seven other mAb identified distinct isolated stromal cells throughout the cortex and medulla. Large thymocyte-rich regions, which often spanned from the outer cortex to medulla, lacked epithelial cells. These mAb should prove invaluable for determining the functional significance of thymic stromal-cell subsets to thymopoiesis. PMID:1387829

  4. Androgen receptor expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors in a large series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Clinical and pathologic data were reviewed in 427 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and the expression of such hormone receptors was investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray technique. All tumors were negative for estrogen receptor expression. Progesterone and androgen receptors expression was observed in 5.4% and 17.6% of tumors, respectively. We found the higher average age at diagnosis, the lower frequency of tumors located in the small intestine, and the higher frequency of extragastrointestinal tumors to be statistically significant in the group of tumors with androgen receptor expression in contrast to the group showing no androgen receptor expression. There was no statistic difference between such groups regarding sex, tumor size, mitotic count, cell morphology, and risk of aggressive behavior. Considering that the expression of androgen receptors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors is not negligible, further studies are encouraged to establish the role of androgen deprivation therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  5. Pleiotropic actions of miR-21 highlight the critical role of deregulated stromal microRNAs during colorectal cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Bullock, M D; Pickard, K M; Nielsen, B S; Sayan, A E; Jenei, V; Mellone, M; Mitter, R; Primrose, J N; Thomas, G J; Packham, G K; Mirenzami, A H; Mirnezami, A H

    2013-01-01

    The oncogene microRNA-21 (miRNA; miR-21) is overexpressed in most solid organ tumours; however, a recent examination of stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens suggests this may be a stromal phenomenon and not only a feature of cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo studies show that miR-21 has potent pro-metastatic effects in various malignant carcinoma cell lines. The tumour microenvironment has also been identified as a key actor during the metastatic cascade; however to date the significance of deregulated miR-21 expression within the cancer-associated stroma has not been examined. In the present study, a quantitative RT-PCR-based analysis of laser microdissected tissue confirmed that miR-21 expression is associated with a four-fold mean increase in CRC stroma compared with normal tissue. In situ hybridisation using locked nucleic acid probes localised miR-21 expression predominantly to fibroblasts within tumour-associated stroma. To study the molecular and biological impact of deregulated stromal miR-21 in CRC, stable ectopic expression was induced in immortalised fibroblasts. This resulted in upregulated α-smooth muscle actin expression implying miR-21 overexpression is driving the fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transdifferentiation. Conditioned medium from miR-21-overexpressing fibroblasts protected CRC cells from oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis and increased their proliferative capacity. 3D organotypic co-cultures containing fibroblasts and CRC cells revealed that ectopic stromal miR-21 expression was associated with increased epithelial invasiveness. Reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with kazal motifs, an inhibitor of matrix-remodelling enzyme MMP2, was significantly downregulated by ectopic miR-21 in established and primary colorectal fibroblasts with a reciprocal rise in MMP2 activity. Inhibition of MMP2 abrogated the invasion-promoting effects of ectopic miR-21. This data, which characterises a novel pro-metastatic mechanism mediated by miR-21 in the

  6. Interaction between Macrophages and Fibroblasts during Wound Healing of Burn Injuries in Rats.

    PubMed

    Oka, Takeshi; Ohta, Keisuke; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the structural changes and cell-to-cell interactions occurring during wound healing of burn injuries is essential to elucidate the morphological characteristics of the reconstitution of tissue architecture. However, conventional approaches do not provide sufficient information with respect to cell-to-cell interactions during wound healing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction between bone marrow-derived cells and resident stromal cells throughout the wound healing of burn injuries, using immunohistochemistry and focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography. We induced third-degree burn injuries on the backs of Wistar rats with a heated cylindrical aluminum block (2.0 cm in diameter). At 7 and 14 days after the burn injuries, the burned skin was immunostained with anti-Iba1 and anti-HSP47 antibodies for visualization of bone marrow-derived cells/macrophages and resident stromal cells/fibroblasts, respectively. Normal skin tissue was used as a control. Double-staining immunohistochemistry revealed frequent contacts between macrophages and fibroblasts and a higher contact ratio in the 3 normal skin compared with burned skin, particularly in the areas of granuloma. Three-dimensional ultrastructural analysis with focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography revealed that macrophages and fibroblasts were located closer together in the normal skin than in the burned skin, confirming the analysis by light microscopic observations and ultrastructural analysis from single sections. These results highlight the importance of contact between macrophages and fibroblasts in the maintenance of skin tissue structure and during wound healing. PMID:27237937

  7. Stromal Cells Positively and Negatively Modulate the Growth of Cancer Cells: Stimulation via the PGE2-TNFα-IL-6 Pathway and Inhibition via Secreted GAPDH-E-Cadherin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Manabu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ohba, Shun-ichi; Yoshida, Junjiro; Masuda, Tohru; Yamasaki, Manabu; Usami, Ihomi; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Abe, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takumi; Yamori, Takao; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Nomoto, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast-like stromal cells modulate cancer cells through secreted factors and adhesion, but those factors are not fully understood. Here, we have identified critical stromal factors that modulate cancer growth positively and negatively. Using a cell co-culture system, we found that gastric stromal cells secreted IL-6 as a growth and survival factor for gastric cancer cells. Moreover, gastric cancer cells secreted PGE2 and TNFα that stimulated IL-6 secretion by the stromal cells. Furthermore, we found that stromal cells secreted glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Extracellular GAPDH, or its N-terminal domain, inhibited gastric cancer cell growth, a finding confirmed in other cell systems. GAPDH bound to E-cadherin and downregulated the mTOR-p70S6 kinase pathway. These results demonstrate that stromal cells could regulate cancer cell growth through the balance of these secreted factors. We propose that negative regulation of cancer growth using GAPDH could be a new anti-cancer strategy. PMID:25785838

  8. Defining Essential Stem Cell Characteristics in Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Extracted from Distinct Anatomical Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Patrick C.; Francis, Michael P.; Zhao, Min; Brumelle, Jenni; Rao, Raj R.; Elmore, Lynne W.; Holt, Shawn E.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) has created many opportunities for the development of patient-specific cell-based replacement therapies. We have isolated multiple cell strains of ASCs from various anatomical sites (abdomen, arms/legs, breast, buttocks), indicating wide-spread distribution of ASCs throughout the body. Unfortunately, there exists a general lack of agreement in the literature as to their “stem cell” characteristics. We find that telomerase activity and expression of its catalytic subunit in ASCs are both below the levels of detection, independent of age and culturing conditions. ASCs also undergo telomere attrition and eventually senesce, while maintaining a stable karyotype without the development of spontaneous tumor-associated abnormalities. Using a set of cell surface markers that have been promoted to identify ASCs, we find that they failed to distinguish ASCs from normal fibroblasts, as both are positive for CD29, CD73, and CD105 and negative for CD14, CD31, and CD45. All of the ASC isolates are multipotent, capable of differentiating into osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, while fibroblasts show no differentiation potential. Our ASC strains also show elevated expression of genes associated with pluripotent cells, Oct-4, SOX2, and NANOG when compared to fibroblasts and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), although the levels were lower than induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). Together, our data suggest that while the cell surface profile of ASCs does not distinguish them from normal fibroblasts, their differentiation capacity and the expression of genes closely linked to pluripotency clearly define ASCs as multipotent stem cells, regardless of tissue isolation location. PMID:22628159

  9. Characteristics of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Isolated from Human Endometrium and Endometriosis Lesions.

    PubMed

    Savilova, A M; Yushina, M N; Rudimova, Yu V; Khabas, G N; Chuprynin, V D; Sukhikh, G T

    2016-08-01

    Cell cultures isolated from endometriosis lesions by enzymatic dissociation consisted of fibroblast-like cells expressing CD90, CD73, and CD105; cell viability in these cultures was >90%, but this parameter decreased by passage 3. Zero passage cultures contained 10-25% epithelial cells expressing cytokeratin-7, but by passage 2, the cultures became more homogeneous and epithelial cells disappeared. The proportion of proliferating cells and population doubling level increased from passage 1 to passage 3. The cultures from the endometrium were induced to adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. The cultures derived from ectopic endometrium have properties of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells that exhibited in vitro similarities and differences from cell cultures from eutopic endometrium, which allows using this cell model for the search and testing of new drugs and technologies aimed at suppression of the growth and spread of endometriosis lesions. PMID:27590769

  10. Dynamic mast cell-stromal cell interactions promote growth of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying; Hwang, Rosa F.; Logsdon, Craig D.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) exists in a complex desmoplastic microenvironment, which includes cancer-associated fibroblasts (also known as pancreatic stellate cells, PSCs) and immune cells that provide a fibrotic niche that impedes successful cancer therapy. We have found that mast cells are essential for PDAC tumorigenesis. Whether mast cells contribute to the growth of PDAC and/or PSCs is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that mast cells contribute to the growth of PSCs and tumor cells, thus contributing to PDAC development. Tumor cells promoted mast cell migration. Both tumor cells and PSCs stimulated mast cell activation. Conversely, mast cell-derived IL-13 and tryptase stimulated PSC proliferation. Treating tumor-bearing mice with agents that block mast cell migration and function depressed PDAC growth. Our findings suggest that mast cells exacerbate the cellular and extracellular dynamics of the tumor microenvironment found in PDAC. Therefore, targeting mast cells may inhibit stromal formation and improve therapy. PMID:23633481

  11. Impaired Capacity of Fibroblasts to Support Airway Epithelial Progenitors in Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Su-Bei; Sun, Xin; Wu, Qi; Wu, Jun-Ping; Chen, Huai-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) often develops in transplant patients and results in injury to the respiratory and terminal airway epithelium. Owing to its rising incidence, the pathogenesis of BOS is currently an area of intensive research. Studies have shown that injury to the respiratory epithelium results in dysregulation of epithelial repair. Airway epithelial regeneration is supported by stromal cells, including fibroblasts. This study aimed to investigate whether the supportive role of lung fibroblasts is altered in BOS. Methods: Suspensions of lung cells were prepared by enzyme digestion. Lung progenitor cells (LPCs) were separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Lung fibroblasts from patients with BOS or healthy controls were mixed with sorted mouse LPCs to compare the colony-forming efficiency of LPCs by counting the number of colonies with a diameter of ≥50 μm in each culture. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS 17.0 software (SPSS Inc., USA). The paired Student's t-test was used to test for statistical significance. Results: LPCs were isolated with the surface phenotype of CD31- CD34- CD45- EpCAM+ Sca-1+. The colony-forming efficiency of LPCs was significantly reduced when co-cultured with fibroblasts isolated from patients with BOS. The addition of SB431542 increased the colony-forming efficiency of LPCs to 1.8%; however, it was still significantly less than that in co-culture with healthy control fibroblasts (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The epithelial-supportive capacity of fibroblasts is impaired in the development of BOS and suggest that inefficient repair of airway epithelium could contribute to persistent airway inflammation in BOS. PMID:27569228

  12. Silibinin prevents prostate cancer cell-mediated differentiation of naïve fibroblasts into cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype by targeting TGF β2.

    PubMed

    Ting, Harold J; Deep, Gagan; Jain, Anil K; Cimic, Adela; Sirintrapun, Joseph; Romero, Lina M; Cramer, Scott D; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-09-01

    Tumor microenvironment (TM) is an essential element in prostate cancer (PCA), offering unique opportunities for its prevention. TM includes naïve fibroblasts that are recruited by nascent neoplastic lesion and altered into 'cancer-associated fibroblasts' (CAFs) that promote PCA. A better understanding and targeting of interaction between PCA cells and fibroblasts and inhibiting CAF phenotype through non-toxic agents are novel approaches to prevent PCA progression. One well-studied cancer chemopreventive agent is silibinin, and thus, we examined its efficacy against PCA cells-mediated differentiation of naïve fibroblasts into a myofibroblastic-phenotype similar to that found in CAFs. Silibinin's direct inhibitory effect on the phenotype of CAFs derived directly from PCA patients was also assessed. Human prostate stromal cells (PrSCs) exposed to control conditioned media (CCM) from human PCA PC3 cells showed more invasiveness, with increased alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin expression, and differentiation into a phenotype we identified in CAFs. Importantly, silibinin (at physiologically achievable concentrations) inhibited α-SMA expression and invasiveness in differentiated fibroblasts and prostate CAFs directly, as well as indirectly by targeting PCA cells. The observed increase in α-SMA and CAF-like phenotype was transforming growth factor (TGF) β2 dependent, which was strongly inhibited by silibinin. Furthermore, induction of α-SMA and CAF phenotype by CCM were also strongly inhibited by a TGFβ2-neutralizing antibody. The inhibitory effect of silibinin on TGFβ2 expression and CAF-like biomarkers was also observed in PC3 tumors. Together, these findings highlight the potential usefulness of silibinin in PCA prevention through targeting the CAF phenotype in the prostate TM.

  13. Suppression of SRC Signaling Is Effective in Reducing Synergy between Glioblastoma and Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Calgani, Alessia; Vignaroli, Giulia; Zamperini, Claudio; Coniglio, Federica; Festuccia, Claudio; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Mattei, Claudia; Vitale, Flora; Schenone, Silvia; Botta, Maurizio; Angelucci, Adriano

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma cells efficiently interact with and infiltrate the surrounding normal tissue, rendering surgical resection and adjuvant chemo/radiotherapy ineffective. New therapeutic targets, able to interfere with glioblastoma's capacity to synergize with normal brain tissue, are currently under investigation. The compound Si306, a pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine derivative, selected for its favorable activity against SRC, was tested in vitro and in vivo on glioblastoma cell lines. In vivo, combination treatment with Si306 and radiotherapy was strongly active in reducing U-87 xenograft growth with respect to control and single treatments. The histology revealed a significant difference in the stromal compartment of tumoral tissue derived from control or radiotherapy-treated samples with respect to Si306-treated samples, showing in the latter a reduced presence of collagen and α-SMA-positive cells. This effect was paralleled in vitro by the capacity of Si306 to interfere with myofibroblastic differentiation of normal fibroblasts induced by U-87 cells. In the presence of Si306, TGF-β released by U-87 cells, mainly in hypoxia, was ineffective in upregulating α-SMA and β-PDGFR in fibroblasts. Si306 efficiently reached the brain and significantly prolonged the survival of mice orthotopically injected with U-87 cells. Drugs that target SRC could represent an effective therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma, able to block positive paracrine loop with stromal cells based on the β-PDGFR axis and the formation of a tumor-promoting microenvironment. This approach could be important in combination with conventional treatments in the effort to reduce tumor resistance to therapy. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1535-44. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196762

  14. Role of non-genomic androgen signalling in suppressing proliferation of fibroblasts and fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Castoria, G; Giovannelli, P; Di Donato, M; Ciociola, A; Hayashi, R; Bernal, F; Appella, E; Auricchio, F; Migliaccio, A

    2014-12-04

    The functions of androgen receptor (AR) in stromal cells are still debated in spite of the demonstrated importance of these cells in organ development and diseases. Here, we show that physiological androgen concentration (10 nM R1881 or DHT) fails to induce DNA synthesis, while it consistently stimulates cell migration in mesenchymal and transformed mesenchymal cells. Ten nanomolar R1881 triggers p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and its stabilization in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Activation of Rac and its downstream effector DYRK 1B is responsible for p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and cell quiescence. Ten nanomolar androgen also inhibits transformation induced by oncogenic Ras in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Overexpression of an AR mutant unable to interact with filamin A, use of a small peptide displacing AR/filamin A interaction, and filamin A knockdown indicate that the androgen-triggered AR/filamin A complex regulates the pathway leading to p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. As the AR/filamin A complex is also responsible for migration stimulated by 10 nM androgen, our report shows that the androgen-triggered AR/filamin A complex controls, through Rac 1, the decision of cells to halt cell cycle and migration. This study reveals a new and unexpected role of androgen/AR signalling in coordinating stromal cell functions.

  15. Tumor and Stromal-Based Contributions to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Markwell, Steven M.; Weed, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is typically diagnosed at advanced stages with evident loco-regional and/or distal metastases. The prevalence of metastatic lesions directly correlates with poor patient outcome, resulting in high patient mortality rates following metastatic development. The progression to metastatic disease requires changes not only in the carcinoma cells, but also in the surrounding stromal cells and tumor microenvironment. Within the microenvironment, acellular contributions from the surrounding extracellular matrix, along with contributions from various infiltrating immune cells, tumor associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells facilitate the spread of tumor cells from the primary site to the rest of the body. Thus far, most attempts to limit metastatic spread through therapeutic intervention have failed to show patient benefit in clinic trails. The goal of this review is highlight the complexity of invasion-promoting interactions in the HNSCC tumor microenvironment, focusing on contributions from tumor and stromal cells in order to assist future therapeutic development and patient treatment. PMID:25734659

  16. Stromal SLIT2 impacts on pancreatic cancer-associated neural remodeling.

    PubMed

    Secq, V; Leca, J; Bressy, C; Guillaumond, F; Skrobuk, P; Nigri, J; Lac, S; Lavaut, M-N; Bui, T-T; Thakur, A K; Callizot, N; Steinschneider, R; Berthezene, P; Dusetti, N; Ouaissi, M; Moutardier, V; Calvo, E; Bousquet, C; Garcia, S; Bidaut, G; Vasseur, S; Iovanna, J L; Tomasini, R

    2015-01-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a critical health issue in the field of cancer, with few therapeutic options. Evidence supports an implication of the intratumoral microenvironment (stroma) on PDA progression. However, its contribution to the role of neuroplastic changes within the pathophysiology and clinical course of PDA, through tumor recurrence and neuropathic pain, remains unknown, neglecting a putative, therapeutic window. Here, we report that the intratumoral microenvironment is a mediator of PDA-associated neural remodeling (PANR), and we highlight factors such as 'SLIT2' (an axon guidance molecule), which is expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), that impact on neuroplastic changes in human PDA. We showed that 'CAF-secreted SLIT2' increases neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia neurons as well as from Schwann cell migration/proliferation by modulating N-cadherin/β-catenin signaling. Importantly, SLIT2/ROBO signaling inhibition disrupts this stromal/neural connection. Finally, we revealed that SLIT2 expression and CAFs are correlated with neural remodeling within human and mouse PDA. All together, our data demonstrate the implication of CAFs, through the secretion of axon guidance molecule, in PANR. Furthermore, it provides rationale to investigate the disruption of the stromal/neural compartment connection with SLIT2/ROBO inhibitors for the treatment of pancreatic cancer recurrence and pain.

  17. Stromal modulation and its role in the diagnosis of papillary patterned thyroid lesions.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Sahar Aly; Esmail, Reham Shehab El Nemr; Hareedy, Amal Ahmed; Khalil, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The papillary patterned lesion of thyroid may be challenging with many diagnostic pitfalls. Tumor stroma plays an important part in the determination of the tumor phenotype. CD34 is thought to be involved in the modulation of cell adhesion and signal transduction as CD34(+) fibrocytes are potent antigen-presenting cells. Smooth muscle actin (SMA) positivity could be diagnostic for fibroblast activation during tumorigenesis. We aimed to examine the expression of CD34 and alphaSMA in the stroma of papillary thyroid hyperplasia, papillary thyroid carcinoma and papillary tumors of uncertain malignant potential in order to elucidate their possible differential distribution and roles. A total number of 54 cases with papillary thyroid lesions were studied by routine HandE staining, CD34 and ASMA immunostaining. ASMA was not expressed in benign papillary hyperplastic lesions while it was expressed in papillary carcinoma, indicating that tumors have modulated stroma. Although the stroma was not well developed in papillary lesions with equivocal features of uncertain potentiality, CD34 was notable in such cases with higher incidence in malignant cases. So ASMA as well as CD34 could predict neoplastic behavior, pointing to the importance of the stromal role. Differences between groups suggest that the presence of CD34 + stromal cells is an early event in carcinogensis and is associated with neoplasia, however ASMA+ cells are more likely to be associated with malignant behavior and metastatic potential adding additional tools to the light microscopic picture helping in diagnosis of problematic cases with HandE.

  18. Isolation, Culture, and Characterization of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Bieback, Karen; Netsch, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (CB) is considered one of the youngest available sources of adult stem cells. Besides hematopoietic stem cells, CB has been shown to contain endothelial progenitor cells as well as mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC). To isolate MSC from cord blood, CB is collected into a sterile bag containing the anticoagulant citrate-phosphate-dextrose (CPD). The CB is then processed by density-gradient centrifugation to obtain mononuclear cells (MNC). These are cultured until the outgrowth of fibroblastoid cell colonies appears. After reaching a subconfluent stage, cells are harvested, expanded, and characterized as cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells (CB-MSC) according to standard criteria: plastic adherence, fibroblast morphology, CFU-f assay, proliferation potential, immune phenotype, and differentiation potential.Apparently, the frequency of MSC in CB is extremely low. Thus, not every CB unit will provide adequate MSC isolation yields. Different strategies have been proposed aiming to optimize the isolation success by selecting CB units of optimal quality. It is commonly agreed on that a high CB volume, a high cellular content, and a short time frame between birth and MSC isolation are criteria that will enhance the MSC isolation success.The procedures in this chapter are standardized protocols that were established and optimized in the authors' research laboratory; however, various modifications of the protocols are possible. PMID:27236676

  19. Stromal modulation and its role in the diagnosis of papillary patterned thyroid lesions.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Sahar Aly; Esmail, Reham Shehab El Nemr; Hareedy, Amal Ahmed; Khalil, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The papillary patterned lesion of thyroid may be challenging with many diagnostic pitfalls. Tumor stroma plays an important part in the determination of the tumor phenotype. CD34 is thought to be involved in the modulation of cell adhesion and signal transduction as CD34(+) fibrocytes are potent antigen-presenting cells. Smooth muscle actin (SMA) positivity could be diagnostic for fibroblast activation during tumorigenesis. We aimed to examine the expression of CD34 and alphaSMA in the stroma of papillary thyroid hyperplasia, papillary thyroid carcinoma and papillary tumors of uncertain malignant potential in order to elucidate their possible differential distribution and roles. A total number of 54 cases with papillary thyroid lesions were studied by routine HandE staining, CD34 and ASMA immunostaining. ASMA was not expressed in benign papillary hyperplastic lesions while it was expressed in papillary carcinoma, indicating that tumors have modulated stroma. Although the stroma was not well developed in papillary lesions with equivocal features of uncertain potentiality, CD34 was notable in such cases with higher incidence in malignant cases. So ASMA as well as CD34 could predict neoplastic behavior, pointing to the importance of the stromal role. Differences between groups suggest that the presence of CD34 + stromal cells is an early event in carcinogensis and is associated with neoplasia, however ASMA+ cells are more likely to be associated with malignant behavior and metastatic potential adding additional tools to the light microscopic picture helping in diagnosis of problematic cases with HandE. PMID:25921136

  20. Human amniotic membrane-derived stromal cells (hAMSC) interact depending on breast cancer cell type through secreted molecules.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Bang, So Hee; Kang, So Yeong; Park, Ki Dae; Eom, Jun Ho; Oh, Il Ung; Yoo, Si Hyung; Kim, Chan-Wha; Baek, Sun Young

    2015-02-01

    Human amniotic membrane-derived stromal cells (hAMSC) are candidates for cell-based therapies. We examined the characteristics of hAMSC including the interaction between hAMSC and breast cancer cells, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231. Human amniotic membrane-derived stromal cells showed typical MSC properties, including fibroblast-like morphology, surface antigen expression, and mesodermal differentiation. To investigate cell-cell interaction via secreted molecules, we cultured breast cancer cells in hAMSC-conditioned medium (hAMSC-CM) and analyzed their proliferation, migration, and secretome profiles. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells exposed to hAMSC-CM showed increased proliferation and migration. However, in hAMSC-CM, MCF-7 cells proliferated significantly faster than MDA-MB-231 cells. When cultured in hAMSC-CM, MCF-7 cells migrated faster than MDA-MB-231 cells. Two cell types showed different profiles of secreted factors. MCF-7 cells expressed much amounts of IL-8, GRO, and MCP-1 in hAMSC-CM. Human amniotic membrane-derived stromal cells interact with breast cancer cells through secreted molecules. Factors secreted by hAMSCs promote the proliferation and migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. For much safe cell-based therapies using hAMSC, it is necessary to study carefully about interaction between hAMSC and cancer cells.

  1. Stromal reengineering to treat pancreas cancer.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; DelGiorno, Kathleen E; Greenberg, Philip D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma co-opts multiple cellular and extracellular mechanisms to create a complex cancer organ with an unusual proclivity for metastasis and resistance to therapy. Cell-autonomous events are essential for the initiation and maintenance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, but recent studies have implicated critical non-cell autonomous processes within the robust desmoplastic stroma that promote disease pathogenesis and resistance. Thus, non-malignant cells and associated factors are culprits in tumor growth, immunosuppression and invasion. However, even this increasing awareness of non-cell autonomous contributions to disease progression is tempered by the conflicting roles stromal elements can play. A greater understanding of stromal complexity and complicity has been aided in part by studies in highly faithful genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Insights gleaned from such studies are spurring the development of therapies designed to reengineer the pancreas cancer stroma and render it permissive to agents targeting cell-autonomous events or to reinstate immunosurveillance. Integrating conventional and immunological treatments in the context of stromal targeting may provide the key to a durable clinical impact on this formidable disease. PMID:24908682

  2. HER-2 status in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro Ferreira; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2008-08-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) encodes for the transmembrane glycoprotein HER-2 that is involved in activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways that control cell growth and differentiation. HER-2 is overexpressed in approximately 20% of patients with breast cancer and has been associated with poorer prognosis. Since 1998, the anti-HER-2 antibody trastuzumab has been used for the treatment of patients with HER-2-positive breast cancers. However, little information is available about the relationship between HER-2 and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. This study's purpose was to determine the HER-2 status in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We found that all 477 cases included in this study were negative (score 0) by immunohistochemistry using HercepTest, and no HER-2 gene amplification was detected in 71 cases submitted to fluorescence in situ hybridization. These results show that HER-2 may not have any role in gastrointestinal stromal tumor pathogenesis and that the neoplasm may not be suitable for treatment with trastuzumab.

  3. Stromal Effects on Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Bryony S.; Werb, Zena

    2002-05-01

    Breast cancer manifests itself in the mammary epithelium, yet there is a growing recognition that mammary stromal cells also play an important role in tumorigenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer, and many of the stromal factors necessary for mammary development also promote or protect against breast cancer. Here we review our present knowledge of the specific factors and cell types that contribute to epithelial-stromal crosstalk during mammary development. To find cures for diseases like breast cancer that rely on epithelial-stromal crosstalk, we must understand how these different cell types communicate with each other.

  4. Lymphoid Tissue Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Development and Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are sites that facilitate cell-cell interactions required for generating adaptive immune responses. Nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to play a critical role in SLO function, organization, and tissue homeostasis. The stromal microenvironment undergoes profound remodeling to support immune responses. However, chronic inflammatory conditions can promote uncontrolled stromal cell activation and aberrant tissue remodeling including fibrosis, thus leading to tissue damage. Despite recent advancements, the origin and role of mesenchymal stromal cells involved in SLO development and remodeling remain unclear. PMID:27190524

  5. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T

    2016-04-12

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX).Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment.In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  6. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, James R.; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J.; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX). Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment. In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  7. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T

    2016-04-12

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX).Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment.In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery.

  8. Role of Nanog in the maintenance of marrow stromal stem cells during post natal bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Bais, Manish V.; Shabin, Zabrina M.; Young, Megan; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Gerstnefeld, Louis C.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is related to marrow stromal stem cell maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing Nanog expression is seen during post natal surgical bone repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog knockdown decreases post surgical bone regeneration. -- Abstract: Post natal bone repair elicits a regenerative mechanism that restores the injured tissue to its pre-injury cellular composition and structure and is believed to recapitulate the embryological processes of bone formation. Prior studies showed that Nanog, a central epigenetic regulator associated with the maintenance of embryonic stem cells (ESC) was transiently expressed during fracture healing, Bais et al. . In this study, we show that murine bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) before they are induced to undergo osteogenic differentiation express {approx}50 Multiplication-Sign the background levels of Nanog seen in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and the W20-17 murine marrow stromal cell line stably expresses Nanog at {approx}80 Multiplication-Sign the MEF levels. Nanog expression in this cell line was inhibited by BMP7 treatment and Nanog lentivrial shRNA knockdown induced the expression of the terminal osteogenic gene osteocalcin. Lentivrial shRNA knockdown or lentiviral overexpression of Nanog in bone MSCs had inverse effects on proliferation, with knockdown decreasing and overexpression increasing MSC cell proliferation. Surgical marrow ablation of mouse tibia by medullary reaming led to a {approx}3-fold increase in Nanog that preceded osteogenic differentiation during intramembranous bone formation. Lentiviral shRNA knockdown of Nanog after surgical ablation led to an initial overexpression of osteogenic gene expression with no initial effect on bone formation but during subsequent remodeling of the newly formed bone a {approx}50% decrease was seen in the expression of terminal osteogenic gene expression and a {approx}50% loss in trabecular bone mass. This

  9. Inhibition of fibroblast growth by Notch1 signaling is mediated by induction of Wnt11-dependent WISP-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao-Jun; Li, Yan; Tan, Yurong; Xiao, Min; Zhang, Jialin; Radtke, Freddy; Velazquez, Omaida C

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblasts are an integral component of stroma and important source of growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM). They play a prominent role in maintaining tissue homeostasis and in wound healing and tumor growth. Notch signaling regulates biological function in a variety of cells. To elucidate the physiological function of Notch signaling in fibroblasts, we ablated Notch1 in mouse (Notch1(Flox/Flox)) embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Notch1-deficient (Notch1(-/-)) MEFs displayed faster growth and motility rate compared to Notch1(Flox/Flox) MEFs. Such phenotypic changes, however, were reversible by reconstitution of Notch1 activation via overexpression of the intracellular domain of Notch1 (NICD1) in Notch1-deficient MEFs. In contrast, constitutive activation of Notch1 signaling by introducing NICD1 into primary human dermal fibroblasts (FF2441), which caused pan-Notch activation, inhibited cell growth and motility, whereas cellular inhibition was relievable when the Notch activation was countered with dominant-negative mutant of Master-mind like 1 (DN-MAML-1). Functionally, "Notch-activated" stromal fibroblasts could inhibit tumor cell growth/invasion. Moreover, Notch activation induced expression of Wnt-induced secreted proteins-1 (WISP-1/CCN4) in FF2441 cells while deletion of Notch1 in MEFs resulted in an opposite effect. Notably, WISP-1 suppressed fibroblast proliferation, and was responsible for mediating Notch1's inhibitory effect since siRNA-mediated blockade of WISP-1 expression could relieve cell growth inhibition. Notch1-induced WISP-1 expression appeared to be Wnt11-dependent, but Wnt1-independent. Blockade of Wnt11 expression resulted in decreased WISP-1 expression and liberated Notch-induced cell growth inhibition. These findings indicated that inhibition of fibroblast proliferation by Notch pathway activation is mediated, at least in part, through regulating Wnt1-independent, but Wnt11-dependent WISP-1 expression.

  10. Tumor-associated Endo180 requires stromal-derived LOX to promote metastatic prostate cancer cell migration on human ECM surfaces.

    PubMed

    Caley, Matthew P; King, Helen; Shah, Neel; Wang, Kai; Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Gronau, Julian H; Waxman, Jonathan; Sturge, Justin

    2016-02-01

    The diverse composition and structure of extracellular matrix (ECM) interfaces encountered by tumor cells at secondary tissue sites can influence metastatic progression. Extensive in vitro and in vivo data has confirmed that metastasizing tumor cells can adopt different migratory modes in response to their microenvironment. Here we present a model that uses human stromal cell-derived matrices to demonstrate that plasticity in tumor cell movement is controlled by the tumor-associated collagen receptor Endo180 (CD280, CLEC13E, KIAA0709, MRC2, TEM9, uPARAP) and the crosslinking of collagen fibers by stromal-derived lysyl oxidase (LOX). Human osteoblast-derived and fibroblast-derived ECM supported a rounded 'amoeboid-like' mode of cell migration and enhanced Endo180 expression in three prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, VCaP, DU145). Genetic silencing of Endo180 reverted PC3 cells from their rounded mode of migration towards a bipolar 'mesenchymal-like' mode of migration and blocked their translocation on human fibroblast-derived and osteoblast-derived matrices. The concomitant decrease in PC3 cell migration and increase in Endo180 expression induced by stromal LOX inhibition indicates that the Endo180-dependent rounded mode of prostate cancer cell migration requires ECM crosslinking. In conclusion, this study introduces a realistic in vitro model for the study of metastatic prostate cancer cell plasticity and pinpoints the cooperation between tumor-associated Endo180 and the stiff microenvironment imposed by stromal-derived LOX as a potential target for limiting metastatic progression in prostate cancer. PMID:26567111

  11. Silibinin Prevents Prostate Cancer Cell-Mediated Differentiation of Naïve Fibroblasts into Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Phenotype by Targeting TGF β2

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Harold; Deep, Gagan; Jain, Anil K.; Cimic, Adela; Sirintrapun, Joseph; Romero, Lina M.; Cramer, Scott D.; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment is an essential element in prostate cancer (PCA), offering unique opportunities for its prevention. Tumor microenvironment includes naïve fibroblasts that are recruited by nascent neoplastic lesion and altered into ‘cancer-associated fibroblasts’ (CAFs) that promote PCA. A better understanding and targeting of interaction between PCA cells and fibroblasts and inhibiting CAF phenotype through non-toxic agents are novel approaches to prevent PCA progression. One well-studied cancer chemopreventive agent is silibinin, and thus, we examined its efficacy against PCA cells-mediated differentiation of naïve fibroblasts into a myofibroblastic-phenotype similar to that found in CAFs. Silibinin’s direct inhibitory effect on the phenotype of CAFs derived directly from PCA patients was also assessed. Human prostate stromal cells (PrSCs) exposed to control conditioned media (CCM) from human PCA PC3 cells showed more invasiveness, with increased α-SMA (alpha-smooth muscle actin) and vimentin expression, and differentiation into a phenotype we identified in CAFs. Importantly, silibinin (at physiologically-achievable concentrations) inhibited α-SMA expression and invasiveness in differentiated fibroblasts and prostate CAFs directly, as well as indirectly by targeting PCA cells. The observed increase in α-SMA and CAF-like phenotype was transforming growth factor (TGF) β2 dependent, which was strongly inhibited by silibinin. Furthermore, induction of ±-SMA and CAF phenotype by CCM were also strongly inhibited by a TGFβ2-neutralizing antibody. The inhibitory effect of silibinin on TGFβ2 expression and CAF-like biomarkers was also observed in PC3 tumors. Together, these findings highlight the potential usefulness of silibinin in PCA prevention through targeting the CAF phenotype in the prostate tumor microenvironment. PMID:24615813

  12. Stromal Cell Contribution to Human Follicular Lymphoma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mourcin, Frédéric; Pangault, Céline; Amin-Ali, Rada; Amé-Thomas, Patricia; Tarte, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the prototypical model of indolent B cell lymphoma displaying a strong dependence on a specialized cell microenvironment mimicking normal germinal center. Within malignant cell niches in invaded lymph nodes and bone marrow, external stimuli provided by infiltrating stromal cells make a pivotal contribution to disease development, progression, and drug resistance. The crosstalk between FL B cells and stromal cells is bidirectional, causing activation of both partners. In agreement, FL stromal cells exhibit specific phenotypic, transcriptomic, and functional properties. This review highlights the critical pathways involved in the direct tumor-promoting activity of stromal cells but also their role in the organization of FL cell niche through the recruitment of accessory immune cells and their polarization to a B cell supportive phenotype. Finally, deciphering the interplay between stromal cells and FL cells provides potential new therapeutic targets with the aim to mobilize malignant cells outside their protective microenvironment and increase their sensitivity to conventional treatment. PMID:22973275

  13. Stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of studies of neoplastic transformation have focused attention on events that occur within transformed cells. These cell autonomous events result in the disruption of molecular pathways that regulate basic activities of the cells such as proliferation, death, movement and genomic integrity. Other studies have addressed the microenvironment of tumor cells and documented its importance in supporting tumor progression. Recent work has begun to expand on these initial studies of tumor microenvironment and now provide novel insights into the possible initiation and progression of malignant cells. This review will address the transforming effect of stromal cells on epithelial components. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  14. Combined Therapy of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Piotr; Hompes, Daphne

    2016-10-01

    Radical surgery is the mainstay of therapy for primary resectable, localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Nevertheless, approximately 40% to 50% of patients with potentially curative resections develop recurrent or metastatic disease. The introduction of imatinib mesylate has revolutionized the therapy of advanced (inoperable and/or metastatic) GIST and has become the standard of care in treatment of patients with advanced GIST. This article discusses the proper selection of candidates for adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in locally advanced GIST, exploring the available evidence behind the combination of preoperative imatinib and surgery. PMID:27591496

  15. Hematopoietic progenitor cells grow on 3T3 fibroblast monolayers that overexpress growth arrest-specific gene-6 (GAS6).

    PubMed

    Dormady, S P; Zhang, X M; Basch, R S

    2000-10-24

    Pluripotential hematopoietic stem cells grow in close association with bone marrow stromal cells, which play a critical role in sustaining hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures. The mechanisms through which stromal cells act to support pluripotential hematopoietic stem cells are largely unknown. This study demonstrates that growth arrest-specific gene-6 (GAS6) plays an important role in this process. GAS6 is a ligand for the Axl (Ufo/Ark), Sky (Dtk/Tyro3/Rse/Brt/Tif), and Mer (Eyk) family of tyrosine kinase receptors and binds to these receptors via tandem G domains at its C terminus. After translation, GAS6 moves to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is extensively gamma-carboxylated. The carboxylation process is vitamin K dependent, and current evidence suggests that GAS6 must be gamma-carboxylated to bind and activate any of the cognate tyrosine kinase receptors. Here, we show that expression of GAS6 is highly correlated with the capacity of bone marrow stromal cells to support hematopoiesis in culture. Nonsupportive stromal cell lines express little to no GAS6, whereas supportive cell lines express high levels of GAS6. Transfection of the cDNA encoding GAS6 into 3T3 fibroblasts is sufficient to render this previously nonsupportive cell line capable of supporting long-term hematopoietic cultures. 3T3 cells, genetically engineered to stably express GAS6 (GAS6-3T3), produce a stromal layer that supports the generation of colony-forming units in culture (CFU-c) for up to 6 wk. Hematopoietic support by genetically engineered 3T3 is not vitamin K dependent, and soluble recombinant GAS6 does not substitute for coculturing the hematopoietic progenitors with genetically modified 3T3 cells. PMID:11050245

  16. The characterization of fibrocyte-like cells: a novel fibroblastic cell of the placenta.

    PubMed

    Riddell, M R; Winkler-Lowen, B; Chakrabarti, S; Dunk, C; Davidge, S T; Guilbert, L J

    2012-03-01

    The placenta is a highly vascularized organ thus angiogenesis is a key process in placental development. The contribution that different cells in the villous stroma play in placental angiogenesis is largely unknown. In this study we identified a novel stromal cell type in sections of term placenta which is morphologically fibroblastic and expressing the fibroblast marker TE-7 but also positive for the monocytic markers CD115 and CD14 and designated these cells as fibrocyte-like cells. Populations of fibrocyte-like cells from the placenta were isolated by two methods: culture of adherence-selected placental cells and, for higher purity, by CD45 fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Fibrocyte-like cell conditioned medium increased endothelial tubule-like structure formation 2-fold versus control medium. Both pro-angiogenic growth factors vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) and the anti-angiogenic factor soluble-Flt were found in the conditioned medium. Neutralizing antibodies against VEGF and b-FGF reduced endothelial cell tubule-like structures to control levels. These data suggests that fibrocyte-like cells, a previously unidentified cell of the villous stroma, may play an important role in the regulation of placental angiogenesis.

  17. Notch1 Pathway Activity Determines the Regulatory Role of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in Melanoma Growth and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hongwei; Kong, Ranran; Ferrari, Massimiliano L.; Radtke, Freddy; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Liu, Zhao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) play a crucial role in regulating cancer progression, yet the molecular determinant that governs the tumor regulatory role of CAF remains unknown. Using a mouse melanoma model in which exogenous melanoma cells were grafted on the skin of two lines of mice where the genetic activation or inactivation of Notch1 signaling specifically occurs in natural host stromal fibroblasts, we demonstrated that Notch1 pathway activity could determine the tumor-promoting or tumor-suppressing phenotype in CAF. CAF carrying elevated Notch1 activity significantly inhibited melanoma growth and invasion, while those with a null Notch1 promoted melanoma invasion. These findings identify the Notch1 pathway as a molecular determinant that controls the regulatory role of CAF in melanoma skin growth and invasion, unveiling Notch1 signaling as a potential therapeutic target for melanoma and potentially other solid tumors. PMID:26562315

  18. Transformable Peptide Nanocarriers for Expeditious Drug Release and Effective Cancer Therapy via Cancer‐Associated Fibroblast Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Tianjiao; Zhao, Ying; Ding, Yanping; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Ruifang; Lang, Jiayan; Qin, Hao; Liu, Xiaoman; Shi, Jian; Tao, Ning; Qin, Zhihai; Nie, Guangjun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A novel cleavable amphiphilic peptide (CAP) was designed to be specifically responsive to fibroblast activation protein‐α (FAP‐α), a protease specifically expressed on the surface of cancer‐associated fibroblasts. The CAP self‐assembled into fiber‐like nanostructures in solution, while the presence of hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drugs readily transformed the assemblies into drug‐loaded spherical nanoparticles. The disassembly of these nanoparticles (CAP‐NPs) upon FAP‐α cleavage resulted in rapid and efficient release of the encapsulated drugs specifically at tumor sites. This Transformers‐like drug delivery strategy could allow them to disrupt the stromal barrier and enhance local drug accumulation. Therapeutic results suggested that drug‐loaded CAP‐NPs hold promising tumor specificity and therapeutic efficacy for various solid tumor models, confirming its potential utility and versatility in antitumor therapy. PMID:26283097

  19. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a ‘more clinically relevant’ tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  20. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  1. In vitro quantitation of lethal and physiologic effects of total body irradiation on stromal and hematopoietic stem cells in continuous bone marrow cultures from Rf mice

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberger, J.S.; Eckner, R.J.; Otten, J.A.; Tennant, R.W.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of in vivo total body irradiation (TBI) and interval from TBI to explant of marrow on: stromal cell proliferation in vitro; stromal cell support of hematopoiesis in continuous bone marrow culture; and generation of WEHI-3 growth factor (GF)-dependent lines of hematopoietic progenitor cells were evaluated. Explant of marrow at 2, 4, 5, or 6 months after single fraction TBI (300-800 rad) was associated with decreased longevity of hemopoiesis and a decrease in the proliferative capacity of fibroblastic adherent-stromal colony forming cells (CFUf) as measured by colony size at 14 days and number of colonies per 10/sup 6/ cells plated. In contrast, explant of marrow 8 to 24 months after TBI produced cultures with longevity that was indistinguishable from age-matched control cultures (19-24 weeks). Marrow from irradiated first and second generation recipients of serially transferred marrow demonstrated a similar 7-month in vivo recovery period; however, the plateau maximum duration of hemopoiesis did not return to control levels. Purified stromal cell cultures were prepared by corticosteroid-deprivation of explanted marrow for 28 days and were then engrafted in vitro with marrow from C57BL/6J or RfM/UN mice that had been irradiated 1 month previously. Hemopoiesis in these cultures was restored, and they produced GM-CFUc and granulocytes for 15-24 weeks. Thus, healthy stroma supported growth of recently irradiated hemopoietic cells in vitro. Indirect effects of x-irradiation on hemopoietic stem cells through damage and repair in the stromal cell compartment can be effectively studied with the present bone marrow culture system. (JMT)

  2. Targeting Inhibition of Fibroblast Activation Protein-α and Prolyl Oligopeptidase Activities on Cells Common to Metastatic Tumor Microenvironments1

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Victoria J; Jackson, Kenneth W; Lee, Kyung N; Downs, Tamyra D; McKee, Patrick A

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP), a membrane prolyl-specific proteinase with both dipeptidase and endopeptidase activities, is overexpressed by reactive stromal fibroblasts during epithelial-derived cancer growth. FAP digests extracellular matrix as tissue is remodeled during cancer expansion and may also promote an immunotolerant tumor microenvironment. Recent studies suggest that nonspecific FAP inhibitors suppress human cancer xenografts in mouse models. Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP), another prolyl-specific serine proteinase, is also elevated in many cancers and may have a regulatory role in angiogenesis promotion. FAP and POP cell-associated activities may be targets for diagnosis and treatment of various cancers, but their accessibilities to highly effective specific inhibitors have not been shown for cells important to cancer growth. Despite their frequent simultaneous expression in many cancers and their overlapping activities toward commonly used substrates, precise, separate measurement of FAP or POP activity has largely been ignored. To distinguish each of the two activities, we synthesized highly specific substrates and inhibitors for FAP or POP based on amino acid sequences surrounding the scissile bonds of their respective putative substrates. We found varying amounts of FAP and POP protein and activities on activated fibroblasts, mesenchymal cells, normal breast cells, and one breast cancer cell line, with some cells exhibiting more POP than FAP activity. Replicating endothelial cells (ECs) expressed POP but not FAP until tubulogenesis began. Targeting FAP-positive cells, especially mesenchymal stem cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts for inactivation or destruction, and inhibiting POP-producing EC may abrogate stromal invasion and angiogenesis simultaneously and thereby diminish cancer growth. PMID:23555181

  3. Remodeling in myocardium adjacent to an infarction in the pig left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Scott D; Criscione, John; Covell, James W

    2004-12-01

    Changes in the structure of the "normal" ventricular wall adjacent to an infarcted area involve all components of the myocardium (myocytes, fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, and the coronary vasculature) and their three-dimensional structural relationship. Assessing changes in these components requires tracking material markers in the remodeling tissue over long periods of time with a three-dimensional approach as well as a detailed histological evaluation of the remodeled structure. The purpose of the present study was to examine the hypotheses that changes in the tissue adjacent to an infarct are related to myocyte elongation, myofiber rearrangement, and changes in the laminar architecture of the adjacent tissue. Three weeks after myocardial infarction, noninfarcted tissue adjacent to the infarct remodeled by expansion along the direction of the fibers and in the cross fiber direction. These changes are consistent with myocyte elongation and myofiber rearrangement (slippage), as well as a change in cell shape to a more elliptical cross section with the major axis in the epicardial tangent plane, and indicate that reorientation of fibers either via "cell slippage" or changes in orientation of the laminar structure of the ventricular wall are quantitatively important aspects of the remodeling of the normally perfused myocardium.

  4. Ultrastructure of Fanconi anemia fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Willingale-Theune, J; Schweiger, M; Hirsch-Kauffmann, M; Meek, A E; Paulin-Levasseur, M; Traub, P

    1989-08-01

    Employing indirect immunofluorescence and conventional electron microscopy, gross nuclear aberrations were observed in cultured interphase fibroblasts derived from a patient suffering from Fanconi's anemia (FA). Such aberrations were predominantly expressed in cells at high passages between 28 and 34. The structure of the nuclei appeared compound in nature, often consisting of two to three nuclear fragments connected to each other by thin nuclear bridges containing chromatin and nuclear lamin material. In other cases, the nuclei appeared lobed or budded but the cells did not contain distinct nuclear fragments. Chromatin was conspicuously absent from some nuclear lobes, revealing empty, cage-like structures comprising nuclear lamin material. Micronuclei were often abundant in the perinuclear cytoplasm but in some instances they appeared to be composed of chromatin lacking a delineating nuclear lamin matrix. Residual cytoskeletons examined by whole-mount electron microscopy revealed a network of intermediate filaments (IFs) within FA fibroblasts forming a bridge between the plasma membrane and the nucleus or its major fragments. In addition, there were thinner, 3-4 nm filaments connecting individual IFs with the surface of the nucleus. Micronuclei that were not connected to the main nuclear body, but which were delineated by a distinct lamina and possessed nuclear pores, did not appear to be anchored to the IF network. Multinuclearity, nuclear fragmentation, irregular chromatin distribution and inter-nuclear chromatin/lamin bridges might result from a failure in the redistribution of chromatin to sister nuclei, incomplete cytokinesis and proliferation of nuclear envelope material. These phenomena point to precocious aging of FA fibroblasts and may occur as a consequence of spontaneous damage to the sister chromatids or through the action of DNA-toxic agents.

  5. Papillary fibroblasts differentiate into reticular fibroblasts after prolonged in vitro culture.

    PubMed

    Janson, David; Saintigny, Gaëlle; Mahé, Christian; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb

    2013-01-01

    The dermis can be divided into two morphologically different layers: the papillary and reticular dermis. Fibroblasts isolated from these layers behave differently when cultured in vitro. During skin ageing, the papillary dermis decreases in volume. Based on the functional differences in vitro, it is hypothesized that the loss of papillary fibroblasts contributes to skin ageing. In this study, we aimed to mimic certain aspects of skin ageing by using high-passage cultures of reticular and papillary fibroblasts and investigated the effect of these cells on skin morphogenesis in reconstructed human skin equivalents. Skin equivalents generated with reticular fibroblasts showed a reduced terminal differentiation and fewer proliferating basal keratinocytes. Aged in vitro papillary fibroblasts had increased expression of biomarkers specific to reticular fibroblasts. The phenotype and morphology of skin equivalents generated with high-passage papillary fibroblasts resembled that of reticular fibroblasts. This demonstrates that papillary fibroblasts can differentiate into reticular fibroblasts in vitro. Therefore, we hypothesize that papillary fibroblasts represent an undifferentiated phenotype, while reticular fibroblasts represent a more differentiated population. The differentiation process could be a new target for anti-skin-ageing strategies.

  6. Sex cord-gonadal stromal tumor of the rete testis.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Kamran P; Dalton, Rory R; Brown, James A

    2009-01-01

    A 34-year-old tetraplegic patient with suppurative epididymitis was found on follow-up examination and ultrasonography to have a testicular mass. The radical orchiectomy specimen contained an undifferentiated spindled sex cord-stromal tumor arising in the rete testis. Testicular sex cord-stromal tumors are far less common than germ cell neoplasms and are usually benign. The close relationship between sex cords and ductules of the rete testis during development provides the opportunity for these uncommon tumors to arise anatomically within the rete tesis. This undifferentiated sex cord-stromal tumor, occurring in a previously unreported location, is an example of an unusual lesion mimicking an intratesticular malignant neoplasm.

  7. Direct Melanoma Cell Contact Induces Stromal Cell Autocrine Prostaglandin E2-EP4 Receptor Signaling That Drives Tumor Growth, Angiogenesis, and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Inada, Masaki; Takita, Morichika; Yokoyama, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kenta; Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Hirata, Michiko; Maru, Yoshiro; Maruyama, Takayuki; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Narumiya, Shuh; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Murphy, Gillian; Nagase, Hideaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2015-12-11

    The stromal cells associated with tumors such as melanoma are significant determinants of tumor growth and metastasis. Using membrane-bound prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPges1(-/-)) mice, we show that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by host tissues is critical for B16 melanoma growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis to both bone and soft tissues. Concomitant studies in vitro showed that PGE2 production by fibroblasts is regulated by direct interaction with B16 cells. Autocrine activity of PGE2 further regulates the production of angiogenic factors by fibroblasts, which are key to the vascularization of both primary and metastatic tumor growth. Similarly, cell-cell interactions between B16 cells and host osteoblasts modulate mPGES-1 activity and PGE2 production by the osteoblasts. PGE2, in turn, acts to stimulate receptor activator of NF-κB ligand expression, leading to osteoclast differentiation and bone erosion. Using eicosanoid receptor antagonists, we show that PGE2 acts on osteoblasts and fibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment through the EP4 receptor. Metastatic tumor growth and vascularization in soft tissues was abrogated by an EP4 receptor antagonist. EP4-null Ptger4(-/-) mice do not support B16 melanoma growth. In vitro, an EP4 receptor antagonist modulated PGE2 effects on fibroblast production of angiogenic factors. Our data show that B16 melanoma cells directly influence host stromal cells to generate PGE2 signals governing neoangiogenesis and metastatic growth in bone via osteoclast erosive activity as well as angiogenesis in soft tissue tumors.

  8. Breast Cancer-associated Fibroblasts Confer AKT1-mediated Epigenetic Silencing of Cystatin M in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huey-Jen L.; Zuo, Tao; Lin, Ching-Hung; Kuo, Chieh Ti; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Sun, Shuying; Shen, Rulong; Deatherage, Daniel E.; Potter, Dustin; Asamoto, Lisa; Lin, Shili; Yan, Pearlly S.; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Huang, Tim H.-M.

    2010-01-01

    The interplay between histone modifications and promoter hypermethylation provides a causative explanation for epigenetic gene silencing in cancer. Less is known about the upstream initiators that direct this process. Here, we report that the Cystatin M (CST6) tumor suppressor gene is concurrently down-regulated with other loci in breast epithelial cells co-cultured with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Promoter hypermethylation of CST6 is associated with aberrant AKT1 activation in epithelial cells, as well as the disabled INNP4B regulator resulted from the suppression by CAFs. Repressive chromatin, marked by trimethyl-H3K27 and dimethyl-H3K9, and de novo DNA methylation is established at the promoter. The findings suggest that microenvironmental stimuli are triggers in this epigenetic cascade, leading to the long-term silencing of CST6 in breast tumors. Our present findings implicate a causal mechanism defining how tumor stromal fibroblasts support neoplastic progression by manipulating the epigenome of mammary epithelial cells. The result also highlights the importance of direct cell-cell contract between epithelial cells and the surrounding fibroblasts that confer this epigenetic perturbation. Since this two-way interaction is anticipated, the described co-culture system can be used to determine the effect of epithelial factors on fibroblasts in future studies. PMID:19074894

  9. Staphylococcus aureus Blepharitis Associated with Multiple Corneal Stromal Microabscess, Stromal Edema, and Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Boto-de-los-Bueis, Ana; del Hierro Zarzuelo, Almudena; García Perea, Adela; de Pablos, Manuela; Pastora, Natalia; Noval, Susana

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of an immunocompetent woman with atypical marginal keratitis. She presented with recurrent episodes of multiples microabscess distributed in a triangular pattern associated with stromal oedema and anterior chamber uveitis, affecting both eyes, but not simultaneously. The episodes responded to steroid drops, corneal inflammation was coincidental with a worsening of her blepharitis in the affected eye and S. aureus was isolated from the lids.

  10. Prostate stromal cell proteomics analysis discriminates normal from tumour reactive stromal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Jason P.; Spary, Lisa K.; Mason, Malcolm D.; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Brewis, Ian A.; Clayton, Aled

    2016-01-01

    Changes within interstitial stromal compartments often accompany carcinogenesis, and this is true of prostate cancer. Typically, the tissue becomes populated by myofibroblasts that can promote progression. Not all myofibroblasts exhibit the same negative influence, however, and identifying the aggressive form of myofibroblast may provide useful information at diagnosis. A means of molecularly defining such myofibroblasts is unknown. We compared protein profiles of normal and diseased stroma isolated from prostate cancer patients to identify discriminating hallmarks of disease-associated stroma. We included the stimulation of normal stromal cells with known myofibroblast inducers namely soluble TGFβ and exosome-associated-TGFβ and compared the function and protein profiles arising. In all 6-patients examined, diseased stroma exhibited a pro-angiogenic influence on endothelial cells, generating large multicellular vessel-like structures. Identical structures were apparent following stimulation of normal stroma with exosomes (5/6 patients), but TGFβ-stimulation generated a non-angiogenic stroma. Proteomics highlighted disease-related cytoskeleton alterations such as elevated Transgelin (TAGLN). Many of these were also changed following TGFβ or exosome stimulation and did not well discriminate the nature of the stimulus. Soluble TGFβ, however triggered differential expression of proteins related to mitochondrial function including voltage dependent ion channels VDAC1 and 2, and this was not found in the other stromal types studied. Surprisingly, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH1A1), a stem-cell associated protein was detected in normal stromal cells and found to decrease in disease. In summary, we have discovered a set of proteins that contribute to defining disease-associated myofibroblasts, and emphasise the similarity between exosome-generated myofibroblasts and those naturally arising in situ. PMID:26934553

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Blepharitis Associated with Multiple Corneal Stromal Microabscess, Stromal Edema, and Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Boto-de-los-Bueis, Ana; del Hierro Zarzuelo, Almudena; García Perea, Adela; de Pablos, Manuela; Pastora, Natalia; Noval, Susana

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of an immunocompetent woman with atypical marginal keratitis. She presented with recurrent episodes of multiples microabscess distributed in a triangular pattern associated with stromal oedema and anterior chamber uveitis, affecting both eyes, but not simultaneously. The episodes responded to steroid drops, corneal inflammation was coincidental with a worsening of her blepharitis in the affected eye and S. aureus was isolated from the lids. PMID:24410378

  12. MINARETS WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, N. King; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Minarets Wilderness and adjacent areas in the central Sierra Nevada, California was conducted. The results of the survey indicate that the study area has a substantiated resource potential for small deposits of copper, silver, zinc, lead, and iron, and a probable mineral-resource potential for molybdenum. No energy-resource potential was identified in the study.

  13. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  14. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  15. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  16. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  17. Viscoelastic response of fibroblasts to tension transmitted through adherens junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Ragsdale, G K; Phelps, J; Luby-Phelps, K

    1997-01-01

    Cytoplasmic deformation was monitored by observing the displacements of 200-nm green fluorescent beads microinjected into the cytoplasm of Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. We noted a novel protrusion of nonruffling cell margins that was accompanied by axial flow of beads and cytoplasmic vesicles as far as 50 microm behind the protruding plasma membrane. Fluorescent analog cytochemistry and immunofluorescence localization of F-actin, alpha-actinin, N-cadherin, and beta-catenin showed that the protruding margins of deforming cells were mechanically coupled to neighboring cells by adherens junctions. Observations suggested that protrusion resulted from passive linear deformation in response to tensile stress exerted by centripetal contraction of the neighboring cell. The time dependence of cytoplasmic strain calculated from the displacements of beads and vesicles was fit quantitatively by a Kelvin-Voight model for a viscoelastic solid with a mean limiting strain of 0.58 and a mean strain rate of 4.3 x 10(-3) s(-1). In rare instances, the deforming cell and its neighbor spontaneously became uncoupled, and recoil of the protruding margin was observed. The time dependence of strain during recoil also fit a Kelvin-Voight model with similar parameters, suggesting that the kinetics of deformation primarily reflect the mechanical properties of the deformed cell rather than the contractile properties of its neighbor. The existence of mechanical coupling between adjacent fibroblasts through adherens junctions and the viscoelastic responses of cells to tension transmitted directly from cell to cell are factors that must be taken into account to fully understand the role of fibroblasts in such biological processes as wound closure and extracellular matrix remodeling during tissue development. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:9370474

  18. Pediatric Fibroblastic and Myofibroblastic Tumors: A Pictorial Review.

    PubMed

    Sargar, Kiran M; Sheybani, Elizabeth F; Shenoy, Archana; Aranake-Chrisinger, John; Khanna, Geetika

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors are a relatively common group of soft-tissue proliferations that are associated with a wide spectrum of clinical behavior. These tumors have been divided into the following categories on the basis of their biologic behavior: benign (eg, myositis ossificans, myofibroma, fibromatosis colli), intermediate-locally aggressive (eg, lipofibromatosis, desmoid fibroma), intermediate-rarely metastasizing (eg, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, infantile fibrosarcoma, low-grade myofibroblastic sarcoma), and malignant (eg, fibromyxoid sarcoma, adult fibrosarcoma). Imaging has a key role in the evaluation of lesion origin, extent, and involvement with adjacent structures, and in the treatment management and postresection surveillance of these tumors. The imaging findings of these tumors are often nonspecific. However, certain imaging features, such as low or intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images and extension along fascial planes, support the diagnosis of a fibroblastic or myofibroblastic tumor. In addition, certain tumors have characteristic imaging findings (eg, multiple subcutaneous or intramuscular lesions in infantile myofibromatosis, plaquelike growth pattern of Gardner fibroma, presence of adipose tissue in lipofibromatosis) or characteristic clinical manifestations (eg, great toe malformations in fibrodysplasia ossificans fibroma, neonatal torticollis in fibromatosis colli) that suggest the correct diagnosis. Knowledge of the syndrome associations of some of these tumors-for example, the association between familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome and both Gardner fibroma and desmoid fibromatosis, and that between nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome and cardiac fibroma-further facilitate a diagnosis. The recognition of key imaging findings can help guide treatment management and help avoid unnecessary intervention in cases of benign lesions such as myositis ossificans and fibromatosis

  19. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Dei Tos, Angelo P; Laurino, Licia; Bearzi, Italo; Messerini, Luca; Farinati, Fabio

    2011-03-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent a mesenchymal neoplasm occurring primarily in the gastrointestinal tract, and showing differentiation toward the interstitial cell of Cajal. Its incidence is approximately 15 case/100,000/year. Stomach and small bowel are the most frequently affected anatomic sites. GIST represents a morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular distinct entity, the recognition of which has profound therapeutic implications. In fact, they have shown an exquisite sensitivity to treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib. Diagnosis relies upon morphology along with immunodetection of KIT and/or DOG1. When dealing with KIT negative cases, molecular analysis of KIT/PDGFRA genes may help in confirming diagnosis. Molecular evaluation of both genes are in any case recommended as mutational status provides key predictive information. Pathologists also play a key role in providing an estimation of the risk of biological aggressiveness, which is currently based on anatomic location of the tumor, size, and mitotic activity.

  20. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor – An Evolving Concept

    PubMed Central

    Tornillo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with RTK inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan) the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other “entities,” have been discovered (e.g., succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, and mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway). The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data. PMID:25593916

  1. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor - an evolving concept.

    PubMed

    Tornillo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with RTK inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan) the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other "entities," have been discovered (e.g., succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, and mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway). The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data. PMID:25593916

  2. Generation and Characterization of an Immortalized Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Skårn, Magne; Noordhuis, Paul; Wang, Meng-Yu; Veuger, Marjan; Kresse, Stine Henrichson; Egeland, Eivind Valen; Micci, Francesca; Namløs, Heidi Maria; Håkelien, Anne-Mari; Olafsrud, Solveig Mjelstad; Lorenz, Susanne; Haraldsen, Guttorm; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) show great potential for clinical and experimental use due to their capacity to self-renew and differentiate into multiple mesenchymal lineages. However, disadvantages of primary cultures of hMSCs are the limited in vitro lifespan, and the variable properties of cells from different donors and over time in culture. In this article, we describe the generation of a telomerase-immortalized nontumorigenic human bone marrow-derived stromal mesenchymal cell line, and its detailed characterization after long-term culturing (up to 155 population doublings). The resulting cell line, iMSC#3, maintained a fibroblast-like phenotype comparable to early passages of primary hMSCs, and showed no major differences from hMSCs regarding surface marker expression. Furthermore, iMSC#3 had a normal karyotype, and high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization confirmed normal copy numbers. The gene expression profiles of immortalized and primary hMSCs were also similar, whereas the corresponding DNA methylation profiles were more diverse. The cells also had proliferation characteristics comparable to primary hMSCs and maintained the capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes. A detailed characterization of the mRNA and microRNA transcriptomes during adipocyte differentiation also showed that the iMSC#3 recapitulates this process at the molecular level. In summary, the immortalized mesenchymal cells represent a valuable model system that can be used for studies of candidate genes and their role in differentiation or oncogenic transformation, and basic studies of mesenchymal biology. PMID:24857590

  3. CD34 and dural fibroblasts: the relationship to solitary fibrous tumor and meningioma.

    PubMed

    Cummings, T J; Burchette, J L; McLendon, R E

    2001-10-01

    Intracranial solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are typically dural-based, CD34-positive neoplasms of uncertain histogenesis. We examined ten cases of meninges obtained at autopsy from patients with no history of neurological illness, head trauma, or neurosurgical intervention, and ten cases of typical meningiomas with attached dural margins not involved by tumor. All cases were immunostained with CD34. CD34 reactivity was noted in the long, thin delicate processes of dural fibroblasts preferentially located in the meningeal portion of the dura rather than the periosteal portion. No CD34 reactivity was identified in the arachnoid or pia mater, except in some endothelial cells. One supratentorial dural-based fibrous nodule and one SFT within the confines of the fourth ventricle showed strong and diffuse reactivity to CD34, bcl-2, and vimentin, and were negative for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), S-100 protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, smooth muscle actin, and desmin. We also describe a meningothelial meningioma within which a well circumscribed SFT-like nodule was embedded. The SFT-like nodule was strongly CD34 positive and EMA negative, and the meningioma was strongly EMA positive and CD34 negative. Fibroblasts of the dural border cell layer are attached to the underlying arachnoid, and their inclusion with arachnoidal stromal elements and pial-based tela choroidea during formation of choroid plexus interstitium may account for intraventricular SFTs. Our results suggest that SFTs and dural-based fibrous nodules derive from CD34-positive dural-based fibroblasts, and that CD34 reactivity in meningiomas may result from inclusion of dural fibroblasts within the neoplasm.

  4. Stromal-epithelial dynamics in response to fractionated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, Muqeem Abdul

    effective at treating the reactive stroma. We can kill the cancer cells at the standard rate (180 cGy/fraction), but we have found the larger fractions specifically inhibit wound healing mechanisms by inactivating stromal fibroblasts. The long term goal would be to reduce recurrence rates for early stage breast cancer by treating postsurgical regions most likely to harbor residual tumor cells. Ionizing radiation stress and its effect on ECM mediated cellular functions continues to be an evolving area of research. This study is an initial step in my career plans to study stromal modulation of epithelial tumors. It is also my career goal to integrate basic science experiments and engineering tools into clinical practice.

  5. Systemic therapy for endometrial stromal sarcomas: current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Serkies, Krystyna; Pawłowska, Ewa; Jassem, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Uterine endometrial stromal sarcomas including true low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (LG-ESS) and high-grade (HG-ESS) or undifferentiated endometrial sarcoma (UES) constitute a group of rare, aggressive malignancies. Most LG-ESSs express steroid receptors. Surgery is the principal primary therapy for endometrial stromal sarcomas and should be considered in all cases. These malignancies are relatively radio- and chemoresistant. Chemotherapy is used in recurrent and advanced HG-ESS and UES. Currently, the combination of gemcitabine and docetaxel is considered the most effective regimen, but at the expense of substantial toxicity. In steroid receptor positive advanced LG-ESS hormonal therapy, mainly with progestins, allows in some patients for a long-term survival. Aromatase inhibitors seem to be equally effective as first- and subsequent-line of treatment, and are well tolerated. The role of molecular-targeted therapies in endometrial stromal sarcomas remains to be established. PMID:27629136

  6. Extra gonadal sclerosing stromal tumour in the transverse mesocolon.

    PubMed

    Mensah, Samuel; Kyei, Ishmael; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Adjei, Ernest

    2016-03-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumour (SST) is a rare benign sex cord stromal tumour of the ovary. We report a case of sclerosing stromal tumour of the mesentery in a 32-year-old Para one who presented with intra abdominal mass, menstrual irregularity and secondary infertility. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the completely excised tumour was consistent with sclerosing stromal tumour, immunoreactive only to vimentin. No ovarian tissue was found in the sectioned tumour. Her menses became regular and she conceived 3 months after complete excision and delivered after 9 months. Hormonal assay was not done because SST was least suspected. From literature this is the first case of SST in the transverse mesocolon reported in the West African subregion, and may probably be one of the rare cases of hormonally active SST. PMID:27605726

  7. Senescent stromal cells induce cancer cell migration via inhibition of RhoA/ROCK/myosin-based cell contractility.

    PubMed

    Aifuwa, Ivie; Giri, Anjil; Longe, Nick; Lee, Sang Hyuk; An, Steven S; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-10-13

    Cells induced into senescence exhibit a marked increase in the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines termed senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Here we report that SASP from senescent stromal fibroblasts promote spontaneous morphological changes accompanied by an aggressive migratory behavior in originally non-motile human breast cancer cells. This phenotypic switch is coordinated, in space and time, by a dramatic reorganization of the actin and microtubule filament networks, a discrete polarization of EB1 comets, and an unconventional front-to-back inversion of nucleus-MTOC polarity. SASP-induced morphological/migratory changes are critically dependent on microtubule integrity and dynamics, and are coordinated by the inhibition of RhoA and cell contractility. RhoA/ROCK inhibition reduces focal adhesions and traction forces, while promoting a novel gliding mode of migration. PMID:26483365

  8. The actin of muscle and fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P J

    1976-01-01

    The isolation and quantification of an 18-residue peptide from the N-terminal region of chicken actin was used to quantify the amount of actin in acetone-dried powders of chicken breast muscle and chicken-embryo fibroblasts. Either isotope dilution or double labelling can be used for peptide quantification. About 17% of the protein of chicken breast muscle was estimated to be actin. However, only 0.25% of the protein of chicken-embryo fibroblasts was determined to be actin by quantification of this peptide. The actin content of fibroblasts may be low or the amino acid sequences of muscle and fibroblast actin may differ in the N-terminal region. The methodology used can be extended to examine whether other regions of muscle actin sequence are present in fibroblasts or other cell types. PMID:938480

  9. Aberrant DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vizoso, Miguel; Puig, Marta; Carmona, F Javier; Maqueda, María; Velásquez, Adriana; Gómez, Antonio; Labernadie, Anna; Lugo, Roberto; Gabasa, Marta; Rigat-Brugarolas, Luis G; Trepat, Xavier; Ramírez, Josep; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, Enrique; Reguart, Noemí; Perera, Alexandre; Esteller, Manel; Alcaraz, Jordi

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetic changes through altered DNA methylation have been implicated in critical aspects of tumor progression, and have been extensively studied in a variety of cancer types. In contrast, our current knowledge of the aberrant genomic DNA methylation in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs) or other stromal cells that act as critical coconspirators of tumor progression is very scarce. To address this gap of knowledge, we conducted genome-wide DNA methylation profiling on lung TAFs and paired control fibroblasts (CFs) from non-small cell lung cancer patients using the HumanMethylation450 microarray. We found widespread DNA hypomethylation concomitant with focal gain of DNA methylation in TAFs compared to CFs. The aberrant DNA methylation landscape of TAFs had a global impact on gene expression and a selective impact on the TGF-β pathway. The latter included promoter hypermethylation-associated SMAD3 silencing, which was associated with hyperresponsiveness to exogenous TGF-β1 in terms of contractility and extracellular matrix deposition. In turn, activation of CFs with exogenous TGF-β1 partially mimicked the epigenetic alterations observed in TAFs, suggesting that TGF-β1 may be necessary but not sufficient to elicit such alterations. Moreover, integrated pathway-enrichment analyses of the DNA methylation alterations revealed that a fraction of TAFs may be bone marrow-derived fibrocytes. Finally, survival analyses using DNA methylation and gene expression datasets identified aberrant DNA methylation on the EDARADD promoter sequence as a prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Our findings shed light on the unique origin and molecular alterations underlying the aberrant phenotype of lung TAFs, and identify a stromal biomarker with potential clinical relevance. PMID:26449251

  10. Cancer-associated fibroblasts predict poor outcome and promote periostin-dependent invasion in oesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Timothy J; Hayden, Annette L; Derouet, Mathieu; Garcia, Edwin; Noble, Fergus; White, Michael J; Thirdborough, Steve; Mead, Abbie; Clemons, Nicholas; Mellone, Massimiliano; Uzoho, Chudy; Primrose, John N; Blaydes, Jeremy P; Thomas, Gareth J

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play an important role in tumour development and progression. In this study we investigated the functional role of CAFs in oesophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). We used immunochemistry to analyse a cohort of 183 EAC patients for CAF markers related to disease mortality. We characterized CAFs and normal oesophageal fibroblasts (NOFs) using western blotting, immunofluorescence and gel contraction. Transwell assays, 3D organotypic culture and xenograft models were used to examine the effects on EAC cell function and to dissect molecular mechanisms regulating invasion. Most EACs (93%) contained CAFs with a myofibroblastic (α-SMA-positive) phenotype, which correlated significantly with poor survival [p = 0.016; HR 7. 1 (1.7–29.4)]. Primary CAFs isolated from EACs have a contractile, myofibroblastic phenotype and promote EAC cell invasion in vitro (Transwell assays, p ≤ 0.05; organotypic culture, p < 0.001) and in vivo (p ≤ 0.05). In vitro, this pro-invasive effect is modulated through the matricellular protein periostin. Periostin is secreted by CAFs and acts as a ligand for EAC cell integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5, promoting activation of the PI3kinase–Akt pathway. In patient samples, periostin expression at the tumour cell–stromal interface correlates with poor overall and disease-free survival. Our study highlights the importance of the tumour stroma in EAC progression. Paracrine interaction between CAF-secreted periostin and EAC-expressed integrins results in PI3 kinase–Akt activation and increased tumour cell invasion. Most EACs contain a myofibroblastic CAF-rich stroma; this may explain the aggressive, highly infiltrative nature of the disease, and suggests that stromal targeting may produce therapeutic benefit in EAC patients. PMID:25345775

  11. Aberrant DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Vizoso, Miguel; Puig, Marta; Carmona, F.Javier; Maqueda, María; Velásquez, Adriana; Gómez, Antonio; Labernadie, Anna; Lugo, Roberto; Gabasa, Marta; Rigat-Brugarolas, Luis G.; Trepat, Xavier; Ramírez, Josep; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, Enrique; Reguart, Noemí; Perera, Alexandre; Esteller, Manel; Alcaraz, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic changes through altered DNA methylation have been implicated in critical aspects of tumor progression, and have been extensively studied in a variety of cancer types. In contrast, our current knowledge of the aberrant genomic DNA methylation in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs) or other stromal cells that act as critical coconspirators of tumor progression is very scarce. To address this gap of knowledge, we conducted genome-wide DNA methylation profiling on lung TAFs and paired control fibroblasts (CFs) from non-small cell lung cancer patients using the HumanMethylation450 microarray. We found widespread DNA hypomethylation concomitant with focal gain of DNA methylation in TAFs compared to CFs. The aberrant DNA methylation landscape of TAFs had a global impact on gene expression and a selective impact on the TGF-β pathway. The latter included promoter hypermethylation-associated SMAD3 silencing, which was associated with hyperresponsiveness to exogenous TGF-β1 in terms of contractility and extracellular matrix deposition. In turn, activation of CFs with exogenous TGF-β1 partially mimicked the epigenetic alterations observed in TAFs, suggesting that TGF-β1 may be necessary but not sufficient to elicit such alterations. Moreover, integrated pathway-enrichment analyses of the DNA methylation alterations revealed that a fraction of TAFs may be bone marrow-derived fibrocytes. Finally, survival analyses using DNA methylation and gene expression datasets identified aberrant DNA methylation on the EDARADD promoter sequence as a prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Our findings shed light on the unique origin and molecular alterations underlying the aberrant phenotype of lung TAFs, and identify a stromal biomarker with potential clinical relevance. PMID:26449251

  12. Stromal Integrin α11β1 Affects RM11 Prostate and 4T1 Breast Xenograft Tumors Differently

    PubMed Central

    Skogstrand, Trude; Sortland, Kristina; Schmid, Marei Caroline; Reed, Rolf K.; Stuhr, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It has been implied that the collagen binding integrin α11β1 plays a role in carcinogenesis. As still relatively little is known about how the stromal integrin α11β1 affects different aspects of tumor development, we wanted to examine the direct effects on primary tumor growth, fibrosis, tumor interstitial fluid pressure (PIF) and metastasis in murine 4T1 mammary and RM11 prostate tumors, using an in vivo SCID integrin α11-deficient mouse model. Methods Tumor growth was measured using a caliper, PIF by the wick-in-needle technique, activated fibroblasts by α-SMA immunofluorescence staining and fibrosis by transmission electron microscopy and picrosirius-red staining. Metastases were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. Results RM11 tumor growth was significantly reduced in the SCID integrin α11-deficient (α11-KO) compared to in SCID integrin α11 wild type (WT) mice, whereas there was no similar effect in the 4T1 tumor model. The 4T1 model demonstrated an alteration in collagen fibril diameter in the integrin α11-KO mice compared to WT, which was not found in the RM11 model. There were no significant differences in the amount of activated fibroblasts, total collagen content, collagen organization or PIF in the tumors in integrin α11-deficient mice compared to WT mice. There was also no difference in lung metastases between the two groups. Conclusion Deficiency of stromal integrin α11β1 showed different effects on tumor growth and collagen fibril diameter depending on tumor type, but no effect on tumor PIF or development of lung metastasis. PMID:26990302

  13. Stromal-Based Signatures for the Classification of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Liu, Jiangang; Falcon, Beverly L; Iyer, Seema; Stewart, Julie; Celikkaya, Hilal; O'Mahony, Marguerita; Sevinsky, Christopher; Lowes, Christina; Douglass, Larry; Jeffries, Cynthia; Bodenmiller, Diane; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Fischl, Anthony; Gerald, Damien; Xue, Qi; Lee, Jee-Yun; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Sui, Yunxia; Desai, Keyur; Doman, Thompson; Aggarwal, Amit; Carter, Julia H; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Ginty, Fiona; Nasir, Aejaz; Nagy, Janice A; Dvorak, Harold F; Benjamin, Laura E

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of metastatic gastric cancer typically involves chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies targeting HER2 (ERBB2) and VEGFR2 (KDR). However, reliable methods to identify patients who would benefit most from a combination of treatment modalities targeting the tumor stroma, including new immunotherapy approaches, are still lacking. Therefore, we integrated a mouse model of stromal activation and gastric cancer genomic information to identify gene expression signatures that may inform treatment strategies. We generated a mouse model in which VEGF-A is expressed via adenovirus, enabling a stromal response marked by immune infiltration and angiogenesis at the injection site, and identified distinct stromal gene expression signatures. With these data, we designed multiplexed IHC assays that were applied to human primary gastric tumors and classified each tumor to a dominant stromal phenotype representative of the vascular and immune diversity found in gastric cancer. We also refined the stromal gene signatures and explored their relation to the dominant patient phenotypes identified by recent large-scale studies of gastric cancer genomics (The Cancer Genome Atlas and Asian Cancer Research Group), revealing four distinct stromal phenotypes. Collectively, these findings suggest that a genomics-based systems approach focused on the tumor stroma can be used to discover putative predictive biomarkers of treatment response, especially to antiangiogenesis agents and immunotherapy, thus offering an opportunity to improve patient stratification. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2573-86. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197264

  14. Prostate cancer cells and bone stromal cells mutually interact with each other through bone morphogenetic protein-mediated signals.

    PubMed

    Nishimori, Hikaru; Ehata, Shogo; Suzuki, Hiroshi I; Katsuno, Yoko; Miyazono, Kohei

    2012-06-01

    Functional interactions between cancer cells and the bone microenvironment contribute to the development of bone metastasis. Although the bone metastasis of prostate cancer is characterized by increased ossification, the molecular mechanisms involved in this process are not fully understood. Here, the roles of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in the interactions between prostate cancer cells and bone stromal cells were investigated. In human prostate cancer LNCaP cells, BMP-4 induced the production of Sonic hedgehog (SHH) through a Smad-dependent pathway. In mouse stromal MC3T3-E1 cells, SHH up-regulated the expression of activin receptor IIB (ActR-IIB) and Smad1, which in turn enhanced BMP-responsive reporter activities in these cells. The combined stimulation with BMP-4 and SHH of MC3T3-E1 cells cooperatively induced the expression of osteoblastic markers, including alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, collagen type II α1, and osteocalcin. When MC3T3-E1 cells and LNCaP cells were co-cultured, the osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells, which was induced by BMP-4, was accelerated by SHH from LNCaP cells. Furthermore, LNCaP cells and BMP-4 cooperatively induced the production of growth factors, including fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in MC3T3-E1 cells, and these may promote the proliferation of LNCaP cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that BMPs provide favorable circumstances for the survival of prostate cancer cells and the differentiation of bone stromal cells in the bone microenvironment, possibly leading to the osteoblastic metastasis of prostate cancer.

  15. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  16. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  17. Exosome-mediated delivery of miR-9 induces cancer-associated fibroblast-like properties in human breast fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Baroni, S; Romero-Cordoba, S; Plantamura, I; Dugo, M; D'Ippolito, E; Cataldo, A; Cosentino, G; Angeloni, V; Rossini, A; Daidone, M G; Iorio, M V

    2016-01-01

    It is established that the interaction between microenvironment and cancer cells has a critical role in tumor development, given the dependence of neoplastic cells on stromal support. However, how this communication promotes the activation of normal (NFs) into cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) is still not well understood. Most microRNA (miRNA) studies focused on tumor cell, but there is increasing evidence of their involvement in reprogramming NFs into CAFs. Here we show that miR-9, upregulated in various breast cancer cell lines and identified as pro-metastatic miRNA, affects the properties of human breast fibroblasts, enhancing the switch to CAF phenotype, thus contributing to tumor growth. Expressed at higher levels in primary triple-negative breast CAFs versus NFs isolated from patients, miR-9 improves indeed migration and invasion capabilities when transfected in immortalized NFs; viceversa, these properties are strongly impaired in CAFs upon miR-9 inhibition. We also demonstrate that tumor-secreted miR-9 can be transferred via exosomes to recipient NFs and this uptake results in enhanced cell motility. Moreover, we observed that this miRNA is also secreted by fibroblasts and in turn able to alter tumor cell behavior, by modulating its direct target E-cadherin, and NFs themselves. Consistently with the biological effects observed, gene expression profiles of NFs upon transient transfection with miR-9 show the modulation of genes mainly involved in cell motility and extracellular matrix remodeling pathways. Finally, we were able to confirm the capability of NFs transiently transfected with miR-9 to promote in vivo tumor growth. Taken together, these data provide new insights into the role of miR-9 as an important player in the cross-talk between cancer cells and stroma. PMID:27468688

  18. Exosome-mediated delivery of miR-9 induces cancer-associated fibroblast-like properties in human breast fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, S; Romero-Cordoba, S; Plantamura, I; Dugo, M; D'Ippolito, E; Cataldo, A; Cosentino, G; Angeloni, V; Rossini, A; Daidone, M G; Iorio, M V

    2016-01-01

    It is established that the interaction between microenvironment and cancer cells has a critical role in tumor development, given the dependence of neoplastic cells on stromal support. However, how this communication promotes the activation of normal (NFs) into cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) is still not well understood. Most microRNA (miRNA) studies focused on tumor cell, but there is increasing evidence of their involvement in reprogramming NFs into CAFs. Here we show that miR-9, upregulated in various breast cancer cell lines and identified as pro-metastatic miRNA, affects the properties of human breast fibroblasts, enhancing the switch to CAF phenotype, thus contributing to tumor growth. Expressed at higher levels in primary triple-negative breast CAFs versus NFs isolated from patients, miR-9 improves indeed migration and invasion capabilities when transfected in immortalized NFs; viceversa, these properties are strongly impaired in CAFs upon miR-9 inhibition. We also demonstrate that tumor-secreted miR-9 can be transferred via exosomes to recipient NFs and this uptake results in enhanced cell motility. Moreover, we observed that this miRNA is also secreted by fibroblasts and in turn able to alter tumor cell behavior, by modulating its direct target E-cadherin, and NFs themselves. Consistently with the biological effects observed, gene expression profiles of NFs upon transient transfection with miR-9 show the modulation of genes mainly involved in cell motility and extracellular matrix remodeling pathways. Finally, we were able to confirm the capability of NFs transiently transfected with miR-9 to promote in vivo tumor growth. Taken together, these data provide new insights into the role of miR-9 as an important player in the cross-talk between cancer cells and stroma. PMID:27468688

  19. The tumor microenvironment modulates tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer: a role for soluble stromal factors and fibronectin through β1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Pontiggia, Osvaldo; Sampayo, Rocio; Raffo, Diego; Motter, Andrea; Xu, Ren; Bissell, Mina J; Joffé, Elisa Bal de Kier; Simian, Marina

    2012-06-01

    Tamoxifen resistance has been largely attributed to genetic alterations in the epithelial tumor cells themselves, such as overexpression of HER-2/Neu. However, in the clinic, only about 15-20% of cases of HER-2/Neu amplification has actually been correlated to the acquisition of endocrine resistance, suggesting that other mechanisms must be involved as well. Using the epithelial LM05-E and the fibroblastic LM05-F cell lines, derived from the estrogen dependent spontaneous M05 mouse mammary tumor, as well as MCF-7 cells, we analyzed whether soluble stromal factors or extracellular matrix components protected against tamoxifen induced cell death. Involvement of signaling pathways was determined by using specific inhibitors and western blot, and phosphorylation of the estrogen receptor alpha by western blot and immunofluorescence. Soluble factors produced by the fibroblastic cells protect the epithelial tumor cells from tamoxifen-induced cell death through a mechanism that involves EGFR and matrix metalloproteinases upstream of PI3K/AKT. Exogenous fibronectin by itself confers endocrine resistance through interaction with β1 integrin and activation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK 1/2 pathways. The conferred resistance is reversed by blocking β1 integrin. We show also that treatment with both conditioned medium and fibronectin leads to the phosphorylation of the estrogen receptor at serine-118, suggesting stromal factors as modulators of ER activity. Our results show that the tumor microenvironment can modulate tamoxifen resistance, providing an alternative explanation for why patients become refractory to hormone-therapy.

  20. A 3D in vitro model of patient-derived prostate cancer xenograft for controlled interrogation of in vivo tumor-stromal interactions.

    PubMed

    Fong, Eliza L S; Wan, Xinhai; Yang, Jun; Morgado, Micaela; Mikos, Antonios G; Harrington, Daniel A; Navone, Nora M; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models better represent human cancer than traditional cell lines. However, the complex in vivo environment makes it challenging to employ PDX models to investigate tumor-stromal interactions, such as those that mediate prostate cancer (PCa) bone metastasis. Thus, we engineered a defined three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel system capable of supporting the co-culture of PCa PDX cells and osteoblastic cells to recapitulate the PCa-osteoblast unit within the bone metastatic microenvironment in vitro. Our 3D model not only maintained cell viability but also preserved the typical osteogenic phenotype of PCa PDX cells. Additionally, co-culture cellularity was maintained over that of either cell type cultured alone, suggesting that the PCa-osteoblast cross-talk supports PCa progression in bone, as is hypothesized to occur in patients with prostatic bone metastasis. Strikingly, osteoblastic cells co-cultured with PCa PDX tumoroids organized around the tumoroids, closely mimicking the architecture of PCa metastases in bone. Finally, tumor-stromal signaling mediated by the fibroblast growth factor axis tightly paralleled that in the in vivo counterpart. Together, these findings indicate that this 3D PCa PDX model recapitulates important pathological properties of PCa bone metastasis, and validate the use of this model for controlled and systematic interrogation of complex in vivo tumor-stromal interactions.

  1. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion.

  2. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  3. Tensional homeostasis in single fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Webster, Kevin D; Ng, Win Pin; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2014-07-01

    Adherent cells generate forces through acto-myosin contraction to move, change shape, and sense the mechanical properties of their environment. They are thought to maintain defined levels of tension with their surroundings despite mechanical perturbations that could change tension, a concept known as tensional homeostasis. Misregulation of tensional homeostasis has been proposed to drive disorganization of tissues and promote progression of diseases such as cancer. However, whether tensional homeostasis operates at the single cell level is unclear. Here, we directly test the ability of single fibroblast cells to regulate tension when subjected to mechanical displacements in the absence of changes to spread area or substrate elasticity. We use a feedback-controlled atomic force microscope to measure and modulate forces and displacements of individual contracting cells as they spread on a fibronectin-patterned atomic-force microscope cantilever and coverslip. We find that the cells reach a steady-state contraction force and height that is insensitive to stiffness changes as they fill the micropatterned areas. Rather than maintaining a constant tension, the fibroblasts altered their contraction force in response to mechanical displacement in a strain-rate-dependent manner, leading to a new and stable steady-state force and height. This response is influenced by overexpression of the actin crosslinker α-actinin, and rheology measurements reveal that changes in cell elasticity are also strain- rate-dependent. Our finding of tensional buffering, rather than homeostasis, allows cells to transition between different tensional states depending on how they are displaced, permitting distinct responses to slow deformations during tissue growth and rapid deformations associated with injury.

  4. Electrical consequences of cardiac myocyte: fibroblast coupling.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Lisa; Chilton, Lisa; Smith, Godfrey L; Nicklin, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Gap junctions are channels which allow electrical signals to propagate through the heart from the sinoatrial node and through the atria, conduction system and onwards to the ventricles, and hence are essential for co-ordinated cardiac contraction. Twelve connexin (Cx) proteins make up one gap junction channel, of which there are three main subtypes in the heart; Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45. In the cardiac myocyte, gap junctions are present mainly at the intercalated discs between neighbouring myocytes, and assist in rapid electrical conduction throughout the ventricular myocardium. Fibroblasts provide the structural skeleton of the myocardium and fibroblast numbers significantly increase in heart disease. Fibroblasts also express connexins and this may facilitate heterocellular electrical coupling between myocytes and fibroblasts in the setting of cardiac disease. Interestingly, cardiac fibroblasts have been demonstrated to increase Cx43 expression in experimental models of myocardial infarction and functional gap junctions between myocytes and fibroblasts have been reported. Therefore, in the setting of heart disease enhanced cardiac myocyte: fibroblast coupling may influence the electrical activity of the myocyte and contribute to arrhythmias.

  5. Transcriptional control of cardiac fibroblast plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lighthouse, Janet K; Small, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts help maintain the normal architecture of the healthy heart and are responsible for scar formation and the healing response to pathological insults. Various genetic, biomechanical, or humoral factors stimulate fibroblasts to become contractile smooth muscle-like cells called myofibroblasts that secrete large amounts of extracellular matrix. Unfortunately, unchecked myofibroblast activation in heart disease leads to pathological fibrosis, which is a major risk factor for the development of cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control fibroblast plasticity and myofibroblast activation is essential to develop novel strategies to specifically target pathological cardiac fibrosis without disrupting the adaptive healing response. This review highlights the major transcriptional mediators of fibroblast origin and function in development and disease. The contribution of the fetal epicardial gene program will be discussed in the context of fibroblast origin in development and following injury, primarily focusing on Tcf21 and C/EBP. We will also highlight the major transcriptional regulatory axes that control fibroblast plasticity in the adult heart, including transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Smad signaling, the Rho/myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)/serum response factor (SRF) axis, and Calcineurin/transient receptor potential channel (TRP)/nuclear factor of activated T-Cell (NFAT) signaling. Finally, we will discuss recent strategies to divert the fibroblast transcriptional program in an effort to promote cardiomyocyte regeneration. This article is a part of a Special Issue entitled "Fibrosis and Myocardial Remodeling". PMID:26721596

  6. KIT and PDGFRA mutations and PDGFRA immunostaining in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Barreca, Antonella; Fornari, Alessandro; Bonello, Lisa; Tondat, Fabrizio; Chiusa, Luigi; Lista, Patrizia; Pich, Achille

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the association of PDGFRA and KIT mutations as well as PDGFRA immunohistochemical expression with clinicopathologic features and prognosis in a series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Tumor DNA from 40 GISTs was sequenced for the presence of mutations in KIT exons 9, 11, 13 and 17, and in PDGFRA exons 12 and 18. Tissue sections were stained with polyclonal anti-PDGFRA antibody. KIT mutations occurred in 26 cases. There were 13 deletions, 6 substitutions, 3 deletion-substitutions, 3 duplications and 1 insertion. Tumors with KIT deletions/insertion were large with a high mitotic index (MI), and were associated with a high rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs, distant metastasis, relapse and a short disease-free survival (DFS). PDGFRA mutations occurred in 6 gastric GISTs. There were 4 deletions and 2 substitutions. Tumors with PDGFRA mutations were small, with a low MI and Ki67 score, and were associated with a very low rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs and distant metastasis. PDGFRA immunopositivity was found in 23 cases: a peculiar 'dotlike' staining was found in 5 out of 6 PDGFRA mutated cases. Patients with positive PDGFRA immunostaining had a longer DFS than those with negative staining. Our data confirm that the type of KIT mutation is associated with various clinicopathologic features of GISTs, and indicate that PDGFRA mutations are associated with rather indolent tumors. PDGFRA immunopositivity reflects PDGFRA mutational status and is associated with a favorable outcome. PMID:21461555

  7. Collaboration of cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumour-associated macrophages for neuroblastoma development.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Okito; Yoshida, Makiko; Koma, Yu-Ichiro; Yanai, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Yokozaki, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumour in children and is histologically classified by its Schwannian stromal cells. Although having fewer Schwannian stromal cells is generally associated with more aggressive phenotypes, the exact roles of other stromal cells (mainly macrophages and fibroblasts) are unclear. Here, we examined 41 cases of neuroblastoma using immunohistochemistry for the tumour-associated macrophage (TAM) markers CD68, CD163, and CD204, and a cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) marker, alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA). Each case was assigned to low/high groups on the basis of the number of TAMs or three groups on the basis of the αSMA-staining area for CAFs. Both the number of TAMs and the area of CAFs were significantly correlated with clinical stage, MYCN amplification, bone marrow metastasis, histological classification, histological type, and risk classification. Furthermore, TAM settled in the vicinity of the CAF area, suggesting their close interaction within the tumour microenvironment. We next determined the effects of conditioned medium of a neuroblastoma cell line (NBCM) on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived macrophages in vitro. The TAM markers CD163 and CD204 were significantly up-regulated in PBMC-derived macrophages treated with NBCM. The expression of αSMA by BM-MSCs was increased in NBCM-treated cells. Co-culturing with CAF-like BM-MSCs did not enhance the invasive ability but supported the proliferation of tumour cells, whereas tumour cells co-cultured with TAM-like macrophages had the opposite effect. Intriguingly, TAM-like macrophages enhanced not only the invasive abilities of tumour cells and BM-MSCs but also the proliferation of BM-MSCs. CXCL2 secreted from TAM-like macrophages plays an important role in tumour invasiveness. Taken together, these results indicate that PBMC-derived macrophages and BM-MSCs are recruited to a tumour site

  8. Collaboration of cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumour-associated macrophages for neuroblastoma development.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Okito; Yoshida, Makiko; Koma, Yu-Ichiro; Yanai, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Yokozaki, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumour in children and is histologically classified by its Schwannian stromal cells. Although having fewer Schwannian stromal cells is generally associated with more aggressive phenotypes, the exact roles of other stromal cells (mainly macrophages and fibroblasts) are unclear. Here, we examined 41 cases of neuroblastoma using immunohistochemistry for the tumour-associated macrophage (TAM) markers CD68, CD163, and CD204, and a cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) marker, alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA). Each case was assigned to low/high groups on the basis of the number of TAMs or three groups on the basis of the αSMA-staining area for CAFs. Both the number of TAMs and the area of CAFs were significantly correlated with clinical stage, MYCN amplification, bone marrow metastasis, histological classification, histological type, and risk classification. Furthermore, TAM settled in the vicinity of the CAF area, suggesting their close interaction within the tumour microenvironment. We next determined the effects of conditioned medium of a neuroblastoma cell line (NBCM) on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived macrophages in vitro. The TAM markers CD163 and CD204 were significantly up-regulated in PBMC-derived macrophages treated with NBCM. The expression of αSMA by BM-MSCs was increased in NBCM-treated cells. Co-culturing with CAF-like BM-MSCs did not enhance the invasive ability but supported the proliferation of tumour cells, whereas tumour cells co-cultured with TAM-like macrophages had the opposite effect. Intriguingly, TAM-like macrophages enhanced not only the invasive abilities of tumour cells and BM-MSCs but also the proliferation of BM-MSCs. CXCL2 secreted from TAM-like macrophages plays an important role in tumour invasiveness. Taken together, these results indicate that PBMC-derived macrophages and BM-MSCs are recruited to a tumour site

  9. Identification of a new fibroblast growth factor receptor, FGFR5.

    PubMed

    Sleeman, M; Fraser, J; McDonald, M; Yuan, S; White, D; Grandison, P; Kumble, K; Watson, J D; Murison, J G

    2001-06-27

    A novel fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), designated FGFR5, was identified from an EST database of a murine lymph node stromal cell cDNA library. The EST has approximately 32% identity to the extracellular domain of FGFR1-4. Library screening with this EST identified two full-length alternative transcripts which we designated as FGFR5 beta and FGFR5 gamma. The main difference between these transcripts is that FGFR5 beta contains three extracellular Ig domains whereas FGFR5 gamma contains only two. A unique feature of FGFR5 is that it does not contain an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Predictive structural modelling of the extracellular domain of FGFR5 gamma suggested that it was a member of the I-set subgroup of the Ig-superfamily, consistent with the known FGFRs. Northern analysis of mouse and human FGFR5 showed detectable mRNA in a broad range of tissues, including kidney, brain and lung. Genomic sequencing identified four introns but identified no alternative transcripts containing a tyrosine kinase domain. Extracellular regions of FGFR5 beta and 5 gamma were cloned in-frame with the Fc fragment of human IgG(1) to generate recombinant non-membrane bound protein. Recombinant FGFR5 beta Fc and R5 gamma Fc demonstrated specific binding to the ligand FGF-2, but not FGF-7 or EGF. However, biological data suggest that FGF-2 binding to these proteins is with lower affinity than its cognate receptor FGFR2C. The above data indicate that this receptor should be considered as the fifth member of the FGFR family. PMID:11418238

  10. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor presenting with prominent calcification

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, Naoki; Sawada, Takeshi; Abiko, Ryuichi; Kumon, Daisuke; Hirakawa, Mami; Kobayashi, Mika; Obinata, Nobuyuki; Nomoto, Masahito; Maehata, Tadateru; Yamauchi, Shun-ichi; Kouro, Takefumi; Tsuda, Takashi; Kitajima, Satoshi; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Keiichi; Tanaka, Ichiro; Hoshikawa, Masahiro; Takagi, Masayuki; Itoh, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    We present a rare case of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the stomach with prominent calcification at presentation. A 61-year-old woman visited our hospital because of epigastric discomfort. A spherical calcified lesion with a diameter of about 30 mm was incidentally shown in the left upper quadrant on an abdominal X-ray. Computed tomography demonstrated that the tumor was growing from the upper gastric body, with calcification in the peripheral ring area. A laparoscopic partial gastrectomy was performed, and the resected specimen revealed a well-circumscribed tumor with exophytic growth from the gastric muscularis propria. Microscopic examination revealed spindle-shaped tumor cells with calcification and hemorrhage. Additionally, positive immunoreactivity of the tumor to KIT and CD34 and a low mitotic index resulted in the diagnosis of very low risk GIST. There are a few case reports of heavily calcified GIST, although solitary or punctate calcification of primary GIST has been reported in several case series. Dystrophic calcification of necrotic or degenerative tissue is the supposed cause of primary calcified GISTs. In contrast, appearance of calcification after administration of imatinib mesylate, which may be one indicator of disease response, is possibly caused by a different mechanism. PMID:23112561

  11. Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Gu, Meng-Li; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. However, there are still 10%-15% of GISTs lacking KIT and PDGFRA mutations, called wild-type GISTs (WT GISTs). Among these so-called WT GISTs, a small subset is associated with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) deficiency, known as SDH-deficient GISTs. In addition, GISTs that occur in Carney triad and Carney-Stratakis syndrome represent specific examples of SDH-deficient GISTs. SDH-deficient GISTs locate exclusively in the stomach, showing predilection for children and young adults with female preponderance. The tumor generally pursues an indolent course and exhibits primary resistance to imatinib therapy in most cases. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B expression and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) are common features of SDH-deficient GISTs. In WT GISTs without succinate dehydrogenase activity, upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α may lead to increased growth signaling through IGF1R and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). As a result, IGF1R and VEGFR are promising to be the novel therapeutic targets of GISTs. This review will update the current knowledge on characteristics of SDH-deficient GISTs and further discuss the possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis and clinical management of SDH-deficient GISTs. PMID:25741136

  12. Gastric stromal tumours: a practical approach.

    PubMed Central

    Mihssin, N.; Moorthy, K.; Sengupta, A.; Houghton, P. W.

    2000-01-01

    Recent findings on the pathological diversity of gastric stromal tumours and their unpredictable behaviour prompted us to review our series of 16 patients who had undergone surgery for these tumours from 1991 to 1998. There were 13 benign and 3 malignant lesions. The majority of patients presented with either upper gastrointestinal bleeding or anaemia alone (12 of 16). Endoscopy was an extremely useful diagnostic tool, revealing the lesion as an intraluminal protuberant tumour with or without ulcer in 10 cases and as an ulcer alone in 4 cases, and in 1 case features suggesting an extrinsic mass. All the patients in the series underwent surgery. We used staplers (AutosutureR TA 55) to excise the tumours in 7 cases, all of which on histological examination were benign with clear resection margins. Gastric resections were performed in 5 cases for either large tumours or those situated at the fundus or antrum and local excision of the remaining 4. The mean follow-up of these patients was 24 months. Two patients with malignant lesions died of irresectable recurrences, one 2 months and one 18 months after surgery. There have been no recurrences in the tumours diagnosed as benign on histology. Tumour size, position and the ability to apply the stapler leaving adequate margin below the tumour should be the determinants of extent and type of excision. Reliable determinants of behaviour are tumour size, grade and mitotic index. Images Figure 1 PMID:11103152

  13. LAPAROSCOPIC RESECTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    LOUREIRO, Marcelo de Paula; de ALMEIDA, Rômulo Augusto Andrade; CLAUS, Christiano Marlo Paggi; BONIN, Eduardo Aimoré; CURY-FILHO,, Antônio Moris; DIMBARRE, Daniellson; da COSTA, Marco Aurélio Raeder; VITAL, Marcílio Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal mesenchymal or stromal tumors (GIST) are lesions originated on digestive tract walls, which are treated by surgical resection. Several laparoscopic techniques, from gastrectomies to segmental resections, have been used successfully. Aim Describe a single center experience on laparoscopic GIST resection. Method Charts of 15 operated patients were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen had gastric lesions, of which ten were sub epithelial, ranging from 2-8 cm; and three were pure exofitic growing lesions. The remaining two patients had small bowel lesions. Surgical laparoscopic treatment consisted of two distal gastrectomies, 11 wedge gastric resections and two segmental enterectomies. Mechanical suture was used in the majority of patients except on six, which underwent resection and closure using manual absorbable sutures. There were no conversions to open technique. Results Mean operative time was 1h 29 min±92 (40-420 min). Average lenght of hospital stay was three days (2-6 days). There were no leaks, postoperative bleeding or need for reintervention. Mean postoperative follow-up was 38±17 months (6-60 months). Three patients underwent adjuvant Imatinib treatment, one for recurrence five months postoperatively and two for tumors with moderate risk for recurrence . Conclusion Laparoscopic GIST resection, not only for small lesions but also for tumors above 5 cm, is safe and acceptable technique. PMID:27120729

  14. Divergent gastrointestinal stromal tumors in syndromic settings.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Cenci, Tonia; Riccioni, Maria Elena; Maria, Giorgio; Cassano, Alessandra; Larocca, Luigi Maria

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) occur as sporadic tumors. Rarely, however, these neoplasms can arise in syndromic contexts. Under these circumstances, GISTs are often multiple and associated with accompanying signs peculiar of the hosting syndrome. Moreover, syndromic GISTs themselves tend to show heterogeneous features depending on the underlying condition. Multiple inflammatory fibroid polyps (IFPs) and a jejunal spindle-cell GIST were resected in a germline PDGFRA-mutant individual. Although the association of IFP and GIST is typical of this genetic setting (PDGFRA mutations can in fact trigger both these tumor types), PDGFRA-mutant GISTs are usually epithelioid and gastric. This discrepancy was settled evidencing a somatic KIT mutation in the GIST. The awareness of possible somatic mutations can be critical in the management of high-risk/malignant GISTs arising in syndromic settings. GIST features unusual for a given GIST-predisposing syndrome are a valuable tool in the hands of physicians for suspecting these "extra" triggers, which could not be sought for once a diagnosis of GIST-prone syndrome is well established, in a bona fide cost/benefit perspective. PMID:27318444

  15. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  16. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins.

  17. Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Sever; Barbu, Emil; Ionescu, Călin; Costache, Adrian; Bălăşoiu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal malignancies of the digestive tract. Gastric localization is the most frequent. The aim of this study is to evaluate the importance of immunohistochemical factors (CD117, CD34, α-SMA, vimentin, p53, Ki67) in diagnostic and size tumor and mitotic activity as prognostic factors for these tumors. We present the case of a 66-year-old male patient with a giant gastric GIST. Like in the vast majority, the symptomatology in this patient has long been faint, despite the large tumor size, and when it became manifest, it was nonspecific. Imagery wise, the computer tomography (CT) scan was the most efficient, showing the origin of the tumor from the greater curvature of the stomach, its dimensions, as well as the relations with the other abdominal viscera. Surgery in this patient was en-bloc, according to the principles of GIST. The histological aspect is characterized by a proliferation of spindle cells positive for CD117 and CD34. Despite complete microscopic resection, the size of the tumor (25×20×27 cm) and the mitotic activity (21÷5 mm2) remains important relapse factor.

  18. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (<100 cells). As a proof of concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced

  19. [Disorders of the extracellular matrix in epithelial-stromal and stromal corneal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Varkoly, Gréta; Bencze, János; Módis, László; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-08-01

    The human cornea is rich in extracellular matrix. The stroma constitutes the main thickness of the cornea, which consists of collagens and proteoglycans mainly. The epithelial-stromal and stromal dystrophies of the cornea are either autosomal dominant or recessive inherited disorders, which are unrelated to inflammation or trauma. The diseases can manifest in each layer of the cornea, but in most cases the corneal stroma is affected. Generally, they develop in childhood or young adulthood but the diagnosis is only possible when clinical signs (epithelial erosions, decreased visual acuity, photophobia) develop. The different protein aggregates (hyaline, amyloid, crystalline) deposited in the corneal layers result in mild or advanced corneal opacity and loss of the corneal transparency due to disorganisation of the extracellular matrix. In some of the corneal dystrophies the keratane sulphate proteoglycan looses its function which results in a loss of the regular interfibrillar spacing. Due to the severe corneal opacity patients may need corneal transplantation. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1299-1303. PMID:27523312

  20. The application of the fibroblast activation protein α-targeted immunotherapy strategy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jun; Zhang, Kun-Shui; Zhang, Qiu-Gui; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Shuang-Quan; Xie, Wan-Ying; Liu, Hui-Fang; Liu, Jing-Shi; Wu, Bai-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has primarily been focused on attacking tumor cells. However, given the close interaction between tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the tumor microenvironment (TME), CAF-targeted strategies could also contribute to an integrated cancer immunotherapy. Fibroblast activation protein α (FAP α) is not detectible in normal tissues, but is overexpressed by CAFs and is the predominant component of the stroma in most types of cancer. FAP α has both dipeptidyl peptidase and endopeptidase activities, cleaving substrates at a post-proline bond. When all FAP α-expressing cells (stromal and cancerous) are destroyed, tumors rapidly die. Furthermore, a FAP α antibody, FAP α vaccine, and modified vaccine all inhibit tumor growth and prolong survival in mouse models, suggesting FAP α is an adaptive tumor-associated antigen. This review highlights the role of FAP α in tumor development, explores the relationship between FAP α and immune suppression in the TME, and discusses FAP α as a potential immunotherapeutic target. PMID:26985769

  1. Identification of Selective and Potent Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein and Prolyl Oligopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Poplawski, Sarah E.; Lai, Jack H.; Li, Youhua; Jin, Zhiping; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Wengen; Wu, Yong; Zhou, Yuhong; Sudmeier, James L.; Sanford, David G.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine protease selectively expressed on reactive stromal fibroblasts of epithelial carcinomas. It is widely believed to play a role in tumor invasion and metastasis and therefore to represent a potential new drug target for cancer. Investigation into its biological function, however, has been hampered by the current unavailability of selective inhibitors. The challenge has been in identifying inhibitors that are selective for FAP over both the dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs), with which it shares exopeptidase specificity, and prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP), with which it shares endopeptidase specificity. Here, we report the first potent FAP inhibitor with selectivity over both the DPPs and PREP, N-(pyridine-4-carbonyl)-d-Ala-boroPro (ARI-3099, 6). We also report a similarly potent and selective PREP inhibitor, N-(pyridine-3-carbonyl)-Val-boroPro (ARI-3531, 22). Both are boronic acid based inhibitors, demonstrating that high selectivity can be achieved using this electrophile. The inhibitors are stable, easy to synthesize, and should prove to be useful in helping to elucidate the biological functions of these two unique and interesting enzymes, as well as their potential as drug targets. PMID:23594271

  2. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts: Their Characteristics and Their Roles in Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Kazuyoshi; Hara, Masayasu; Nagasaki, Takaya; Sato, Takafumi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-01

    Cancer tissues are composed of cancer cells and the surrounding stromal cells (e.g., fibroblasts, vascular endothelial cells, and immune cells), in addition to the extracellular matrix. Most studies investigating carcinogenesis and the progression, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis of cancer have focused on alterations in cancer cells, including genetic and epigenetic changes. Recently, interactions between cancer cells and the stroma have attracted considerable attention, and increasing evidence has accumulated on this. Several researchers have gradually clarified the origins, features, and roles of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), a major component of the cancer stroma. CAFs function in a similar manner to myofibroblasts during wound healing. We previously reported the relationship between CAFs and angiogenesis. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a multifunctional cytokine, plays a central role in regulating inflammatory and immune responses, and important roles in the progression, including proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis, of several cancers. We showed that CAFs are an important IL-6 source and that anti-IL-6 receptor antibody suppressed angiogenesis and inhibited tumor-stroma interactions. Furthermore, CAFs contribute to drug-resistance acquisition in cancer cells. The interaction between cancer cells and the stroma could be a potential target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26690480

  3. The application of the fibroblast activation protein α-targeted immunotherapy strategy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guan-Min; Xu, Wei; Du, Jun; Zhang, Kun-Shui; Zhang, Qiu-Gui; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Shuang-Quan; Xie, Wan-Ying; Liu, Hui-Fang; Liu, Jing-Shi; Wu, Bai-Ping

    2016-05-31

    Cancer immunotherapy has primarily been focused on attacking tumor cells. However, given the close interaction between tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the tumor microenvironment (TME), CAF-targeted strategies could also contribute to an integrated cancer immunotherapy. Fibroblast activation protein α (FAP α) is not detectible in normal tissues, but is overexpressed by CAFs and is the predominant component of the stroma in most types of cancer. FAP α has both dipeptidyl peptidase and endopeptidase activities, cleaving substrates at a post-proline bond. When all FAP α-expressing cells (stromal and cancerous) are destroyed, tumors rapidly die. Furthermore, a FAP α antibody, FAP α vaccine, and modified vaccine all inhibit tumor growth and prolong survival in mouse models, suggesting FAP α is an adaptive tumor-associated antigen. This review highlights the role of FAP α in tumor development, explores the relationship between FAP α and immune suppression in the TME, and discusses FAP α as a potential immunotherapeutic target.

  4. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response.

  5. Adult rat bone marrow stromal cells express genes associated with dopamine neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Brian C.; Woodbury, Dale . E-mail: WOODBURYDL@AOL.COM; Black, Ira B.

    2006-05-19

    An intensive search is underway to identify candidates to replace the cells that degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). To date, no suitable substitute has been found. We have recently found that adult rat bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be induced to assume a neuronal phenotype in vitro. These findings may have particular relevance to the treatment of PD. We now report that adult MSCs express multiple dopaminergic genes, suggesting that they are potential candidates for cell therapy. Using RT-PCR, we have examined families of genes that are associated with the development and/or survival of dopaminergic neurons. MSCs transcribe a variety of dopaminergic genes including patched and smoothened (components of the Shh receptor), Gli-1 (downstream mediator of Shh), and Otx-1, a gene associated with formation of the mesencephalon during development. Furthermore, Shh treatment elicits a 1.5-fold increase in DNA synthesis in cultured MSCs, suggesting the presence of a functional Shh receptor complex. We have also found that MSCs transcribe and translate Nurr-1, a nuclear receptor essential for the development of dopamine neurons. In addition, MSCs express a variety of growth factor receptors including the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored ligand-binding subunit of the GDNF receptor, GFR{alpha}1, as well as fibroblast growth factor receptors one and four. The expression of genes that are associated with the development and survival of dopamine neurons suggests a potential role for these cells in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  6. Stromal myofibroblasts in nonmetastatic and metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Sridhara, Sudheendra Udyavara; Choudaha, Nidhi; Kasetty, Sowmya; Joshi, Prathamesh Satish; Kallianpur, Shreenivas; Tijare, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: Myofibroblasts are one of the important components of the tumor microenvironment which could possibly play an important role in tumor progression. The purpose of this study was to compare the presence of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and CD34 positive fibroblasts in nonmetastatic and metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma and to evaluate their role in tumor metastasis. Materials and Methods: Ten cases each of histologically proven metastatic and nonmetastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma formed the study group. The tissue sections were stained immunohistochemically for α-SMA and CD34. The stromal spindle cells positive for these markers in the study groups were counted and compared. Results: α-SMA positive cases were more in the metastatic group and CD34 positive cases were found to be more in the nonmetastatic tumors. Conclusions: Though difference in the staining pattern was statistically nonsignificant, the inverse relationship between α-SMA and CD34 positive cells is indicative of dynamic nature and the influence of tumor stroma in tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:24250077

  7. Making surrogate β-cells from mesenchymal stromal cells: perspectives and future endeavors.

    PubMed

    Bhonde, Ramesh R; Sheshadri, Preethi; Sharma, Shikha; Kumar, Anujith

    2014-01-01

    Generation of surrogate β-cells is the need of the day to compensate the short supply of islets for transplantation to diabetic patients requiring daily shots of insulin. Over the years several sources of stem cells have been claimed to cater to the need of insulin producing cells. These include human embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, human perinatal tissues such as amnion, placenta, umbilical cord and postnatal tissues involving adipose tissue, bone marrow, blood monocytes, cord blood, dental pulp, endometrium, liver, labia minora dermis-derived fibroblasts and pancreas. Despite the availability of such heterogonous sources, there is no substantial breakthrough in selecting and implementing an ideal source for generating large number of stable insulin producing cells. Although the progress in derivation of β-cell like cells from embryonic stem cells has taken a greater leap, their application is limited due to controversy surrounding the destruction of human embryo and immune rejection. Since multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells are free of ethical and immunological complications, they could provide unprecedented opportunity as starting material to derive insulin secreting cells. The main focus of this review is to discuss the merits and demerits of MSCs obtained from human peri- and post-natal tissue sources to yield abundant glucose responsive insulin producing cells as ideal candidates for prospective stem cell therapy to treat diabetes.

  8. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways.

    PubMed

    Perros, Frederic; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs. PMID:21943186

  9. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs. PMID:21943186

  10. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response. PMID:25154887

  11. Making surrogate β-cells from mesenchymal stromal cells: perspectives and future endeavors.

    PubMed

    Bhonde, Ramesh R; Sheshadri, Preethi; Sharma, Shikha; Kumar, Anujith

    2014-01-01

    Generation of surrogate β-cells is the need of the day to compensate the short supply of islets for transplantation to diabetic patients requiring daily shots of insulin. Over the years several sources of stem cells have been claimed to cater to the need of insulin producing cells. These include human embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, human perinatal tissues such as amnion, placenta, umbilical cord and postnatal tissues involving adipose tissue, bone marrow, blood monocytes, cord blood, dental pulp, endometrium, liver, labia minora dermis-derived fibroblasts and pancreas. Despite the availability of such heterogonous sources, there is no substantial breakthrough in selecting and implementing an ideal source for generating large number of stable insulin producing cells. Although the progress in derivation of β-cell like cells from embryonic stem cells has taken a greater leap, their application is limited due to controversy surrounding the destruction of human embryo and immune rejection. Since multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells are free of ethical and immunological complications, they could provide unprecedented opportunity as starting material to derive insulin secreting cells. The main focus of this review is to discuss the merits and demerits of MSCs obtained from human peri- and post-natal tissue sources to yield abundant glucose responsive insulin producing cells as ideal candidates for prospective stem cell therapy to treat diabetes. PMID:24275096

  12. In vitro growth of hematopoietic progenitors and stromal bone marrow cells from patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jaramillo, Guadalupe; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge; Flores-Guzmán, Patricia; Mayani, Hector

    2011-02-01

    In the present study we have determined the content of hematopoietic and stromal progenitors in multiple myeloma (MM) bone marrow, and assessed their in vitro growth. Marrow cells were obtained from 17 MM patients at the time of diagnosis, and from 6 hematologically normal subjects. When mononuclear cells (MNC) from MM marrow were cultured, reduced numbers of hematopoietic progenitors were detected and their growth in long-term cultures was deficient, as compared to cultures of normal cells. When cell fractions enriched for CD34(+) Lin(-) cells were obtained, the levels of hematopoietic progenitors from MM marrow were within the normal range, and so was their growth kinetics in liquid suspension cultures. The levels of fibroblast progenitors in MM were not statistically different from those in normal marrow; however, their proliferation potential was significantly reduced. Conditioned media from MM-derived MNC and stroma cells contained factors that inhibited normal progenitor cell growth. Our observations suggest that hematopoietic progenitors in MM marrow are intrinsically normal; however, their growth in LTMC may be hampered by the presence of abnormal accessory and stroma cells. These results suggest that besides its role in the generation of osteolytic lesions and the expansion of the myeloma clone, the marrow microenvironment in MM may have a negative effect on hematopoiesis. PMID:20621354

  13. Neural cell adhesion molecule modulates mesenchymal stromal cell migration via activation of MAPK/ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Xia, Yin-Yan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Rui; Khoo, King-Shung; Feng, Zhi-Wei

    2012-10-15

    Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) represent promising tools for cellular therapy owing to their multipotentiality and ability to localize to injured, inflamed sites and tumor. Various approaches to manipulate expression of MSC surface markers, including adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors, have been explored to enhance homing of MSCs. Recently, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) has been found to be expressed on MSCs yet its function remains largely elusive. Herein, we show that bone marrow-derived MSCs from NCAM deficient mice exhibit defective migratory ability and significantly impaired adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. We further explore the mechanism governing NCAM mediated migration of MSCs by showing the interplay between NCAM and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) induces activation of MAPK/ERK signaling, thereby the migration of MSCs. In addition, re-expression of NCAM180, but not NCAM140, could restore the defective MAPK/ERK signaling thereby the migration of NCAM deficient MSCs. Finally, we demonstrate that NCAM180 expression level could be manipulated by pro-inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α treatment. Overall, our data reveal the vital function of NCAM in MSCs migration and differentiation thus raising the possibility of manipulating NCAM expression to enhance homing and therapeutic potential of MSCs in cellular therapy.

  14. Isolation, characterization and cardiac differentiation of human thymus tissue derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ze Bang; Qian, Bo; Yang, Yu Zhong; Zhou, Kai; Sun, Jian; Mo, Xu Ming; Wu, Kai Hong

    2015-07-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidate donor cells for replacement of cardiomyocyte loss during ischemia and in vitro generation of myocardial tissue. We have successfully isolated MSCs from the discarded neonatal thymus gland during cardiac surgery. The thymus MSCs were characterized by cell-surface antigen expression. These cells have high ability for proliferation and are able to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes in vitro. For cardiac differentiation, the cells were divided into 3 groups: untreated control; 5-azacytidine group and sequential exposure to 5-azacytidine, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Thymus MSCs showed a fibrolast-like morphology and some differentiated cells increased in size, formed a ball-like appearance over time and spontaneously contracting cells were observed in sequential exposure group. Immunostaining studies, cardiac specific genes/protein expression confirmed the cardiomyocyte phenotype of the differentiated cells. These results demonstrate that thymus MSCs can be a promising cellular source for cardiac cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  15. Local binary patterns for stromal area removal in histology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomari, Raja S.; Ghosh, Subarna; Chaudhary, Vipin; Al-Kadi, Omar

    2012-03-01

    Nuclei counting in epithelial cells is an indication for tumor proliferation rate which is useful to rank tumors and select an appropriate treatment schedule for the patient. However, due to the high interand intra- observer variability in nuclei counting, pathologists seek a deterministic proliferation rate estimate. Histology tissue contains epithelial and stromal cells. However, nuclei counting is clinically restricted to epithelial cells because stromal cells do not become cancerous themselves since they remain genetically normal. Counting nuclei existing within the stromal tissue is one of the major causes of the proliferation rate non-deterministic estimation. Digitally removing stromal tissue will eliminate a major cause in pathologist counting variability and bring the clinical pathologist a major step closer toward a deterministic proliferation rate estimation. To that end, we propose a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system for eliminating stromal cells from digital histology images based on the local binary patterns, entropy measurement, and statistical analysis. We validate our CAD system on a set of fifty Ki-67-stained histology images. Ki-67-stained histology images are among the clinically approved methods for proliferation rate estimation. To test our CAD system, we prove that the manual proliferation rate estimation performed by the expert pathologist does not change before and after stromal removal. Thus, stromal removal does not affect the expert pathologist estimation clinical decision. Hence, the successful elimination of the stromal area highly reduces the false positive nuclei which are the major confusing cause for the less experienced pathologists and thus accounts for the non-determinism in the proliferation rate estimation. Our experimental setting shows statistical insignificance (paired student t-test shows ρ = 0.74) in the manual nuclei counting before and after our automated stromal removal. This means that the clinical decision of

  16. Stromal cells and stem cells in clinical bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Warren L.; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Martin, Elizabeth; Frazier, Trivia; Hung, Ben P.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Stem-cell-mediated bone repair has been used in clinical trials for the regeneration of large craniomaxillofacial defects, to slow the process of bone degeneration in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head and for prophylactic treatment of distal tibial fractures. Successful regenerative outcomes in these investigations have provided a solid foundation for wider use of stromal cells in skeletal repair therapy. However, employing stromal cells to facilitate or enhance bone repair is far from being adopted into clinical practice. Scientific, technical, practical and regulatory obstacles prevent the widespread therapeutic use of stromal cells. Ironically, one of the major challenges lies in the limited understanding of the mechanisms via which transplanted cells mediate regeneration. Animal models have been used to provide insight, but these models largely fail to reproduce the nuances of human diseases and bone defects. Consequently, the development of targeted approaches to optimize cell-mediated outcomes is difficult. In this Review, we highlight the successes and challenges reported in several clinical trials that involved the use of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal or adipose-tissue-derived stromal cells. We identify several obstacles blocking the mainstream use of stromal cells to enhance skeletal repair and highlight technological innovations or areas in which novel techniques might be particularly fruitful in continuing to advance the field of skeletal regenerative medicine. PMID:25560703

  17. Rbbp7 Is Required for Uterine Stromal Decidualization in Mice.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Kong, Shuangbo; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Shuang; Jiang, Yaling; Liao, Yixin; Jiang, Yufei; Li, Qian; Wang, Bingyan; Zhou, Zuomin; Wang, Haibin; Huo, Ran

    2015-07-01

    Uterine stromal cells undergo extensive proliferation and differentiation during postimplantation development, a process known as decidualization. While a range of signaling molecules have been demonstrated to play essential roles in this event, its potential epigenetic regulatory mechanisms remain largely unknown. Retinoblastoma binding protein 7 (Rbbp7) is a protein reported as a core component of many histone modification and chromatin remodeling complexes. In the present study, our in situ hybridization and immunochemistry analysis first reveals a spatiotemporal expression of Rbbp7 in the uterus during the peri-implantation period. Observations of remarkable induction of Rbbp7 expression in uterine stromal cells in response to progesterone-nuclear receptor PR signaling point to its potential physiological significance during postimplantation uterine development. Employing a stealth RNA knockdown approach, combined with primary murine uterine stromal cell culture and an in vitro-induced decidualization model, we further demonstrate that Rbbp7 silencing compromises stromal cell decidualization via attenuating histone H4 acetylation and cyclin D3 expression. The results collectively suggest that Rbbp7 is a potentially functional player regulating normal histone acetylation modification and cyclin D3 expression in stromal cells during postimplantation decidual development. PMID:26040671

  18. Stromal senescence establishes an immunosuppressive microenvironment that drives tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ruhland, Megan K.; Loza, Andrew J.; Capietto, Aude-Helene; Luo, Xianmin; Knolhoff, Brett L.; Flanagan, Kevin C.; Belt, Brian A.; Alspach, Elise; Leahy, Kathleen; Luo, Jingqin; Schaffer, Andras; Edwards, John R.; Longmore, Gregory; Faccio, Roberta; DeNardo, David G.; Stewart, Sheila A.

    2016-01-01

    Age is a significant risk factor for the development of cancer. However, the mechanisms that drive age-related increases in cancer remain poorly understood. To determine if senescent stromal cells influence tumorigenesis, we develop a mouse model that mimics the aged skin microenvironment. Using this model, here we find that senescent stromal cells are sufficient to drive localized increases in suppressive myeloid cells that contributed to tumour promotion. Further, we find that the stromal-derived senescence-associated secretory phenotype factor interleukin-6 orchestrates both increases in suppressive myeloid cells and their ability to inhibit anti-tumour T-cell responses. Significantly, in aged, cancer-free individuals, we find similar increases in immune cells that also localize near senescent stromal cells. This work provides evidence that the accumulation of senescent stromal cells is sufficient to establish a tumour-permissive, chronic inflammatory microenvironment that can shelter incipient tumour cells, thus allowing them to proliferate and progress unabated by the immune system. PMID:27272654

  19. Changes in compartments of hemospoietic and stromal marrow progenitor cells after continuous low dose gamma-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, E.; Starostin, V.

    The low dose continuous gamma-irradiation chosen corresponded with that affected the organisms onboard a spacecraft (Mitrikas, Tsetlin, 2000). F1 (CBAxC57Bl/6) male and female mice were used at 3 4 months of age. Experimental mice were- irradiated during 10 days to a total dose of 15 mGy (Co60 gamma-sources, mean dose rate of 1.5-2.0 mGy/day). Another group of intact mice served as control. Younger and advanced hemopoietic progenitors measured at day 11 (i.e. CFU -S-11) and day 7 (i.e. CFU-S-7), respectively, after transplantation of test donor cells were assayed by the method of Till and McCulloch (1961). Stromal changes were evaluated by estimation of in vitro fibroblastic colony-forming units (CFU -F ) content and by the ability of ectopically grafted (under renal capsule) stroma to regenerate the new bone marrow organ. CFU-S-11 number increased of 40% as compared with control and almost 2-fold higher than that of CFU-S-7. The CFU-F content increased almost of 3-fold. Size of ectopic marrow transplants was estimated at day 70 following grafting by counting myelokariocyte and CFU -S number that repopulated the newly formed bone marrow organ. It was found more than 2-fold increase of myelokariocytes in transplants produced by marrow stroma of irradiated donors. CFU -S contents in transplants increased strikingly in comparison to control level. CFU-S-7 and CFU-S-11 increased of 7.5- and of 3.7-fold, respectively, i.e. the rate of advanced CFU - S predominated. It should be noted a good correlation between number of stromal progenitor cells (CFU-F) and ectopic transplant sizes evaluated as myelokaryocyte counts when irradiated donors used. In the same time, if sizes of transplants was measured as CFU-S-7 and CFU - S-11 numbers, their increases were more pronounced. Therefore, continuous low dose gamma- irradiation augments significantly both hemopoietic and stromal progenitor cell number in bone marrow. Additionally, the ratio of distinct CFU -S subpopulations

  20. CD90/THY1 is over-expressed in prostate cancer-associated fibroblasts and could serve as a cancer biomarker

    SciTech Connect

    True, Lawrence D.; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Mingliang; Huang, Chung-Ying; Nelson, Peter S.; Von Haller, Priska D.; Tjoelker, Larry W.; Kim, Jong Seo; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Ellis, William J.; Liebeskind, Emily S.; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2010-10-01

    A by-product in the processing of prostate tissue for cell sorting by collagenase digestion is the media supernatant that remains after the cells are harvested. These supernatants contain proteins made by the cells within the tissue. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Nglycosylated proteins detected an increased amount of CD90/THY1 in cancer supernatants compared to non-cancer supernatants. Immunohistochemistry showed that in all carcinomas, regardless of Gleason grade, a layer of CD90-positive stromal fibroblastic cells, approximately 5-to-10 cells deep, was localized to tumor glands. In contrast, a no more than 1-cell wide girth of CD90-positive stromal cells was found around benign glands. The increased number of CD90-positive stromal cells in cancer correlated with overexpression of CD90 mRNA detected by gene expression analysis of stromal cells obtained by laser-capture microdissection. There is increasing evidence that cancer-associated stroma plays a role in both tumor progression and carcinogenesis. Most experiments to identify cancer biomarkers have focused on the cancer cells. CD90, being a marker for prostate cancer-associated stroma, might be a potential biomarker for this cancer. A non-invasive test could be provided by a urine test. Proteomic analysis of urine from patients with prostate cancer identified CD90; conversely, CD90 was not detected in the urine of post-prostatectomy patients. Furthermore, this urinary CD90 protein was a variant CD90 protein not known to be expressed by such cells as lymphocytes that express CD90. These CD90 results were obtained from ~90 cases consisting of proteomic analysis of tissue and urine, immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis of tissue media, flow cytometry of cells from digested tissue, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis of isolated stromal cells.

  1. A lactate shuttle system between tumour and stromal cells is associated with poor prognosis in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In a malignant tumour, cancer cells are embedded in stromal cells, namely cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). These CAFs are now accepted as important players in cancer dynamics, being involved in tumour growth and progression. Although there are various reports on the interaction between tumour and stromal cells, the clinico-pathological significance of this cross-talk is still largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to characterise the expression of key metabolic proteins involved in glucose transport, pyruvate/lactate shuttle system, glycolytic metabolism and fatty acid oxidation in CAFs and tumour cells in different stages of malignant transformation. We further aimed to contextualise the clinico-pathological significance of these protein expression profiles with reference to known prognostic indicators, including biochemical recurrence in pT stage. Methods Prostate tissues were obtained from 480 patients with a median age of 64 years following radical prostatectomy with no previous hormonal therapy. Tissues were analysed for the expression of several key metabolism-related proteins in glands and surrounding fibroblasts by immunohistochemistry. Reliable markers of prognosis such as pT stage and biochemical recurrence were assessed for each case. Results We observed that prostate cancer cells did not rely mainly on glycolytic metabolism, while there was a high expression of MCT4 and CAIX - in CAFs. This corroborates the hypothesis of the “Reverse Warburg effect” in prostate cancer, in which fibroblasts are under oxidative stress and express CAIX, an established hypoxia marker. We found that alterations in the expression of metabolism-related proteins were already evident in the early stages of malignant transformation, suggesting the continuing alteration of CAFs from an early stage. Additionally, and for the first time, we show that cases showing high MCT4 expression in CAFs with concomitant strong MCT1 expression in prostate cancer (PCa

  2. Bone marrow fibroblasts parallel multiple myeloma progression in patients and mice: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Frassanito, M A; Rao, L; Moschetta, M; Ria, R; Di Marzo, L; De Luisi, A; Racanelli, V; Catacchio, I; Berardi, S; Basile, A; Menu, E; Ruggieri, S; Nico, B; Ribatti, D; Fumarulo, R; Dammacco, F; Vanderkerken, K; Vacca, A

    2014-04-01

    The role of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) has not been previously studied in multiple myeloma (MM). Here, cytofluorimetric analysis revealed higher proportions of bone marrow (BM) CAFs in patients with active MM (both at diagnosis and relapse) compared with patients in remission or those with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or deficiency anemia (controls). CAFs from MM patients produced increased levels of transforming growth factor-β, interleukin-6, stromal cell-derived factor-1α, insulin-like growth factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor-2 and displayed an activated and heterogeneous phenotype, which supported their origin from resident fibroblasts, endothelial cells and hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells via the endothelial-mesenchymal transition as well as mesenchymal stem cells via the mesenchymal transition, as both of these processes are induced by MM cells and CAFs. Active MM CAFs fostered chemotaxis, adhesion, proliferation and apoptosis resistance in MM cells through cytokine signals and cell-to-cell contact, which were inhibited by blocking CXCR4, several integrins and fibronectin. MM cells also induced the CAFs proliferation. In syngeneic 5T33MM and xenograft mouse models, MM cells induced the expansion of CAFs, which, in turn, promoted MM initiation and progression as well as angiogenesis. In BM biopsies from patients and mice, nests of CAFs were found in close contact with MM cells, suggesting a supportive niche. Therefore, the targeting of CAFs in MM patients may be envisaged as a novel therapeutic strategy.

  3. Suppression of Tumor Growth in Mice by Rationally Designed Pseudopeptide Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein and Prolyl Oligopeptidase1

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kenneth W.; Christiansen, Victoria J.; Yadav, Vivek R.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Zhang, Roy R.; McKee, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments (TMEs) are composed of cancer cells, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix, microvessels, and endothelial cells. Two prolyl endopeptidases, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and prolyl oligopeptidase (POP), are commonly overexpressed by epithelial-derived malignancies, with the specificity of FAP expression by cancer stromal fibroblasts suggesting FAP as a possible therapeutic target. Despite overexpression in most cancers and having a role in angiogenesis, inhibition of POP activity has received little attention as an approach to quench tumor growth. We developed two specific and highly effective pseudopeptide inhibitors, M83, which inhibits FAP and POP proteinase activities, and J94, which inhibits only POP. Both suppressed human colon cancer xenograft growth > 90% in mice. By immunohistochemical stains, M83- and J94-treated tumors had fewer microvessels, and apoptotic areas were apparent in both. In response to M83, but not J94, disordered collagen accumulations were observed. Neither M83- nor J94-treated mice manifested changes in behavior, weight, or gastrointestinal function. Tumor growth suppression was more extensive than noted with recently reported efforts by others to inhibit FAP proteinase function or reduce FAP expression. Diminished angiogenesis and the accompanying profound reduction in tumor growth suggest that inhibition of either FAP or POP may offer new therapeutic approaches that directly target TMEs. PMID:25622898

  4. Impact of Nanotopography, Heparin Hydrogel Microstructures, and Encapsulated Fibroblasts on Phenotype of Primary Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    You, Jungmok; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Son, Kyung Jin; Patel, Dipali; Haque, Amranul; Murphy, Christopher J; Revzin, Alexander

    2015-06-17

    Hepatocytes, the main epithelial cell type in the liver, perform most of the biochemical functions of the liver. Thus, maintenance of a primary hepatocyte phenotype is crucial for investigations of in vitro drug metabolism, toxicity, and development of bioartificial liver constructs. Here, we report the impact of topographic cues alone and in combination with soluble signals provided by encapsulated feeder cells on maintenance of the primary hepatocyte phenotype. Topographic features were 300 nm deep with pitches of either 400, 1400, or 4000 nm. Hepatocyte cell attachment, morphology and function were markedly better on 400 nm pitch patterns compared with larger scale topographies or planar substrates. Interestingly, topographic features having biomimetic size scale dramatically increased cell adhesion whether or not substrates had been precoated with collagen I. Albumin production in primary hepatocytes cultured on 400 nm pitch substrates without collagen I was maintained over 10 days and was considerably higher compared to albumin synthesis on collagen-coated flat substrates. In order to investigate the potential interaction of soluble cytoactive factors supplied by feeder cells with topographic cues in determining cell phenotype, bioactive heparin-containing hydrogel microstructures were molded (100 μm spacing, 100 μm width) over the surface of the topographically patterned substrates. These hydrogel microstructures either carried encapsulated fibroblasts or were free of cells. Hepatocytes cultured on nanopatterned substrates next to fibroblast carrying hydrogel microstructures were significantly more functional than hepatocytes cultured on nanopatterned surfaces without hydrogels or stromal cells significantly elevated albumin expression and cell junction formation compared to cells provided with topographic cues only. The simultaneous presentation of topographic biomechanical cues along with soluble signaling molecules provided by encapsulated fibroblasts

  5. Impact of Nanotopography, Heparin Hydrogel Microstructures, and Encapsulated Fibroblasts on Phenotype of Primary Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocytes, the main epithelial cell type in the liver, perform most of the biochemical functions of the liver. Thus, maintenance of a primary hepatocyte phenotype is crucial for investigations of in vitro drug metabolism, toxicity, and development of bioartificial liver constructs. Here, we report the impact of topographic cues alone and in combination with soluble signals provided by encapsulated feeder cells on maintenance of the primary hepatocyte phenotype. Topographic features were 300 nm deep with pitches of either 400, 1400, or 4000 nm. Hepatocyte cell attachment, morphology and function were markedly better on 400 nm pitch patterns compared with larger scale topographies or planar substrates. Interestingly, topographic features having biomimetic size scale dramatically increased cell adhesion whether or not substrates had been precoated with collagen I. Albumin production in primary hepatocytes cultured on 400 nm pitch substrates without collagen I was maintained over 10 days and was considerably higher compared to albumin synthesis on collagen-coated flat substrates. In order to investigate the potential interaction of soluble cytoactive factors supplied by feeder cells with topographic cues in determining cell phenotype, bioactive heparin-containing hydrogel microstructures were molded (100 μm spacing, 100 μm width) over the surface of the topographically patterned substrates. These hydrogel microstructures either carried encapsulated fibroblasts or were free of cells. Hepatocytes cultured on nanopatterned substrates next to fibroblast carrying hydrogel microstructures were significantly more functional than hepatocytes cultured on nanopatterned surfaces without hydrogels or stromal cells significantly elevated albumin expression and cell junction formation compared to cells provided with topographic cues only. The simultaneous presentation of topographic biomechanical cues along with soluble signaling molecules provided by encapsulated fibroblasts

  6. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and second malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rodriquenz, Maria Grazia; Rossi, Sabrina; Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Larocca, Mario; Dipasquale, Angelo; Quirino, Michela; Schinzari, Giovanni; Basso, Michele; D’Argento, Ettore; Strippoli, Antonia; Barone, Carlo; Cassano, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several evidences showed that patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) develop additional malignancies. However, thorough incidence of second tumors remains uncertain as the possibility of a common molecular pathogenesis. A retrospective series of 128 patients with histologically proven GIST treated at our institution was evaluated. Molecular analysis of KIT and PDGFR-α genes was performed in all patients. Following the involvement of KRAS mutation in many tumors’ pathogenesis, analysis of KRAS was performed in patients with also second neoplasms. Forty-six out of 128 GIST patients (35.9%) had a second neoplasm. Most second tumors (52%) raised from gastrointestinal tract and 19.6% from genitourinary tract. Benign neoplasms were also included (21.7%). Molecular analysis was available for 29/46 patients with a second tumor: wild-type GISTs (n. 5), exon 11 (n. 16), exon 13 (n. 1), exon 9 (n. 1) KIT mutations, exon 14 PDGFR-α mutation (n. 2) and exon 18 PDGFR-α mutation (n. 4). KIT exon 11 mutations were more frequent between patients who developed a second tumor (P = 0.0003). Mutational analysis of KRAS showed a wild-type sequence in all cases. In metachronous cases, the median time interval between GIST and second tumor was 21.5 months. The high frequency of second tumors suggests that an unknown common molecular mechanism might play a role, but it is not likely that KRAS is involved in this common pathogenesis. The short interval between GIST diagnosis and the onset of second neoplasms asks for a careful follow-up, particularly in the first 3 years after diagnosis. PMID:27661019

  7. A function for filamentous alpha-smooth muscle actin: retardation of motility in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Rønnov-Jessen, L; Petersen, O W

    1996-07-01

    Actins are known to comprise six mammalian isoforms of which beta- and gamma-nonmuscle actins are present in all cells, whereas alpha-smooth muscle (alpha-sm) actin is normally restricted to cells of the smooth muscle lineages. alpha-Sm actin has been found also to be expressed transiently in certain nonmuscle cells, in particular fibroblasts, which are referred to as myofibroblasts. The functional significance of alpha-sm actin in fibroblasts is unknown. However, myofibroblasts appear to play a prominent role in stromal reaction in breast cancer, at the site of wound repair, and in fibrotic reactions. Here, we show that the presence of alpha-sm actin is a signal for retardation of migratory behavior in fibroblasts. Comparison in a migration assay of fibroblast cell strains with and without alpha-sm actin revealed migratory restraint in alpha-sm actin-positive fibroblasts. Electroporation of monoclonal antibody (mAb) 1A4, which recognizes specifically the NH2-terminal Ac-EEED sequence of alpha-sm actin, significantly increased the frequency of migrating cells over that obtained with an unrelated antibody or a mAb against beta-actin. Time-lapse video microscopy revealed migratory rates of 4.8 and 3.0 microns/h, respectively. To knock out the alpha-sm actin protein, several antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (ODNs) were tested. One of these, 3'UTI, which is complementary to a highly evolutionary conserved 3' untranslated (3'UT) sequence of alpha-sm actin mRNA, was found to block alpha-sm actin synthesis completely without affecting the synthesis of any other proteins as analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Targeting by antisense 3'UTI significantly increased motility compared with the corresponding sense ODN. alpha-Sm actin inhibition also led to the formation of less prominent focal adhesions as revealed by immunofluorescence staining against vinculin, talin, and beta1-integrin. We propose that an important function of filamentous alpha

  8. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how alcohol consumption promotes the onset of human breast cancer(s). One hypothesis is that ethanol induces metabolic changes in the tumor microenvironment, which then enhances epithelial tumor growth. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we used a co-culture system consisting of human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation. Oxidative stress in stromal fibroblasts also results in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, driving the induction of ketone body production in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, ethanol has just the opposite effect in epithelial cancer cells, where it confers autophagy resistance, elevates mitochondrial biogenesis and induces key enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1/OXCT1). During co-culture, ethanol treatment also converts MCF7 cells from an ER(+) to an ER(-) status, which is thought to be associated with “stemness,” more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Thus, ethanol treatment induces ketone production in cancer-associated fibroblasts and ketone re-utilization in epithelial cancer cells, fueling tumor cell growth via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). This “two-compartment” metabolic model is consistent with previous historical observations that ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde (which induces oxidative stress) and then ultimately to acetyl-CoA (a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), or can be used to synthesize ketone bodies. As such, our results provide a novel mechanism by which alcohol consumption could metabolically convert “low-risk” breast cancer patients to “high-risk” status, explaining tumor recurrence or disease progression. Hence, our findings have clear implications for both breast cancer prevention and therapy. Remarkably, our results

  9. Defining the role of mesenchymal stromal cells on the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in skeletal muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sassoli, Chiara; Nosi, Daniele; Tani, Alessia; Chellini, Flaminia; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Quercioli, Franco; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Formigli, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) transplantation improves healing of injured and diseased skeletal muscle, although the mechanisms of benefit are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether MSCs and/or their trophic factors were able to regulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity in different cells of the muscle tissue. MSCs in co-culture with C2C12 cells or their conditioned medium (MSC-CM) up-regulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and function in the myoblastic cells; these effects were concomitant with the down-regulation of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and -2 and with increased cell motility. In the single muscle fiber experiments, MSC-CM administration increased MMP-2/9 expression in Pax-7{sup +} satellite cells and stimulated their mobilization, differentiation and fusion. The anti-fibrotic properties of MSC-CM involved also the regulation of MMPs by skeletal fibroblasts and the inhibition of their differentiation into myofibroblasts. The treatment with SB-3CT, a potent MMP inhibitor, prevented in these cells, the decrease of α-smooth actin and type-I collagen expression induced by MSC-CM, suggesting that MSC-CM could attenuate the fibrogenic response through mechanisms mediated by MMPs. Our results indicate that growth factors and cytokines released by these cells may modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle repair/regeneration. - Highlights: • MSC-CM contains paracrine factors that up-regulate MMP expression and function in different skeletal muscle cells. • MSC-CM promotes myoblast and satellite cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. • MSC-CM negatively interferes with fibroblast-myoblast transition in primary skeletal fibroblasts. • Paracrine factors from MSCs modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle regeneration.

  10. Stromal myofibroblasts in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    de-Assis, Eliene M.; Pimenta, Luiz G.G.S.; Costa-e-Silva, Edson; Souza, Paulo E.A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Oral leukoplakia (OL) is the main potentially malignant disorder and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignancy of the oral mucosa. Stromal myofibroblasts play an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis, due to its ability to modify the extracellular matrix. This study aimed to evaluate the presence of stromal myofibroblasts in OL and OSCC. Differences in the presence of myofibroblasts among OL with distinct grades of epithelial dysplasia as well as between histologically high- and low-invasive OSCC were also assessed. Study Design: A total of 30 OL and 41 OSCC from archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens were evaluated. 10 samples of normal oral mucosa were used as a control. Myofibroblasts were identified by immunohistochemical detection of alpha smooth muscle actin and its presence was classified as negative, scanty or abundant. Differences in the presence of myofibroblasts among OL with distinct grades of epithelial dysplasia as well as between high- and low-invasive OSCC were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test. Results: Myofibroblasts were not detected in normal oral mucosa and OL, whatever its histological grade. In OSCC, the presence of stromal myofibroblasts was classified as negative in 11 (26.8%), scanty in 15 (36.6%), and abundant in 15 samples (36.6%). The presence of stromal myofibroblasts was statistically higher in high-invasive OSCC than in low-invasive OSCC (p<0.05). Conclusions: Stromal myofibroblasts were not detected in OL, indicating that these cells are not important during oral carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, stromal myofibroblasts were heterogeneously detected in OSCC and its presence was higher in tumors with a more diffuse histological pattern of invasion. These findings suggest that myofibroblasts are associated with the creation of a permissive environment for tumor invasion in OSCC. Key words:Leukoplakia, oral squamous cell carcinoma, myofibroblast. PMID:22322518

  11. Exchange coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Bernstein, G. H.; Porod, W.

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate exchange-coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets. Our results show that two neighboring nanomagnets that are each antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled to a common ferromagnetic bottom layer can be brought into strong ferromagnetic interaction. Simulations show that interlayer exchange coupling effectively promotes ferromagnetic alignment between the two nanomagnets, as opposed to antiferromagnetic alignment due to dipole-coupling. In order to experimentally demonstrate the proposed scheme, we fabricated arrays of pairs of elongated, single-domain nanomagnets. Magnetic force microscopy measurements show that most of the pairs are ferromagnetically ordered. The results are in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. The presented scheme can achieve coupling strengths that are significantly stronger than dipole coupling, potentially enabling far-reaching applications in Nanomagnet Logic, spin-wave devices and three-dimensional storage and computing.

  12. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  13. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  14. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  15. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  16. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  17. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  18. Tumeur stromale rectale: à propos d'une observation

    PubMed Central

    Rejab, Haitham; Kridis, Wala Ben; Ben Ameur, Hazem; Feki, Jihene; Frikha, Mounir; Beyrouti, Mohamed Issam

    2014-01-01

    Les tumeurs stromales gastro-intestinales sont des tumeurs mésenchymateuses peu fréquentes. Elles sont localisées préférentiellement eu niveau de l'estomac. La localisation rectale reste rare. A un nouveau cas de tumeur stromale du rectum ainsi qu'une bref revue de la littérature, on se propose d’étudier les particularités cliniques, radiologiques et thérapeutiques de cette entité rare. PMID:25120863

  19. Quantitative Image Analysis of Epithelial and Stromal Area in Histological Sections of Colorectal Cancer: An Emerging Diagnostic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Rogojanu, R.; Thalhammer, T.; Thiem, U.; Heindl, A.; Mesteri, I.; Seewald, A.; Jäger, W.; Smochina, C.; Ellinger, I.; Bises, G.

    2015-01-01

    In colorectal cancer (CRC), an increase in the stromal (S) area with the reduction of the epithelial (E) parts has been suggested as an indication of tumor progression. Therefore, an automated image method capable of discriminating E and S areas would allow an improved diagnosis. Immunofluorescence staining was performed on paraffin-embedded sections from colorectal tumors (16 samples from patients with liver metastasis and 18 without). Noncancerous tumor adjacent mucosa (n = 5) and normal mucosa (n = 4) were taken as controls. Epithelial cells were identified by an anti-keratin 8 (K8) antibody. Large tissue areas (5–63 mm2/slide) including tumor center, tumor front, and adjacent mucosa were scanned using an automated microscopy system (TissueFAXS). With our newly developed algorithms, we showed that there is more K8-immunoreactive E in the tumor center than in tumor adjacent and normal mucosa. Comparing patients with and without metastasis, the E/S ratio decreased by 20% in the tumor center and by 40% at tumor front in metastatic samples. The reduction of E might be due to a more aggressive phenotype in metastasis patients. The novel software allowed a detailed morphometric analysis of cancer tissue compartments as tools for objective quantitative measurements, reduced analysis time, and increased reproducibility of the data. PMID:26579535

  20. Prevalence and management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Machado-Aranda, David; Malamet, Matthew; Chang, Yeon-Jeen; Jacobs, Michael J; Ferguson, Lorenzo; Silapaswan, Sumet; Goriel, Yousif; Kolachalam, R; Mittal, Vijay K

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence and characteristics of patients with confirmed gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in a community hospital over a 6-year period are described. Our objective was to communicate our experience managing this rare tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. A retrospective chart review was performed. Patients were selected based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes in correlation with their respective confirmational pathology. Patients with a diagnosis of GIST, cells of Cajal tumor, and/or different varieties of gastrointestinal sarcoma were included in this study. These tumors had to have a positive C-kit on immunohistochemistry. Demographic and clinical data were collected from medical records as well as pathology reports. Follow up from attendings' office records and telephone interviews complemented our data. A total of 61 patients was identified in our institution (averaging 10 patients per year). Females represented 63 per cent of our series. The average ages were 70.2 +/- 19.1 years for females and 59.4 +/- 13.5 years for males (P < 0.01). The most common clinical presentation was an intra-abdominal nonobstructing mass followed by an endoscopically detected mass or incidental tumors found during unrelated surgery. Surgical emergencies such as acute abdomen and gastrointestinal bleed were rare. Over half of these tumors were located in the stomach. Other sites were the small intestine, colon, esophagus, and rectal-vaginal septum. Opened surgical resection was performed in two-thirds of treated cases, whereas laparoscopic resection was done in the remainder. Only 18 per cent of these tumors were considered benign, whereas 35 per cent were considered to have some malignant potential and 47 per cent were of undetermined potential. In surgically resected tumors, we found a 42 per cent recurrence rate with a median average time of recurrence of 22 months. Pathologic grading and type of surgery were not predictors of rate and timing

  1. Markers of fibroblast-rich tumor stroma and perivascular cells in serous ovarian cancer: Inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity and impact on survival

    PubMed Central

    Corvigno, Sara; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Mezheyeuski, Artur; van der Zee, Ate G.J.; Nijman, Hans W.; Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Östman, Arne; Dahlstrand, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Inter- and intra-patient variations in tumor microenvironment of serous ovarian cancer are largely unexplored. We aimed to explore potential co-regulation of tumor stroma characteristics, analyze their concordance in primary and metastatic lesions, and study their impact on survival. A tissue microarray (TMA) with 186 tumors and 91 matched metastases was subjected to immunohistochemistry double staining with endothelial cell marker CD34 and fibroblast and pericyte markers α-SMA, PDGFβR and desmin. Images were digitally analyzed to yield “metrics” related to vasculature and stroma features. Intra-case analyses showed that PDGFβR in perivascular cells and fibroblasts were strongly correlated. Similar findings were observed concerning α-SMA. Most stroma characteristics showed large variations in intra-case comparisons of primary tumors and metastasis. Large PDGFβR-positive stroma fraction and high PDGFβFR positive perivascular intensity were both significantly associated with shorter survival in uni- and multi-variate analyses (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.5; HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.8). In conclusion, we found PDGFβR- and α-SMA-expression to be largely independent of each other but concordantly activated in perivascular cells and in fibroblasts within the primary tumor. Stromal characteristics differed between primary tumors and metastases. PDGFβR in perivascular cells and in fibroblasts may be novel prognostic markers in serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26918345

  2. Transforming growth factor-β synthesized by stromal cells and cancer cells participates in bone resorption induced by oral squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kayamori, Kou; Oue, Erika; Sakamoto, Kei; Harada, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2015-03-20

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) plays a significant role in the regulation of the tumor microenvironment. To explore the role of TGF-β in oral cancer-induced bone destruction, we investigated the immunohistochemical localization of TGF-β and phosphorylated Smad2 (p-Smad2) in 12 surgical specimens of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). These studies revealed TGF-β and p-Smad2 expression in cancer cells in all tested cases. Several fibroblasts located between cancer nests and resorbing bone expressed TGF-β in 10 out of 12 cases and p-Smad2 in 11 out of 12 cases. Some osteoclasts also exhibited p ∼ Smad2 expression. The OSCC cell line, HSC3, and the bone marrow-derived fibroblastic cell line, ST2, synthesized substantial levels of TGF-β. Culture media derived from HSC3 cells could stimulate Tgf-β1 mRNA expression in ST2 cells. Recombinant TGF-β1 could stimulate osteoclast formation induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in RAW264 cells. TGF-β1 could upregulate the expression of p-Smad2 in RAW264 cells, and this action was suppressed by the addition of a neutralizing antibody against TGF-β or by SB431542. Transplantation of HSC3 cells onto the calvarial region of athymic mice caused bone destruction, associated with the expression of TGF-β and p-Smad2 in both cancer cells and stromal cells. The bone destruction was substantially inhibited by the administration of SB431542. The present study demonstrated that TGF-β synthesized by both cancer cells and stromal cells participates in the OSCC-induced bone destruction. - Highlights: • Cancer cell, fibroblastic cells, and osteoclasts at bone resorbing area by oral cancer exhibited TGF-β and p-Smad2. • TGF-β1 stimulated osteoclastogenesis induced by RAKL in RAW264 cell. • Xenograft model of oral cancer-induced bone resorption was substantially inhibited by SB431542. • TGF-β synthesized by both cancer cells and stromal cells participates in the OSCC

  3. Gene expression profiling of cholangiocarcinoma-derived fibroblast reveals alterations related to tumor progression and indicates periostin as a poor prognostic marker

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fibroblasts play important roles in several cancers. It was hypothesized that cholangiocarcinoma (CCA)-associated fibroblasts (Cfs) differ from non-tumorigenic liver fibroblasts (Lfs) in their gene expression profiles resulting in the capability to promote cancer. Periostin (PN) is a multi-functional protein and has emerged as a promising marker for tumor progression. The role of PN in CCA, however, has not yet been explored. Results In this study, the gene expression profile of Cfs in comparison to Lfs was performed using oligonucleotide microarrays. The common- and unique-expressed genes in Cfs and the promising roles in cancer promotion and progression were determined. PN was markedly over-expressed in Cfs confirmed by real time RT-PCR and western blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry examination of a number of patients with intrahepatic CCA showed the expression of PN solely in stromal fibroblasts, but was expressed neither in cancer cells nor immune cells. Low to no expression of PN was observed in tissues of benign liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. CCA patients with high levels of PN had significantly shorter survival time than those with low levels (P = 0.026). Multivariate analysis revealed high levels of PN (P = 0.045) and presence of lymph node metastasis (P = 0.002) as independent poor prognostic factors. The in vitro study revealed that recombinant PN induced CCA cell proliferation and invasion. Interestingly, interference RNA against integrin α5 significantly reduced the cellular response to PN-stimulated proliferation and invasion. Conclusion The gene expression profile of fibroblasts in CCA is apparently explored for the first time and has determined the genes involving in induction of this cancer progression. High PN can be used to distinguish CCA from other related liver diseases and is proposed as a prognostic factor of poor survival. Regulation of fibroblast-derived PN in CCA proliferation and invasion may be considered as an

  4. JAZF1/SUZ12 gene fusion in endometrial stromal sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hrzenjak, Andelko

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESSs) belong to the rarest uterine malignancies (prevalence category <1-9/1,000,000). According to the new 2014 World Health Organisation (WHO) classification, they are separated into four categories; benign endometrial stromal nodules (ESNs), low grade endometrial stromal sarcomas (LG-ESSs), high-grade endometrial stromal sarcomas (HG-ESSs) and undifferentiated uterine sarcomas (UUSs). Due to heterogeneous histopathologic appearance these tumors still represent diagnostic challenge, even for experienced pathologists. ESSs are genetically very heterogeneous and several chromosomal translocations and gene fusions have so far been identified in these malignancies. To date the JAZF1/SUZ12 gene fusion is by far the most frequent and seems to be the cytogenetic hallmark of ESN and LG-ESS. Based on present literature data this gene fusion is present in approximately 75% of ESN, 50% of LG-ESS and 15% of HG-ESS cases. The frequency of JAZF1/SUZ12 appearance varies between classic ESS and different morphologic variants. This gene fusion is suggested to become a specific diagnostic tool, especially in difficult borderline cases. In combination with the recently described YWHAE/FAM22 gene fusion the JAZF1/SUZ12 fusion could be used to differentiate between LG-ESS and HG-ESS. The purpose of this review is to summarize literature data published in last two and a half decades about this gene fusion, as a contribution to our understanding of ESS genetics and pathogenesis. PMID:26879382

  5. Quiescent Fibroblasts Exhibit High Metabolic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemons, Johanna M. S.; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Bennett, Bryson D.; Legesse-Miller, Aster; Johnson, Elizabeth L.; Raitman, Irene; Pollina, Elizabeth A.; Rabitz, Herschel A.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Coller, Hilary A.

    2010-01-01

    Many cells in mammals exist in the state of quiescence, which is characterized by reversible exit from the cell cycle. Quiescent cells are widely reported to exhibit reduced size, nucleotide synthesis, and metabolic activity. Much lower glycolytic rates have been reported in quiescent compared with proliferating lymphocytes. In contrast, we show here that primary human fibroblasts continue to exhibit high metabolic rates when induced into quiescence via contact inhibition. By monitoring isotope labeling through metabolic pathways and quantitatively identifying fluxes from the data, we show that contact-inhibited fibroblasts utilize glucose in all branches of central carbon metabolism at rates similar to those of proliferating cells, with greater overflow flux from the pentose phosphate pathway back to glycolysis. Inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway resulted in apoptosis preferentially in quiescent fibroblasts. By feeding the cells labeled glutamine, we also detected a “backwards” flux in the tricarboxylic acid cycle from α-ketoglutarate to citrate that was enhanced in contact-inhibited fibroblasts; this flux likely contributes to shuttling of NADPH from the mitochondrion to cytosol for redox defense or fatty acid synthesis. The high metabolic activity of the fibroblasts was directed in part toward breakdown and resynthesis of protein and lipid, and in part toward excretion of extracellular matrix proteins. Thus, reduced metabolic activity is not a hallmark of the quiescent state. Quiescent fibroblasts, relieved of the biosynthetic requirements associated with generating progeny, direct their metabolic activity to preservation of self integrity and alternative functions beneficial to the organism as a whole. PMID:21049082

  6. Divergent fibroblast growth factor signaling pathways in lung fibroblast subsets: where do we go from here?

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Camp, Jordi; Morty, Rory E

    2015-10-15

    Lung fibroblasts play a key role in postnatal lung development, namely, the formation of the alveolar gas exchange units, through the process of secondary septation. Although evidence initially highlighted roles for fibroblasts in the production and remodeling of the lung extracellular matrix, more recent studies have described the presence of different fibroblast subsets in the developing lung. These subsets include myofibroblasts and lipofibroblasts and their precursors. These cells are believed to play different roles in alveologenesis and are localized to different regions of the developing septa. The precise roles played by these different fibroblast subsets remain unclear. Understanding the signaling pathways that control the discrete functions of these fibroblast subsets would help to clarify the roles and the regulation of lung fibroblasts during lung development. Here, we critically evaluate a recent report that described divergent fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathways in two different subsets of lung fibroblasts that express different levels of green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α promoter. The GFP expression was used as a surrogate for lipofibroblasts (GFP(low)) and myofibroblasts (GFP(high)). It was suggested that Fgf10/Fgf1 and Fgf18/Fgfr3 autocrine pathways may be operative in GFP(low) and GFP(high) cells, respectively, and that these pathways might regulate the proliferation and migration of different fibroblast subsets during alveologenesis. These observations lay important groundwork for the further exploration of FGF function during normal lung development, as well as in aberrant lung development associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

  7. Human resident CD34+ stromal cells/telocytes have progenitor capacity and are a source of αSMA+ cells during repair.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, L; Gutiérrez, R; García, M P; González, M; Sáez, F J; Aparicio, F; Díaz-Flores, L; Madrid, J F

    2015-05-01

    We studied the progenitor capacity of human resident CD34+ stromal cells/telocytes (SC/TCs) in the enteric wall affected by inflammatory/repair processes (appendicitis, diverticulitis of large bowel and Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum) at different stages of evolution (inflammatory, proliferative and remodelling). In these conditions, CD34+ SC/TCs are activated, showing changes, which include the following overlapping events: 1) separation from adjacent structures (e.g., from vascular walls) and location in oedematous spaces, 2) morphological modifications (in cell shape and size) with presence of transitional cell forms between quiescent and activated CD34+ SC/TCs, 3) rapid proliferation and 4) loss of CD34 expression and gain of αSMA expression. These events mainly occur in the inflammatory and proliferative stages. During the loss of CD34 expression, the following findings are observed: a) irregular cell labelling intensity for anti-CD34, b) co-localization of CD34 and actin, c) concurrent irregular labelling intensity for αSMA and d) αSMA expression in all stromal cells, with total loss of CD34 expression. While CD34 expression was conserved, a high proliferative capacity (Ki-67 expression) was observed and vice versa. In the segments of the ileum affected by Crohn's disease, the stromal cells around fissures were αSMA+ and, in the transitional zones with normal enteric wall, activated CD34+ SC/TCs were observed. In conclusion, human resident CD34+ SC/TCs in the enteric wall have progenitor capacity and are activated with or without differentiation into αSMA+ stromal cells during inflammatory/repair processes.

  8. Cancer-associated fibroblast-secreted CXCL16 attracts monocytes to promote stroma activation in triple-negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Allaoui, Roni; Bergenfelz, Caroline; Mohlin, Sofie; Hagerling, Catharina; Salari, Kiarash; Werb, Zena; Anderson, Robin L.; Ethier, Stephen P.; Jirström, Karin; Påhlman, Sven; Bexell, Daniel; Tahin, Balázs; Johansson, Martin E.; Larsson, Christer; Leandersson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative (TN) breast cancers (ER−PR−HER2−) are highly metastatic and associated with poor prognosis. Within this subtype, invasive, stroma-rich tumours with infiltration of inflammatory cells are even more aggressive. The effect of myeloid cells on reactive stroma formation in TN breast cancer is largely unknown. Here, we show that primary human monocytes have a survival advantage, proliferate in vivo and develop into immunosuppressive myeloid cells expressing the myeloid-derived suppressor cell marker S100A9 only in a TN breast cancer environment. This results in activation of cancer-associated fibroblasts and expression of CXCL16, which we show to be a monocyte chemoattractant. We propose that this migratory feedback loop amplifies the formation of a reactive stroma, contributing to the aggressive phenotype of TN breast tumours. These insights could help select more suitable therapies targeting the stromal component of these tumours, and could aid prediction of drug resistance. PMID:27725631

  9. Biased Allelic Expression in Human Primary Fibroblast Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santoni, Federico; Delaneau, Olivier; Fort, Alexandre; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Guipponi, Michel; Padioleau, Ismael; Carninci, Piero; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of gene expression in mammalian single cells via genomic technologies now provides the possibility to investigate the patterns of allelic gene expression. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to detect the allele-specific mRNA level in 203 single human primary fibroblasts over 133,633 unique heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (hetSNVs). We observed that at the snapshot of analyses, each cell contained mostly transcripts from one allele from the majority of genes; indeed, 76.4% of the hetSNVs displayed stochastic monoallelic expression in single cells. Remarkably, adjacent hetSNVs exhibited a haplotype-consistent allelic ratio; in contrast, distant sites located in two different genes were independent of the haplotype structure. Moreover, the allele-specific expression in single cells correlated with the abundance of the cellular transcript. We observed that genes expressing both alleles in the majority of the single cells at a given time point were rare and enriched with highly expressed genes. The relative abundance of each allele in a cell was controlled by some regulatory mechanisms given that we observed related single-cell allelic profiles according to genes. Overall, these results have direct implications in cellular phenotypic variability. PMID:25557783

  10. Free bone graft reconstruction of irradiated facial tissue: Experimental effects of basic fibroblast growth factor stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, B.L.; Connolly, D.T.; Winkelmann, T.; Sadove, A.M.; Heuvelman, D.; Feder, J. )

    1991-07-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the potential utility of basic fibroblast growth factor in the induction of angiogenesis and osseous healing in bone previously exposed to high doses of irradiation. Thirty New Zealand rabbits were evaluated by introducing basic fibroblast growth factor into irradiated mandibular resection sites either prior to or simultaneous with reconstruction by corticocancellous autografts harvested from the ilium. The fate of the free bone grafts was then evaluated at 90 days postoperatively by microangiographic, histologic, and fluorochrome bone-labeling techniques. Sequestration, necrosis, and failure to heal to recipient osseous margins was observed both clinically and histologically in all nontreated irradiated graft sites as well as those receiving simultaneous angiogenic stimulation at the time of graft placement. No fluorescent activity was seen in these graft groups. In the recipient sites pretreated with basic fibroblast growth factor prior to placement of the graft, healing and reestablishment of mandibular contour occurred in nearly 50 percent of the animals. Active bone formation was evident at cortical margins adjacent to the recipient sites but was absent in the more central cancellous regions of the grafts.

  11. ANT2-defective fibroblasts exhibit normal mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Dolly; Goldstein, Amy C.; El-Khoury, Riyad; Rak, Malgorzata; Edmunds, Lia; Rustin, Pierre; Vockley, Jerry; Schiff, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase 2 (ANT2) transports glycolytic ATP across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Patients with ANT2 deletion were recently reported. We aimed at characterizing mitochondrial functions in ANT2-defective fibroblasts. In spite of ANT2 expression in fibroblasts, we observed no difference between ANT2-defective and control fibroblasts for mitochondrial respiration, respiratory chain activities, mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP levels. This indicates that ANT2 insufficiency does not alter fibroblast basal mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:26000237

  12. Stromal liver kinase B1 [STK11] signaling loss induces oviductal adenomas and endometrial cancer by activating mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Pradeep S; Kaneko-Tarui, Tomoko; Zhang, Lihua; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Crum, Christopher P; Teixeira, Jose M

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations of the Liver Kinase b1 (LKB1/STK11) tumor suppressor gene have been linked to Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS), an autosomal-dominant, cancer-prone disorder in which patients develop neoplasms in several organs, including the oviduct, ovary, and cervix. We have conditionally deleted Lkb1 in Müllerian duct mesenchyme-derived cells of the female reproductive tract and observed expansion of the stromal compartment and hyperplasia and/or neoplasia of adjacent epithelial cells throughout the reproductive tract with paratubal cysts and adenomyomas in oviducts and, eventually, endometrial cancer. Examination of the proliferation marker phospho-histone H3 and mammalian Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway members revealed increased proliferation and mTORC1 activation in stromal cells of both the oviduct and uterus. Treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1 activity, decreased tumor burden in adult Lkb1 mutant mice. Deletion of the genes for Tuberous Sclerosis 1 (Tsc1) or Tsc2, regulators of mTORC1 that are downstream of LKB1 signaling, in the oviductal and uterine stroma phenocopies some of the defects observed in Lkb1 mutant mice, confirming that dysregulated mTORC1 activation in the Lkb1-deleted stroma contributes to the phenotype. Loss of PTEN, an upstream regulator of mTORC1 signaling, along with Lkb1 deletion significantly increased tumor burden in uteri and induced tumorigenesis in the cervix and vagina. These studies show that LKB1/TSC1/TSC2/mTORC1 signaling in mesenchymal cells is important for the maintenance of epithelial integrity and suppression of carcinogenesis in adjacent epithelial cells. Because similar changes in the stromal population are also observed in human oviductal/ovarian adenoma and endometrial adenocarcinoma patients, we predict that dysregulated mTORC1 activity by upstream mechanisms similar to those described in these model systems contributes to the pathogenesis of these human diseases.

  13. Cancer-associated fibroblast-targeted strategy enhances antitumor immune responses in dendritic cell-based vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ohshio, Yasuhiko; Teramoto, Koji; Hanaoka, Jun; Tezuka, Noriaki; Itoh, Yasushi; Asai, Tohru; Daigo, Yataro; Ogasawara, Kazumasa

    2015-02-01

    Given the close interaction between tumor cells and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME), TME-targeted strategies would be promising for developing integrated cancer immunotherapy. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the dominant stromal component, playing critical roles in generation of the pro-tumorigenic TME. We focused on the immunosuppressive trait of CAFs, and systematically explored the alteration of tumor-associated immune responses by CAF-targeted therapy. C57BL/6 mice s.c. bearing syngeneic E.G7 lymphoma, LLC1 Lewis lung cancer, or B16F1 melanoma were treated with an anti-fibrotic agent, tranilast, to inhibit CAF function. The infiltration of immune suppressor cell types, including regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, in the TME was effectively decreased through reduction of stromal cell-derived factor-1, prostaglandin E2 , and transforming growth factor-β. In tumor-draining lymph nodes, these immune suppressor cell types were significantly decreased, leading to activation of tumor-associated antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. In addition, CAF-targeted therapy synergistically enhanced multiple types of systemic antitumor immune responses such as the cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response, natural killer activity, and antitumor humoral immunity in combination with dendritic cell-based vaccines; however, the suppressive effect on tumor growth was not observed in tumor-bearing SCID mice. These data indicate that systemic antitumor immune responses by various immunologic cell types are required to bring out the efficacy of CAF-targeted therapy, and these effects are enhanced when combined with effector-stimulatory immunotherapy such as dendritic cell-based vaccines. Our mouse model provides a novel rationale with TME-targeted strategy for the development of cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 expression levels and metalloproteinase 2 and 9 activation by Hexachlorobenzene in human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Florencia; Bastón, Juan Ignacio; Vaccarezza, Agustina; Singla, José Javier; Pontillo, Carolina; Miret, Noelia; Farina, Mariana; Meresman, Gabriela; Randi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is an organochlorine pesticide that induces toxic reproductive effects in laboratory animals. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of functional endometrial tissues outside the uterine cavity. Experimental studies indicate that exposure to organochlorines can interfere with both hormonal regulation and immune function to promote endometriosis. Altered expression of metalloproteinases (MMPs) in patients with endometriosis, suggests that MMPs may play a critical role. In the endometriotic lesions, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) produced by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), binds to its EP4 receptor (EP4), and via c-Src kinase induces MMPs activation, promoting endometriosis. We examined the HCB action on MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities and expression, COX-2 levels, PGE2 signaling, and the AhR involvement in HCB-induced effects. We have used different in vitro models: (1) human endometrial stromal cell line T-HESC, (2) primary cultures of Human Uterine Fibroblast (HUF), and (3) primary cultures of endometrial stromal cells from eutopic endometrium of control (CESC) and subjects with endometriosis (EESC). Our results show that HCB enhances MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in T-HESC, HUF and ESC cells. The MMP-9 levels were elevated in all models, while the MMP-2 expression only increased in ESC cells. HCB enhanced COX-2 and EP4 expression, PGE2 secretion and the c-Src kinase activation in T-HESC. Besides, we observed that AhR is implicated in these HCB-induced effects. In conclusion, our results show that HCB exposure could contribute to endometriosis development, affecting inflammation and invasion parameters of human endometrial cells. PMID:27038655

  15. Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) with Microelectrode Arrays for Investigation of Cancer Cell-Fibroblasts Interaction.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trong Binh; Baek, Changyoon; Min, Junhong

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, including stromal cells, surrounding blood vessels and extracellular matrix components, has been defined as a crucial factor that influences the proliferation, drug-resistance, invasion and metastasis of malignant epithelial cells. Among other factors, the communications and interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells have been reported to play pivotal roles in cancer promotion and progression. To investigate these relationships, an on-chip co-culture model was developed to study the cellular interaction between A549-human lung carcinoma cells and MRC-5-human lung epithelial cells in both normal proliferation and treatment conditions. In brief, a co-culture device consisting of 2 individual fluidic chambers in parallel, which were separated by a 100 μm fence was utilized for cell patterning. Microelectrodes arrays were installed within each chamber including electrodes at various distances away from the confrontation line for the electrochemical impedimetric sensing assessment of cell-to-cell influence. After the fence was removed and cell-to-cell contact occurred, by evaluating the impedance signal responses representing cell condition and behavior, both direct and indirect cell-to-cell interactions through conditioned media were investigated. The impact of specific distances that lead to different influences of fibroblast cells on cancer cells in the co-culture environment was also defined. PMID:27088611

  16. Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) with Microelectrode Arrays for Investigation of Cancer Cell – Fibroblasts Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Trong Binh; Baek, Changyoon; Min, Junhong

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, including stromal cells, surrounding blood vessels and extracellular matrix components, has been defined as a crucial factor that influences the proliferation, drug-resistance, invasion and metastasis of malignant epithelial cells. Among other factors, the communications and interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells have been reported to play pivotal roles in cancer promotion and progression. To investigate these relationships, an on-chip co-culture model was developed to study the cellular interaction between A549—human lung carcinoma cells and MRC-5—human lung epithelial cells in both normal proliferation and treatment conditions. In brief, a co-culture device consisting of 2 individual fluidic chambers in parallel, which were separated by a 100 μm fence was utilized for cell patterning. Microelectrodes arrays were installed within each chamber including electrodes at various distances away from the confrontation line for the electrochemical impedimetric sensing assessment of cell-to-cell influence. After the fence was removed and cell-to-cell contact occurred, by evaluating the impedance signal responses representing cell condition and behavior, both direct and indirect cell-to-cell interactions through conditioned media were investigated. The impact of specific distances that lead to different influences of fibroblast cells on cancer cells in the co-culture environment was also defined. PMID:27088611

  17. Molecular profiling of the invasive tumor microenvironment in a 3-dimensional model of colorectal cancer cells and ex vivo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Marc D; Mellone, Max; Pickard, Karen M; Sayan, Abdulkadir Emre; Mitter, Richard; Primrose, John N; Packham, Graham K; Thomas, Gareth; Mirnezami, Alexander H

    2014-01-01

    Invading colorectal cancer (CRC) cells have acquired the capacity to break free from their sister cells, infiltrate the stroma, and remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). Characterizing the biology of this phenotypically distinct group of cells could substantially improve our understanding of early events during the metastatic cascade. Tumor invasion is a dynamic process facilitated by bidirectional interactions between malignant epithelium and the cancer associated stroma. In order to examine cell-specific responses at the tumor stroma-interface we have combined organotypic co-culture and laser micro-dissection techniques. Organotypic models, in which key stromal constituents such as fibroblasts are 3-dimensionally co-cultured with cancer epithelial cells, are highly manipulatable experimental tools which enable invasion and cancer-stroma interactions to be studied in near-physiological conditions. Laser microdissection (LMD) is a technique which entails the surgical dissection and extraction of the various strata within tumor tissue, with micron level precision. By combining these techniques with genomic, transcriptomic and epigenetic profiling we aim to develop a deeper understanding of the molecular characteristics of invading tumor cells and surrounding stromal tissue, and in doing so potentially reveal novel biomarkers and opportunities for drug development in CRC. PMID:24836208

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Increased Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1 Expression Enhanced Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chih-Yuan; Hua, Jia; Coathup, Melanie; Kalia, Priya; Blunn, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of critical size bone defects pose a challenge in orthopedics. Stem cell therapy together with cytokines has the potential to improve bone repair as they cause the migration and homing of stem cells to the defect site. However, the engraftment, participation, and recruitment of other cells within the regenerating tissue are important. To enhance stem cell involvement, this study investigated overexpression of stem cells with stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) using an adenovirus. We hypothesized that these engineered cells would effectively increase the migration of native cells to the site of fracture, enhancing bone repair. Before implantation, we showed that SDF-1 secreted by transfected cells increased the migration of nontransfected cells. In a rat defect bone model, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing SDF-1 showed significantly (p=0.003) more new bone formation within the gap and less bone mineral loss at the area adjacent to the defect site during the early bone healing stage. In conclusion, SDF-1 was shown to play an important role in accelerating fracture repair and contributing to bone repair in rat models, by recruiting more host stem cells to the defect site and encouraging osteogenic differentiation and production of bone. PMID:25251779

  19. Dll4 Blockade in Stromal Cells Mediates Antitumor Effects in Preclinical Models of Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, Frank; Chen, Guoying; Coetzee, Sandra; Thambi, Nithya; Hickey, Carlos; Shan, Jing; Kovalenko, Pavel; Noguera-Troise, Irene; Smith, Eric; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Andreev, Julian; Kirshner, Jessica R; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Thurston, Gavin

    2015-10-01

    The Notch ligand delta-like 4 (Dll4) has been identified as a promising target in tumor angiogenesis in preclinical studies, and Dll4 inhibitors have recently entered clinical trials for solid tumors, including ovarian cancers. In this study, we report the development of REGN421 (enoticumab), a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds human Dll4 with sub-nanomolar affinity and inhibits Notch signaling. Administering REGN421 to immunodeficient mice engineered to express human Dll4 inhibited the growth of several human tumor xenografts in association with the formation of nonfunctional tumor blood vessels. In ovarian tumor xenograft models, Dll4 was expressed specifically by the tumor endothelium, and Dll4 blockade by human-specific or mouse-specific Dll4 antibodies exerted potent antitumor activity, which relied entirely on targeting Dll4 expressed by tumor stromal cells but not by the tumor cells themselves. However, Dll4 blockade reduced Notch signaling in both blood vessels and tumor cells surrounding the blood vessels, suggesting that endothelial-expressed Dll4 might induce Notch signaling in adjacent ovarian tumor cells. The antitumor effects of targeting Dll4 were augmented significantly by simultaneous inhibition of VEGF signaling, whereas this combined blockade reversed normal organ vascular changes induced by Dll4 blockade alone. Overall, our findings deepen the rationale for antibody-based strategies to target Dll4 in ovarian cancers, especially in combination with VEGF blockade.

  20. Stiffening of Human Skin Fibroblasts with Age

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Christian; Wetzel, Franziska; Kueper, Thomas; Malsen, Anke; Muhr, Gesa; Jaspers, Soeren; Blatt, Thomas; Wittern, Klaus-Peter; Wenck, Horst; Käs, Josef A.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in mechanical properties are an essential characteristic of the aging process of human skin. Previous studies attribute these changes predominantly to the altered collagen and elastin organization and density of the extracellular matrix. Here, we show that individual dermal fibroblasts also exhibit a significant increase in stiffness during aging in vivo. With the laser-based optical cell stretcher we examined the viscoelastic biomechanics of dermal fibroblasts isolated from 14 human donors aged 27 to 80. Increasing age was clearly accompanied by a stiffening of the investigated cells. We found that fibroblasts from old donors exhibited an increase in rigidity of ∼60% with respect to cells of the youngest donors. A FACS analysis of the content of the cytoskeletal polymers shows a shift from monomeric G-actin to polymerized, filamentous F-actin, but no significant changes in the vimentin and microtubule content. The rheological analysis of fibroblast-populated collagen gels demonstrates that cell stiffening directly results in altered viscoelastic properties of the collagen matrix. These results identify a new mechanism that may contribute to the age-related impairment of elastic properties in human skin. The altered mechanical behavior might influence cell functions involving the cytoskeleton, such as contractility, motility, and proliferation, which are essential for reorganization of the extracellular matrix. PMID:20959083

  1. Biocompatibility of Textile Titanium Nickel Implants with Fibroblast Culture.

    PubMed

    Kokorev, O V; Khodorenko, V N; Anikeev, S G; Gunther, V E

    2015-05-01

    The parameters of biocompatibility of titanium nickel implants of different design with fibroblast culture are studied. Colonization of textile and mesh implants with fibroblasts and tissue development depend on the size of mesh cells and thread diameter. Titanium nickel implants of different constructions do not inhibit the growth of fibroblast culture. PMID:26028231

  2. Biocompatibility of Textile Titanium Nickel Implants with Fibroblast Culture.

    PubMed

    Kokorev, O V; Khodorenko, V N; Anikeev, S G; Gunther, V E

    2015-05-01

    The parameters of biocompatibility of titanium nickel implants of different design with fibroblast culture are studied. Colonization of textile and mesh implants with fibroblasts and tissue development depend on the size of mesh cells and thread diameter. Titanium nickel implants of different constructions do not inhibit the growth of fibroblast culture.

  3. Distribution of fibroblast growth factors and their roles in skin fibroblast cell migration.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong Huan; Zhu, Yu Ting; Ding, Jian; Zhou, Fei Ya; Xue, Ji Xin; Jung, Jin Hee; Li, Zhi Jie; Gao, Wei Yang

    2016-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2/basic FGF is a member of the fibroblast growth factor family. Its function in skin wound healing has been well-characterized. However, the function of other FGFs in skin tissues remains to be elucidated. In the present study, FGF expression patterns in heart, liver, skin and kidney tissues were analyzed. Notably, in contrast to other tissues, only four FGFs, FGF2, 7, 10 and 21, were dominant in the skin. To examine FGF function in the wound healing process, mouse NIH3T3 fibroblast cells were treated with FGF2, FGF10 and FGF21, and cell migration was monitored. The results revealed that FGF treatment promoted cell migration, which is an important step in wound healing. In addition, FGF treatment enhanced the activity of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), a key regulator of fibroblast cell migration. To analyze its role in cell migration, FGF7 was overexpressed in fibroblast cells via a lentivirus system; however, this did not change cell migration speed. FGF2, 7, 10 and 21 were highly expressed in skin tissue, and all except FGF7 regulated fibroblast cell migration and activated JNK. The results of the present study increase our understanding of the role of FGFs in skin wound healing. PMID:27572477

  4. Interleukin-1β modulates endochondral ossification by human adult bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Mumme, Marcus; Scotti, Celeste; Papadimitropoulos, Adam; Todorov, Athanas; Hoffmann, Waldemar; Bocelli-Tyndall, Chiara; Jakob, Marcel; Wendt, David; Martin, Ivan; Barbero, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines present in the milieu of the fracture site are important modulators of bone healing. Here we investigated the effects of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) on the main events of endochondral bone formation by human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC), namely cell proliferation, differentiation and maturation/remodelling of the resulting hypertrophic cartilage. Low doses of IL-1β (50 pg/mL) enhanced colony-forming units-fibroblastic (CFU-f) and -osteoblastic (CFU-o) number (up to 1.5-fold) and size (1.2-fold) in the absence of further supplements and glycosaminoglycan accumulation (1.4-fold) upon BM-MSC chondrogenic induction. In osteogenically cultured BM-MSC, IL-1β enhanced calcium deposition (62.2-fold) and BMP-2 mRNA expression by differential activation of NF-κB and ERK signalling. IL-1β-treatment of BM-MSC generated cartilage resulted in higher production of MMP-13 (14.0-fold) in vitro, mirrored by an increased accumulation of the cryptic cleaved fragment of aggrecan, and more efficient cartilage remodelling/resorption after 5 weeks in vivo (i.e., more TRAP positive cells and bone marrow, less cartilaginous areas), resulting in the formation of mature bone and bone marrow after 12 weeks. In conclusion, IL-1β finely modulates early and late events of the endochondral bone formation by BM-MSC. Controlling the inflammatory environment could enhance the success of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of fractures by resident MSC and as well as improve the engineering of implantable tissues. PMID:23007908

  5. Bone marrow regeneration promoted by biophysically sorted osteoprogenitors from mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Poon, Zhiyong; Lee, Wong Cheng; Guan, Guofeng; Nyan, Lin Myint; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue repair deficiencies can be supplemented through strategies to isolate, expand in vitro, and reimplant regenerative cells that supplant damaged cells or stimulate endogenous repair mechanisms. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), a subset of which is described as mesenchymal stem cells, are leading candidates for cell-mediated bone repair and wound healing, with hundreds of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. An outstanding key challenge for successful clinical translation of MSCs is the capacity to produce large quantities of cells in vitro with uniform and relevant therapeutic properties. By leveraging biophysical traits of MSC subpopulations and label-free microfluidic cell sorting, we hypothesized and experimentally verified that MSCs of large diameter within expanded MSC cultures were osteoprogenitors that exhibited significantly greater efficacy over other MSC subpopulations in bone marrow repair. Systemic administration of osteoprogenitor MSCs significantly improved survival rates (>80%) as compared with other MSC subpopulations (0%) for preclinical murine bone marrow injury models. Osteoprogenitor MSCs also exerted potent therapeutic effects as "cell factories" that secreted high levels of regenerative factors such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenetic protein 2, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 1, and angiopoietin-1; this resulted in increased cell proliferation, vessel formation, and reduced apoptosis in bone marrow. This MSC subpopulation mediated rescue of damaged marrow tissue via restoration of the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, as well as subsequent hematopoiesis. Together, the capabilities described herein for label-freeisolation of regenerative osteoprogenitor MSCs can markedly improve the efficacy of MSC-based therapies.

  6. Modes of Antigen Presentation by Lymph Node Stromal Cells and Their Immunological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hirosue, Sachiko; Dubrot, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is no longer the exclusive domain of cells of hematopoietic origin. Recent works have demonstrated that lymph node stromal cell (LNSC) populations, such as fibroblastic reticular cells, lymphatic and blood endothelial cells, not only provide a scaffold for lymphocyte interactions but also exhibit active immunomodulatory roles that are critical to mounting and resolving effective immune responses. Importantly, LNSCs possess the ability to present antigens and establish antigen-specific interactions with T cells. One example is the expression of peripheral tissue antigens, which are presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I molecules with tolerogenic consequences on T cells. Additionally, exogenous antigens, including self and tumor antigens, can be processed and presented on MHC-I complexes, which result in dysfunctional activation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. While MHC-I is widely expressed on cells of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origins, antigen presentation via MHC-II is more precisely regulated. Nevertheless, LNSCs are capable of endogenously expressing, or alternatively, acquiring MHC-II molecules. Transfer of antigen between LNSC and dendritic cells in both directions has been recently suggested to promote tolerogenic roles of LNSCs on the CD4+ T cell compartment. Thus, antigen presentation by LNSCs is thought to be a mechanism that promotes the maintenance of peripheral tolerance as well as generates a pool of diverse antigen-experienced T cells for protective immunity. This review aims to integrate the current and emerging literature to highlight the importance of LNSCs in immune responses, and emphasize their role in antigen trafficking, retention, and presentation. PMID:26441957

  7. Adipose-derived stromal cells inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation inducing apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Takahara, Kiyoshi; Ii, Masaaki; Inamoto, Teruo; Komura, Kazumasa; Ibuki, Naokazu; Minami, Koichiro; Uehara, Hirofumi; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kiyama, Satoshi; Asahi, Michio; Azuma, Haruhito

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • AdSC transplantation exhibits inhibitory effect on tumor progressions of PCa cells. • AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway. • High expression of the TGF-β1 gene in AdSCs. - Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in the field of regenerative medicine. Adipose-derived stromal cells (AdSCs) are known to exhibit extensive proliferation potential and can undergo multilineage differentiation, sharing similar characteristics to bone marrow-derived MSCs. However, as the effect of AdSCs on tumor growth has not been studied sufficiently, we assessed the degree to which AdSCs affect the proliferation of prostate cancer (PCa) cell. Human AdSCs exerted an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of androgen-responsive (LNCaP) and androgen-nonresponsive (PC3) human PCa cells, while normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) did not, and in fact promoted PCa cell proliferation to a degree. Moreover, AdSCs induced apoptosis of LNCaP cells and PC3 cells, activating the caspase3/7 signaling pathway. cDNA microarray analysis suggested that AdSC-induced apoptosis in both LNCaP and PC3 cells was related to the TGF-β signaling pathway. Consistent with our in vitro observations, local transplantation of AdSCs delayed the growth of tumors derived from both LNCaP- and PC3-xenografts in immunodeficient mice. This is the first preclinical study to have directly demonstrated that AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway, irrespective of androgen-responsiveness. Since autologous AdSCs can be easily isolated from adipose tissue without any ethical concerns, we suggest that therapy with these cells could be a novel approach for patients with PCa.

  8. High abundance of CD271(+) multipotential stromal cells (MSCs) in intramedullary cavities of long bones.

    PubMed

    Cox, George; Boxall, Sally A; Giannoudis, Peter V; Buckley, Conor T; Roshdy, Tarek; Churchman, Sarah M; McGonagle, Dennis; Jones, Elena

    2012-02-01

    Aspiration of iliac crest bone marrow (ICBM) remains the most frequent technique used in harvesting multipotential stromal cells (MSCs) for bone regeneration. Although this tissue type is easily accessed by a surgeon, it has a low frequency of MSCs, which is significant given the high cell numbers required for bone regeneration strategies. Lipoaspirates possess higher MSC frequencies, albeit cells with a differentiation profile less suited to orthopaedic interventions. Intra-medullary cavities of long bones have previously been shown to harbour MSCs in animals, however evaluation of their frequency, differentiation capacity and phenotype in humans had not previously been performed. Long bone fatty bone marrow (LBFBM) was collected prior to harvesting bone graft. Basic cellular compositions of donor-matched LBFBM and ICBM aspirates, including the numbers of CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells and CD31(+) endothelial cells, were similar. MSCs were enumerated using colony-forming-unit-fibroblast assays and flow cytometry for the presence of a resident LBFBM CD45(-/low) CD271(+) MSC population and revealed a trend for higher MSC numbers (average 5 fold, n=6) per millilitre of LBFBM compared to donor-matched ICBM. Functional characteristics of resident MSCs, including their growth rates, differentiation potentials and surface phenotypes (CD73(+)CD105(+)CD90(+)) before and after culture-amplification, were similar. Enhanced numbers of MSCs could be recovered following brief enzymatic treatment of solid fragments of LBFBM. Our findings therefore reveal that the intramedullary cavity of the human femur is a depot of MSCs, which, although closely associated with fat, have a differentiation profile equivalent to ICBM. This anatomical site is frequently accessed by the orthopaedic/trauma surgeon and aspiration of the intramedullary cavity represents a 'low-tech' method of harvesting potentially large numbers of MSCs for regenerative therapies and research.

  9. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Promotes Fibrosis and Activates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in MRC-5 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Tang, Su; Tang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening hypoxemic respiratory disorder with high incidence and mortality. ALI usually manifests as widespread inflammation and lung fibrosis with the accumulation of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic factors and collagen. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has a significant role in regulation of inflammation but little is known about its roles in lung fibrosis or ALI. This study aimed to define the role and possible regulatory mechanism of TSLP in lung fibrosis. Material/Methods We cultured human lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells and overexpressed or inhibited TSLP by the vector or small interfering RNA transfection. Then, the pro-fibrotic factors skeletal muscle actin alpha (α-SMA) and collagen I, and the 4 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) – MAPK7, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) – were detected by Western blot. Results Results showed that TSLP promoted the production of α-SMA and collagen I (P<0.001), suggesting that it can accelerate MRC-5 cell fibrosis. It also activated the expression of MAPK7, p-p38, p-ERK1, and p-JNK1, but the total MAPK7, p-38, ERK1, and JNK1 protein levels were mostly unchanged, indicating the activated MAPK pathways that might contribute to the promotion of cell fibrosis. Conclusions This study shows the pro-fibrotic role of TSLP in MRC-5 cells, suggesting TSLP is a potential therapeutic target for treating lung fibrosis in ALI. It possibly functions via activating MAPKs. These findings add to our understanding of the mechanism of fibrosis. PMID:27385084

  10. Isolation of CD146+ Resident Lung Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Rat Lungs.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jennifer J P; Möbius, Marius A; Thébaud, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are increasingly recognized for their therapeutic potential in a wide range of diseases, including lung diseases. Besides the use of bone marrow and umbilical cord MSCs for exogenous cell therapy, there is also increasing interest in the repair and regenerative potential of resident tissue MSCs. Moreover, they likely have a role in normal organ development, and have been attributed roles in disease, particularly those with a fibrotic nature. The main hurdle for the study of these resident tissue MSCs is the lack of a clear marker for the isolation and identification of these cells. The isolation technique described here applies multiple characteristics of lung resident MSCs (L-MSCs). Upon sacrifice of the rats, lungs are removed and rinsed multiple times to remove blood. Following mechanical dissociation by scalpel, the lungs are digested for 2-3 hr using a mix of collagenase type I, neutral protease and DNase type I. The obtained single cell suspension is subsequently washed and layered over density gradient medium (density 1.073 g/ml). After centrifugation, cells from the interphase are washed and plated in culture-treated flasks. Cells are cultured for 4-7 days in physiological 5% O2, 5% CO2 conditions. To deplete fibroblasts (CD146(-)) and to ensure a population of only L-MSCs (CD146(+)), positive selection for CD146(+) cells is performed through magnetic bead selection. In summary, this procedure reliably produces a population of primary L-MSCs for further in vitro study and manipulation. Because of the nature of the protocol, it can easily be translated to other experimental animal models. PMID:27340891

  11. Activated human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells suppress metastatic features of MDA-MB-231 cells by secreting IFN-β.

    PubMed

    Yoon, N; Park, M S; Shigemoto, T; Peltier, G; Lee, R H

    2016-01-01

    Our recent study showed that human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs) are activated to express tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) by exposure to TNF-α and these activated hMSCs effectively induce apoptosis in triple-negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 (MDA) cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we further demonstrated that activated hMSCs not only induced apoptosis of MDA cells but also reduced metastatic features in MDA cells. These activated hMSC-exposed MDA cells showed reduced tumorigenicity and suppressed formation of lung metastasis when implanted in the mammary fat pad. Surprisingly, the activated hMSC-exposed MDA cells increased TRAIL expression, resulting in apoptosis in MDA cells. Interestingly, upregulation of TRAIL in MDA cells was mediated by interferon-beta (IFN-β) secreted from activated hMSCs. Furthermore, IFN-β in activated hMSCs was induced by RNA and DNA released from apoptotic MDA cells in absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) and IFN induced with helicase C domain 1 (IFIH1)-dependent manners. These observations were only seen in the TRAIL-sensitive breast cancer cell lines but not in the TRAIL-resistant breast cancer cell lines. Consistent with these results, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis also showed that lack of innate sensors detecting DNA or RNA is strongly associated with poor survival in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients. In addition, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) isolated from a breast cancer patient were also able to express TRAIL and IFN-β upon DNA and RNA stimulation. Therefore, our results suggest that the crosstalk between TRAIL-sensitive cancer cells and stromal cells creates a tumor-suppressive microenvironment and further provide a novel therapeutic approach to target stromal cells within cancer microenvironment for TRAIL sensitive cancer treatment. PMID:27077807

  12. Activated human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells suppress metastatic features of MDA-MB-231 cells by secreting IFN-β

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, N; Park, M S; Shigemoto, T; Peltier, G; Lee, R H

    2016-01-01

    Our recent study showed that human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs) are activated to express tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) by exposure to TNF-α and these activated hMSCs effectively induce apoptosis in triple-negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 (MDA) cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we further demonstrated that activated hMSCs not only induced apoptosis of MDA cells but also reduced metastatic features in MDA cells. These activated hMSC-exposed MDA cells showed reduced tumorigenicity and suppressed formation of lung metastasis when implanted in the mammary fat pad. Surprisingly, the activated hMSC-exposed MDA cells increased TRAIL expression, resulting in apoptosis in MDA cells. Interestingly, upregulation of TRAIL in MDA cells was mediated by interferon-beta (IFN-β) secreted from activated hMSCs. Furthermore, IFN-β in activated hMSCs was induced by RNA and DNA released from apoptotic MDA cells in absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) and IFN induced with helicase C domain 1 (IFIH1)-dependent manners. These observations were only seen in the TRAIL-sensitive breast cancer cell lines but not in the TRAIL-resistant breast cancer cell lines. Consistent with these results, Kaplan–Meier survival analysis also showed that lack of innate sensors detecting DNA or RNA is strongly associated with poor survival in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients. In addition, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) isolated from a breast cancer patient were also able to express TRAIL and IFN-β upon DNA and RNA stimulation. Therefore, our results suggest that the crosstalk between TRAIL-sensitive cancer cells and stromal cells creates a tumor-suppressive microenvironment and further provide a novel therapeutic approach to target stromal cells within cancer microenvironment for TRAIL sensitive cancer treatment. PMID:27077807

  13. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in myofibroblasts differs from lipofibroblasts during alveolar septation in mice

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Diann M.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar fibroblasts produce extracellular matrix in a temporally and spatially regulated pattern to yield a durable yet pliable gas-exchange surface. Proliferation ensures a sufficient complement of cells, but they must differentiate into functionally distinct subtypes: contractile myofibroblasts (MF), which generate elastin and regulate air-flow at the alveolar ducts, and, in mice and rats, lipofibroblasts (LF), which store neutral lipids. PDGF-A is required but acts in conjunction with other differentiation factors arising from adjacent epithelia or within fibroblasts. We hypothesized that FGF receptor (FGFR) expression and function vary for MF and LF and contributes to their divergent differentiation. Whereas approximately half of the FGFR3 was extracellular in MF, FGFR2 and FGFR4 were primarily intracellular. Intracellular FGFR3 localized to the multivesicular body, and its abundance may be modified by Sprouty and interaction with heat shock protein-90. FGF18 mRNA is more abundant in MF, whereas FGF10 mRNA predominated in LF, which also express FGFR1 IIIb, a receptor for FGF10. FGF18 diminished fibroblast proliferation and was chemotactic for cultured fibroblasts. Although PDGF receptor-α (PDGFR-α) primarily signals through phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Akt, p42/p44 MAP kinase (Erk1/2), a major signaling pathway for FGFRs, influenced the abundance of cell-surface PDGFR-α. Observing different FGFR and ligand profiles in MF and LF is consistent with their divergent differentiation although both subpopulations express PDGFR-α. These studies also emphasize the importance of particular cellular locations of FGFR3 and PDGFR-α, which may modify their effects during alveolar development or repair. PMID:26138642

  14. A stromal cell line from rainbow trout spleen, RTS34ST, that supports the growth of rainbow trout macrophages and produces conditioned medium with mitogenic effects on leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ganassin, R C; Bols, N C

    1999-02-01

    A rainbow trout spleen cell line, RTS34, was developed from a long-term hemopoietic culture. This cell line consisted of a mixed stromal cell layer with an associated cell population of macrophage-like cells that formed proliferative foci and released nonadherent progeny cells into the culture medium. A stromal cell line, RTS34st, was isolated from the RTS34 cell line. RTS34st cultures contained cells with fibroblast-like and epithelial-like morphologies and showed enhanced [3H]thymidine incorporation in response to either FBS or rainbow trout serum. The combination of FBS and trout serum was synergistic. Conditioned medium from RTS34st stimulated thymidine incorporation by peripheral blood and head kidney leukocytes, but not by leukocytes from the spleen. In addition, RTS34st provided a hemopoietic inductive microenvironment for immature precursor cells, selectively supporting the growth of macrophage-like cells. Therefore, RTS34st appears useful for studying the different roles of the stroma in regulating hemopoiesis in fish.

  15. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit extensive developmental and phenotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Prabhat K; Sassi, Slim; Lan, Lan; Au, Patrick; Halvorsen, Stefan C; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Seed, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of embryonic fibroblasts from GFP reporter mice indicates that the fibroblast cell type harbors a large collection of developmentally and phenotypically heterogeneous subtypes. Some of these cells exhibit multipotency, whereas others do not. Multiparameter flow cytometry analysis shows that a large number of distinct populations of fibroblast-like cells can be found in cultures initiated from different embryonic organs, and cells sorted according to their surface phenotype typically retain their characteristics on continued propagation in culture. Similarly, surface phenotypes of individual cloned fibroblast-like cells exhibit significant variation. The fibroblast cell class appears to contain a very large number of denumerable subtypes. PMID:26699463

  16. Ius Chasma Tributary Valleys and Adjacent Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image covers valley tributaries of Ius Chasma, as well as the plains adjacent to the valleys. Ius Chasma is one of several canyons that make up the Valles Marineris canyon system. Valles Marineris likely formed by extension associated with the growth of the large volcanoes and topographic high of Tharsis to the northwest. As the ground was pulled apart, large and deep gaps resulted in the valleys seen in the top and bottom of this HiRISE image. Ice that was once in the ground could have also melted to create additional removal of material in the formation of the valleys. HiRISE is able to see the rocks along the walls of both these valleys and also impact craters in the image. Rock layers that appear lower down in elevation appear rougher and are shedding boulders. Near the top of the walls and also seen in patches along the smooth plains are brighter layers. These brighter layers are not shedding boulders so they must represent a different kind of rock formed in a different kind of environment than those further down the walls. Because they are highest in elevation, the bright layers are youngest in age. HiRISE is able to see dozens of the bright layers, which are perhaps only a meter in thickness. Darker sand dunes and ripples cover most of the plains and fill the floors of impact craters.

    Image PSP_001351_1715 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 9, 2006. The complete image is centered at -8.3 degrees latitude, 275.4 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 254.3 km (158.9 miles). At this distance the image scale ranges from 25.4 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) to 101.8 cm/pixel (with 4 x 4 binning). The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 3:32 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 59 degrees, thus the sun was about

  17. Fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors of the head and neck: comprehensive imaging-based review with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Roula; Taslakian, Bedros; Shabb, Nina S; Nassar, Lara; Hourani, Mukbil H; Moukarbel, Roger; Sabri, Alain; Rizk, Toni

    2015-02-01

    Fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors of the head and neck are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the proliferation of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, or both. These tumors may be further subclassified on the basis of their behavior as benign, intermediate with malignant potential, or malignant. There are different types of fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors that can involve the head and neck including desmoid-type fibromatosis, solitary fibrous tumor, myofibroma/myofibromatosis, nodular fasciitis, nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, fibrosarcoma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, fibromatosis coli, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, ossifying fibroma, fibrous histiocytoma, nodular fasciitis, fibromyxoma, hyaline fibromatosis and fibrous hamartoma. Although the imaging characteristics of fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors of the head and neck are nonspecific, imaging plays a pivotal role in the noninvasive diagnosis and characterization of these tumors, providing information about the constitution of tumors, their extension and invasion of adjacent structures. Correlation with the clinical history may help limit the differential diagnosis and radiologists should be familiar with the imaging appearance of these tumors to reach an accurate diagnosis.

  18. Learning Non-Adjacent Regularities at Age 0 ; 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F.

    2013-01-01

    One important mechanism suggested to underlie the acquisition of grammar is rule learning. Indeed, infants aged 0 ; 7 are able to learn rules based on simple identity relations (adjacent repetitions, ABB: "wo fe fe" and non-adjacent repetitions, ABA: "wo fe wo", respectively; Marcus et al., 1999). One unexplored issue is…

  19. View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, bottom cut off by fringed buildings, view facing south-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Delayed Acquisition of Non-Adjacent Vocalic Distributional Regularities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compute non-adjacent regularities is key in the acquisition of a new language. In the domain of phonology/phonotactics, sensitivity to non-adjacent regularities between consonants has been found to appear between 7 and 10 months. The present study focuses on the emergence of a posterior-anterior (PA) bias, a regularity involving two…

  1. Gastric inflammatory fibroid polyp mimicking a gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marco; Albuquerque, Andreia; Cardoso, Hélder; Costa, Jennifer; Macedo, Guilherme

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyp of the gastrointestinal tract is a rare, benign neoplasm, most frequently located in the gastric antrum. Symptoms depend on the location and the size of the lesion. Biopsies are limited for the diagnosis of inflammatory fibroid polyps and diagnosis may not be possible until resection. The authors present a case of a 55-year-old woman, presenting with an upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to a large gastric inflammatory fibroid polyp imitating a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PMID:27554383

  2. Therapeutic effect of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells on memory in animals with Alzheimer-type neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, N V; Poltavtseva, R A; Samokhin, A N; Sukhikh, G T

    2013-11-01

    Transplantation of human mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells improved spatial memory in bulbectomized mice with Alzheimer-type neurodegeneration. The positive effect was observed in 1 month after intracerebral transplantation and in 3 months after systemic injection of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells. No cases of malignant transformation were noted. These findings indicate prospects of using mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells for the therapy of Alzheimer disease and the possibility of their systemic administration for attaining the therapeutic effect.

  3. Fibroblast growth factor 2 orchestrates angiogenic networking in non-GIST STS patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Non-gastrointestinal stromal tumor soft-tissue sarcomas (non-GIST STSs) constitute a heterogeneous group of tumors with poor prognosis. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR-1), in close interplay with platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3), are strongly involved in angiogenesis. This study investigates the prognostic impact of FGF2 and FGFR-1 and explores the impact of their co-expression with PDGF-B and VEGFR-3 in widely resected tumors from non-GIST STS patients. Methods Tumor samples from 108 non-GIST STS patients were obtained and tissue microarrays were constructed for each specimen. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expressions of FGF-2, FGFR-1, PDGF-B and VEGFR-3. Results In the multivariate analysis, high expression of FGF2 (P = 0.024, HR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.4) and the co-expressions of FGF2 & PDGF-B (overall; P = 0.007, intermediate; P = 0.013, HR = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.3-9.7, high; P = 0.002, HR = 6.0, 95% CI = 2.0-18.1) and FGF2 & VEGFR-3 (overall; P = 0.050, intermediate; P = 0.058, HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 0.98-4.1, high; P = 0.028, HR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.1-6.0) were significant independent prognostic indicators of poor disease-specific survival. Conclusion FGF2, alone or in co-expression with PDGF-B and VEGFR-3, is a significant independent negative prognosticator in widely resected non-GIST STS patients. PMID:21733164

  4. Evidence for the involvement of fibroblast growth factor 10 in lipofibroblast formation during embryonic lung development.

    PubMed

    Al Alam, Denise; El Agha, Elie; Sakurai, Reiko; Kheirollahi, Vahid; Moiseenko, Alena; Danopoulos, Soula; Shrestha, Amit; Schmoldt, Carole; Quantius, Jennifer; Herold, Susanne; Chao, Cho-Ming; Tiozzo, Caterina; De Langhe, Stijn; Plikus, Maksim V; Thornton, Matthew; Grubbs, Brendan; Minoo, Parviz; Rehan, Virender K; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-12-01

    Lipid-containing alveolar interstitial fibroblasts (lipofibroblasts) are increasingly recognized as an important component of the epithelial stem cell niche in the rodent lung. Although lipofibroblasts were initially believed merely to assist type 2 alveolar epithelial cells in surfactant production during neonatal life, recent evidence suggests that these cells are indispensable for survival and growth of epithelial stem cells during adulthood. Despite increasing interest in lipofibroblast biology, little is known about their cellular origin or the molecular pathways controlling their formation during embryonic development. Here, we show that a population of lipid-droplet-containing stromal cells emerges in the developing mouse lung between E15.5 and E16.5. This is accompanied by significant upregulation, in the lung mesenchyme, of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (master switch of lipogenesis), adipose differentiation-related protein (marker of mature lipofibroblasts) and fibroblast growth factor 10 (previously shown to identify a subpopulation of lipofibroblast progenitors). We also demonstrate that although only a subpopulation of total embryonic lipofibroblasts derives from Fgf10(+) progenitor cells, in vivo knockdown of Fgfr2b ligand activity and reduction in Fgf10 expression lead to global reduction in the expression levels of lipofibroblast markers at E18.5. Constitutive Fgfr1b knockouts and mutants with conditional partial inactivation of Fgfr2b in the lung mesenchyme reveal the involvement of both receptors in lipofibroblast formation and suggest a possible compensation between the two receptors. We also provide data from human fetal lungs to demonstrate the relevance of our discoveries to humans. Our results reveal an essential role for Fgf10 signaling in the formation of lipofibroblasts during late lung development.

  5. IL-6 secreted by cancer-associated fibroblasts induces tamoxifen resistance in luminal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, X; Mao, Y; Wang, J; Zu, L; Hao, M; Cheng, G; Qu, Q; Cui, D; Keller, E T; Chen, X; Shen, K; Wang, J

    2014-06-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) have been implicated in the development of resistance to anticancer drugs; however, the role and mechanism underlying CAFs in luminal breast cancer (BrCA) tamoxifen resistance are unclear. We found that stromal fibroblasts isolated from the central or peripheral area of BrCA have similar CAF phenotype and activity. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that CAFs derived from clinical-luminal BrCAs induce tamoxifen resistance through decreasing estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) level when cultured with luminal BrCA cell lines MCF7 and T47D. CAFs promoted tamoxifen resistance through interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion, which activates Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT3) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathways in tumor cells, followed by induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and upregulation of E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex 10 activity, which targeted ER-α degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Inhibition of proteasome activity, IL-6 activity or either the JAK/STAT3 or PI3K/AKT pathways markedly reduced CAF-induced tamoxifen resistance. In xenograft experiments of CAFs mixed with MCF7 cells, CAF-specific IL-6 knockdown inhibited tumorigenesis and restored tamoxifen sensitivity. These findings indicate that CAFs mediate tamoxifen resistance through IL-6-induced degradation of ER-α in luminal BrCAs.Oncogene advance online publication, 9 June 2014; doi:10.1038/onc.2014.158.

  6. Gene expression in normal-appearing tissue adjacent to prostate cancers are predictive of clinical outcome: evidence for a biologically meaningful field effect

    PubMed Central

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Maddala, Tara; Falzarano, Sara Moscovita; Cherbavaz, Diana B.; Zhang, Nan; Knezevic, Dejan; Febbo, Phillip G.; Lee, Mark; Lawrence, Hugh Jeffrey; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated gene expression in histologically normal-appearing tissue (NT) adjacent to prostate tumor in radical prostatectomy specimens, assessing for biological significance based on prediction of clinical recurrence (cR - metastatic disease or local recurrence). Results A total of 410 evaluable patients had paired tumor and NT. Fortysix genes, representing diverse biological pathways (androgen signaling, stromal response, stress response, cellular organization, proliferation, cell adhesion, and chromatin remodeling) were associated with cR in NT (FDR < 20%), of which 39 concordantly predicted cR in tumor (FDR < 20%). Overall GPS and its stromal response and androgen-signaling gene group components also significantly predicted time to cR in NT (RM-corrected HR/20 units = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01-1.56; P = 0.024). Experimental Design Expression of 732 genes was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) separately in tumor and adjacent NT specimens from 127 patients with and 374 without cR following radical prostatectomy for T1/T2 prostate cancer. A 17-gene expression signature (Genomic Prostate Score [GPS]), previously validated to predict aggressive prostate cancer when measured in tumor tissue, was also assessed using pre-specified genes and algorithms. Analysis used Cox proportional hazards models, Storey's false discovery rate (FDR) control, and regression to the mean (RM) correction. Conclusions Gene expression profiles, including GPS, from NT adjacent to tumor can predict prostate cancer outcome. These findings suggest that there is a biologically significant field effect in primary prostate cancer that is a marker for aggressive disease. PMID:27121323

  7. Role of uterine stromal-epithelial crosstalk in embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Hantak, Alison M; Bagchi, Indrani C; Bagchi, Milan K

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a crucial step for successful pregnancy. Prior to implantation, the luminal epithelium undergoes steroid hormone-induced structural and functional changes that render it competent for embryo attachment. Subsequent invasion of the embryo into the maternal tissue triggers differentiation of the underlying stromal cells to form the decidua, a transient tissue which supports the developing embryo. Many molecular cues of both stromal and epithelial origin have been identified that are critical mediators of this process. An important aspect of uterine biology is the elaborate crosstalk that occurs between these tissue compartments during early pregnancy through expression of paracrine factors regulated by the steroid hormones estrogen and progesterone. Aberrant expression of these factors often leads to implantation failure and infertility. Genetically-engineered mouse models have been instrumental in elucidating what these paracrine factors are, what drives their expression, and what their effects are on neighboring cells. This review provides an overview of several well-characterized signaling pathways that span both epithelial and stromal compartments and their function during implantation in the mouse. PMID:25023679

  8. Sheep stromal-epithelial cell interactions and ovarian tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Wang-Johanning, Feng; Huang, Miao; Liu, Jinsong; Rycaj, Kiera; Plummer, Joshua B; Barnhart, Kirstin F; Satterfield, William C; Johanning, Gary L

    2007-11-15

    Previous studies suggest that underlying ovarian stromal cues may regulate the ovarian surface epithelium. However, little is known about the interaction between ovarian stromal cells (OSC) and ovarian surface epithelial cells (OSE) under normal physiologic and pathologic conditions, largely because of the lack of a suitable model. In the current study, the OSC obtained from a sheep were immortalized with SV-40 T/t antigen (designated IOSC) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (designated IOSCH), followed by transfection with the oncogenic allele of the human H-Ras oncogene (designated IOSChR). IOSC cells transfected with H-Ras before immortalization with telomerase were designated IOSCRH. These sheep OSCs were used in both in vitro and in vivo model systems to evaluate mechanisms by which OSCs influence ovarian tumor progression. Normal sheep OSCs were found to inhibit the growth of SKOV3 and OVCAR3 human ovarian cancer cells, but not normal sheep OSE and human OSE cells (hOSE137 cells). In contrast, IOSChR and IOSCRH cells stimulated the growth of normal sheep and human OSE cells, as well as cancer cells. These findings were confirmed by in vivo studies. Our data provide compelling support for the importance of stromal-epithelial cell interactions during tumor progression, and show for the first time that immortalized and transformed OSCs promote growth of ovarian epithelial tumors.

  9. Stromal Targets for Fluorescent-Guided Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Martin C.; Prakash, Jai; Van De Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Mesker, Wilma E.; Kuppen, Peter J. K.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Sier, Cornelis F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-operative imaging techniques are essential for tumor detection and diagnosis, but offer limited help during surgery. Recently, the applicability of imaging during oncologic surgery has been recognized, using near-infrared fluorescent dyes conjugated to targeting antibodies, peptides, or other vehicles. Image-guided oncologic surgery (IGOS) assists the surgeFon to distinguish tumor from normal tissue during operation, and can aid in recognizing vital structures. IGOS relies on an optimized combination of a dedicated fluorescent camera system and specific probes for targeting. IGOS probes for clinical use are not widely available yet, but numerous pre-clinical studies have been published and clinical trials are being established or prepared. Most of the investigated probes are based on antibodies or peptides against proteins on the membranes of malignant cells, whereas others are directed against stromal cells. Targeting stroma cells for IGOS has several advantages. Besides the high stromal content in more aggressive tumor types, the stroma is often primarily located at the periphery/invasive front of the tumor, which makes stromal targets particularly suited for imaging purposes. Moreover, because stroma up-regulation is a physiological reaction, most proteins to be targeted on these cells are “universal” and not derived from a specific genetic variation, as is the case with many upregulated proteins on malignant cancer cells. PMID:26636036

  10. HIF1-alpha functions as a tumor promoter in cancer associated fibroblasts, and as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiavarina, Barbara; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Migneco, Gemma; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pavlides, Stephanos; Howell, Anthony; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Casimiro, Mathew C; Wang, Chenguang; Pestell, Richard G; Grieshaber, Philip; Caro, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    Our recent studies have mechanistically implicated a loss of stromal Cav-1 expression and HIF1α-activation in driving the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype, through the paracrine production of nutrients via autophagy and aerobic glycolysis. However, it remains unknown if HIF1α-activation is sufficient to confer the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype. To test this hypothesis directly, we stably-expressed activated HIF1α in fibroblasts and then examined their ability to promote tumor growth using a xenograft model employing human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Fibroblasts harboring activated HIF1α showed a dramatic reduction in Cav-1 levels and a shift towards aerobic glycolysis, as evidenced by a loss of mitochondrial activity, and an increase in lactate production. Activated HIF1α also induced BNIP3 and BNIP3L expression, markers for the autophagic destruction of mitochondria. Most importantly, fibroblasts expressing activated HIF1α increased tumor mass by ∼2-fold and tumor volume by ∼3-fold, without a significant increase in tumor angiogenesis. In this context, HIF1α also induced an increase in the lymph node metastasis of cancer cells. Similar results were obtained by driving NFκB activation in fibroblasts, another inducer of autophagy. Thus, activated HIF1α is sufficient to functionally confer the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype. It is also known that HIF1α expression is required for the induction of autophagy in cancer cells. As such, we next directly expressed activated HIF1α in MDA-MB-231 cells and assessed its effect on tumor growth via xenograft analysis. Surprisingly, activated HIF1α in cancer cells dramatically suppressed tumor growth, resulting in a 2-fold reduction in tumor mass and a three-fold reduction in tumor volume. We conclude that HIF1α activation in different cell types can either promote or repress tumorigenesis. Based on these studies, we suggest that autophagy in cancer-associated fibroblasts promotes

  11. An optimized protocol for isolating lymphoid stromal cells from the intestinal lamina propria.

    PubMed

    Stzepourginski, Igor; Eberl, Gérard; Peduto, Lucie

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells in lymphoid organs, also called lymphoid stromal cells (LSCs), play a pivotal role in immunity by forming specialized microenvironments that provide signals for leukocyte migration, positioning, and survival. Best characterized in lymphoid organs, LSCs are also abundant in the intestinal mucosa, which harbors a rich repertoire of immune cells. However, the lack of efficient procedures for isolation and purification of LSCs from the intestine has been a major limitation to their characterization. Here we report a new method to efficiently isolate, in addition to immune cells, viable lymphoid stromal cells and other stromal subsets from the intestinal lamina propria for subsequent phenotypic and functional analysis.

  12. Interleukin-8 derived from local tissue-resident stromal cells promotes tumor cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Welte, Gabriel; Alt, Eckhard; Devarajan, Eswaran; Krishnappa, Srinivasalu; Jotzu, Constantin; Song, Yao-Hua

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of adipose tissue resident stromal cells on tumor cell invasion. Our data show that a subpopulation of adipose tissue derived stromal cells expressing Nestin, NG2, α-smooth muscle actin and PDGFR-α migrate toward the cancer cells. Microarray analysis revealed the upregulation of IL-8 in the migrated cells. We demonstrated that stromal cell derived IL-8 promote the invasion and the anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells. We conclude that human breast cancer cells attract a subpopulation of stromal cells that secrete IL-8 to promote tumor cell invasion in a paracrine fashion.

  13. A subset of myofibroblastic cancer-associated fibroblasts regulate collagen fiber elongation, which is prognostic in multiple cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Christopher J.; Noble, Fergus; Ward, Matthew; Bullock, Marc; Drifka, Cole; Mellone, Massimiliano; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E.; Hayden, Annette; Thirdborough, Steve; Liu, Yuming; Smith, David M.; Mellows, Toby; Kao, W. John; Garbis, Spiros D.; Mirnezami, Alex; Underwood, Tim J.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen structure has been shown to influence tumor cell invasion, metastasis and clinical outcome in breast cancer. However, it remains unclear how it affects other solid cancers. Here we utilized multi-photon laser scanning microscopy and Second Harmonic Generation to identify alterations to collagen fiber structure within the tumor stroma of head & neck, esophageal and colorectal cancers. Image segmentation algorithms were then applied to quantitatively characterize these morphological changes, showing that elongated collagen fibers significantly correlated with poor clinical outcome (Log Rank p < 0.05). We used TGF-β treatment to model fibroblast conversion to smooth muscle actin SMA-positive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and found that these cells induce the formation of elongated collagen fibers in vivo. However, proteomic/transcriptomic analysis of SMA-positive CAFs cultured ex-vivo showed significant heterogeneity in the expression of genes with collagen fibril organizing gene ontology. Notably, stratifying patients according to stromal SMA-positivity and collagen fiber elongation was found to provide a highly significant correlation with poor survival in all 3 cancer types (Log Rank p ≤ 0.003). In summary, we show that increased collagen fiber length correlates with poor patient survival in multiple tumor types and that only a sub-set of SMA-positive CAFs can mediate the formation of this collagen structure. PMID:26716418

  14. Characterization of human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts in three-dimensional in vitro co-culture model

    SciTech Connect

    Horie, Masafumi; Saito, Akira; Mikami, Yu; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Nakajima, Jun; Kohyama, Tadashi; Nagase, Takahide

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established three patient-paired sets of CAFs and NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs and NFs were analyzed using three-dimensional co-culture experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs showed higher {alpha}-SMA expression than NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs were implicated in invasion and differentiation of lung cancer cells. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play crucial roles in carcinogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of non-small cell lung carcinoma, and targeting of CAFs could be a novel strategy for cancer treatment. However, the characteristics of human CAFs still remain to be better defined. In this study, we established patient-matched CAFs and normal fibroblasts (NFs), from tumoral and non-tumoral portions of resected lung tissue from lung cancer patients. CAFs showed higher {alpha}-smooth muscle actin ({alpha}-SMA) expression than NFs, and CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Furthermore, we employed three-dimensional co-culture assay with A549 lung cancer cells, where CAFs were more potent in inducing collagen gel contraction. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of co-cultured collagen gel revealed that CAFs had the potential to increase invasion of A549 cells compared to NFs. These observations provide evidence that lung CAFs have the tumor-promoting capacity distinct from NFs.

  15. Inhibition of fibroblast proliferation by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, B J; Kushner, M E; Tsai, C C

    1982-01-01

    We have examined soluble sonic extracts of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans for their ability to alter human and murine fibroblast proliferation. We found that extracts of all A. actinomycetemcomitans strains examined (both leukotoxic and nonleukotoxic) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of both murine and human fibroblast proliferation as assessed by DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation). Addition of sonic extract simultaneously with [3H]thymidine had no effect on incorporation, indicating that suppression was not due to the presence of excessive amounts of cold thymidine. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was also paralleled by decreased RNA synthesis ([3H]uridine incorporation) and by a decrease in cell growth as assessed by direct cell counts; there was no effect on cell viability. The suppressive factor(s) is heat labile; preliminary purification and characterization studies indicate that it is a distinct and separate moiety from other A. actinomycetemcomitans mediators previously reported, including leukotoxin, immune suppressive factor, and endotoxin. Although it is not clear how A. actinomycetemcomitans acts to cause disease, we propose that one aspect of the pathogenicity of this organism rests in its ability to inhibit fibroblast growth, which in turn could contribute to the collagen loss associated with certain forms of periodontal disease, in particular juvenile periodontitis. PMID:7152684

  16. Cytotoxic effects of amitriptyline in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Fernández, A M; Cordero, M D; de Miguel, M; Delgado-Rufino, M D; Sánchez-Alcázar, J A; Navas, P

    2008-01-14

    Amitriptyline is a tricyclic antidepressant widely used in the treatment of chronic pain. The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential cytotoxic effects of amitriptyline in human fibroblasts primary culture. Human fibroblast cells were cultured from healthy subjects and incubated with 50 microM and 100 microM amitriptyline. Cell counting was performed to study dose-dependency of toxicity. Lipid peroxidation analysis and western blotting for antioxidants catalase and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) were carried out in order to evaluate oxidative stress. To investigate mitochondria damage the following determinations were made: cytochrome c, citrate synthase, and mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)). Amitriptyline reduced significantly the number of cultured cells, resulting in a decrease of 45.2%, 65.0% and 94.9% when treated with 20 microM, 50 microM and 100 microM amitriptyline, respectively. This drug enhanced the production of oxidized products during lipid peroxidation, inverting the reduced/oxidized ratio to 25% reduction and 75% oxidation after 24h of amitriptyline administration. A decreased in catalase protein levels has been also observed. Moreover, amitriptyline treatment induced a significant decrease of cytochrome c, DeltaPsi(m), and citrate synthase activity; revealing mitochondrial damage. These findings suggest that amitriptyline has a strong cytotoxic effect in human fibroblasts, decreasing growth rate and mitochondrial activity, and increasing oxidative stress.

  17. Isolation of the stromal-vascular fraction of mouse bone marrow markedly enhances the yield of clonogenic stromal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Suire, Colby; Brouard, Nathalie; Hirschi, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The low incidence of CFU-F significantly complicates the isolation of homogeneous populations of mouse bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), a common problem being contamination with hematopoietic cells. Taking advantage of burgeoning evidence demonstrating the perivascular location of stromal cell stem/progenitors, we hypothesized that a potential reason for the low yield of mouse BMSCs is the flushing of the marrow used to remove single-cell suspensions and the consequent destruction of the marrow vasculature, which may adversely affect recovery of BMSCs physically associated with the abluminal surface of blood vessels. Herein, we describe a simple methodology based on preparation and enzymatic disaggregation of intact marrow plugs, which yields distinct populations of both stromal and endothelial cells. The recovery of CFU-F obtained by pooling the product of each digestion (1631.8 + 199) reproducibly exceeds that obtained using the standard BM flushing technique (14.32 + 1.9) by at least 2 orders of magnitude (P < .001; N = 8) with an accompanying 113.95-fold enrichment of CFU-F frequency when plated at low oxygen (5%). Purified BMSC populations devoid of hematopoietic contamination are readily obtained by FACS at P0 and from freshly prepared single-cell suspensions. Furthermore, this population demonstrates robust multilineage differentiation using standard in vivo and in vitro bioassays. PMID:22262767

  18. Respiratory activity and growth of human skin derma fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Papa, F; Scacco, S; Vergari, R; Bucaria, V; Dioguardi, D; Papa, S

    1998-09-01

    A study has been made on the speed of growth and respiratory activity of fibroblast cultures from control derma, cheloid (hypertrophic) scar and stabilized scar taken from human skin. The speed of growth and the efficiency of plaque formation of fibroblasts from cheloid scar were greater in comparison with those of fibroblasts from stabilized scar and were stimulated by the addition to the culture medium of the exudate from post-traumatic ulcer. Measurement of the contents of cytochromes showed a decrease in the content of cytochromes b562 and c + c1 in the fibroblast culture from both cheloid and stabilized scar as compared to the fibroblast culture from control derma. Cytochrome aa3 content did not show significant difference among the three types of fibroblast cultures. The respiratory activities supported by pyruvate plus malate, succinate or ascorbate plus N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine did not show, however, significant difference among the three fibroblast cultures. These observations show that the speed of growth of skin fibroblasts does not depend on the overall respiratory capacity. The exudate stimulated the activity of cytochrome c oxidase in fibroblasts from control derma, and cheloid scar. This effect and the accompanying stimulation of fibroblast growth might be correlated with the balance of oxygen free radicals.

  19. Alteration of Skin Properties with Autologous Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Darling, Thomas N.; Meyerle, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are mesenchymal cells found between the skin epidermis and subcutaneous tissue. They are primarily responsible for synthesizing collagen and glycosaminoglycans; components of extracellular matrix supporting the structural integrity of the skin. Dermal fibroblasts play a pivotal role in cutaneous wound healing and skin repair. Preclinical studies suggest wider applications of dermal fibroblasts ranging from skin based indications to non-skin tissue regeneration in tendon repair. One clinical application for autologous dermal fibroblasts has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) while others are in preclinical development or various stages of regulatory approval. In this context, we outline the role of fibroblasts in wound healing and discuss recent advances and the current development pipeline for cellular therapies using autologous dermal fibroblasts. The microanatomic and phenotypic differences of fibroblasts occupying particular locations within the skin are reviewed, emphasizing the therapeutic relevance of attributes exhibited by subpopulations of fibroblasts. Special focus is provided to fibroblast characteristics that define regional differences in skin, including the thick and hairless skin of the palms and soles as compared to hair-bearing skin. This regional specificity and functional identity of fibroblasts provides another platform for developing regional skin applications such as the induction of hair follicles in bald scalp or alteration of the phenotype of stump skin in amputees to better support their prosthetic devices. PMID:24828202

  20. Expression of the glucocorticoid receptor in breast cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Catteau, Xavier; Simon, Philippe; Buxant, Frédéric; Noël, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Cancer- associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are actively involved in breast carcinoma. Our previous study demonstrated that the majority of these CAFs were smooth muscle actin (SMA) positive and were therefore termed peritumoral myofibroblast (PMY). Glucocorticoid, linked or not with its receptor (GR), has been postulated to serve a major role in normal breast and breast carcinoma; however, their role in CAFs remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of GR in breast CAFs and particularly in PMY in 56 cases of invasive breast carcinoma in correlation with clinicopathological parameters, by immunohistochemistry. GR was observed in CAFs in 51 cases (91%) and were more frequent in luminal A subtype (19/19 cases; 100%). The stromal expression was statistically correlated with the tumor grade (P=0.03), the Ki-67 index (P=0.003) and the presence of GR in the epithelial component (P=0.01). The demonstration of a frequent expression of GR in breast CAFs may serve as an interesting target for future therapeutics for the regulation of the tumoral breast microenvironment. PMID:27699028

  1. Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ERα)-Associated Fibroblasts Promote Cell Growth in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Da, Jun; Lu, Mujun; Wang, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) is expressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the stromal compartment of cancerous prostate. However, the effect of ERα in CAF cells on prostate cancer (PCa) cell growth remains unclear. We used lentiviral transduction to stably express ERα in CAF cells isolated from transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate model. MTT and 3D colony-formation assays demonstrated that conditioned medium from ERα-expressing CAF cells (CAF-ERα+) promoted cell proliferation and colony growth of various PCa cell lines, such as PC3, LNCaP, 22RV1, and C4-2. We further confirmed the in vitro data by orthotopically co-implanting 22RV1, transfected with firefly luciferase, and CAF-ERα+ cells in vivo using mouse model. Mice co-implanted with CAF-ERα+ exhibited stronger luciferase signals and bigger tumor size compared to animals co-implanted with CAF that do not express ER. Our results demonstrate that ER expressed in CAF might play a pro-proliferative role in PCa. PMID:27259327

  2. Dendritic cells control fibroblastic reticular network tension and lymph node expansion.

    PubMed

    Acton, Sophie E; Farrugia, Aaron J; Astarita, Jillian L; Mourão-Sá, Diego; Jenkins, Robert P; Nye, Emma; Hooper, Steven; van Blijswijk, Janneke; Rogers, Neil C; Snelgrove, Kathryn J; Rosewell, Ian; Moita, Luis F; Stamp, Gordon; Turley, Shannon J; Sahai, Erik; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2014-10-23

    After immunogenic challenge, infiltrating and dividing lymphocytes markedly increase lymph node cellularity, leading to organ expansion. Here we report that the physical elasticity of lymph nodes is maintained in part by podoplanin (PDPN) signalling in stromal fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and its modulation by CLEC-2 expressed on dendritic cells. We show in mouse cells that PDPN induces actomyosin contractility in FRCs via activation of RhoA/C and downstream Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK). Engagement by CLEC-2 causes PDPN clustering and rapidly uncouples PDPN from RhoA/C activation, relaxing the actomyosin cytoskeleton and permitting FRC stretching. Notably, administration of CLEC-2 protein to immunized mice augments lymph node expansion. In contrast, lymph node expansion is significantly constrained in mice selectively lacking CLEC-2 expression in dendritic cells. Thus, the same dendritic cells that initiate immunity by presenting antigens to T lymphocytes also initiate remodelling of lymph nodes by delivering CLEC-2 to FRCs. CLEC-2 modulation of PDPN signalling permits FRC network stretching and allows for the rapid lymph node expansion--driven by lymphocyte influx and proliferation--that is the critical hallmark of adaptive immunity.

  3. Expression of the glucocorticoid receptor in breast cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Catteau, Xavier; Simon, Philippe; Buxant, Frédéric; Noël, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Cancer- associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are actively involved in breast carcinoma. Our previous study demonstrated that the majority of these CAFs were smooth muscle actin (SMA) positive and were therefore termed peritumoral myofibroblast (PMY). Glucocorticoid, linked or not with its receptor (GR), has been postulated to serve a major role in normal breast and breast carcinoma; however, their role in CAFs remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of GR in breast CAFs and particularly in PMY in 56 cases of invasive breast carcinoma in correlation with clinicopathological parameters, by immunohistochemistry. GR was observed in CAFs in 51 cases (91%) and were more frequent in luminal A subtype (19/19 cases; 100%). The stromal expression was statistically correlated with the tumor grade (P=0.03), the Ki-67 index (P=0.003) and the presence of GR in the epithelial component (P=0.01). The demonstration of a frequent expression of GR in breast CAFs may serve as an interesting target for future therapeutics for the regulation of the tumoral breast microenvironment.

  4. Key players in pancreatic cancer-stroma interaction: Cancer-associated fibroblasts, endothelial and inflammatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most aggressive type of common cancers, and in 2014, nearly 40000 patients died from the disease in the United States. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which accounts for the majority of PC cases, is characterized by an intense stromal desmoplastic reaction surrounding the cancer cells. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the main effector cells in the desmoplastic reaction, and pancreatic stellate cells are the most important source of CAFs. However, other important components of the PC stroma are inflammatory cells and endothelial cells. The aim of this review is to describe the complex interplay between PC cells and the cellular and non-cellular components of the tumour stroma. Published data have indicated that the desmoplastic stroma protects PC cells against chemotherapy and radiation therapy and that it might promote the proliferation and migration of PC cells. However, in animal studies, experimental depletion of the desmoplastic stroma and CAFs has led to more aggressive cancers. Hence, the precise role of the tumour stroma in PC remains to be elucidated. However, it is likely that a context-dependent therapeutic modification, rather than pure depletion, of the PC stroma holds potential for the development of new treatment strategies for PC patients. PMID:26973408

  5. Interactions among Lung Cancer Cells, Fibroblasts, and Macrophages in 3D Co-Cultures and the Impact on MMP-1 and VEGF Expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Qing; Kiefl, Rosemarie; Roskopf, Claudia; Tian, Fei; Huber, Rudolf M

    2016-01-01

    In vitro cell-based models of lung cancer are frequently employed to study invasion and the mechanisms behind metastasis. However, these models often study only one cell type with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell cultures, which do not accurately reflect the complexity of inflammation in vivo. Here, a three-dimensional (3D) cell co-culture collagen gel model was employed, containing human lung adenocarcinoma cells (HCC), human lung fibroblast cells (MRC-5), and macrophages. Cell culture media and cell images were collected, and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production was monitored under different cell culture conditions. We found that simulating hypoxia and/or serum starvation conditions induced elevated secretion of VEGF in the 3D co-culture model in vitro, but not MMP-1; the morphology of HCC in the 2D versus the 3D co-culture system was extremely different. MMP-1 and VEGF were secreted at higher levels in mixed cell groups rather than mono-culture groups. Therefore, incorporating lung cancer cells, fibroblasts, and macrophages may better reflect physiological metastasis mechanisms compared to mono-culture systems. Tumour stromal cells, macrophages, and fibroblast cells may promote invasion and metastasis, which also provides a new direction for the design of therapies targeted at destroying the stroma of tumor tissues.

  6. Enhanced wound healing by topical administration of mesenchymal stem cells transfected with stromal cell-derived factor-1.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoko; Ishikawa, Hidefumi; Kawai, Katsuya; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) genetically engineered with stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) to heal skin wounds. When transfected with SDF-1 plasmid DNA, MSC which were isolated from the bone marrow of rats, secreted SDF-1 for 7 days. In vitro cell migration assay revealed that the SDF-1-engineered MSC (SDF-MSC) enhanced the migration of MSC and dermal fibroblasts to a significantly greater extent than MSC. The SDF-MSC secreted vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and interleukin 6 at a significantly high level. A skin defect model of rats was prepared and MSC and SDF-MSC were applied to the wound to evaluate wound healing in terms of wound size and histological examinations. The wound size decreased significantly faster with SDF-MSC treatment than with MSC and PBS treatments. The length of the neoepithelium and the number of blood vessels newly formed were significantly larger. A cell-tracing experiment with fluorescently labeled cells demonstrated that the percent survival of SDF-MSC in the tissue treated was significantly high compared with that of MSC. It was concluded that SDF-1 genetic engineering is a promising way to promote the wound healing activity of MSC for a skin defect.

  7. The New Role of CD163 in the Differentiation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Vascular Endothelial-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Su, Le; Yu, Zhezheng; Zhang, Shangli; Miao, Junying

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (VECs). It is regarded as an important solution to cure many diseases, such as ischemic diseases and diabetes. However, the mechanisms underlying BMSC differentiation into VECs are not well understood. Recent reports showed that CD163 expression was associated with angiogenesis. In this study, overexpression of CD163 in BMSCs elevated the protein level of the endothelial-associated markers CD31, Flk-1, eNOS, and VE-cadherin, significantly increased the proportion of Alexa Fluor 488-acetylated-LDL-positive VECs, and promoted angiogenesis on Matrigel. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CD163 acted downstream homeobox containing 1 (Hmbox1) and upstream fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). These data suggested that CD163 was involved in Hmbox1/CD163/FGF-2 signal pathway in BMSC differentiation into vascular endothelial-like cells. We found a new signal pathway and a novel target for further investigating the gene control of BMSC differentiation into a VEC lineage. PMID:26880943

  8. Insights from a Chimpanzee Adipose Stromal Cell Population: Opportunities for Adult Stem Cells to Expand Primate Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferle, Lisa W.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Comparisons between humans and chimpanzees are essential for understanding traits unique to each species. However, linking important phenotypic differences to underlying molecular changes is often challenging. The ability to generate, differentiate, and profile adult stem cells provides a powerful but underutilized opportunity to investigate the molecular basis for trait differences between species within specific cell types and in a controlled environment. Here, we characterize adipose stromal cells (ASCs) from Clint, the chimpanzee whose genome was first sequenced. Using imaging and RNA-Seq, we compare the chimpanzee ASCs with three comparable human cell lines. Consistent with previous studies on ASCs in humans, the chimpanzee cells have fibroblast-like morphology and express genes encoding components of the extracellular matrix at high levels. Differentially expressed genes are enriched for distinct functional classes between species: immunity and protein processing are higher in chimpanzees, whereas cell cycle and DNA processing are higher in humans. Although hesitant to draw definitive conclusions from these data given the limited sample size, we wish to stress the opportunities that adult stem cells offer for studying primate evolution. In particular, adult stem cells provide a powerful means to investigate the profound disease susceptibilities unique to humans and a promising tool for conservation efforts with nonhuman primates. By allowing for experimental perturbations in relevant cell types, adult stem cells promise to complement classic comparative primate genomics based on in vivo sampling. PMID:24092797

  9. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells seeded on cartilaginous endplates promote Intervertebral Disc Regeneration through Extracellular Matrix Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Catarina Leite; Teixeira, Graciosa Q.; Ribeiro-Machado, Cláudia; Caldeira, Joana; Costa, Madalena; Figueiredo, Francisco; Fernandes, Rui; Aguiar, Paulo; Grad, Sibylle; Barbosa, Mário A.; Gonçalves, Raquel M.

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is characterized by significant biochemical and histomorphological alterations, such as loss of extracellular matrix (ECM) integrity, by abnormal synthesis of ECM main components, resultant from altered anabolic/catabolic cell activities and cell death. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cell (MSC) migration towards degenerated IVD may represent a viable strategy to promote tissue repair/regeneration. Here, human MSCs (hMSCs) were seeded on top of cartilaginous endplates (CEP) of nucleotomized IVDs of bovine origin and cultured ex vivo up to 3 weeks. hMSCs migrated from CEP towards the lesion area and significantly increased expression of collagen type II and aggrecan in IVD, namely in the nucleus pulposus. Concomitantly, hMSCs stimulated the production of growth factors, promoters of ECM synthesis, such as fibroblast growth factor 6 (FGF-6) and 7 (FGF-7), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF-R), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1sR). Overall, our results demonstrate that CEP can be an alternative route to MSC-based therapies for IVD regeneration through ECM remodeling, thus opening new perspectives on endogenous repair capacity through MSC recruitment. PMID:27652931

  10. Notch1 Is Regulated by Chorionic Gonadotropin and Progesterone in Endometrial Stromal Cells and Modulates Decidualization in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Yalda; Miele, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    No other tissue in the body undergoes such a vast and extensive growth and remodeling in a relatively short period of time as the primate endometrium. Endometrial integrity is coordinated by ovarian hormones, namely, estrogens, progesterone, and the embryonic hormone chorionic gonadotropin (CG). These regulated events modulate the menstrual cycle and decidualization. The Notch family of transmembrane receptors regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, cellular processes required to maintain endometrial integrity. In two primate models, the human and the simulated pregnant baboon model, we demonstrated that Notch1 is increased during the window of uterine receptivity, concomitant with CG. Furthermore, CG combined with estrogens and progesterone up-regulate the level of Notch1, whereas progesterone increases the intracellular transcriptionally competent Notch1, which binds in a complex with progesterone receptor. Inhibition of Notch1 prevented decidualization, and alternatively, when decidualization is biochemically recapitulated in vitro, Notch1 is down-regulated. A focused microarray demonstrated that the Notch inhibitor, Numb, dramatically increased when Notch1 decreased during decidualization. We propose that in the endometrium, Notch has a dual role during the window of uterine receptivity. Initially, Notch1 mediates a survival signal in the uterine endometrium in response to CG from the implanting blastocyst and progesterone, so that menstrual sloughing is averted. Subsequently, Notch1 down-regulation may be critical for the transition of stromal fibroblast to decidual cells, which is essential for the establishment of a successful pregnancy. PMID:22535768

  11. Human adipose-derived stromal cells for the production of completely autologous self-assembled tissue-engineered vascular substitutes.

    PubMed

    Vallières, Karine; Laterreur, Véronique; Tondreau, Maxime Y; Ruel, Jean; Germain, Lucie; Fradette, Julie; Auger, François A

    2015-09-01

    There is a clinical need for small-diameter vascular substitutes, notably for coronary and peripheral artery bypass procedures since these surgeries are limited by the availability of grafting material. This study reports the characterization of a novel autologous tissue-engineered vascular substitute (TEVS) produced in 10weeks exclusively from human adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC) self-assembly, and its comparison to an established model made from dermal fibroblasts (DF). Briefly, ASC and DF were cultured with ascorbate to form cell sheets subsequently rolled around a mandrel. These TEVS were further cultured as a maturation period before undergoing mechanical testing, histological analyses and endothelialization. No significant differences were measured in burst pressure, suture strength, failure load, elastic modulus and failure strain according to the cell type used to produce the TEVS. Indeed, ASC- and DF-TEVS both displayed burst pressures well above maximal physiological blood pressure. However, ASC-TEVS were 1.40-fold more compliant than DF-TEVS. The structural matrix, comprising collagens type I and III, fibronectin and elastin, was very similar in all TEVS although histological analysis showed a wavier and less dense collagen matrix in ASC-TEVS. This difference in collagen organization could explain their higher compliance. Finally, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) successfully formed a confluent endothelium on ASC and DF cell sheets, as well as inside ASC-TEVS. Our results demonstrated that ASC are an alternative cell source for the production of TEVS displaying good mechanical properties and appropriate endothelialization.

  12. Bone marrow-derived cells participate in stromal remodeling of the lung following acute bacterial pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    Serikov, Vladimir B; Mikhaylov, Viatcheslav M; Krasnodembskay, Anna D; Matthay, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) have been shown to graft injured tissues, differentiate in specialized cells, and participate in repair. The importance of these processes in acute lung bacterial inflammation and development of fibrosis is unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the temporal sequence and lineage commitment of BMDC in mouse lungs injured by bacterial pneumonia. We transplanted GFP-tagged BMDC into 5-Gy-irradiated C57BL/6 mice. After 3 months of recovery, mice were subjected to LD(50) intratracheal instillation of live E. coli (controls received saline) which produced pneumonia and subsequent areas of fibrosis. Lungs were investigated by immunohistology for up to 6 months. At the peak of lung inflammation, the predominant influx of BMDC were GFP(+) leukocytes. Postinflammatory foci of lung fibrosis were evident after 1-2 months. The fibrotic foci in lung stroma contained clusters of GFP(+) CD45(+) cells, GFP(+) vimentin-positive cells, and GFP(+) collagen I-positive fibroblasts. GFP(+) endothelial or epithelial cells were not identified. These data suggest that following 5-Gy irradiation and acute bacterial pneumonia, BMDC may temporarily participate in lung postinflammatory repair and stromal remodeling without long-term engraftment as specialized endothelial or epithelial cells.

  13. Preparation of Biotubes with vascular cells component by in vivo incubation using adipose-derived stromal cell-exuding multi-microporous molds.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Ryosuke; Tsujinaka, Takahiro; Nakayama, Yasuhide

    2015-12-01

    Biotubes, prepared using in-body tissue architecture (IBTA) technology, have adequate mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility for vascular grafts. However, they have thin walls, lack vascular constructing cells, and are composed of subcutaneous connective tissues consisting mainly of collagen and fibroblasts. This study aimed to prepare Biotubes with a vascular-like structure including an endothelial cell lining and a smooth muscle cell by IBTA using adipose-derived vascular stromal cell (ADSCs)-exuding specially designed multiporous tubes (outer diameter 5 mm, length 24 mm, pore size 500 μm, pore number 180, cell number/tube >3.0 × 10(6)). ADSCs were separated from rat subcutaneous fat, suspended in a Matrigel™ solution at 4 °C, and then filled into the tubes. After the tubes were embedded into dorsal subcutaneous pouches of the same rats for 2 weeks, robust Biotubes with a wall thickness of >600 μm were formed surrounding the tubes. The luminal layer of the obtained Biotubes was dominated by the cells positive for an endothelial marker. Almost the entire intima, with a thickness of about 400 μm, was occupied with cells positive for a smooth muscle marker. Both cells were derived from ADSCs. Biotube walls were constructed by fusing ADSC-derived vascular constructing cells exuded from the tubes and fibroblasts and collagen from the surrounding connective tissue. A robust Biotubes with vascular cells component, were formed after only 2 weeks of subcutaneous incubation of ADSCs-exuding multiporous tubes.

  14. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism: implications for breast cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-01-15

    Little is known about how alcohol consumption promotes the onset of human breast cancer(s). One hypothesis is that ethanol induces metabolic changes in the tumor microenvironment, which then enhances epithelial tumor growth. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we used a co-culture system consisting of human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation. Oxidative stress in stromal fibroblasts also results in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, driving the induction of ketone body production in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, ethanol has just the opposite effect in epithelial cancer cells, where it confers autophagy resistance, elevates mitochondrial biogenesis and induces key enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1/OXCT1). During co-culture, ethanol treatment also converts MCF7 cells from an ER(+) to an ER(-) status, which is thought to be associated with "stemness," more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Thus, ethanol treatment induces ketone production in cancer-associated fibroblasts and ketone re-utilization in epithelial cancer cells, fueling tumor cell growth via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). This "two-compartment" metabolic model is consistent with previous historical observations that ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde (which induces oxidative stress) and then ultimately to acetyl-CoA (a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), or can be used to synthesize ketone bodies. As such, our results provide a novel mechanism by which alcohol consumption could metabolically convert "low-risk" breast cancer patients to "high-risk" status, explaining tumor recurrence or disease progression. Hence, our findings have clear implications for both breast cancer prevention and therapy. Remarkably, our results also show that

  15. Lock 4 View east of lock wall and adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 4 - View east of lock wall and adjacent roadway built atop tow path. The gate pocket can be seen at center. - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  16. 14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen he designed and installed in the Congdon Canal, facing southeast. Photo dates ca. late 1920's. - Congdon Canal, Fish Screen, Naches River, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  17. 3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent vacant property. Original wood lap siding and trim is covered by aluminum siding. Recessed side porch is in middle. - 645 South Eighteenth Street (House), Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  18. View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips (Facility Nos. S375 & S376) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Boat House, Hornet Avenue at Independence Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY 391 IN THE FOREGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to northwest cell: granite and brick threshold, poured concrete floors, plastered finished walls, vaulted veiling; northwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  1. View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking garage. - Mulberry Street Viaduct, Spanning Paxton Creek & Cameron Street (State Route 230) at Mulberry Street (State Route 3012), Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  2. Cement Leakage into Adjacent Vertebral Body Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hoo; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) is a minimally invasive procedure for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures that fail to respond to conventional conservative treatment. It significantly improves intolerable back pain within hours, and has a low complication rate. Although rare, PV is not free of complications, most of which are directly related to cement leakage. Because of its association with new adjacent fracture, the importance of cement leakage into the adjacent disc space is paramount. Here, we report an interesting case of cement leakage into the adjacent upper vertebral body as well as disc space following PV. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of cement leakage into the adjacent vertebral body following PV. This rare case is presented along with a review of the literature. PMID:27437018

  3. 2. DETAIL OF CONTROL GATE ADJACENT TO LIFT LOCK NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF CONTROL GATE ADJACENT TO LIFT LOCK NO. 7; THIS CONTROL GATE IS A 1980s RECONSTRUCTION. - Illinois & Michigan Canal, Lift Lock No. 7 & Control Gate, East side of DuPage River, Channahon, Will County, IL

  4. 33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY WITH CONCRETE CULVERT LEADING NORTH OUT OF RAVINE TOWARD JOHNSTON MEMORIAL SITE. VIEW NW. - Shiloh National Military Park Tour Roads, Shiloh, Hardin County, TN

  5. VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING 23, FACING NORTH - Roosevelt Base, Auditorium-Gymnasium, West Virginia Street between Richardson & Reeves Avenues, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO BUILDING 199 (POLICE STATION) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Post Office, Avenue A near Eleventh Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. 73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, LOOKING WEST BY NORTHWEST, SHOWING EASTERNMOST ARCH OF FORMER GREAT HALL NORTH ARCADE - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 28. TOP VIEW OF CIRCUIT BREAKER ADJACENT TO BRIDGE, CATENARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. TOP VIEW OF CIRCUIT BREAKER ADJACENT TO BRIDGE, CATENARY ANCHOR BRIDGE 310, COS COB POWER PLANT - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  9. 1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE OF THE ADIT OPENINGS (VIEW TO THE NORTH). - Foster Gulch Mine, Fan Housing, Bear Creek 1 mile Southwest of Town of Bear Creek, Red Lodge, Carbon County, MT

  10. GENERAL VIEW OF WAREHOUSE ADJACENT TO BATCH PLANT, LOOKING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF WAREHOUSE ADJACENT TO BATCH PLANT, LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM DREY STREET PLANT, INSIDE WELCOME WALL - Chambers Window Glass Company, Warehouse & Shipping, North of Drey (Nineteenth) Street, West of Constitution Boulevard, Arnold, Westmoreland County, PA

  11. 10. SLATE PATIO ADJACENT TO SOUTH PORCH OF HOUSE, FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SLATE PATIO ADJACENT TO SOUTH PORCH OF HOUSE, FROM SOUTHEAST CORNER OF REAR PORCH. SHED IS VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Butt Valley Dam, Gate Tender's House, Butt Valley Reservoir Road, Caribou, Plumas County, CA

  12. Detail of fire alarm boxes located adjacent to the entrance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of fire alarm boxes located adjacent to the entrance of the northwest wing - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  13. Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to engine house. Gas cooling system is on far right. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  14. 1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is the 9th Street facade of 816 E Street. Both buildings were originally one property. - Riley Building, Rendezvous Adult Magazines & Films, 437 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. 2. THREEQUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. THREE-QUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS AND NORTHWEST APPROACH SPANS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Red River Bridge, Spanning Red River at U.S. Highway 82, Garland, Miller County, AR

  16. 31. VAL, DETAIL OF LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO LAUNCHER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VAL, DETAIL OF LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING WEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with soundproof walls and pedestal flooring - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  18. 52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  19. 7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH (NOT IN STUDY AREA) - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  20. Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example is located between Buildings 26 and 27. Facing northeast - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Adjacent Segment Disease Perspective and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra-Pozo, Fanor M.; Deusdara, Renato A. M.; Benzel, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adjacent segment disease has become a common topic in spine surgery circles because of the significant increase in fusion surgery in recent years and the development of motion preservation technologies that theoretically should lead to a decrease in this pathology. The purpose of this review is to organize the evidence available in the current literature on this subject. Methods For this literature review, a search was conducted in PubMed with the following keywords: adjacent segment degeneration and disease. Selection, review, and analysis of the literature were completed according to level of evidence. Results The PubMed search identified 850 articles, from which 41 articles were selected and reviewed. The incidence of adjacent segment disease in the cervical spine is close to 3% without a significant statistical difference between surgical techniques (fusion vs arthroplasty). Authors report the incidence of adjacent segment disease in the lumbar spine to range from 2% to 14%. Damage to the posterior ligamentous complex and sagittal imbalances are important risk factors for both degeneration and disease. Conclusion Insufficient evidence exists at this point to support the idea that total disc arthroplasty is superior to fusion procedures in minimizing the incidence of adjacent segment disease. The etiology is most likely multifactorial but it is becoming abundantly clear that adjacent segment disease is not caused by motion segment fusion alone. Fusion plus the presence of abnormal end-fusion alignment appears to be a major factor in creating end-fusion stresses that result in adjacent segment degeneration and subsequent disease. The data presented cast further doubt on previously established rationales for total disc arthroplasty, at least with regard to the effect of total disc arthroplasty on adjacent segment degeneration pathology. PMID:24688337

  2. Expression of microRNAs in fibroblast of pterygium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joon H.; Jung, Sun-Ah; Kwon, Young-A; Chung, Jae-Lim; Kim, Ungsoo Samuel

    2016-01-01

    AIM To screen microRNAs (miRNAs) and set up target miRNAs in pterygium. METHODS Primary fibroblasts were isolated from pterygium and Tenon's capsule and cultured. Immunocytochemical analysis and Western blotting were performed to confirm the culture of fibroblasts. In all, 1733 miRNAs were screened in the first step by using GeneChip® miRNA3.0 Array. Specific miRNAs involved in the pathogenesis of pterygium were subsequently determined using the following criteria: 1) high reproducibility in a repetitive test; 2) base log value of >7.0 for both control and pterygial fibroblasts; and 3) log ratio of >1.0 between pterygial fibroblasts and control fibroblasts. RESULTS Primary screening showed that 887/1733 miRNAs were up-regulated and 846/1733 miRNAs were down-regulated in pterygial fibroblasts compared with those in control fibroblasts. Of the 1733 miRNAs screened, 4 miRNAs, namely, miRNA-143a-3p, miRNA-181a-2-3p, miRNA-377-5p and miRNA-411a-5p, met the above-mentioned criteria. Primary screening showed that these 4 miRNAs were up-regulated in pterygial fibroblasts compared with control fibroblasts and that miRNA-143a-3p had the highest mean ratio compared with the miRNAs in control fibroblasts. CONCLUSION miRNA-143a-3p, miRNA-181a-2-3p, miRNA-377-5p and miRNA-411a-5p are up-regulated in pterygial fibroblasts compared with control fibroblasts, suggesting their involvement in the pathogenesis of pterygium. PMID:27500101

  3. Cholesteatoma Fibroblasts Promote Epithelial Cell Proliferation through Overexpression of Epiregulin

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Mamoru; Kojima, Hiromi; Yaguchi, Yuichiro; Okada, Naoko; Saito, Hirohisa; Moriyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether keratinocytes proliferate in response to epiregulin produced by subepithelial fibroblasts derived from middle ear cholesteatoma. Tissue samples were obtained from patients undergoing tympanoplasty. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were performed to examine epiregulin expression and localization in cholesteatoma tissues and retroauricular skin tissues. Fibroblasts were cultured from cholesteatoma tissues and from normal retroauricular skin. These fibroblasts were used as feeder cells for culture with a human keratinocyte cell line (PHK16-0b). To investigate the role of epiregulin in colony formation by PHK16-0b cells, epiregulin mRNA expression was knocked down in fibroblasts by using short interfering RNA and epiregulin protein was blocked with a neutralizing antibody. Epiregulin mRNA expression was significantly elevated in cholesteatoma tissues compared with that in normal retroauricular skin. Staining for epiregulin was more intense in the epithelial cells and subepithelial fibroblasts of cholesteatoma tissues than in retroauricular skin. When PHK16-0b cells were cultured with cholesteatoma fibroblasts, their colony-forming efficiency was 50% higher than when these cells were cultured with normal skin fibroblasts. Also, knockdown of epiregulin mRNA in cholesteatoma fibroblasts led to greater suppression of colony formation than knockdown in skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the colony-forming efficiency of PHK16-0b cells was significantly reduced after treatment with an epiregulin neutralizing antibody in co-culture with cholesteatoma fibroblasts, but not in co-culture with skin fibroblasts. These results suggest that keratinocyte hyperproliferation in cholesteatoma is promoted through overexpression of epiregulin by subepithelial fibroblasts via epithelial–mesenchymal interactions, which may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of middle ear cholesteatoma. PMID:23826119

  4. Potential Effect of CD271 on Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Giovanna; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Lo Furno, Debora; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Forte, Stefano; Gulino, Rosario; Colarossi, Cristina; Schinocca, Luciana Rita; Giuffrida, Rosario; Cardile, Venera; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor (LNGFR), also known as CD271, is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily. The CD271 cell surface marker defines a subset of multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells and may be used to isolate and enrich cells derived from bone marrow aspirate. In this study, we compare the proliferative and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from bone marrow aspirate and adipose tissue by plastic adherence and positive selection. The proliferation and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells were assessed by inducing osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic in vitro differentiation. Compared to CD271+, CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells showed a lower proliferation rate and a decreased ability to give rise to osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Furthermore, we observed that CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue displayed a higher efficiency of proliferation and trilineage differentiation compared to CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow samples, although the CD271 expression levels were comparable. In conclusion, these data show that both the presence of CD271 antigen and the source of mesenchymal stromal cells represent important factors in determining the ability of the cells to proliferate and differentiate. PMID:26184166

  5. Stromal cells expressing hedgehog-interacting protein regulate the proliferation of myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kobune, M; Iyama, S; Kikuchi, S; Horiguchi, H; Sato, T; Murase, K; Kawano, Y; Takada, K; Ono, K; Kamihara, Y; Hayashi, T; Miyanishi, K; Sato, Y; Takimoto, R; Kato, J

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant reactivation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling has been described in a wide variety of human cancers including cancer stem cells. However, involvement of the Hh-signaling system in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment during the development of myeloid neoplasms is unknown. In this study, we assessed the expression of Hh-related genes in primary human CD34+ cells, CD34+ blastic cells and BM stromal cells. Both Indian Hh (Ihh) and its signal transducer, smoothened (SMO), were expressed in CD34+ acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-derived cells. However, Ihh expression was relatively low in BM stromal cells. Remarkably, expression of the intrinsic Hh-signaling inhibitor, human Hh-interacting protein (HHIP) in AML/MDS-derived stromal cells was markedly lower than in healthy donor-derived stromal cells. Moreover, HHIP expression levels in BM stromal cells highly correlated with their supporting activity for SMO+ leukemic cells. Knockdown of HHIP gene in stromal cells increased their supporting activity although control cells marginally supported SMO+ leukemic cell proliferation. The demethylating agent, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine rescued HHIP expression via demethylation of HHIP gene and reduced the leukemic cell-supporting activity of AML/MDS-derived stromal cells. This indicates that suppression of stromal HHIP could be associated with the proliferation of AML/MDS cells. PMID:22961059

  6. Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Sex Cord-Stromal Tumors of the Ovary

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Granulosa Cell Tumor; Ovarian Gynandroblastoma; Ovarian Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sex Cord Tumor With Annular Tubules; Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor; Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor of Mixed or Unclassified Cell Types; Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumor

  7. Resolving Cancer-Stroma Interfacial Signaling and Interventions with Micropatterned Tumor-Stromal Assays

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Keyue; Luk, Samantha; Hicks, Daniel F; Elman, Jessica S; Bohr, Stefan; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Murray, Ryan; Pena, Kristen; Wang, Fangjing; Seker, Erkin; Weissleder, Ralph; Yarmush, Martin L; Toner, Mehmet; Sgroi, Dennis; Parekkadan, Biju

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-stromal interactions are a determining factor in cancer progression. In vivo, the interaction interface is associated with spatially-resolved distributions of cancer and stromal phenotypes. Here, we establish a micropatterned tumor-stromal assay (μTSA) with laser capture microdissection to control the location of co-cultured cells and analyze bulk and interfacial tumor-stromal signaling in driving cancer progression. μTSA reveals a spatial distribution of phenotypes in concordance with human estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer samples, and heterogeneous drug activity relative to the tumor-stroma interface. Specifically, an unknown mechanism of reversine is shown in targeting tumor-stromal interfacial interactions using ER+ MCF-7 breast cancer and bone marrow-derived stromal cells. Reversine suppresses MCF-7 tumor growth and bone metastasis in vivo by reducing tumor stromalization including collagen deposition and recruitment of activated stromal cells. This study advocates μTSA as a platform for studying tumor microenvironmental interactions and cancer field effects with applications in drug discovery and development. PMID:25489927

  8. Potential Effect of CD271 on Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Proliferation and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Giovanna; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Lo Furno, Debora; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Forte, Stefano; Gulino, Rosario; Colarossi, Cristina; Schinocca, Luciana Rita; Giuffrida, Rosario; Cardile, Venera; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor (LNGFR), also known as CD271, is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily. The CD271 cell surface marker defines a subset of multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells and may be used to isolate and enrich cells derived from bone marrow aspirate. In this study, we compare the proliferative and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from bone marrow aspirate and adipose tissue by plastic adherence and positive selection. The proliferation and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells were assessed by inducing osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic in vitro differentiation. Compared to CD271+, CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells showed a lower proliferation rate and a decreased ability to give rise to osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Furthermore, we observed that CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue displayed a higher efficiency of proliferation and trilineage differentiation compared to CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow samples, although the CD271 expression levels were comparable. In conclusion, these data show that both the presence of CD271 antigen and the source of mesenchymal stromal cells represent important factors in determining the ability of the cells to proliferate and differentiate. PMID:26184166

  9. Ex vivo Co-culture of Lymphoid Tissue Stromal Cells and T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ming; Haase, Ashley T.

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells within lymphoid tissues produce IL-7, which is critical for the survival and function of T cells. This protocol is to be used to isolate primary human lymphoid tissue stromal cells to study their impact on the survival of T cells in an ex vivo co-culture system.

  10. Data from a proteomic analysis of colonic fibroblasts secretomes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sun-Xia; Xu, Xiao-En; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Cui, Shu-Jian; Xu, Lei-Lei; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Yan, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Qian; Qiao, Jie; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion were influenced by the interaction between the cancer cells and their microenvironment. In current study, we established two pairs of the primary fibroblast cultures from colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues and the normal counterparts and identified 227 proteins in the colonic fibroblast secretomes; half of these proteins were novel. The mass spectrometry data and analyzed results presented here provide novel insights into the molecular characteristics and modulatory role of colon cancer associated fibroblasts. The data is related to “Identification of colonic fibroblast secretomes reveals secretory factors regulating colon cancer cell proliferation” by Chen et al. [1]. PMID:26217680

  11. The effect of growth factor supplementation on corneal stromal cell phenotype in vitro using a serum-free media.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Amy P; O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Ahearne, Mark

    2016-10-01

    In order to expand cells quickly and in high numbers for corneal tissue engineering applications corneal stromal cells, or keratocytes, are often cultured in the presence of serum. However, keratocytes become fibroblastic when exposed to serum leading to a downregulation of corneal stromal specific markers. The purpose of this current study was to determine if corneal stromal cells, made fibroblastic by serum, could display native quiescent keratocyte characteristics when cultured under serum-free conditions supplemented by different growth factors. Markers specific to a native keratocyte phenotype such as keratocan and aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1) and those specific to a fibrotic phenotype such as α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) and collagen type III were examined. Cells were cultured in monolayer, self-assembled pellets or collagen hydrogels. Growth factors known to modulate keratocyte phenotype were chosen to supplement the serum free media, specifically insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and transforming growth factor beta 1 and 3 (Tβ1 and Tβ3). The effects of serum-free media, growth factors and culture system on cell proliferation and morphology and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis were evaluated. The expression of keratocyte markers was evaluated by real-time PCR, immunofluorescent staining and western blotting. In addition, cell migration was tested using scratch assays. When serum was removed from the cells they displayed a reduction in proliferation and ECM synthesis (not significant), in addition to a significant decrease in migratory capacity (p < 0.05). Serum-free media promoted increased expression of keratocan (130.68 ± 47.44-fold increase; p < 0.05) and collagen type I (15.58 ± 9.49-fold increase; p < 0.05). However, there was no significant change in ALDH3A1 and αSMA expression, while collagen type III expression was significantly increased (44.66 ± 25.61-fold increase; p < 0.05). In addition, cells retained an

  12. The effect of growth factor supplementation on corneal stromal cell phenotype in vitro using a serum-free media.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Amy P; O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Ahearne, Mark

    2016-10-01

    In order to expand cells quickly and in high numbers for corneal tissue engineering applications corneal stromal cells, or keratocytes, are often cultured in the presence of serum. However, keratocytes become fibroblastic when exposed to serum leading to a downregulation of corneal stromal specific markers. The purpose of this current study was to determine if corneal stromal cells, made fibroblastic by serum, could display native quiescent keratocyte characteristics when cultured under serum-free conditions supplemented by different growth factors. Markers specific to a native keratocyte phenotype such as keratocan and aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1) and those specific to a fibrotic phenotype such as α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) and collagen type III were examined. Cells were cultured in monolayer, self-assembled pellets or collagen hydrogels. Growth factors known to modulate keratocyte phenotype were chosen to supplement the serum free media, specifically insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and transforming growth factor beta 1 and 3 (Tβ1 and Tβ3). The effects of serum-free media, growth factors and culture system on cell proliferation and morphology and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis were evaluated. The expression of keratocyte markers was evaluated by real-time PCR, immunofluorescent staining and western blotting. In addition, cell migration was tested using scratch assays. When serum was removed from the cells they displayed a reduction in proliferation and ECM synthesis (not significant), in addition to a significant decrease in migratory capacity (p < 0.05). Serum-free media promoted increased expression of keratocan (130.68 ± 47.44-fold increase; p < 0.05) and collagen type I (15.58 ± 9.49-fold increase; p < 0.05). However, there was no significant change in ALDH3A1 and αSMA expression, while collagen type III expression was significantly increased (44.66 ± 25.61-fold increase; p < 0.05). In addition, cells retained an

  13. Native human adipose stromal cells: localization, morphology and phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Maumus, M; Peyrafitte, J-A; D'Angelo, R; Fournier-Wirth, C; Bouloumié, A; Casteilla, L; Sengenès, C; Bourin, P

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Beside having roles in energy homeostasis and endocrine modulation, adipose tissue (AT) is now considered a promising source of mesenchymal stromal cells (adipose-derived stromal cells or ASCs) for regenerative medicine. Despite numerous studies on cultured ASCs, native human ASCs are rarely investigated. Indeed, the phenotype of ASCs in their native state, their localization within AT and comparison with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) has been poorly investigated. Design: To address these issues, the stroma vascular fraction (SVF) of human AT was extracted and native cell subtypes were isolated by immunoselection to study their clonogenic potential in culture. Immunohistology on samples of human AT in combination with reconstruction of confocal sections were performed in order to localize ASCs. Results: Compared with BM-MNCs, all native ASCs were found in the CD34+ cell fraction of the AT-SVF. Native ASCs expressed classical mesenchymal markers described for BM-MSCs. Interestingly, CD34 expression decreased during ASC cell culture and was negatively correlated with cell proliferation rate. Immunohistological analysis revealed that native ASCs exhibited specific morphological features with protrusions. They were found scattered in AT stroma and did not express in vivo pericytic markers such as NG2, CD140b or alpha-smooth muscle actin, which appeared during the culture process. Finally, ASCs spontaneous commitment to adipocytic lineage was enhanced in AT from obese humans. Conclusions: The use of complementary methodological approaches to study native human ASCs revealed their immunophenotype, their specific morphology, their location within AT and their stemness. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that human ASCs participate in adipogenesis during AT development. PMID:21266947

  14. Multivariate biophysical markers predictive of mesenchymal stromal cell multipotency

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wong Cheng; Shi, Hui; Poon, Zhiyong; Nyan, Lin Myint; Kaushik, Tanwi; Shivashankar, G. V.; Chan, Jerry K. Y.; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to produce therapeutically relevant quantities of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) via in vitro culture is a common prerequisite for stem cell-based therapies. Although culture expanded MSCs are widely studied and considered for therapeutic applications, it has remained challenging to identify a unique set of characteristics that enables robust identification and isolation of the multipotent stem cells. New means to describe and separate this rare cell type and its downstream progenitor cells within heterogeneous cell populations will contribute significantly to basic biological understanding and can potentially improve efficacy of stem and progenitor cell-based therapies. Here, we use multivariate biophysical analysis of culture-expanded, bone marrow-derived MSCs, correlating these quantitative measures with biomolecular markers and in vitro and in vivo functionality. We find that, although no single biophysical property robustly predicts stem cell multipotency, there exists a unique and minimal set of three biophysical markers that together are predictive of multipotent subpopulations, in vitro and in vivo. Subpopulations of culture-expanded stromal cells from both adult and fetal bone marrow that exhibit sufficiently small cell diameter, low cell stiffness, and high nuclear membrane fluctuations are highly clonogenic and also exhibit gene, protein, and functional signatures of multipotency. Further, we show that high-throughput inertial microfluidics enables efficient sorting of committed osteoprogenitor cells, as distinct from these mesenchymal stem cells, in adult bone marrow. Together, these results demonstrate novel methods and markers of stemness that facilitate physical isolation, study, and therapeutic use of culture-expanded, stromal cell subpopulations. PMID:25298531

  15. Osterix marks distinct waves of primitive and definitive stromal progenitors during bone marrow development.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Pinho, Sandra; Ahmed, Jalal; Kunisaki, Yuya; Hanoun, Maher; Mendelson, Avital; Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M; Frenette, Paul S

    2014-05-12

    Mesenchymal stem and progenitor cells (MSPCs) contribute to bone marrow (BM) homeostasis by generating multiple types of stromal cells. MSPCs can be labeled in the adult BM by Nestin-GFP, whereas committed osteoblast progenitors are marked by Osterix expression. However, the developmental origin and hierarchical relationship of stromal cells remain largely unknown. Here, by using a lineage-tracing system, we describe three distinct waves of contributions of Osterix(+) cells in the BM. First, Osterix(+) progenitors in the fetal BM contribute to nascent bone tissues and transient stromal cells that are replaced in the adult marrow. Second, Osterix-expressing cells perinatally contribute to osteolineages and long-lived BM stroma, which have characteristics of Nestin-GFP(+) MSPCs. Third, Osterix labeling in the adult marrow is osteolineage-restricted, devoid of stromal contribution. These results uncover a broad expression profile of Osterix and raise the intriguing possibility that distinct waves of stromal cells, primitive and definitive, may organize the developing BM.

  16. Identification of the 64 kilodalton chloroplast stromal phosphoprotein as phosphoglucomutase. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Salvucci, M.E.; Drake, R.R.; Broadbent, K.P.; Haley, B.E. ); Hanson, K.R.; McHale, N.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Phosphorylation of the 64 kilodalton stromal phosphoprotein by incubation of pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast extracts with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP decreased in the presence of Glc-6-P and Glc-1,6-P{sub 2}, but was stimulated by glucose. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis following incubation of intact chloroplasts and stromal extracts with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP, or incubation of stromal extracts and partially purified phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1) with ({sup 32}P)Glc-1-P showed that the identical 64 kilodalton polypeptide was labeled. A 62 kilodalton polypeptide was phosphorylated by incubation of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) stromal extracts with either ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP or ({sup 32}P)Glc-1-P. In contrast, an analogous polypeptide was not phosphorylated in extracts from a tobacco mutant deficient in plastid phosphoglucomutase activity. The results indicate that the 64 (or 62) kilodalton chloroplast stromal phosphoprotein is phosphoglucomutase.

  17. Induced pluripotent stem cells from goat fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Song, Hui; Li, Hui; Huang, Mingrui; Xu, Dan; Gu, Chenghao; Wang, Ziyu; Dong, Fulu; Wang, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are a powerful model for genetic engineering, studying developmental biology, and modeling disease. To date, ESCs have been established from the mouse (Evans and Kaufman, 1981, Nature 292:154-156), non-human primates (Thomson et al., , Proc Nat Acad Sci USA 92:7844-7848), humans (Thomson et al., 1998, Science 282:1145-1147), and rats (Buehr et al., , Cell 135:1287-1298); however, the derivation of ESCs from domesticated ungulates such as goats, sheep, cattle, and pigs have not been successful. Alternatively, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be generated by reprogramming somatic cells with several combinations of genes encoding transcription factors (OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, cMYC, LIN28, and NANOG). To date, iPSCs have been isolated from various species, but only limited information is available regarding goat iPSCs (Ren et al., 2011, Cell Res 21:849-853). The objectives of this study were to generate goat iPSCs from fetal goat primary ear fibroblasts using lentiviral transduction of four human transcription factors: OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC. The goat iPSCs were successfully generated by co-culture with mitomycin C-treated mouse embryonic fibroblasts using medium supplemented with knockout serum replacement and human basic fibroblast growth factor. The goat iPSCs colonies are flat, compact, and closely resemble human iPSCs. They have a normal karyotype; stain positive for alkaline phosphatase, OCT4, and NANOG; express endogenous pluripotency genes (OCT4, SOX2, cMYC, and NANOG); and can spontaneously differentiate into three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24123501

  18. Induced pluripotent stem cells from goat fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Song, Hui; Li, Hui; Huang, Mingrui; Xu, Dan; Gu, Chenghao; Wang, Ziyu; Dong, Fulu; Wang, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are a powerful model for genetic engineering, studying developmental biology, and modeling disease. To date, ESCs have been established from the mouse (Evans and Kaufman, 1981, Nature 292:154-156), non-human primates (Thomson et al., , Proc Nat Acad Sci USA 92:7844-7848), humans (Thomson et al., 1998, Science 282:1145-1147), and rats (Buehr et al., , Cell 135:1287-1298); however, the derivation of ESCs from domesticated ungulates such as goats, sheep, cattle, and pigs have not been successful. Alternatively, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be generated by reprogramming somatic cells with several combinations of genes encoding transcription factors (OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, cMYC, LIN28, and NANOG). To date, iPSCs have been isolated from various species, but only limited information is available regarding goat iPSCs (Ren et al., 2011, Cell Res 21:849-853). The objectives of this study were to generate goat iPSCs from fetal goat primary ear fibroblasts using lentiviral transduction of four human transcription factors: OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC. The goat iPSCs were successfully generated by co-culture with mitomycin C-treated mouse embryonic fibroblasts using medium supplemented with knockout serum replacement and human basic fibroblast growth factor. The goat iPSCs colonies are flat, compact, and closely resemble human iPSCs. They have a normal karyotype; stain positive for alkaline phosphatase, OCT4, and NANOG; express endogenous pluripotency genes (OCT4, SOX2, cMYC, and NANOG); and can spontaneously differentiate into three germ layers in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Suppression of fibroblast proliferation by oral spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Boehringer, H; Taichman, N S; Shenker, B J

    1984-01-01

    Soluble sonic extracts of several strains of Treponema denticola and Treponema vincentii were examined for their abilities to alter proliferation of both murine and human fibroblasts. We found that sonic extracts of all tested strains of T. denticola caused a dose-dependent inhibition of murine and human fibroblast proliferation when assessed by both DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation) and direct cell counts. T. vincentii had only a minimal inhibitory effect at comparable doses. No inhibition was observed when sonic extracts were added simultaneously with [3H]thymidine, indicating that suppression was not due to the presence of excessive amounts of cold thymidine in the extract, nonspecific effects on thymidine utilization by the cells (transport and incorporation), or degradation of label. RNA ([3H]uridine incorporation) and protein ([3H]leucine incorporation) synthesis were similarly altered after exposure to the T. denticola sonic extracts. There was no effect on cell viability as measured by trypan blue exclusion. Inhibition could be reversed by extensive washing of the cells within the first few hours of exposure to sonic extracts. Preliminary characterization and purification indicated that the inhibitory factor(s) is not endotoxin since it is heat labile, and elutes in a single, well-defined peak on a Sephadex G-150 chromatography column corresponding to a molecular weight of approximately 50,000. Since oral spirochetes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontal disorders, it is possible that they contribute to the disease process by inhibition of fibroblast growth and therefore may, at least in part, account for the loss of collagen seen in diseased tissue. PMID:6735466

  20. Targeting stromal microenvironment in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: controversies and promises

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Lin; Du, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease. Conventional therapeutics targeting pancreas cancer cell compartment using cytotoxics improved patient survival but at the expense of significant toxicity. Microscopically, the tumor is characterized by thick desmoplastic stroma that surrounds islands of pancreatic cancer cells. The tumor microenvironment has been found to play important roles in carcinogenesis, the development of drug resistance, and mediating immunosuppression. The understanding the tumor-stromal interaction has led to the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we review the strategies that are currently in (or, near to) clinical evaluation and the underlying preclinical rationales. PMID:27284483

  1. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Arising From a Gastric Duplication Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Machicado, Jorge; Davogustto, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts (GDC) are rarely diagnosed in adults, but previous cases have been associated with malignancy. We present a case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) arising from a GDC in a 71-year-old woman who presented with 3 years of early satiety, anorexia, abdominal distention, and weight loss. Abdominal CT showed a 9.3 x 5.2 x 9.5-cm well-circumscribed cystic mass arising 3 cm above the gastroduodenal junction. The cyst was resected, and histopathology was consistent with GDC. Future studies are needed to clarify the malignant potential of GDC and the molecular pathways for its development. PMID:27144196

  2. [Therapeutic Effects of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells after Irradiation].

    PubMed

    Kalmykova, N V; Alexandrova, S A

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are now considered to be a perspective multifunctional treatment option for radiation side effects. At present.a great number of sufficient evidence has been collected in favor of therapeutic effects of MSCs in acute radiation reactions. It has been shown that MSC-based products injected locally or systemically have therapeutic effects on irradiated organs and tissues. This review presents summarized experimental and clinical data about protective and regenerative effects of MSCs on different radiation-injured organs and tissues; the main probable therapeutic mechanisms of their action are also discussed. PMID:27534063

  3. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: current translational research and management modalities.

    PubMed

    Huang, R-X; Xiang, P; Huang, C

    2014-10-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. In recent years, detection of these subepithelial lesions has improved due to advances in endoscopic imaging techniques. Furthermore, developments in immunohistochemical technologies, allowing for reliable differentiation of GISTs from other subepithelial tumors, have improved the understanding of these lesions significantly. Alongside the emergence of these new technologies, clinical management of GISTs has progressed greatly in the last decade. However, major controversies still exist in various aspects of GIST management, such as diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. This review article provides the current overview of the research status in the management of GISTs.

  4. Primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Li; Liu, Dan; Yang, Jian-Jun; Zheng, Min-Wen; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Xiao-Dong

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the liver. A 17-year-old man with a solid mass in the anterior segment of the right liver was asymptomatic with negative laboratory examinations with the exception of positive HBV. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) revealed a hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase and hypoechoic features during the portal and late phases. However, enhanced spiral computed tomography (CT) showed hypoattenuation in all three phases. Following biopsy, immunohistochemical evaluation demonstrated positive CD117. Different imaging features of primary GISTs of the liver are due to pathological properties and different working systems between CEUS and enhanced spiral CT. PMID:19653356

  5. Manufacturing mesenchymal stromal cells for phase I clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Patrick J; Mei, Zhuyong; da Graca Cabreira-Hansen, Maria; Klis, Mariola; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yali; Durett, April G; Zheng, Xingwu; Wang, Yongping; Gee, Adrian P; Horwitz, Edwin M

    2013-04-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells capable of differentiating into adipocytes, osteoblasts and chondroblasts as well as secreting a vast array of soluble mediators. This potentially makes MSCs important mediators of a variety of therapeutic applications. They are actively under evaluation for immunomodulatory purposes such as graft-versus-host disease and Crohn's disease as well as regenerative applications such as stroke and congestive heart failure. We report our method of generating clinical-grade MSCs together with suggestions gathered from manufacturing experience in our Good Manufacturing Practices facility. PMID:23480951

  6. [Surgical principles of gastrointestinal stromal tumors at different locations].

    PubMed

    Ye, Yingjiang; Gao, Zhidong; Wang, Shan

    2015-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors(GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors in gastrointestinal tract. At present, surgical and molecular targeted therapies are the main treatments. Operation is properly the only way of radical resection. The general principles of surgery are complete resection of the tumor, negative margins, as well as no intraoperative tumor rupture. The choice of surgical skills for GIST is obviously affected by different locations. This paper reviews current literatures combined with our experiences, and elaborates relevant contents in detail. PMID:25940165

  7. Knowns and Known Unknowns of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Marín, Virginia; Maki, Robert G

    2016-09-01

    The first 15 years of management of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) have led to 3 lines of therapy for metastatic disease: imatinib, sunitinib, and regorafenib. In the adjuvant setting, imatinib is usually given for 3 years postoperatively to patients with higher-risk primary tumors that are completely resected. In this review, issues regarding GIST adjuvant therapy are discussed. It is hoped this review will help the reader understand the present standard of care to improve upon it in years to come. PMID:27546844

  8. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Updates and Therapeutic Outlook in Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pers, Yves-Marie; Jorgensen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells exhibiting functional properties that have opened the way for cell-based clinical therapies. MSCs have been reported to exhibit immunosuppressive as well as healing properties, improving angiogenesis and preventing apoptosis or fibrosis through the secretion of paracrine mediators. This review summarizes recent progress on the clinical application of stem cells therapy in some inflammatory and degenerative rheumatic diseases. To date, most of the available data have been obtained in preclinical models and clinical efficacy needs to be evaluated through controlled randomized double-blind trials. PMID:26237144

  9. Immortalization of Werner syndrome and progeria fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.; Moses, R.E. )

    1991-02-01

    Human fibroblast cells from two different progeroid syndromes, Werner syndrome (WS) and progeria, were established as immortalized cell lines by transfection with plasmid DNA containing the SV40 early region. The lineage of each immortalized cell line was confirmed by VNTR analysis. Each of the immortalized cell lines maintained its original phenotype of slow growth. DNA repair ability of these cells was also studied by measuring sensitivity to killing by uv or the DNA-damaging drugs methyl methansulfonate, bleomycin, and cis-dichlorodiamine platinum. The results showed that both WS and progeria cells have normal sensitivity to these agents.

  10. Division of mitochondria in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Hisashi; Tandler, Bernard; Consolo, Mary C; Karnik, Pratima

    2013-12-01

    Ovate mitochondria in cultured human fibroblasts divide by pinching. In the process, as observed by transmission electron microscopy, a deep incisure of the surface membranes separates the organelle into two lobes connected by a slender isthmus. A single element of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) invariably accompanies each incisure, extending deep into the cleft. When the ingrowing membranes meet and fuse with the antipodal membranes, fission occurs. Elongated mitochondria that give no indication of division often are cloaked by a single, continuous cistern of SER.

  11. HMC and fibroblast illuminating experiments using microdisplay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Chung-Jen; Shen, Ching-I.; Ou, Chung-Ming

    2010-02-01

    Techniques like optical neural guiding, photodynamic therapy and photosynthesis of the cell all required specific spatial energy distribution. Influences factors like the wavelength, polarization, spatial intensity distribution are all required, and the appropriate illumination condition for the cells inside the incubator are required to meet more complicated conditions. We report the system that using of the spatial light modulator to provide a multi-points control for the cell culturing. This system is modified from the commercialized projection system to reduce the cost. It is now possible to apply it to other bio-culturing related applications. Results for Human Melanocyte HMC, Glia cell and fibroblast cell are discussed.

  12. Gaining myocytes or losing fibroblasts: Challenges in cardiac fibroblast reprogramming for infarct repair.

    PubMed

    Nagalingam, Raghu S; Safi, Hamza A; Czubryt, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    Unlike most somatic tissues, the heart possesses a very limited inherent ability to repair itself following damage. Attempts to therapeutically salvage the myocardium after infarction, either by sparing surviving myocytes or by injection of exogenous cells of varied provenance, have met with limited success. Cardiac fibroblasts are numerous, resistant to hypoxia, and amenable to phenotype reprogramming to cardiomyocytes - a potential panacea to an intractable problem. However, the long-term effects of mass conversion of fibroblasts are as-yet unknown. Since fibroblasts play key roles in normal cardiac function, treating these cells as a ready source of replacements for myocytes may have the effect of swapping one problem for another. This review briefly examines the roles of cardiac fibroblasts, recaps the strides made so far in their reprogramming to cardiomyocytes both in vitro and in vivo, and discusses the potential ramifications of large-scale cellular identity swapping. While such therapy offers great promise, the potential repercussions require consideration and careful study. PMID:26640115

  13. Gene Signature of Human Oral Mucosa Fibroblasts: Comparison with Dermal Fibroblasts and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Keiko; Horiguchi, Taigo; Tanimura, Ayako; Hagita, Hiroko; Noma, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucosa is a useful material for regeneration therapy with the advantages of its accessibility and versatility regardless of age and gender. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of oral mucosa. Here we report the first comparative profiles of the gene signatures of human oral mucosa fibroblasts (hOFs), human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs), and hOF-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (hOF-iPSCs), linking these with biological roles by functional annotation and pathway analyses. As a common feature of fibroblasts, both hOFs and hDFs expressed glycolipid metabolism-related genes at higher levels compared with hOF-iPSCs. Distinct characteristics of hOFs compared with hDFs included a high expression of glycoprotein genes, involved in signaling, extracellular matrix, membrane, and receptor proteins, besides a low expression of HOX genes, the hDFs-markers. The results of the pathway analyses indicated that tissue-reconstructive, proliferative, and signaling pathways are active, whereas senescence-related genes in p53 pathway are inactive in hOFs. Furthermore, more than half of hOF-specific genes were similarly expressed to those of hOF-iPSC genes and might be controlled by WNT signaling. Our findings demonstrated that hOFs have unique cellular characteristics in specificity and plasticity. These data may provide useful insight into application of oral fibroblasts for direct reprograming.

  14. Analysis of adjacent segment reoperation after lumbar total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Scott; Blumenthal, Scott L.; Zigler, Jack E.; Guyer, Richard D.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusion has long been used for treating chronic back pain unresponsive to nonoperative care. However, potential development of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation is a concern. Total disc replacement (TDR) has been proposed as a method for addressing back pain and preventing or reducing adjacent segment degeneration. The purpose of the study was to determine the reoperation rate at the segment adjacent to a level implanted with a lumbar TDR and to analyze the pre-TDR condition of the adjacent segment. Methods This study was based on a retrospective review of charts and radiographs from a consecutive series of 1000 TDR patients to identify those who underwent reoperation because of adjacent segment degeneration. Some of the patients were part of randomized studies comparing TDR with fusion. Adjacent segment reoperation data were also collected from 67 patients who were randomized to fusion in those studies. The condition of the adjacent segment before the index surgery was compared with its condition before reoperation based on radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography. Results Of the 1000 TDR patients, 20 (2.0%) underwent reoperation. The mean length of time from arthroplasty to reoperation was 28.3 months (range, 0.5–85 months). Of the adjacent segments evaluated on preoperative MRI, 38.8% were normal, 38.8% were moderately diseased, and 22.2% were classified as having severe degeneration. None of these levels had a different grading at the time of reoperation compared with the pre-TDR MRI study. Reoperation for adjacent segment degeneration was performed in 4.5% of the fusion patients. Conclusions The 2.0% rate of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation in this study is similar to the 2.0% to 2.8% range in other studies and lower than the published rates of 7% to 18% after lumbar fusion. By carefully assessing the presence of pre-existing degenerative changes before performing arthroplasty

  15. Label-Retaining Stromal Cells in Mouse Endometrium