Science.gov

Sample records for adjacent surface features

  1. Titan's rotation - Surface feature observed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmon, M. T.; Karkoschka, E.; Tomasko, M.

    1993-06-01

    A surface feature or a near-surface fracture is suggested to account for the time variations in the 0.94, 1.08, and 1.28 micron atmospheric windows of Titan's geometric albedo, relative to its albedo in adjacent methane bands. These observations are noted to be consistent with synchronous rotation. They can also be explained by a 0.1-higher surface albedo on Titan's leading hemisphere.

  2. Effect of Fluoridated Sealants on Adjacent Tooth Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cagetti, M.G.; Carta, G.; Cocco, F.; Sale, S.; Congiu, G.; Mura, A.; Strohmenger, L.; Lingström, P.; Campus, G.

    2014-01-01

    A double-blind randomized clinical trial was performed in 6- to 7-yr-old schoolchildren to evaluate, in a 30-mo period, whether the caries increment on the distal surface of the second primary molars adjacent to permanent first molars sealed with fluoride release compounds would be lower with respect to those adjacent to permanent first molars sealed with a nonfluoridated sealant. In sum, 2,776 subjects were enrolled and randomly divided into 3 groups receiving sealants on sound first molars: high-viscosity glass ionomer cement (GIC group); resin-based sealant with fluoride (fluoride-RB group); and a resin-based sealant without fluoride (RB group). Caries (D1 – D3 level) was recorded on the distal surface of the second primary molar, considered the unit of analysis including only sound surfaces at the baseline. At baseline, no differences in caries prevalence were recorded in the 3 groups regarding the considered surfaces. At follow-up, the prevalence of an affected unit of analysis was statistically lower (p = .03) in the GIC and fluoride-RB groups (p = .04). In the GIC group, fewer new caries were observed in the unit of analysis respect to the other 2 groups. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were 0.70 (95% confidence interval: 0.50, 0.68; p < .01) for GIC vs. RB and 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.53, 1.04; p = .005) for fluoride-RB vs. RB. Caries incidence was significantly associated with low socioeconomic status (IRR = 1.18; 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.42; p = .05). Dental sealant high-viscosity GIC and fluoride-RB demonstrated protection against dental caries, and there was evidence that these materials afforded additional protection for the tooth nearest to the sealed tooth (clinical trial registration NCT01588210). PMID:24846910

  3. Mapping stellar surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, P.V.

    1987-01-01

    New photometric and spectroscopic observations of the RS Canum Venaticorum binaries Sigma Geminorum and UX Arietis are reported along with details of the Doppler-imaging program SPOTPROF. The observations suggest that the starspot activity on Sigma Gem has decreased to 0.05 magnitude in two years. A photometric spot model for September 1984 to January 1985 found that a single spot covering 2% of the surface and 1000 K cooler than the surrounding photosphere could model the light variations. Equivalent-width observations contemporaneous with the photometric observations did not show any significant variations. Line-profile models from SPOTPROF predict that the variation of the equivalent width of the 6393 A Fe I line should be approx. 1mA. Photometric observations of UX Ari from January 1984 to March 1985 show an 0.3 magnitude variation indicating a large spot group must cover the surface. Contemporaneous spectroscopic observations show asymmetric line profiles. The Doppler imaging and the photometric light-curve models were used in an iterative method to describe the stellar surface-spot distribution and successfully model both the photometric and the spectroscopic variations.

  4. Air bubble-shock wave interaction adjacent to gelantine surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lush, P. A.; Tomita, Y.; Onodera, O.; Takayama, K.; Sanada, N.; Kuwahara, M.; Ioritani, N.; Kitayama, O.

    1990-07-01

    The interaction between a shock wave and an air bubble-adjacent to a gelatine surface is investigated in order to simulate human tissue damage resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Using high speed cine photography it is found that a shock wave of strength 11 MPa causes 1-3 mm diameter bubbles to produce high velocity microjets with penetration rates of approximately 110 m/s and penetration depths approximately equal to twice the initial bubble diameter. Theoretical considerations for liquid impact on soft solid of similar density indicate that microjet velocities will be twice the penetration rate, i.e. 220 m/s in the present case. Such events are the probable cause of observed renal tissue damage.

  5. Assessment of heavy metal levels in surface sediments of estuaries and adjacent coastal areas in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianbin; Li, Deliang; Song, Guisheng

    2016-05-01

    This article investigates the variations of contamination levels of heavy metals such as copper, lead, chromium, cadmium, zinc, arsenic, and mercury over time in surface sediments of the Changjiang River Estuary (CRE), Yellow River Estuary (YRE), Pearl River Estuary (PRE), and their adjacent coastal areas in China. The contamination factor (CF), pollution load index (PLI), and geoaccumulation index (I geo) are used to evaluate the quality of the surface sediments in the study areas. The results showed that the CRE, YRE, and their adjacent coastal areas were at a low risk of contamination in terms of heavy metals, while the PRE and its adjacent coastal area were at a moderate level. By comparison, the concentrations of heavy metals in the surface sediments of the YRE and its adjacent coastal area were relatively lower than those in the CRE, PRE, and their adjacent coastal areas.

  6. Composite, ordered material having sharp surface features

    DOEpatents

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2006-12-19

    A composite material having sharp surface features includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a sharp surface feature. The sharp surface features can be coated to make the surface super-hydrophobic.

  7. Motion of a cylinder adjacent to a free-surface: flow patterns and loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Q.; Lin, J.-C.; Unal, M. F.; Rockwell, D.

    The flow structure and loading due to combined translatory and sinusoidal motion of a cylinder adjacent to a free-surface are characterized using a cinema technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry and simultaneous force measurements. The instantaneous patterns of vorticity and streamline topology are interpreted as a function of degree of submergence beneath the free-surface. The relative magnitudes of the peak vorticity and the circulation of vortices formed from the upper and lower surfaces of the cylinder, as well as vortex formation from the free-surface, are remarkably affected by the nominal submergence. The corresponding streamline topology, interpreted in terms of foci, saddle points, and multiple separation and reattachment points also exhibit substantial changes with submergence. All of these features affect the instantaneous loading of the cylinder. Calculation of instantaneous moments of vorticity and the incremental changes in these moments during the cylinder motion allow identification of those vortices that contribute most substantially to the instantaneous lift and drag. Furthermore, the calculated moments are in general accord with the time integrals of the measured lift and drag acting on the cylinder for sufficiently large submergence.

  8. Sea-floor drainage features of Cascadia Basin and the adjacent continental slope, northeast Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, M.A.; Karl, Herman A.; Kenyon, Neil H.

    1989-01-01

    Sea-floor drainage features of Cascadia Basin and the adjacent continental slope include canyons, primary fan valleys, deep-sea valleys, and remnant valley segments. Long-range sidescan sonographs and associated seismic-reflection profiles indicate that the canyons may originate along a mid-slope escarpment and grow upslope by mass wasting and downslope by valley erosion or aggradation. Most canyons are partly filled with sediment, and Quillayute Canyon is almost completely filled. Under normal growth conditions, the larger canyons connect with primary fan valleys or deep-sea valleys in Cascadia Basin, but development of accretionary ridges blocks or re-routes most canyons, forcing abandonment of the associated valleys in the basin. Astoria Fan has a primary fan valley that connects with Astoria Canyon at the fan apex. The fan valley is bordered by parallel levees on the upper fan but becomes obscure on the lower fan, where a few valley segments appear on the sonographs. Apparently, Nitinat Fan does not presently have a primary fan valley; none of the numerous valleys on the fan connect with a canyon. The Willapa-Cascadia-Vancouver-Juan de Fuca deep-sea valley system bypasses the submarine fans and includes deeply incised valleys to broad shallow swales, as well as within-valley terraces and hanging-valley confluences. ?? 1989.

  9. Surface ultrastructure of the cornea and adjacent epidermis during metamorphosis of Rana pipiens: a scanning electron microscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltenbach, J.C.; Harding, C.V.; Susan, S.

    1980-01-01

    The external surface of the cornea and adjacent epidermis of larvae in representative developmental stages and of adult frogs, Rana pipiens, was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Surface cells are polygonal, usually hexagonal, in outline and covered with microprojections. During larval development prior to metamorphic stages, neither eyelids nor Harderian glands have developed; microprojections on the corneal surface are high and branched, and cell boundaries are elevated. On the anterior portion of the cornea and on the epidermis near the eye, the surface pattern is less dense, and ciliated cells are present. During metamorphic stages, corneal cell boundaries become less prominent and the pattern of microprojections more variable and markedly different from that of larvae of earlier stages. Corneal cells have a spongy appearance, are covered by a coating material, or are characterized as light or dark based on their brightness and surface texture. As eyelids develop in metamorphic stages XX-XXI, the numbers of ciliated cells increase dramatically, both on the corneal surface and on the edges of the developing lids. In later metamorphic stages XXII to XXV, lids and Harderian glands become well-developed, and cilia are no longer observed. The adjacent epidermal surface becomes devoid of cilia but perforated by openings of cutaneous glands. Its spongy appearance is similar to that of both the cornea and neighboring epidermis of the mature frog. Changes in corneal surface features are probably metamorphic events associated with development of lids and Harderian glands and a shift from an aqueous to an air environment.

  10. Distinguishing epigenetic features of preneoplastic testis tissues adjacent to seminomas and nonseminomas

    PubMed Central

    Skvortsova, Yulia V.; Zinovyeva, Marina V.; Stukacheva, Elena A.; Klimov, Alexey; Tryakin, Alexey A.; Azhikina, Tatyana L.

    2016-01-01

    PIWI pathway proteins are expressed during spermatogenesis where they play a key role in germ cell development. Epigenetic loss of PIWI proteins expression was previously demonstrated in testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), implying their involvement in TGCT development. In this work, apart from studying only normal testis and TGCT samples, we also analyzed an intermediate stage, i.e. preneoplastic testis tissues adjacent to TGCTs. Importantly, in this study, we minimized the contribution of patient-to-patient heterogeneity by using matched preneoplastic/TGCT samples. Surprisingly, expression of germ cell marker DDX4 suggests that spermatogenesis is retained in premalignant testis tissues adjacent to nonseminoma, but not those adjacent to seminoma. Moreover, this pattern is followed by expression of PIWI pathway genes, which impacts one of their functions: DNA methylation level over LINE-1 promoters is higher in preneoplastic testis tissues adjacent to nonseminomas than those adjacent to seminomas. This finding might imply distinct routes for development of the two types of TGCTs and could be used as a novel diagnostic marker, possibly, noninvasively. Finally, we studied the role of CpG island methylation in expression of PIWI genes in patient samples and using in vitro experiments in cell line models: a more complex interrelation between DNA methylation and expression of the corresponding genes was revealed. PMID:26843623

  11. Features of semiplanotron surface plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2012-02-15

    Features of the semiplanotron surface plasma sources (SPS) with cesiation used for high efficient negative ion beam production from first development to modern condition are considered. Design features of semiplanotrons SPS with cylindrical and spherical geometric focusing and the features of the negative ion production in the semiplanotrons are reviewed. Several versions of semiplanotrons with efficiency up to 0.1 A of H{sup -} per kW of discharge power are discussed. Modifications of the semiplanotrons for dc operation and for heavy negative ion production are reviewed.

  12. Historic surface faulting in continental United States and adjacent parts of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonilla, M.G.

    1967-01-01

    This report summarizes geometric aspects of approximately 35 instances of historic faulting of the ground surface in the continental United States and adjacent parts of Mexico. This information is of immediate importance in the selection and evaluation of sites for vital structures such as nuclear power plants. The data are presented in a table and graphs which show the quantitative relations between various aspects of the faulting. Certain items in the table that are uncertain, poorly known, or not in the published literature are briefly described in the text.

  13. Relationship between Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonic features in west central Arizona and adjacent southeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.; Reynolds, S.J. )

    1990-01-10

    The Maria fold-and-thrust belt (MFTB) is a narrow belt of Mesozoic crustal shortening that is characterized by generally south vergent folds and thrusts that commonly displace Proterozoic crystalline rocks over deformed and metamorphosed Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata. The MFTB is cut by a south to southeast trending belt of mid-Tertiary extensional deformation. Extension was characterized by large displacements on low-angle normal faults, known as detachment faults, and by isostatic uplift of mylonitic midcrustal rocks now exposed in metamorphic core complexes. The geometry and style of extensional deformation change along the extensional belt and reveal the influence of the MFTB. Several extensional features are spatially coincident with the root zone of MFTB thrusts: (1) an areally extensive west-northwest trending belt of denuded Tertiary mylonitic fabrics in the Whipple and Harcuvar metamorphic core complexes, (2) a style of extension characterized by minimum extensional dismemberment of the upper plate and maximum denudation and uplift of deep-seated lower plate rocks, (3) an abrupt bend in the belt of arched, uplifted rocks below detachment faults, and (4) an abrupt bend in the trend of the breakaway zone of the detachment faults and an associated lateral ramp in the detachment fault system.

  14. Surface osteosarcoma: Clinical features and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, H.; Ben Maitigue, M.; Abid, L.; Nouri, N.; Abdelkader, A.; Bouaziz, M.; Mestiri, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surface osteosarcoma are rare variant of osteosarcoma that include parosteal osteosarcoma, periosteal osteosarcoma and high grade surface osteosarcoma. These lesions have different clinical presentation and biological behavior compared to conventional osteosarcoma, and hence need to be managed differently. Goal The aim of this study is to analyze the clinico-pathological features and outcome of a series of surface osteosarcoma in an attempt to define the adequate treatment of this rare entity. Patient and method It is a retrospective and bicentric study of 18 surface osteosarcoma that were seen at the KASSAB’s Institute and SAHLOUL Hospital from 2006 to 2013. The authors reviewed the clinical and radiologic features, histologic sections, treatments, and outcomes in this group of patients. Results Seven patients were male (38.9%) and 11 were female (61.1%) with mean age of 25 years (range from 16 to 55 years). Eleven lesions were in the femur and 7 in the tibia. We identified 11 parosteal osteosarcoma (six of them were dedifferentiated), 3 periosteal osteosarcoma and 4 high grade surface osteosarcoma. Six patients had neoadjuvant chemotherapy and all lesions had surgical resection. Margins were wide in 15 cases and intra lesional in 3 cases. Histological response to chemotherapy was poor in all cases. The mean follow up was 34.5 months. Six patients (33.3%) presented local recurrence and 8 patients (44.4%) presented lung metastases. Six patients (33.3%) died from the disease after a mean follow up of 12 months (6–30 months); all of them had high grade lesions. Conclusion Histological grade of malignancy is the main point to assess in surface osteosarcoma since it determines treatment and prognosis. Low grade lesions should be treated by wide resection, while high grade lesions need more aggressive surgical approach associated to post operative chemotherapy. PMID:26730360

  15. Surface features of Phobos and Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.

    1979-01-01

    Viking Orbiter images have provided nearly complete coverage of the two satellites of Mars and have been used to construct maps of the surface features of Phobos and Deimos. The satellites have radically different appearances although nearly all features on both objects were formed directly or indirectly by impact cratering. Phobos has an extensive network of linear depressions (grooves) that probably were formed indirectly by the largest impact recorded on Phobos. Deimos lacks grooves as well as the large number of ridges that occur on Phobos. Craters on Deimos have substantial sediment fill; those on Phobos have none. Evidence of downslope movement of debris is prominent on Deimos but is rare on Phobos. Many of the differences between Phobos and Deimos may be caused by modest differences in mechanical properties. However, the lack of a very large crater on Deimos may be responsible for its lack of grooves.

  16. Dome shaped features on Europa's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Solid State Imaging system aboard the spacecraft Galileo took this image of the surface of Europa on February 20, 1997 during its sixth orbit around Jupiter. The image is located near 16 North, 268 West; illumination is from the lower-right. The area covered is approximately 48 miles (80 kilometers) by 56 miles (95 kilometers) across. North is toward the top of the image.

    This image reveals that the icy surface of Europa has been disrupted by ridges and faults numerous times during its past. These ridges have themselves been disrupted by the localized formation of domes and other features that may be indicative of thermal upwelling of water from beneath the crust. These features provide strong evidence for the presence of subsurface liquid during Europa's recent past.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  17. 30 CFR 817.57 - Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 817.57 Section 817.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.57 Hydrologic balance:...

  18. 30 CFR 817.57 - Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 817.57 Section 817.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.57 Hydrologic balance:...

  19. 30 CFR 817.57 - Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 817.57 Section 817.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.57 Hydrologic balance:...

  20. 30 CFR 817.57 - Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 817.57 Section 817.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.57 Hydrologic balance:...

  1. 30 CFR 817.57 - Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 817.57 Section 817.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.57 Hydrologic balance:...

  2. Robust Features Of Surface Electromyography Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri, M. I.; Miskon, M. F.; Yaacob, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, application of robotics in human life has been explored widely. Robotics exoskeleton system are one of drastically areas in recent robotic research that shows mimic impact in human life. These system have been developed significantly to be used for human power augmentation, robotics rehabilitation, human power assist, and haptic interaction in virtual reality. This paper focus on solving challenges in problem using neural signals and extracting human intent. Commonly, surface electromyography signal (sEMG) are used in order to control human intent for application exoskeleton robot. But the problem lies on difficulty of pattern recognition of the sEMG features due to high noises which are electrode and cable motion artifact, electrode noise, dermic noise, alternating current power line interface, and other noise came from electronic instrument. The main objective in this paper is to study the best features of electromyography in term of time domain (statistical analysis) and frequency domain (Fast Fourier Transform).The secondary objectives is to map the relationship between torque and best features of muscle unit activation potential (MaxPS and RMS) of biceps brachii. This project scope use primary data of 2 male sample subject which using same dominant hand (right handed), age between 20-27 years old, muscle diameter 32cm to 35cm and using single channel muscle (biceps brachii muscle). The experiment conduct 2 times repeated task of contraction and relaxation of biceps brachii when lifting different load from no load to 3kg with ascending 1kg The result shows that Fast Fourier Transform maximum power spectrum (MaxPS) has less error than mean value of reading compare to root mean square (RMS) value. Thus, Fast Fourier Transform maximum power spectrum (MaxPS) show the linear relationship against torque experience by elbow joint to lift different load. As the conclusion, the best features is MaxPS because it has the lowest error than other features and show

  3. Metacatalog of Planetary Surface Features for Multicriteria Evaluation of Surface Evolution: the Integrated Planetary Feature Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargitai, Henrik

    2016-10-01

    We have created a metacatalog, or catalog or catalogs, of surface features of Mars that also includes the actual data in the catalogs listed. The goal is to make mesoscale surface feature databases available in one place, in a GIS-ready format. The databases can be directly imported to ArcGIS or other GIS platforms, like Google Mars. Some of the catalogs in our database are also ingested into the JMARS platform.All catalogs have been previously published in a peer-reviewed journal, but they may contain updates of the published catalogs. Many of the catalogs are "integrated", i.e. they merge databases or information from various papers on the same topic, including references to each individual features listed.Where available, we have included shapefiles with polygon or linear features, however, most of the catalogs only contain point data of their center points and morphological data.One of the unexpected results of the planetary feature metacatalog is that some features have been described by several papers, using different, i.e., conflicting designations. This shows the need for the development of an identification system suitable for mesoscale (100s m to km sized) features that tracks papers and thus prevents multiple naming of the same feature.The feature database can be used for multicriteria analysis of a terrain, thus enables easy distribution pattern analysis and the correlation of the distribution of different landforms and features on Mars. Such catalog makes a scientific evaluation of potential landing sites easier and more effective during the selection process and also supports automated landing site selections.The catalog is accessible at https://planetarydatabase.wordpress.com/.

  4. Surface geology of the northern Midway-Sunset Field and adjacent Temblor Range, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Sturm, D.H.; Gardiner, R.L.; Mercer, M.F.

    1996-12-31

    New surface mapping at a 1:12000 scale adjacent to the 2 billion barrel Midway Sunset Field has revealed complex intraformational stratigraphy within the upper Miocene Santa Margarita Formation (Tms). Locally known as the Potter and Spellacy Formations in the subsurface, these sandstone and conglomerate heavy oil reservoirs produce the majority of Midway Sunset daily production of 164,000 barrels of oil via thermal EOR processes. The Tms consists mostly of conglomerate inserted into the Belridge Diatomite (Tmb) interval. The stratigraphically lower intervals of the Tms clearly fill deeply incised valleys or submarine canyons cut into Tmb and locally into the underlying Antelope Shale (Tma). The basal intervals of Tms; are very coarse grained, containing boulders of granitic and metamorphic rock as large as 4 meters that were derived from the Salinian block west of the San Andreas Fault. The upper intervals of Tms are more sheet-like and interbedded containing clasts less than 50 cm in length. The incised valleys have a spacing of about one mile in outcrop, with a gap located in the area of the older Republic Sandstone (Tmr). Paleocurrents from Tms regionally suggest sediment transport to the northeast. The sedimentary structures of Tms suggest deposition in deep-water conditions, probably a slope (bathyal) setting. Shelf environments should have been present to the southwest (now stripped away by erosion) and submarine-fan and basin-floor environments to the northeast.

  5. Surface geology of the northern Midway-Sunset Field and adjacent Temblor Range, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Sturm, D.H.; Gardiner, R.L.; Mercer, M.F. )

    1996-01-01

    New surface mapping at a 1:12000 scale adjacent to the 2 billion barrel Midway Sunset Field has revealed complex intraformational stratigraphy within the upper Miocene Santa Margarita Formation (Tms). Locally known as the Potter and Spellacy Formations in the subsurface, these sandstone and conglomerate heavy oil reservoirs produce the majority of Midway Sunset daily production of 164,000 barrels of oil via thermal EOR processes. The Tms consists mostly of conglomerate inserted into the Belridge Diatomite (Tmb) interval. The stratigraphically lower intervals of the Tms clearly fill deeply incised valleys or submarine canyons cut into Tmb and locally into the underlying Antelope Shale (Tma). The basal intervals of Tms; are very coarse grained, containing boulders of granitic and metamorphic rock as large as 4 meters that were derived from the Salinian block west of the San Andreas Fault. The upper intervals of Tms are more sheet-like and interbedded containing clasts less than 50 cm in length. The incised valleys have a spacing of about one mile in outcrop, with a gap located in the area of the older Republic Sandstone (Tmr). Paleocurrents from Tms regionally suggest sediment transport to the northeast. The sedimentary structures of Tms suggest deposition in deep-water conditions, probably a slope (bathyal) setting. Shelf environments should have been present to the southwest (now stripped away by erosion) and submarine-fan and basin-floor environments to the northeast.

  6. Inverting interpolated receiver functions with surface wave dispersion and gravity: Application to the western U.S. and adjacent Canada and Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Chengping; Ammon, Charles J.; Maceira, Monica; Herrmann, Robert B.

    2015-06-01

    We use P wave receiver functions from the western U.S. and adjacent regions to construct a receiver function wavefield interpolation scheme that helps to equalize the lateral sampling of the receiver functions and the surface wave dispersion and to greatly simplify the receiver functions. Spatial interpolation and smoothing suppress poorly sampled and difficult to interpret back azimuthal variations and allow the extraction of the first-order features in the receiver function wavefield, including observations from several ray parameter ranges. We combine the interpolated receiver functions with Rayleigh wave dispersion estimates and surface gravity observations to estimate the 3-D shear wave speed beneath the region. Speed variations in the 3-D model correlate strongly with expected geologic variations and illuminate broad-scale features of the western U.S. crust and upper mantle. The model is smooth, self-consistent, and demonstrates the compatibility of the interpolated receiver functions and dispersion observations.

  7. LIC for Surface Flow Feature Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David L.; Bryson, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Line Integral Convolution (LIC) algorithm has received a lot of attention and interest. Yet, only a few of the current LIC related algorithms deal specifically with color textures for automatic detection of flow features. This paper provides an overview of research in this area.

  8. Adjacent effect and cross talk of land surfaces on coastal water in the Aster VNIR and SWIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Tsutomu; Masuda, Kazuhiko; Sato, Isao; Tsuchida, Satoshi

    2002-12-01

    The adjacency effect is discussed at coastal areas of main land and peninsula using VNIR and SWIR on ASTER sensor, although the cross-talk phenomenon is apparently noted on some SWIR. The purpose of the analysis is to derive optical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol. The aerosol model is in accordance to the dust-like model. This model is adopted to ASTER and MISR on Terra satellite. Data is the Atsumi Peninsula near Nagoya (34° 40'N, 134° 00'E) GMT1.55 on July 10,2000. The ASTER SWIR(1.65μm-2.395μm) cross-talk phenomenon is noted in the data. This is known as a result of a structure of ASTER sensor. It is relatively large (5-6 DN counts and 100 lines or 3km length). On the other hands, when ASTER observe heterogeneous surface of coastal water, the adjacency effect due to the scattering by atmosphere might partly be contaminated to the above effect. In the SWIR region of spectrum, molecular scattering is practically neglected. However, some aerosol model indicates strong scattering effect at SWIR wavelengths. The main results are (1) The Japan Main land indicates 6~20 times more effect than the peninsula on adjacent radiance from ocean water. (2) SWIR & VNIR exhibit similar adjacent effect which might indicate aerosol or large particles.

  9. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  10. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  11. A thermal monitoring sheet with low influence from adjacent waterbolus for tissue surface thermometry during clinical hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F; Stauffer, Paul R

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a complete thermal analysis of a novel conformal surface thermometer design with directional sensitivity for real-time temperature monitoring during hyperthermia treatments of large superficial cancer. The thermal monitoring sheet (TMS) discussed in this paper consists of a 2-D array of fiberoptic sensors embedded between two layers of flexible, low-loss, and thermally conductive printed circuit board (PCB) film. Heat transfer across all interfaces from the tissue surface through multiple layers of insulating dielectrics surrounding the small buried temperature sensor and into an adjacent temperature-regulated water coupling bolus was studied using 3-D thermal simulation software. Theoretical analyses were carried out to identify the most effective differential TMS probe configuration possible with commercially available flexible PCB materials and to compare their thermal responses with omnidirectional probes commonly used in clinical hyperthermia. A TMS sensor design that employs 0.0508-mm Kapton MTB and 0.2032-mm Kapton HN flexible polyimide films is proposed for tissue surface thermometry with low influence from the adjacent waterbolus. Comparison of the thermal simulations with clinical probes indicates the new differential TMS probe design to outperform in terms of both transient response and steady-state accuracy in selectively reading the tissue surface temperature, while decreasing the overall thermal barrier of the probe between the coupling waterbolus and tissue surface.

  12. A Thermal Monitoring Sheet with Low Influence from Adjacent Waterbolus for Tissue Surface Thermometry during Clinical Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, K.; Maccarini, P.F.; Stauffer, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a complete thermal analysis of a novel conformal surface thermometer design with directional sensitivity for real time temperature monitoring during hyperthermia treatments of large superficial cancer. The thermal monitoring sheet (TMS) discussed in this paper consists of a two-dimensional array of fiberoptic sensors embedded between two layers of flexible, low loss and thermally conductive printed circuit board (PCB) film. Heat transfer across all interfaces from the tissue surface through multiple layers of insulating dielectrics surrounding the small buried temperature sensor and into an adjacent temperature regulated water coupling bolus was studied using 3D thermal simulation software. Theoretical analyses were carried out to identify the most effective differential TMS probe configuration possible with commercially available flexible PCB materials, and to compare their thermal responses with omni-directional probes commonly used in clinical hyperthermia. A TMS sensor design that employs 0.0508m Kapton MTB® and 0.2032 mm Kapton HN® flexible polyimide films is proposed for tissue surface thermometry with low influence from the adjacent waterbolus. Comparison of the thermal simulations with clinical probes indicate the new differential TMS probe design to outperform in terms of both transient response and steady state accuracy in selectively reading the tissue surface temperature, while decreasing the overall thermal barrier of the probe between the coupling waterbolus and tissue surface. PMID:18838365

  13. 30 CFR 784.28 - Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; and (ii) Minimize disturbances and adverse impacts on fish, wildlife, and related environmental values... AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY PROGRAMS UNDERGROUND MINING PERMIT...

  14. 30 CFR 784.28 - Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; and (ii) Minimize disturbances and adverse impacts on fish, wildlife, and related environmental values... AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY PROGRAMS UNDERGROUND MINING PERMIT...

  15. 30 CFR 784.28 - Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; and (ii) Minimize disturbances and adverse impacts on fish, wildlife, and related environmental values... AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY PROGRAMS UNDERGROUND MINING PERMIT...

  16. 30 CFR 784.28 - Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; and (ii) Minimize disturbances and adverse impacts on fish, wildlife, and related environmental values... AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY PROGRAMS UNDERGROUND MINING PERMIT...

  17. 30 CFR 784.28 - Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; and (ii) Minimize disturbances and adverse impacts on fish, wildlife, and related environmental values... AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY PROGRAMS UNDERGROUND MINING PERMIT...

  18. Manufacturing of Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Nanoscale and Microscale Features

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will develop a technology that will enable nanoscale and microscale superhydrophobic (SHP) features to be imaged onto surfaces for the high-volume manufacturing of water-repellent components and coatings.

  19. Engineering nanoscale surface features to sustain microparticle rolling in flow.

    PubMed

    Kalasin, Surachate; Santore, Maria M

    2015-05-26

    Nanoscopic features of channel walls are often engineered to facilitate microfluidic transport, for instance when surface charge enables electro-osmosis or when grooves drive mixing. The dynamic or rolling adhesion of flowing microparticles on a channel wall holds potential to accomplish particle sorting or to selectively transfer reactive species or signals between the wall and flowing particles. Inspired by cell rolling under the direction of adhesion molecules called selectins, we present an engineered platform in which the rolling of flowing microparticles is sustained through the incorporation of entirely synthetic, discrete, nanoscale, attractive features into the nonadhesive (electrostatically repulsive) surface of a flow channel. Focusing on one example or type of nanoscale feature and probing the impact of broad systematic variations in surface feature loading and processing parameters, this study demonstrates how relatively flat, weakly adhesive nanoscale features, positioned with average spacings on the order of tens of nanometers, can produce sustained microparticle rolling. We further demonstrate how the rolling velocity and travel distance depend on flow and surface design. We identify classes of related surfaces that fail to support rolling and present a state space that identifies combinations of surface and processing variables corresponding to transitions between rolling, free particle motion, and arrest. Finally we identify combinations of parameters (surface length scales, particle size, flow rates) where particles can be manipulated with size-selectivity.

  20. Coanda effect jet around a cylinder with an interacting adjacent surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Randolph Allen

    The effects of placing a plane solid surface in close proximity to a Coanda effect jet turning over a cylindrical surface are investigated to help judge the possible application of this type of jet to manufacturing line processes. The Coanda jet is proposed as a coating control mechanism for fluidic coatings on sheets or a particulate removal device. A Coanda jet placed close to a surface will develop a strong tangential flow that will shear by viscous effects and pressure gradients. A turbulent k-epsilon finite element model, developed in FIDAP, is presented that studies the effects of cylinder-sheet separation distance and jet-to-gap angular placement of the jet. It is assumed that the operation is isothermal and that the sheet speed is negligible compared to the air jet speed. Unconstrained models and cases with a distant surface were run and compared to published experimental results for an unconstrained Coanda jet to validate the modeling method and optimize the empirical constants in the k-epsilon equations. Best agreement is found if the C(sub 2) parameter in the equations is increased from 1.92 to 3.0. Maximum shear stress and pressure gradient values increased exponentially for a decreasing gap size and physical geometric constraints will be the limiting factor to efficiency. For similar initial jets this study shows that the Coanda jet develops stripping forces about 1/2 as great as the regular air-knife, but has advantages such as directed flow. The Coanda jet is seen as a viable option to air-knives for certain operations.

  1. Intrepretation of surface features and surface processes on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gad-El-hak, M.; Howard, A.; Morton, J. B.; Pierce, D.

    1975-01-01

    Eolian erosion and deposition on earth was studied in order to interpret the eolian land forms of Mars. Emphasis of the wind tunnel studies was on the flow field around models of eolian forms. Areas of the wind tunnel studies include: simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer; velocity profile measurements around different models in the desert boundary layer, and estimating shear stress distributions on the model surfaces; flow visualization techniques; streamline mapping using tuft photographs; and roughness contrasts.

  2. An ontology design pattern for surface water features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E.; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, E. Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities exist due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology for other more context-dependent ontologies. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex or specialized surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this ontology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is implemented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided in this paper. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. Also provided is a discussion of why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, especially the previously developed Surface Network pattern. Finally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through an annotated geospatial dataset and sample queries using the classes of the Surface Water pattern.

  3. Potentiometric surface of the Floridan Aquifer, Southwest Florida Water Management District and adjacent areas, September 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolansky, R.M.; Mills, L.R.; Woodham, W.M.; Laughlin, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    A September 1978 potentiometric-surface map depicts the annual high water-level period of the Floridan aquifer in the Southwest Florida Management District. Potentiometric levels increased 10 to 25 feet between May 1978 and September 1978, in the citrus and farming sections of southern Hillsborough, northern Hardee, southwestern Polk and Manatee Counties. These areas are widely affected by pumping for irrigation and have the greatest fluctuations in water-levels between the low and high water-level periods. Water-level rises in coastal, northern and southern areas of the Water Management District ranged from 0 to 10 feet. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Potentiometric surface of Floridan aquifer, Southwest Florida Water Management District and adjacent areas, September 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, P.D.; Mills, L.R.; Laughlin, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    A potentiometric-surface map of the Southwest Florida Water Management District depicts the annual high water-level period. Potentiometric levels increased 15 to 30 feet between May 1977 and September 1977 in the citrus and farming sections of southeastern Hillsborough, northern Hardee, and southwestern Polk Counties. These areas are widely affected by pumpage for irrigation and have the greatest range in water-level fluctuations between the low and high water-level periods. Water-level rises in coastal, northern, and southern areas of the Water Management District ranged from 0 to 15 feet. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Potentiometric surface of Floridan Aquifer, Southwest Florida Water Management District and adjacent areas, May 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolansky, R.M.; Mills, L.R.; Woodham, W.M.; Laughlin, C.P.

    1979-01-01

    A May 1979 potentiometric-surface map depicts the annual low water-level period. Potentiometric levels declined 4 to 21 feet between September 1978 and May 1979, in the citrus and farming sections of southern Hillsborough, northern Hardee, southwestern Polk, northwestern DeSoto, and Manatee Counties. Water levels in these areas are widely affected by pumping for irrigation and have the greatest range in fluctuations. Water-level declines ranged from 0 to 6 feet in coastal, northern, and southern areas of the Water Management District. Generally potentiometric levels were higher than previous May levels due to heavy rains in April and May. In parts of Hillsborough, Pasco, and Pinellas Counties, May 1979 potentiometric levels were 18 feet higher than those of September 1978. (USGS)

  6. Occurrence and distribution of heavy metals in surface sediments of the Changhua River Estuary and adjacent shelf (Hainan Island).

    PubMed

    Hu, Bangqi; Cui, Ruyong; Li, Jun; Wei, Helong; Zhao, Jingtao; Bai, Fenglong; Song, Weiyu; Ding, Xue

    2013-11-15

    Heavy metal (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn) concentrations in surface sediments from the Changhua River Estuary and adjacent shelf, western Hainan Island, were conducted to evaluate the level of contamination. Numerical Sediment Quality Guidelines (TEL and PEL) were applied to assess adverse biological effects of these metals, suggesting that occasional biological effect may occur due to As, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb. Enrichment factors shown that the significant As and Pb contaminations in the study area. Multivariate analysis indicated that the sources of Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni and Zn resulted primarily from natural weathering processes, whereas As and Pb were mainly attributed to anthropogenic sources. The results of this study would provide a useful aid for sustainable marine management in the region.

  7. Subpixel measurement of image features based on paraboloid surface fit

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, S.S.; Hunt, M.A.; Jatko, W.B.

    1990-01-01

    A digital image processing inspection system is under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will locate image features on printed material and measure distances between them to accuracies of 0.001 in. An algorithm has been developed for this system that can locate unique image features to subpixel accuracies. It is based on a least-squares fit of a paraboloid function to the surface generated by correlating a reference image feature against a test image search area. normalizing the correlation surface makes the algorithm robust in the presence of illumination variations and local flaws. Subpixel accuracies better than 1/16 of a pixel have been achieved using a variety of different reference image features. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Simulation of Integrated Surface-Water/Ground-Water Flow and Salinity for a Coastal Wetland and Adjacent Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, Christian D.; Swain, Eric D.; Melinda A., Wolfert

    2004-01-01

    The SWIFT2D surface-water flow and transport code, which solves the St. Venant equations in two dimensions, was coupled with the SEAWAT variable-density ground-water code to represent hydrologic processes in coastal wetlands and adjacent estuaries. The integrated code was applied to the southern Everglades of Florida to quantify flow and salinity patterns and to evaluate effects of hydrologic processes. Results indicate that most surface water within Taylor Slough flows through Joe Bay and into Florida Bay through Trout Creek. Overtopping of the Buttonwood Embankment, a narrow but continuous ridge that separates the coastal wetlands from Florida Bay, does occur in response to tropical storms, but the net overflow is only 1.5 percent of creek discharge. The net leakage rate for the coastal wetland is about zero with nearly equal upward (17.1 cm/yr) and downward (17.4 cm/yr) rates. During the dry season, the coastal wetland increases in salinity to 30-35 practical salinity units but is flushed each year with the onset of the wet season. Model results demonstrate that surface-water/ground-water interactions, density-dependent flow, and wind affect flow and salinity patterns.

  9. Speciation, bioavailability and preservation of phosphorus in surface sediments of the Changjiang Estuary and adjacent East China Sea inner shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jia; Yao, Peng; Yu, Zhigang; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Zhao, Bin; Pan, Huihui; Li, Dong

    2014-05-01

    The speciation, potential bioavailability and preservation of phosphorus (P) in surface sediments of the Changjiang (Yangtze River) Estuary and adjacent East China Sea (ECS) inner shelf were investigated through the analyses of P fractions and sediment bulk properties. A sequential extraction method (SEDEX) was used to separate and quantify the following six sedimentary P reservoirs: exchangeable P (Ex-P), authigenic P (Au-P), detrital P (De-P), organic P (Or-P), refractory P (Re-P) and Fe-bound P (Fe-P). Total P (TP) in surface sediments ranged from 15.0 to 21.4 μmol g-1 and was highest near the Changjiang river mouth. The average contribution of each form of P to TP was 55.6% (De-P), 17.8% (Re-P), 16.1% (Or-P), 5.5% (Au-P), 2.5% (Ex-P) and 2.5% (Fe-P), respectively. De-P showed relatively higher concentrations in the river mouth and the ECS shelf region, off the Changjiang Estuary. High concentrations of Or-P were found mainly in mud areas showing a similar distribution pattern with silt, sediment surface area (SSA), and total organic carbon (TOC). Re-P was mainly distributed near the estuarine area and the Zhe-Min coast. Bioavailable P (BAP), accounted for 9.5-32.0% of TP (with a mean of 21.2%) and showed a similar distribution pattern to that of Or-P. De-P/SSA and TOC/SSA loadings both decreased with increasing of SSA, while Or-P/SSA loadings varied little with SSA, indicating that Or-P may have reached an adsorption-desorption equilibrium on mineral surfaces. TOC to total organic P (TOP; sum of Re-P and Or-P) ratios less than the Redfield ratio (84 in average) may have indicated efficient remineralization of organic matter in mobile muds of the Changjiang Estuary and adjacent ECS inner shelf. Furthermore, the relatively high TOC/Or-P ratios (72-422 with a mean of 188) likely suggest a higher degree of preferential regeneration of labile Or-P over TOC in sediments.

  10. Comparisons of sensible and latent heat fluxes using surface and aircraft data over adjacent wet and dry surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Shaw, W.J. ); Baldocchi, D.D.; Crawford, T.L.; Dobosy, R.J.; Meyers, T.J. . Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.)

    1992-01-01

    In June 1991, a field study of surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over heterogeneous surfaces was carried out near Boardman, Oregon (Doran et al., 1992). The object of the study was to develop improved methods of extrapolating from local measurements of fluxes to area-averaged values suitable for use in general circulation models (GCMs) applied to climate studies. A grid element in a GCM is likely to encompass regions whose fluxes vary significantly from one surface type to another. The problem of integrating these fluxes into a single, representative value for the whole element is not simple, and describing such a flux in terms of flux-gradient relationships, as is often done, presents additional difficulties.

  11. Relating sub-surface ice features to physiological stress in a climate sensitive mammal, the American pika (Ochotona princeps).

    PubMed

    Wilkening, Jennifer L; Ray, Chris; Varner, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    The American pika (Ochotona princeps) is considered a sentinel species for detecting ecological effects of climate change. Pikas are declining within a large portion of their range, and ongoing research suggests loss of sub-surface ice as a mechanism. However, no studies have demonstrated physiological responses of pikas to sub-surface ice features. Here we present the first analysis of physiological stress in pikas living in and adjacent to habitats underlain by ice. Fresh fecal samples were collected non-invasively from two adjacent sites in the Rocky Mountains (one with sub-surface ice and one without) and analyzed for glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM). We also measured sub-surface microclimates in each habitat. Results indicate lower GCM concentration in sites with sub-surface ice, suggesting that pikas are less stressed in favorable microclimates resulting from sub-surface ice features. GCM response was well predicted by habitat characteristics associated with sub-surface ice features, such as lower mean summer temperatures. These results suggest that pikas inhabiting areas without sub-surface ice features are experiencing higher levels of physiological stress and may be more susceptible to changing climates. Although post-deposition environmental effects can confound analyses based on fecal GCM, we found no evidence for such effects in this study. Sub-surface ice features are key to water cycling and storage and will likely represent an increasingly important component of water resources in a warming climate. Fecal samples collected from additional watersheds as part of current pika monitoring programs could be used to further characterize relationships between pika stress and sub-surface ice features.

  12. Relating Sub-Surface Ice Features to Physiological Stress in a Climate Sensitive Mammal, the American Pika (Ochotona princeps)

    PubMed Central

    Wilkening, Jennifer L.; Ray, Chris; Varner, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    The American pika (Ochotona princeps) is considered a sentinel species for detecting ecological effects of climate change. Pikas are declining within a large portion of their range, and ongoing research suggests loss of sub-surface ice as a mechanism. However, no studies have demonstrated physiological responses of pikas to sub-surface ice features. Here we present the first analysis of physiological stress in pikas living in and adjacent to habitats underlain by ice. Fresh fecal samples were collected non-invasively from two adjacent sites in the Rocky Mountains (one with sub-surface ice and one without) and analyzed for glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM). We also measured sub-surface microclimates in each habitat. Results indicate lower GCM concentration in sites with sub-surface ice, suggesting that pikas are less stressed in favorable microclimates resulting from sub-surface ice features. GCM response was well predicted by habitat characteristics associated with sub-surface ice features, such as lower mean summer temperatures. These results suggest that pikas inhabiting areas without sub-surface ice features are experiencing higher levels of physiological stress and may be more susceptible to changing climates. Although post-deposition environmental effects can confound analyses based on fecal GCM, we found no evidence for such effects in this study. Sub-surface ice features are key to water cycling and storage and will likely represent an increasingly important component of water resources in a warming climate. Fecal samples collected from additional watersheds as part of current pika monitoring programs could be used to further characterize relationships between pika stress and sub-surface ice features. PMID:25803587

  13. Sources of Heavy Metals in Surface Sediments and an Ecological Risk Assessment from Two Adjacent Plateau Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Binbin; Wang, Guoqiang; Wu, Jin; Fu, Qing; Liu, Changming

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of heavy metals (mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu) and arsenic (As)) in surface water and sediments were investigated in two adjacent drinking water reservoirs (Hongfeng and Baihua Reservoirs) on the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau in Southwest China. Possible pollution sources were identified by spatial and statistical analyses. For both reservoirs, Cd was most likely from industrial activities, and As was from lithogenic sources. For the Hongfeng Reservoir, Pb, Cr and Cu might have originated from mixed sources (traffic pollution and residual effect of former industrial practices), and the sources of Hg included the inflows, which were different for the North (industrial activities) and South (lithogenic origin) Lakes, and atmospheric deposition resulting from coal combustion. For the Baihua Reservoir, the Hg, Cr and Cu were primarily derived from industrial activities, and the Pb originated from traffic pollution. The Hg in the Baihua Reservoir might also have been associated with coal combustion pollution. An analysis of ecological risk using sediment quality guidelines showed that there were moderate toxicological risks for sediment-dwelling organisms in both reservoirs, mainly from Hg and Cr. Ecological risk analysis using the Hakanson index suggested that there was a potential moderate to very high ecological risk to humans from fish in both reservoirs, mainly because of elevated levels of Hg and Cd. The upstream Hongfeng Reservoir acts as a buffer, but remains an important source of Cd, Cu and Pb and a moderately important source of Cr, for the downstream Baihua Reservoir. This study provides a replicable method for assessing aquatic ecosystem health in adjacent plateau reservoirs. PMID:25010771

  14. Molecular characterization of sulfate-reducing bacteria community in surface sediments from the adjacent area of Changjiang Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhen, Yu; Mi, Tiezhu; He, Hui; Yu, Zhigang

    2016-02-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which obtain energy from dissimilatory sulfate reduction, play a vital role in the carbon and sulfur cycles. The dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr), catalyzing the last step in the sulfate reduction pathway, has been found in all known SRB that have been tested so far. In this study, the diversity of SRB was investigated in the surface sediments from the adjacent area of Changjiang Estuary by PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase beta subunit gene ( dsrB). Based on dsrB clone libraries constructed in this study, diversified SRB were found, represented by 173 unique OTUs. Certain cloned sequences were associated with Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and a large fraction (60%) of novel sequences that have deeply branched groups in the dsrB tree, indicating that novel SRB inhabit the surface sediments. In addition, correlations of the SRB assemblages with environmental factors were analyzed by the linear model-based redundancy analysis (RDA). The result revealed that temperature, salinity and the content of TOC were most closely correlated with the SRB communities. More information on SRB community was obtained by applying the utility of UniFrac to published dsrB gene sequences from this study and other 9 different kinds of marine environments. The results demonstrated that there were highly similar SRB genotypes in the marine and estuarine sediments, and that geographic positions and environmental factors influenced the SRB community distribution.

  15. Co- and distinct existence of Tris-NTA and biotin functionalities on individual and adjacent micropatterned surfaces generated by photo-destruction.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Atanu; Saha, Abhijit; Ghosh, Dhruba; Jana, Batakrishna; Ghosh, Surajit

    2014-04-14

    Micropatterned surfaces with Tris-NTA and biotin functionalities both in the same micropattern as well as individually in adjacent micropatterns are generated by UV light illumination through photo-masks. These surfaces are extremely useful for the immobilization of oligohistidine and biotin tagged multiple biomolecules/proteins. PMID:24623362

  16. Analysis of iris surface features in populations of diverse ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Melissa; Cha, David; Krithika, S.; Johnson, Monique; Parra, Esteban J.

    2016-01-01

    There are many textural elements that can be found in the human eye, including Fuchs’ crypts, Wolfflin nodules, pigment spots, contraction furrows and conjunctival melanosis. Although iris surface features have been well-studied in populations of European ancestry, the worldwide distribution of these traits is poorly understood. In this paper, we develop a new method of characterizing iris features from photographs of the iris. We then apply this method to a diverse sample of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. All five iris features showed significant differences in frequency between the three populations, indicating that iris features are largely population dependent. Although none of the features were correlated with each other in the East and South Asian groups, Fuchs’ crypts were significantly correlated with contraction furrows and pigment spots and contraction furrows were significantly associated with pigment spots in the European group. The genetic marker SEMA3A rs10235789 was significantly associated with Fuchs’ crypt grade in the European, East Asian and South Asian samples and a borderline association between TRAF3IP1 rs3739070 and contraction furrow grade was found in the European sample. The study of iris surface features in diverse populations may provide valuable information of forensic, biomedical and ophthalmological interest. PMID:26909168

  17. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  18. Biogeochemistry of bulk organic matter and biogenic elements in surface sediments of the Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent sea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Cao, Lu; Liu, Su-Mei; Zhang, Guo-Sen

    2015-07-15

    This study investigated the distribution and roles of total organic carbon (TOC), biogenic silicon (BSi), various forms of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), and the stable carbon isotope (δ(13)C) in surface sediments of the Yangtze River Estuary (YRE) and adjacent sea. Terrestrial input accounted for 12-63% of total organic matter in the study area. The distribution of biogenic elements was affected by the Changjiang Diluted Water, the Jiangsu Coastal Current, human activities, marine biological processes, and the sediment grain size. Potentially bioavailable N and P accounted for an average 79.6% of the total N (TN) and 31.8% of the total P (TP), respectively. The burial fluxes for TOC, BSi, TN and TP were 39.74-2194.32, 17.34-517.48, 5.02-188.85 and 3.10-62.72 μmol cm(-2) yr(-1), respectively. The molar ratios of total N/P (1.2-5.0), Si/P (5.0-14.8) and Fe/P (21-61) indicated that much of the P was sequestered in sediments.

  19. [Distribution patterns of heavy metals in surface sediments of the Yangtze estuary and its adjacent areas and environmental quality assessment].

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ju-jiang; Fan, De-jiang; Yang, Dong-fang; Qi, Hong-yan; Xu, Lin

    2008-09-01

    The concentrations of six heavy metals were determined in the fine fraction ( < 63 microm) of surface sediments in the Yangtze Estuary and its adjacent areas by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The average contents of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Cr and Zn are 10.47, 0.19, 37.68, 36.86, 97.80 and 98.65 mg x kg(-1), respectively. The contents of As, Cd and Cu appear gradually degressive from west to east, while the contents of Pb, Cr and Zn appear no apparent difference. In generally, the concentrations of heavy metals are higher in the south sea areas than those in the north sea areas. Environmental assessment with single factor method suggests that As, Cu, Pb, Cr and Zn are moderately contaminated, while Cd is not polluted. The values of As,Cu and Cr are between effect range-low (ERL) and effect range-median (ERM), which indicate they occasionally bring adverse biological effect at most stations, and the values of Cd,Pb and Zn are below ERL mean they rarely bring adverse biological effect by sediment quality guidelines assessment. From the results of factor analysis and cluster analysis, we conclude that the outer sea areas of the Yangtze Estuary and the Hangzhou Bay have lower sediment environmental quality, therefore much attention should be paid to these areas.

  20. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (<5 mm) synthetic vascular graft materials exhibit poor long-term patency due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Tissue engineered solutions have yielded functional vascular tissue, but some require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  1. Effects of height and adjacent surfaces on captures of Indianmeal moth (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in pheromone-baited traps.

    PubMed

    Nansen, Christian; Phillips, Thomas W; Sanders, Stacy

    2004-08-01

    Diamond-shaped pheromone-baited traps are used widely in food storage and food processing facilities for monitoring of Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), and here we evaluated to what extent trap captures were affected by 1) vertical placement of traps, 2) deployment of a horizontal landing platform to the diamond-shaped pheromone trap, and 3) placement of traps either freely exposed or along a sidewall. In the small sheds (height 1.8 m), traps were placed in three heights and significantly highest trap captures were obtained near the ceiling. When the same experiment was conducted in a larger room (height 6 m) with traps at seven heights, highest captures were obtained at both the lowest and highest traps. In a subsequent experiment, we deployed a horizontal platform to traps at seven heights and found that the importance of vertical placement became less important. Thus, it seemed that male moths preferred to orient to a pheromone source associated with a physical surface, such as the floor, ceiling, or landing platform. In a comparison of P. interpunctella male trap captures in a completely dark room (no visual cues), traps with a landing platform caught significantly more than traps without the platform. In a final experiment, we evaluated the effect of hanging traps either freely or adjacent to sidewalls, and significantly highest trap captures were obtained along side-walls. The results presented here suggest that deployment of a horizontal platform reduces the importance of the vertical placement of traps and seems to increase the trap efficiency, and we recommend placement of traps along sidewalls and/or near the ground.

  2. Pollution status of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from the Yangtze River Estuary and its adjacent coastal zone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenglong; Zou, Xinqing; Gao, Jianhua; Zhao, Yifei; Yu, Wenwen; Li, Yali; Song, Qiaochu

    2016-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are mainly produced by incomplete combustion and are used as indicators of anthropogenic activities on the environment. This study analyses the PAHs level in the Yangtze River Estuary (YRE), an important component of Yangtze River and a developed and populated region in China. Surface sediments were collected from 77 sites at the YRE and its adjacent coastal zone (IACZ) for a comprehensive study of PAHs. Kriging interpolation technology and Positive matrix factorization (PMF) model were applied to explore the spatial distribution and sources of PAHs. Concentrations of 16 PAHs (ΣPAHs) varied from 27.2 ng g(-1) to 621.6 ng g(-1) dry weight, with an average value of 158.2 ng g(-1). Spatially, ΣPAHs exhibited wide fluctuation and exhibited an increasing tendency from north to south. In addition, ΣPAHs exhibited a decreasing trend with increasing distance between the estuary and IACZ. The deposition flux of PAHs indicated that more than 107.8 t a(-1) PAHs was deposited in the study area annually. The results of the PMF model revealed that anthropogenic activities were the main sources of PAHs in the study area. Vehicle emissions and marine engines were the most important sources and accounted for 40.9% of the pollution. Coal combustion, petrogenic sources, and wood combustion were other sources that contributed 23.9%, 23.6%, and 11.5%, respectively. The distribution patterns of PAHs in the YRE and IACZ were influenced by many complicated factors such as sediment grain size, hydrodynamics and so on. PMID:27485799

  3. CosmoQuest: A software platform for surface feature mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Pamela

    2016-07-01

    While many tools exist for allowing individuals to mark features in images, it has previously been unwieldy to get entire teams collaboratively mapping out surface features, and to statistically compare each team members contributions. Our CSB software was initially developed to facilitate crowd-sourcing projects, including CosmoQuest's "Moon Mappers" project. Statistically study of its results (Robbins et al 2014) has shown that professionals using this software get results that are as good as those they get using other commonly used software packages. This has lead to an expansion of the software to facilitate professional science use of the software. In order to allow the greatest use of CSB, and to facilitate better science collaboration, CosmoQuest now allows teams to create private projects. Basic features include: using their own data sets, allowing multiple team members to annotate the images, performing basic statistics on the resulting data, downloading all results in either .sql or .csv formats. In this presentation, we will overview how best to use CSB to improve your own science collaboration. Current applications include surface science and transient object identification, and published results include both crater maps and the discovery of KBOs.

  4. Seasonal changes in Titan's weather and surface features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtle, E. P.; Perry, J. E.; McEwen, A. S.; Barbara, J.; Del Genio, A.; West, R. A.; Hayes, A.; Schaller, E.

    2010-04-01

    Since Cassini's arrival at Saturn, the Titan's season has progressed from southern summer to just past the southern autumnal equinox (the equivalent of 12 January to 26 March), and accompanying changes in meteorology have been observed. Through 2004, large convective cloud systems were common over Titan's South Pole (e.g., Schaller et al., 2006); since 2005 such storms have been less common. Elongated streaks of clouds have been observed consistently at mid-southern latitudes, and became common at high northern latitudes in 2007. Only recently have clouds been detected at mid-northern latitudes. Changes have also been observed in surface features at high southern latitudes. A large dark area appeared between July 2004 and June 2005 (Turtle et al., 2009), and may have subsequently faded. Recent observations of Ontario Lacus suggest that its shoreline may have receded (e.g., Hayes et al., 2009). No changes have been observed to date in lakes and seas at high northern latitudes. Intriguingly, Cassini RADAR observations of Titan's South Pole reveal far fewer lakes than have been identified in the north (Stofan et al., 2007) and fewer than suggested by the number of dark features observed by ISS in this area (Turtle et al., 2009). This apparent discrepancy may indicate that not all of the dark south-polar features identified by ISS are filled with liquid. Alternatively, some lakes may be ephemeral: differences may be the result of precipitation and ponding of liquid methane and subsequent evaporation or infiltration thereof (Turtle et al., 2009) in the time between observations: ISS in mid-2004 and mid-2005 (equivalent of ~12 and ~25 January) and the RADAR observations starting in late 2007 (equivalent of ~28 February). We will present observations of Titan's meteorology and surface features, documenting seasonal changes and their implications for Titan's active methane cycle and atmospheric circulation.

  5. Surface charge features of kaolinite particles and their interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vishal

    Kaolinite is both a blessing and a curse. As an important industrial mineral commodity, kaolinite clays are extensively used in the paper, ceramic, paint, plastic and rubber industries. In all these applications the wettability, aggregation, dispersion, flotation and thickening of kaolinite particles are affected by its crystal structure and surface properties. It is therefore the objective of this research to investigate selected physical and surface chemical properties of kaolinite, specifically the surface charge of kaolinite particles. A pool of advanced analytical techniques such as XRD, XRF, SEM, AFM, FTIR and ISS were utilized to investigate the morphological and surface chemistry features of kaolinite. Surface force measurements revealed that the silica tetrahedral face of kaolinite is negatively charged at pH>4, whereas the alumina octahedral face of kaolinite is positively charged at pH<6, and negatively charged at pH>8. Based on electrophoresis measurements, the apparent iso-electric point for kaolinite particles was determined to be less than pH 3. In contrast, the point of zero charge was determined to be pH 4.5 by titration techniques, which corresponds to the iso-electric point of between pH 4 and 5 as determined by surface force measurements. Results from kaolinite particle interactions indicate that the silica face--alumina face interaction is dominant for kaolinite particle aggregation at low and intermediate pH values, which explains the maximum shear yield stress at pH 5-5.5. Lattice resolution images reveal the hexagonal lattice structure of these two face surfaces of kaolinite. Analysis of the silica face of kaolinite showed that the center of the hexagonal ring of oxygen atoms is vacant, whereas the alumina face showed that the hexagonal surface lattice ring of hydroxyls surround another hydroxyl in the center of the ring. High resolution transmission electron microscopy investigation of kaolinite has indicated that kaolinite is indeed

  6. Feature-preserving surface mesh smoothing via suboptimal Delaunay triangulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhanheng; Yu, Zeyun; Holst, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A method of triangular surface mesh smoothing is presented to improve angle quality by extending the original optimal Delaunay triangulation (ODT) to surface meshes. The mesh quality is improved by solving a quadratic optimization problem that minimizes the approximated interpolation error between a parabolic function and its piecewise linear interpolation defined on the mesh. A suboptimal problem is derived to guarantee a unique, analytic solution that is significantly faster with little loss in accuracy as compared to the optimal one. In addition to the quality-improving capability, the proposed method has been adapted to remove noise while faithfully preserving sharp features such as edges and corners of a mesh. Numerous experiments are included to demonstrate the performance of the method.

  7. Hydrogeochemistry and stable isotopes of ground and surface waters from two adjacent closed basins, Atacama Desert, northern Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpers, C.N.; Whittemore, D.O.

    1990-01-01

    The geochemistry and stable isotopes of groundwaters, surface waters, and precipitation indicate different sources of some dissolved constituents, but a common source of recharge and other constituents in two adjacent closed basins in the Atacama Desert region of northern Chile (24??15???-24??45???S). Waters from artesian wells, trenches, and ephemeral streams in the Punta Negra Basin are characterized by concentrations of Na>Ca>Mg and Cl ???SO4, with TDS Mg ??? Ca and SO4 > Cl, with TDS also Mg ??? Ca and SO4 > Cl, but with TDS up to 40 g/l. The deep mine waters have pH between 3.2 and 3.9, and are high in dissolved CO2 (??13 C = -4.8%PDB), indicating probable interaction with oxidizing sulfides. The deep mine waters have ??18O values of ???-1.8%.compared with values < -3.5??? for other Hamburgo Basin waters; thus the mine waters may represent a mixture of meteoric waters with deeper "metamorphic" waters, which had interacted with rocks and exchanged oxygen isotopes at elevated temperatures. Alternatively, the deep mine waters may represent fossil meteoric waters which evolved isotopically along an evaporative trend starting from values quite depleted in ??18O and ??Dd relative to either precipitation or shallow groundwaters. High I/Br ratios in the Hamburgo Basin waters and La Escondida mine waters are consistent with regionally high I in surficial deposits in the Atacama Desert region and may represent dissolution of a wind-blown evaporite component. Rain and snow collected during June 1984, indicate systematic ??18O and ??D fractionation with increasing elevation between 3150 and 4180 m a.s.l. (-0.21??.??18O and -1.7??.??D per 100 m). Excluding the deep mine waters from La Escondida, the waters from the Hamburgo and Punta Negra Basins have similar ??D and ??18O values and together show a distinct evaporative trend (??D = 5.0 ??18O - 20.2). Snowmelt from the central Andes Cordillera to the east is the most likely source of recharge to both basins. Some of the

  8. THE THOMSON SURFACE. III. TRACKING FEATURES IN 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, T. A.; DeForest, C. E.; Tappin, S. J.; Odstrcil, D.

    2013-03-01

    In this, the final installment in a three-part series on the Thomson surface, we present simulated observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by a hypothetical polarizing white light heliospheric imager. Thomson scattering yields a polarization signal that can be exploited to locate observed features in three dimensions relative to the Thomson surface. We consider how the appearance of the CME changes with the direction of trajectory, using simulations of a simple geometrical shape and also of a more realistic CME generated using the ENLIL model. We compare the appearance in both unpolarized B and polarized pB light, and show that there is a quantifiable difference in the measured brightness of a CME between unpolarized and polarized observations. We demonstrate a technique for using this difference to extract the three-dimensional (3D) trajectory of large objects such as CMEs. We conclude with a discussion on how a polarizing heliospheric imager could be used to extract 3D trajectory information about CMEs or other observed features.

  9. Diamond Provenance Through Shape, Colour, Surface Features and Value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J.

    2002-05-01

    The physical properties of diamond provide a possible means by which run-of-mine productions may be identified. Such properties as shape, the regularity and angularity of the crystal form, the level of transparency, colour, syngenetic inclusion content and surface feature characteristics, all as a function of diamond size, can classify diamond productions. In early work, up to 1500 diamonds in specific sizes ranging from just under 2mm up to 6mm were evaluated. Using this procedure, most of the diamonds from the main mines in southern Africa have now been classified. Within South Africa, the mine at Swartruggens is the only one to have measurable levels of cube-shaped diamonds and an absence of the spinel twin form of diamond, more commonly known as the macle. In Botswana, the proportion of cube related forms at Jwaneng is about four times that at Orapa. Whilst the common diamond colours, colourless, yellow and brown, occur in most mines, there is a marked change in the proportion of transparent green-coated diamonds with depth in mines such as Finsch and Jwaneng. Individual mines may also have very small proportions of distinctive diamond colours, such as pinks at the Argyle mine in Australia and blues in the Premier mine in South Africa. More recently, classification emphasis has shifted away from large numbers of diamonds examined and particular attention has been paid to surface features, which reflect changes to the diamond either whilst still in the kimberlite, or subsequently during transport to an alluvial source. A classification of diamonds at the Venetia mine, South Africa, for example, showed that the proportion of diamonds with the feature referred to as corrosion sculpture, was distinctive between kimberlite types within the mine. With alluvial diamonds, transport causes further defects, particularly a general increase in the proportion of diamonds with surface features referred to as percussion marks and edge abrasion. The above observational

  10. Nd isotopic composition and REE pattern in the surface waters of the eastern Indian Ocean and its adjacent seas

    SciTech Connect

    Amakawa, Hiroshi; Alibo, D.S.; Nozaki, Yoshiyuki

    2000-05-01

    The Nd isotopic composition and dissolved rare earth elements (REEs) have been measured in the surface waters along the 1996/97 R.V. Hakuho-Maru Expedition route from Tokyo to the Southern Ocean, southwest of Australia, through the Philippine and Indonesian Archipelago, the eastern Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal and the South China Sea. The radiogenic {epsilon}{sub Nd} values of {minus}1.3 and {minus}1.4 were found in the Sulu Sea and near the Lombok Strait, indicating the strong influence of surrounding volcanic islands, whereas non-radiogenic {epsilon}{sub Nd} values of less than {minus}10 were found in the Southern Ocean and the Bay of Bengal suggesting Nd of continental origin. The dissolved Nd concentrations also showed a wide range of variation from 2.8 to 19.6 pmol/kg and the trivalent REE patterns exhibited characteristic features that can be grouped into each different oceanic province. The geographical distribution of dissolved Nd is different from that of atmospherically derived {sup 210}Pb, but generally resembles that of coastally derived {sup 228}Ra. This strongly suggests that fluvial and coastal input predominates over eolian input for dissolved Nd in the surface ocean. However, the riverine dissolved Nd flux appears to be relatively minor, and remobilization of Nd from coastal and shelf sediments may play an important role in the total Nd input to the ocean. By modeling the distributions of the isotopic composition and concentration of Nd together with the activity ratio of {sup 228}Ra/{sup 226}Ra in the southeastern Indian Ocean, the authors estimate a mean residence time of Nd in the surface mixed layer to be 1.5--2.6 years. The short mean residence time is comparable with, or slightly longer than that of {sup 210}Pb suggesting similar chemical reactivity.

  11. Seasonal changes in Titan's meteorology and surface features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtle, Elizabeth; Perry, Jason; McEwen, Alfred; Barbara, John; Del Genio, Anthony; West, Robert; Hayes, Alex; Schaller, Emily

    2010-05-01

    Since Cassini's arrival at Saturn in July 2004, the seasons on Titan have progressed from southern summer to just past the southern autumnal equinox (to date, the equivalent of 12 January to 26 March), and accompanying changes in cloud distribution and activity have been observed by Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS). Through 2004, large convective cloud systems were common over Titan's South Pole (e.g., Schaller et al., 2006; Porco et al., 2005). However, since 2005 such storms have been less common. Elongated streaks of clouds (several hundred km long) have been observed consistently at mid-southern latitudes, and became common at high northern latitudes starting in 2007. Only recently have such clouds been detected at mid-northern latitudes. ISS has also observed changes in surface features at high southern latitudes. A new large dark area appeared between July 2004 and June 2005 (Turtle et al., 2009), and may have subsequently faded. Recent observations of Ontario Lacus suggest that its shoreline may have receded as well (e.g., Hayes et al., 2009). Such changes are interpreted to be the result of precipitation and ponding of liquid methane and the subsequent evaporation thereof (Turtle et al., 2009). No changes have been observed to date in the lakes and seas at high northern latitudes. Intriguingly, Cassini RADAR observations of areas near Titan's south pole (Lunine et al., 2008) reveal far fewer lakes than have been identified at high northern latitudes (Stofan et al., 2007) and fewer than suggested by the number of dark features observed by ISS in this area (Turtle et al., 2009). This apparent discrepancy may simply be a result of the fact that not all of the dark south-polar features identified by ISS are filled with liquid. However, another possible explanation is that some lakes are ephemeral and have disappeared as a result of a combination of evaporation and infiltration into the subsurface in the time that elapsed between the observations by ISS

  12. Distributions and sources of petroleum, aliphatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments from Bohai Bay and its adjacent river, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Wang, Chuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoke; Zhang, Haijiang; He, Shijie; Lv, Shuangyan

    2015-01-15

    Surface sediment samples from Bohai Bay and its adjacent river, China, were analyzed for aliphatic hydrocarbon, PAHs and biomarkers in order to determine the distribution, composition and source of organic matter in a coastal environment. Results suggested that the input of organic matter from anthropogenic activities has a more significant influence on its distribution than that from natural processes. Petroleum contamination, mainly from offshore oil exploration and discharge of pollutants from rivers, was the main source of n-alkanes. PAHs were mostly of pyrogenic origin; while some sites in Yellow River Estuary were derived mainly from the petrogenic sources. The toxic assessment suggested that the PAHs in surface sediments will not cause immediately adverse biological effects in sediments from Bohai Bay and its adjacent river, China. PMID:25499964

  13. Distributions and sources of petroleum, aliphatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments from Bohai Bay and its adjacent river, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Wang, Chuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoke; Zhang, Haijiang; He, Shijie; Lv, Shuangyan

    2015-01-15

    Surface sediment samples from Bohai Bay and its adjacent river, China, were analyzed for aliphatic hydrocarbon, PAHs and biomarkers in order to determine the distribution, composition and source of organic matter in a coastal environment. Results suggested that the input of organic matter from anthropogenic activities has a more significant influence on its distribution than that from natural processes. Petroleum contamination, mainly from offshore oil exploration and discharge of pollutants from rivers, was the main source of n-alkanes. PAHs were mostly of pyrogenic origin; while some sites in Yellow River Estuary were derived mainly from the petrogenic sources. The toxic assessment suggested that the PAHs in surface sediments will not cause immediately adverse biological effects in sediments from Bohai Bay and its adjacent river, China.

  14. Cross-cutting Relationships of Surface Features on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of Jupiter's moon Europa shows a very complex terrain of ridges and fractures. The absence of large craters and the low number of small craters indicates that this surface is geologically young. The relative ages of the ridges can be determined by using the principle of cross-cutting relationships; i.e. older features are cross-cut by younger features. Using this principle, planetary geologists are able to unravel the sequence of events in this seemingly chaotic terrain to unfold Europa's unique geologic history.

    The spacecraft Galileo obtained this image on February 20, 1997. The area covered in this image is approximately 11 miles (18 kilometers) by 8.5 miles (14 kilometers) across, near 15 North, 273 West. North is toward the top of the image, with the sun illuminating from the right.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  15. Ceres' deformational surface features compared to other planetary bodies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Gathen, Isabel; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Buczkowski, Debra L.; Elgner, Stephan; Kersten, Elke; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Nass, Andrea; Otto, Katharina; Preusker, Frank; Roatsch, Thomas; Schröder, Stefanus E.; Schulzeck, Franziska; Stephan, Katrin; Wagner, Roland; De Sanctis, Maria C.; Schenk, Paul; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Williams, Dave A.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2016-04-01

    On March 2015, NASA's Dawn spacecraft arrived at the dwarf planet Ceres and has been providing images of its surface. Based on High Altitude Mapping Orbiter (HAMO) clear filter images (140 m/px res.), a Survey mosaic (~400 m/px) and a series of Low Altitude Mapping Orbiter (LAMO) clear filter images (35 m/px) of the Dawn mission [1], deformational features are identified on the surface of Ceres. In order to further our knowledge about the nature and origin of these features, we start a comparative analysis of similar features on different planetary bodies, like Enceladus, Ganymede and the Moon, based on images provided by the Cassini, Galileo and Lunar Orbiter mission. This study focuses on the small scale fractures, mostly located on Ceres' crater floors, in comparison with crater fractures on the planetary bodies named above. The fractures were analyzed concerning the morphology and shape, the distribution, orientation and possible building mechanisms. On Ceres, two different groups of fractures are distinct. The first one includes fractures, normally arranged in subparallel pattern, which are usually located on crater floors, but also on crater rims. Their sense of direction is relatively uniform but in some cases they get deformed by shearing. The second group consists of joint systems, which spread out of one single location, sometimes arranged concentric to the crater rim. They were likely formed by cooling-melting processes linked to the impact process or up doming material. Fractures located on crater floors are also common on the icy satellite Enceladus [3]. While Enceladus' fractures don't seem to have a lot in common compared to those on Ceres, we assume that similar fracture patterns and therefore similar building mechanism can be found e.g. on Ganymede and especially on the Moon [2]. Further work will include the comparison of the fractures with additional planetary bodies and the trial to explain why fracturing e.g. on Enceladus differs from that on

  16. Sand Furrows: A new surface feature on martian dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Mary

    2013-04-01

    Planetary geomorphology is at the forefront of today's Geoscience endeavours. A characteristic of frontier science is the discovery of new landforms and processes. Sand furrows are a new geomorphic feature that has not been previously described. They are ubiquitous and occur on 95% of polar dune images. Furrows are shallow and narrow erosion forms which can extend up to 300 m along a dune surface. Patterns are reminiscent of fluid flow, perhaps even fluvial flow (e.g., sinuosity, braiding and anastomosing) and are often slope-normal. However, furrows also display attributes that defy gravity (e.g., upslope trending flow paths) and they are not associated with terminal deposits. This suggests that the formative fluid is likely to be a pressurised gas. Cryo-venting has been proposed to explain the formation of dark spots and fans in the seasonal ice cap. It has also been linked to the formation of araniform. Here it is proposed to be the process by which aeolian sediment is eroded to form sand furrows. During the Martian spring, basal sublimation of the seasonal CO2 ice cap occurs on dune surfaces. Weaknesses in the ice allow pressurised gas and some dune sediment to be transported through vents to the surface. Furrows are eroded along the gas flow paths as it moves towards the vent. Cryo-venting is therefore identified as a new style of sediment transport on aeolian dunes in our solar system, and one that is, so far, unique to Mars. An estimate of the sand volume eroded from a sample dune during one Mars' spring is geomorphologically significant and is equivalent to that of a small dome dune on Mars (500m^3). The deposits are diffuse and extend into the interdune as well as back onto the source dune. The geomorphic efficacy of cryo-venting as a mechanism of aeolian dune erosion is dependent on the magnitude and frequency of venting, the location of vents and the scale of the source dune. Small dunes may undergo accelerated erosion rates as the ability to intersect

  17. Replication of surface features from a master model to an amorphous metallic article

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, William L.; Bakke, Eric; Peker, Atakan

    1999-01-01

    The surface features of an article are replicated by preparing a master model having a preselected surface feature thereon which is to be replicated, and replicating the preselected surface feature of the master model. The replication is accomplished by providing a piece of a bulk-solidifying amorphous metallic alloy, contacting the piece of the bulk-solidifying amorphous metallic alloy to the surface of the master model at an elevated replication temperature to transfer a negative copy of the preselected surface feature of the master model to the piece, and separating the piece having the negative copy of the preselected surface feature from the master model.

  18. Voyager photometry of surface features on Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S. W.; Veverka, J.

    1981-01-01

    Photometric properties of selected surface features on Ganymede and Callisto are studied, using Voyager images over phase angles from 10 to 124 deg, taken with a clear filter (effective wavelength of approximately 0.5 microns). Normal reflectances on Ganymede average 0.35 for the cratered terrain, and 0.44 for the grooved terrain; the ubiquitous cratered terrain on Callisto is 0.18. The photometric properties of these regions are described by a simple scattering function, where the function of the phase angle is qualitatively similar to that of the moon, i.e., concave upward. By contrast, bright craters on both satellites have functions of the phase angle which are concave downward. The scattering function is not Lambertian, and may be due to an admixture of a small amount of dark, opaque silicate grains with the frost deposits. The brightest craters on Callisto have reflectances which are 10% lower than the brightest craters on Ganymede, and both have similar scattering laws.

  19. Lava Flow Emplacement and Related Surface Features on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needham, D. H.; Bleacher, J. E.; Garry, W. B.; Petro, N. E.; Whelley, P. L.; Young, K. E.

    2016-05-01

    Observations of new volcanic features and of finer-scaled details of known features have shown the Moon to be more complex than previously considered; thus, these features should be incorporated into a volcanism chapter in New Views of the Moon 2.

  20. Ground Penetrating Radar Investigation of Sinter Deposits at Old Faithful Geyser and Immediately Adjacent Hydrothermal Features, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, D.; Lynne, B. Y.; Jaworowski, C.; Heasler, H.; Smith, G.; Smith, I.

    2015-12-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) was used to evaluate the characteristics of the shallow subsurface siliceous sinter deposits around Old Faithful Geyser. Zones of fractures, areas of subsurface alteration and pre-eruption hydrologic changes at Old Faithful Geyser and surrounding hydrothermal mounds were observed. Despite being viewed directly by about 3,000,000 people a year, shallow subsurface geologic and hydrologic conditions on and near Old Faithful Geyser are poorly characterized. GPR transects of 5754 ft (1754m) show strong horizontal to sub-horizontal reflections, which are interpreted as 2.5 to 4.5 meters of sinter. Some discontinuities in reflections are interpreted as fractures in the sinter, some of which line up with known hydrothermal features and some of which have little to no surface expression. Zones with moderate and weak amplitude reflections are interpreted as sinter that has been hydrothermally altered. Temporal changes from stronger to weaker reflections are correlated with the eruption cycle of Old Faithful Geyser, and are interpreted as post-eruption draining of shallow fractures, followed by pre-eruption fracture filling with liquid or vapor thermal fluids.

  1. Geographic comparison of selected large-scale planetary surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Meszaros, S.P.

    1984-08-01

    Photographic and cartographic comparisons of geographic features on Mercury, the Moon, Earth, Mars, Ganymede, Callisto, Mimas, and Tethys are presented. Planetary structures caused by impacts, volcanism, tectonics, and other natural forces are included. Each feature is discussed individually and then those of similar origin are compared at the same scale.

  2. Surface circulation in Block Island Sound and adjacent coastal and shelf regions: A FVCOM-CODAR comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunfang; Chen, Changsheng; Beardsley, Robert C.; Ullman, Dave; Butman, Bradford; Lin, Huichan

    2016-04-01

    CODAR-derived surface currents in Block Island Sound over the period of June 2000 through September 2008 were compared to currents computed using the Northeast Coastal Ocean Forecast System (NECOFS). The measurement uncertainty of CODAR-derived currents, estimated using statistics of a screened nine-year time series of hourly-averaged flow field, ranged from 3 to 7 cm/s in speed and 4° to 14° in direction. The CODAR-derived and model-computed kinetic energy spectrum densities were in good agreement at subtidal frequencies, but the NECOFS-derived currents were larger by about 28% at semi-diurnal and diurnal tidal frequencies. The short-term (hourly to daily) current variability was dominated by the semidiurnal tides (predominantly the M2 tide), which on average accounted for ∼87% of the total kinetic energy. The diurnal tidal and subtidal variability accounted for ∼4% and ∼9% of the total kinetic energy, respectively. The monthly-averaged difference between the CODAR-derived and model-computed velocities over the study area was 6 cm/s or less in speed and 28° or less in direction over the study period. An EOF analysis for the low-frequency vertically-averaged model current field showed that the water transport in the Block Island Sound region was dominated by modes 1 and 2, which accounted for 89% and 7% of the total variance, respectively. Mode 1 represented a relatively stationary spatial and temporal flow pattern with a magnitude that varied with season. Mode 2 was characterized mainly by a secondary cross-shelf flow and a relatively strong along-shelf flow. Process-oriented model experiments indicated that the relatively stationary flow pattern found in mode 1 was a result of tidal rectification and its magnitude changed with seasonal stratification. Correlation analysis between the flow and wind stress suggested that the cross-shelf water transport and its temporal variability in mode 2 were highly correlated to the surface wind forcing. The mode 2

  3. Interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors within or adjacent to bone: Contributions of preferential heating at the bone surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Serena J.; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Jones, Peter D.; Cam, Richard N.; Han, Misung; Rieke, Viola; Burdette, E. Clif; Diederich, Chris J.

    2013-02-01

    Preferential heating of bone due to high ultrasound attenuation may enhance thermal ablation performed with cathetercooled interstitial ultrasound applicators in or near bone. At the same time, thermally and acoustically insulating cortical bone may protect sensitive structures nearby. 3D acoustic and biothermal transient finite element models were developed to simulate temperature and thermal dose distributions during catheter-cooled interstitial ultrasound ablation near bone. Experiments in ex vivo tissues and tissue-mimicking phantoms were performed to validate the models and to quantify the temperature profiles and ablated volumes for various distances between the interstitial applicator and the bone surface. 3D patient-specific models selected to bracket the range of clinical usage were developed to investigate what types of tumors could be treated, applicator configurations, insertion paths, safety margins, and other parameters. Experiments show that preferential heating at the bone surface decreases treatment times compared to when bone is absent and that all tissue between an applicator and bone can be ablated when they are up to 2 cm apart. Simulations indicate that a 5-7 mm safety margin of normal bone is needed to protect (thermal dose < 6 CEM43°C and T < 45°C) sensitive structures behind ablated bone. In 3D patient-specific simulations, tumors 1.0-3.8 cm (L) and 1.3-3.0 cm (D) near or within bone were ablated (thermal dose > 240 CEM43°C) within 10 min without damaging the nearby spinal cord, lungs, esophagus, trachea, or major vasculature. Preferential absorption of ultrasound by bone may provide improved localization, faster treatment times, and larger treatment zones in tumors in and near bone compared to other heating modalities.

  4. Protein functionalized micro hydrogel features for cell-surface interaction.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Nixon, Alan J; Kim, Il; Kameoka, Jun

    2008-08-01

    Cross-linked hydrogel features have been patterned using subtractive lift-off of polymerized hydrogel film. Projection lithography and oxygen plasma etch was used to pattern parylene C polymer film. Molecular self-assembly of polymerizable monolayer was obtained in solution-phase and acrylamide based hydrogel was polymerized using free-radical polymerization on this substrate. Parylene C film was mechanically lifted-off to remove the blanket hydrogel film and micro hydrogel features (muhf) were obtained attached to the predefined patterns in the range from 1 to 60 mum. The muhf were functionalized with aldehyde functional groups, and proteins were coupled to them using Schiff base chemistry followed by reductive amination. Interaction of mesenchymal stem cells with transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1) functionalized muhf was studied, and TGF-beta1 was found to retain its tumor suppression activity. PMID:18259869

  5. IL-22R, IL-10R2, and IL-22BP binding sites are topologically juxtaposed on adjacent and overlapping surfaces of IL-22.

    PubMed

    Wu, Paul W; Li, Jing; Kodangattil, Sreekumar R; Luxenberg, Deborah P; Bennett, Frann; Martino, Margot; Collins, Mary; Dunussi-Joannopoulos, Kyriaki; Gill, Davinder S; Wolfman, Neil M; Fouser, Lynette A

    2008-10-24

    Interleukin (IL) 22 is a type II cytokine that is produced by immune cells and acts on nonimmune cells to regulate local tissue inflammation. As a product of the recently identified T helper 17 lineage of CD4(+) effector lymphocytes, IL-22 plays a critical role in mucosal immunity as well as in dysregulated inflammation observed in autoimmune diseases. We used comprehensive mutagenesis combined with mammalian cell expression, ELISA cell-based, and structural methods to evaluate how IL-22 interacts with its cell surface receptor, IL-22R/IL-10R2, and with secreted IL-22 binding protein. This study identifies those amino acid side chains of IL-22 that are individually important for optimal binding to IL-22R, considerably expands the definition of IL-22 surface required for binding to IL-10R2, and demonstrates how IL-22 binding protein prevents IL-22R from binding to IL-22. The IL-22R and IL-10R2 binding sites are juxtaposed on adjacent IL-22 surfaces contributed mostly by helices A, D, and F and loop AB. Our results also provide a model for how IL-19, IL-20, IL-24, and IL-26 which are other IL-10-like cytokines, interact with their respective cell surface receptors.

  6. Grain surface features of Apollo 17 orange and black glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, David S.; Wentworth, Sue J.

    1993-01-01

    Lunar soil sample 74220 and core samples 74001/2 consist mainly of orange glass droplets, droplet fragments, and their crystallized equivalents. These samples are now generally accepted to be pyroclastic ejecta from early lunar volcanic eruptions. It has been known that they contain surface coatings and material rich in volatile condensable phases including S, Zn, F, Cl, and many volatile metals. Meyer summarizes the voluminous published chemical data and calculates the volatile enrichment ratios for most of the surface condensates. In an attempt to more completely understand this enrichment of surface volatiles, we have searched for carbon and carbon-bearing phases on droplet surfaces. We have reviewed many of our existing photomicrographs and energy dispersive analysis (EDX) of grain surfaces and have reexamined some of our older SEM mounts using an improved EDXA system capable of light element detection and analysis (oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon). In addition, we have made fresh mounts using procedures which should minimize carbon contamination or extraneous carbon x-rays and have analyzed for carbon.

  7. Recent applications of liquid metals featuring nanoscale surface oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Taylor V.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-05-01

    This proceeding describes recent efforts from our group to control the shape and actuation of liquid metal. The liquid metal is an alloy of gallium and indium which is non-toxic, has negligible vapor pressure, and develops a thin, passivating surface oxide layer. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be patterned and shaped into structures that do not minimize interfacial energy. The surface oxide can be selectively removed by changes in pH or by applying a voltage. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be 3D printed to form free-standing structures. It also allows for the liquid metal to be injected into microfluidic channels and to maintain its shape within the channels. The selective removal of the oxide results in drastic changes in surface tension that can be used to control the flow behavior of the liquid metal. The metal can also wet thin, solid films of metal that accelerates droplets of the liquid along the metal traces .Here we discuss the properties and applications of liquid metal to make soft, reconfigurable electronics.

  8. Featuring the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Isabel Torres Gomes; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Santos, Guilherme Martins

    2015-05-01

    Chromatin is the major regulator of gene expression and genome maintenance. Proteins that bind the nucleosome, the repetitive unit of chromatin, and the histone H4 tail are critical to establishing chromatin architecture and phenotypic outcomes. Intriguingly, nucleosome-binding proteins (NBPs) and the H4 tail peptide compete for the same binding site at an acidic region on the nucleosome surface. Although the essential facts about the nucleosome were revealed 17 years ago, new insights into its atomic structure and molecular mechanisms are still emerging. Several complex nucleosome:NBP structures were recently revealed, characterizing the NBP-binding sites on the nucleosome surface. Here we discuss the potential of the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target and the impact and development of exogenous nucleosome-binding molecules (eNBMs).

  9. Features of surface topography and the geological activity of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    According to the data "New Horizons" of the spacecraft, researchers were able to specify the diameter of Pluto-2374 km. Its surface temperature in the equatorial region varies from 33 to 55 K over the planet's orbital period around the Sun in ~248 years. Presumably the surface of Pluto has a rocky base covered with a mantle of water ice, of frozen methane, nitrogen, ammonia and CO. Due to the large eccentricity of the orbit of Pluto, as it approaches the Sun, the ice melts, and the atmosphere is formed mainly of nitrogen and methane; while removing of the planet from the Sun - the atmosphere freezes out again.

  10. Adhering grains and surface features on two Itokawa particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrică, E.; Ogliore, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the surface texture and chemical compositions of two ~40-μm particles returned from the surface regolith of asteroid Itokawa (RB-DQ04-0062 and RB-DQ04-0091) by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Hayabusa mission. We identified splash melts, surface blistering, and many small adhering particles. Seven focused ion beam sections were extracted from both Itokawa particles, targeting one splash melt and ten adhering particles to investigate their composition and provenance and the role of micrometeoroid impacts on Itokawa's surface. Based on the particle's structure, mineralogy, and interface between the adhering particle and host grain, we identified lithic fragments and particles deposited by impact. These have morphologies and compositions consistent with impact-generated deposits: two have morphologies and compositions that are consistent with impact-generated silica glass, and one was a Ni-free, metallic Fe, and S-rich assemblage that was likely generated by vapor recondensation during a micrometeoroid impact. This study shows that, even though its regolith is young, micrometeoroid impacts have altered the regolith of asteroid Itokawa.

  11. Emerging Applications of Liquid Metals Featuring Surface Oxides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gallium and several of its alloys are liquid metals at or near room temperature. Gallium has low toxicity, essentially no vapor pressure, and a low viscosity. Despite these desirable properties, applications calling for liquid metal often use toxic mercury because gallium forms a thin oxide layer on its surface. The oxide interferes with electrochemical measurements, alters the physicochemical properties of the surface, and changes the fluid dynamic behavior of the metal in a way that has, until recently, been considered a nuisance. Here, we show that this solid oxide “skin” enables many new applications for liquid metals including soft electrodes and sensors, functional microcomponents for microfluidic devices, self-healing circuits, shape-reconfigurable conductors, and stretchable antennas, wires, and interconnects. PMID:25283244

  12. Body condition of the deep water demersal resources at two adjacent oligotrophic areas of the western Mediterranean and the influence of the environmental features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, L.; Moranta, J.; Abelló, P.; Balbín, R.; Barberá, C.; Fernández de Puelles, M. L.; Olivar, M. P.; Ordines, F.; Ramón, M.; Torres, A. P.; Valls, M.; Massutí, E.

    2014-10-01

    Body condition indices not only are often used as reliable indicators of the nutritional status of individuals but also can they be utilized to provide insights regarding food availability and habitat quality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the connection between the body condition of the demersal species and the environmental features in the water column (i.e. the hydrographic conditions and the potential trophic resources) in two proximate areas, the north and south regions of the Balearic Islands (western Mediterranean), viz., the Balearic sub-basin (BsB) and the Algerian sub-basin (AsB), respectively, with different geomorphological and hydrodynamic features. Body condition indices were calculated for individuals of 21 demersal species including 11 teleosts, 4 elasmobranchs, 3 cephalopods and 3 crustaceans, which represented > 70-77% of the deep water resources, captured by bottom trawling. The morphometric indices, viz., Relative Condition Index (Kn) and Standardised Residuals (SR) from the length-weight relationship, were used. The results for each one of the 21 species indicated a significantly better condition in terms of Kn and SR in the BsB, for 7 and 9 species, respectively. In addition, a general model, including the 21 species together, showed better body condition in the BsB, and during the summer. The spatial and temporal differences in the body condition are discussed in the context of the environmental variables characterising both the study areas, which showed significant variations, for some of the hydrographic features (chlorophyll a, dissolved oxygen, salinity, potential density and temperature), as well as for some of the potential trophic resources (mesopelagic and epibenthic fauna). These findings suggest an environmental effect on the body condition of the deep-water resources in the Balearic Islands, one of the most oligotrophic areas of the western Mediterranean, and reveal more suitable environmental conditions for these species

  13. Major structural features of the northern North Sea and adjacent areas of the continent according to lithosphere-scale 3D density and thermal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maystrenko, Y. P.; Olesen, O.; Ebbing, J.

    2013-12-01

    In order to analyse the regional configuration of the crystalline crust within the northern North Sea and adjacent areas of the continent, a lithosphere-scale 3D structural model has been constructed in the frame of the Crustal Onshore-Offshore Project (COOP project). Construction of the 3D model has been done by use of recently published/released structural data. For upper part of the model, all available data were merged into the following layers: sea water, the Cenozoic, the Upper Cretaceous, the Lower Cretaceous, the Jurassic, the Triassic, the Upper Permian (Zechstein) salt, Upper Permian clastics/carbonates and, finally, the Lower Permian-pre-Permian sedimentary rocks. Configuration of the crystalline crust and the Moho topography have been constrained by the published interpretations of deep seismic lines. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary has been compiled from previously published data. To evaluate the deep structure of the crystalline crust, a 3D density modelling has been carried out by use of the software IGMAS+ (the Interactive Gravity and Magnetic Application System). According to the 3D density modeling, the crystalline crust of the study area consists of several layers. Within the upper crystalline crust, gabbro to anorthositic rocks have been included into the 3D model along the western coast of Norway. In addition, a low-density (2627 kg/m3) upper crustal layer is modelled beneath the Horda Platform. The next upper crustal layer is characterized by regional distribution and has a density of 2670 kg/m3. The modelled middle crust of the study area contains four layers with similar densities around 2700 kg/m3. The lower crust consists of three layers. The deepest crustal layer is the high-density lower crustal layer (3060 kg/m3) which corresponds to the high-velocity layer. This layer thickens strongly beneath the Norwegian-Danish Basin and the eastern part of the East-Shetland platform. In addition to this high-density lower crustal layer, the

  14. Gaspra's shape and surface features: Comparison to small satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. C.; Davies, M. E.; Simonelli, D.; Veverka, J.; Belton, M. J. S.

    1992-01-01

    The several thousand asteroids constitute the second largest population of substantial solid objects in the solar system (there are probably more comets), and have been studied from the Earth for nearly two centuries. Asteroids are important members of the solar system for several reasons, among them: (1) they contain the materials that reflect the processes going on early in the time of planet formation; (2) their impacts have been the major external influences on the surface of some terrestrial planets; and (3) their impacts on Earth have probably had major effects on biologic evolution. This paper examines and describes the asteroid Gaspra, and compares it to small satellites.

  15. Engineered biomimicry: polymeric replication of surface features found on insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2011-04-01

    By combining the modified conformal-evaporated-film-by-rotation (M-CEFR) technique with nickel electroforming, we have produced master negatives of nonplanar biotemplates. An approximately 250-nm-thick conformal coating of nanocrystaline nickel is deposited on a surface structure of interest found in class Insecta, and the coating is then reinforced with a roughly 60-μm-thick structural layer of nickel by electroforming. This structural layer endows the M-CEFR coating with the mechanical robustness necessary for casting or stamping multiple polymer replicas of the biotemplate. We have made master negatives of blowfly corneas, beetle elytrons, and butterfly wings.

  16. Relationships of surface water, pore water, and sediment chemistry in wetlands adjacent to Great Salt Lake, Utah, and potential impacts on plant community health.

    PubMed

    Carling, Gregory T; Richards, David C; Hoven, Heidi; Miller, Theron; Fernandez, Diego P; Rudd, Abigail; Pazmino, Eddy; Johnson, William P

    2013-01-15

    We collected surface water, pore water, and sediment samples at five impounded wetlands adjacent to Great Salt Lake, Utah, during 2010 and 2011 in order to characterize pond chemistry and to compare chemistry with plant community health metrics. We also collected pore water and sediment samples along multiple transects at two sheet flow wetlands during 2011 to investigate a potential link between wetland chemistry and encroachment of invasive emergent plant species. Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace and major elements, nutrients, and relevant field parameters. The extensive sampling campaign provides a broad assessment of Great Salt Lake wetlands, including a range of conditions from reference to highly degraded. We used nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) to characterize the wetland sites based on the multiple parameters measured in surface water, pore water, and sediment. NMS results showed that the impounded wetlands fall along a gradient of high salinity/low trace element concentrations to low salinity/high trace element concentrations, whereas the sheet flow wetlands have both elevated salinity and high trace element concentrations, reflecting either different sources of element loading or different biogeochemical/hydrological processes operating within the wetlands. Other geochemical distinctions were found among the wetlands, including Fe-reducing conditions at two sites and sulfate-reducing conditions at the remaining sites. Plant community health metrics in the impounded wetlands showed negative correlations with specific metal concentrations in sediment (THg, Cu, Zn, Cd, Sb, Pb, Ag, Tl), and negative correlations with nutrient concentrations in surface water (nitrite, phosphate, nitrate). In the sheet flow wetlands, invasive plant species were inversely correlated with pore water salinity. These results indicate that sediment and pore water chemistry play an important role in wetland plant community health, and that monitoring and

  17. Characterization of surface-water resources in the Great Basin National Park area and their susceptibility to ground-water withdrawals in adjacent valleys, White Pine County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Peggy E.; Beck, David A.; Prudic, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Eight drainage basins and one spring within the Great Basin National Park area were monitored continually from October 2002 to September 2004 to quantify stream discharge and assess the natural variability in flow. Mean annual discharge for the stream drainages ranged from 0 cubic feet per second at Decathon Canyon to 9.08 cubic feet per second at Baker Creek. Seasonal variability in streamflow generally was uniform throughout the network. Minimum and maximum mean monthly discharges occurred in February and June, respectively, at all but one of the perennial streamflow sites. Synoptic-discharge, specific-conductance, and water- and air-temperature measurements were collected during the spring, summer, and autumn of 2003 along selected reaches of Strawberry, Shingle, Lehman, Baker, and Snake Creeks, and Big Wash to determine areas where surface-water resources would be susceptible to ground-water withdrawals in adjacent valleys. Comparison of streamflow and water-property data to the geology along each stream indicated areas where surface-water resources likely or potentially would be susceptible to ground-water withdrawals. These areas consist of reaches where streams (1) are in contact with permeable rocks or sediments, or (2) receive water from either spring discharge or ground-water inflow.

  18. Comparing maps of mean monthly surface temperature and precipitation for Alaska and adjacent areas of Canada produced by two different methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, James J.; Hufford, Gary L.; Daly, Christopher; Berg, Jared S.; Fleming, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Maps of mean monthly surface temperature and precipitation for Alaska and adjacent areas of Canada, produced by Oregon State University's Spatial Climate Analysis Service (SCAS) and the Alaska Geospatial Data Clearinghouse (AGDC), were analyzed. Because both sets of maps are generally available and in use by the community, there is a need to document differences between the processes and input data sets used by the two groups to produce their respective set of maps and to identify similarities and differences between the two sets of maps and possible reasons for the differences. These differences do not affect the observed large-scale patterns of seasonal and annual variability. Alaska is divided into interior and coastal zones, with consistent but different variability, separated by a transition region. The transition region has high interannual variability but low long-term mean variability. Both data sets support the four major ecosystems and ecosystem transition zone identified in our earlier work. Differences between the two sets of maps do occur, however, on the regional scale; they reflect differences in physiographic domains and in the treatment of these domains by the two groups (AGDC, SCAS). These differences also provide guidance for an improved observational network for Alaska. On the basis of validation with independent in situ data, we conclude that the data set produced by SCAS provides the best spatial coverage of Alaskan long-term mean monthly surface temperature and precipitation currently available. ?? The Arctic Institute of North America.

  19. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. R.; Moraes, M.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Youssef, M. N.; Brugnera Junior, A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2016-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm-2  +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC-C group. It was concluded that CO2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used.

  20. Large-scale distribution and activity of prokaryotes in deep-sea surface sediments of the Mediterranean Sea and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Donato; Molari, Massimiliano; d'Errico, Giuseppe; Baldrighi, Elisa; Pala, Claudia; Manini, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The deep-sea represents a substantial portion of the biosphere and has a major influence on carbon cycling and global biogeochemistry. Benthic deep-sea prokaryotes have crucial roles in this ecosystem, with their recycling of organic matter from the photic zone. Despite this, little is known about the large-scale distribution of prokaryotes in the surface deep-sea sediments. To assess the influence of environmental and trophic variables on the large-scale distribution of prokaryotes, we investigated the prokaryotic assemblage composition (Bacteria to Archaea and Euryarchaeota to Crenarchaeota ratio) and activity in the surface deep-sea sediments of the Mediterranean Sea and the adjacent North Atlantic Ocean. Prokaryotic abundance and biomass did not vary significantly across the Mediterranean Sea; however, there were depth-related trends in all areas. The abundance of prokaryotes was positively correlated with the sedimentary concentration of protein, an indicator of the quality and bioavailability of organic matter. Moving eastwards, the Bacteria contribution to the total prokaryotes decreased, which appears to be linked to the more oligotrophic conditions of the Eastern Mediterranean basins. Despite the increased importance of Archaea, the contributions of Crenarchaeota Marine Group I to the total pool was relatively constant across the investigated stations, with the exception of Matapan-Vavilov Deep, in which Euryarchaeota Marine Group II dominated. Overall, our data suggest that deeper areas of the Mediterranean Sea share more similar communities with each other than with shallower sites. Freshness and quality of sedimentary organic matter were identified through Generalized Additive Model analysis as the major factors for describing the variation in the prokaryotic community structure and activity in the surface deep-sea sediments. Longitude was also important in explaining the observed variability, which suggests that the overlying water masses might have a

  1. Large-Scale Distribution and Activity of Prokaryotes in Deep-Sea Surface Sediments of the Mediterranean Sea and the Adjacent Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Giovannelli, Donato; Molari, Massimiliano; d’Errico, Giuseppe; Baldrighi, Elisa; Pala, Claudia; Manini, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The deep-sea represents a substantial portion of the biosphere and has a major influence on carbon cycling and global biogeochemistry. Benthic deep-sea prokaryotes have crucial roles in this ecosystem, with their recycling of organic matter from the photic zone. Despite this, little is known about the large-scale distribution of prokaryotes in the surface deep-sea sediments. To assess the influence of environmental and trophic variables on the large-scale distribution of prokaryotes, we investigated the prokaryotic assemblage composition (Bacteria to Archaea and Euryarchaeota to Crenarchaeota ratio) and activity in the surface deep-sea sediments of the Mediterranean Sea and the adjacent North Atlantic Ocean. Prokaryotic abundance and biomass did not vary significantly across the Mediterranean Sea; however, there were depth-related trends in all areas. The abundance of prokaryotes was positively correlated with the sedimentary concentration of protein, an indicator of the quality and bioavailability of organic matter. Moving eastwards, the Bacteria contribution to the total prokaryotes decreased, which appears to be linked to the more oligotrophic conditions of the Eastern Mediterranean basins. Despite the increased importance of Archaea, the contributions of Crenarchaeota Marine Group I to the total pool was relatively constant across the investigated stations, with the exception of Matapan-Vavilov Deep, in which Euryarchaeota Marine Group II dominated. Overall, our data suggest that deeper areas of the Mediterranean Sea share more similar communities with each other than with shallower sites. Freshness and quality of sedimentary organic matter were identified through Generalized Additive Model analysis as the major factors for describing the variation in the prokaryotic community structure and activity in the surface deep-sea sediments. Longitude was also important in explaining the observed variability, which suggests that the overlying water masses might have a

  2. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules using outer surface features.

    PubMed

    Demir, Önder; Yılmaz Çamurcu, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a computer-aided detection (CAD) system was developed for the detection of lung nodules in computed tomography images. The CAD system consists of four phases, including two-dimensional and three-dimensional preprocessing phases. In the feature extraction phase, four different groups of features are extracted from volume of interests: morphological features, statistical and histogram features, statistical and histogram features of outer surface, and texture features of outer surface. The support vector machine algorithm is optimized using particle swarm optimization for classification. The CAD system provides 97.37% sensitivity, 86.38% selectivity, 88.97% accuracy and 2.7 false positive per scan using three groups of classification features. After the inclusion of outer surface texture features, classification results of the CAD system reaches 98.03% sensitivity, 87.71% selectivity, 90.12% accuracy and 2.45 false positive per scan. Experimental results demonstrate that outer surface texture features of nodule candidates are useful to increase sensitivity and decrease the number of false positives in the detection of lung nodules in computed tomography images. PMID:26405880

  3. Generating Sub-Micron Features On Rough Surfaces Using Optical Trap Assisted Nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Fardel, Romain; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    Near-field intensity enhancement enables laser modification of materials with feature sizes below the classical diffraction limit. However, the need to maintain close distances between the objective element and the substrate typically limit demonstrations of this technology to flat surfaces, even though there are many cases where the ability to produce sub-micron features on rough or structured surfaces are needed. Here, we show the use of a new technique, optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN), for the production of nanoscale features on rippled substrates. The ability to position a microbead near-field objective close to the surface without the need for active feedback and control allows one to continuously move the bead across a rough surface without sticking. Sub-micron patterning of polyimide is demonstrated on surfaces with 1.1 μm steps showing good uniformity. Finally, the enabling technology allows for straightforward parallelization where multiple patterns can be created simultaneously over surface.

  4. Generating Sub-Micron Features On Rough Surfaces Using Optical Trap Assisted Nanopatterning

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Fardel, Romain; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-08

    Near-field intensity enhancement enables laser modification of materials with feature sizes below the classical diffraction limit. However, the need to maintain close distances between the objective element and the substrate typically limit demonstrations of this technology to flat surfaces, even though there are many cases where the ability to produce sub-micron features on rough or structured surfaces are needed. Here, we show the use of a new technique, optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN), for the production of nanoscale features on rippled substrates. The ability to position a microbead near-field objective close to the surface without the need for active feedback and control allows one to continuously move the bead across a rough surface without sticking. Sub-micron patterning of polyimide is demonstrated on surfaces with 1.1 {mu}m steps showing good uniformity. Finally, the enabling technology allows for straightforward parallelization where multiple patterns can be created simultaneously over surface.

  5. Influence of Vacancy Defect on Surface Feature and Adsorption of Cs on GaN(0001) Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanjun; Du, Yujie; Wang, Meishan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Ga and N vacancy defect on the change in surface feature, work function, and characteristic of Cs adsorption on a (2 × 2) GaN(0001) surface have been investigated using density functional theory with a plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential method based on first-principles calculations. The covalent bonds gain strength for Ga vacancy defect, whereas they grow weak for N vacancy defect. The lower work function is achieved for Ga and N vacancy defect surfaces than intact surface. The most stable position of Cs adatom on Ga vacancy defect surface is at T1 site, whereas it is at BGa site on N vacancy defect surface. The Eads of Cs on GaN(0001) vacancy defect surface increases compared with that of intact surface; this illustrates that the adsorption of Cs on intact surface is more stable. PMID:25126599

  6. Influence of vacancy defect on surface feature and adsorption of Cs on GaN(0001) surface.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanjun; Du, Yujie; Wang, Meishan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Ga and N vacancy defect on the change in surface feature, work function, and characteristic of Cs adsorption on a (2 × 2) GaN(0001) surface have been investigated using density functional theory with a plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential method based on first-principles calculations. The covalent bonds gain strength for Ga vacancy defect, whereas they grow weak for N vacancy defect. The lower work function is achieved for Ga and N vacancy defect surfaces than intact surface. The most stable position of Cs adatom on Ga vacancy defect surface is at T1 site, whereas it is at B(Ga) site on N vacancy defect surface. The E(ads) of Cs on GaN(0001) vacancy defect surface increases compared with that of intact surface; this illustrates that the adsorption of Cs on intact surface is more stable.

  7. Galileo PPR Observations of Europa: Correlations of Thermophysical Properties with Surface Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Howett, C. J. A.

    2012-03-01

    We will compare Galileo Photopolarimeter-Radiometer (PPR) temperature data to thermal models and a geologic map to determine if there are correlations between thermophysical properties and surface features.

  8. Effect of a CO2 Laser on the Inhibition of Root Surface Caries Adjacent to Restorations of Glass Ionomer Cement or Composite Resin: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, L. C.; Araújo, F. C.; Zancopé, B. R.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; Youssef, M. N.; Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement (GIC) or composite resin (CR) restorations. 40 dental blocks were divided into 4 groups: G1 (negative control): cavity preparation + adhesive restoration with CR; G2: (positive control) cavity preparation + GIC restoration; G3: equal to group 1 + CO2 laser with 6 J/cm2; G4: equal to group 2 + CO2 laser. The blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Dental demineralization around restorations was quantified using microhardness analyses and Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF). The groups showed no significant differences in mineral loss at depths between 20 μm and 40 μm. At 60 μm, G2 and G3 ≠ G1, but G4 = G1, G2 and G3. At 80 μm, G4 ≠ G1, and at 100 μm, G4 = G2 = G1. At 140 and 220 μm, G2, G3, and G4 = G1. The averages obtained using QFL in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.637, 0.162, 0.095, and 0.048, respectively. QLF and microhardness analyses showed that CO2 laser irradiation reduced mineral loss around the CR restorations but that it did not increase the anticariogenic effect of GIC restorations. PMID:26347900

  9. Turnover and release of P-, N-, Si-nutrients in the Mexicali Valley (Mexico): interactions between the lower Colorado River and adjacent ground- and surface water systems.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Durán, A; Daesslé, L W; Camacho-Ibar, V F; Ortiz-Campos, E; Barth, J A C

    2015-04-15

    A study on dissolved nitrate, ammonium, phosphate and silicate concentrations was carried out in various water compartments (rivers, drains, channels, springs, wetland, groundwater, tidal floodplains and ocean water) in the Mexicali Valley and the Colorado River delta between 2012 and 2013, to assess modern potential nutrient sources into the marine system after river damming. While nitrate and silicate appear to have a significant input into the coastal ocean, phosphate is rapidly transformed into a particulate phase. Nitrate is, in general, rapidly bio-consumed in the surface waters rich in micro algae, but its excess (up to 2.02 mg L(-1) of N from NO3 in winter) in the Santa Clara Wetland represents a potential average annual source to the coast of 59.4×10(3)kg N-NO3. Despite such localized inputs, continuous regional groundwater flow does not appear to be a source of nitrate to the estuary and coastal ocean. Silicate is associated with groundwaters that are also geothermally influenced. A silicate receiving agricultural drain adjacent to the tidal floodplain had maximum silicate concentrations of 16.1 mg L(-1) Si-SiO2. Seepage of drain water and/or mixing with seawater during high spring tides represents a potential source of dissolved silicate and nitrate into the Gulf of California. PMID:25617998

  10. Turnover and release of P-, N-, Si-nutrients in the Mexicali Valley (Mexico): interactions between the lower Colorado River and adjacent ground- and surface water systems.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Durán, A; Daesslé, L W; Camacho-Ibar, V F; Ortiz-Campos, E; Barth, J A C

    2015-04-15

    A study on dissolved nitrate, ammonium, phosphate and silicate concentrations was carried out in various water compartments (rivers, drains, channels, springs, wetland, groundwater, tidal floodplains and ocean water) in the Mexicali Valley and the Colorado River delta between 2012 and 2013, to assess modern potential nutrient sources into the marine system after river damming. While nitrate and silicate appear to have a significant input into the coastal ocean, phosphate is rapidly transformed into a particulate phase. Nitrate is, in general, rapidly bio-consumed in the surface waters rich in micro algae, but its excess (up to 2.02 mg L(-1) of N from NO3 in winter) in the Santa Clara Wetland represents a potential average annual source to the coast of 59.4×10(3)kg N-NO3. Despite such localized inputs, continuous regional groundwater flow does not appear to be a source of nitrate to the estuary and coastal ocean. Silicate is associated with groundwaters that are also geothermally influenced. A silicate receiving agricultural drain adjacent to the tidal floodplain had maximum silicate concentrations of 16.1 mg L(-1) Si-SiO2. Seepage of drain water and/or mixing with seawater during high spring tides represents a potential source of dissolved silicate and nitrate into the Gulf of California.

  11. Effect of a CO2 Laser on the Inhibition of Root Surface Caries Adjacent to Restorations of Glass Ionomer Cement or Composite Resin: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Daniel, L C; Araújo, F C; Zancopé, B R; Hanashiro, F S; Nobre-dos-Santos, M; Youssef, M N; Souza-Zaroni, W C

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement (GIC) or composite resin (CR) restorations. 40 dental blocks were divided into 4 groups: G1 (negative control): cavity preparation + adhesive restoration with CR; G2: (positive control) cavity preparation + GIC restoration; G3: equal to group 1 + CO2 laser with 6 J/cm(2); G4: equal to group 2 + CO2 laser. The blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Dental demineralization around restorations was quantified using microhardness analyses and Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF). The groups showed no significant differences in mineral loss at depths between 20 μm and 40 μm. At 60 μm, G2 and G3 ≠ G1, but G4 = G1, G2 and G3. At 80 μm, G4 ≠ G1, and at 100 μm, G4 = G2 = G1. At 140 and 220 μm, G2, G3, and G4 = G1. The averages obtained using QFL in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.637, 0.162, 0.095, and 0.048, respectively. QLF and microhardness analyses showed that CO2 laser irradiation reduced mineral loss around the CR restorations but that it did not increase the anticariogenic effect of GIC restorations. PMID:26347900

  12. Orienting in Virtual Environments: How Are Surface Features and Environmental Geometry Weighted in an Orientation Task?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Debbie M.; Bischof, Walter F.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated how human adults orient in enclosed virtual environments, when discrete landmark information is not available and participants have to rely on geometric and featural information on the environmental surfaces. In contrast to earlier studies, where, for women, the featural information from discrete landmarks overshadowed the encoding…

  13. The vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum produces biofilms required for its virulence on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yuka; Inoue, Kanako; Ikeda, Kenichi; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Higashimoto, Chikaki; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Kiba, Akinori; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of colonization of intercellular spaces by the soil-borne and vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum strain OE1-1 after invasion into host plants remains unclear. To analyse the behaviour of OE1-1 cells in intercellular spaces, tomato leaves with the lower epidermis layers excised after infiltration with OE1-1 were observed under a scanning electron microscope. OE1-1 cells formed microcolonies on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces, and then aggregated surrounded by an extracellular matrix, forming mature biofilm structures. Furthermore, OE1-1 cells produced mushroom-type biofilms when incubated in fluids of apoplasts including intercellular spaces, but not xylem fluids from tomato plants. This is the first report of biofilm formation by R. solanacearum on host plant cells after invasion into intercellular spaces and mushroom-type biofilms produced by R. solanacearum in vitro. Sugar application led to enhanced biofilm formation by OE1-1. Mutation of lecM encoding a lectin, RS-IIL, which reportedly exhibits affinity for these sugars, led to a significant decrease in biofilm formation. Colonization in intercellular spaces was significantly decreased in the lecM mutant, leading to a loss of virulence on tomato plants. Complementation of the lecM mutant with native lecM resulted in the recovery of mushroom-type biofilms and virulence on tomato plants. Together, our findings indicate that OE1-1 produces mature biofilms on the surfaces of tomato cells after invasion into intercellular spaces. RS-IIL may contribute to biofilm formation by OE1-1, which is required for OE1-1 virulence. PMID:26609568

  14. The vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum produces biofilms required for its virulence on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yuka; Inoue, Kanako; Ikeda, Kenichi; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Higashimoto, Chikaki; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Kiba, Akinori; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of colonization of intercellular spaces by the soil-borne and vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum strain OE1-1 after invasion into host plants remains unclear. To analyse the behaviour of OE1-1 cells in intercellular spaces, tomato leaves with the lower epidermis layers excised after infiltration with OE1-1 were observed under a scanning electron microscope. OE1-1 cells formed microcolonies on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces, and then aggregated surrounded by an extracellular matrix, forming mature biofilm structures. Furthermore, OE1-1 cells produced mushroom-type biofilms when incubated in fluids of apoplasts including intercellular spaces, but not xylem fluids from tomato plants. This is the first report of biofilm formation by R. solanacearum on host plant cells after invasion into intercellular spaces and mushroom-type biofilms produced by R. solanacearum in vitro. Sugar application led to enhanced biofilm formation by OE1-1. Mutation of lecM encoding a lectin, RS-IIL, which reportedly exhibits affinity for these sugars, led to a significant decrease in biofilm formation. Colonization in intercellular spaces was significantly decreased in the lecM mutant, leading to a loss of virulence on tomato plants. Complementation of the lecM mutant with native lecM resulted in the recovery of mushroom-type biofilms and virulence on tomato plants. Together, our findings indicate that OE1-1 produces mature biofilms on the surfaces of tomato cells after invasion into intercellular spaces. RS-IIL may contribute to biofilm formation by OE1-1, which is required for OE1-1 virulence.

  15. Aquatic risk assessment of pesticides in surface waters in and adjacent to the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks: II. Probabilistic analyses.

    PubMed

    Carriger, John F; Rand, Gary M

    2008-10-01

    A screening-level aquatic probabilistic risk assessment was completed to determine the potential risks of organic pesticides found in surface waters of the C-111 freshwater basin (11 sites at the east boundary of the Everglades National Park) and adjacent estuarine tidal zones (two sites in northeast Florida Bay, one site in south Biscayne Bay) in south Florida. It followed the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) ecological risk framework and focused only on the acute and chronic risks of endosulfan and chlorpyrifos individually and jointly with atrazine, metolachlor, and malathion by comparing distributions of surface water exposure concentrations with the distributions of species toxicity data. The highest risk of acute effects was associated with endosulfan exposure to freshwater arthropods at S-178/site C on the C-111 system, followed by endosulfan effects to estuarine arthropods at Joe Bay in northeast Florida Bay. The highest risk of acute effects from joint toxicity of pesticides was to estuarine arthropods in Joe Bay followed by freshwater arthropods in S-178/site C. For fish, the highest acute risk was for endosulfan at S-178/site C. There was low potential for acute risk of endosulfan to fish at estuarine sites. Joint probability curves indicated that the majority of potential risks to arthropods and fish were due to endosulfan concentrations and not to chlorpyrifos, at S-178/site C. In addition, the highest risk of acute effects for saltwater organisms was in Joe Bay, which receives water from the C-111. The potential risk of chronic effects from pesticide exposures was minimal at fresh- and saltwater sites except at S-178/site C, where endosulfan concentrations showed the highest exceedence of species toxicity values. In general, potential risks were higher in February than June.

  16. Channels and Fan-like Features on Titan Surface Imaged by the Cassini RADAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paganelli, F.; Elachi, C.; Lopes, R. M.; West, R.; Stiles, B.; Janssen, M. A.; Stofan, E. R.; Wood, C. A.; Lorenz, R. D.; Lunine, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    During two close flybys of Titan on October 26, 2004, and February 15, 2005, the Cassini s radar instrument acquired synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) data revealing Titan s complex surface and intriguing geological features. Fan-like and apparently flow-related features are connected to sinuous and linear features which resemble channels. The fan-like features and channels appear to be relatively SAR-bright and suggest surface roughness properties at the scale and bigger than the Ku-band, and possible volume scattering. A strong correlation between the SAR-bright and radiometric cold regions has been observed. The correlation is consistent with radiometric cold areas being caused by volume scattering at Ku as due to broken low-loss ice and resulting low emissivity as with the surfaces of Europa and Ganymede.

  17. Color heterogeneity of the surface of PHOBOS - Relationships to geologic features and comparison to meteorite analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murchie, S. L.; Britt, D. T.; Head, J. W.; Pratt, S. F.; Fisher, P. C.; Zhukov, B. S.; Kuzmin, A. A.; Ksanfomality, L. V.; Zharkov, A. V.; Nikitin, G. E.; Fanale, F. P.; Blaney, D. L.; Bell, J. F.; Robinson, M. S.

    1991-04-01

    Color ratio images created from multispectral observations of Phobos are analyzed in order to characterize the spectral properties of Phobos' surface, to assess their spatial distributions and relationships with geologic features, and to compare Phobos' surface materials with possible meteorite analogs. Data calibration and processing is briefly discussed, and the observed spectral properties of Phobos and their lateral variations are examined. Attention is then given to the color properties of different types of impact craters, the origin of lateral variations in surface color, the relation between the spatial distribution of color properties and independently identifiable geologic features, and the relevance of color variation spatial distribution to the origin of the grooves.

  18. Transient nonlinear optically-thick radiative-convective double-diffusive boundary layers in a Darcian porous medium adjacent to an impulsively started surface: Network simulation solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar Bég, O.; Zueco, J.; Takhar, H. S.; Bég, T. A.; Sajid, A.

    2009-11-01

    A boundary-layer model is described for the two-dimensional nonlinear transient thermal convection heat and mass transfer in an optically-thick fluid in a Darcian porous medium adjacent to an impulsively started vertical surface, in the presence of significant thermal radiation and buoyancy forces in an (X∗,Y∗,t∗) coordinate system. An algebraic approximation is employed to simplify the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer for unidirectional flux normal to the plate into the boundary-layer regime, by incorporating this flux term in the energy conservation equation. The conservation equations are non-dimensionalized into an (X,Y,T) coordinate system and solved using the Network Simulation Method (NSM), a robust numerical technique which demonstrates high efficiency and accuracy. The transient variation of non-dimensional streamwise velocity component (u) and temperature (T) and concentration (C) functions is computed for various selected values of Stark number (radiation-conduction interaction parameter) and Darcy number. Transient velocity (u) and steady-state local skin friction (τX) are also studied for various thermal Grashof number (Gr), species Grashof number (Gm), Schmidt number (Sc) and Stark number (N) values. These computations for the infinite permeability case (Da → ∞) are compared with previous finite difference solutions [Prasad et al. Int J Therm Sci 2007;46(12):1251-8] and shown to be in excellent agreement. An increase in Darcy number is seen to accelerate the flow and boost velocity. A decrease in Stark number (corresponding to an increase in thermal radiation heat transfer contribution) is shown to increase the velocity values. Temperature function is observed to fall in value with a rise in Da and increase with decrease in N (corresponding to an increase in thermal radiation heat transfer contribution). Applications of the study include rocket combustion chambers, astrophysical flows, spacecraft thermal fluid dynamics in

  19. Investigations of micron and submicron wear features of diseased human cartilage surfaces.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Baena, Juan C; Wang, Meiling

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common disease. However, its causes and morphological features of diseased cartilage surfaces are not well understood. The purposes of this research were (a) to develop quantitative surface characterization techniques to study human cartilages at a micron and submicron scale and (b) to investigate distinctive changes in the surface morphologies and biomechanical properties of the cartilages in different osteoarthritis grades. Diseased cartilage samples collected from osteoarthritis patients were prepared for image acquisition using two different techniques, that is, laser scanning microscopy at a micrometer scale and atomic force microscopy at a nanometer scale. Three-dimensional, digital images of human cartilages were processed and analyzed quantitatively. This study has demonstrated that high-quality three-dimensional images of human cartilage surfaces could be obtained in a hydrated condition using laser scanning microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Based on the numerical data extracted from improved image quality and quantity, it has been found that osteoarthritis evolution can be identified by specific surface features at the micrometer scale, and these features are amplitude and functional property related. At the submicron level, the spatial features of the surfaces were revealed to differ between early and advanced osteoarthritis grades. The effective indentation moduli of human cartilages effectively revealed the cartilage deterioration. The imaging acquisition and numerical analysis methods established allow quantitative studies of distinctive changes in cartilage surface characteristics and better understanding of the cartilage degradation process.

  20. Surface processes on the asteroid deduced from the external 3D shapes and surface features of Itokawa particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiyama, A.; Matsumoto, T.

    2015-10-01

    Particles on the surface of S-type Asteroid 25143 Itokawa were successfully recovered by the Hayabusa mission of JAXA (e.g., [1,2]). They are not only the first samples recovered from an asteroid, but also the second extraterrestrial regolith to have been sampled, the first being the Moon by Apollo and Luna missions. The analysis of tiny sample particles (20-200 μm) shows that the Itokawa surface material is consistent with LL chondrites suffered by space weathering as expected and brought an end to the origin of meteorites (e.g., [2-4]). In addition, the examination of Itokawa particles allow studies of surface processes on the asteroid because regolith particles can be regarded as an interface with the space environment, where the impacts of small objects and irradiation by the solar wind and galactic cosmic rays should have been recorded. External 3D shapes and surface features of Itokawa regolith particles were examined. Two kinds of surface modification, formation of space-weathering rims mainly by solar wind implantation and surface abrasion by grain migration, were recognized. Spectral change of the asteroid proceeded by formation of space-weathering rims and refreshment of the regolith surfaces. External 3D shapes and surface morphologies of the regolith particles can provide information about formation and evolution history of regolith particles in relation to asteroidal surface processes. 3D shapes of Itokawa regolith particles were obtained using microtomography [3]. The surface nanomiromorpholgy of Itokawa particles were also observed using FE-SEM [5]. However, the number of particles was limited and genial feature on the surface morphology has not been understood. In this study, the surface morphology of Itokawa regolith particles was systematically investigated together with their 3D structures.

  1. Application of multi-scale feature extraction to surface defect classification of hot-rolled steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ke; Ai, Yong-hao; Wu, Xiu-yong

    2013-01-01

    Feature extraction is essential to the classification of surface defect images. The defects of hot-rolled steels distribute in different directions. Therefore, the methods of multi-scale geometric analysis (MGA) were employed to decompose the image into several directional subbands at several scales. Then, the statistical features of each subband were calculated to produce a high-dimensional feature vector, which was reduced to a lower-dimensional vector by graph embedding algorithms. Finally, support vector machine (SVM) was used for defect classification. The multi-scale feature extraction method was implemented via curvelet transform and kernel locality preserving projections (KLPP). Experiment results show that the proposed method is effective for classifying the surface defects of hot-rolled steels and the total classification rate is up to 97.33%.

  2. FOCUSR: Feature Oriented Correspondence using Spectral Regularization–A Method for Precise Surface Matching

    PubMed Central

    Lombaert, Herve; Grady, Leo; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Cheriet, Farida

    2013-01-01

    Existing methods for surface matching are limited by the trade-off between precision and computational efficiency. Here we present an improved algorithm for dense vertex-to-vertex correspondence that uses direct matching of features defined on a surface and improves it by using spectral correspondence as a regularization. This algorithm has the speed of both feature matching and spectral matching while exhibiting greatly improved precision (distance errors of 1.4%). The method, FOCUSR, incorporates implicitly such additional features to calculate the correspondence and relies on the smoothness of the lowest-frequency harmonics of a graph Laplacian to spatially regularize the features. In its simplest form, FOCUSR is an improved spectral correspondence method that nonrigidly deforms spectral embeddings. We provide here a full realization of spectral correspondence where virtually any feature can be used as additional information using weights on graph edges, but also on graph nodes and as extra embedded coordinates. As an example, the full power of FOCUSR is demonstrated in a real case scenario with the challenging task of brain surface matching across several individuals. Our results show that combining features and regularizing them in a spectral embedding greatly improves the matching precision (to a sub-millimeter level) while performing at much greater speed than existing methods. PMID:23868776

  3. A Statistical-Textural-Features Based Approach for Classification of Solid Drugs Using Surface Microscopic Images

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The quality of pharmaceutical products plays an important role in pharmaceutical industry as well as in our lives. Usage of defective tablets can be harmful for patients. In this research we proposed a nondestructive method to identify defective and nondefective tablets using their surface morphology. Three different environmental factors temperature, humidity and moisture are analyzed to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Multiple textural features are extracted from the surface of the defective and nondefective tablets. These textural features are gray level cooccurrence matrix, run length matrix, histogram, autoregressive model and HAAR wavelet. Total textural features extracted from images are 281. We performed an analysis on all those 281, top 15, and top 2 features. Top 15 features are extracted using three different feature reduction techniques: chi-square, gain ratio and relief-F. In this research we have used three different classifiers: support vector machine, K-nearest neighbors and naïve Bayes to calculate the accuracies against proposed method using two experiments, that is, leave-one-out cross-validation technique and train test models. We tested each classifier against all selected features and then performed the comparison of their results. The experimental work resulted in that in most of the cases SVM performed better than the other two classifiers. PMID:25371702

  4. Adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  5. Ion microprobe elemental analyses of impact features on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, Jerry L.; Wortman, Jim J.; Griffis, Dieter P.

    1992-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact features from very small particles (less than 3 microns in diameter) on several of the electro-active dust sensors used in the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) were subjected to elemental analysis using an ion microscope. The same analytical techniques were applied to impact and containment features on a set of ultra-pure, highly polished single crystal germanium wafer witness plates that were mounted on tray B12. Very little unambiguously identifiable impactor debris was found in the central craters or shatter zones of small impacts in this crystalline surface. The surface contamination, ubiquitous on the surface of the Long Duration Exposure Facility, has greatly complicated data collection and interpretation from microparticle impacts on all surfaces.

  6. Interpretation of Impact Features on the Surface of the WFPC-2 Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Kou, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    An examination of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) radiator assembly was conducted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) during the summer of 2009. Immediately apparent was the predominance of impact features resident only in the thermal paint layer; similar phenomenology was observed during a prior survey of the WFPC-1 radiator. As well, larger impact features displayed spallation zones, darkened areas, and other features not encountered in impacts onto bare surfaces. Whereas the characterization of impact features by depth and diameter on unpainted surfaces has been long established, the mitigation provided by the painted layer presented a challenge to further analysis of the WFPC-2 features; a literature search revealed no systematic characterization of the ballistic limit equations of painted or coated surfaces. In order to characterize the impactors responsible for the observed damage, an understanding of the cratering and spallation phenomenology of the painted surface was required. To address that challenge, NASA sponsored a series of hypervelocity calibration shots at the White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). This effort required the following activities: the production, painting, and artificial ageing of test coupons in a manner similar to the actual radiator; the determination of the test matrix parameters projectile diameter and material (mass density), impact velocity, and impact angle, so as to enable both an adequate characterization of the impact by projectile and impact geometry and support hydrocode modeling to fill in and extend the applicability of the calibration shots; the selection of suitable projectiles; logistics; and an analysis of feature characteristics upon return of the coupons. This paper reports the results of the test campaign and presents ballistic limit equations for painted surfaces. We also present initial results of our interpretation methodologies.

  7. Comparison of the surface features of two wood-based activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Salame, I.I.; Bandosz, T.J.

    2000-02-01

    The surface features of two carbons of wood origin were compared. One sample was manufactured using phosphoric acid activation and the other using potassium hydroxide activation. To check the susceptibility to oxidation and the stability of the porous structure, the samples were oxidized with ammonium persulfate. Structural properties of carbons and their oxidized counterparts were determined using sorption of nitrogen. Surface acidity was evaluated using Boehm titration, potentiometric titration, inverse gas chromatography, and diffuse reflectance FTIR. It was demonstrated that, despite the same wood origin, the carbons significantly differ in their pore structure and surface chemistry. The carbon obtained using KOH activation is homogeneously microporous with high surface area around 2,300 m{sup 2}/g (BET). On the other hand, the carbon manufactured using phosphoric acid contains a high volume of mesopores and its surface area is significantly lower. The carbons also differ in their surface chemistry and susceptibility to oxidation.

  8. Manufacturing and microscopical characterisation of polyurethane nerve guidance channel featuring a highly smooth internal surface.

    PubMed

    Soldani, G; Varelli, G; Minnocci, A; Dario, P

    1998-11-01

    The present study demonstrates the possibility of manufacturing polyurethane [ChronoFlex (CF)] nerve guidance channels (NGCs) featuring a highly smooth internal surface. Comparative SEM and AFM observations prove marked differences between the internal surface microgeometry of Silastic and CF channels. SEM of CF samples shows a surface with no detectable roughness, while Silastic channels show transversal rows along the entire surface. AFM digital image of Silastic samples show a surface with a rough microgeometry defined by a tridimensional pattern with peaks up to 1400 nm. AFM digital image of CF samples show, indeed, an essentially flat microgeometry with the highest level at 545 nm. These preliminary results suggest that the association of an innovative sequential deposition manufacturing technique with the new CF polyurethane may produce NGCs with a smoother surface microgeometry, in comparison to NGCs obtained from commercial Silastic tubes. PMID:9863525

  9. Contributions of feature shapes and surface cues to the recognition of facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Sormaz, Mladen; Young, Andrew W; Andrews, Timothy J

    2016-10-01

    Theoretical accounts of face processing often emphasise feature shapes as the primary visual cue to the recognition of facial expressions. However, changes in facial expression also affect the surface properties of the face. In this study, we investigated whether this surface information can also be used in the recognition of facial expression. First, participants identified facial expressions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, happiness) from images that were manipulated such that they varied mainly in shape or mainly in surface properties. We found that the categorization of facial expression is possible in either type of image, but that different expressions are relatively dependent on surface or shape properties. Next, we investigated the relative contributions of shape and surface information to the categorization of facial expressions. This employed a complementary method that involved combining the surface properties of one expression with the shape properties from a different expression. Our results showed that the categorization of facial expressions in these hybrid images was equally dependent on the surface and shape properties of the image. Together, these findings provide a direct demonstration that both feature shape and surface information make significant contributions to the recognition of facial expressions. PMID:27425385

  10. Contributions of feature shapes and surface cues to the recognition of facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Sormaz, Mladen; Young, Andrew W; Andrews, Timothy J

    2016-10-01

    Theoretical accounts of face processing often emphasise feature shapes as the primary visual cue to the recognition of facial expressions. However, changes in facial expression also affect the surface properties of the face. In this study, we investigated whether this surface information can also be used in the recognition of facial expression. First, participants identified facial expressions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, happiness) from images that were manipulated such that they varied mainly in shape or mainly in surface properties. We found that the categorization of facial expression is possible in either type of image, but that different expressions are relatively dependent on surface or shape properties. Next, we investigated the relative contributions of shape and surface information to the categorization of facial expressions. This employed a complementary method that involved combining the surface properties of one expression with the shape properties from a different expression. Our results showed that the categorization of facial expressions in these hybrid images was equally dependent on the surface and shape properties of the image. Together, these findings provide a direct demonstration that both feature shape and surface information make significant contributions to the recognition of facial expressions.

  11. Automatic segmentation of pulmonary fissures in computed tomography images using 3D surface features.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mali; Liu, Hong; Gong, Jianping; Jin, Renchao; Han, Ping; Song, Enmin

    2014-02-01

    Pulmonary interlobar fissures are important anatomic structures in human lungs and are useful in locating and classifying lung abnormalities. Automatic segmentation of fissures is a difficult task because of their low contrast and large variability. We developed a fully automatic training-free approach for fissure segmentation based on the local bending degree (LBD) and the maximum bending index (MBI). The LBD is determined by the angle between the eigenvectors of two Hessian matrices for a pair of adjacent voxels. It is used to construct a constraint to extract the candidate surfaces in three-dimensional (3D) space. The MBI is a measure to discriminate cylindrical surfaces from planar surfaces in 3D space. Our approach for segmenting fissures consists of five steps, including lung segmentation, plane-like structure enhancement, surface extraction with LBD, initial fissure identification with MBI, and fissure extension based on local plane fitting. When applying our approach to 15 chest computed tomography (CT) scans, the mean values of the positive predictive value, the sensitivity, the root-mean square (RMS) distance, and the maximal RMS are 91 %, 88 %, 1.01 ± 0.99 mm, and 11.56 mm, respectively, which suggests that our algorithm can efficiently segment fissures in chest CT scans.

  12. Establishing Object Correspondence across Eye Movements: Flexible Use of Spatiotemporal and Surface Feature Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Ashleigh M.; Luck, Steven J.; Hollingworth, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Visual input is frequently disrupted by eye movements, blinks, and occlusion. The visual system must be able to establish correspondence between objects visible before and after a disruption. Current theories hold that correspondence is established solely on the basis of spatiotemporal information, with no contribution from surface features. In…

  13. Improved discrete Fourier transform based spectral feature for surface electromyogram signal classification.

    PubMed

    He, Jiayuan; Zhang, Dingguo; Sheng, Xinjun; Meng, Jianjun; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2013-01-01

    An improved discrete Fourier transform (iDFT) is presented in this study as a novel feature for surface electromyogram (sEMG) pattern classification. It employs the principle that the spectrum of sEMG signals changes regarding different motions. iDFT feature focuses on global information of local bands to increase the inter-class distance. The experiment results showed that iDFT feature had a better separability than two other spectral features, auto regression (AR) and Power spectral density (PSD), both on experienced and inexperienced subjects. The optimal bandwidth is between 30 and 50 Hz and influence of division methods is not significant. With the low computation cost and property of insensitivity to sampling frequency, our proposed method provides a competitive choice for prosthetic control.

  14. Analytical evaluation of algorithms for point cloud surface reconstruction using shape features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lu; Verbeek, Fons J.

    2013-10-01

    In computer vision and graphics, reconstruction of a three-dimensional surface from a point cloud is a well-studied research area. As the surface contains information that can be measured, the application of surface reconstruction may be potentially important for applications in bioimaging. In the past decade, a number of algorithms for surface reconstruction have been developed. Generally speaking, these algorithms can be separated into two categories: explicit representation and implicit approximation. Most of these algorithms have a sound basis in mathematical theory. However, so far, no analytical evaluation between these algorithms has been presented. The straightforward method of evaluation has been by convincing through visual inspection. Therefore, we design an analytical approach by selecting surface distance, surface area, and surface curvature as three major surface descriptors. We evaluate these features in varied conditions. Our ground truth values are obtained from analytical shapes: the sphere, the ellipsoid, and the oval. Through evaluation we search for a method that can preserve the surface characteristics best and which is robust in the presence of noise. The results obtained from our experiments indicate that Poisson reconstruction method performs best. This outcome can now be used to produce reliable surface reconstruction of biological models.

  15. Young (late Amazonian), near-surface, ground ice features near the equator, Athabasca Valles, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burr, D.M.; Soare, R.J.; Wan, Bun Tseung J.-M.; Emery, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    A suite of four feature types in a ???20 km2 area near 10?? N, 204?? W in Athabasca Valles is interpreted to have resulted from near-surface ground ice. These features include mounds, conical forms with rimmed summit depressions, flatter irregularly-shaped forms with raised rims, and polygonal terrain. Based on morphology, size, and analogy to terrestrial ground ice forms, these Athabascan features are interpreted as pingos, collapsing pingos, pingo scars, and thermal contraction polygons, respectively. Thermal Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (THEMIS) data and geological features in the area are consistent with a sedimentary substrate underlying these features. These observations lead us to favor a ground ice interpretation, although we do not rule out volcanic and especially glaciofluvial hypotheses. The hypothesized ground ice that formed the mounds and rimmed features may have been emplaced via the deposition of saturated sediment during flooding; an alternative scenario invokes magmatically cycled groundwater. The ground ice implicit in the hypothesized thermal contraction polygons may have derived either from this flooding/ground water, or from atmospheric water vapor. The lack of obvious flood modification of the mounds and rimmed features indicates that they formed after the most recent flood inundated the area. Analogy with terrestrial pingos suggests that ground ice may be still extant within the positive relief mounds. As the water that flooded down Athabasca Valles emerged via a volcanotectonic fissure from a deep aquifer, any extant pingo ice may contain evidence of a deep subsurface biosphere. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Abnormal changes of multidimensional surface features using multivariate pattern classification in amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuyu; Yuan, Xiankun; Pu, Fang; Li, Deyu; Fan, Yubo; Wu, Liyong; Chao, Wang; Chen, Nan; He, Yong; Han, Ying

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) is associated with changes in cortical morphological features, such as cortical thickness, sulcal depth, surface area, gray matter volume, metric distortion, and mean curvature. These features have been proven to have specific neuropathological and genetic underpinnings. However, most studies primarily focused on mass-univariate methods, and cortical features were generally explored in isolation. Here, we used a multivariate method to characterize the complex and subtle structural changing pattern of cortical anatomy in 24 aMCI human participants and 26 normal human controls. Six cortical features were extracted for each participant, and the spatial patterns of brain abnormities in aMCI were identified by high classification weights using a support vector machine method. The classification accuracy in discriminating the two groups was 76% in the left hemisphere and 80% in the right hemisphere when all six cortical features were used. Regions showing high weights were subtle, spatially complex, and predominately located in the left medial temporal lobe and the supramarginal and right inferior parietal lobes. In addition, we also found that the six morphological features had different contributions in discriminating the two groups even for the same region. Our results indicated that the neuroanatomical patterns that discriminated individuals with aMCI from controls were truly multidimensional and had different effects on the morphological features. Furthermore, the regions identified by our method could potentially be useful for clinical diagnosis. PMID:25100588

  17. Physical Features of Intracellular Proteins that Moonlight on the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Amblee, Vaishak; Jeffery, Constance J.

    2015-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins comprise a subset of multifunctional proteins that perform two or more biochemical functions that are not due to gene fusions, multiple splice variants, proteolytic fragments, or promiscuous enzyme activities. The project described herein focuses on a sub-set of moonlighting proteins that have a canonical biochemical function inside the cell and perform a second biochemical function on the cell surface in at least one species. The goal of this project is to consider the biophysical features of these moonlighting proteins to determine whether they have shared characteristics or defining features that might suggest why these particular proteins were adopted for a second function on the cell surface, or if these proteins resemble typical intracellular proteins. The latter might suggest that many other normally intracellular proteins found on the cell surface might also be moonlighting in this fashion. We have identified 30 types of proteins that have different functions inside the cell and on the cell surface. Some of these proteins are found to moonlight on the surface of multiple species, sometimes with different extracellular functions in different species, so there are a total of 98 proteins in the study set. Although a variety of intracellular proteins (enzymes, chaperones, etc.) are observed to be re-used on the cell surface, for the most part, these proteins were found to have physical characteristics typical of intracellular proteins. Many other intracellular proteins have also been found on the surface of bacterial pathogens and other organisms in proteomics experiments. It is quite possible that many of those proteins also have a moonlighting function on the cell surface. The increasing number and variety of known moonlighting proteins suggest that there may be more moonlighting proteins than previously thought, and moonlighting might be a common feature of many more proteins. PMID:26110848

  18. Separation of Atmospheric and Surface Spectral Features in Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2000-01-01

    We present two algorithms for the separation of spectral features caused by atmospheric and surface components in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data. One algorithm uses radiative transfer and successive least squares fitting to find spectral shapes first for atmospheric dust, then for water-ice aerosols, and then, finally, for surface emissivity. A second independent algorithm uses a combination of factor analysis, target transformation, and deconvolution to simultaneously find dust, water ice, and surface emissivity spectral shapes. Both algorithms have been applied to TES spectra, and both find very similar atmospheric and surface spectral shapes. For TES spectra taken during aerobraking and science phasing periods in nadir-geometry these two algorithms give meaningful and usable surface emissivity spectra that can be used for mineralogical identification.

  19. Ion microprobe elemental analyses of impact features on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Wortman, Jim J.; Griffis, Dieter P.; Simon, Charles G.

    1991-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact features on several of the electro-active dust sensors utilized in the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) were subjected to elemental analysis using an ion microprobe. The negatively biased dust sensor surfaces acted as ion traps for cations produced in the plasma plumes of impacting particles. Impactor residue surrounds most impact features to two or three feature diameters. After etching away a layer of carbonaceous/silicaceous surface contamination, low mass resolution elemental survey scans are used to tentatively identify the presence of impactor debris. High mass resolution two-dimensional elemental maps and three dimensional depth profiling of the feature and surrounding area show the distribution and relative composition of the debris. The location of these sensors on the six primary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) sides provides a unique opportunity to further define the debris environment. Researchers applied the same techniques to impact and contaminant features on a set of ultra-pure, highly polished single crystal germanium wafer witness plates that were mounted on row 12 and exposed to the environment during the entire mission.

  20. Predicting the Occurrence of Cave-Inhabiting Fauna Based on Features of the Earth Surface Environment.

    PubMed

    Christman, Mary C; Doctor, Daniel H; Niemiller, Matthew L; Weary, David J; Young, John A; Zigler, Kirk S; Culver, David C

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging fauna to study in situ is the obligate cave fauna because of the difficulty of sampling. Cave-limited species display patchy and restricted distributions, but it is often unclear whether the observed distribution is a sampling artifact or a true restriction in range. Further, the drivers of the distribution could be local environmental conditions, such as cave humidity, or they could be associated with surface features that are surrogates for cave conditions. If surface features can be used to predict the distribution of important cave taxa, then conservation management is more easily obtained. We examined the hypothesis that the presence of major faunal groups of cave obligate species could be predicted based on features of the earth surface. Georeferenced records of cave obligate amphipods, crayfish, fish, isopods, beetles, millipedes, pseudoscorpions, spiders, and springtails within the area of Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative in the eastern United States (Illinois to Virginia and New York to Alabama) were assigned to 20 x 20 km grid cells. Habitat suitability for these faunal groups was modeled using logistic regression with twenty predictor variables within each grid cell, such as percent karst, soil features, temperature, precipitation, and elevation. Models successfully predicted the presence of a group greater than 65% of the time (mean = 88%) for the presence of single grid cell endemics, and for all faunal groups except pseudoscorpions. The most common predictor variables were latitude, percent karst, and the standard deviation of the Topographic Position Index (TPI), a measure of landscape rugosity within each grid cell. The overall success of these models points to a number of important connections between the surface and cave environments, and some of these, especially soil features and topographic variability, suggest new research directions. These models should prove to be useful tools in predicting the

  1. Predicting the Occurrence of Cave-Inhabiting Fauna Based on Features of the Earth Surface Environment

    PubMed Central

    Doctor, Daniel H.; Niemiller, Matthew L.; Weary, David J.; Young, John A.; Zigler, Kirk S.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging fauna to study in situ is the obligate cave fauna because of the difficulty of sampling. Cave-limited species display patchy and restricted distributions, but it is often unclear whether the observed distribution is a sampling artifact or a true restriction in range. Further, the drivers of the distribution could be local environmental conditions, such as cave humidity, or they could be associated with surface features that are surrogates for cave conditions. If surface features can be used to predict the distribution of important cave taxa, then conservation management is more easily obtained. We examined the hypothesis that the presence of major faunal groups of cave obligate species could be predicted based on features of the earth surface. Georeferenced records of cave obligate amphipods, crayfish, fish, isopods, beetles, millipedes, pseudoscorpions, spiders, and springtails within the area of Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative in the eastern United States (Illinois to Virginia and New York to Alabama) were assigned to 20 x 20 km grid cells. Habitat suitability for these faunal groups was modeled using logistic regression with twenty predictor variables within each grid cell, such as percent karst, soil features, temperature, precipitation, and elevation. Models successfully predicted the presence of a group greater than 65% of the time (mean = 88%) for the presence of single grid cell endemics, and for all faunal groups except pseudoscorpions. The most common predictor variables were latitude, percent karst, and the standard deviation of the Topographic Position Index (TPI), a measure of landscape rugosity within each grid cell. The overall success of these models points to a number of important connections between the surface and cave environments, and some of these, especially soil features and topographic variability, suggest new research directions. These models should prove to be useful tools in predicting the

  2. Predicting the Occurrence of Cave-Inhabiting Fauna Based on Features of the Earth Surface Environment.

    PubMed

    Christman, Mary C; Doctor, Daniel H; Niemiller, Matthew L; Weary, David J; Young, John A; Zigler, Kirk S; Culver, David C

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging fauna to study in situ is the obligate cave fauna because of the difficulty of sampling. Cave-limited species display patchy and restricted distributions, but it is often unclear whether the observed distribution is a sampling artifact or a true restriction in range. Further, the drivers of the distribution could be local environmental conditions, such as cave humidity, or they could be associated with surface features that are surrogates for cave conditions. If surface features can be used to predict the distribution of important cave taxa, then conservation management is more easily obtained. We examined the hypothesis that the presence of major faunal groups of cave obligate species could be predicted based on features of the earth surface. Georeferenced records of cave obligate amphipods, crayfish, fish, isopods, beetles, millipedes, pseudoscorpions, spiders, and springtails within the area of Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative in the eastern United States (Illinois to Virginia and New York to Alabama) were assigned to 20 x 20 km grid cells. Habitat suitability for these faunal groups was modeled using logistic regression with twenty predictor variables within each grid cell, such as percent karst, soil features, temperature, precipitation, and elevation. Models successfully predicted the presence of a group greater than 65% of the time (mean = 88%) for the presence of single grid cell endemics, and for all faunal groups except pseudoscorpions. The most common predictor variables were latitude, percent karst, and the standard deviation of the Topographic Position Index (TPI), a measure of landscape rugosity within each grid cell. The overall success of these models points to a number of important connections between the surface and cave environments, and some of these, especially soil features and topographic variability, suggest new research directions. These models should prove to be useful tools in predicting the

  3. Characterization and optimization of illumination vector for contouring surface form and feature using DSPI.

    PubMed

    Song, Chaolong; Prasad A S, Guru; Chan, Kelvin H K; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-06-01

    Surface defect or damage is one of the critical factors leading to the failure of engineering materials and structures. The methodologies for the measurement of surface shape and feature or defect have been extensively explored and developed over the past few decades, including both contact and non-contact methods. Speckle pattern interferometry, as a non-contact optical method, has been demonstrated to effectively contour the surface shape through adjusting the illumination vector. However, few studies have been made to investigate the effect of the initial position of the illumination source as well as the source translation direction. In this paper, we report to carry out a study of measuring the surface form and feature using digital speckle pattern interferometry system via a slight translation of illumination source. Through theoretically analyzing the sensitivity factor along with the experimental validation, it is shown that the contouring fringe is more sensitive to the surface height with an off-axis illumination than the paraxial illumination. It is also found that translating the source along axial and lateral direction can be both used for the surface shape re-construction. PMID:27370435

  4. Characterization and optimization of illumination vector for contouring surface form and feature using DSPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chaolong; Prasad A. S., Guru; Chan, Kelvin H. K.; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-06-01

    Surface defect or damage is one of the critical factors leading to the failure of engineering materials and structures. The methodologies for the measurement of surface shape and feature or defect have been extensively explored and developed over the past few decades, including both contact and non-contact methods. Speckle pattern interferometry, as a non-contact optical method, has been demonstrated to effectively contour the surface shape through adjusting the illumination vector. However, few studies have been made to investigate the effect of the initial position of the illumination source as well as the source translation direction. In this paper, we report to carry out a study of measuring the surface form and feature using digital speckle pattern interferometry system via a slight translation of illumination source. Through theoretically analyzing the sensitivity factor along with the experimental validation, it is shown that the contouring fringe is more sensitive to the surface height with an off-axis illumination than the paraxial illumination. It is also found that translating the source along axial and lateral direction can be both used for the surface shape re-construction.

  5. Distinct Surface Features of Ignimbrites Related to Post-depositional Degassing - Criteria for their Identification on Other Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, S. L.; Bailey, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Developing criteria to differentiate between different lithologies is crucial to unraveling the history of planetary surfaces. The presence of ignimbrites on Mars has been debated for over three decades. If correct, this interpretation has implications for the style of volcanism, the evolution of magmas and volatiles in the mantle and crust, the presence of water, and the evolution of the atmosphere. Ongoing work on the surface patterns of terrestrial ignimbrites in the Central Andes reveal a class of features related to post-depositional degassing that maybe unique to ignimbrites. We focus on interconnected broadly concentric zones of polygonally-fractured intense alteration that form the cores to an extensive radiating fracture network. These are informally called 'arachnids' or 'matrix bugs'. Field investigation reveals abundant sulphur and hydrothermal alteration of the cores with a clear thermal zonation. Resulting induration manifests as elevated core regions and indurated ridges that control the development of yardangs. The character and spacing of the arachnids suggests their formation is related to the presence of external water. The manifestation of these features varies with the degree of induration of the ignimbrites, which is a rough proxy for the volume of the deposit. Arachnids and bugs maybe part of a genre of post-depositional thermal and volatile release features in ignimbrites that include phreatic explosion craters, columnar jointing and fumarolic mounds. These features maybe unique to ignimbrites and may provide a distinct criterion for their identification with high resolution remotely sensed data in regions with little dust cover. Recognising such features in higher resolution data such as HiRiSe on Mars may be limited by the extensive dust cover.

  6. Thermal Behaviour of Unusual Local-Scale Surface Features on Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosi, F.; Capria, M. T.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Sunshine, J. M.; McCord, T. B.; Titus, T. N.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Toplis, M. J.; Forni, O.; Sykes, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    On Vesta, the region of the infrared spectrum beyond approximately 3.5 micrometers is dominated by the thermal emission of the asteroid's surface, which can be used to determine surface temperature by means of temperature-retrieval algorithms. The thermal behavior of areas of unusual albedo seen at the local scale can be related to physical properties that can provide information about the origin of those materials. Dawn's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) hyperspectral cubes are used to retrieve surface temperatures, with high accuracy as long as temperatures are greater than 180 K. Data acquired in the Survey phase (23 July through 29 August 2011) show several unusual surface features: 1) high-albedo (bright) and low-albedo (dark) material deposits, 2) spectrally distinct ejecta, 3) regions suggesting finer-grained materials. Some of the unusual dark and bright features were re-observed by VIR in the subsequent High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) phases at increased pixel resolution. To calculate surface temperatures, we applied a Bayesian approach to nonlinear inversion based on the Kirchhoff law and the Planck function. These results were cross-checked through application of alternative methods. Here we present temperature maps of several local-scale features that were observed by Dawn under different illumination conditions and different local solar times. Some bright terrains have an overall albedo in the visible as much as 40% brighter than surrounding areas. Data from the IR channel of VIR show that bright regions generally correspond to regions with lower thermal emission, i.e. lower temperature, while dark regions correspond to areas with higher thermal emission, i.e. higher temperature. This behavior confirms that many of the dark appearances in the VIS mainly reflect albedo variations. In particular, it is shown that during maximum daily insolation, dark features in the equatorial region may rise to

  7. Meteorological data for four sites at surface-disruption features in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1985--1986

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    Surface-disruption features, or craters, resulting from underground nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site may increase the potential for ground-water recharge in an area that would normally produce little, if any, recharge. This report presents selected meteorological data resulting from a study of two surface-disruption features during May 1985 through June 1986. The data were collected at four adjacent sites in Yucca Flat, about 56 kilometers north of Mercury, Nevada. Three sites (one in each of two craters and one at an undisturbed site at the original land surface) were instrumented to collect meteorological data for calculating bare-soil evaporation. These data include (1) long-wave radiation, (2) short-wave radiation, (3) net radiation, (4) air temperature, and (5) soil surface temperature. Meteorological data also were collected at a weather station at an undisturbed site near the study craters. Data collected at this site include (1) air temperature, (2) relative humidity, (3) wind velocity, and (4) wind direction.

  8. Meteorological data for four sites at surface-disruption features in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1985-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carman, Rita L.

    1994-01-01

    Surface-disruption features, or craters, resulting from underground nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site may increase the potential for ground-water recharge in an area that would normally produce little, if any, recharge. This report presents selected meteorological data resulting from a study of two surface-disruption features during May 1985 through June 1986. The data were collected at four adjacent sites in Yucca Flat, about 56 kilometers north of Mercury, Nevada. Three sites (one in each of two craters and one at an undisturbed site at the original land surface) were instrumented to collect meteorological data for calculating bare-soil evaporation. These data include (1) long-wave radiation, (2) short-wave radiation, (3) net radiation, (4) air temperae, and (5) soil surface temperature. Meteorological data also were collected at a weather station at an undisturbed site near the study craters. Data collected at this site include (1) air temperature, (2) relative humidity, (3) wind velocity, and (4) wind direction.

  9. Nanoporous Gold as a Neural Interface Coating: Effects of Topography, Surface Chemistry, and Feature Size

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Christopher A. R.; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika M.; Lein, Pamela J.; Seker, Erkin

    2015-02-23

    We report that designing neural interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to an electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron–electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au’s interaction with cortical neuron–glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au achieves close physical coupling of neurons by maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations in the dealloying conditions. In conclusion, our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage and may enhance neuron–electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation.

  10. Nanoporous Gold as a Neural Interface Coating: Effects of Topography, Surface Chemistry, and Feature Size

    DOE PAGES

    Chapman, Christopher A. R.; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika M.; Lein, Pamela J.; Seker, Erkin

    2015-02-23

    We report that designing neural interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to an electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron–electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au’s interactionmore » with cortical neuron–glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au achieves close physical coupling of neurons by maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations in the dealloying conditions. In conclusion, our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage and may enhance neuron–electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation.« less

  11. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  12. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  13. Dry granular flows can generate surface features resembling those seen in Martian gullies

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Troy; Duong, N.-H.; Kwan, L.; Alvarez, M. M.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade or more, contradictory evidence of Martian climate, indicating that surface temperatures seldom if ever approach the melting point of water at midlatitudes, and geomorphic features, consistent with liquid flows at these same latitudes, have proven difficult to reconcile. In this article, we demonstrate that several features of liquid-erosional flows can be produced by dry granular materials when individual particle settling is slower than characteristic debris flow speeds. Since the gravitational acceleration on Mars is about one-third that on Earth, and since particle settling speeds scale with gravity, we propose that some (although perhaps not all) Martian geomorphological features attributed to liquid flows may in fact be associated with dry granular flows in the presence of reduced gravity. PMID:15169960

  14. Formation of Combined Surface Features of Protrusion Array and Wrinkles atop Shape-Memory Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, W. M.; Tong, T. H.

    We demonstrate a simple and cost-effective approach to realize two combined surface features of different scales together, namely submillimeter-sized protrusion array and microwrinkles, atop a polystyrene shape-memory polymer. Two different types of protrusions, namely flat-top protrusion and crown-shaped protrusion, were studied. The array of protrusions was produced by the Indentation-Polishing-Heating (IPH) process. Compactly packed steel balls were used for making array of indents. A thin gold layer was sputter deposited atop the polymer surface right after polishing. After heating for shape recovery, array of protrusions with wrinkles on the top due to the buckling of gold layer was produced.

  15. Phobos and deimos: Analysis of surface features, ejecta dynamics and a volatile loss mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. R.; Chapman, C. R.; Greenberg, R.; Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The question of whether the crater population on Phobos represents a production population or an equilibrium population is considered. The absolute ages of cratered surfaces are interpreted and analyzed. A computer program was developed to study the dynamics of material ejected from Martian satellites and to investigate the hypothesis that at least some of the extensive set of linear features discovered on the surface of Phobos could be the result of secondary cratering from the Stickney impact. The possibility that Deimos was catastrophically disrupted by a large impact but subsequently reaccreted is considered as well as the probability the Phobos had an impact nearly large enough to disrupt it are also discussed.

  16. Thermal infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The subjects of infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications is reviewed with respect to the basic physical concepts involved at the Earth's surface and up through the atmosphere, as well as the historical development of satellite systems which produce such data at increasingly greater spatial resolution. With this general background in hand, the growth of a variety of specific renewable resource applications using the developing thermal infrared technology are discussed, including data from HCMM investigators. Recommendations are made for continued growth in this field of applications.

  17. Cryovolcanic Features on Titan's Surface as Revealed by the Cassini RADAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, R. M.; Elachi, C.; Stofan, E.; Paganelli, F.; Wood, C.; Kirk, R.; Lorenz, R.; Fortes, A. D.; Lunine, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper obtained Synthetic Aperture radar images of about 1.1% of Titan's surface during the spacecraft s first targeted fly-by on October 26, 2004 (referred to as the Ta fly-by). These images revealed that Titan is very complex geologically. Features identified include a possible volcanic dome or shield, craters that appear to be of volcanic origin, and extensive flows. We will discuss these features and others that will likely be revealed during Cassini s T3 Titan fly-by of February 15, 2005, during which a swath covering comparable amount of the surface will be obtained. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  18. Soil characteristics and vegetation features of abandoned and artificially revegetated surface mines in the Cumberland Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Rafaill, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    Soil characteristics and vegetational features of four 15-to-20-year-old contour coal surface mines in the Cumberland Mountains were compared. Two of the mines were abandoned after mining and are located in Campbell County, Tennessee. The other two mines, located in Bell County, Kentucky, were reclaimed after mining. The soils at all four sites were found to be in early stages of soil development. Chemical and physical soil factors were not detrimental to plant growth. Total overstory density at the abandoned sites was similar to that on the reclaimed mines, but one and one-half times as many tree size stems and twice as much basal area coverage were found on the abandoned sites as compared to the reclaimed mines. Many features resulting from prelaw contour mining practices benefited the development of plant communities on the mined land. Information should be sought from the study of plant communities which develop over the years on surface mines.

  19. Thermal Analysis of Unusual Local-scale Features on the Surface of Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosi, F.; Capria, M. T.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Capaccioni, F.; Palomba, E.; Zambon, F.; Ammannito, E.; Blewett, D. T.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Denevi, B. W.; Li, J.-Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Palmer, E.; Sunshine, J. M.; Titus, T. N.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-01-01

    At 525 km in mean diameter, Vesta is the second-most massive object in the main asteroid belt of our Solar System. At all scales, pyroxene absorptions are the most prominent spectral features on Vesta and overall, Vesta mineralogy indicates a complex magmatic evolution that led to a differentiated crust and mantle [1]. The thermal behavior of areas of unusual albedo seen on the surface at the local scale can be related to physical properties that can provide information about the origin of those materials. Dawn's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) [2] hyperspectral images are routinely used, by means of temperature-retrieval algorithms, to compute surface temperatures along with spectral emissivities. Here we present temperature maps of several local-scale features of Vesta that were observed by Dawn under different illumination conditions and different local solar times.

  20. Radar signal return from near-shore surface and shallow subsurface features, Darien Province, Panama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, B. C.; Dellwig, L. F.

    1973-01-01

    The AN/APQ-97 radar imagery over eastern Panama is analyzed. The imagery was directed toward extraction of geologic and engineering data and the establishment of operational parameters. Subsequent investigations emphasized landform identification and vegetation distribution. The parameters affecting the observed return signal strength from such features are considered. Near-shore ocean phenomena were analyzed. Tidal zone features such as mud flats and reefs were identified in the near range, but were not detectable in the far range. Surface roughness dictated the nature of reflected energy (specular or diffuse). In surf zones, changes in wave train orientation relative to look direction, the slope of the surface, and the physical character of the wave must be considered. It is concluded that the establishment of the areal extent of the tidal flats, distributary channels, and reefs is practical only in the near to intermediate range under minimal low tide conditions.

  1. Optimizing angle-to-area-converting, light-piping systems using surface features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Thomas L. R.; Cassarly, William J.; Hough, Thomas A.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate how to improve the uniformity of the spatial distribution of the illuminance at the output plane for angle-to-area-converting, light-piping systems through the introduction of cyclical surface features. A superposition approach is used for studying uniformity. Improvements in uniformity for square-to-circle and rectangle-to-circle lightpipe configurations are demonstrated for a short package length.

  2. Taxonomically Important Features on the Surface of Floatoblasts in Plumatella (Bryozoa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Kevin T.

    2000-05-01

    : At the species level, bryozoans (class Phylactolaemata) in the family Plumatellidae are difficult to organize taxonomically. Of principal concern is the absence of consistent distinguishing features due mainly to plasticity of the group, a common problem with soft-bodied invertebrates. Yet, within the last three decades, analysis of distinctive chitinous statoblasts—using scanning electron microscopy—has resolved certain taxonomic questions. I examined statoblasts from 30 similar collections, the majority from the midwestern United States, and identified four distinct subgroups. Also, nine new statoblast surface features were identified: fold, polar grooves, bead, cave, demarcation, parasutural zone, ridge, sutural band, and sutural knob. The surface features of floating statoblasts (floatoblasts) provide useful data for species identification. Most consistently useful in plumatellids is a suture which varies from one species to the next. Mound-like tubercles and net-like ridges are next in the extent of variability. Finally, folds and polar grooves are present but vary even within floatoblasts from the same colony. Analysis of the suture in PLUMATELLA FUNGOSA, over a 5-day germination period, reveals all features at the site remain intact regardless of the initial age of the floatoblast. Only the suture line itself splits lengthwise to permit emergence of the new animal.

  3. Memory for surface features of unfamiliar melodies: independent effects of changes in pitch and tempo.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Stalinski, Stephanie M; Marks, Bradley M

    2014-01-01

    A melody's identity is determined by relations between consecutive tones in terms of pitch and duration, whereas surface features (i.e., pitch level or key, tempo, and timbre) are irrelevant. Although surface features of highly familiar recordings are encoded into memory, little is known about listeners' mental representations of melodies heard once or twice. It is also unknown whether musical pitch is represented additively or interactively with temporal information. In two experiments, listeners heard unfamiliar melodies twice in an initial exposure phase. In a subsequent test phase, they heard the same (old) melodies interspersed with new melodies. Some of the old melodies were shifted in key, tempo, or key and tempo. Listeners' task was to rate how well they recognized each melody from the exposure phase while ignoring changes in key and tempo. Recognition ratings were higher for old melodies that stayed the same compared to those that were shifted in key or tempo, and detrimental effects of key and tempo changes were additive in between-subjects (Experiment 1) and within-subjects (Experiment 2) designs. The results confirm that surface features are remembered for melodies heard only twice. They also imply that key and tempo are processed and stored independently. PMID:23385775

  4. Memory for surface features of unfamiliar melodies: independent effects of changes in pitch and tempo.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Stalinski, Stephanie M; Marks, Bradley M

    2014-01-01

    A melody's identity is determined by relations between consecutive tones in terms of pitch and duration, whereas surface features (i.e., pitch level or key, tempo, and timbre) are irrelevant. Although surface features of highly familiar recordings are encoded into memory, little is known about listeners' mental representations of melodies heard once or twice. It is also unknown whether musical pitch is represented additively or interactively with temporal information. In two experiments, listeners heard unfamiliar melodies twice in an initial exposure phase. In a subsequent test phase, they heard the same (old) melodies interspersed with new melodies. Some of the old melodies were shifted in key, tempo, or key and tempo. Listeners' task was to rate how well they recognized each melody from the exposure phase while ignoring changes in key and tempo. Recognition ratings were higher for old melodies that stayed the same compared to those that were shifted in key or tempo, and detrimental effects of key and tempo changes were additive in between-subjects (Experiment 1) and within-subjects (Experiment 2) designs. The results confirm that surface features are remembered for melodies heard only twice. They also imply that key and tempo are processed and stored independently.

  5. Reduced adhesion of macrophages on anodized titanium with select nanotube surface features

    PubMed Central

    Rajyalakshmi, Amancherla; Ercan, Batur; Balasubramanian, K; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    One of the important prerequisites for a successful orthopedic implant apart from being osteoconductive is the elicitation of a favorable immune response that does not lead to the rejection of the implant by the host tissue. Anodization is one of the simplest surface modification processes used to create nanotextured and nanotubular features on metal oxides which has been shown to improve bone formation. Anodization of titanium (Ti) leads to the formation of TiO2 nanotubes on the surface, and the presence of these nanotubes mimics the natural nanoscale features of bone, which in turn contributes to improved bone cell attachment, migration, and proliferation. However, inflammatory cell responses on anodized Ti remains to be tested. It is hypothesized that surface roughness and surface feature size on anodized Ti can be carefully manipulated to control immune cell (specifically, macrophages) responses. Here, when Ti samples were anodized at 10 V in the presence of 1% hydrofluoric acid (HF) for 1 minute, nanotextured (nonnanotube) surfaces were created. When anodization of Ti samples was carried out with 1% HF for 10 minutes at 15 V, nanotubes with 40–50 nm diameters were formed, whereas at 20 V with 1% HF for 10 minutes, nanotubes with 60–70 nm diameters were formed. In this study, a reduced density of macrophages was observed after 24 hours of culture on nanotextured and nanotubular Ti samples which were anodized at 10, 15, and 20 V, compared with conventional unmodified Ti samples. This in vitro study thus demonstrated a reduced density of macrophages on anodized Ti, thereby providing further evidence of the greater efficacy of anodized Ti for orthopedic applications. PMID:21980239

  6. Geology and ground-water features of salt springs, seeps, and plains in the Arkansas and Red River basins of western Oklahoma and adjacent parts of Kansas and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, P.E.

    1963-01-01

    The salt springs, seeps, and plains described in this report are in the Arkansas and Red River basins in western Oklahoma and adjacent areas in Kansas and Texas. The springs and seeps contribute significantly to the generally poor water quality of the rivers by bringing salt (HaCI) to the surface at an estimated daily rate of more than 8,000 tons. The region investigated is characterized by low hills and rolling plains. Many of the rivers are eroded 100 feet or more below the .surrounding upland surface and in places the valleys are bordered by steep bluffs. The alluvial plains of the major rivers are wide and the river channels are shallow and unstable. The flow of many surface streams is intermittent, especially in the western part of the area. All the natural salt-contributing areas studied are within the outcrop area of rocks of Permian age. The Permian rocks, commonly termed red beds, are composed principally of red and gray gypsiferous shale, siltstone, sandstone, gypsum, anhydrite, and dolomite. Many of the formations contain halite in the subsurface. The halite occurs mostly as discontinuous lenses in shale, although some of the thicker, more massive beds are extensive. It underlies the entire region studied at depths ranging from about 30 feet to more than 2,000 feet. The salt and associated strata show evidence of extensive removal of salt through solution by ground water. Although the salt generally occurs in relatively impervious shale small joints and fractures ,allow the passage of small quantities of water which dissolves the salt. Salt water occurs in the report area at depths ranging from less than 100 feet to more than 1,000 feet. Salt water occurs both as meteoric and connate, but the water emerging as salt springs is meteoric. Tritium analyses show that the age of the water from several springs is less than 20 years. The salt springs, seeps, and plains are confined to 13 local areas. The flow of the springs and seeps is small, but the chloride

  7. Microdevice having interior cavity with high aspect ratio surface features and associated methods of manufacture and use

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2002-01-01

    A microdevice having interior cavity with high aspect ratio features and ultrasmooth surfaces, and associated method of manufacture and use is described. An LIGA-produced shaped bit is used to contour polish the surface of a sacrificial mandrel. The contoured sacrificial mandrel is subsequently coated with a structural material and the mandrel removed to produce microdevices having micrometer-sized surface features and sub-micrometer RMS surface roughness.

  8. Contributions of feature shapes and surface cues to the recognition and neural representation of facial identity.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Timothy J; Baseler, Heidi; Jenkins, Rob; Burton, A Mike; Young, Andrew W

    2016-10-01

    A full understanding of face recognition will involve identifying the visual information that is used to discriminate different identities and how this is represented in the brain. The aim of this study was to explore the importance of shape and surface properties in the recognition and neural representation of familiar faces. We used image morphing techniques to generate hybrid faces that mixed shape properties (more specifically, second order spatial configural information as defined by feature positions in the 2D-image) from one identity and surface properties from a different identity. Behavioural responses showed that recognition and matching of these hybrid faces was primarily based on their surface properties. These behavioural findings contrasted with neural responses recorded using a block design fMRI adaptation paradigm to test the sensitivity of Haxby et al.'s (2000) core face-selective regions in the human brain to the shape or surface properties of the face. The fusiform face area (FFA) and occipital face area (OFA) showed a lower response (adaptation) to repeated images of the same face (same shape, same surface) compared to different faces (different shapes, different surfaces). From the behavioural data indicating the critical contribution of surface properties to the recognition of identity, we predicted that brain regions responsible for familiar face recognition should continue to adapt to faces that vary in shape but not surface properties, but show a release from adaptation to faces that vary in surface properties but not shape. However, we found that the FFA and OFA showed an equivalent release from adaptation to changes in both shape and surface properties. The dissociation between the neural and perceptual responses suggests that, although they may play a role in the process, these core face regions are not solely responsible for the recognition of facial identity.

  9. Stability, surface features, and atom leaching of palladium nanoparticles: toward prediction of catalytic functionality.

    PubMed

    Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Mirau, Peter A; Naik, Rajesh R; Knecht, Marc R; Heinz, Hendrik

    2013-04-21

    Surfactant-stabilized metal nanoparticles have shown promise as catalysts although specific surface features and their influence on catalytic performance have not been well understood. We quantify the thermodynamic stability, the facet composition of the surface, and distinct atom types that affect rates of atom leaching for a series of twenty near-spherical Pd nanoparticles of 1.8 to 3.1 nm size using computational models. Cohesive energies indicate higher stability of certain particles that feature an approximate 60/20/20 ratio of {111}, {100}, and {110} facets while less stable particles exhibit widely variable facet composition. Unique patterns of atom types on the surface cause apparent differences in binding energies and changes in reactivity. Estimates of the relative rate of atom leaching as a function of particle size were obtained by the summation of Boltzmann-weighted binding energies over all surface atoms. Computed leaching rates are in good qualitative correlation with the measured catalytic activity of peptide-stabilized Pd nanoparticles of the same shape and size in Stille coupling reactions. The agreement supports rate-controlling contributions by atom leaching in the presence of reactive substrates. The computational approach provides a pathway to estimate the catalytic activity of metal nanostructures of engineered shape and size, and possible further refinements are described.

  10. Modeling the electromagnetic response of Titan's surface features observed by Cassini Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, B.; Casarano, D.; Notarnicola, C.; Di Rosa, D.; Posa, F.

    2006-09-01

    The Cassini spacecraft, launched in 1997, begun the exploration of the Saturnian system in July 2004. 44 flybies of the Saturn largest moon Titan are planned during the four years of the Cassini mission and 16 are Radar passes. A Radar, developed jointly by JPL, ASI and Alenia Spazio, is mounted on Cassini. The instrument operates at 13.8 GHz (Ku band) and has passive (radiometer) and active (scatterometer, altimeter, SAR imaging) capabilities. Until July 2006, six (Ta, T3, T7, T8, T13, T16) radar planned passes have been accomplished. The data are processed by the JPL and stored in the Basic Image Data Records (BIDR) files, thus obtaining SAR images and brightness temperature profiles of a significant fraction of Titan's surface. The Radar Cross Section, RCS, derived from the SAR imagery, reflects the complex Titan's surface morphology. The data show RCS variations in excess of 20 dB between the "brightest" and the "darkest" areas. On the basis of brightness, texture, and morphology eight different surface units were identified by Cassini Radar Science Team (CRST) scientists. The darkest features are good candidate to be lakes of hydrocarbons. Moreover, periodic structures ("sand dunes") have been observed: in this case the RCS variations can be described in terms of tilt angle effect, thus modifying the local incidence angle. In this paper, the RCS behaviour of the observed features is studied in detail by the means of the Integral Equation Method, IEM. The dependence of the backscattering coefficient on the surface physical properties, composition and roughness of different areas is analyzed resulting in some possible scenarios for the observed features. Surfaces are modeled as Gaussian stationary processes and volume scattering is also taken into account, due to the transparency of water ice at radar wavelength. The data of the IEM model are compared with numerical simulations based on the Kirchhoff approximation with auto similar surfaces performed as

  11. Reduced responses of macrophages on nanometer surface features of altered alumina crystalline phases.

    PubMed

    Khang, Dongwoo; Liu-Snyder, Peishan; Pareta, Rajesh; Lu, Jing; Webster, Thomas J

    2009-06-01

    Extensive prolonged interactions of inflammatory cells (such as macrophages) at the host-implant interface may lead to implant failure. While previous studies have shown increased in vitro and in vivo bone cell adhesion, proliferation and mineralization on nanophase compared to currently implanted ceramics, few studies have been conducted to elucidate inflammatory cell responses on such nanophase ceramics. Controlling surface feature size and corresponding surface roughness on implants may clearly alter immune cell responses, which would be an extremely important consideration for the use of nanostructured materials as improved biomaterials. In this study, reduced macrophage density was observed on alumina (Al(2)O(3)) compacts with greater nanometer surface roughness accompanied by changes in crystallinity for up to 24 h in culture. Since alumina is a commonly used ceramic in orthopedic applications, this in vitro study continues to support the use of nanophase ceramics as improved orthopedic implants by demonstrating reduced macrophage responses.

  12. Integration of Urban Features into a Coupled Groundwater-Surface Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, A. S.; Welty, C.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    To better understand the feedbacks between urban development and water availability, we are coupling an integrated hydrologic model with an urban growth model, both of the Baltimore, Maryland, USA region. The urban growth model SLEUTH has been calibrated, validated and run by collaborators at Shippensburg University. We are using ParFlow.CLM as the integrated hydrologic model. This model is applied to the 13,000 sq. km. Baltimore metropolitan area, which spans the Gunpowder and Patapsco watersheds. The model domain includes both Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces. We have incorporated characteristics of both the natural hydrogeologic system and the superimposed urban environment. Standard hydrogeologic information such as hydraulic conductivity of fractured bedrock, Coastal Plain sediments, and surficial soils, as well as saprolite thickness, porosity, and specific storage properties have been included. We have also quantified a number of aspects representing urban development, such as residential and municipal well pumping, municipal reservoir use, lawn watering, and water supply pipe leakage estimates. We have represented impervious surface coverage using low surface hydraulic conductivity values. The land surface fluxes in CLM (Common Land Model) use surface land cover and therefore represent reduced evapotranspiration in urban areas. A study of urban and natural watershed inflows and inflows in this region indicated some urban features significantly modify catchment water balances. We are particularly interested in the effects of these urban hydrologic features on groundwater recharge in the Baltimore area. Prior to inclusion of subsurface heterogeneity, we initialized the model by running it hourly from 2000 to 2007. The initialization was generated by a dynamic spin-up process, using the UMBC High Performance Computing Facility. Observed meteorological forcing, such as hourly precipitation and air temperature, are used by the land surface

  13. Feasibility of detecting near-surface feature with Rayleigh-wave diffraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Nyquist, J.E.; Xu, Y.; Roth, M.J.S.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    Detection of near-surfaces features such as voids and faults is challenging due to the complexity of near-surface materials and the limited resolution of geophysical methods. Although multichannel, high-frequency, surface-wave techniques can provide reliable shear (S)-wave velocities in different geological settings, they are not suitable for detecting voids directly based on anomalies of the S-wave velocity because of limitations on the resolution of S-wave velocity profiles inverted from surface-wave phase velocities. Therefore, we studied the feasibility of directly detecting near-surfaces features with surface-wave diffractions. Based on the properties of surface waves, we have derived a Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation. We also have solved the equation for the depth to the top of a void and an average velocity of Rayleigh waves. Using these equations, the depth to the top of a void/fault can be determined based on traveltime data from a diffraction curve. In practice, only two diffraction times are necessary to define the depth to the top of a void/fault and the average Rayleigh-wave velocity that generates the diffraction curve. We used four two-dimensional square voids to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting a void with Rayleigh-wave diffractions: a 2??m by 2??m with a depth to the top of the void of 2??m, 4??m by 4??m with a depth to the top of the void of 7??m, and 6??m by 6??m with depths to the top of the void 12??m and 17??m. We also modeled surface waves due to a vertical fault. Rayleigh-wave diffractions were recognizable for all these models after FK filtering was applied to the synthetic data. The Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation was verified by the modeled data. Modeling results suggested that FK filtering is critical to enhance diffracted surface waves. A real-world example is presented to show how to utilize the derived equation of surface-wave diffractions. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential surface models for tactile perception of shape and on-line tracking of features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemami, H.

    1987-01-01

    Tactile perception of shape involves an on-line controller and a shape perceptor. The purpose of the on-line controller is to maintain gliding or rolling contact with the surface, and collect information, or track specific features of the surface such as edges of a certain sharpness. The shape perceptor uses the information to perceive, estimate the parameters of, or recognize the shape. The differential surface model depends on the information collected and on the a priori information known about the robot and its physical parameters. These differential models are certain functionals that are projections of the dynamics of the robot onto the surface gradient or onto the tangent plane. A number of differential properties may be directly measured from present day tactile sensors. Others may have to be indirectly computed from measurements. Others may constitute design objectives for distributed tactile sensors of the future. A parameterization of the surface leads to linear and nonlinear sequential parameter estimation techniques for identification of the surface. Many interesting compromises between measurement and computation are possible.

  15. Examining the Impact of Question Surface Features on Students' Answers to Constructed-Response Questions on Photosynthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Michele; Haudek, Kevin C.; Prevost, Luanna; Urban-Lurain, Mark; Merrill, John

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in science education assessment is that students often focus on surface features of questions rather than the underlying scientific principles. We investigated how student written responses to constructed-response questions about photosynthesis vary based on two surface features of the question: the species of plant and the order of…

  16. Groundwater and surface-water resources in the Bureau of Land Management Moab Master Leasing Plan area and adjacent areas, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, and Mesa and Montrose Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masbruch, Melissa D.; Shope, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Canyon Country District Office is preparing a leasing plan known as the Moab Master Leasing Plan (Moab MLP) for oil, gas, and potash mineral rights in an area encompassing 946,469 acres in southeastern Utah. The BLM has identified water resources as being potentially affected by oil, gas, and potash development and has requested that the U.S. Geological Survey prepare a summary of existing water-resources information for the Moab MLP area. This report includes a summary and synthesis of previous and ongoing investigations conducted in the Moab MLP and adjacent areas in Utah and Colorado from the early 1930s through the late 2000s. Eight principal aquifers and six confining units were identified within the study area. Permeability is a function of both the primary permeability from interstitial pore connectivity and secondary permeability created by karst features or faults and fractures. Vertical hydraulic connection generally is restricted to strongly folded and fractured zones, which are concentrated along steeply dipping monoclines and in narrow regions encompassing igneous and salt intrusive masses. Several studies have identified both an upper and lower aquifer system separated by the Pennsylvanian age Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation evaporite, which is considered a confining unit and is present throughout large parts of the study area. Surface-water resources of the study area are dominated by the Colorado River. Several perennial and ephemeral or intermittent tributaries join the Colorado River as it flows from northeast to southwest across the study area. An annual spring snowmelt and runoff event dominates the hydrology of streams draining mountainous parts of the study area, and most perennial streams in the study area are snowmelt-dominated. A bimodal distribution is observed in hydrographs from some sites with a late-spring snowmelt-runoff peak followed by smaller peaks of shorter duration during the late

  17. Features of morphology and geology of surface of Jupiter satellite Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, Anatoliy; Morozhenko, A.; Klyanchin, A.

    2011-12-01

    Comparison of large-scale images of "Vojager-2" and "Galileo" did not find out no noticeable changes on the surface of Europe. But "Galileo" images of Europe with a high spatial resolution was changed our picture of character and nature of its surface. A surface is an icy shell, covered by cracks and by ice-drifts. Under a comparatively thin shell, possibly, there is an ocean of liquid water in to a few ten of kilometres depth. Very small amount of shock craters specifies on relative youth of surface of Europe and, possibly, on its geological activity and now. The basic geological features of satellite are selected taking into account likeness of form, structure, color, illuminations etc. of Europe surfaces and other known types of surface: large plains regiones, areas of cracks (lines, bands) and mountain backbones (linea, lineaes), areas with chaotic relief (chaos, chaoses), craters and cycloid cracks (flexus). Presumably, global network of lines - it caused by tectonic processes in icy shell cracks, after filled the frozen dark matter of orange - red color. Correlation of stratum features with albedo allows to suppose that its young areas, which were less changed by subsequent endogenous and exogenous processes which would clean them, have less albedo. Classification of craters is based on the clearness of scopes of the thrown out breeds. Tracks of shots can be seen on the presence of concentric features; some - have well visible edges and shock texture; some have rays. On the Europe surface 41 craters with diameters a 2-50 km is found. In 2000 was found out a large crater which can be the result of collision in the past of asteroid with Europe. Size of external structure of Tayr object (diameter - 149 km) far more than size of its crater. This morphological detail appeared so original, that for it (and yet for 2-3 to it similar) it was necessary to offer the special name: large circular structures. If to examine satellite on the whole, to our opinion, it is

  18. Surface and morphological features of laser-irradiated silicon under vacuum, nitrogen and ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Asma; Bashir, Shazia; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced surface and structural modification of silicon (Si) has been investigated under three different environments of vacuum, nitrogen (100 Torr) and ethanol. The interaction of 1000 pulses of KrF (λ ≈ 248 nm, τ ≈ 18 ns, repetition rate ≈ 30 Hz) Excimer laser at two different fluences of 2.8 J/cm2 and 4 J/cm2 resulted in formation of various kinds of features such as laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), spikes, columns, cones and cracks. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets is explored by Raman spectroscopy. SEM analysis exhibits a non-uniform distribution of micro-scale pillars and spikes at the central ablated regime of silicon irradiated at low laser fluence of 2.8 J/cm2 under vacuum. Whereas cones, pits, cavities and ripples like features are seen at the boundaries. At higher fluence of 4 J/cm2, laser induced periodic structures as well as micro-columns are observed. In the case of ablation in nitrogen environment, melting, splashing, self-organized granular structures and cracks along with redeposition are observed at lower fluence. Such types of small scaled structures in nitrogen are attributed to confinement and shielding effects of nitrogen plasma. Whereas, a crater with multiple ablative layers is formed in the case of ablation at higher fluence. Significantly different surface morphology of Si is observed in the case of ablation in ethanol. It reveals the formation of cavities along with small scale pores and less redeposition. These results reveal that the growth of surface and morphological features of irradiated Si are strongly dependent upon the laser fluence as well as environmental conditions. The difference in surface morphology is attributable to cooling, confinement and shielding effects as well as difference in plasma temperature, density and pressure of environmental media that corresponds to different energy deposition

  19. Enhanced flyby science with onboard computer vision: Tracking and surface feature detection at small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Thomas J.; Thompson, David R.; Bue, Brian D.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Chien, Steve A.; Gharibian, Dero; Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2015-10-01

    Spacecraft autonomy is crucial to increase the science return of optical remote sensing observations at distant primitive bodies. To date, most small bodies exploration has involved short timescale flybys that execute prescripted data collection sequences. Light time delay means that the spacecraft must operate completely autonomously without direct control from the ground, but in most cases the physical properties and morphologies of prospective targets are unknown before the flyby. Surface features of interest are highly localized, and successful observations must account for geometry and illumination constraints. Under these circumstances onboard computer vision can improve science yield by responding immediately to collected imagery. It can reacquire bad data or identify features of opportunity for additional targeted measurements. We present a comprehensive framework for onboard computer vision for flyby missions at small bodies. We introduce novel algorithms for target tracking, target segmentation, surface feature detection, and anomaly detection. The performance and generalization power are evaluated in detail using expert annotations on data sets from previous encounters with primitive bodies.

  20. Sub-surface oxide features at the aluminum-sapphire interface after low temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Sreya

    This work focuses on the formation of sub-surface oxide features that form at the aluminum-sapphire interface during a low temperature heat-treatment. The features consist of two parts, stable alpha-alumina ridges on the substrate, and faceted pyramidal structures composed of thin, low-temperature oxide shells that are bounded by the ridges. It is surprising to observe the formation of thermodynamically stable alpha-alumina at a low temperature. The ridges are epitaxial with the (0001) sapphire substrate and the overlying metal. The pyramidal features resemble closely the Wulff shape in aluminum. Experiments show that these features are underlying the annealing hillocks. This work is a detailed study of such oxide interfacial features associated with hollow hillocks. At the annealing temperatures (below the melting point of aluminum), the aluminum thin film is subjected to compressive stresses arising from the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch and this is aided by dewetting at the aluminum-sapphire interface. Creep cavitation and grain boundary sliding are postulated to help in the cavity formation. Annealing holes are also observed in the thin films. Two different types of holes are seen: dendritic branched holes and hexagonal faceted holes (drums). At lower temperature and thickness, dendritic holes are seen to be formed at the grain boundaries. The drums form within the grains at higher temperatures and in thicker films. The drums have a surface oxide layer suspended on the top. It is postulated that clustering of vacancies due to the presence of irregularities, defects, and dislocations at the interface as well as dewetting causes the nucleation of the drums at the interface. Numerous hillock-hole couples were seen. Thinning of the metal in areas near the hillocks could possibly aid in the hole formation process. It is speculated that the hole growth occurred during the cooling stage when the film was subjected to tensile stresses. Another interesting

  1. Characterization of surface electromyography using time domain features for determining hand motion and stages of contraction.

    PubMed

    Bin Ahmad Nadzri, Ahmad Akmal; Ahmad, Siti Anom; Marhaban, Mohd Hamiruce; Jaafar, Haslina

    2014-03-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) signals can provide important information for prosthetic hand control application. In this study, time domain (TD) features were used in extracting information from the SEMG signal in determining hand motions and stages of contraction (start, middle and end). Data were collected from ten healthy subjects. Two muscles, which are flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) were assessed during three hand motions of wrist flexion (WF), wrist extension (WE) and co-contraction (CC). The SEMG signals were first segmented into 132.5 ms windows, full wave rectified and filtered with a 6 Hz low pass Butterworth filter. Five TD features of mean absolute value, variance, root mean square, integrated absolute value and waveform length were used for feature extraction and subsequently patterns were determined. It is concluded that the TD features that were used are able to differentiate hand motions. However, for the stages of contraction determination, although there were patterns observed, it is determined that the stages could not be properly be differentiated due to the variability of signal strengths between subjects.

  2. Visualization of brain surface features using registered partially segmented MRI scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Loyd M.; Brinkley, James F.

    1995-04-01

    Intraoperative brain mapping of cortical language sites has generated a need for accurate visualization of the cortical surface with its associated arteries and veins. We describe a technique for registering multiple magnetic resonance imaging studies, segmenting those studies, and visualizing the combined vessels and cortical surface. The patient receives three pre-operative MRI scans corresponding to the three tissue types to be visualized. The studies are read into three volumes in the visualization software and voxel size information is then used to interpolate each of the volumes producing cubic voxels. The volumes are then cropped and translated interactively to be the exact same dimension and orientation. A region growing algorithm is applied to the most homogeneous volume (usually the vein data) to produce a mask which approximates the cortical region. A morphological dilation is performed on the mask expanding it to include features on or near the cortical surface. The mask is applied to the cortical surface, artery, and vein volumes, and they then become the green, red, and blue channels of a composite RGB volume. The resulting volume is selectively weighted and input to a ray-tracing algorithm which produces the final image. This technique provides neurosurgeons with an image containing the landmarks necessary to record intraoperative brain mapping data. Example results are presented which show that the generated cortical surface, including surface veins and arteries, corresponds closely to intraoperative photographs of the exposed cortical surface taken at the time of surgery. When combined with an image database and integrated into an interactive program this technique allows neurosurgeons to obtain accurate 3-D stimulation maps of functional areas on the brain surface.

  3. Hyperspectral interferometry: Sizing microscale surface features in the pine bark beetle.

    PubMed

    Beach, James M; Uertz, James L; Eckhardt, Lori G

    2015-10-01

    A new method of interferometry employing a Fabry-Perot etalon model was used to locate and size microscale features on the surface of the pine bark beetle. Oscillations in the reflected light spectrum, caused by self-interference of light reflecting from surfaces of foreleg setae and spores on the elytrum, were recorded using white light hyperspectral microscopy. By making the assumption that pairs of reflecting surfaces produce an etalon effect, the distance between surfaces could be determined from the oscillation frequency. Low frequencies of less than 0.08 nm(-1) were observed in the spectrum below 700 nm while higher frequencies generally occupied wavelengths from 600 to 850 nm. In many cases, two frequencies appeared separately or in combination across the spectrum. The etalon model gave a mean spore size of 3.04 ± 1.27 μm and a seta diameter of 5.44 ± 2.88 μm. The tapering near the setae tip was detected as a lowering of frequency. Spatial fringes were observed together with spectral oscillations from surfaces on the exoskeleton at higher magnification. These signals were consistent with embedded multi-layer reflecting surfaces. Possible applications for hyperspectral interferometry include medical imaging, detection of spore loads in insects and other fungal carriers, wafer surface and subsurface inspection, nanoscale materials, biological surface analysis, and spectroscopy calibration. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of oscillations directly observed by microscopy in the reflected light spectra from Coleoptera, and the first demonstration of broadband hyperspectral interferometry using microscopy that does not employ an internal interferometer. PMID:26303206

  4. Cryovolcanic features on Titan's surface as revealed by the Cassini Titan Radar Mapper

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Mitchell, K.L.; Stofan, E.R.; Lunine, J.I.; Lorenz, R.; Paganelli, F.; Kirk, R.L.; Wood, C.A.; Wall, S.D.; Robshaw, L.E.; Fortes, A.D.; Neish, C.D.; Radebaugh, J.; Reffet, E.; Ostro, S.J.; Elachi, C.; Allison, M.D.; Anderson, Y.; Boehmer, R.; Boubin, G.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Janssen, M.A.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.O.; Ori, G.; Orosei, R.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.E.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Soderblom, L.A.; Stiles, B.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.D.; Wye, L.; Zebker, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper obtained Synthetic Aperture Radar images of Titan's surface during four fly-bys during the mission's first year. These images show that Titan's surface is very complex geologically, showing evidence of major planetary geologic processes, including cryovolcanism. This paper discusses the variety of cryovolcanic features identified from SAR images, their possible origin, and their geologic context. The features which we identify as cryovolcanic in origin include a large (180 km diameter) volcanic construct (dome or shield), several extensive flows, and three calderas which appear to be the source of flows. The composition of the cryomagma on Titan is still unknown, but constraints on rheological properties can be estimated using flow thickness. Rheological properties of one flow were estimated and appear inconsistent with ammonia-water slurries, and possibly more consistent with ammonia-water-methanol slurries. The extent of cryovolcanism on Titan is still not known, as only a small fraction of the surface has been imaged at sufficient resolution. Energetic considerations suggest that cryovolcanism may have been a dominant process in the resurfacing of Titan. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc.

  5. Smooth versus Textured Surfaces: Feature-Based Category Selectivity in Human Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tootell, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In fMRI studies, human lateral occipital (LO) cortex is thought to respond selectively to images of objects, compared with nonobjects. However, it remains unresolved whether all objects evoke equivalent levels of activity in LO, and, if not, which image features produce stronger activation. Here, we used an unbiased parametric texture model to predict preferred versus nonpreferred stimuli in LO. Observation and psychophysical results showed that predicted preferred stimuli (both objects and nonobjects) had smooth (rather than textured) surfaces. These predictions were confirmed using fMRI, for objects and nonobjects. Similar preferences were also found in the fusiform face area (FFA). Consistent with this: (1) FFA and LO responded more strongly to nonfreckled (smooth) faces, compared with otherwise identical freckled (textured) faces; and (2) strong functional connections were found between LO and FFA. Thus, LO and FFA may be part of an information-processing stream distinguished by feature-based category selectivity (smooth > textured).

  6. Apollo 14 visibility tests: Visibility of lunar surface features and lunar landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziedman, K.

    1972-01-01

    An in-flight visibility test conducted on the Apollo 14 mission is discussed. The need for obtaining experimental data on lunar feature visibility arose from visibility problems associated with various aspects of the Apollo missions; and especially from anticipated difficulties of recognizing lunar surface features at the time of descent and landing under certain illumination conditions. Although visibility problems have influenced many other aspects of the Apollo mission, they have been particularly important for descent operations, due to the criticality of this mission phase and the crew's guidance and control role for landing site recognition and touchdown point selection. A series of analytical and photographic studies were conducted during the Apollo program (prior to as well as after the initial manned lunar operations) to delineate constraints imposed on landing operations by visibility limitations. The purpose of the visibility test conducted on Apollo 14 was to obtain data to reduce uncertainties and to extend the analytical models of visibility in the lunar environment.

  7. Smooth versus Textured Surfaces: Feature-Based Category Selectivity in Human Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tootell, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In fMRI studies, human lateral occipital (LO) cortex is thought to respond selectively to images of objects, compared with nonobjects. However, it remains unresolved whether all objects evoke equivalent levels of activity in LO, and, if not, which image features produce stronger activation. Here, we used an unbiased parametric texture model to predict preferred versus nonpreferred stimuli in LO. Observation and psychophysical results showed that predicted preferred stimuli (both objects and nonobjects) had smooth (rather than textured) surfaces. These predictions were confirmed using fMRI, for objects and nonobjects. Similar preferences were also found in the fusiform face area (FFA). Consistent with this: (1) FFA and LO responded more strongly to nonfreckled (smooth) faces, compared with otherwise identical freckled (textured) faces; and (2) strong functional connections were found between LO and FFA. Thus, LO and FFA may be part of an information-processing stream distinguished by feature-based category selectivity (smooth > textured). PMID:27699206

  8. Post-mortem surface features in larger foraminiferan Archaias angulatus as paleoenvironmental indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Cottey, T.L.

    1986-05-01

    Larger foraminifera are major contributors to sand-sized carbonate sediments. Archaias angulatus (Fichtel and Moll) is the dominant larger foraminiferan in the Caribbean region. A taphonomic study of this species revealed several stages of preservation from newly unaltered tests to complete destruction of outer calcite layers. Tests collected from contrasting environments in Key Largo, Florida, show different paths of degradation. Impact features and secondary growths predominate on tests collected from well-sorted sediments of the open platform, whereas dissolution features are most common on tests from the calm, muddy environment of Largo Sound. Tests from the open platform show major breakage, abundant scratches, and small, randomly spaced holes. Tests from Largo Sound show little breakage, few scratches, and loss of entire sections of the outer wall. Microborings are present on tests from both environments. This study shows that postmortem alterations of surface textures of larger foraminifera may be useful indicators of paleoenvironments of deposition.

  9. Delineating Surface Water Features In The Prairie Pothole Wetlands With MODIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, L.; Wylie, B. K.; Zhang, L.; Rover, J.; Tieszen, L. L.

    2007-12-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR), covered with thousands of shallow ponds known as potholes, is a large wetland area in central North America. The PPR wetlands are valuable because of the ecosystem services they provide, including water balance and flood mediation, habitat for migratory birds and waterfowl production, and carbon sequestration. During the last century, impacts of intense land use (agricultural and commercial development) and climate change have caused drastic reductions of surface water area and wetland habitat in the PPR. Spatial and temporal characterizations of the surface water dynamics are important for understanding the hydrological and ecological characteristics in the PPR wetlands. In this study, we use the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance data processed as 8-day composites at 500-meter resolution from 2000 to 2006. The modified normalized difference water index [MNDWI = (band 4 ¡§C band 6)/(band 4 + band 6)] was computed to delineate water features. By adjusting the MNDWI threshold, we generated three land-cover classes: water, land, and water/land mixture. Additionally, we acquired 26 Landsat TM/ETM+ scenes, 14 to calibrate the MODIS MDNWI threshold and 12 to independently validate the MODIS water feature products. For the validation, the maps of percent water area derived from MODIS were compared with the maps generated from the Landsat images at a 5-kilometer grid level. The comparison illustrates a low root mean square error (0.0034 percent) and a high correlation coefficient (0.95), suggesting satisfactory accuracy of the MODIS water products. We have produced and illustrated the MODIS water feature maps for the U.S. portion of the PPR at 32-day intervals for the growing seasons from 2000 to 2006. The time series of MODIS-derived water feature maps are useful for delineating water features and monitoring water area dynamics in this area, and these products provide coarse resolution information

  10. Biomaterial design for specific cellular interactions: Role of surface functionalization and geometric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolhar, Poornima

    The areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering have experienced extraordinary growth in recent years with the application of engineering principles and their potential to support and improve the field of medicine. The tremendous progress in nanotechnology and biotechnology has lead to this explosion of research and development in biomedical applications. Biomaterials can now be engineered at a nanoscale and their specific interactions with the biological tissues can be modulated. Various design parameters are being established and researched for design of drug-delivery carriers and scaffolds to be implanted into humans. Nanoparticles made from versatile biomaterial can deliver both small-molecule drugs and various classes of bio-macromolecules, such as proteins and oligonucleotides. Similarly in the field of tissue engineering, current approaches emphasize nanoscale control of cell behavior by mimicking the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) unlike, traditional scaffolds. Drug delivery and tissue engineering are closely connected fields and both of these applications require materials with exceptional physical, chemical, biological, and biomechanical properties to provide superior therapy. In the current study the surface functionalization and the geometric features of the biomaterials has been explored. In particular, a synthetic surface for culture of human embryonic stem cells has been developed, demonstrating the importance of surface functionalization in maintaining the pluripotency of hESCs. In the second study, the geometric features of the drug delivery carriers are investigated and the polymeric nanoneedles mediated cellular permeabilization and direct cytoplasmic delivery is reported. In the third study, the combined effect of surface functionalization and geometric modification of carriers for vascular targeting is enunciated. These studies illustrate how the biomaterials can be designed to achieve various cellular behaviors and control the

  11. Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Imagery to Investigate Surface Displacements and Surface Features of the Super-Sauze Earthflow (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Tizzard, S.; Niethammer, U.

    2014-12-01

    We present the result of using imagery collected with a small rotary wing UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) to investigate surface displacements and fissures on the Super-Sauze earthflow (France); a slow moving earthflow with the potential to develop into rapid and highly destructive mud flows. UAV imagery acquired in October 2009 was processed using a structure-from-motion and multi-view stereo (SfM-MVS) approach in PhotoScan software. Identification of ~200 ground control points throughout the image set was facilitated by automated image matching in SfM_georef software[1] and the data incorporated into PhotoScan for network optimisation and georeferencing. The completed 2009 model enabled an ~5 cm spatial resolution orthoimage to be generated with an expected accuracy (based on residuals on control) of ~0.3 m. This was supported by comparison to a previously created 2008 model, which gave standard deviations on tie points (located on stationary terrain) of 0.27 m and 0.43 m in Easting and Northing respectively. The high resolution of the orthoimage allowed an investigation into surface displacements and geomorphology of surface features (compared to the 2008 model). The results have produced a comprehensive surface displacement map of the Super-Sauze earthflow, as well as highlighting interesting variations in fissure geomorphology and density between the 2008 and 2009 models. This study underscored the capability for UAV imagery and SfM-MVS to generate highly detailed orthographic imagery and DEMs with a low cost approach that offers significant potential for landslide hazard assessments. [1] http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/staff/jamesm/software/sfm_georef.htm

  12. Thermal emission spectroscopy of microcrystalline sedimentary phases: Effects of natural surface roughness on spectral feature shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C. J.; Rogers, A. D.; Glotch, T. D.; Arnold, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Distinguishing between microcrystalline and macrocrystalline mineral phases can help constrain the conditions under which those minerals formed or the degree of postdepositional alteration. This study demonstrates the effects of crystal size and surface roughness on thermal infrared emission spectra of micro and macrocrystalline phases of the two most common minerals on Earth, quartz and calcite. Given the characteristic depositional and environmental conditions under which microcrystalline minerals form, and the recent observations of high-silica deposits on Mars, it is important to understand how these unique materials can be identified using remote infrared spectroscopy techniques. We find that (a) microcrystalline minerals exhibit naturally rough surfaces compared to their macrocrystalline counterparts at the 10 µm scale; and that (b) this roughness causes distinct spectral differences within the Reststrahlen bands of each mineral. These spectral differences occur for surfaces that are rough on the wavelength scale, where the absorption coefficient (k) is large. Specifically, the wavelength positions of the Reststrahlen features for microcrystalline phases are narrowed and shifted compared to macrocrystalline counterparts. The spectral shape differences are small enough that the composition of the material is still recognizable, but large enough such that a roughness effect could be detected. Petrographic and topographic analyses of microcrystalline samples suggest a relationship between crystal size and surface roughness. Together, these observations suggest it may be possible to make general inferences about microcrystallinity from the thermal infrared spectral character of samples, which could aid in reconstructions of sedimentary rock diagenesis where corresponding petrographic or microimaging is not available.

  13. High-resolution seismic reflection survey near SPR surface collapse feature at Weeks Island, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Harding, R.S. Jr.; Steeples, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    Shallow high resolution 2-D and 3-D seismic reflection techniques are assisting in the subsurface delineation of a surface collapse feature (sinkhole) at Weeks Island, Louisiana. Seismic reflection surveys were conducted in March 1994. Data from walkaway noise tests were used to assist selection of field recording parameters. The top of the salt dome is about 180 ft below ground surface at the sinkhole. The water table is an estimated 90 ft below the ground surface. A single coherent reflection was consistently recorded across the entire area of the survey, although stacking velocity and spectral content of the event varied. On the basis of observed travel times and stacking velocities, the coherent reflection event appears to originate above the top of the salt, possibly at or near the water table. Identification of this reflector will be made form borehole investigations currently planned for the sinkhole site. A depression or time sag in this reflection event is clearly evident in both the 2-D and 3-D seismic data in the immediate vicinity of the sinkhole. The time sag appears to be related to the subsurface structure of the reflector and not to near surface topography or velocity effects. Elsewhere in the survey area, observed changes in reflection travel times and wavelet character appear to be related to subsurface geologic structure. These seismic observations may assist in predicting where future sinkholes will develop after they have been tied to borehole data collected at the site.

  14. The behaviour of antimony released from surface geothermal features in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Nathaniel; Webster-Brown, Jenny; Brown, Kevin

    2012-12-01

    Antimony-rich geothermal features in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) of New Zealand's North Island drain directly into surface aquatic environments. The discharge from Champagne Pool, a mixed alkali-chloride/sulfate hot spring at Wai-O-Tapu Geothermal Field, contains up to 194 μg/L Sb. The discharge from Frying Pan Lake, a chloride-sulfate hot spring at Waimangu Geothermal Field, contains up to 21.5 μg/L Sb. At Champagne Pool, downstream concentrations of Sb show distinct diurnal variations, particularly in winter, when concentrations in the early morning were less than half those measured mid-afternoon. Changes in sulfide-sulfate equilibria and direct stibnite oxidation may explain this phenomenon. In the discharge from Frying Pan Lake, Sb exhibits little diurnal variation. Most (> 80%) of the dissolved Sb released from Champagne Pool is removed from solution at Alum Lake, an acid-sulfate hot pool containing elevated levels of dissolved sulfide. Therefore relatively little Sb is discharged into the freshwater drainage in the area. However, in the absence of a sulfide-rich feature at Waimangu, most of the Sb discharged from Frying Pan Lake remains dissolved, and is transported into the freshwater drainage system of Lake Rotomahana. The contrast in Sb behaviour between these two sites confirms the importance of dissolved sulfide and low (< 3) pH conditions in the precipitation and removal of dissolved Sb downstream of geothermal features. Otherwise, largely conservative behaviour can be expected.

  15. Comparison of unsteady pressure fields on turrets with different surface features using pressure-sensitive paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeyev, Stanislav; De Lucca, Nicholas; Jumper, Eric J.; Hird, Kyle; Juliano, Thomas J.; Gregory, James W.; Thordahl, James; Wittich, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    Spatially temporally resolved unsteady pressure fields on a surface of a hemisphere-on-cylinder turret with either a flat or a conformal window with realistic features such as gaps and "smile" cutouts were characterized using fast-response pressure-sensitive paint at M = 0.33 for several window viewing angles. Various statistical properties of pressure fields were computed, and geometry effects on the unsteady pressure fields were analyzed and discussed. Proper orthogonal decomposition was also used to extract dominant pressure modes and corresponding temporal coefficients and to analyze and compare instantaneous pressure structures for different turret geometric features and the window viewing angles. An unsteady separation off the turret and a recirculation region downstream of the turret were identified as dominant sources of the unsteady pressure. It was found that while all geometric features affected the unsteady pressure field, the "smiles," positioned spanwise-symmetrically on both sides of the turret, were the leading cause of these changes, followed by the looking forward flat window. The gaps, the side- and the back-looking flat window introduced only small local changes.

  16. Characterizing surface features on conducting specimens through an insulation layer using the capacitive imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Yin, Xiaokang; Yan, An; Li, Wei; Chen, Guoming

    2016-02-01

    Capacitive imaging (CI) technique is a novel electromagnetic NDE technique. It uses a carefully designed probe with a pair of metal electrodes. Interaction between the Quasi-static electromagnetic field from the electrode pair and the testing material causes changes in signal when the electrical properties of the sample themselves change, leading to the possibility of imaging. Due to its capacitive nature, the CI technique requires single side non-contact access to the testing material and little sample surface preparation. In addition, it provides a very clear and simple defect indication. Previous work [1] has demonstrated the feasibility of the CI technique to the detection of surface features on conducting specimens. It is found that the CI technique is useful to confirm the presence of a defect but cannot further characterize it due to the "blurring effect". The problem caused by the blurring effect is more significant, when trying to image smaller feature though a thicker insulation layer (comparing to the dimensions of the CI probe). This paper aims to tackle this problem using a two dimensional deconvolution method based on the analysis of the measurement sensitivity distribution. In this paper, the trade-offs between penetration depth, signal strength and imaging resolution of the CI technique are discussed. The blurring effect due to the CI probe geometry is explained. The proposed method to retrieve the real shape of the feature is then described in details, and its feasibility is also demonstrated. The results indicated that the CI technique could be useful to detect Corrosion Under Insulation (CUI).

  17. Small-scale features of temperature and salinity surface fields in the Coral Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christophe; Dewitte, Boris; Sudre, Joël.; Garçon, Véronique; Varillon, David

    2013-10-01

    The small-scale features in sea surface temperature and salinity fields (SST and SSS) of the Coral Sea are examined using high horizontal spatial and short-term temporal in situ measurements. These features are extracted from thermosalinographs (TSGs) gathered onboard commercial and research vessels and at one long-term fixed station. The analyses are performed along the vessel tracks and the structures of small-scale features are extracted by high-pass spatial filtering the original TSG data. For SSS, it is shown that the features at the scale of mesoscale eddies (˜100 km) vary from about -1.1 to +0.6 psu in the Coral Sea region. Processes sustaining such range include rainfall events, stirring by mesoscale eddies, and the latitudinal displacement of the sharp front associated with the edge of the Western Pacific Warm Pool at the seasonal time scales. The TSG data have revealed the presence of a sharp front (0.4-0.6 psu) between the subtropical and equatorial waters instead of a smooth gradient in the standard SSS climatologies. Within the context of recent remotely sensed observations of salinity, this could represent an important limitation for the validation and calibration of satellite products. In addition to these spatial considerations, temporal variations at one long-term station near Vanuatu show that the coupled air-sea responses to intraseasonal tropical variability, such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation, may have a signature in both SST and SSS fields. However, this response is found to be complex and not necessarily in phase. In the Coral Sea region, our results suggest that MJO-induced variability on SST and SSS exhibit little coherency at the seasonal time scales.

  18. Are the circular, dark features on Comet Borrelly's surface albedo variations or pits?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, R.M.; Soderblom, L.A.; Hapke, B.W.

    2004-01-01

    The highest resolution images of Comet 19P/Borrelly show many dark features which, upon casual inspection, appear to be low albedo markings, but which may also be shadows or other photometric variations caused by a depression in the local topography. In order to distinguish between these two possible interpretations we conducted a photometric analysis of three of the most prominent of these features using six of the highest quality images from the September 22, 2001 Deep Space 1 (DS1) flyby. We find that: 1. The radiance in the darkest parts of each feature increases as phase angle decreases, similarly to the radiance behavior of the higher albedo surrounding terrain. The dark features could be either fully illuminated low albedo spots or, alternatively, they could be depressions. No part of any of the three regions was in full shadow. 2. One of the regions has a radiance profile consistent with a rimmed depression, the second, with a simple depression with no rim, and the third with a low albedo spot. 3. The regolith particles are backscattering and carbon black is one of the few candidate regolith materials that might explain this low albedo. We conclude that Borrelly's surface is geologically complex to the limit of resolution of the images with a combination complex topography, pits, troughs, peaks and ridges, and some very dark albedo markings, perhaps a factor of two to three darker than the average 3-4% albedo of the surrounding terrains. Our technique utilizing measured radiance profiles through the dark regions is able to discriminate between rimmed depressions, rimless depressions and simple albedo changes not associated with topography. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Geologically recent small-scale surface features in Meridiani Planum and Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, David

    2014-05-01

    Enigmatic small scale (<1m) depositional and erosional features have been imaged at several locations in the equatorial Meridiani Planum region by the rover Opportunity. They occur in loose, dark basaltic sands partly covering exposures of light-toned bedrock. Leveed fissures are narrow, elongate, steep-sided depressions flanked by raised levees or half-cones of soil, typically 2-10 cm wide and up to 50 cm long in most cases. Some cross-cut and are therefore younger than eolian ripples thought to have last been active c. 50,000 years ago. Gutters are elongate, straight or sinuous surface depressions, typically 2-10cm wide and 1-5 cm deep, sometimes internally terraced or with a hollow near one end, and in one case seem to give way to small depositional fans downslope; they have the appearance of having been formed by liquid flow rather than by wind erosion. Leveed fissures were imaged at more than 25 locations by Opportunity between 2004 and 2013, particularly near the rims of Endurance, Erebus and Endeavour craters, but also on the plains between Santa Maria and Endeavour craters; sharply-defined gutters are less common but examples were imaged close to the rim of Endurance and on the approach to Endeavour, whereas subdued, possibly wind-softened examples are more widespread. Scrutiny of images obtained by the rover Spirit in Gusev Crater between 2004 and 2010 has so far failed to find any leveed fissures or gutters, but examples of both types of features, as well as numerous small holes suggestive of surface sediment falling into underlying voids, were imaged by the rover Curiosity in the Yellowknife Bay region of Gale Crater during 2013. Leveed fissures appear to have been formed by venting from beneath. Ground disturbance by the rover can be ruled out in many cases by the appearance of features in images taken before close approach. Blowholes seem plausible close to crater rims (where wind might enter a connected void system through a crater wall) but less so

  20. The relationship between radar scattering and surface roughness of lunar volcanic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawin, Erica R.; Kiefer, Walter S.; Fassett, Caleb I.; Bussey, D. Benjamin J.; Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Dyar, M. Darby; Lawrence, Samuel J.; Spudis, Paul D.

    2014-11-01

    Lunar roughness measurements derived from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter are compared to 12.6 cm wavelength radar data collected by the Miniature Radio Frequency instrument and 70 cm wavelength radar data collected by the Arecibo Observatory. These data are compared to assess how surface and subsurface roughness are correlated and affected by parameters including age and composition at length scales between 0.1 and 100 m. A range of features are analyzed including volcanic domes (Marius Hills, Rümker Hills, Gruithuisen, and Mairan Domes); mare (Imbrium, Serenitatis, and Oceanus Procellarum); pyroclastic dark mantle deposits (Sinus Aestuum, Sulpicius Gallus, and Mare Vaporum); and two young craters (Copernicus and Tycho). Statistically significant positive correlations exist between topographic roughness and both P- and S-band circular polarization ratios. The strongest correlation is observed at the longest length scales. Correlations weaken as length scales become less similar, potentially due to distinct processes controlling surface modification. Roughness is not significantly correlated with local slope. Although the Marius Hills are compositionally distinct from the Gruithuisen and Mairan domes, they are indistinguishable in roughness characteristics. Conversely, the Rümker Hills, mare, and dark mantle deposits are smoother at the length scales examined, possibly due to fine-grained mantling of regolith or pyroclastic deposits. The floor and ejecta of Tycho are the roughest surfaces measured in this study, while the floor and ejecta of Copernicus overlap the roughness distribution of the volcanic features. This study shows that many factors control the evolution of roughness over time on various length scales.

  1. Near-Surface Geologic Units Exposed Along Ares Vallis and in Adjacent Areas: A Potential Source of Sediment at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1997-01-01

    A sequence of layers, bright and dark, is exposed on the walls of canyons, impact craters and mesas throughout the Ares Vallis region, Chryse Planitia, and Xanthe Terra, Mars. Four layers can be seen: two pairs of alternating dark and bright albedo. The upper dark layer forms the top surface of many walls and mesas. The upper dark-bright pair was stripped as a unit from many streamlined mesas and from the walls of Ares Valles, leaving a bench at the top of the lower dark layer, approximately 250 m below the highland surface on streamlined islands and on the walls of Ares Vallis itself. Along Ares Vallis, the scarp between the highlands surface and this bench is commonly angular in plan view (not smoothly curving), suggesting that erosion of the upper dark-bright pair of layers controlled by planes of weakness, like fractures or joints. These near-surface layers in the Ares Vallis area have similar thicknesses, colors, and resistances to erosion to layers exposed near the tops of walls in Valles Marineris (Treiman et al.) and may represent the same pedogenic hardpan units. From this correlation, and from analogies with hardpans on Earth, the light-color layers may be cemented by calcite or gypsum. The dark layers are likely cemented by an iron-bearing mineral. Mars Pathfinder instruments should permit recognition and useful analyses of hardpan fragments, provided that clean uncoated surfaces are accessible. Even in hardpan-cemented materials, it should be possible to determine the broad types of lithologies in the Martian highlands. However, detailed geochemical modeling of highland rocks and soils may be compromised by the presence of hardpan cement minerals.

  2. Exploring microstructure and surface features of Chinese coins using non-invasive approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ruishi; Li, Yuanli; Guo, Baogang; Hu, Hailong; Jiang, Linhai

    2015-03-01

    Despite the apparent significance of Chinese coins, the knowledge about the surface properties of the coins is still largely unknown. To date, most analytical techniques (e.g., cross-section analysis, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, thermal analysis) require the partial or total destruction of the investigated sample, which is fatal to precious objects (e.g., artefacts and monuments). Herein, we systematically investigate the surface of a series of one yuan Chinese coins to disclose their chemical composition, morphology, and microstructure features using non-invasive techniques. Investigations were performed with scanning electron microscopy, coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The application of these approaches enables unambiguous explorations of the component, morphology, microstructure and physical properties of the samples without destroying them. The identification of the coins was achieved in light of the name of issuing authority and floral pattern. The morphology observations of the samples display that these coins possess mostly homogeneous surfaces; hence such a finding allows the formulation of a possible minting technology. Besides, the energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has proved of great role in exploring these coins, mainly because of its detectability to easily probe the presence of certain minor elements, which is critical in understanding surface finishing technologies, and production processes. The findings manifest that the coins were made of high purity nickel and a good refining process was applied in general. The detectable amounts of carbon measured in some coins suggest that the refining process was not exactly alike. These coin samples are found to be highly crystalline in nature with face-centred cubic crystallographic structure. Furthermore, to shed more light on the surface features of the coins, their physical properties (e.g., interplanar spacing, lattice parameter, lattice

  3. Feature, design intention and constraint preservation for direct modeling of 3D freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Luoting; Kara, Levent Burak; Shimada, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    Direct modeling has recently emerged as a suitable approach for 3D free-form shape modeling in industrial design. It has several advantages over the conventional, parametric modeling techniques, including natural user interactions, as well as the underlying, automatic feature-preserving shape deformation algorithms. However, current direct modeling packages still lack several capabilities critical for product design, such as managing aesthetic design intentions, and enforcing dimensional, geometric constraints. In this paper, we describe a novel 3D surface editing system capable of jointly accommodating aesthetic design intentions expressed in the form of surface painting and color-coded annotations, as well as engineering constraints expressed as dimensions. The proposed system is built upon differential coordinates and constrained least squares, and is intended for conceptual design that involves frequent shape tuning and explorations. We also provide an extensive review of the state-of-the-art direct modeling approaches for 3D mesh-based, freeform surfaces, with an emphasis on the two broad categories of shape deformation algorithms developed in the relevant field of geometric modeling. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. A joint NOAA/USGS study to evaluate satellite assessment of land surface features and climatic variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallo, K.P.; Tarpley, J.D.; Howard, S.M.; Moore, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    Data collection and preliminary analyses have begun for a study that will evaluate the usefulness of satellite data for assessment of land surface features and climatic variables. The objective of the study is to determine what relationships exist between routinely available ground-based climatic and land surface information and satellite-obtained land surface information. The overall goal is to contribute to the increasingly important understanding of land surface climatology.

  5. Aquatic risk assessment of pesticides in surface waters in and adjacent to the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks: I. Hazard assessment and problem formulation.

    PubMed

    Carriger, John F; Rand, Gary M

    2008-10-01

    An aquatic risk assessment under the U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) ecological risk framework was conducted for atrazine, metolachlor, malathion, chlorpyrifos, and endosulfan in the C-111 freshwater basin (eastern boundary of the Everglades National Park), northeast Florida Bay, and south Biscayne Bay in South Florida. Based on the use of the hazard quotient approach, measured concentrations of chlorpyrifos and endosulfan in surface waters suggest potential hazards to aquatic organisms and were, therefore, considered as chemicals of potential ecological concern (COPECs). The problem formulation included an overview of the physical/chemical and environmental fate characteristics and aquatic toxicology of the COPECs. Background surface water exposure concentrations of endosulfan and toxicity data from laboratory and field studies indicate that fish and invertebrate mortality may be a concern when endosulfan is applied in agricultural areas near aquatic ecosystems.

  6. Does soil water saturation mobilize metals from riparian soils to adjacent surface water? A field monitoring study in a metal contaminated region.

    PubMed

    Van Laer, Liesbeth; Smolders, Erik

    2013-06-01

    In the Noorderkempen (NW Belgium), a large area (about 280 km(2)) is contaminated with cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) due to historical pollution by the Zn smelters. Direct aquatic emissions of metals have diminished over time, however the surface water metal concentration largely exceeds quality standards, mainly during winter periods. Monitoring data were analyzed to reveal whether these fluctuations are related to seasonal redox reactions in associated contaminated riparian soils that drain into the rivers. A field survey was set up with soil pore-water and groundwater monitored for three years in transects of soil monitoring points perpendicular to rivers at contaminated and non-contaminated sites. Site averaged surface water concentrations of a 15 year dataset exceeded local quality standards 4 to 200-fold. Winter averaged metal concentrations significantly exceeded the corresponding summer values 1.3-1.8 (Zn) and 1.5-2.4 fold (Cd). Zinc and Cd concentrations in water were positively related to Fe and Mn but not to Ca, K or Na suggesting that redox reactions and not dilution processes are involved. In ground- and pore-water of the associated riparian soils, the concentrations of Zn fluctuate by the same order of magnitude as in surface water but were generally smaller than in the corresponding contaminated rivers. In addition, correlations of dissolved Zn with Fe and Mn were lacking. This analysis suggests that redox reactions in streams, and not in riparian soils, explain the seasonal trends of Zn and Cd in surface water. Hence, river sediments and not riparian soils may be the cause of the winter peaks of Zn and Cd in these rivers.

  7. Tidal Distortion of Titan: Implications for Surface Features and Tidal Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohl, F.; Hussmann, H.; Coustenis, A.; Knapmeyer, M.; Lange, C.; Solomonidou, A.; Stephan, K.; Wagner, F. W.

    2012-04-01

    Titan is unique due to its similarity to the Earth and terrestrial planets in spite of the satellite's ice-rich bulk composition. Gravitational field data acquired by the Cassini spacecraft suggest that Titan's interior is composed of a mixture of rock and ice and is only partly differentiated. Titan is tidally locked with respect to Saturn and thereby subject to periodic tidal forcing of its interior and surface. Based on interior structure models and assumptions on rheological properties of planetary materials (i.e. ice, rock, water-ammonia ocean), we compute the elastic body tide Love numbers h2, k2, and l2 in order to describe Titan's tidal response. Key parameters, e.g., tidally-induced changes of local gravity, tilt relative to the direction of gravity, and areal strain are then given by linear combinations of h2, k2, and l2. We find peak-to-peak amplitudes of tidally-induced surface displacement and tilt variation on the order of up to a few tens of metres and a few arc seconds, respectively. Based on the obtained variations of tidal parameters, we will address possible implications for morphotectonic surface features and compositional heterogeneity on Titan. In addition, we will address possible measurements of global tidal distortion by using a network of several small landed stations. Each of those would have to carry an instrument suite to monitor tidally-induced changes of local gravity, tilt relative to the direction of gravity, and areal strain at the surface of Titan. Furthermore, tidal stresses are expected to induce significant seismic activity comparable to tidally-induced quakes on the Moon, and possibly along with seismicity induced by localized cryovolcanic activity.

  8. Iceberg ploughmark features on bottom surface of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorokhov, Dmitry; Sivkov, Vadim; Dorokhova, Evgenia; Krechik, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    A detail swath bathymetry, side-scan sonar and acoustic profiling combined with sediment sampling during the 64th cruise of RV "Academic Mstislav Keldysh" (October 2015) allowed to identify new geomorphological features of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea bottom surface. The extended chaotic ploughmarks (furrows) in most cases filled with thin layer of mud were discovered on surface of the Gdansk-Gotland sill glacial deposits. They are observed on the depth of more than 70 m and have depth and width from 1 to 10 m. Most of them are v- or u-shaped stepped depressions. The side-scan records of similar geomorpholoical features are extensively reported from Northern Hemisphere and Antarctica (Goodwin et al., 1985; Dowdeswell et al., 1993). Ploughmarks are attributed to the action of icebergs scouring into the sediment as they touch bottom. We are suggest that furrows discovered in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea are also the result of iceberg scouring during the Baltic Ice Lake stage (more than 11 600 cal yr BP (Bjorck, 2008)). This assumption confirmed by occurrence of fragmental stones and boulders on the sea bottom surface which are good indicators of iceberg rafting (Lisitzin, 2003). Ice ploughmarks at sea bottom surface were not occurred before in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea. The study was financed by Russian Scientific Fund, grant number 14-37-00047. References Bjorck S. The late Quaternary development of the Baltic Sea Basin. In: The BACC Author Team (eds) Assessment of climate change for the Baltic Sea Basin. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. 2008. Dowdeswell J. A., Villinger H., Whittington R. J., Marienfeld P. Iceberg scouring in Scoresby Sund and on the East Greenland continental shelf // Marine Geology. V. 111. N. 1-2. 1993. P. 37-53. Goodwin C. R., Finley J. C., Howard L. M. Ice scour bibliography. Environmental Studies Revolving Funds Report No. 010. Ottawa. 1985. 99 pp. Lisitzin A. P. Sea-Ice and Iceberg Sedimentation in the Ocean: Recent and Past. Springer

  9. Scanning Acoustic Microscopy for Characterization of Coatings and Near-Surface Features of Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian

    2006-01-01

    Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (SAcM) has been widely used for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) in various fields such as material characterization, electronics, and biomedicine. SAcM uses high-frequency acoustic waves (60 MHz to 2.0 GHz) providing much higher resolution (up to 0.5 {micro}m) compared to conventional ultrasonic NDE, which is typically about 500 {micro}m. SAcM offers the ability to non-destructively image subsurface features and visualize the variations in elastic properties. These attributes make SAcM a valuable tool for characterizing near-surface material properties and detecting fine-scale flaws. This paper presents some recent applications of SAcM in detecting subsurface damage, assessing coatings, and visualizing residual stress for ceramic and semiconductor materials.

  10. Chemical and textural surface features of pyroclasts from hydrovolcanic eruption sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1987-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the vertical textural variations observed in stratigraphic sections of ash and show how these can be related to the eruptive history of volcanic vents. Samples were systematically taken from near-vent localities in vertical sequences of ash layers. Both size distributions and petrologic (chemical) constraints are among the features used in interpretation of textural features of the ash samples. The samples studied in this report were taken from four small (less than 2 km diameter) volcanoes: Crater Elegante and Cerro Colorado in Sonora, Mexico, and Panum Crater and Obsidian Dome, California. All four are typical volcanoes formed by hydrovolcanic eruptions. Crater Elegante is a basaltic tuff ring and Cerro Colorado is a tuff cone. The California examples are rhyolitic tuff rings. All are less than 10/sup 5/ years old. The significance of selecting these four volcanoes is that their pyroclasts have been formed by explosive mixing of meteoric water with magma as it approached the surface.

  11. Effective method for detecting regions of given colors and the features of the region surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yihong; Zhang, HongJiang

    1994-03-01

    Color can be used as a very important cue for image recognition. In industrial and commercial areas, color is widely used as a trademark or identifying feature in objects, such as packaged goods, advertising signs, etc. In image database systems, one may retrieve an image of interest by specifying prominent colors and their locations in the image (image retrieval by contents). These facts enable us to detect or identify a target object using colors. However, this task depends mainly on how effectively we can identify a color and detect regions of the given color under possibly non-uniform illumination conditions such as shade, highlight, and strong contrast. In this paper, we present an effective method to detect regions matching given colors, along with the features of the region surfaces. We adopt the HVC color coordinates in the method because of its ability of completely separating the luminant and chromatic components of colors. Three basis functions functionally serving as the low-pass, high-pass, and band-pass filters, respectively, are introduced.

  12. Discharge, suspended sediment, and salinity in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway and adjacent surface waters in South-Central Louisiana, 1997–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Perrien, Scott M.

    2015-10-19

    River water penetrates much of the Louisiana coast, as demonstrated by the large year-to-year fluctuations in salinity regimes of intradistributary basins in response to differences in flow regimes of the Mississippi and the Atchafalaya Rivers. This occurs directly through inflow along the GIWW and through controlled diversions and indirectly by transport into basin interiors after mixing with the Gulf of Mexico. The GIWW plays an important role in moderating salinity in intradistributary basins; for example, salinity in surface waters just south of the GIWW between Bayou Boeuf and the Houma Navigation Canal remained low even during a year with prolonged low water (2000).

  13. Discharge, suspended sediment, and salinity in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway and adjacent surface waters in South-Central Louisiana, 1997–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Perrien, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    River water penetrates much of the Louisiana coast, as demonstrated by the large year-to-year fluctuations in salinity regimes of intradistributary basins in response to differences in flow regimes of the Mississippi and the Atchafalaya Rivers. This occurs directly through inflow along the GIWW and through controlled diversions and indirectly by transport into basin interiors after mixing with the Gulf of Mexico. The GIWW plays an important role in moderating salinity in intradistributary basins; for example, salinity in surface waters just south of the GIWW between Bayou Boeuf and the Houma Navigation Canal remained low even during a year with prolonged low water (2000).

  14. Water-surface profile and flood boundaries for the computed 100-year flood, Big Muddy Creek, Fort Peck Indian Reservation and adjacent area, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Omang, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrologic and hydraulic evaluations of Big Muddy Creek were made to determine the magnitude of the 100-year flood and the extent of flooding that would occur as the result of this flood. The magnitude of the 100-year flood was determined to range from 13,600 to 20,400 ft3/s, depending on location. Field surveys were made at 39 cross sections along a 41-mile reach of Big Muddy Creek. An additional two cross sections along the same reach were synthesized. Data from the surveys were used to calculate the water-surface elevation at each cross section using a computer program (WSPRO) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The water-surface profile of the computed 100-year flood elevations was then drawn. The profile also shows the streambed elevation and the location of the bridges and cross sections. The computed 100-year flood elevation at each cross section was used to delineate the width of the flood plain at that section. Flood boundaries between cross sections were interpolated using contour lines on topographic maps.

  15. Obtaining 3d models of surface snow and ice features (penitentes) with a Xbox Kinect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Lindsey; Partan, Benjamin; Pętlicki, Michał; MacDonell, Shelley

    2014-05-01

    Penitentes are snow or ice spikes that can reach several metres in height. They are a common feature of snow and ice surfaces in the semi-arid Andes as their formation is favoured by very low humidity, persistently low temperatures and sustained high solar radiation. While the conditions of their formation are relatively well constrained it is not yet clear how their presence influences the rate of mass loss and meltwater production from the mountain cryosphere and there is a need for accurate measurements of ablation within penitente fields through time in order to evaluate how well existing energy balance models perform for surfaces with penitentes. The complex surface morphology poses a challenge to measuring the mass loss at snow or glacier surfaces as (i) the spatial distribution of surface lowering within a penitente field is very heterogeneous, and (ii) the steep walls and sharp edges of the penitentes limit the line of sight view for surveying from fixed positions. In this work we explored whether these problems can be solved by using the Xbox Kinect sensor to generate small scale digital terrain models (DTMs) of sample areas of snow and ice penitentes. The study site was Glaciar Tapado in Chile (30°08'S; 69°55'W) where three sample sites were monitored from November 2013 to January 2014. The range of the Kinect sensor was found to be restricted to about 1 m over snow and ice, and scanning was only possible after dusk. Moving the sensor around the penitente field was challenging and often resulted in fragmented scans. However, despite these challenges, the scans obtained could be successfully combined in MeshLab software to produce good surface representations of the penitentes. GPS locations of target stakes in the sample plots allow the DTMs to be orientated correctly in space so the morphology of the penitente field and the volume loss through time can be fully described. At the study site in snow penitentes the Kinect DTM was compared with the quality

  16. Polarization controlled deep sub-wavelength periodic features written by femtosecond laser on nanodiamond thin film surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Kuntumalla, Mohan; Srikanth, Vadali V. S. S.; Rajamudili, Kuladeep; Rao Desai, Narayana

    2014-04-21

    Deep sub-wavelength (Λ/λ = ∼0.22) periodic features are induced uniformly on a nanodiamond (ND) thin film surface using femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation (pulse duration = ∼110 fs and central wavelength of ∼800 nm). The topography of the surface features is controlled by the laser polarization. Orientation of features is perpendicular to laser polarization. Periodicity (spatial periodicity of < λ/4) of the surface features is less than the laser wavelength. This work gives an experimental proof of polarization controlled surface plasmon-fs laser coupling mechanism prompting the interaction between fs laser and solid matter (here ND thin film) which in turn is resulting in the periodic surface features. Scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with micro Raman scattering, X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy are carried out to extract surface morphology and phase information of the laser irradiated regions. This work demonstrates an easy and efficient surface fabrication technique.

  17. Integrating surface and mantle constraints for palaeo-ocean evolution: a tour of the Arctic and adjacent regions (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, Grace E.

    2016-04-01

    Plate tectonic reconstructions heavily rely on absolute motions derived from hotspot trails or palaeomagnetic data and ocean-floor magnetic anomaies and fracture-zone geometries to constrain the detailed history of ocean basins. However, as oceanic lithosphere is progressively recycled into the mantle, kinematic data regarding the history of these now extinct-oceans is lost. In order to better understand their evolution, novel workflows, which integrate a wide range of complementary yet independent geological and geophysical datasets from both the surface and deep mantle, must be utilised. In particular, the emergence of time-dependent, semi or self-consistent geodynamic models of ever-increasing temporal and spatial resolution are revealing some critical constraints on the evolution and fate of oceanic slabs. The tectonic evolution of the circum-Arctic is no exception; since the breakup of Pangea, this enigmatic region has seen major plate reorganizations and the opening and closure of several ocean basins. At the surface, a myriad of potential kinematic scenarios including polarity, timing, geometry and location of subduction have emerged, including for systems along continental margins and intra-oceanic settings. Furthermore, recent work has reignited a debate about the origins of 'anchor' slabs, such as the Farallon and Mongol-Okhotsk slabs, which have been used to refine absolute plate motions. Moving to the mantle, seismic tomography models reveal a region peppered with inferred slabs, however assumptions about their affinities and subduction location, timing, geometry and polarity are often made in isolation. Here, by integrating regional plate reconstructions with insights from seismic tomography, satellite derived gravity gradients, slab sinking rates and geochemistry, I explore some Mesozoic examples from the palaeo-Arctic, northern Panthalassa and western margin of North America, including evidence for a discrete and previously undescribed slab under

  18. Higher Surface Ozone Concentrations Over the Chesapeake Bay than Over the Adjacent Land: Observations and Models from the DISCOVER-AQ and CBODAQ Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Daniel L.; Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Marufu, Lackson T.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2013-01-01

    Air quality models, such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, indicate decidedly higher ozone near the surface of large interior water bodies, such as the Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay. In order to test the validity of the model output, we performed surface measurements of ozone (O3) and total reactive nitrogen (NOy) on the 26-m Delaware II NOAA Small Research Vessel experimental (SRVx), deployed in the Chesapeake Bay for 10 daytime cruises in July 2011 as part of NASA's GEO-CAPE CBODAQ oceanographic field campaign in conjunction with NASA's DISCOVER-AQ air quality field campaign. During this 10-day period, the EPA O3 regulatory standard of 75 ppbv averaged over an 8-h period was exceeded four times over water while ground stations in the area only exceeded the standard at most twice. This suggests that on days when the Baltimore/Washington region is in compliance with the EPA standard, air quality over the Chesapeake Bay might exceed the EPA standard. Ozone observations over the bay during the afternoon were consistently 10-20% higher than the closest upwind ground sites during the 10-day campaign; this pattern persisted during good and poor air quality days. A lower boundary layer, reduced cloud cover, slower dry deposition rates, and other lesser mechanisms, contribute to the local maximum of ozone over the Chesapeake Bay. Observations from this campaign were compared to a CMAQ simulation at 1.33 km resolution. The model is able to predict the regional maximum of ozone over the Chesapeake Bay accurately, but NOy concentrations are significantly overestimated. Explanations for the overestimation of NOy in the model simulations are also explored

  19. Higher surface ozone concentrations over the Chesapeake Bay than over the adjacent land: Observations and models from the DISCOVER-AQ and CBODAQ campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Daniel L.; Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Marufu, Lackson T.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2014-02-01

    Air quality models, such as the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, indicate decidedly higher ozone near the surface of large interior water bodies, such as the Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay. In order to test the validity of the model output, we performed surface measurements of ozone (O3) and total reactive nitrogen (NOy) on the 26-m Delaware II NOAA Small Research Vessel experimental (SRVx), deployed in the Chesapeake Bay for 10 daytime cruises in July 2011 as part of NASA's GEO-CAPE CBODAQ oceanographic field campaign in conjunction with NASA's DISCOVER-AQ air quality field campaign. During this 10-day period, the EPA O3 regulatory standard of 75 ppbv averaged over an 8-h period was exceeded four times over water while ground stations in the area only exceeded the standard at most twice. This suggests that on days when the Baltimore/Washington region is in compliance with the EPA standard, air quality over the Chesapeake Bay might exceed the EPA standard. Ozone observations over the bay during the afternoon were consistently 10-20% higher than the closest upwind ground sites during the 10-day campaign; this pattern persisted during good and poor air quality days. A lower boundary layer, reduced cloud cover, slower dry deposition rates, and other lesser mechanisms, contribute to the local maximum of ozone over the Chesapeake Bay. Observations from this campaign were compared to a CMAQ simulation at 1.33 km resolution. The model is able to predict the regional maximum of ozone over the Chesapeake Bay accurately, but NOy concentrations are significantly overestimated. Explanations for the overestimation of NOy in the model simulations are also explored.

  20. Thermal measurements of dark and bright surface features on Vesta as derived from Dawn/VIR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tosi, Federico; Capria, Maria Teresa; De Sanctis, M.C.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Zambon, F.; Nathues, A.; Schröder, S.E.; Li, J.-Y.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Blewett, D.T.; Denevi, B.W.; Palmer, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Titus, Timothy N.; Mittlefehldt, D.W.; Sunshine, J.M.; Russell, C.T.; Raymond, C.A.; Dawn/VIR Team,

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing data acquired during Dawn’s orbital mission at Vesta showed several local concentrations of high-albedo (bright) and low-albedo (dark) material units, in addition to spectrally distinct meteorite impact ejecta. The thermal behavior of such areas seen at local scale (1-10 km) is related to physical properties that can provide information about the origin of those materials. We use Dawn’s Visible and InfraRed (VIR) mapping spectrometer hyperspectral data to retrieve surface temperatures and emissivities, with high accuracy as long as temperatures are greater than 220 K. Some of the dark and bright features were observed multiple times by VIR in the various mission phases at variable spatial resolution, illumination and observation angles, local solar time, and heliocentric distance. This work presents the first temperature maps and spectral emissivities of several kilometer-scale dark and bright material units on Vesta. Results retrieved from the infrared data acquired by VIR show that bright regions generally correspond to regions with lower temperature, while dark regions correspond to areas with higher temperature. During maximum daily insolation and in the range of heliocentric distances explored by Dawn, i.e. 2.23-2.54 AU, the warmest dark unit found on Vesta rises to a temperature of 273 K, while bright units observed under comparable conditions do not exceed 266 K. Similarly, dark units appear to have higher emissivity on average compared to bright units. Dark-material units show a weak anticorrelation between temperature and albedo, whereas the relation is stronger for bright material units observed under the same conditions. Individual features may show either evanescent or distinct margins in the thermal images, as a consequence of the cohesion of the surface material. Finally, for the two categories of dark and bright materials, we were able to highlight the influence of heliocentric distance on surface temperatures, and estimate an

  1. A Near-Infrared and Thermal Imager for Mapping Titan's Surface Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, S.; Hewagma, T.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 10% of the solar insolation reaches the surface of Titan through atmospheric spectral windows. We will discuss a filter based imaging system for a future Titan orbiter that will exploit these windows mapping surface features, cloud regions, polar storms. In the near-infrared (NIR), two filters (1.28 micrometer and 1.6 micrometer), strategically positioned between CH1 absorption bands, and InSb linear array pixels will explore the solar reflected radiation. We propose to map the mid, infrared (MIR) region with two filters: 9.76 micrometer and 5.88-to-6.06 micrometers with MCT linear arrays. The first will map MIR thermal emission variations due to surface albedo differences in the atmospheric window between gas phase CH3D and C2H4 opacity sources. The latter spans the crossover spectral region where observed radiation transitions from being dominated by thermal emission to solar reflected light component. The passively cooled linear arrays will be incorporated into the focal plane of a light-weight thin film stretched membrane 10 cm telescope. A rad-hard ASIC together with an FPGA will be used for detector pixel readout and detector linear array selection depending on if the field-of-view (FOV) is looking at the day- or night-side of Titan. The instantaneous FOV corresponds to 3.1, 15.6, and 31.2 mrad for the 1, 5, and 10 micrometer channels, respectively. For a 1500 km orbit, a 5 micrometer channel pixel represents a spatial resolution of 91 m, with a FOV that spans 23 kilometers, and Titan is mapped in a push-broom manner as determined by the orbital path. The system mass and power requirements are estimated to be 6 kg and 5 W, respectively. The package is proposed for a polar orbiter with a lifetime matching two Saturn seasons.

  2. The stress relaxation characteristics of composite matrices etched to produce nanoscale surface features.

    PubMed

    Mirani, Rahul D; Pratt, Jonathan; Iyer, Pooja; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2009-02-01

    Many synthetic and xenogenic natural matrices have been explored in tissue regeneration, however, they lack either mechanical strength or cell colonization characteristics found in natural tissue. Moreover natural matrices such as small intestinal submucosa (SIS) lack sample to sample homogeneity, leading to unpredictable clinical outcomes. This work explored a novel fabrication technique by blending together the useful characteristics of synthetic and natural polymers to form a composite structure by using a NaOH etching process that produces nanoscale surface features. The composite scaffold was formed by sandwiching a thin layer of PLGA between porous layers of gelatin-chitosan. The etching process increased the surface roughness of PLGA membrane, allowing easy spreading of the hydrophilic gelatin-chitosan solution on its hydrophobic surface and reducing the scaffold thickness by nearly 50% than otherwise. The viscoelastic properties of the scaffold, an area of mechanical analysis which remains largely unexplored in tissue regeneration was assessed. Stress relaxation experiments of the "ramp and hold" type performed at variable ranges of temperature (25 degrees C and 37 degrees C), loading rates (3.125% s(-1) and 12.5% s(-1)) and relaxation times (60 s, 100 s and 200 s) found stress relaxation to be sensitive to temperature and the loading rate but less dependent on the relaxation time. Stress relaxation behavior of the composite matrix was compared with SIS structures at 25 degrees C (hydrated), 3.125% s(-1) loading rate and 100 s relaxation time which showed that the synthetic matrix was found to be strain softening as compared to the strain hardening behavior exhibited by SIS. Popularly used quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) model to describe biomechanics of soft tissues was utilized. The QLV model predicted the loading behavior with an average error of 3%. The parameters of the QLV model predicted using nonlinear regression analysis appear to be in concurrence

  3. Impact of slope gradient on soil surface features and infiltration on steep slopes in northern Laos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribolzi, O.; Patin, J.; Bresson, L. M.; Latsachack, K. O.; Mouche, E.; Sengtaheuanghoung, O.; Silvera, N.; Thiébaux, J. P.; Valentin, C.

    2011-04-01

    It was recently demonstrated that, infiltration into mountain-tilled soils with highly stable microaggregates, increases with increasing slope gradient. In this work we investigate the processes that underpin this phenomenon by means of field experiments and modelling. The study area is located in northern Laos. Rainfall simulations were conducted in two 1-m 2 plots using a portable field simulator. The drop size distribution and kinetic energy were similar to that occurring on the occasion of tropical downpours. Soils exhibited a clay loam texture and very similar organic matter contents across experimental plots, but differed greatly in slope gradient (30% and 75%). Runoff water samples were collected at intervals ranging from 1 to 3 min, depending on the runoff intensity. Plots microtopography was measured before and after rainfall simulations using an automatic surface roughness meter on a 1-cm grid. High-resolution bulk density images were obtained from soil slices using a standard X-ray generator. Final infiltration rates of 6 and 21 mm h -1; soil detachment of 667 and 310 g m -2; surface lowering due to soil loss of 0.82 and 0.38 mm; surface lowering due to compaction of 1.21 and 0.90 mm; percentage area with sieving crust of 36% and 90%; percentage area with erosion crust of 63% and 0%; were obtained for the 30% and 75% slopes, respectively. Three main conclusions can be drawn from this work: (1) high intensity rainfall can rapidly transform soil surface features of steep bare soil; (2) on steeper slopes, the micro-relief tends to form micro-terraces much more pervious and less erodible than the ripple-like roughness that formed on gentler slopes; and (3) there was a more pronounced lowering of the soil surface due to compaction and denser microlayers on gentler slopes. The latter conclusion confirms the hypothesis that higher effective rainfall intensity is responsible for the formation of less permeable erosion crusts under 30% slope gradients while more

  4. Groundwater and surface-water resources in the Bureau of Land Management Moab Master Leasing Plan area and adjacent areas, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, and Mesa and Montrose Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masbruch, Melissa D.; Shope, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Canyon Country District Office is preparing a leasing plan known as the Moab Master Leasing Plan (Moab MLP) for oil, gas, and potash mineral rights in an area encompassing 946,469 acres in southeastern Utah. The BLM has identified water resources as being potentially affected by oil, gas, and potash development and has requested that the U.S. Geological Survey prepare a summary of existing water-resources information for the Moab MLP area. This report includes a summary and synthesis of previous and ongoing investigations conducted in the Moab MLP and adjacent areas in Utah and Colorado from the early 1930s through the late 2000s. Eight principal aquifers and six confining units were identified within the study area. Permeability is a function of both the primary permeability from interstitial pore connectivity and secondary permeability created by karst features or faults and fractures. Vertical hydraulic connection generally is restricted to strongly folded and fractured zones, which are concentrated along steeply dipping monoclines and in narrow regions encompassing igneous and salt intrusive masses. Several studies have identified both an upper and lower aquifer system separated by the Pennsylvanian age Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation evaporite, which is considered a confining unit and is present throughout large parts of the study area. Surface-water resources of the study area are dominated by the Colorado River. Several perennial and ephemeral or intermittent tributaries join the Colorado River as it flows from northeast to southwest across the study area. An annual spring snowmelt and runoff event dominates the hydrology of streams draining mountainous parts of the study area, and most perennial streams in the study area are snowmelt-dominated. A bimodal distribution is observed in hydrographs from some sites with a late-spring snowmelt-runoff peak followed by smaller peaks of shorter duration during the late

  5. The ‘Excess’ Emission from the Warm Surface Adjacent to Active Fissures on Enceladus from Combined VIMS and CIRS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Howell, Robert R.

    2015-11-01

    The exciting discovery of thermal emission from the tiger stripe fissures at the S. pole of Enceladus is a major highlight of the Cassini mission. Both VIMS (Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and CIRS (Composite InfraRed Spectrometer) detect the thermal ‘blackbody’ spectrum emitted from the warm fissure areas. The VIMS instrument is uniquely suited to measuring the hottest active locations because VIMS covers the 3 to 5 micron wavelength range where the rising edge of the Planck function for these T~200 K areas dominates the emission spectrum. At longer wavelengths, the spectrum is more complicated because contributions from small hot areas and larger cooler areas combine to form the broad emission spectrum that is detected by the CIRS instrument at wavelengths >6.7 microns. It is the combination of VIMS and CIRS spectra that paint a more complete portrait of the fissure heat transfer processes. Using spectra that span both the VIMS and CIRS wavelengths places a stronger constraint on the T distribution near the fissures than consideration of the spectra from either instrument alone.We show that when the best (= highest spatial resolution, 800 m/pixel and smaller) VIMS and CIRS spectra of the fissure thermal emission are considered together, there is a large (up to 400%) component of ‘excess’ emission spanning 7 to 17 microns that requires explanation. New analysis of ~2 km spatial resolution VIMS spectra of the Damascus hot spot on 8/13/2010 are similar to the highest resolution 4/14/2012 VIMS Baghdad spectra, confirming that differences in location or time between the best VIMS and CIRS spectra do not explain away the excess. The obvious interpretation is that there are processes that transfer heat from the fissure eruption to the surface within 400 m of the fissure center in addition to heat conduction through the fissure walls. Candidate heat transfer processes include fallback of large warm low velocity ice particles from the edges of the

  6. Charge-regulation phase transition on surface lattices of titratable sites adjacent to electrolyte solutions: An analog of the Ising antiferromagnet in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Joel D.; Thurston, George M.

    2015-12-01

    through comparison with exact and approximate results for the nearest-neighbor case. We then use the simulations to map the charge-patterning phase boundary in the (p H-p K ,W ) plane. The physical parameters that determine W provide a framework for identifying and designing real surfaces that could exhibit charge-patterning phase transitions.

  7. Tissue growth into three-dimensional composite scaffolds with controlled micro-features and nanotopographical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tamjid, Elnaz; Simchi, Arash; Dunlop, John W C; Fratzl, Peter; Bagheri, Reza; Vossoughi, Manouchehr

    2013-10-01

    Controlling topographic features at all length scales is of great importance for the interaction of cells with tissue regenerative materials. We utilized an indirect three-dimensional printing method to fabricate polymeric scaffolds with pre-defined and controlled external and internal architecture that had an interconnected structure with macro- (400-500 μm) and micro- (∼25 μm) porosity. Polycaprolactone (PCL) was used as model system to study the kinetics of tissue growth within porous scaffolds. The surface of the scaffolds was decorated with TiO2 and bioactive glass (BG) nanoparticles to the better match to nanoarchitecture of extracellular matrix (ECM). Micrometric BG particles were also used to reveal the effect of particle size on the cell behavior. Observation of tissue growth and enzyme activity on two-dimensional (2D) films and three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds showed effects of nanoparticle inclusion and of surface curvature on the cellular adhesion, proliferation, and kinetics of preosteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1) tissue growth into the pore channels. It was found that the presence of nanoparticles in the substrate impaired cellular adhesion and proliferation in 3D structures. Evaluation of alkaline phosphate activity showed that the presence of the hard particles affects differentiation of the cells on 2D films. Notwithstanding, the effect of particles on cell differentiation was not as strong as that seen by the curvature of the substrate. We observed different effects of nanofeatures on 2D structures with those of 3D scaffolds, which influence the cell proliferation and differentiation for non-load-bearing applications in bone regenerative medicine. PMID:23463703

  8. Identifying magma-water interaction from the surface features of ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Ralf; Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Zimanowski, Bernd

    1999-10-01

    The deposits from explosive volcanic eruptions (those eruptions that release mechanical energy over a short time span) are characterized by an abundance of volcanic ash. This ash is produced by fragmentation of the magma driving the eruption and by fragmenting and ejecting parts of the pre-existing crust (host rocks). Interactions between rising magma and the hydrosphere (oceans, lakes, and ground water) play an important role in explosive volcanism, because of the unique thermodynamic properties of water that allow it to very effectively convert thermal into mechanical energy. Although the relative proportion of magma to host-rock fragments is well preserved in the pyroclastic rocks deposited by such eruptions, it has remained difficult to quantitatively assess the interaction of magma with liquid water from the analysis of pyroclastic deposits. Here we report the results of a study of natural pyroclastic sequences combined with scaled laboratory experiments. We find that surface features of ash grains can be used to identify the dynamic contact of magma with liquid water. The abundance of such ash grains can then be related to the water/magma mass ratios during their interaction.

  9. Accurate single-sequence prediction of solvent accessible surface area using local and global features.

    PubMed

    Faraggi, Eshel; Zhou, Yaoqi; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    We present a new approach for predicting the Accessible Surface Area (ASA) using a General Neural Network (GENN). The novelty of the new approach lies in not using residue mutation profiles generated by multiple sequence alignments as descriptive inputs. Instead we use solely sequential window information and global features such as single-residue and two-residue compositions of the chain. The resulting predictor is both highly more efficient than sequence alignment-based predictors and of comparable accuracy to them. Introduction of the global inputs significantly helps achieve this comparable accuracy. The predictor, termed ASAquick, is tested on predicting the ASA of globular proteins and found to perform similarly well for so-called easy and hard cases indicating generalizability and possible usability for de-novo protein structure prediction. The source code and a Linux executables for GENN and ASAquick are available from Research and Information Systems at http://mamiris.com, from the SPARKS Lab at http://sparks-lab.org, and from the Battelle Center for Mathematical Medicine at http://mathmed.org. PMID:25204636

  10. Local moving window to delineate near surface features from surficial curvature of potential field (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. D.; Morris, W. A.

    2013-12-01

    Many semi-automatic source depth estimation algorithms applied to potential field data implement an aspect of signal curvature in their computation. The location of a source body or lithological contrast is deemed valid when the spatial variation of the observed potential field signal matches some predetermined pattern. The curvature of the potential field is defined in terms of either the first or second horizontal, or vertical derivative of the observed potential field depending on the algorithm chosen. Currently the application of these methods is achieved by systematically running a local moving window across the data, independently finding all valid solutions and then attempting to identify meaningful solutions through use of exclusion criteria. However, the window size plays an important role as it determines the number of lineaments contained within the viewing area and ultimately what data will be analysed. The aim is to select a window size small enough to isolate a single lineament or a group of lineaments with similar characteristics (i.e. dyke swarm). Fundamentally, potential field anomalies can only have two basic forms: elongate linear 2D or compact 3D features. Linear sources are characterized by a high frequency positive or negative anomaly in profile view and near 1D in planar view. Describing these parameters in terms of curvature means that all true 2D sources will be associated with a magnetic signal surface which exhibits a large profile curvature and a small planform curvature. Using this basic concept on the output of different source edge routines it is possible to employ a simple curvature threshold procedure that can decide what is deemed a lineament and what the lineament describes. Lineaments extracted by the procedure may either be artefacts or true signal. Artificial lineaments may arise from issues such as: a) inaccurate survey procedures (inadequate line to line signal leveling); b) artefacts introduced during computation of the

  11. Molecular dynamics-based ion-surface interaction models for ionized physical vapor deposition feature scale simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Coronell, D.G.; Hansen, D.E.; Voter, A.F.; Liu, C.; Liu, X.; Kress, J.D.

    1998-12-01

    A procedure is presented for incorporating the results of atomistic simulations of ion{endash}surface interactions into integrated circuit topographic simulations of ionized physical vapor deposition (PVD). Energy and angular dependent sticking probabilities for energetic Cu atoms impacting a {l_brace}111{r_brace} Cu surface, obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, were implemented in a simple Monte Carlo flux model. The resulting flux-averaged Cu sticking probability was found to vary significantly with position within submicron features and with the feature geometry. This illustrates the shortcomings of a constant (energy and angle independent) sticking probability model for ionized PVD. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. A geographic comparison of selected large-scale planetary surface features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    Photographic and cartographic comparisons of geographic features on Mercury, the Moon, Earth, Mars, Ganymede, Callisto, Mimas, and Tethys are presented. Planetary structures caused by impacts, volcanism, tectonics, and other natural forces are included. Each feature is discussed individually and then those of similar origin are compared at the same scale.

  13. The Benefit of Surface Uniformity for Encoding Boundary Features in Visual Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jung-Oh

    2011-01-01

    Using a change detection paradigm, the present study examined an object-based encoding benefit in visual working memory (VWM) for two boundary features (two orientations in Experiments 1-2 and two shapes in Experiments 3-4) assigned to a single object. Participants remembered more boundary features when they were conjoined into a single object of…

  14. The relative influence of road characteristics and habitat on adjacent lizard populations in arid shrublands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, Kaylan A.; Chalfoun, Anna D.; Gerow, Kenneth G.

    2016-01-01

    As road networks continue to expand globally, indirect impacts to adjacent wildlife populations remain largely unknown. Simultaneously, reptile populations are declining worldwide and anthropogenic habitat loss and fragmentation are frequently cited causes. We evaluated the relative influence of three different road characteristics (surface treatment, width, and traffic volume) and habitat features on adjacent populations of Northern Sagebrush Lizards (Sceloporus graciosus graciosus), Plateau Fence Lizards (S. tristichus), and Greater Short-Horned Lizards (Phrynosoma hernandesi) in mixed arid shrubland habitats in southwest Wyoming. Neither odds of lizard presence nor relative abundance was significantly related to any of the assessed road characteristics, although there was a trend for higher Sceloporus spp. abundance adjacent to paved roads. Sceloporus spp. relative abundance did not vary systematically with distance to the nearest road. Rather, both Sceloporus spp. and Greater Short-Horned Lizards were associated strongly with particular habitat characteristics adjacent to roads. Sceloporus spp. presence and relative abundance increased with rock cover, relative abundance was associated positively with shrub cover, and presence was associated negatively with grass cover. Greater Short-Horned Lizard presence increased with bare ground and decreased marginally with shrub cover. Our results suggest that habitat attributes are stronger correlates of lizard presence and relative abundance than individual characteristics of adjacent roads, at least in our system. Therefore, an effective conservation approach for these species may be to consider the landscape through which new roads and their associated development would occur, and the impact that placement could have on fragment size and key habitat elements.

  15. Internal Physical Features of a Land Surface Model Employing a Tangent Linear Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Runhua; Cohn, Stephen E.; daSilva, Arlindo; Joiner, Joanna; Houser, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    The Earth's land surface, including its biomass, is an integral part of the Earth's weather and climate system. Land surface heterogeneity, such as the type and amount of vegetative covering., has a profound effect on local weather variability and therefore on regional variations of the global climate. Surface conditions affect local weather and climate through a number of mechanisms. First, they determine the re-distribution of the net radiative energy received at the surface, through the atmosphere, from the sun. A certain fraction of this energy increases the surface ground temperature, another warms the near-surface atmosphere, and the rest evaporates surface water, which in turn creates clouds and causes precipitation. Second, they determine how much rainfall and snowmelt can be stored in the soil and how much instead runs off into waterways. Finally, surface conditions influence the near-surface concentration and distribution of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. The processes through which these mechanisms interact with the atmosphere can be modeled mathematically, to within some degree of uncertainty, on the basis of underlying physical principles. Such a land surface model provides predictive capability for surface variables including ground temperature, surface humidity, and soil moisture and temperature. This information is important for agriculture and industry, as well as for addressing fundamental scientific questions concerning global and local climate change. In this study we apply a methodology known as tangent linear modeling to help us understand more deeply, the behavior of the Mosaic land surface model, a model that has been developed over the past several years at NASA/GSFC. This methodology allows us to examine, directly and quantitatively, the dependence of prediction errors in land surface variables upon different vegetation conditions. The work also highlights the importance of accurate soil moisture information. Although surface

  16. Understanding convection features over Bay of Bengal using sea surface temperature and atmospheric variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uma, R.; Lakshmi Kumar, T. V.; Narayanan, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    Tropical oceanic regions are frequently prone to deep convections. Hence, it is very essential to understand the features of convection with the help of oceanic and atmospheric variables such as sea surface temperature (SST), outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), rainfall, relative humidity, columnar water vapour (CWV) etc. and the linkage among them. In our present study, we have divided the Bay of Bengal (BoB) into ten different subregions (SR) and have attempted to study the connection between the above-stated variables during convective and non-convective events in the southwest monsoon (SWM) season (June to September) for the period 1998-2010. The monthly behaviour of SST/OLR decreased by 0.5 °C/14 W/m2 from May to June and increased by 0.1 °C/7 W/m2 from September to October. Among the ten SRs, SR 5 and SR 10 are observed to be coldest and warmest, respectively, based on the SST variations. Intra-seasonal oscillations of the above-mentioned variables show the influences of quasi-biweekly oscillations (QBWO) and Madden-Julian oscillations (MJO). As the threshold values for SST, OLR and rainfall were already reported, we have drawn our attention to deduce a threshold value for water vapour in lower level troposphere (water vapour density (WVD) at 850 mb) which highly influences the convection. In arriving at a threshold of low-level water vapour, we have analysed the convective and non-convective events of each central 1 × 1° grid in all the SRs for the period from 1998 to 2010, along with water vapour scale height. Our analysis inferred that the low-level water vapour density at 850 mb varied above 12 g/m3during convective days and below 12 g/m3during non-convective days. We noticed that the variability in water vapour density is more in non-convective days than in convective days over BoB. The results of the study may be useful to understand the water vapour dynamics with SST, OLR and rainfall.

  17. How do features of dressage arenas influence training surface properties which are potentially associated with lameness?

    PubMed

    Murray, Rachel C; Walters, Juli; Snart, Hannah; Dyson, Sue; Parkin, Tim

    2010-11-01

    Results from a previous study indicated that there are specific arena surface characteristics that are associated with an increased likelihood of lameness in dressage horses. It is important to understand what modifiable arena factors lead to these detrimental surface characteristics. The aim of this study was to describe the use of training surfaces and arenas for United Kingdom dressage horses and to investigate any relationships between arena/surface variables and detrimental surface characteristics. Data from a questionnaire returned by 22.5% of all 11,363 registered members of British Dressage were used for the study. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were developed with each of the previously identified surface characteristics as dependent variables. Respondents reported that the majority of arenas were privately owned, sized 20 × 40 m and had a sand and rubber surface. The results indicated that wax-coated and sand and rubber surfaces were associated with less detrimental surface properties than sand, sand and PVC, woodchips or grass. Woodchips were most strongly associated with the detrimental characteristic of slipping, and sand with tripping. The findings indicated that any arena surface should have a base, with limestone the recommended surface, and that crushed concrete was best avoided. This information supported previous studies in racehorses that indicated that surface maintenance is essential, especially when many horses are using an arena daily. Problems were less likely if an arena was privately owned.

  18. Use of the discriminant Fourier-derived cepstrum with feature-level post-processing for surface electromyographic signal classification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinpu; Zhu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Dingguo

    2009-12-01

    Myoelectrical pattern classification is a crucial part in multi-functional prosthesis control. This paper investigates a discriminant Fourier-derived cepstrum (DFC) and feature-level post-processing (FLPP) to discriminate hand and wrist motions using the surface electromyographic signal. The Fourier-derived cepstrum takes advantage of the Fourier magnitude or sub-band power energy of signals directly and provides flexible use of spectral information changing with different motions. Appropriate cepstral coefficients are selected by a proposed separability criterion to construct DFC features. For the post-processing, FLPP which combines features from several analysis windows is used to improve the feature performance further. In this work, two classifiers (a linear discriminant classifier and quadratic discriminant classifier) without hyper-parameter optimization are employed to simplify the training procedure and avoid the possible bias of feature evaluation. Experimental results of the 11-motion problem show that the proposed DFC feature outperforms traditional features such as time-domain statistics and autoregressive-derived cepstrum in terms of the classification accuracy, and it is a promising method for the multi-functionality and high-accuracy control of myoelectric prostheses.

  19. Chemical and textural surface features of pyroclasts from hydrovolcanic eruption sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    Hydrovolcanic pyroclasts are produced by the interaction of erupting magma with surface or near-surface water. Eruption energy determining pyroclast transport and depositional modes is dependent upon the amount of water interacting with magma. Grain morphologies, size distributions, surface textures, and chemical effects studied record the history of eruption cycles for volcanoes under consideration. Samples of crater-rim stratigraphic sequences from Crater Elegante and Cerro Colorado, Mexico, and from Panum Crater and Obsidian Dome, California, illustrate a basaltic tuff ring and tuff cone and two rhyolitic tuff rings respectively. Grain morphologies observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal information on the process of melt fragmentation. Surface alteration and diagenesis have greater effect on pyroclasts from wet eruptions compared to dry ones. These textures are patchy overgrowths of microcrystalline and hydrated materials. Surface chemical characteristics observed with energy dispersive spectral analysis (EDS) show relative gains or losses of elements and an apparent enrichment of silica on altered surfaces.

  20. Near-Surface Crevasse Detection in Ice Sheets using Feature-Based Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, L.; Walker, B.; Lever, J.; Arcone, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    In 2014, a team of Dartmouth, CRREL, and University of Maine researchers conducted the first of three annual ground-penetrating radar surveys of the McMurdo Shear Zone using robot-towed instruments. This survey provides over 100 transects of a 5.7 km x 5.0 km grid spanning the width of the shear zone at spacing of approximately 50 m. Transect direction was orthogonal to ice flow. Additionally, a dense 200 m x 200 m grid was surveyed at 10 m spacing in both the N-S and W-E directions. Radar settings provided 20 traces/sec, which combined with an average robot speed of 1.52 m/s, provides a trace every 7.6 cm. The robot towed two antenna units at 400 MHz and 200 MHz center frequencies, with the former penetrating to approximately 19 m. We establish boundaries for the shear zone over the region surveyed using the 400 MHz antenna data, and we geo-locate crevasses using feature-based machine learning classification of GPR traces into one of three classes - 1) firn, 2) distinct crevasses, and 3) less distinct or deeper features originating within the 19 m penetration depth. Distinct crevasses feature wide, hyperbolic reflections with strike angles of 35-40° to transect direction and clear voids. Less distinct or deeper features range from broad diffraction patterns with no clear void to overlapping diffractions extending tens of meters in width with or without a clear void. The classification is derived from statistical features of unprocessed traces and thus provides a computationally efficient means for eventual real-time classification of GPR traces. Feature-based classification is shown to be insensitive to artifacts related to rolling or pitching motion of the instrument sled and also provides a means of assessing crevasse width and depth. In subsequent years, we will use feature-based classification to estimate ice flow and evolution of individual crevasses.

  1. Dynamics of Soil Deflation Features in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland Revealed by Variations in Lichen Diameters on Exposed Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindel, R. C.; Kelly, M. A.; Virginia, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about the pervasive soil deflation features in the Kangerlussuaq region, West Greenland, an area deglaciated between ~6,800 and 150 years ago. While the majority of the landscape is vegetated with low-lying shrubs and graminoids, wind erosion has removed loess and vegetation from distinct patches ranging in size from a few to tens of meters across, leaving the underlying glacial till or bedrock exposed. Although previous work has considered aeolian landforms and regional loess deposition along the Watson River Valley, these deflation features have not been investigated in detail. We aim to determine both the timing and mechanisms of formation of the deflation features and will examine whether these mechanisms were related to regional climatic conditions, such as increased aridity, to fluctuations in the Greenland Ice Sheet, or to other factors. Our ongoing research investigating these features includes geomorphic mapping using field observations and satellite imagery, lichenometry of the exposed surfaces, and cosmogenic nuclide dating of boulders and bedrock within and near the deflation features. Here we present initial results from our lichenometry studies. During the summer of 2013, we measured maximum lichen (Rhizocarpon sp.) diameters on boulder and bedrock surfaces in 15 soil deflation features located between Kangerlussuaq and the ice sheet margin. Lichen diameters vary from only a few millimeters at the outer margins of deflation features to multiple centimeters (maximum ~50 mm) in the centers of the unvegetated patches. This distinct pattern suggests that the outer margins of the soil deflation features are currently active. Based on a previously established lichen growth curve for Rhizocarpon sp. in West Greenland, our results indicate that the features are expanding at a rate of ~1.5 m per 100 yrs. In addition, the large lichen diameters (~40-50 mm) that occur in the centers of deflation features suggest that the formation mechanism has

  2. Micropatterned Hydrogel Surface with High-Aspect-Ratio Features for Cell Guidance and Tissue Growth.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuhang; You, Jin-Oh; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-08-31

    Surface topography has been introduced as a new tool to coordinate cell selection, growth, morphology, and differentiation. The materials explored so far for making such structural surfaces are mostly rigid and impermeable. Hydrogel, on the other hand, was proved a better synthetic media for cell culture because of its biocompatibility, softness, and high permeability. Herein, we fabricated a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) hydrogel substrate with high-aspect-ratio surface microfeatures. Such structural surface could effectively guide the orientation and shape of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs). Notably, on the flat hydrogel surface, cells rounded up, whereas on the microplate patterned hydrogel surface, cells elongated and aligned along the direction parallel to the plates. The microplates were 2 μm thick, 20 μm tall, and 10-50 μm wide. The interplate spacing was 5-15 μm, and the intercolumn spacing was 5 μm. The elongation of cell body was more pronounced on the patterns with narrower interplate spacing and wider plates. The cells behaved like soft solid. The competition between surface energy and elastic energy defined the shape of the cells on the structured surfaces. The soft permeable hydrogel scaffold with surface structures was also demonstrated as being viable for long-term cell culture, and could be used to generate interconnected tissues with finely tuned cell morphology and alignment across a few centimeter sizes. PMID:27089518

  3. Micropatterned Hydrogel Surface with High-Aspect-Ratio Features for Cell Guidance and Tissue Growth.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuhang; You, Jin-Oh; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-08-31

    Surface topography has been introduced as a new tool to coordinate cell selection, growth, morphology, and differentiation. The materials explored so far for making such structural surfaces are mostly rigid and impermeable. Hydrogel, on the other hand, was proved a better synthetic media for cell culture because of its biocompatibility, softness, and high permeability. Herein, we fabricated a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) hydrogel substrate with high-aspect-ratio surface microfeatures. Such structural surface could effectively guide the orientation and shape of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs). Notably, on the flat hydrogel surface, cells rounded up, whereas on the microplate patterned hydrogel surface, cells elongated and aligned along the direction parallel to the plates. The microplates were 2 μm thick, 20 μm tall, and 10-50 μm wide. The interplate spacing was 5-15 μm, and the intercolumn spacing was 5 μm. The elongation of cell body was more pronounced on the patterns with narrower interplate spacing and wider plates. The cells behaved like soft solid. The competition between surface energy and elastic energy defined the shape of the cells on the structured surfaces. The soft permeable hydrogel scaffold with surface structures was also demonstrated as being viable for long-term cell culture, and could be used to generate interconnected tissues with finely tuned cell morphology and alignment across a few centimeter sizes.

  4. Computation of fractal features based on the fractal analysis of surface electromyogram to estimate force of contraction of different muscles.

    PubMed

    Poosapadi Arjunan, Sridhar; Kumar, Dinesh Kant

    2014-01-01

    This research study investigates the fractal properties of surface Electromyogram (sEMG) to estimate the force levels of contraction of three muscles with different cross-sectional areas (CSA): m. quadriceps--vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, andm. flexor digitorum superficialis. The fractal features were computed based on the fractal analysis of sEMG, signal recorded while performing sustained muscle contraction at different force levels. A comparison was performed between the fractal features and five other features reported in the literature. Linear regression analysis was carried out to determine the relationship between the force of contraction (20-100%) and features of sEMG. The results from the coefficients of regression r² show that the new fractal feature, maximum fractal length of the signal has highest correlation (range 0.88-0.90) when compared with other features which ranges from 0.34 to 0.74 for the three different muscles. This study suggests that the estimation of various levels of sustained contraction of muscles with varied CSA will provide a better insight into the biomechanics model that involves muscle properties and muscle activation.

  5. Surface features on Mars: Ground-based albedo and radar compared with Mariner 9 topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H.

    1973-01-01

    Earth-based albedo maps of Mars were compared with Mariner 9 television data and ground-based radar profiles to investigate the nature of the bright and dark albedo features. Little correlation was found except at the boundaries of classical albedo features, where some topographic control is indicated. Wind-blown dust models for seasonal and secular albedo variations are supported, but it is not clear whether the fines are derived from bright or dark parent rock. Mars, like the Earth and Moon, has probably generated two distinct types of crustal material.

  6. The geology and morphology of Ina. [comparison of lunar surface features with Icelandic lava pillars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strain, P. L.; El-Baz, F.

    1980-01-01

    The lunar feature Ina, an unusual D-shaped depression, is located in Lacus Felicitatis north of Mare Vaporum. Attention was drawn to the feature because of its strange 'blistered' appearance. Using detailed topographic data available from the Lunar Topographic Orthophotomap (LTO) series, it is now possible to depict the morphology and structure of Ina and the surrounding region more accurately than was previously feasible. The maps employed in the study are 41C3 and 41C4 at 1:250,000 scale, and 41C3S1 (Ina) at 1:10,000 scale. Attention is given to the regional setting, and the morphologic characteristics and origins of features. It is concluded that Ina is an apparently unique volcanic feature. It rests on a dome displaying evidence of episodic extrusive activity. Its odd D-shape is probably related to a local fracture pattern, since the straight edge is aligned with other small lineaments in the area. Ina's floor exhibits several volcanic units.

  7. [Quantitative analysis of thiram by surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy combined with feature extraction Algorithms].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-hua; Jiang, Yong-cheng; Sha, Wen; Zhang, Xian-yi; Cui, Zhi-feng

    2015-02-01

    Three feature extraction algorithms, such as the principal component analysis (PCA), the discrete cosine transform (DCT) and the non-negative factorization (NMF), were used to extract the main information of the spectral data in order to weaken the influence of the spectral fluctuation on the subsequent quantitative analysis results based on the SERS spectra of the pesticide thiram. Then the extracted components were respectively combined with the linear regression algorithm--the partial least square regression (PLSR) and the non-linear regression algorithm--the support vector machine regression (SVR) to develop the quantitative analysis models. Finally, the effect of the different feature extraction algorithms on the different kinds of the regression algorithms was evaluated by using 5-fold cross-validation method. The experiments demonstrate that the analysis results of SVR are better than PLSR for the non-linear relationship between the intensity of the SERS spectrum and the concentration of the analyte. Further, the feature extraction algorithms can significantly improve the analysis results regardless of the regression algorithms which mainly due to extracting the main information of the source spectral data and eliminating the fluctuation. Additionally, PCA performs best on the linear regression model and NMF is best on the non-linear model, and the predictive error can be reduced nearly three times in the best case. The root mean square error of cross-validation of the best regression model (NMF+SVR) is 0.0455 micormol x L(-1) (10(-6) mol x L(-1)), and it attains the national detection limit of thiram, so the method in this study provides a novel method for the fast detection of thiram. In conclusion, the study provides the experimental references the selecting the feature extraction algorithms on the analysis of the SERS spectrum, and some common findings of feature extraction can also help processing of other kinds of spectroscopy.

  8. Nano-scale three dimensional surface relief features using single exposure counterpropagating multiple evanescent waves interference phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham; Chua, Jeun Kee; Tan, Sia Kim; Lin, Qun Yin

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, fabrication of nano-scale 3-D features by total internal reflection generated single exposure counter propagating multiple evanescent waves interference lithography (TIR-MEWIL) in a positive tone resist is investigated numerically. Using a four incident plane waves configuration from an 364nm wavelength illumination source, the simulated results indicate that the proposed technique shows potential in realizing periodic surface relief features with diameter as small as 0.08lambda and height-to-diameter aspect ratio as high as 10. It is also demonstrated that the sensitivity of multiple evanescent waves' interference depends on the polarization and phase of the incident plane waves, and can be tailored to obtain different geometry features. A modified cellular automata algorithm has been employed to simulate three-dimensional photoresist profiles that would result from exposure to the studied evanescent waves interference configurations.

  9. Polarization dependent formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures near stepped features

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Torralva, Ben; Adams, David P.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2014-06-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are formed near 110 nm-tall Au microstructured edges on Si substrates after single-pulse femtosecond irradiation with a 150 fs pulse centered near a 780 nm wavelength. We investigate the contributions of Fresnel diffraction from step-edges and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation to LIPSS formation on Au and Si surfaces. For certain laser polarization vector orientations, LIPSS formation is dominated by SPP excitation; however, when SPP excitation is minimized, Fresnel diffraction dominates. The LIPSS orientation and period distributions are shown to depend on which mechanism is activated. These results support previous observations of the laser polarization vector influencing LIPSS formation on bulk surfaces.

  10. Combining Spectral and Texture Features Using Random Forest Algorithm: Extracting Impervious Surface Area in Wuhan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhenfeng; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Lei; Song, Yang; Peng, Minjun

    2016-06-01

    Impervious surface area (ISA) is one of the most important indicators of urban environments. At present, based on multi-resolution remote sensing images, numerous approaches have been proposed to extract impervious surface, using statistical estimation, sub-pixel classification and spectral mixture analysis method of sub-pixel analysis. Through these methods, impervious surfaces can be effectively applied to regional-scale planning and management. However, for the large scale region, high resolution remote sensing images can provide more details, and therefore they will be more conducive to analysis environmental monitoring and urban management. Since the purpose of this study is to map impervious surfaces more effectively, three classification algorithms (random forests, decision trees, and artificial neural networks) were tested for their ability to map impervious surface. Random forests outperformed the decision trees, and artificial neural networks in precision. Combining the spectral indices and texture, random forests is applied to impervious surface extraction with a producer's accuracy of 0.98, a user's accuracy of 0.97, and an overall accuracy of 0.98 and a kappa coefficient of 0.97.

  11. In Situ Experiments To Reveal the Role of Surface Feature Sidewalls in the Cassie–Wenzel Transition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Waterproof and self-cleaning surfaces continue to attract much attention as they can be instrumental in various different technologies. Such surfaces are typically rough, allowing liquids to contact only the outermost tops of their asperities, with air being entrapped underneath. The formed solid–liquid–air interface is metastable and, hence, can be forced into a completely wetted solid surface. A detailed understanding of the wetting barrier and the dynamics of this transition is critically important for the practical use of the related surfaces. Toward this aim, wetting transitions were studied in situ at a set of patterned perfluoropolyether dimethacrylate (PFPEdma) polymer surfaces exhibiting surface features with different types of sidewall profiles. PFPEdma is intrinsically hydrophobic and exhibits a refractive index very similar to water. Upon immersion of the patterned surfaces into water, incident light was differently scattered at the solid–liquid–air and solid–liquid interface, which allows for distinguishing between both wetting states by dark-field microscopy. The wetting transition observed with this methodology was found to be determined by the sidewall profiles of the patterned structures. Partial recovery of the wetting was demonstrated to be induced by abrupt and continuous pressure reductions. A theoretical model based on Laplace’s law was developed and applied, allowing for the analytical calculation of the transition barrier and the potential to revert the wetting upon pressure reduction. PMID:25496232

  12. In situ experiments to reveal the role of surface feature sidewalls in the Cassie-Wenzel transition.

    PubMed

    Hensel, René; Finn, Andreas; Helbig, Ralf; Killge, Sebastian; Braun, Hans-Georg; Werner, Carsten

    2014-12-23

    Waterproof and self-cleaning surfaces continue to attract much attention as they can be instrumental in various different technologies. Such surfaces are typically rough, allowing liquids to contact only the outermost tops of their asperities, with air being entrapped underneath. The formed solid-liquid-air interface is metastable and, hence, can be forced into a completely wetted solid surface. A detailed understanding of the wetting barrier and the dynamics of this transition is critically important for the practical use of the related surfaces. Toward this aim, wetting transitions were studied in situ at a set of patterned perfluoropolyether dimethacrylate (PFPEdma) polymer surfaces exhibiting surface features with different types of sidewall profiles. PFPEdma is intrinsically hydrophobic and exhibits a refractive index very similar to water. Upon immersion of the patterned surfaces into water, incident light was differently scattered at the solid-liquid-air and solid-liquid interface, which allows for distinguishing between both wetting states by dark-field microscopy. The wetting transition observed with this methodology was found to be determined by the sidewall profiles of the patterned structures. Partial recovery of the wetting was demonstrated to be induced by abrupt and continuous pressure reductions. A theoretical model based on Laplace's law was developed and applied, allowing for the analytical calculation of the transition barrier and the potential to revert the wetting upon pressure reduction. PMID:25496232

  13. Mixed-Mode Fracture Behavior and Related Surface Topography Feature of a Typical Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Xie, L. Z.; Xie, H. P.; Ai, T.; He, B.

    2016-08-01

    The geo-mechanical properties of reservoirs, especially the morphology of the rock surface and the fracture properties of rocks, are of great importance in the modeling and simulation of hydraulic processes. To better understand these fundamental issues, five groups of mixed-mode fracture tests were conducted on sandstone using edge-cracked semi-circular bend specimens. Accordingly, the fracture loads, growth paths and fracture surfaces for different initial mixities of the mixed-mode loadings from pure mode I to pure mode II were then determined. A surface topography measurement for each rough fracture surface was conducted using a laser profilometer, and the fractal properties of these surfaces were then investigated. The fracture path evolution mechanism was also investigated via optical microscopy. Moreover, the mixed-mode fracture strength envelope and the crack propagation trajectories of sandstone were theoretically modeled using three widely accepted fracture criteria (i.e., the MTS, MSED and MERR criterions). The published test results in Hasanpour and Choupani (World Acad Sci Eng Tech 41:764-769, 2008) for limestone were also theoretically investigated to further examine the effectiveness of the above fracture criteria. However, none of these criteria could accurately predict the fracture envelopes of both sandstone and limestone. To better estimate the fracture strength of mixed-mode fractures, an empirical maximum tensile stress (EMTS) criterion was proposed and found to achieve good agreement with the test results. Finally, a uniformly pressurized fracture model was simulated for low pressurization rates using this criterion.

  14. Developments in convective heat transfer models featuring seamless and selected detail surfaces, employing electroless plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalmach, C. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Several model/instrument concepts employing electroless metallic skin were considered for improvement of surface condition, accuracy, and cost of contoured-geometry convective heat transfer models. A plated semi-infinite slab approach was chosen for development and evaluation in a hypersonic wind tunnel. The plated slab model consists of an epoxy casting containing fine constantan wires accurately placed at specified surface locations. An electroless alloy was deposited on the plastic surface that provides a hard, uniformly thick, seamless skin. The chosen alloy forms a high-output thermocouple junction with each exposed constantan wire, providing means of determining heat transfer during tunnel testing of the model. A selective electroless plating procedure was used to deposit scaled heatshield tiles on the lower surface of a 0.0175-scale shuttle orbiter model. Twenty-five percent of the tiles were randomly selected and plated to a height of 0.001-inch. The purpose was to assess the heating effects of surface roughness simulating misalignment of tiles that may occur during manufacture of the spacecraft.

  15. Surface temperatures and temperature gradient features of the US Gulf Coast waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huh, O. K.; Rouse, L. J., Jr.; Smith, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Satellite thermal infrared data on the Gulf of Mexico show that a seasonal cycle exists in the horizontal surface temperature structure. In the fall, the surface temperatures of both coastal and deep waters are nearly uniform. With the onset of winter, atmospheric cold fronts, which are accompanied by dry, low temperature air and strong winds, draw heat from the sea. A band of cooler water forming on the inner shelf expands, until a thermal front develops seaward along the shelf break between the cold shelf waters and the warmer deep waters of the Gulf. Digital analysis of the satellite data was carried out in an interactive mode using a minicomputer and software. A time series of temperature profiles illustrates the temporal and spatial changes in the sea-surface temperature field.

  16. Osteoblast maturation and new bone formation in response to titanium implant surface features are reduced with age.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Raines, Andrew L; Hyzy, Sharon L; Park, Jung Hwa; Hutton, Daphne L; Cochran, David L; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2012-08-01

    The surface properties of materials contribute to host cellular response and play a significant role in determining the overall success or failure of an implanted biomaterial. Rough titanium (Ti) surface microtopography and high surface free energy have been shown to enhance osteoblast maturation in vitro and increase bone formation in vivo. Whereas the surface properties of Ti are known to affect osteoblast response, host bone quality also plays a significant role in determining successful osseointegration. One factor affecting host bone quality is patient age. We examined both in vitro and in vivo whether response to Ti surface features was affected by animal age. Calvarial osteoblasts isolated from 1-, 3-, and 11-month-old rats all displayed a reduction in cell number and increases in alkaline phosphatase-specific activity and osteocalcin in response to increasing Ti surface microtopography and surface energy. Further, osteoblasts from the three ages examined displayed increased production of osteocalcin and local factors osteoprotegerin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and active transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in response to increasing Ti surface roughness and surface energy. Latent TGF-β1 only increased in cultures of osteoblasts from 1- and 3-month-old rats. Treatment with the systemic osteotropic hormone 1α,25(OH)(2)D(3) further enhanced the response of osteoblasts to Ti surface features for all three age groups. However, osteoblasts derived from 11-month-old animals had a reduced response to 1α,25(OH)(2)D(3) compared to osteoblasts derived from 1- or 3-month-old animals. These results were confirmed in vivo. Ti implants placed in the femoral intramedullary canal of old (9-month-old) mice yielded lower bone-to-implant contact and neovascularization in response to Ti surface roughness and energy compared to younger (2-month-old) mice. These results show that rodent osteoblast maturation in vitro as well as new bone formation in vivo is

  17. Symmetry plays a key role in the erasing of patterned surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Benzaquen, Michael; Salez, Thomas; Raphaël, Elie; Ilton, Mark; Massa, Michael V.; Fowler, Paul; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2015-08-03

    We report on how the relaxation of patterns prepared on a thin film can be controlled by manipulating the symmetry of the initial shape. The validity of a lubrication theory for the capillary-driven relaxation of surface profiles is verified by atomic force microscopy measurements, performed on films that were patterned using focused laser spike annealing. In particular, we observe that the shape of the surface profile at late times is entirely determined by the initial symmetry of the perturbation, in agreement with the theory. The results have relevance in the dynamical control of topographic perturbations for nanolithography and high density memory storage.

  18. Simulation study and guidelines to generate Laser-induced Surface Acoustic Waves for human skin feature detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tingting; Fu, Xing; Chen, Kun; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Li, Yanning; Wu, Sen; Hu, Xiaotang

    2015-12-01

    Despite the seriously increasing number of people contracting skin cancer every year, limited attention has been given to the investigation of human skin tissues. To this regard, Laser-induced Surface Acoustic Wave (LSAW) technology, with its accurate, non-invasive and rapid testing characteristics, has recently shown promising results in biological and biomedical tissues. In order to improve the measurement accuracy and efficiency of detecting important features in highly opaque and soft surfaces such as human skin, this paper identifies the most important parameters of a pulse laser source, as well as provides practical guidelines to recommended proper ranges to generate Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs) for characterization purposes. Considering that melanoma is a serious type of skin cancer, we conducted a finite element simulation-based research on the generation and propagation of surface waves in human skin containing a melanoma-like feature, determine best pulse laser parameter ranges of variation, simulation mesh size and time step, working bandwidth, and minimal size of detectable melanoma.

  19. Quantifying groundwater dependency of riparian surface hydrologic features using the exit gradient

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines groundwater exit gradients as a way to quantify groundwater interactions with surface water. We calibrated high resolution groundwater models for the basin fill sediments in the lower Calapooia watershed, Oregon, using data collected between 1928--2000. The e...

  20. Outstanding Antibiofilm Features of Quanta-CuO Film on Glass Surface.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Nirmalya; Ahmad, Rafiq; Bang, Seung Hyuck; Khang, Gilson; Min, Jiho; Hahn, Yoon-Bong

    2016-06-22

    Intelligently designed surface nanoarchitecture provides defined control over the behavior of cells and biomolecules at the solid-liquid interface. In this study, CuO quantum dots (quanta-CuO; ∼3-5 nm) were synthesized by a simple, low-temperature solution process and further formulated as paint to construct quanta-CuO thin film on glass. Surface morphological characterizations of the as-coated glass surface reveal a uniform film thickness (∼120 ± 10 nm) with homogeneous distribution of quanta-CuO. The antibiofilm assay showed a very high contact bacteria-killing capacity of as-coated quanta-CuO glass surfaces toward Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. This efficient antibacterial/antibiofilm activity was ascribed to the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the quanta-CuO attached to the bacterial cells, which leads to an oxidative assault and finally results in bacterial cell death. Although there is a significant debate regarding the CuO nanostructure's antibacterial mode of action, we propose both contact killing and/or copper ion release killing mechanisms for the antibiofilm activity of quanta-CuO paint. Moreover, synergism of quanta-CuO with conventional antibiotics was also found to further enhance the antibacterial efficacy of commonly used antibiotics. Collectively, this state-of-the-art design of quanta-CuO coated glass can be envisioned as promising candidates for various biomedical and environmental device coatings. PMID:27248981

  1. C-band RISAT-1 imagery for geospatial mapping of cryospheric surface features in the Antarctic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawak, Shridhar D.; Panditrao, Satej N.; Luis, Alvarinho J.

    2016-05-01

    Cryospheric surface feature classification is one of the widely used applications in the field of polar remote sensing. Precise surface feature maps derived from remotely sensed imageries are the major requirement for many geoscientific applications in polar regions. The present study explores the capabilities of C-band dual polarimetric (HH & HV) SAR imagery from Indian Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT-1) for land cryospheric surface feature mapping. The study areas selected for the present task were Larsemann Hills and Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica. RISAT-1 Fine Resolution STRIPMAP (FRS-1) mode data with 3-m spatial resolution was used in the present research attempt. In order to provide additional context to the amount of information in dual polarized RISAT-1 SAR data, a band HH+HV was introduced to make use of the original two polarizations. In addition to the data calibration, transformed divergence (TD) procedure was performed for class separability analysis to evaluate the quality of the statistics before image classification. For most of the class pairs the TD values were comparable, which indicated that the classes have good separability. Fuzzy and Artificial Neural Network classifiers were implemented and accuracy was checked. Nonparametric classifier Support Vector Machine (SVM) was also used to classify RISAT-1 data with an optimized polarization combination into three land-cover classes consisting of sea ice/snow/ice, rocks/landmass, and lakes/waterbodies. This study demonstrates that C-band FRS1 image mode data from the RISAT-1 mission can be exploited to identify, map and monitor land cover features in the polar regions, even during dark winter period. For better landcover classification and analysis, hybrid polarimetric data (cFRS-1 mode) from RISAT-1, which incorporates phase information, unlike the dual-pol linear (HH, HV) can be used for obtaining better polarization signatures.

  2. The control network of Rhea. [surface feature coordinates for satellite mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A control network of the Saturnian satellite Rhea has been established photogrammetrically from pictures taken by the two Voyager spacecraft. Coordinates of 288 control points on Rhea have been computed and listed; some of these are identified on the preliminary U.S. Geological Survey map of Rhea and many of the control point features have been named. Pixel measurements of these points were made on 81 Voyager 1 and 3 Voyager 2 pictures. The longitude system on Rhea is defined by the crater Tore; the 340 deg meridian passes through the center of this crater. The mean radius of Rhea has been determined at 764 + or - 4 km.

  3. Influence of surface features on the adhesion of Staphylococcus epidermidis to Ag-TiCN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Isabel; Henriques, Mariana; Oliveira, João Carlos; Filipa Almeida Alves, Cristiana; Piedade, Ana Paula; Carvalho, Sandra

    2013-06-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as one of the major nosocomial pathogens associated with infections of implanted medical devices. The initial adhesion of these organisms to the surface of biomaterials is assumed to be an important stage in their colonization. The main objective of this work is to assess the influence of surface features on the adhesion of S. epidermidis to Ag-TiCN coatings deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering. The structural results obtained by x-ray diffraction show that the coatings crystallize in a B1-NaCl crystal structure typical of TiC0.3N0.7. The increase of Ag content promoted the formation of Ag crystalline phases. According to the results obtained with atomic force microscopy, a decrease on the surface roughness of the films from 39 to 7 nm is observed as the Ag content increases from 0 to 15 at.%. Surface energy results show that the increase of Ag promotes an increase in hydrophobicity. Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on coatings were assessed by the enumeration of the number of viable cells. The results showed that the surface with lower roughness and higher hydrophobicity leads to greater bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, highlighting that surface morphology and hydrophobicity rule the colonization of materials.

  4. Local changes of work function near rough features on Cu surfaces operated under high external electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Djurabekova, Flyura Ruzibaev, Avaz; Parviainen, Stefan; Holmström, Eero; Hakala, Mikko

    2013-12-28

    Metal surfaces operated under high electric fields produce sparks even if they are held in ultra high vacuum. In spite of extensive research on the topic of vacuum arcs, the mystery of vacuum arc origin still remains unresolved. The indications that the sparking rates depend on the material motivate the research on surface response to extremely high external electric fields. In this work by means of density-functional theory calculations we analyze the redistribution of electron density on (100) Cu surfaces due to self-adatoms and in presence of high electric fields from −1 V/nm up to −2 V/nm (−1 to −2 GV/m, respectively). We also calculate the partial charge induced by the external field on a single adatom and a cluster of two adatoms in order to obtain reliable information on charge redistribution on surface atoms, which can serve as a benchmarking quantity for the assessment of the electric field effects on metal surfaces by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, we investigate the modifications of work function around rough surface features, such as step edges and self-adatoms.

  5. Simulating thermal stress features on hot planetary surfaces in vacuum at high temperature facility in the PEL laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, A.; Ferrari, S.; Helbert, J.; D'Incecco, P.; D'Amore, M.

    2011-12-01

    In the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) at the Institute for Planetary Research of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Berlin, we set-up a simulation chamber for the spectroscopic investigation of minerals separates under Mercurial conditions. The chamber can be evacuated to 10-4 bar and the target samples heated to 700 K within few minutes, thanks to the innovative inductive heating system. While developing the protocol for the high temperature spectroscopy measurements we discovered interesting "morphologies" on the sample surfaces. The powders are poured into stainless steel cups of 50 mm internal diameter, 8 mm height and 3 mm depth, having a 5 mm thick base (thus leaving 3 mm free space for the minerals), and rim 1 mm thick. We selected several minerals of interest for Mercurial surface composition and for each of them we analyzed various grain size separates, to study the influence of grain dimensions to the process of thermal stressing. We observed that for the smaller grain size separate (0-25 μm) the thermal stress mainly induces large depressions and fractures, while on larger grain sizes (125-250 μm) small depressions and a cratered surface. Our current working hypothesis is that these features are mainly caused by thermal stress induced by a radiatively quickly cooling surface layer covering the much hotter bulk material. Further investigation is ongoing to understand the processes better. The observed morphologies exhibit surprising similarities to features observed at planetary scale size for example on Mercury and even on Venus. Especially the high resolution images provided currently from MESSENGER'S Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) instrument has revealed plains dominated by polygonal fractures whose origin still have to be determined. Our laboratory analogue studies might in the future provide some insight into the processes creating those features

  6. Initial heats of H{sub 2}S adsorption on activated carbons: Effect of surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Bagreev, A.; Adib, F.; Bandosz, T.J.

    1999-11-15

    The sorption of hydrogen sulfide was studied on activated carbons of various origins by means of inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution. The conditions of the experiment were dry and anaerobic. Prior to the experiments the surface of some carbon samples was oxidized using either nitric acid or ammonium persulfate. Then the structural parameters of carbons were evaluated from the sorption of nitrogen. From the IGC experiments at various temperatures, heats of adsorption were calculated. The results showed that the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption under dry anaerobic conditions does not depend on surface chemistry. The dependence of the heat of adsorption on the characteristic energy of nitrogen adsorption calculated from the Dubinin-Raduskevich equation was found. This correlation can be used to predict the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption based on the results obtained from nitrogen adsorption.

  7. Morphological features of the copper surface layer under sliding with high density electric current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadin, V. V.; Aleutdinova, M. I.; Rubtsov, V. Ye.; Aleutdinova, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    Conductivity and wear intensity of copper under the influence of dry friction and electric current with contact density higher 100 A/cm2 are presented. It is shown that an increase in hardness and heat outflow from a friction zone leads to the reduction of wear intensity and current contact density increase corresponding to the beginning of catastrophic wear. Structural changes, such as the formation of FeO oxide and α-Fe particles in the copper surface layer, have also been found. It is observed that a worn surface is deformed according to a viscous liquid mechanism. Such singularity is explained in terms of appearance of high-excited atomic states in deforming micro-volumes near contact spots that lead to easy stress relaxation by local plastic shears in the vicinity of stress concentrators. In common this effect allows to achieve high wear resistance.

  8. Morphological features of the copper surface layer under sliding with high density electric current

    SciTech Connect

    Fadin, V. V.; Aleutdinova, M. I.; Rubtsov, V. Ye.; Aleutdinova, V. A.

    2015-10-27

    Conductivity and wear intensity of copper under the influence of dry friction and electric current with contact density higher 100 A/cm{sup 2} are presented. It is shown that an increase in hardness and heat outflow from a friction zone leads to the reduction of wear intensity and current contact density increase corresponding to the beginning of catastrophic wear. Structural changes, such as the formation of FeO oxide and α-Fe particles in the copper surface layer, have also been found. It is observed that a worn surface is deformed according to a viscous liquid mechanism. Such singularity is explained in terms of appearance of high-excited atomic states in deforming micro-volumes near contact spots that lead to easy stress relaxation by local plastic shears in the vicinity of stress concentrators. In common this effect allows to achieve high wear resistance.

  9. Mach number effects on conical surface features of swept shock boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, F. K.; Settles, G. S.; Horstman, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    A joint experimental and computational study is made of the shock-wave turbulent boundary-layer interaction generated by sharp fins, with emphasis on Mach-number effects. The Mach number range is from 2 to 4 and the unit Reynolds number is from 50 to 80 million per meter. Fin angles are varied from 4 to 22 deg. Surface-flow patterns are obtained using a color surface-flow-visualization technique. The results show that the upstream-influence response in the conical far-field region is a function of the freestream Mach number and the shock strength. A new interpretation of the behavior of the upstream influence with changes of the inviscid shock angle is given. Agreement between the experimental and the computed upstream-influence lines becomes poorer for stronger interactions, with the computations underpredicting the upstream-influence line.

  10. 1DTempPro V2: new features for inferring groundwater/surface-water exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koch, Franklin W.; Voytek, Emily B.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Healy, Richard W.; Briggs, Martin; Lane, Jr., John W.; Werkema, Dale

    2016-01-01

    A new version of the computer program 1DTempPro extends the original code to include new capabilities for (1) automated parameter estimation, (2) layer heterogeneity, and (3) time-varying specific discharge. The code serves as an interface to the U.S. Geological Survey model VS2DH and supports analysis of vertical one-dimensional temperature profiles under saturated flow conditions to assess groundwater/surface-water exchange and estimate hydraulic conductivity for cases where hydraulic head is known.

  11. Tuning anatase and rutile phase ratios and nanoscale surface features by anodization processing onto titanium substrate surfaces.

    PubMed

    Roach, M D; Williamson, R S; Blakely, I P; Didier, L M

    2016-01-01

    Both the anatase (A) and rutile (R) phases of titanium oxide have shown enhanced antimicrobial and bioactivity levels but the specific A/R phase ratio needed for the best results is still unknown. In this study titanium samples were anodized to produce specific ratios of anatase and rutile phases within the oxide layers. Specific ratios produced included maximum A minimum R, minimum A maximum R, 50% A 50% R, minimum A minimum R, and a non-anodized titanium control group. Samples were characterized for phase distributions within the oxide layers, surface porosity, corrosion resistance, and bioactivity. Results indicated the targeted phase ratios were reproducibly achieved during the anodization process. Samples containing the highest levels of anatase showed the largest individual pore sizes, but a lower overall percent porosity value compared to samples containing higher rutile levels. EBSD examination of the anodized layer cross-sections provided valuable new spatial information on the distribution of anatase and rutile phases within the anodized layers. Highly porous oxide layers showed significantly higher corrosion rates compared to non-anodized titanium, but no significant differences were shown in the icorr values between samples containing primarily anatase phase, samples containing primarily rutile phase, and samples containing an approximate 50:50 mixture of the two phases. Minimum A minimum R samples showed substantially less porosity compared to the other anodization groups, a significantly lower oxide thickness, and comparable corrosion rates to non-anodized titanium. All samples within the study showed apatite production in simulated body fluid within the seven day test period indicating enhanced bioactivity.

  12. Delineation of a collapse feature in a noisy environment using a multichannel surface wave technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Chen, C.; Li, P.H.; Lewis, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    A collapse developed at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Maryland, in early 2001. The location of the collapse was over a groundwater drainage system pipe buried at an elevation of +0??9 m (reference is to Chesapeake Bay level). The cause of the collapse was a subsurface drain pipe that collapsed because of saltwater corrosion of the corrugated metal pipe. The inflow/outflow of sea water and groundwater flow caused soil to be removed from the area where the pipe collapsed. To prevent damage to nearby structures, the collapse was quickly filled with uncompacted sand and gravel (???36000 kg). However, the plant had an immediate need to determine whether more underground voids existed. A high-frequency multichannel surface-wave survey technique was conducted to define the zone affected by the collapse. Although the surface-wave survey at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant was conducted at a noise level 50-100 times higher than the normal environment for a shallow seismic survey, the shear (S)-wave velocity field calculated from surface-wave data delineated a possible zone affected by the collapse. The S-wave velocity field showed chimney-shaped low-velocity anomalies that were directly related to the collapse. Based on S-wave velocity field maps, a potential zone affected by the collapse was tentatively defined.

  13. Nanometer-scale features on micrometer-scale surface texturing: a bone histological, gene expression, and nanomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paulo G; Takayama, Tadahiro; Yoo, Daniel; Jimbo, Ryo; Karunagaran, Sanjay; Tovar, Nick; Janal, Malvin N; Yamano, Seiichi

    2014-08-01

    Micro- and nanoscale surface modifications have been the focus of multiple studies in the pursuit of accelerating bone apposition or osseointegration at the implant surface. Here, we evaluated histological and nanomechanical properties, and gene expression, for a microblasted surface presenting nanometer-scale texture within a micrometer-scale texture (MB) (Ossean Surface, Intra-Lock International, Boca Raton, FL) versus a dual-acid etched surface presenting texture at the micrometer-scale only (AA), in a rodent femur model for 1, 2, 4, and 8weeks in vivo. Following animal sacrifice, samples were evaluated in terms of histomorphometry, biomechanical properties through nanoindentation, and gene expression by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Although the histomorphometric, and gene expression analysis results were not significantly different between MB and AA at 4 and 8 weeks, significant differences were seen at 1 and 2 weeks. The expression of the genes encoding collagen type I (COL-1), and osteopontin (OPN) was significantly higher for MB than for AA at 1 week, indicating up-regulated osteoprogenitor and osteoblast differentiation. At 2 weeks, significantly up-regulated expression of the genes for COL-1, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX-2), osterix, and osteocalcin (OCN) indicated progressive mineralization in newly formed bone. The nanomechanical properties tested by the nanoindentation presented significantly higher-rank hardness and elastic modulus for the MB compared to AA at all time points tested. In conclusion, the nanotopographical featured surfaces presented an overall higher host-to-implant response compared to the microtextured only surfaces. The statistical differences observed in some of the osteogenic gene expression between the two groups may shed some insight into the role of surface texture and its extent in the observed bone healing mechanisms. PMID:24813260

  14. Features and causes of recent surface solar radiation dimming and brightening patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianastassiou, N.; Papadimas, C. D.; Matsoukas, C.; Pavlakis, K.; Fotiadi, A.; Wild, M.; Vardavas, I.

    2012-04-01

    Incoming solar radiation at the Earth's surface has undergone substantial decreases/increases on decadal timescales in the second half of 20th century. More specifically, surface measurements have indicated a widespread decrease of surface solar radiation (SSR) from the 1950s to the 1980s, described as global dimming, followed by a period with either no more decrease or even an increase at various locations worldwide till the end of 1990s, namely a global brightening. These measured patterns of SSR are, in general, in line with SSR fluxes computed with radiative transfer models (RTMs) using satellite input data, while efforts are currently being made to reproduce them with regional or global climate models. The advantage of reproducing SSR dimming/brightening with RTMs is that an almost complete coverage of the globe is possible, whereas dimming/brightening patterns are obtained under both clear- and all-sky conditions. Moreover, an even more important and incomparable advantage of the use of RTMs for reproducing SSR dimming/brightening, is that it makes possible the identification of their causes in terms of specific radiative forcing agents, and the assessment and quantification of their relative contribution to GDB, which is of major importance for understanding current and future climate changes. In the present study, first an update of SSR dimming/brightening at global scale beyond 2000 is attempted using a spectral RTM along with a variety of satellite and reanalyses input data. The results are obtained at scales varying from the regional to continental/hemispherical/global, and are validated through comparisons against quality surface measurements from reference global networks such as GEBA (Global Energy Balance Archive) and BSRN (Baseline Surface Radiation Network). An inter-hemispherical difference is revealed up to 2007, consisting in a clear dimming in the South Hemisphere (SH), against a no clear dimming/brightening signal in North Hemisphere (NH

  15. Near-surface gas mapping studies of salt geologic features at Weeks Island and other sites

    SciTech Connect

    Molecke, M.A.; Carney, K.R.; Autin, W.J.; Overton, E.B.

    1996-10-01

    Field sampling and rapid gas analysis techniques were used to survey near-surface soil gases for geotechnical diagnostic purposes at the Weeks Island Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site and other salt dome locations in southern Louisiana. This report presents the complete data, results and interpretations obtained during 1995. Weeks Island 1994 gas survey results are also briefly summarized; this earlier study did not find a definitive correlation between sinkhole No. 1 and soil gases. During 1995, several hundred soil gas samples were obtained and analyzed in the field by gas chromatography, for profiling low concentrations and gas anomalies at ppm to percent levels. The target gases included hydrogen, methane, ethane and ethylene. To supplement the field data, additional gas samples were collected at various site locations for laboratory analysis of target gases at ppb levels. Gases in the near-surface soil originate predominantly from the oil, from petrogenic sources within the salt, or from surface microbial activity. Surveys were conducted across two Weeks Island sinkholes, several mapped anomalous zones in the salt, and over the SPR repository site and its perimeter. Samples were also taken at other south Louisiana salt dome locations for comparative purposes. Notable results from these studies are that elevated levels of hydrogen and methane (1) were positively associated with anomalous gassy or shear zones in the salt dome(s) and (2) are also associated with suspected salt fracture (dilatant) zones over the edges of the SPR repository. Significantly elevated areas of hydrogen, methane, plus some ethane, were found over anomalous shear zones in the salt, particularly in a location over high pressure gas pockets in the salt, identified in the mine prior to SPR operations. Limited stable isotope ratio analyses, SIRA, were also conducted and determined that methane samples were of petrogenic origin, not biogenic.

  16. Feature-based recognition of surface-enhanced Raman spectra for biological targets.

    PubMed

    Pavillon, Nicolas; Bando, Kazuki; Fujita, Katsumasa; Smith, Nicholas I

    2013-08-01

    We propose and compare multiple approaches to automatically process data measured through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), in the context of intracellular molecule probing. It relies on locally detecting the most relevant spectra to retrieve all data independently through indexing, thus avoiding any pre-filtering which occurs with standard processing methods. We first assess our approach on simulated data of the spectrum of Rhodamine 6G, and then validate high-performing methods on experimental measurements of this compound. The optimized method is then utilized to extract and classify the complex SERS response behavior of gold nanoparticles taken in live cells. PMID:23192987

  17. Percentage Contributions from Atmospheric and Surface Features to Computed Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    Over the past few years, there has become an increasing interest in the use of millimeter-wave (mm-wave) and sub-millimeter-wave (submm-wave) radiometer observations to investigate the properties of ice particles in clouds. Passive radiometric channels respond to both the integrated particle mass throughout the volume and field of view, and to the amount, location, and size distribution of the frozen (and liquid) particles with the sensitivity varying for different frequencies and hydrometeor types. One methodology used since the 1960's to discern the relationship between the physical state observed and the brightness temperature (TB) is through the temperature weighting function profile. In this research, the temperature weighting function concept is exploited to analyze the sensitivity of various characteristics of the cloud profile, such as relative humidity, ice water path, liquid water path, and surface emissivity. In our numerical analysis, we compute the contribution (in Kelvin) from each of these cloud and surface characteristics, so that the sum of these various parts equals the computed TB. Furthermore, the percentage contribution from each of these characteristics is assessed. There is some intermingling/contamination of the contributions from various components due to the integrated nature of passive observations and the absorption and scattering between the vertical layers, but all in all the knowledge gained is useful. This investigation probes the sensitivity over several cloud classifications, such as cirrus, blizzards, light snow, anvil clouds, and heavy rain. The focus is on mm-wave and submm-wave frequencies, however discussions of the effects of cloud variations to frequencies as low as 10 GHz and up to 874 GHz will also be presented. The results show that nearly 60% of the TB value at 89 GHz comes from the earth's surface for even the heaviest blizzard snow rates. On the other hand, a significant percentage of the TB value comes from the snow

  18. Reconciling Diurnal Features of Thermal- and Microwave-derived Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, T. R.; Crow, W. T.; Hain, C.; Anderson, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Land surface temperature (T), a key ingredient for physically-based retrieval algorithms of hydrological states and fluxes, remains a poorly constrained parameter for global scale studies. The main two observational methods to remotely measure T are based on thermal infrared (TIR) observations and passive microwave observations (PMW). TIR is the most commonly used approach and the method of choice to provide standard T products for various satellite missions. It has found wide application, for example in energy balance approaches to retrieve land surface evapotranspiration. PMW-based T retrievals on the other hand are not as widely adopted for land applications; currently their principle use is in soil moisture retrieval algorithms. PMW and TIR technologies present two highly complementary and independent means of measuring T. PMW observations have a high tolerance to clouds but a low spatial resolution, and TIR has a high spatial resolution with temporal sampling restricted to clear skies. Furthermore, a combination of these T estimates with independent errors would inevitably reduce the overall uncertainty in estimating T. The need for improved T estimates at global scale for use in physical retrieval models of land surface parameters have motivated our work to understand the structural differences in the characteristics of the shape of the diurnal temperature cycle (DTC) as observed by PMW and TIR sensors. The ultimate goal of this work is to create a merged PMW and TIR temperature product that is spatially and diurnally continuous. This paper will report on recent progress in characterizing the main structural components of the DTC that explain differences in TIR and PMW estimates of T. Spatial patterns in DTC timing (phase lag with solar noon) have been calculated for TIR, PMW and compared to weather prediction estimates. Based on knowledge of DTC timing, which is relatively stable over the year, the DTC amplitude is studied in terms of spatial and temporal

  19. Percentage Contributions from Atmospheric and Surface Features to Computed Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few years, there has become an increasing interest in the use of millimeter-wave (mm-wave) and sub-millimeter-wave (submm-wave) radiometer observations to investigate the properties of ice particles in clouds. Passive radiometric channels respond to both the integrated particle mass throughout the volume and field of view, and to the amount, location, and size distribution of the frozen (and liquid) particles with the sensitivity varying for different frequencies and hydrometeor types. One methodology used since the 1960's to discern the relationship between the physical state observed and the brightness temperature (TB) is through the temperature weighting function profile. In this research, the temperature weighting function concept is exploited to analyze the sensitivity of various characteristics of the cloud profile, such as relative humidity, ice water path, liquid water path, and surface emissivity. In our numerical analysis, we compute the contribution (in Kelvin) from each of these cloud and surface characteristics, so that the sum of these various parts equals the computed TB. Furthermore, the percentage contribution from each of these characteristics is assessed. There is some intermingling/contamination of the contributions from various components due to the integrated nature of passive observations and the absorption and scattering between the vertical layers, but all in all the knowledge gained is useful. This investigation probes the sensitivity over several cloud classifications, such as cirrus, blizzards, light snow, anvil clouds, and heavy rain. The focus is on mm-wave and submm-wave frequencies, however discussions of the effects of cloud variations to frequencies as low as 10 GHz and up to 874 GHz will also be presented. The results show that nearly 60% of the TB value at 89 GHz comes from the earth's surface for even the heaviest blizzard snow rates. On the other hand, a significant percentage of the TB value comes from the snow

  20. Surface-water and ground-water features, Clay County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bentley, C.B.

    1977-01-01

    Clay County is a rapidly growing area in northeastern Florida. Surface water largely is undeveloped except for recreational use. Black Creek is the largest fresh-water stream in the country and has an average discharge of about 515 cubic feet per second. However, excessive color, iron concentration, hardness, and pH often make the water objectionable for many asses. Water from the lakes and streams in the Etonia Creek basin in southwestern Clay County generally is of good chemical quality. Ground water occurs in the county in a water-table aquifer, secondary artesian aquifers, and the Floridan aquifer. Large withdrawals of water from the Floridan aquifer since the 1940's, especially in nearby metropolitan Jacksonville, have caused a decline of the potentiometric surface of up to 30 feet in the northeast corner of Clay County to less than 5 feet in the western part. The rate of decline in recent years at Orange Park has been about 0.7 of a foot per year. Ground water in the county generally is of good chemical quality and is suitable for most uses. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Features of the Earth surface deformations in Kamchatka peninsula and their relation with geoacoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, I. A.; Marapulets, Yu. V.; Shevtsov, B. M.

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations of deformation process in the near surface sedimentary rocks, which has been carried out in a seismically active region of Kamchatka peninsular since 2007. The peculiarity of the experiments on registration of geodeformations is the application of a laser strainmeter-interferometer constructed according to the Michelson interferometer scheme. Besides rock deformations, geoacoustic emission in the frequency range from several hertz to the first tens of kilohertz is under the investigation. Piezoceramic hydrophones installed in artificial water reservoirs are applied. It is shown that periods of primary rock compression and tension with the duration up to several months are distinguished in the geodeformation process at the observation site. During the direction change in the deformations, when geodeformation process rate grows, the increase of geoacoustic radiation is observed.

  2. Thermal evolution of a differentiated Ganymede and implications for surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, R.L.; Stevenson, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamic models are developed for the processes which controlled the evolution of the surface Ganymede, an icy Jovian satellite assumed to have a rock-rich core surrounded by a water-ice mantle. Account is taken of a heat pulse which would have arisen from a Rayleigh-Taylor instability at a deep-seated liquid-solid water interface, rapid fracturing from global stresses imposed by warm ice diapiric upwelling, impacts by large meteorites, and resurfacing by ice flows (rather than core formation). Comparisons are made with existing models for the evolution of Callisto, and the difficulties in defining a mechanism which produced the groove terrain of Ganymede are discussed. 100 references.

  3. Coastal zone color scanner pigment concentrations in the southern ocean and relationships to geophysical surface features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, J. C.; Mcclain, C. R.; Sullivan, C. W.; Ryan, J. P.; Leonard, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    Climatological data on the distribution of surface pigment fields in the entire southern ocean over a seasonal cycle are examined. The occurrence of intense phytoplankton blooms during austral summer months and during other seasons in different regions is identified and analyzed. The highest pigment concentrations are observed at high latitudes and over regions with water depths usually less than 600 m. Basin-scale pigment distribution shows a slightly asymmetric pattern of enhanced pigment concentrations about Antarctica, with enhanced concentrations extending to lower latitudes in the Atlantic and Indian sectors than in the Pacific sector. A general increase in pigment concentrations is evident from the low latitudes toward the Antarctic circumpolar region. Spatial relationships between pigment and archived geophysical data reveal significant correlation between pigment distributions and both bathymetry and wind stress, while general hemispheric scale patterns of pigment distributions are most coherent with the geostrophic flow of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

  4. Gravitational signatures of the Moon's near-surface features from GRAIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sori, M.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Observations from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission [Zuber et al., 2011] have provided the highest resolution and most accurate gravity data of the Moon to date. Combining these data with topographic data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) [Smith et al., 2011] aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) [Chin et al., 2007] has allowed for construction of a global 16 pixels per degree map of lunar Bouguer anomalies. In this study, we analyze Bouguer gravity to study shallow subsurface structure. Analysis of data from the Clementine mission [Neumann et al., 1996] revealed that some lunar basins contain positive Bouguer anomalies that are in excess of that due to maria infill. This excess has been attributed to mechanisms that uplift high density mantle material closer to the surface, either during [e.g. Neumann et al., 1996] or after [e.g. Andrews-Hanna and Stewart, 2011] basin formation. GRAIL data allow for a more thorough analysis of these "mascons." We search for correlations between a basin's topographic expression and its gravitational signature, and find a strong correlation between basin diameter and the magnitude of the Bouguer anomaly found in the center of the basin. Positive gravity anomalies are present in basins as small as ~190 km in diameter, and exist for all basins greater than ~270 km in diameter. GRAIL data are also particularly apt for studying cryptomaria, i.e. mare basalt deposits that are hidden from the surface beneath a layer of higher albedo material. Previous authors [Antonenko et al., 1994] have provided criteria for the detection of cryptomaria, especially the presence of dark-halo craters [e.g., Schultz and Spudis, 1979]. We use the Bouguer anomaly map to study areas where cryptomaria deposits are thought to exist, such as the Schiller-Schickard region [Bell and Hawke, 1984].

  5. Coastal zone color scanner pigment concentrations in the southern ocean and relationships to geophysical surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Comiso, J.C.; McClain, C.R. ); Sullivan, C.W. ); Ryan, J.P. ); Leonard, C.L. )

    1993-02-15

    The spatial and seasonal distributions of phytoplankton pigment concentration over the entire southern ocean have been studied for the first time using the coastal zone color scanner historical data set (from October 1978 through June 1986). Enhanced pigment concentrations are observed between 35[degrees]S and 55[degrees]S throughout the year, with such enhanced regions being more confined to the south in the austral summer and extending further north in the winter. North and south of the polar front, phytoplankton blooms (>1 mg/m[sup 3]) are not uniformly distributed around the circumpolar region. Instead, blooms appear to be located in regions of ice retreat (or high melt areas) such as the Scotia Sea and the Ross Sea, in relatively shallow areas (e.g., the Patagonian and the New Zealand shelves), in some regions of Ekman upwelling like the Tasman Sea, and near areas of high eddy kinetic such as the Agulhas retroflection. Among all features examined by regression analysis, bathymetry appears to be the one most consistently correlated with pigments (correlation coefficient being about [minus]0.3 for the entire region). The cause of negative correlation with bathymetry is unknown but is consistent with the observed abundance of iron in shallow areas in the Antarctic region. It is also consistent with resuspension of phytoplankton cells by wind-induced mixing, especially in shallow waters. Nutrients (phosphate, nitrate, and silicate) are found to correlate significantly with pigments when the entire southern ocean is considered, but south of 55[degrees]S the correlation is poor, probably because the Antarctic waters are not nutrient limited. Large interannual variability (>30%) in average pigment concentration over the entire region during different seasons indicates possible influence of time dependent parameters. 66 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Revisiting the quantitative features of surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Yi; Lee, Kai-Chieh; Kuo, Yen-Ling; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-10-28

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) is frequently used to analyse small organics owing to its clean background. Inorganic materials can be used as energy absorbers and the transfer medium to facilitate the desorption/ionization of analytes; thus, they are used as SALDI-assisting materials. Many studies have demonstrated the usefulness of SALDI-MS in quantitative analysis of small organics. However, some characteristics occurring in SALDI-MS require certain attention to ensure the reliability of the quantitative analysis results. The appearance of a coffee-ring effect in SALDI sample preparation is the primary factor that can affect quantitative SALDI-MS analysis results. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reports relating to quantitative SALDI-MS analysis that discuss or consider this effect. In this study, the coffee-ring effect is discussed using nanoparticles and nanostructured substrates as SALDI-assisting materials to show how this effect influences SALDI-MS analysis results. Potential solutions for overcoming the existing problems are also suggested.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  7. Some features of surface pressure fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers with zero and favorable pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, B. E.; Simpson, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of surface pressure fluctuation spectra, coherence and convective wave speeds from zero and favorable pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers are reported for momentum Reynolds numbers from 3000 to 18,800. The acceleration parameter K is near 2 x 10 to the -7 power for the favorable pressure gradient flow. The outer variables, U sub e, tau sub w and delta sub 1 non-dimensionalize and collapse the spectra for the low to middle range of frequencies for most test cases. The grouping using the inner variable, U sub tau and gamma, collapse the spectra for the middle to high range of frequencies for all test cases. The value of p'/tau sub w was near 3.8 and 2.8 for the smallest values of d+ in the zero and favorable pressure gradient flows, respectively. The coherence exhibits a decay that is not exponential in some cases, but the Corcos similarity parameters omega Delta x/U sub c and omega Delta z/U sub c collapse the data for all test cases. The ratio of U sub c/U sub e increases with omega delta sub 1/U sub e up to omega delta sub 1/U sub e on the order of unity, where U sub c/U sub e becomes nearly constant. This was observed in the present results for both streamwise pressure gradient flows. The experimental results presented show good agreement with previous research.

  8. Revisiting the quantitative features of surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Yi; Lee, Kai-Chieh; Kuo, Yen-Ling; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-10-28

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) is frequently used to analyse small organics owing to its clean background. Inorganic materials can be used as energy absorbers and the transfer medium to facilitate the desorption/ionization of analytes; thus, they are used as SALDI-assisting materials. Many studies have demonstrated the usefulness of SALDI-MS in quantitative analysis of small organics. However, some characteristics occurring in SALDI-MS require certain attention to ensure the reliability of the quantitative analysis results. The appearance of a coffee-ring effect in SALDI sample preparation is the primary factor that can affect quantitative SALDI-MS analysis results. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reports relating to quantitative SALDI-MS analysis that discuss or consider this effect. In this study, the coffee-ring effect is discussed using nanoparticles and nanostructured substrates as SALDI-assisting materials to show how this effect influences SALDI-MS analysis results. Potential solutions for overcoming the existing problems are also suggested.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. PMID:27644973

  9. Characteristics, seasonal distribution and surface degradation features of microplastic pellets along the Goa coast, India.

    PubMed

    Veerasingam, S; Saha, Mahua; Suneel, V; Vethamony, P; Rodrigues, Andrea Carmelita; Bhattacharyya, Sourav; Naik, B G

    2016-09-01

    Microplastic pellets (MPPs) are ubiquitous contaminants, recognised as a serious threat to the biota in coastal, estuarine and marine environment. The distribution, abundance, weathering and chemical characteristics of MPPs on the beaches of Goa, and their transport to the coast during the southwest (SW) monsoon are discussed in this paper. MPP samples collected from six sandy beaches were categorised based on colour and polymer types using Stereoscope microscope and FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, respectively. White colour MPPs were the most abundant, and Polyethylene (PE) and Polypropylene (PP) were the dominant polymer types of MPPs deposited on all the beaches. Carbonyl index values showed that MPPs collected in June 2015 (representing SW monsoon) were 'new', whereas the MPPs collected in January 2015 were 'aged', showing that MPPs are arriving at Goa coast only during SW monsoon due to conducive hydrodynamic conditions. Characteristics of MPPs suggest that they could be originated primarily from ocean-based sources. The winds and surface currents during SW monsoon are the driving forces for the transportation and deposition of MPPs on the Goa beaches. The results of this study will be useful to the National 'Clean India' program for effective plastic debris removal management.

  10. Characteristics, seasonal distribution and surface degradation features of microplastic pellets along the Goa coast, India.

    PubMed

    Veerasingam, S; Saha, Mahua; Suneel, V; Vethamony, P; Rodrigues, Andrea Carmelita; Bhattacharyya, Sourav; Naik, B G

    2016-09-01

    Microplastic pellets (MPPs) are ubiquitous contaminants, recognised as a serious threat to the biota in coastal, estuarine and marine environment. The distribution, abundance, weathering and chemical characteristics of MPPs on the beaches of Goa, and their transport to the coast during the southwest (SW) monsoon are discussed in this paper. MPP samples collected from six sandy beaches were categorised based on colour and polymer types using Stereoscope microscope and FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, respectively. White colour MPPs were the most abundant, and Polyethylene (PE) and Polypropylene (PP) were the dominant polymer types of MPPs deposited on all the beaches. Carbonyl index values showed that MPPs collected in June 2015 (representing SW monsoon) were 'new', whereas the MPPs collected in January 2015 were 'aged', showing that MPPs are arriving at Goa coast only during SW monsoon due to conducive hydrodynamic conditions. Characteristics of MPPs suggest that they could be originated primarily from ocean-based sources. The winds and surface currents during SW monsoon are the driving forces for the transportation and deposition of MPPs on the Goa beaches. The results of this study will be useful to the National 'Clean India' program for effective plastic debris removal management. PMID:27341153

  11. Modification of the large-scale features of high Reynolds number wall turbulence by passive surface obtrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monty, J. P.; Allen, J. J.; Lien, K.; Chong, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    A high Reynolds number boundary-layer wind-tunnel facility at New Mexico State University was fitted with a regularly distributed braille surface. The surface was such that braille dots were closely packed in the streamwise direction and sparsely spaced in the spanwise direction. This novel surface had an unexpected influence on the flow: the energy of the very large-scale features of wall turbulence (approximately six-times the boundary-layer thickness in length) became significantly attenuated, even into the logarithmic region. To the author's knowledge, this is the first experimental study to report a modification of `superstructures' in a rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. The result gives rise to the possibility that flow control through very small, passive surface roughness may be possible at high Reynolds numbers, without the prohibitive drag penalty anticipated heretofore. Evidence was also found for the uninhibited existence of the near-wall cycle, well known to smooth-wall-turbulence researchers, in the spanwise space between roughness elements.

  12. Effect of the measurement size on the robustness of the assessment of the features specific for cylinder liner surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimkovski, Z.; Ohlsson, R.; Rosén, B.-G.

    2014-01-01

    The quality of the cylinder liner surface is of great importance due to its impact on the fuel/oil consumption and emissions of the internal combustion engine. A good liner function depends on the size and distribution of the deep honing grooves and the amount of the cold work material (Blechmantel) left inside the grooves after finishing. A fast evaluation of these features requires optical three-dimensional measurements with a large area and good resolution, but many interferometers used today have limited resolution when measuring larger areas. To find out how the measurement size and resolution would affect the quantification and the variation of the parameters, two objectives, 2.5 × and 10 × , were used for measuring a cylinder liner from a truck engine. The Blechmantel was of special interest as it first comes into contact with piston/rings, detaches as particles and wears the running surfaces. The 2.5 × objective showed more robust assessment than the 10 × one, manifested by a lower coefficient of variation for the parameters describing the features: Blechmantel, groove width and height, groove balance and number of grooves. This means that fewer measurements are required if a 2.5 × objective is used in production and hence the time and cost of the liner would be decreased.

  13. Features of ODEs derived from an autonomous surface ozone network in coastal Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. E.; Wolff, E. W.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; Brough, N.

    2012-04-01

    In 2008, a network of 10 autonomous ozone monitors was established around Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, along 800 km of the coastal perimeter and with a transect running ~450 km up onto the polar plateau. The monitors ran for a full year. The aim of the network was to explore variability of ozone at the different sites, and the contrasting influences of O3 production (arising from snowpack photochemistry) and O3 destruction driven by halogen chemistry. While ozone depletion events have been much studied at single coastal locations, and even from within a large ozone depleted air mass over the Arctic Ocean, a different approach is required to gain information on their spatial extent. The autonomous network provided an opportunity to map the movement, and thereby the size, of ozone-depleted air masses. Here we present results from the network, focusing particularly on activity during springtime. In many cases the same ODE appeared at several (in some cases, all) of the coastal sites, the arrival and departure of the depleted air mass being offset in time. In some instances a severe ODE was evident at a single coastal site only. We explore the meteorological conditions operative during the ODEs as a means of accounting for these observations, and estimate the size of the depleted air masses. Further, we use our data to explore how far inland ODEs can penetrate to address why these are thus far seen as coastal phenomena only. An awareness of the variability in ODEs, spatially as well as temporally, will be necessary for trend studies using coastal polar surface ozone measurements.

  14. Integration of geophysical, ground surface, and remote sensing methods to identify ice features in discontinuous permafrost near Fairbanks, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, T. A.; Bjella, K.; Hiemstra, C. A.; Newman, S. D.; Anderson, J.; Edwards, J.; Arcone, S. A.; Wagner, A. M.; Barbato, R.; Berkowitz, J.; Deeb, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Ground ice features such as ice wedges, segregation ice, and thermokarst cave ice are present in the subsurface in a variety of spatial scales and patterns. Accurately identifying the character and extent of these ice features in permafrost terrains allows engineers and planners to cost effectively create innovative infrastructure designs to withstand the changing environment. We are assembling a holistic view of how a variety of surficial and standoff geophysical measurements can be combined with classic ground based measurements to delineate subsurface permafrost features. We are combining horizontal geophysical measurements; borehole mapping; multispectral and radar remote sensing; airborne and ground-based LiDAR; snow, soil, and vegetation mapping; and subsurface thermal measurements and modeling at three field sites in discontinuous permafrost of Interior Alaska. Our sites cross transects representing upland and lowland permafrost and a variety of soil and vegetation compositions. With our measurements we identified and mapped a 300 meter wide swath of ice rich frozen peat at one of our lowland field sites. The high ice content was confirmed with borehole measurements. This ice rich permafrost region yields higher electrical resistivity values than the nearby permafrost and is associated with anomalously low seasonal thaw depths compared to other sites nearby. Surface soils in the ice rich region have high soil moisture contents, low redox potential (30-100 mV), and elevated soil microbial activity. The ice rice region yields low phase changes from paired interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurements collected in late spring and late summer. One interpretation of this result is that the ice rich area experiences minimal summer season subsidence. Taken in total, our results suggest the ice rich peat region has distinct surface signatures and subsurface geophysical characteristics that may be extrapolated to other areas to identify ice rich permafrost in

  15. Stereo Topography of Surface Features on Europa and Comparisons with Formation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. B.; El Henson, E.; Nimmo, F.

    2013-12-01

    to over 100 meters. As we continue to compare our results for other features on Europa with previous work, we will also evaluate geophysical models for which topographic profiles can serve as an important initial constraint, such as crater relaxation [3] and flexure due to tectonic ridge emplacement [5]. Ridge flank profiles can also be studied to provide information on slope angles as compared with the angle of repose, with important implications for ridge material consolidation [6]. We are also evaluating models for the formation of chaotic terrain [7, 8] in view of these new topographic profiles. 1. Kirk R.L., et al., LPSC XL,#1414, 2009. 2. Moratto, Z. M. et al. LPSC XLI, #2364, 2010. 3. Phillips, C. B., et al. LPSC XLIV, abstract 2766, 2013. 4. Schenk, P. and E. Turtle, Europa's Impact Craters, in Europa, ed. R. T. Pappalardo, W. B. McKinnon, and K. Khurana, Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2009. 5. Hammond, N. P., et al. Icarus, v. 223 p. 418-422, 2013. 6. Kadel, S. D. et al. LPSC XXIX, abstract 1078, 1998. 7. Nimmo, F. and B. Giese, 2005. Icarus 177, 327-340. 8. Schmidt, B. E., et al. Nature 479, 502-505, 2011.

  16. Color heterogeneity of the surface of Phobos: Relationships to geologic features and comparison to meteorite analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Murchie, S.L.; Britt, D.T.; Head, J.W.; Pratt, S.F.; Fisher, P.C. ); Zhukov, B.S.; Kuzmin, A.A.; Ksanfomality, L.V.; Zharkov, A.V.; Nikitin, G.E. ); Fanale, F.P.; Blaney, D.L.; Bell, J.F.; Robinson, M.S. )

    1991-04-10

    Multispectral observations of Phobos by the VSK (Videospectrometric) TV cameras and KRFM (Combined Radiometer and Photometer for Mars) UV-visible spectrometer on Phobos 2 have provided new determinations of the satellite's spectral reflectance properties, at greater spatial and spectral resolutions and over a greater geographic range than have previously been available. Images of the ratio of visible and NIR reflectances covering the longitude range 30-250{degrees}W were constructed from 0.40-0.56 {mu}m and 0.78-1.1 {mu}m VSK images. The average color ratio of Phobos was found to be {approximately}0.97{plus minus}0.14, consistent with previously obtained measurements. However, the surface is heterogeneous, with at least four recognizable spectral units whose absolute color ratios were determined to within {approximately}10%: a red unit with a color ratio of 0.7-0.8, a reddish gray unit with a color ratio of 0.8-1.0, a bluish gray unit with a color ratio of 1.0-1.1, and a blue unit with a color ratio of 1.1-1.4. The redder and bluer color units are interpreted to have been excavated by impacts, from an optically and/or compositionally heterogeneous interior overlain by a reddish gray surficial layer. The location of the blue lobe emanating from Stickney correlates with the location of one of the morphologic classes of grooves, as predicted by ejecta reimpact models of groove origin. The large color ratio of blue material is comparable to that of an assemblage of mafic minerals like that forming black chondrites. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of the color ratio and UV-visible spectral properties of bluish gray material with those of meteorites indicates that black chondrites are this material's closest spectral analog. The UV-visible spectra of reddish gray and red materials most resemble spectra of black chondrites but are also comparable to spectra of some carbonaceous chondrites.

  17. Distribution and lability of land-derived organic matter in the surface sediments of the Rhône prodelta and the adjacent shelf (Mediterranean sea, France): a multi proxy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, S.; Pruski, A. M.; Sun, M.-Y.; Buscail, R.; Lantoine, F.; Vétion, G.; Rivière, B.; Charles, F.

    2011-03-01

    The Gulf of Lions is a river-dominated ocean margin (RiOMar) that receives high loads of nutrients, sediments and particulate matter from the Rhône river. Most of the particulate materials from the Rhône settle rapidly on the seafloor, this raises the question of the fate of these large quantities of organic carbon delivered to the benthic boundary layer. Surface sediments (0-0.5 cm) were collected in the Rhône prodelta and its adjacent shelf during a period of low river discharge (April 2007, 16 stations). The sources, distribution and lability of sedimentary organic matter was examined using bulk (organic carbon, total nitrogen, grain size) and molecular-level (pigments, amino acids, fatty acids, δ13C of individual fatty acids) analyses. Our results confirmed previous observations of a southwestward Rhodanian imprint in the nearshore sediments. Fatty acid biomarkers and compound-specific δ13C signatures of most fatty acids clearly indicate that the Rhône inputs consist in a mixture of organic matter (OM) from different sources with a strong contribution from terrestrial plants, and a smaller input from freshwater microalgae, mostly diatoms. The influence of the Rhône River was prominent within the first ten kilometers, but may still be observed in the outer shelf (~21 km) as indicated by the occurrence of long chain fatty acids derived from vascular plants and their δ13C signatures. In the proximal prodelta, bacteria-specific fatty acids were abundant (1.65 mg g-1OC at the mouth site) and were relatively depleted in δ13C confirming that bacteria preferentially utilize terrestrial OM in this area. In the shelf area, the inputs of marine OM and its preferential utilization by the bacteria was confirmed, but the coupling between the pelagic and the benthic compartments appeared limited at this period of the year. Overall, degradation indexes based on amino acids (Dauwe's degradation index) and pigments (ratio of intact chlorophyll-a to the sum of

  18. Distribution and lability of land-derived organic matter in the surface sediments of the Rhône prodelta and the adjacent shelf (Mediterranean Sea, France): a multi proxy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, S.; Pruski, A. M.; Sun, M.-Y.; Buscail, R.; Lantoine, F.; Kerhervé, P.; Vétion, G.; Rivière, B.; Charles, F.

    2011-11-01

    The Gulf of Lions is a river-dominated ocean margin that receives high loads of nutrients and particulate matter from the Rhône River but most particulate materials settle rapidly on the nearshore seafloor. One question is raised on the fate of these large quantities of organic carbon delivered by the river to the coastal marine environment. Surface sediments (0-0.5 cm) were collected in the Rhône prodelta and its adjacent shelf during a period of low river discharge (April 2007, 16 stations). The sources, distribution and lability of sedimentary organic matter were examined using bulk (organic carbon, total nitrogen, stable carbon isotope ratios, and grain size) and molecular-level (pigments, amino acids, fatty acids, and δ13C of individual fatty acids) analyses. Our results confirmed previous observations of a southwestward Rhodanian imprint in the nearshore sediments, with 97% of terrigenous inputs of organic matter near the river mouth. Isotopic values of bulk organic carbon, as well as fatty acid biomarkers and compound-specific δ13C signatures of most fatty acids clearly indicate that the Rhône inputs consist of a mixture of organic matter (OM) from different origins with a strong contribution from terrestrial sources (soil and plant debris), and a smaller input from freshwater microalgae, mostly diatoms. The influence of the Rhône River was prominent within the first ten kilometers, but may still be observed on the outer shelf (~21 km) as indicated by the occurrence of long chain fatty acids, which are derived from vascular plants, and their δ13C signatures. In the proximal prodelta, bacteria-specific fatty acids were abundant (1.65 mg g-1 OC at the mouth site) and were relatively depleted in δ13C confirming that bacteria mostly utilize land-derived OM. In the shelf area, the inputs of marine OM and its predominant utilization by the bacteria was confirmed, but the coupling between the pelagic and the benthic compartments appeared limited at this

  19. Learning to detect vocal hyperfunction from ambulatory neck-surface acceleration features: Initial results for vocal fold nodules

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, Marzyeh; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Mehta, Daryush D.; Zañartu, Matías; Cheyne, Harold A.; Hillman, Robert E.; Guttag, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Voice disorders are medical conditions that often result from vocal abuse/misuse which is referred to generically as vocal hyperfunction. Standard voice assessment approaches cannot accurately determine the actual nature, prevalence, and pathological impact of hyperfunctional vocal behaviors because such behaviors can vary greatly across the course of an individual’s typical day and may not be clearly demonstrated during a brief clinical encounter. Thus, it would be clinically valuable to develop non-invasive ambulatory measures that can reliably differentiate vocal hyperfunction from normal patterns of vocal behavior. As an initial step towards this goal we used an accelerometer taped to the neck surface to provide a continuous, non-invasive acceleration signal designed to capture some aspects of vocal behavior related to a common manifestation of vocal hyperfunction; vocal cord nodules. We gathered data from 12 female adult patients diagnosed with vocal fold nodules and 12 control speakers matched for age and occupation. We derived features from weeklong neck-surface acceleration recordings by using distributions of sound pressure level and fundamental frequency over five-minute windows of the acceleration signal and normalized these features so that inter-subject comparisons were meaningful. We then used supervised machine learning to show that the two groups exhibit distinct vocal behaviors that can be detected using the acceleration signal. We were able to correctly classify 22 of the 24 subjects, suggesting that in the future measures of the acceleration signal could be used to detect patients with the types of aberrant vocal behaviors that are associated with hyperfunctional voice disorders. PMID:24845276

  20. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  1. Zinc (hydr)oxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites: role of surface features in H₂S reactive adsorption.

    PubMed

    Giannakoudakis, Dimitrios A; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2014-12-15

    Zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites with various levels of complexity were synthesized using an in situ precipitation method. Then they were used as H2S adsorbents in visible light. The materials' surfaces were characterized before and after H2S adsorption by various physical and chemical methods (XRD, FTIR, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration, adsorption of nitrogen and SEM/EDX). Significant differences in surface features and synergistic effects were found depending on the materials' composition. Addition of graphite oxide and the deposition of gold nanoparticles resulted in a marked increase in the adsorption capacity in comparison with that on the zinc hydroxide and zinc hydroxide/AuNP. Addition of AuNPs to zinc hydroxide led to a crystalline ZnO/AuNP composite while the zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNP composite was amorphous. The ZnOH/GO/AuNPs composite exhibited the greatest H2S adsorption capacity due to the increased number of OH terminal groups and the conductive properties of GO that facilitated the electron transfer and consequently the formation of superoxide ions promoting oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. AuNPs present in the composite increased the conductivity, helped with electron transfer to oxygen, and prevented the fast recombination of the electrons and holes.

  2. Feature Article: Fast scanning tunnelling microscopy as a tool to understand changes on metal surfaces: from nanostructures to single atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Karina

    2005-03-01

    The Feature Article [1] describes how structural changes in metallic nanostructures can be followed with fast scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The title page shows the same spot of a Ag(111) surface at room temperature, imaged with STM approximately one hour apart. Intrinsic changes to prepared nano-structures are marked as Brownian motion of vacancy islands (rectangle), coalescence of two vacancy islands (hexagon), and decay of an adatom island (circle).Karina Morgenstern is now professor at the University of Hannover. Her research is placed within the field of nanoscience and is in particular devoted to thermally activated processes of metallic nanostructures, electronically activated reactions of molecules on metallic surfaces, and water-metal interactions.The present issue of physica status solidi (b) also contains the article Apperance of copper d9 defect centres in wide-gap CdSe nanoparticles: A high-fequency EPR study by N. R. J. Poolton et al. as Editor's Choice [2] as well as several papers on electrical and nonlinear optical properties from the European Conference on Organised Films (ECOF 2004) chaired by José Antonio de Saja, Valladolid.

  3. Front variability and surface ocean features of the presumed southern bluefin tuna spawning grounds in the tropical southeast Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieblas, Anne-Elise; Demarcq, Hervé; Drushka, Kyla; Sloyan, Bernadette; Bonhommeau, Sylvain

    2014-09-01

    The southern bluefin tuna (SBT, Thunnus maccoyii) is an ecologically and economically valuable fish. However, surprisingly little is known about its critical early life history, a period when mortality is several orders of magnitude higher than at any other life stage, and when larvae are highly sensitive to environmental conditions. Ocean fronts can be important in creating favourable spawning conditions, as they are a convergence of water masses with different properties that can concentrate planktonic particles and lead to enhanced productivity. In this study, we examine the front activity within the only region where SBT have been observed to spawn: the tropical southeast Indian Ocean between Indonesia and Australia (10°S-20°S, 105°E-125°E). We investigate front activity and its relationship to ocean dynamics and surface features of the region. Results are also presented for the entire Indian Ocean (30°N-45°S, 20°E-140°E) to provide a background context. We use an extension of the Cayula and Cornillon algorithm to detect ocean fronts from satellite images of sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll-a concentration (chl-a). Front occurrence represents the probability of occurrence of a front at each pixel of an image. Front intensity represents the magnitude of the difference between the two water masses that make up a front. Relative to the rest of the Indian Ocean, both SST and chl-a fronts in the offshore spawning region are persistent in occurrence and weak in intensity. Front occurrence and intensity along the Australian coast are high, with persistent and intense fronts found along the northwest and west coasts. Fronts in the tropical southeast Indian Ocean are shown to have strong annual variability and some moderate interannual variability. SST front occurrence is found to lead the Southern Oscillation Index by one year, potentially linked to warming and wind anomalies in the Indian Ocean. The surface ocean characteristics of the offshore

  4. Determining surface magnetic susceptibility of loess-paleosol sections based on spectral features: Application to a UHD 185 hyperspectral image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Zhang, Shimin; Zhang, Jingfa; Liu, Xudong; Ding, Rui; Liu, Hanyong

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) records of loess-paleosol sequences have been considered a measure of the degree of pedogenic activity and are considered to be excellent proxies for terrestrial climatic fluctuations. However, the MS of single (vertical) path variations occasionally represents site-specific influences rather than monsoonal changes (depending on the position of the path). Few studies have used remote sensing techniques to map the surface MS information of loess-paleosol sections. Hyperspectral techniques provide an efficient, economical and quantitative alternative. In this study, stepwise regression was used to build MS estimation models based on spectral features. Six MS models based on spectral features were established. Test datasets indicated that our models are very successful, all resulting in R2 > 0.92 and RMSEs ranging from 4.5736 to 6.80475. The slope change between 810 nm and 880 nm (b880/b810) observed in all models played an important role in MS estimation. Models 5 and 6 have higher RMSEs and relatively lower SAM values, although the R2 values are both above 0.95. The RMSEs of the first four models are similar. Therefore, the first four models were thought to be more stable and useful. UHD 185, a new generation of commercial hyperspectral imaging sensor, was used for surface MS mapping of a loess-paleosol section by model 1 and model 2. The MS map corresponded well to the loess sequences. The MS values obtained from the UHD 185 data are convincing and consistent with the measured data (R2 > 0.85). The trend in changing MS values is clear, suggesting that model 1 and model 2 could produce reasonable loess-paleosol section surface maps from the UHD 185 image, although there is a linear offset between the estimated MS and the measured MS. The methodology proposed here can be used to map MS on a much larger scale. Because of the limit of the spectral range, the performances of model 3 and model 4 with the image were not discussed. However

  5. Surface mesoscale features associated with leading convective line-trailing stratiform squall lines over the Gangetic West Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawn, S.; Mandal, M.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper an attempt is made to identify the mesoscale features in surface pressure pattern, if any, associated with thunderstorm over the Gangetic West Bengal region in India. The study was conducted over Kharagpur and the adjoining area in the Gangetic West Bengal, frequently affected by thunderstorms during the pre-monsoon seasons of April-May. Observations recorded at 50 m instrumented micro-meteorological tower and upper air sounding at Kharagpur under nationally coordinated Severe Thunderstorm Observations and Regional Modeling (STORM) Programme are used to study the variation in surface pressure, wind speed and direction, temperature and relative humidity associated with the squall lines with trailing stratiform precipitation region. In the surface pressure variation, pre-squall mesolow, mesohigh and wake low are identified with the passage of the squall line at Kharagpur. It is observed that in the squall line with trailing stratiform precipitation shield, the mesohigh is associated with convective line and wake low exists at the rear of the storms. The position of the mesohigh is typically found in the vicinity of the heavy rain directly beneath the downdraft. The mesohigh seems to be initiated by the cooling due to evaporation of precipitation in the downdraft and intensified due to the non-hydrostatic effect because of the rainfall directly beneath the downdraft. It is also observed that the passage of trailing edges of the stratiform precipitation coincided with the wake low. Upper air sounding shows mid-tropospheric cooling and lower tropospheric warming. It may be possible due to the dominance of evaporative cooling in the mid-levels and dynamically forced descending motion leading to adiabatic warming in the low levels which may lead to the formation of the wake low.

  6. Secondary shock features for large surface explosions: results from the Sayarim Military Range, Israel and other experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Y.

    2014-05-01

    A series of surface explosions was designed and conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel at the Sayarim Military Range in the Negev desert, including two large-scale explosions: approx. 82 tons of high explosives in 2009, and approx. 100 tons of low-grade ANFO explosives in 2011. The main goal of the explosions was to provide large controlled sources for calibration of global infrasound stations designated for monitoring nuclear tests; however, the geophysical experiment also provided valuable observations for shock wave research. High-pressure gauges were deployed at distances between 100 and 600 m to record air blast properties and to provide reliable estimation of the true charge yield compared to the design value. Secondary shock phenomena were clearly observed at all near-source gauges as characteristic shock wave shapes. Secondary shocks were also observed at numerous seismic and acoustic sensors deployed in the range 0.3-20 km as acoustic phases. Empirical relationships for standard air blast parameters (peak pressure and impulse) and for a new parameter called secondary shock time delay, as a function of distance, were established and analyzed. The standard parameters, scaled by the cubic root of the estimated TNT yield, were found to be consistent for all analyzed explosions. However, the scaled secondary shock delays were clearly separated for the 2009 and 2011 explosions, thus demonstrating dependence on the explosive type. Additionally, air blast records from other experiments were used to extend the charge and distance ranges for the secondary shock observation, and showed consistency with the Sayarim data. Analysis and interpretation of observed features of the secondary shock phenomenon are proposed and a new empirical relationship of scaled secondary shock delay versus scaled distance is established. The results suggest that the secondary shock delay can be used as a new additional waveform feature for simple and cost-effective explosive

  7. On the correlation between phonon spectra and surface segregation features in Ag-Cu-Ni ternary nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.

    2011-08-01

    Atomic scale characterization of chemical ordering, compositional distribution and microstructure is of tremendous importance for applications such as catalysis which is primarily dominated by processes occurring at surface and is strongly influenced by the subsurface layers. Phonon spectra obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of single metals as well as their bimetallic and ternary alloy nanoclusters can be used to obtain new insights into the atomic scale distribution in the nanoclusters, their microstructure and dynamical properties. Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations are used to obtain the minimum energy configurations of various Ag-Cu-Ni ternary alloys in which the Ag content is systematically varied from 0 to 50%Ag while keeping the relative composition of Cu and Ni constant. Detailed compositional analyses of the final MC configurations are carried out. The generated microstructure comprised of surface segregated structures in which Ag atoms occupy low coordination sites such as corners, edges and faces. As the Ag content in the ternary alloy is increased, the surface sites get increasingly occupied with the lowest coordination sites being populated first. The Cu and Ni compositions in the interior of the cluster show compositional oscillation. The final alloy microstructure is dictated by the competition between the various entropic and energetic factors. Our analysis of the phonon density of states identifies various surface (low frequency) and bulk (high frequency) modes which is determined by their location in the nanocluster and the local environment. Systematic trends in the observed peak intensities and frequency shifts at the low and high frequency ends of the spectrum for the various alloy compositions are explained on the basis of bond-lengths, local coordination, extent of alloying, and neighboring elemental environment. We find that the characteristic microstructural features observed at the atomic scale are strongly correlated to the

  8. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional SF6-air interface with a minimum-surface feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xisheng; Guan, Ben; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Wang, Xiansheng

    2016-01-01

    The Richmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional (3D) SF6-air single-mode interface with a minimum-surface feature is investigated experimentally. The interface produced by the soap film technique is subjected to a planar shock and the evolution of the shocked interface is captured by time-resolved schlieren photography. Different from the light-heavy single-mode case, a phase inversion occurs in the shock-interface interaction and a bubblelike structure is observed behind the shocked interface, which may be ascribed to the difference in pressure perturbation at different planes. The superimposition of spikelike forward-moving jets forms a complex structure, indicating a distinctly 3D effect. Quantitatively, it is also found that the instability at the symmetry plane grows much slower than the prediction of two-dimensional linear model, but matches the extended 3D linear and nonlinear models accounting for the curvature effects. Therefore, the opposite curvatures of the 3D interface are beneficial for suppressing the growth of the instability.

  9. An overview of the Gulf of Batabanó (Cuba): Environmental features as revealed by surface sediment characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Hernández, Carlos M.; Conte, Fabio; Misic, Cristina; Barsanti, Mattia; Gómez-Batista, Miguel; Díaz-Asencio, Misael; Covazzi-Harriague, Anabella; Pannacciulli, Federica G.

    2011-05-01

    The main environmental features of the Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba, Caribbean, were investigated through the analyses of surface sediments collected at 23 sites. In order to highlight the potential threats affecting the sedimentary compartment of this area, samples were analysed for: granulometry, mineralogy, heavy metals concentration (As, Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn), organic carbon, total nitrogen and radionuclides. Findings were compared with published data and "grey" literature. Results showed: granulometric homogeneity and a widespread carbonatic condition all over the gulf, probably due to stable bathymetry and lack of terrigenous input (except for the La Coloma basin); a rather pristine environment for what concerns heavy metals pollution, except for La Coloma where a large arsenic input was recorded; very low levels of natural and artificial radioactivity; a relevant quantity of sedimentary organic matter, providing biota with useful substrate for feeding and enhancing the food-web development while indirectly supplying lobster fisheries. Combined data highlighted the impact of the Dique Sur in reducing terrigenous input in the coastal area. Future studies should focus on dating of sediment cores for identifying and quantifying the changes acting in the gulf and on investigating the origins of the large arsenic input to La Coloma.

  10. Features, events, processes, and safety factor analysis applied to a near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, M.E.; Dolinar, G.M.; Lange, B.A.

    1995-12-31

    An analysis of features, events, processes (FEPs) and other safety factors was applied to AECL`s proposed IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure) near-surface LLRW disposal facility. The FEP analysis process which had been developed for and applied to high-level and transuranic disposal concepts was adapted for application to a low-level facility for which significant efforts in developing a safety case had already been made. The starting point for this process was a series of meetings of the project team to identify and briefly describe FEPs or safety factors which they thought should be considered. At this early stage participants were specifically asked not to screen ideas. This initial list was supplemented by selecting FEPs documented in other programs and comments received from an initial regulatory review. The entire list was then sorted by topic and common issues were grouped, and issues were classified in three priority categories and assigned to individuals for resolution. In this paper, the issue identification and resolution process will be described, from the initial description of an issue to its resolution and inclusion in the various levels of the safety case documentation.

  11. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional SF_{6}-air interface with a minimum-surface feature.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xisheng; Guan, Ben; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Wang, Xiansheng

    2016-01-01

    The Richmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional (3D) SF_{6}-air single-mode interface with a minimum-surface feature is investigated experimentally. The interface produced by the soap film technique is subjected to a planar shock and the evolution of the shocked interface is captured by time-resolved schlieren photography. Different from the light-heavy single-mode case, a phase inversion occurs in the shock-interface interaction and a bubblelike structure is observed behind the shocked interface, which may be ascribed to the difference in pressure perturbation at different planes. The superimposition of spikelike forward-moving jets forms a complex structure, indicating a distinctly 3D effect. Quantitatively, it is also found that the instability at the symmetry plane grows much slower than the prediction of two-dimensional linear model, but matches the extended 3D linear and nonlinear models accounting for the curvature effects. Therefore, the opposite curvatures of the 3D interface are beneficial for suppressing the growth of the instability. PMID:26871149

  12. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional SF_{6}-air interface with a minimum-surface feature.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xisheng; Guan, Ben; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Wang, Xiansheng

    2016-01-01

    The Richmyer-Meshkov instability of a three-dimensional (3D) SF_{6}-air single-mode interface with a minimum-surface feature is investigated experimentally. The interface produced by the soap film technique is subjected to a planar shock and the evolution of the shocked interface is captured by time-resolved schlieren photography. Different from the light-heavy single-mode case, a phase inversion occurs in the shock-interface interaction and a bubblelike structure is observed behind the shocked interface, which may be ascribed to the difference in pressure perturbation at different planes. The superimposition of spikelike forward-moving jets forms a complex structure, indicating a distinctly 3D effect. Quantitatively, it is also found that the instability at the symmetry plane grows much slower than the prediction of two-dimensional linear model, but matches the extended 3D linear and nonlinear models accounting for the curvature effects. Therefore, the opposite curvatures of the 3D interface are beneficial for suppressing the growth of the instability.

  13. Surface Features Analysis in Salt-Affected Area Using Hyperspectral Data: A Case Study in the Zone of Chotts, Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaziz, Moncef; Liesenberg, Veraldo; Bouaziz, Samir; Gloaguen, Richard

    2010-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions are most affected by Salinity. Chotts regions in southern Tunisia are such an area, where the excessive content of salt in the soil is a hard faced problem. Soil salinity in this area enforces several environmental problems such as limiting plant growth, reducing crop productivity, degrading soil quality and leads to accelerated rates rill and gully erosion . Remote sensing analysis by the mean of spectral analysis, geomorphologic aspect from digital elevation models and distribution of rainfall intensity from satellite data are used in this study to discern features and patterns of areas affected by salt. Correlation between these remote sensing indicators is made in order to assess the contribution of each indicator to identify the salt-affected area. The approach followed in this study was applied on Hyperspectral data from EO-1 Mission. Hyperion data are promoted due to their very high spectral resolution and wide enhanced spatial information. The present study highlighted the high correlation between the flat surfaces and the high content of salt in the soil (from soil salinity indices) on one hand and a low correlation between the high intensity of rainfall distribution and indicators of low salt content in the soil on the other hand.

  14. [Research on the spectral feature and identification of the surface vegetation stressed by stored CO2 underground leakage].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Hao; Jiang, Jin-Bao; Steven, Michael D; Gong, A-Du; Li, Yi-Fan

    2012-07-01

    With the global climate warming, reducing greenhouse gas emissions becomes a focused problem for the world. The carbon capture and storage (CCS) techniques could mitigate CO2 into atmosphere, but there is a risk in case that the CO2 leaks from underground. The objective of this paper is to study the chlorophyll contents (SPAD value), relative water contents (RWC) and leaf spectra changing features of beetroot under CO2 leakage stress through field experiment. The result shows that the chlorophyll contents and RWC of beetroot under CO2 leakage stress become lower than the control beetroot', and the leaf reflectance increases in the 550 nm region and decreases in the 680nm region. A new vegetation index (R550/R680) was designed for identifying beetroot under CO2 leakage stress, and the result indicates that the vegetation index R550/R680 could identify the beetroots after CO2 leakage for 7 days. The index has strong sensitivity, stability and identification for monitoring the beetroots under CO2 stress. The result of this paper has very important meaning and application values for selecting spots of CCS project, monitoring and evaluating land-surface ecology under CO2 stress and monitoring the leakage spots by using remote sensing.

  15. Comparison of Surface Flow Features from Lidar-Derived Digital Elevation Models with Historical Elevation and Hydrography Data for Minnehaha County, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppenga, Sandra K.; Worstell, Bruce B.; Stoker, Jason M.; Greenlee, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has taken the lead in the creation of a valuable remote sensing product by incorporating digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) into the National Elevation Dataset (NED), the elevation layer of 'The National Map'. High-resolution lidar-derived DEMs provide the accuracy needed to systematically quantify and fully integrate surface flow including flow direction, flow accumulation, sinks, slope, and a dense drainage network. In 2008, 1-meter resolution lidar data were acquired in Minnehaha County, South Dakota. The acquisition was a collaborative effort between Minnehaha County, the city of Sioux Falls, and the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center. With the newly acquired lidar data, USGS scientists generated high-resolution DEMs and surface flow features. This report compares lidar-derived surface flow features in Minnehaha County to 30- and 10-meter elevation data previously incorporated in the NED and ancillary hydrography datasets. Surface flow features generated from lidar-derived DEMs are consistently integrated with elevation and are important in understanding surface-water movement to better detect surface-water runoff, flood inundation, and erosion. Many topographic and hydrologic applications will benefit from the increased availability of accurate, high-quality, and high-resolution surface-water data. The remotely sensed data provide topographic information and data integration capabilities needed for meeting current and future human and environmental needs.

  16. How subaerial salt extrusions influence water quality in adjacent aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Razieh; Zarei, Mehdi; Raeisi, Ezzat

    2015-12-01

    Brines supplied from salt extrusions cause significant groundwater salinization in arid and semi-arid regions where salt rock is exposed to dissolution by episodic rainfalls. Here we focus on 62 of the 122 diapirs of Hormuz salt emergent in the southern Iran. To consider managing the degradation effect that salt extrusions have on the quality of adjoining aquifers, it is first necessary to understand how they influence adjacent water resources. We evaluate here the impacts that these diapirs have on adjacent aquifers based on investigating their geomorphologies, geologies, hydrologies and hydrogeologies. The results indicate that 28/62 (45%) of our sample of salt diapirs have no significant impact on the quality of groundwater in adjoining aquifers (namely Type N), while the remaining 34/62 (55%) degrade nearby groundwater quality. We offer simple conceptual models that account for how brines flowing from each of these types of salt extrusions contaminate adjacent aquifers. We identify three main mechanisms that lead to contamination: surface impact (Type A), subsurface intrusion (Type B) and indirect infiltration (Type C). A combination of all these mechanisms degrades the water quality in nearby aquifers in 19/62 (31%) of the salt diapirs studied. Having characterized the mechanism(s) by which each diapir affects the adjacent aquifer, we suggest a few possible remediation strategies to be considered. For instance, engineering the surface runoff of diapirs Types A and C into nearby evaporation basins would improve groundwater quality.

  17. Spectroscopic Character and Spatial Distribution of Hydroxyl and Water Absorption Features Measured on the Lunar Surface by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper Imaging Spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. O.; Pieters, C. M.; Goswami, J.; Clark, R. N.; Annadurai, M.; Boardman, J. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Combe, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Head, J. W.; Hibbitts, C.; Hicks, M.; Isaacson, P.; Klima, R. L.; Kramer, G. Y.; Kumar, S.; Livo, K. E.; Lundeen, S.; Malaret, E.; McCord, T. B.; Mustard, J. F.; Nettles, J. W.; Petro, N. E.; Runyon, C. J.; Staid, M.; Sunshine, J. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Tompkins, S.; Varanasi, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Moon Mineralogy Mapper imaging spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1 has a broad spectral range from 430 to 3000 nm. By design, the range was specified to extend to 3000 nm to allow for possible detection of trace volatile compounds that possess absorption bands near 3000 nm. Soon after acquisition and calibration of a large fraction of the lunar surface in early February 2009, absorption features in the 2700 to 3000 nm region were detected over unexpectedly large regional areas. This extraordinary discovery has withstood extensive re-analysis and falsification efforts. We have concluded these absorption features are fundamentally present in the M3 measurements and are indicators of extensive hydroxyl and water-bearing materials occurring on the surface of the Moon. Based on current analyses, these absorption features appear strongest at high latitudes, but also occur in association with several fresh feldspathic craters. Interestingly, the distribution of these absorption features are not directly correlated with existing neutron spectrometer hydrogen abundance data for the sunlight surface. This may indicate that the formation and retention of hydroxyl and water is an active process largely restricted to the upper most surface. We present the detailed spectroscopic character of these absorption features in the 2700 to 3000 nm spectral region, including selected examples through all levels of measurement processing from raw data to calibrated apparent surface reflectance. In summary we show the measured strength and latitudinal distribution of the absorptions as well as selected localized occurrences in association with fresh feldspathic craters. The presence of hydroxyl and water bearing material over extensive regions of the lunar surface provides a new and unexpected source of volatiles. Options for harvesting these elements directly from the regolith may provide an alternate supply of volatiles for long term human exploration objectives.

  18. [Specific regular features of trace formation depending on the properties of the trace-receptive surface and the height of blood droplet fall].

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, N N; Sarkisian, B A; Badalian, A F

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the morphological characteristics of blood stains resulting from the static fall of blood droplets onto a sloping stain-receptive surface depending on its properties and the height of fall. The blood droplets were allowed to fall down from a specially designed device onto the sloping surfaces at an angle of 45 degrees from the height varying from 5 to 200 cm. The receptive surfaces had different absorbing capacity (non-absorbing, moderately absorbing, and well-absorbing surfaces). The analysis of the blood stains thus obtained showed that they differed in the size, shape, and morphological features depending on the height of fall of the droplets, the absorbing properties of the trace-receptive surfaces, and the angle of incidence of blood droplets. The results of the study can be used to improve the quality of forensic medical expertise of the surfaces soiled with blood stains. PMID:25271348

  19. A flexible image fiber probe based speckle imaging for extraction of surface features with possible application in intra-cavity inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guru, P. A. S.; Matham, Murukeshan V.; Chan, Kelvin H. K.

    2015-07-01

    Non-destructive inspection and non-invasive interrogation of surface features has always been a subject of discussion owing to the rapid advances in engineering and medical fields. Measurement of surface features which are miniature in size, inaccessible and of complex shape, has always posed challenges to conventional types of imaging and metrological systems. This paper, presents a methodology and a miniature image fiber probe configuration based on speckle technology for imaging such surface features, with possible application in intra cavity inspection. In the present work, a metal pipe is used as a test sample representing an engineering cavity. The acquired images of the intra cavity were subjected to image processing for contouring and size estimation. An analysis on the variation in the average speckle intensity, when the speckle image passes through an image fiber, is also carried out in this work. The obtained results indicate that the proposed probe configuration and related methodology can be used for inspection of cavity features and profiles of diffusive surfaces.

  20. Effect of sward surface height and level of herbage depletion on bite features of cattle grazing Sorghum bicolor swards.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, L; Carvalho, P C F; Mezzalira, J C; Bremm, C; Galli, J R; Gregorini, P

    2013-09-01

    To maximize herbage DMI, pregrazing sward surface height (SSH) and level of herbage depletion (HD) must be such that variables determining short-term herbage intake such as bite mass (BM) and bite rate (BR) are optimized. The objective of this study was to determine a SSH target and the level of HD as a proportion of the SSH that optimizes BM and BR of beef heifers grazing Sorghum bicolor swards. Two experiments were conducted using 2 S. bicolor swards and 4 beef heifers (25 mo old; 322 kg BW). Experiment 1 compared the effect of 6 pregrazing SSH, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 cm, on BM, BR, and jaw movements. Experiment 2 assessed the effect of HD level as a proportion of SSH (0.17, 0.34, 0.50, 0.67 and 0.84) on BM, BR, and jaw movements using the optimal pregrazing SSH defined in Exp. 1. Short-term herbage DMI was estimated using a double-weighing technique and corrected for insensible BW loss. Herbage DMI was subsequently used to calculate the BM. Net eating time and jaw movements for apprehension and manipulation + mastication during grazing as well as total jaw movements were determined using the IGER (Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research) behavior recorders. Bite rate and the number of total jaw movements per gram herbage DMI were derived from jaw movement count and measurements of herbage DMI. The results of Exp. 1 showed low and high SSH constraint the ease of herbage harvesting. Greater BM are maintained until a SSH of 50 cm is reached (P < 0.05) and then decline at greater SSH due to herbage dispersion. The nonbiting jaw movement rate increased at greater SSH whereas BR decreased (P < 0.05). For both variables, the turning point was close to a SSH of 50 cm. Experiment 2 showed that such an optimization of BM and BR was maintained until an HD level of 0.34 was reached (P < 0.05). There was a linear increase in both the total jaw movements per unit herbage DMI and the nonbiting jaw movements rate (manipulation + mastication) subsequent to levels

  1. 137Cs, 239+240Pu and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in the surface waters of the western North Pacific Ocean, eastern Indian Ocean and their adjacent seas.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2006-07-31

    Surface seawater samples were collected along the track of the R/V Hakuho-Maru cruise (KH-96-5) from Tokyo to the Southern Ocean. The (137)Cs activities were determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, the eastern Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal, the Andaman Sea, and the South China Sea. The (137)Cs activities showed a wide variation with values ranging from 1.1 Bq m(-3) in the Antarctic Circumpolar Region of the Southern Ocean to 3 Bq m(-3) in the western North Pacific Ocean and the South China Sea. The latitudinal distributions of (137)Cs activity were not reflective of that of the integrated deposition density of atmospheric global fallout. The removal rates of (137)Cs from the surface waters were roughly estimated from the two data sets of Miyake et al. [Miyake Y, Saruhashi K, Sugimura Y, Kanazawa T, Hirose K. Contents of (137)Cs, plutonium and americium isotopes in the Southern Ocean waters. Pap Meteorol Geophys 1988;39:95-113] and this study to be 0.016 yr(-1) in the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, 0.033 yr(-1) in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, and 0.029 yr(-1) in the South China Sea. These values were much lower than that in the coastal surface water of the western Northwest Pacific Ocean. This was likely due to less horizontal and vertical mixing of water masses and less scavenging. (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were also determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and the South China Sea. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.199+/-0.026 to 0.248+/-0.027 on average, and were significantly higher than the global stratospheric fallout ratio of 0.18. The contributions of the North Pacific Proving Grounds close-in fallout Pu were estimated to be 20% for the western North Pacific Ocean, 39% for the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and 42% for the South China Sea by using the two end-member mixing model. The higher (240)Pu/(239)Pu

  2. 137Cs, 239+240Pu and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in the surface waters of the western North Pacific Ocean, eastern Indian Ocean and their adjacent seas.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2006-07-31

    Surface seawater samples were collected along the track of the R/V Hakuho-Maru cruise (KH-96-5) from Tokyo to the Southern Ocean. The (137)Cs activities were determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, the eastern Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal, the Andaman Sea, and the South China Sea. The (137)Cs activities showed a wide variation with values ranging from 1.1 Bq m(-3) in the Antarctic Circumpolar Region of the Southern Ocean to 3 Bq m(-3) in the western North Pacific Ocean and the South China Sea. The latitudinal distributions of (137)Cs activity were not reflective of that of the integrated deposition density of atmospheric global fallout. The removal rates of (137)Cs from the surface waters were roughly estimated from the two data sets of Miyake et al. [Miyake Y, Saruhashi K, Sugimura Y, Kanazawa T, Hirose K. Contents of (137)Cs, plutonium and americium isotopes in the Southern Ocean waters. Pap Meteorol Geophys 1988;39:95-113] and this study to be 0.016 yr(-1) in the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, 0.033 yr(-1) in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, and 0.029 yr(-1) in the South China Sea. These values were much lower than that in the coastal surface water of the western Northwest Pacific Ocean. This was likely due to less horizontal and vertical mixing of water masses and less scavenging. (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were also determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and the South China Sea. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.199+/-0.026 to 0.248+/-0.027 on average, and were significantly higher than the global stratospheric fallout ratio of 0.18. The contributions of the North Pacific Proving Grounds close-in fallout Pu were estimated to be 20% for the western North Pacific Ocean, 39% for the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and 42% for the South China Sea by using the two end-member mixing model. The higher (240)Pu/(239)Pu

  3. Visual constraints for the perception of quantitative depth from temporal interocular unmatched features.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rui; Chen, Lin; Andersen, George J

    2010-07-21

    Previous research (Brooks & Gillam, 2006) has found that temporal interocular unmatched (IOUM) features generate a perception of subjective contours and can result in a perception of quantitative depth. In the present study we examine in detail the factors important for quantitative depth perception from IOUM features. In Experiments 1 and 2 observers were shown temporal IOUM features based on three dots that disappeared behind an implicit surface. Subjects reported a perception of a subjective surface and were able to perceive qualitative depth. In Experiments 3 and 4 metrical depth was perceived when binocular disparity features were added to the display. These results suggest that quantitative depth from IOUM information is perceived when binocular matched information is present in regions adjacent to the surface. In addition, the perceived depth of the subjective surface decreased with an increase in the width of the subjective surface suggesting a limitation in the propagation of quantitative depth to surface regions where qualitative depth information is available.

  4. Interpretability of potential geological features of the Hermean surface restituted by the STereo imaging Camera of the SIMBIO-SYS package (BepiColombo mission).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massironi, Matteo

    One of the imaging instruments of BepiColombo mission is the STereo Camera (STC) integrated in the SIMBIO-SYS package. STC will permit the generation of a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of Mercury's surface, improving the interpretation of morphological features at different scales and clarifying the stratigraphic relationships between different geological units. To evaluate the effectiveness of the STC-derived DTM for geological purposes, a series of simulations has been performed to find out to what extent the errors expected in the DTM may prevent the correct classification and interpretation of geological features. To meet this objective, Earth analogues (craters, lava cones, endogenous domes, ridges) of likely components of the Hermean surface, small enough to be near the detection limit of the STC, were selected and a photorealistic 3D model of each feature was generated. Stereoscopic pairs of synthetic images of each feature were then generated from the 3D model at different locations along the BepiColombo orbit. For each stereo pair, the corresponding Hermean DTM was computed using image correlation and compared to the reference data to assess the loss of detail and interpretability. On these basis some considerations are made on scientific objectives that can be met thanks to STC surface restitution capabilities.

  5. Influence of Structural Features and Fracture Processes on Surface Roughness: A Case Study from the Krosno Sandstones of the Górka-Mucharz Quarry (Little Beskids, Southern Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieczara, Łukasz

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the results of analysis of surface roughness parameters in the Krosno Sandstones of Mucharz, southern Poland. It was aimed at determining whether these parameters are influenced by structural features (mainly the laminar distribution of mineral components and directional distribution of non-isometric grains) and fracture processes. The tests applied in the analysis enabled us to determine and describe the primary statistical parameters used in the quantitative description of surface roughness, as well as specify the usefulness of contact profilometry as a method of visualizing spatial differentiation of fracture processes in rocks. These aims were achieved by selecting a model material (Krosno Sandstones from the Górka-Mucharz Quarry) and an appropriate research methodology. The schedule of laboratory analyses included: identification analyses connected with non-destructive ultrasonic tests, aimed at the preliminary determination of rock anisotropy, strength point load tests (cleaved surfaces were obtained due to destruction of rock samples), microscopic analysis (observation of thin sections in order to determine the mechanism of inducing fracture processes) and a test method of measuring surface roughness (two- and three-dimensional diagrams, topographic and contour maps, and statistical parameters of surface roughness). The highest values of roughness indicators were achieved for surfaces formed under the influence of intragranular fracture processes (cracks propagating directly through grains). This is related to the structural features of the Krosno Sandstones (distribution of lamination and bedding).

  6. Distribution of small volcanic cones on the surface of Venus by size and elevation: Implications for differential deposition of volcanic features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, J. F.; Ellison, Mike; Johnson, J.; Kamatsu, G.

    1993-01-01

    It appears that volcanic features are not evenly distributed on the surface of Venus. Head et. al. theorizes that the sparcity of volcanic features in the lowlands may be due to an altitude dependent inhibition of volatile exsolution and the resulting products of neutral buoyancy zones sufficient to form magma reservoirs and favoring flood lavas at lower elevation. The astronomy research classes of Evergreen and Sahuaro High Schools surveyed a cross-section of different elevation topography to investigate size and distribution of small volcanic cones by elevation. The results from this survey are presented.

  7. Crystal structure and nanotopographical features on the surface of heat-treated and anodized porous titanium biomaterials produced using selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Yavari, S.; Wauthle, R.; Böttger, A. J.; Schrooten, J.; Weinans, H.; Zadpoor, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Porous titanium biomaterials manufactured using additive manufacturing techniques such as selective laser melting are considered promising materials for orthopedic applications where the biomaterial needs to mimic the properties of bone. Despite their appropriate mechanical properties and the ample pore space they provide for bone ingrowth and osseointegration, porous titanium structures have an intrinsically bioinert surface and need to be subjected to surface bio-functionalizing procedures to enhance their in vivo performance. In this study, we used a specific anodizing process to build a hierarchical oxide layer on the surface of porous titanium structures made by selective laser melting of Ti6Al4V ELI powder. The hierarchical structure included both nanotopographical features (nanotubes) and micro-features (micropits). After anodizing, the biomaterial was heat treated in Argon at different temperatures ranging between 400 and 600 °C for either 1 or 2 h to improve its bioactivity. The effects of applied heat treatment on the crystal structure of TiO2 nanotubes and the nanotopographical features of the surface were studied using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was shown that the transition from the initial crystal structure, i.e. anatase, to rutile occurs between 500 and 600 °C and that after 2 h of heat treatment at 600 °C the crystal structure is predominantly rutile. The nanotopographical features of the surface were found to be largely unchanged for heat treatments carried out at 500 °C or below, whereas they were partially or largely disrupted after heat treatment at 600 °C. The possible implications of these findings for the bioactivity of porous titanium structures are discussed.

  8. Specific features of formation of GaAs nanowire crystals during molecular beam epitaxy on different silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Samsonenko, Yu. B. Cirlin, G. E.; Egorov, V. A.; Polyakov, N. K.; Ulin, V. P.; Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2008-12-15

    The results of experimental studies on the growth and the morphological and structural properties of GaAs nanowire crystals on different silicon surfaces are reported. It is shown that the nonplanar geometrical layout of growth allows the production of epitaxial nanowire crystals in a system with a large lattice mismatch. The growth on porous substrates, the role of the surface orientation, high-temperature annealing, and presence of an oxide layer at the surface, and some other effects typical of growth of III-V nanowire crystals on the Si surface are studied and analyzed. Intense emission from the array of GaAs nanowire crystals grown on the Si (111) surface is observed.

  9. Frequency and intensity dependence of the sub-band-gap features observed in the surface photovoltage spectrum of semi-insulating GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, T. K.; Kumar, Shailendra; Rustagi, K. C.

    2002-11-01

    Surface photovoltage spectroscopy studies on thick semi-insulating GaAs wafers are reported in the range 850-950 nm using the chopped light geometry. We observed some interesting sharp features in the sub-band-gap of SI-GaAs, which were reported recently [Appl. Phys. Lett. 79, 1715(2001); Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 1835 (2002)]. In this article, we present the dependence of these features on the chopping frequency and the source intensity. The intensity variation in the above-band-gap region and for the A peak (898 nm) in the sub-band-gap region could be fitted with single component while it is necessary to consider more than one component to fit the data for the Q peak (887 nm) in the sub-band-gap region. A model consistent with the observed features is also proposed.

  10. Nonlinear reflection from the surface of neutron stars and features of radio emission from the pulsar in the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontorovich, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    There are no explanations for the high-frequency component of the emission from the pulsar in the Crab nebula, but it may be a manifestation of instability in nonlinear reflection from the star's surface. Radiation from relativistic positrons flying from the magnetosphere to the star and accelerated by the electric field of the polar gap is reflected. The instability involves stimulated scattering on surface waves.

  11. Investigation of the topographical features of surface carrier concentrations in silicon solar cell material using electrolyte electroreflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollay, F. H.; Okeke, C. E.; Raccah, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    Topographical variations in carrier concentration delta N/N across the surface of n(+) on p diffused silicon solar cell material are studied by utilizing electrolyte electroreflectance with a spatial resolution of 100 microns within approximately 500 A of the surface. The topographical variations of delta N/N approximately 10 - 20% are found to be comparable to Czochralski grown material. The electroreflectance method can also be utilized to investigate other semiconductors such as GaAs.

  12. Comparison Of Solar Surface Features In HMI Images And Mount Wilson Images Found By The Automatic Bayesian Classification System AutoClass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. G.; Ulrich, R. K.; Beck, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Bayesian automatic classification system AutoClass has been applied to daily solar magnetogram and intensity images taken at the 150 Foot Solar Tower at Mount Wilson to find and identify classes of solar surface features which are associated with variations in total solar irradiance (TSI) and, using those identifications, to improve modeling of TSI variations over time. (Ulrich, et al, 2010) AutoClass does this by a two step process in which it: (1) finds, without human supervision, a set of class definitions based on specified attributes of a sample of the image data pixels, such as magnetic field and intensity in the case of MWO images, and (2) applies the class definitions thus found to new data sets to identify automatically in them the classes found in the sample set. HMI high resolution images embody four observables-magnetic field, continuum intensity, line depth and line width-in contrast to MWO's two-magnetic field and intensity. In this study, we apply AutoClass to the HMI image observables to derive solar surface feature classes and compare the characteristic statistics of those classes to the MWO classes. The ability to categorize automatically surface features in the HMI images holds out the promise of consistent, relatively quick and manageable analysis of the large quantity of data available in these images. Given that the classes found in MWO images using AutoClass have been found to improve modeling of TSI, application of AutoClass to the more complex HMI images should enhance understanding of the physical processes at work in solar surface features and their implications for the solar-terrestrial environment. Ulrich, R.K., Parker, D, Bertello, L. and Boyden, J. 2010, Solar Phys. , 261 , 11.

  13. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  14. Contribution of energetically reactive surface features to the dissolution of CeO2 and ThO2 analogues for spent nuclear fuel microstructures.

    PubMed

    Corkhill, Claire L; Myllykylä, Emmi; Bailey, Daniel J; Thornber, Stephanie M; Qi, Jiahui; Maldonado, Pablo; Stennett, Martin C; Hamilton, Andrea; Hyatt, Neil C

    2014-08-13

    In the safety case for the geological disposal of nuclear waste, the release of radioactivity from the repository is controlled by the dissolution of the spent fuel in groundwater. There remain several uncertainties associated with understanding spent fuel dissolution, including the contribution of energetically reactive surface sites to the dissolution rate. In this study, we investigate how surface features influence the dissolution rate of synthetic CeO2 and ThO2, spent nuclear fuel analogues that approximate as closely as possible the microstructure characteristics of fuel-grade UO2 but are not sensitive to changes in oxidation state of the cation. The morphology of grain boundaries (natural features) and surface facets (specimen preparation-induced features) was investigated during dissolution. The effects of surface polishing on dissolution rate were also investigated. We show that preferential dissolution occurs at grain boundaries, resulting in grain boundary decohesion and enhanced dissolution rates. A strong crystallographic control was exerted, with high misorientation angle grain boundaries retreating more rapidly than those with low misorientation angles, which may be due to the accommodation of defects in the grain boundary structure. The data from these simplified analogue systems support the hypothesis that grain boundaries play a role in the so-called "instant release fraction" of spent fuel, and should be carefully considered, in conjunction with other chemical effects, in safety performance assessements for the geological disposal of spent fuel. Surface facets formed during the sample annealing process also exhibited a strong crystallographic control and were found to dissolve rapidly on initial contact with dissolution medium. Defects and strain induced during sample polishing caused an overestimation of the dissolution rate, by up to 3 orders of magnitude.

  15. A surface recombination model applied to large features in inorganic phosphor efficiency measurements in the soft x-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez, E. L.; Husk, D. E.; Schnatterly, S. E.; Tarrio, C.

    1991-09-01

    The photoluminescent quantum efficiencies of the inorganic phosphors Y2O2S:Eu, Y2O3:Eu, La2O2S:Tm, Gd2O2S:Tb, and Sr5Cl(PO4)3:Eu have been measured in the range 17 to 450 eV. The optical properties of these phosphors from 2 to 160 eV have been determined from inelastic electron scattering measurements. Using a model which involves nonradiative recombination at the surface of the material, we relate photoluminescent efficiency to optical absorption properties, and find that surface recombination is the predominant source of efficiency loss for these materials in the soft x-ray range. From the model, we obtain values for the diffusion length, surface recombination velocity, and bulk quantum efficiency of these materials.

  16. Significant Enhancement of the Chiral Correlation Length in Nematic Liquid Crystals by Gold Nanoparticle Surfaces Featuring Axially Chiral Binaphthyl Ligands.

    PubMed

    Mori, Taizo; Sharma, Anshul; Hegmann, Torsten

    2016-01-26

    Chirality is a fundamental scientific concept best described by the absence of mirror symmetry and the inability to superimpose an object onto its mirror image by translation and rotation. Chirality is expressed at almost all molecular levels, from single molecules to supramolecular systems, and present virtually everywhere in nature. Here, to explore how chirality propagates from a chiral nanoscale surface, we study gold nanoparticles functionalized with axially chiral binaphthyl molecules. In particular, we synthesized three enantiomeric pairs of chiral ligand-capped gold nanoparticles differing in size, curvature, and ligand density to tune the chirality transfer from nanoscale solid surfaces to a bulk anisotropic liquid crystal medium. Ultimately, we are examining how far the chirality from a nanoparticle surface reaches into a bulk material. Circular dichroism spectra of the gold nanoparticles decorated with binaphthyl thiols confirmed that the binaphthyl moieties form a cisoid conformation in isotropic organic solvents. In the chiral nematic liquid crystal phase, induced by dispersing the gold nanoparticles into an achiral anisotropic nematic liquid crystal solvent, the binaphthyl moieties on the nanoparticle surface form a transoid conformation as determined by imaging the helical twist direction of the induced cholesteric phase. This suggests that the ligand density on the nanoscale metal surfaces provides a dynamic space to alter and adjust the helicity of binaphthyl derivatives in response to the ordering of the surrounding medium. The helical pitch values of the induced chiral nematic phase were determined, and the helical twisting power (HTP) of the chiral gold nanoparticles calculated to elucidate the chirality transfer efficiency of the binaphthyl ligand capped gold nanoparticles. Remarkably, the HTP increases with increasing diameter of the particles, that is, the efficiency of the chirality transfer of the binaphthyl units bound to the nanoparticle

  17. Kinetics and thermodynamics studies on the BMP-2 adsorption onto hydroxyapatite surface with different multi-morphological features.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhiwei; Huangfu, Changxin; Wang, Yanying; Ge, Hongwei; Yao, Yao; Zou, Ping; Wang, Guangtu; He, Hua; Rao, Hanbing

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the surface topography on protein adsorption process is of great significance for designing hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic material surfaces. In this work, three different topographies of HA materials HA-sheet, HA-rod, and HA-whisker were synthesized and testified by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and a field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). We have systematically investigated the adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2) on the three different topography surfaces of HA, respectively. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacities of HA-sheet, HA-rod and HA-whisker were (219.96 ± 10.18), (247.13 ± 12.35), and (354.67 ± 17.73) μg · g(-1), respectively. Kinetic parameters, rate constants, equilibrium adsorption capacities and related correlation coefficients, for each kinetic model were calculated as well as discussed. It demonstrated that the adsorption of BMP-2 onto HA could be described by the pseudo second-order equation. Adsorption of BMP-2 onto HA followed the Langmuir isotherm. It confirmed that compared with other samples HA-whisker had more adsorption sites for its high specific surface area which could provide more opportunities for protein molecules. The adsorption processes were endothermic (ΔH > 0), spontaneous (ΔG < 0) and entropy increasing (ΔS > 0). A possible adsorption mechanism has been proposed. In addition, the BMP-2 could be adsorbed to the surface which existed slight conformational changes by FT-IR. PMID:25953565

  18. Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Design Selection (LADS) Phase 1 Analysis of Surface Modification Consisting of Addition of Alluvium (Feature 23a)

    SciTech Connect

    N. Erb

    1999-06-11

    The objective of this report is to document the analysis that was conducted to evaluate the effect of a potential change to the TSPA-VA base case design that could improve long-term repository performance. The design feature evaluated in this report is a modification of the topographic surface of Yucca Mountain. The modification consists of covering the land surface immediately above the repository foot-print with a thick layer of unconsolidated material utilizing rip-rap and plants to mitigate erosion. This surface modification is designated as Feature 23a or simply abbreviated as F23a. The fundamental aim of F23a is to reduce the net infiltration into the unsaturated zone by enhancing the potential for evapotranspiratiration at the surface; such a change would, in turn, reduce the seepage flux and the rate of radionuclide releases from the repository. Field and modeling studies of water movement in the unsaturated zone have indicated that shallow infiltration at the surface is almost negligible in locations where the bedrock is covered by a sufficiently thick soil layer. In addition to providing storage for meteoric water, a thick soil layer would slow the downward movement of soil moisture to such an extent that evaporation and transpiration could easily transfer most of the soil-water back to the atmosphere. Generic requirements for the effectiveness of this design feature are two-fold. First, the soil layer above the repository foot-print must be thick enough to provide sufficient storage of meteoric water (from episodic precipitation events) and accommodate plant roots. Second, the added soil layer must be engineered so as to mitigate thinning by erosional processes and have sufficient thickness to accommodate the roots of common desert plants. Under these two conditions, it is reasonable to expect that modification would be effective for a significant time period and the net infiltration and deep percolation flux would be reduced by orders of magnitude lower

  19. Evaluation of whole cell fixation methods for the analysis of nanoscale surface features of Yersinia pestis KIM.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Stanciu, C E; Ehrhardt, C J; Yadavalli, V K

    2016-09-01

    Manipulation of viable Yersinia pestis (etiologic agent of plague) in the laboratory usually necessitates elevated biosafety and biocontainment procedures, even with avirulent or vaccine strains. To facilitate downstream biochemical or physical analyses in a Biosafety Level 1 laboratory environment, effective inactivation without affecting its intrinsic properties is critical. Here, we report on the morphological and biochemical changes to Y. pestis surfaces following four different fixation methods that render the cells nonviable. The results, obtained at the single cell level, demonstrate that methanol inactivation is best able to preserve bacterial morphology and bioactivity, enabling subsequent analysis. This nanoscale evaluation of the effects of inactivation on cell morphology and surface bioactivity may provide a crucial preparatory approach to study virulent pathogens in the lab setting using high-resolution microscopic techniques such as atomic force microscopy. PMID:27527609

  20. A Novel Micro-Scale Plastic Deformation Feature on a Bulk Metallic Glass Surface under Laser Shock Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yan-Peng; Wei, Bing-Chen; Wang, Xi; Xu, Guang-Yue; Li, Lei; Wu, Xian-Qian; Song, Hong-Wei; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2013-03-01

    Laser shocking peening is a widely applied surface treatment technique that can effectively improve the fatigue properties of metal parts. We observe many micro-scale arc plastic steps on the surface of Zr47.9Ti0.3Ni3.1Cu39.3Al9.4 metallic glass subjected to the ultra-high pressure and strain rate induced by laser shock peening. The scanning electronic microscopy and atomic force microscopy show that the arc plastic step (APS) has an arc boundary, 50-300 nm step height, 5-50 μm radius and no preferable direction. These APSs have the ability to accommodate plastic deformation in the same way as shear band. This may indicate a new mechanism to accommodate the plastic deformation in amorphous metallic glass under high pressure, ultra-high strain rates, and short duration.

  1. Lipoprotein hydrophobic core lipids are partially extruded to surface in smaller HDL: "Herniated" HDL, a common feature in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Amigó, Núria; Mallol, Roger; Heras, Mercedes; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Blanco Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Plana, Núria; Yanes, Óscar; Masana, Lluís; Correig, Xavier

    2016-01-18

    Recent studies have shown that pharmacological increases in HDL cholesterol concentrations do not necessarily translate into clinical benefits for patients, raising concerns about its predictive value for cardiovascular events. Here we hypothesize that the size-modulated lipid distribution within HDL particles is compromised in metabolic disorders that have abnormal HDL particle sizes, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). By using NMR spectroscopy combined with a biochemical volumetric model we determined the size and spatial lipid distribution of HDL subclasses in a cohort of 26 controls and 29 DM2 patients before and after two drug treatments, one with niacin plus laropiprant and another with fenofibrate as an add-on to simvastatin. We further characterized the HDL surface properties using atomic force microscopy and fluorescent probes to show an abnormal lipid distribution within smaller HDL particles, a subclass particularly enriched in the DM2 patients. The reduction in the size, force cholesterol esters and triglycerides to emerge from the HDL core to the surface, making the outer surface of HDL more hydrophobic. Interestingly, pharmacological interventions had no effect on this undesired configuration, which may explain the lack of clinical benefits in DM2 subjects.

  2. MINARETS WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, N. King; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Minarets Wilderness and adjacent areas in the central Sierra Nevada, California was conducted. The results of the survey indicate that the study area has a substantiated resource potential for small deposits of copper, silver, zinc, lead, and iron, and a probable mineral-resource potential for molybdenum. No energy-resource potential was identified in the study.

  3. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  4. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  5. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  6. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  7. Response to memorandum by Rowley and Dixon regarding U.S. Geological Survey report titled "Characterization of Surface-Water Resources in the Great Basin National Park Area and Their Susceptibility to Ground-Water Withdrawals in Adjacent Valleys, White Pine County, Nevada"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prudic, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Applications pending for permanent permits to pump large quantities of ground water in Spring and Snake Valleys adjacent to Great Basin National Park (the Park) prompted the National Park Service to request a study by the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate the susceptibility of the Park's surface-water resources to pumping. The result of this study was published as U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2006-5099 'Characterization of Surface-Water Resources in the Great Basin National Park Area and Their Susceptibility to Ground-Water Withdrawals in Adjacent Valleys, White Pine County, Nevada,' by P.E. Elliott, D.A. Beck, and D.E. Prudic. That report identified areas within the Park where surface-water resources are susceptible to ground-water pumping; results from the study showed that three streams and several springs near the eastern edge of the Park were susceptible. However, most of the Park's surface-water resources likely would not be affected by pumping because of either low-permeability rocks or because ground water is sufficiently deep as to not be directly in contact with the streambeds. A memorandum sent by Peter D. Rowley and Gary L. Dixon, Consulting Geologists, to the Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) on June 29, 2006 was critical of the report. The memorandum by Rowley and Dixon was made available to the National Park Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the public during the Nevada State Engineer's 'Evidentiary Exchange' process for the recent hearing on applications for ground-water permits by SNWA in Spring Valley adjacent to Great Basin National Park. The U.S. Geological Survey was asked by the National Park Service to assess the validity of the concerns and comments contained in the Rowley and Dixon memorandum. An Administrative Letter Report responding to Rowley and Dixon's concerns and comments was released to the National Park Service on October 30, 2006. The National Park Service subsequently requested that the

  8. Fouling assemblages on offshore wind power plants and adjacent substrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Dan; Malm, Torleif

    2008-09-01

    A significant expansion of offshore wind power is expected in the near future, with thousands of turbines in coastal waters, and various aspects of how this may influence the coastal ecology including disturbance effects from noise, shadows, electromagnetic fields, and changed hydrological conditions are accordingly of concern. Further, wind power plants constitute habitats for a number of organisms, and may locally alter assemblage composition and biomass of invertebrates, algae and fish. In this study, fouling assemblages on offshore wind turbines were compared to adjacent hard substrate. Influences of the structures on the seabed were also investigated. The turbines differed significantly from adjacent boulders in terms of assemblage composition of epibiota and motile invertebrates. Species number and Shannon-Wiener diversity were, also, significantly lower on the wind power plants. It was also indicated that the turbines might have affected assemblages of invertebrates and algae on adjacent boulders. Off shore wind power plant offer atypical substrates for fouling assemblages in terms of orientation, depth range, structure, and surface texture. Some potential ecological implications of the addition of these non-natural habitats for coastal ecology are discussed.

  9. Radar remote sensing of glacial features, Malaspina Glacier, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Molnia, B.F.; Jones, J.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Two types of radar investigations were conducted at Malaspina glacier, the largest piedmont glacier lobe in North America. Digital x-band side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) data were collected to image surface features; ice-surface, ice-penetrating radar was employed to measure ice thickness and to identify the configuration of subglacial bed rock SLAR revealed a complex pattern of surface backscatter responses related to three types of channellike features on the glacier surface, which mimic the configuration of its underlying bed rock. The features resemble (1) glacially eroded valleys with cirque-like indentations, (2) dendritic stream valleys, and (3) a greater than 40-km-long, arcuate, east-west lineament that corresponds to the Fairweather fault. Field examinations of the three types of features were made to determine relief, slope, and other conditions. The channel-like features had elevations as much as 40 m lower than adjacent high areas and were characterized by fewer crevasses, minimal surface relief, a sediment veneer, and standing and running water. Hundred-m-spaced ice-penetrating radar soundings showed that the ice thickness over these low areas is much greater than over adjacent highs. About 50 ice-thickness measurements were made elsewhere on the glacier. The maximum ice thickness measured exceeded 850 m, whereas the minimum thickness was less than 150 m. Comparison of ice-thickness measurements and ice-surface elevations at each site suggests that the Malaspina Glacier occupies a deep basin or series of basins extending well below sea level.

  10. Maximizing power to track Alzheimer's disease and MCI progression by LDA-based weighting of longitudinal ventricular surface features.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Boris A; Hua, Xue; Rajagopalan, Priya; Chou, Yi-Yu; Wang, Yalin; Yanovsky, Igor; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-04-15

    We propose a new method to maximize biomarker efficiency for detecting anatomical change over time in serial MRI. Drug trials using neuroimaging become prohibitively costly if vast numbers of subjects must be assessed, so it is vital to develop efficient measures of brain change. A popular measure of efficiency is the minimal sample size (n80) needed to detect 25% change in a biomarker, with 95% confidence and 80% power. For multivariate measures of brain change, we can directly optimize n80 based on a Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA). Here we use a supervised learning framework to optimize n80, offering two alternative solutions. With a new medial surface modeling method, we track 3D dynamic changes in the lateral ventricles in 2065 ADNI scans. We apply our LDA-based weighting to the results. Our best average n80-in two-fold nested cross-validation-is 104 MCI subjects (95% CI: [94,139]) for a 1-year drug trial, and 75AD subjects [64,102]. This compares favorably with other MRI analysis methods. The standard "statistical ROI" approach applied to the same ventricular surfaces requires 165 MCI or 94AD subjects. At 2 years, the best LDA measure needs only 67 MCI and 52AD subjects, versus 119 MCI and 80AD subjects for the stat-ROI method. Our surface-based measures are unbiased: they give no artifactual additive atrophy over three time points. Our results suggest that statistical weighting may boost efficiency of drug trials that use brain maps.

  11. Magnetoactive feature of in-situ polymerised polyaniline film developed on the surface of manganese-zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, V.; Kazantseva, N. E.; Sapurina, I.; Moučka, R.; Vilčáková, J.; Stejskal, J.

    2012-07-01

    A polyaniline film exhibits magnetoactive properties when deposited on the surface of multidomain particles of manganese-zinc ferrite during in-situ polymerisation of aniline. This is reflected in the increased coercivity and thermomagnetic stability of an in-situ prepared composite compared with bare ferrite and its mixed composite with polyaniline. In addition, the deposition of a polyaniline film results in a shift of the complex-permeability dispersion region towards ultrahigh frequency band. These changes in the magnetic properties of polyaniline-coated ferrite are attributed to the increased value of the inner demagnetisation factor, which results from stress-induced magnetic anisotropy due to the pinning of domain walls appearing on the surface of ferrite. This study is focused on the mechanism of pinning of domain walls and its influence on the magnetic properties of in-situ prepared composites in terms of the molecular mechanism of oxidative polymerisation of aniline. Ferrite stimulates the propagation of polyaniline chains, which start to grow on the domain walls on the ferrite surface. It leads to the pinning of domain walls and restricts their mobility in a magnetic field. The further increase in the coercivity and the resonance frequency of polyaniline-coated ferrite due to film shrinkage after deprotonation of polyaniline makes it obvious that polyaniline coating induces elastic stresses in a ferrite particle that stimulate the growth of the effective magnetic anisotropy. Stress-induced magnetic anisotropy contributes to the reorientation of the magnetisation vectors in domains with respect to the new directions of easy magnetisation, given by magnetoelastic stresses, which leads to complex changes in the magnetic properties of in-situ prepared composites.

  12. Interaction of Cracks Between Two Adjacent Indents in Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Salem, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental observations of the interaction behavior of cracks between two adjacent indents were made using an indentation technique in soda-lime glass. It was specifically demonstrated how one indent crack initiates and propagates in the vicinity of another indent crack. Several types of crack interactions were examined by changing the orientation and distance of one indent relative to the other. It was found that the residual stress field produced by elastic/plastic indentation has a significant influence on controlling the mode of crack interaction. The interaction of an indent crack with a free surface was also investigated for glass and ceramic specimens.

  13. Geomorphology of portions of western Kentucky and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Dilamarter, R.C.

    1982-07-01

    The geomorphology of portions of western Kentucky and adjacent areas in Indiana, Illinois and Tennessee is presented as a background for interpreters evaluating the present land surface using remotely sensed imagery. Eight physiographic units were analyzed and are briefly discussed with reference to topography and surface deposits. Great diversity was found to be characteristic of the region, the result of different structural influences and geomorphic processes. The landscape bears the marks of fluvial, glacial, eolian, lacustrine and karstic environments, so a regional geomorphic history was compiled from the literature as an aid to understanding the land surface. Three smaller zones in Kentucky were analyzed in greater detail regarding topography and geomorphic development because of their potential importance in subsurface exploration.

  14. 3D non-rigid registration using surface and local salient features for transrectal ultrasound image-guided prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Akbari, Hamed; Halig, Luma; Fei, Baowei

    2011-03-01

    We present a 3D non-rigid registration algorithm for the potential use in combining PET/CT and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images for targeted prostate biopsy. Our registration is a hybrid approach that simultaneously optimizes the similarities from point-based registration and volume matching methods. The 3D registration is obtained by minimizing the distances of corresponding points at the surface and within the prostate and by maximizing the overlap ratio of the bladder neck on both images. The hybrid approach not only capture deformation at the prostate surface and internal landmarks but also the deformation at the bladder neck regions. The registration uses a soft assignment and deterministic annealing process. The correspondences are iteratively established in a fuzzy-to-deterministic approach. B-splines are used to generate a smooth non-rigid spatial transformation. In this study, we tested our registration with pre- and postbiopsy TRUS images of the same patients. Registration accuracy is evaluated using manual defined anatomic landmarks, i.e. calcification. The root-mean-squared (RMS) of the difference image between the reference and floating images was decreased by 62.6+/-9.1% after registration. The mean target registration error (TRE) was 0.88+/-0.16 mm, i.e. less than 3 voxels with a voxel size of 0.38×0.38×0.38 mm3 for all five patients. The experimental results demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of the 3D non-rigid registration algorithm.

  15. The characteristics of Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells are modified by substrate topography with cell-like features and the polymer surface.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li Hui; Sykes, Peter H; Alkaisi, Maan M; Evans, John J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional in vitro culture studies on flat surfaces do not reproduce tissue environments, which have inherent topographical mechanical signals. To understand the impact of these mechanical signals better, we use a cell imprinting technique to replicate cell features onto hard polymer culture surfaces as an alternative platform for investigating biomechanical effects on cells; the high-resolution replication of cells offers the micro- and nanotopography experienced in typical cell-cell interactions. We call this platform a Bioimprint. Cells of an endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line, Ishikawa, were cultured on a bioimprinted substrate, in which Ishikawa cells were replicated on polymethacrylate (pMA) and polystyrene (pST), and compared to cells cultured on flat surfaces. Characteristics of cells, incorporating morphology and cell responses, including expression of adhesion-associated molecules and cell proliferation, were studied. In this project, we fabricated two different topographies for the cells to grow on: a negative imprint that creates cell-shaped hollows and a positive imprint that recreates the raised surface topography of a cell layer. We used two different substrate materials, pMA and pST. We observed that cells on imprinted substrates of both polymers, compared to cells on flat surfaces, exhibited higher expression of β1-integrin, focal adhesion kinase, and cytokeratin-18. Compared to cells on flat surfaces, cells were larger on imprinted pMA and more in number, whereas on pST-imprinted surfaces, cells were smaller and fewer than those on a flat pST surface. This method, which provided substrates in vitro with cell-like features, enabled the study of effects of topographies that are similar to those experienced by cells in vivo. The observations establish that such a physical environment has an effect on cancer cell behavior independent of the characteristics of the substrate. The results support the concept that the physical topography of a cell

  16. Structural Features of the Pseudomonas fluorescens Biofilm Adhesin LapA Required for LapG-Dependent Cleavage, Biofilm Formation, and Cell Surface Localization

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Chelsea D.; Smith, T. Jarrod; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Newell, Peter D.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2014-01-01

    The localization of the LapA protein to the cell surface is a key step required by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 to irreversibly attach to a surface and form a biofilm. LapA is a member of a diverse family of predicted bacterial adhesins, and although lacking a high degree of sequence similarity, family members do share common predicted domains. Here, using mutational analysis, we determine the significance of each domain feature of LapA in relation to its export and localization to the cell surface and function in biofilm formation. Our previous work showed that the N terminus of LapA is required for cleavage by the periplasmic cysteine protease LapG and release of the adhesin from the cell surface under conditions unfavorable for biofilm formation. We define an additional critical region of the N terminus of LapA required for LapG proteolysis. Furthermore, our results suggest that the domains within the C terminus of LapA are not absolutely required for biofilm formation, export, or localization to the cell surface, with the exception of the type I secretion signal, which is required for LapA export and cell surface localization. In contrast, deletion of the central repetitive region of LapA, consisting of 37 repeats of 100 amino acids, results in an inability to form a biofilm. We also used single-molecule atomic force microscopy to further characterize the role of these domains in biofilm formation on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. These studies represent the first detailed analysis of the domains of the LapA family of biofilm adhesin proteins. PMID:24837291

  17. Effects of surface features on sulfur dioxide adsorption on calcined NiAl hydrotalcite-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Li, Xinyong; Quan, Xie; Chen, Guohua

    2011-06-15

    The hydrotalcite-based NiAl mixed oxides were synthesized by coprecipitation and urea hydrolysis approaches and employed for SO₂ removal. The samples were well characterized by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and N₂ adsorption/desorption isotherm analyses. The acid-base properties were characterized by pyridine chemisorption and CO₂ temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The calcined NiAlO from the urea method showed excellent SO₂ adsorption and its adsorption equilibrium showed a type I isotherm, which significantly improved the adsorption performance for low-concentration SO₂. Both the physical structure and the acidic-basic sites were found to play important roles in the SO₂ adsorption process. In situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) investigation revealed that adsorbed SO₂ molecules formed surface bisulfite, sulfite, and bidentate binuclear sulfate. The mechanisms for SO₂ adsorption and transformation are discussed in detail. PMID:21609013

  18. Insights into the supramolecular features in isopropylmalonic and n-butylmalonic acids: Inputs from PIXEL and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Dhananjay; Mondal, Ranjan Kumar; Dhibar, Subhendu; Lin, Chia-Her; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Chopra, Deepak; Dey, Biswajit

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we have investigated the supramolecular pattern in two dicarboxylic acids, namely isopropylmalonic acid (1) and n-butylmalonic acid (2), via the presence of different hydrogen bonding patterns and aliphatic chains associated with the respective acids. The crystal structure is formed via the presence of strong Osbnd H⋯O and Csbnd H⋯O H-bonds, in the solid-state. The nature and energetics of the different supramolecular architectures in these two molecules have been further analyzed quantitatively via the PIXEL method. Hirshfeld surface analysis and fingerprint plots help to evaluate the contribution of different types of intermolecular contacts in the crystal packing. MESP calculations have been done to delineate the negative and positive areas of the electrostatic potential in different regions of the molecule in the crystal environment.

  19. Interactions of near-coastal and basin-wide features of the Mediterranean Sea in the surface colour and temperature historical record

    SciTech Connect

    Barale, V.; Filippi, P.

    1997-08-01

    Sea surface colour and temperature images, derived from time series of CZCS (1978-1986) and AVHRR (1982-1990) data, have been used to assess the interactions of near-coastal and basin-wide features in the Mediterranean basin. Individual images were processed to apply sensor(s) calibration, to correct for atmospheric contamination, and to estimate chlorophyll-like pigment concentration and surface temperature. Long-term composites show marked differences between western and eastern sub-basins, inshore and offshore domains, northern and southern near-coastal areas. Continental runoff and wind-driven mixing, as well as geomorphology and meteorology of the (northern) basin margins, appear to influence both water dynamics and bio-geo-chemistry. The major sub-basins present a distinct seasonality, superimposed to that of the basin.

  20. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  1. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  2. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion.

  3. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  4. LDRD final report : on the development of hybrid level-set/particle methods for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Musson, Lawrence Cale

    2005-01-01

    Two methods for creating a hybrid level-set (LS)/particle method for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes are developed and tested. The first method supplements the LS method by introducing Lagrangian marker points in regions of high curvature. Once both the particle set and the LS function are advanced in time, minimization of certain objective functions adjusts the LS function so that its zero contour is in closer alignment with the particle locations. It was found that the objective-minimization problem was unexpectedly difficult to solve, and even when a solution could be found, the acquisition of it proved more costly than simply expanding the basis set of the LS function. The second method explored is a novel explicit marker-particle method that we have named the grid point particle (GPP) approach. Although not a LS method, the GPP approach has strong procedural similarities to certain aspects of the LS approach. A key aspect of the method is a surface rediscretization procedure--applied at each time step and based on a global background mesh--that maintains a representation of the surface while naturally adding and subtracting surface discretization points as the surface evolves in time. This method was coded in 2-D, and tested on a variety of surface evolution problems by using it in the ChISELS computer code. Results shown for 2-D problems illustrate the effectiveness of the method and highlight some notable advantages in accuracy over the LS method. Generalizing the method to 3D is discussed but not implemented.

  5. Incorporation of texture-based features in optimal graph-theoretic approach with application to the 3D segmentation of intraretinal surfaces in SD-OCT volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, Bhavna J.; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan; Kwon, Young H.; Garvin, Mona K.

    2012-02-01

    While efficient graph-theoretic approaches exist for the optimal (with respect to a cost function) and simultaneous segmentation of multiple surfaces within volumetric medical images, the appropriate design of cost functions remains an important challenge. Previously proposed methods have used simple cost functions or optimized a combination of the same, but little has been done to design cost functions using learned features from a training set, in a less biased fashion. Here, we present a method to design cost functions for the simultaneous segmentation of multiple surfaces using the graph-theoretic approach. Classified texture features were used to create probability maps, which were incorporated into the graph-search approach. The efficiency of such an approach was tested on 10 optic nerve head centered optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes obtained from 10 subjects that presented with glaucoma. The mean unsigned border position error was computed with respect to the average of manual tracings from two independent observers and compared to our previously reported results. A significant improvement was noted in the overall means which reduced from 9.25 +/- 4.03μm to 6.73 +/- 2.45μm (p < 0.01) and is also comparable with the inter-observer variability of 8.85 +/- 3.85μm.

  6. Effects of charge design features on parameters of acoustic and seismic waves and cratering, for SMR chemical surface explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Y.

    2012-04-01

    A series of experimental on-surface shots was designed and conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel at Sayarim Military Range (SMR) in Negev desert, including two large calibration explosions: about 82 tons of strong IMI explosives in August 2009, and about 100 tons of ANFO explosives in January 2011. It was a collaborative effort between Israel, CTBTO, USA and several European countries, with the main goal to provide fully controlled ground truth (GT0) infrasound sources in different weather/wind conditions, for calibration of IMS infrasound stations in Europe, Middle East and Asia. Strong boosters and the upward charge detonation scheme were applied to provide a reduced energy release to the ground and an enlarged energy radiation to the atmosphere, producing enhanced infrasound signals, for better observation at far-regional stations. The following observations and results indicate on the required explosives energy partition for this charge design: 1) crater size and local seismic (duration) magnitudes were found smaller than expected for these large surface explosions; 2) small test shots of the same charge (1 ton) conducted at SMR with different detonation directions showed clearly lower seismic amplitudes/energy and smaller crater size for the upward detonation; 3) many infrasound stations at local and regional distances showed higher than expected peak amplitudes, even after application of a wind-correction procedure. For the large-scale explosions, high-pressure gauges were deployed at 100-600 m to record air-blast properties, evaluate the efficiency of the charge design and energy generation, and provide a reliable estimation of the charge yield. Empirical relations for air-blast parameters - peak pressure, impulse and the Secondary Shock (SS) time delay - depending on distance, were developed and analyzed. The parameters, scaled by the cubic root of estimated TNT equivalent charges, were found consistent for all analyzed explosions, except of SS

  7. A Homology Model Reveals Novel Structural Features and an Immunodominant Surface Loop/Opsonic Target in the Treponema pallidum BamA Ortholog TP_0326

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Amit; Anand, Arvind; Hawley, Kelly L.; LeDoyt, Morgan; La Vake, Carson J.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Cruz, Adriana R.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently demonstrated that TP_0326 is a bona fide rare outer membrane protein (OMP) in Treponema pallidum and that it possesses characteristic BamA bipartite topology. Herein, we used immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) to show that only the β-barrel domain of TP_0326 contains surface-exposed epitopes in intact T. pallidum. Using the solved structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae BamA, we generated a homology model of full-length TP_0326. Although the model predicts a typical BamA fold, the β-barrel harbors features not described in other BamAs. Structural modeling predicted that a dome comprised of three large extracellular loops, loop 4 (L4), L6, and L7, covers the barrel's extracellular opening. L4, the dome's major surface-accessible loop, contains mainly charged residues, while L7 is largely neutral and contains a polyserine tract in a two-tiered conformation. L6 projects into the β-barrel but lacks the VRGF/Y motif that anchors L6 within other BamAs. IFA and opsonophagocytosis assay revealed that L4 is surface exposed and an opsonic target. Consistent with B cell epitope predictions, immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed that L4 is an immunodominant loop in T. pallidum-infected rabbits and humans with secondary syphilis. Antibody capture experiments using Escherichia coli expressing OM-localized TP_0326 as a T. pallidum surrogate further established the surface accessibility of L4. Lastly, we found that a naturally occurring substitution (Leu593 → Gln593) in the L4 sequences of T. pallidum strains affects antibody binding in sera from syphilitic patients. Ours is the first study to employ a “structure-to-pathogenesis” approach to map the surface topology of a T. pallidum OMP within the context of syphilitic infection. IMPORTANCE Previously, we reported that TP_0326 is a bona fide rare outer membrane protein (OMP) in Treponema pallidum and that it possesses the bipartite topology characteristic of a BamA ortholog

  8. 30 CFR 816.57 - Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 816.57 Section 816.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.57 Hydrologic balance: Activities...

  9. 30 CFR 816.57 - Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 816.57 Section 816.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.57 Hydrologic balance: Activities...

  10. 30 CFR 816.57 - Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 816.57 Section 816.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.57 Hydrologic balance: Activities...

  11. 30 CFR 816.57 - Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 816.57 Section 816.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.57 Hydrologic balance: Activities...

  12. 30 CFR 816.57 - Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 816.57 Section 816.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.57 Hydrologic balance: Activities...

  13. Seroprevalence and biochemical features of hepatitis B surface antigenemia in patients with HIV-1 infection in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Iwalokun, B A; Hodonu, S O; Olaleye, B M; Olabisi, O A

    2006-09-01

    Studies have confirmed HBsAg antigenemia as an important correlate of HIV-1 infections in Nigeria. However, the hepatic pathophysiology and therapeutic implications in antiretroviral regimens are poorly understood. In this study, fifty-four HIV-1 seropositive patients aged 16-47 years (mean age 31.8 years) with CD4 T lymphocyte counts of 148-420 cells/mm3 attending clinics in General Hospital, Ikeja and private medical centres in Lagos Island, Nigeria and forty sex and age-matched apparently healthy controls were serologically examined as carriers of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) using a particle agglutination assay procedure (Sensitivity 94.5 - 100%, Serodia-HBs.PA, Fujirebio, Inc.). HBsAg was detected in 28 (51.9%) and 5 (12.5%) of the patients and controls respectively ( 2 Mantel-Haenszel = 13.8; P = 0.02). HBV co-infection was found to result in significant (P < 0.05) reduction in total lymphocyte count (1368.6 +/- 53.2 vs. 1590.5 +/- 80.4 cells/ mm3) with 7 of 10 (70%), 18 of 33 (54.5%) and 3 of 6 (50%) HIV-1 patients having < 200, 200 - 350 and > 350 CD4 lymphocyte cells/microl and eliciting HBsAg antigenemia. These patients exhibited 2.9 - 8.6% reduction in CD4 T lymphocyte counts compared to their seronegative counterparts. Although the liver function parameters measured in HIV-1 patients tested were higher than control values, significantly (P < 0.05) elevated liver enzymes: sGOT (44.1 +/- 2.2 vs. 26.2 +/- 2.1 IU/L), sGPT (46.2 +/- 2.4 vs. 23.5 +/- 1.8 IU/ L), and serum bilirubin levels (2.04 +/- 0.18 vs. 1.0 +/- 0.07 mg/ dL) were observed in HBsAg positive HIV-1 patients. sGOT or sGPT activity that was five times greater than the control was observed in 7(25%) and 2 (7.7%) of HbsAg positive and negative HIV-1 patients in whom significant association between decreased total lymphocyte count and measured liver parameters was found. We conclude that hepatitis infection deteriorates liver functions and its investigation in HIV-1 infected patients may be

  14. Distribution features and controls of heavy metals in surface sediments from the riverbed of the Ningxia-Inner Mongolian reaches, Yellow River, China.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qingyu; Wang, Lei; Pan, Baotian; Guan, Wenqian; Sun, Xiazhong; Cai, Ao

    2016-02-01

    Fifty-six riverbed surface sediment (RSS) samples were collected along the Ningxia-Inner Mongolian reaches of the Yellow River (NIMYR). These samples were analyzed to determine their heavy metal concentrations (Co, Cr, Ni, Cu, V and Zn), grain sizes, sediment sources and the causes of their heavy metal contamination. The cumulative distribution functions of the heavy metals in RSS of these reaches are plotted to identify the geochemical baseline level (GBL) of each element and determine the average background concentration of each heavy metal. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis are conducted based on the grain sizes of RSS, and the samples are classified into two groups: coarse grained samples (CGS) and fine grained samples (FGS). The degree of heavy metal contamination for each sample is identified by its enrichment factor (EF). The results reveal that the coarse particle component (medium sand and coarse sand) in the bed materials is chiefly from the bordering deserts along the Yellow River. The clay and silt in the bed materials chiefly originate from the upper reaches of the Yellow River, and the fine sand is identified as a hybrid sediment derived from the upper reaches of the Yellow River and the bordering deserts. The CGS primarily appear in the reaches bordering deserts, and the sites are near the confluence of gullies and the Yellow River. The FGS are located adjacent to cities with especially strong industrial activity such as Wuhai, Bayan Nur, Baotou and Togtoh. The Cr, Ni, Cu, V and Zn concentrations (mg kg(-1)) are 84.34 ± 49.46, 30.21 ± 7.90, 25.01 ± 7.61, 73.17 ± 18.92 and 55.62 ± 18.93 in the FGS and 65.07 ± 19.51, 23.86 ± 6.84, 18.04 ± 3.8, 53.47 ± 10.57 and 34.89 ± 9.19 in the CGS respectively, and the concentrations of Co in the CGS (213.40 ± 69.71) are notably higher than in the FGS (112.02 ± 48.87) and greater than the Co GBL (210). The most contaminated samples in the NIMYR are adjacent to the cities of

  15. Conserved Surface Features Form the Double-stranded RNA Binding Site of Non-structural Protein 1 (NS1) from Influenza A and B Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Yin,C.; Khan, J.; Swapna, G.; Ertekin, A.; Krug, R.; Tong, L.; Montelione, G.

    2007-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause a highly contagious respiratory disease in humans and are responsible for periodic widespread epidemics with high mortality rates. The influenza A virus NS1 protein (NS1A) plays a key role in countering host antiviral defense and in virulence. The 73-residue N-terminal domain of NS1A (NS1A-(1-73)) forms a symmetric homodimer with a unique six-helical chain fold. It binds canonical A-form double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Mutational inactivation of this dsRNA binding activity of NS1A highly attenuates virus replication. Here, we have characterized the unique structural features of the dsRNA binding surface of NS1A-(1-73) using NMR methods and describe the 2.1-{angstrom} x-ray crystal structure of the corresponding dsRNA binding domain from human influenza B virus NS1B-(15-93). These results identify conserved dsRNA binding surfaces on both NS1A-(1-73) and NS1B-(15-93) that are very different from those indicated in earlier 'working models' of the complex between dsRNA and NS1A-(1-73). The combined NMR and crystallographic data reveal highly conserved surface tracks of basic and hydrophilic residues that interact with dsRNA. These tracks are structurally complementary to the polyphosphate backbone conformation of A-form dsRNA and run at an {approx}45{sup o} angle relative to the axes of helices {alpha}2/{alpha}2'. At the center of this dsRNA binding epitope, and common to NS1 proteins from influenza A and B viruses, is a deep pocket that includes both hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acids. This pocket provides a target on the surface of the NS1 protein that is potentially suitable for the development of antiviral drugs targeting both influenza A and B viruses.

  16. Observation of UV-induced Auger features in catechol adsorbed on anatase TiO{sub 2} (101) single crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Andrew G.; Syres, Karen L.

    2012-04-23

    We have investigated the electronic structure of catechol adsorbed on the anatase TiO{sub 2} (101) surface under illumination with ultraviolet (UV) light (4.75 eV) using resonant photoemission spectroscopy. UV illumination results in the appearance of a strong Ti MVV (M refers to photoionization of 3p level and VV the Auger decay process via the valence levels) feature at a kinetic energy of 26.2 eV. This is attributed to the creation of localised states following catechol to Ti-3d excitation by the UV source. A sharp resonance attributed to excitation from Ti 3p states into these localised states is observed in constant final state spectra.

  17. Non-target adjacent stimuli classification improves performance of classical ERP-based brain computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, G. A.; Hernández, L. F.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The classical ERP-based speller, or P300 Speller, is one of the most commonly used paradigms in the field of Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI). Several alterations to the visual stimuli presentation system have been developed to avoid unfavorable effects elicited by adjacent stimuli. However, there has been little, if any, regard to useful information contained in responses to adjacent stimuli about spatial location of target symbols. This paper aims to demonstrate that combining the classification of non-target adjacent stimuli with standard classification (target versus non-target) significantly improves classical ERP-based speller efficiency. Approach. Four SWLDA classifiers were trained and combined with the standard classifier: the lower row, upper row, right column and left column classifiers. This new feature extraction procedure and the classification method were carried out on three open databases: the UAM P300 database (Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico), BCI competition II (dataset IIb) and BCI competition III (dataset II). Main results. The inclusion of the classification of non-target adjacent stimuli improves target classification in the classical row/column paradigm. A gain in mean single trial classification of 9.6% and an overall improvement of 25% in simulated spelling speed was achieved. Significance. We have provided further evidence that the ERPs produced by adjacent stimuli present discriminable features, which could provide additional information about the spatial location of intended symbols. This work promotes the searching of information on the peripheral stimulation responses to improve the performance of emerging visual ERP-based spellers.

  18. Age determination of linear surface features using the Buffered Crater Counting approach - Case studies of the Sirenum and Fortuna Fossae graben systems on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneissl, T.; Michael, G. G.; Platz, T.; Walter, S. H. G.

    2015-04-01

    Buffered Crater Counting (BCC) offers a possibility to determine ages of linear/curvilinear surface features that provide no or only very limited surface areas for the conventional crater counting approach. In this study we applied the BCC analysis to two tectonic fault systems, Fortuna Fossae and a subsection of Sirenum Fossae. We compared BCC results with age estimates derived from conventional crater counting on the surrounding geologic units and investigated to what extent crater ejecta blankets can be used for determining the stratigraphic placement of craters pre- or post-dating the formation of linear features. Furthermore, we introduce a new functionality of the CraterTools software for ArcGIS which allows for a user-friendly semi-automatic application of the otherwise time-consuming procedure of BCC analysis. The software provides the resulting crater size-frequency data in a standard format, which can be read and analyzed in the CraterStats analysis software. Our case studies showed that the BCC approach provides equivalent or even more precise age results compared to the conventional stratigraphic approach. Here, we found that the investigated section of Sirenum Fossae is younger than previously thought. The derived formation age from the BCC analysis is 3.44-0.25+0.1Ga which corresponds to Late instead of Early Hesperian. Fortuna Fossae formed shortly after the emplacement of its now-fractured geologic host unit (Late Hesperian). Ages derived from BCC analysis vary between 3.53-0.11+0.06Ga and 3.50-0.11+0.07Ga . Furthermore, we recommend the use of crater ejecta blankets to position them in the stratigraphic sequence in order to improve crater statistics. However, the accuracy of the results depends on the extent and preservation state of the continuous ejecta blankets in the region of interest. Thus, the applied buffer width has to be chosen carefully according to investigated crater sizes and local observations.

  19. Hepatitis B virus-associated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: unique clinical features, poor outcome, and hepatitis B surface antigen-driven origin.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lijuan; Song, Yuqin; Young, Ken H; Hu, Shimin; Ding, Ning; Song, Weiwei; Li, Xianghong; Shi, Yunfei; Huang, Huiying; Liu, Weiping; Zheng, Wen; Wang, Xiaopei; Xie, Yan; Lin, Ningjing; Tu, Meifeng; Ping, Lingyan; Ying, Zhitao; Zhang, Chen; Sun, Yingli; Zhu, Jun

    2015-09-22

    While the epidemiologic association between hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is established, little is known more than this epidemiologic evidence. We studied a cohort of 587 patients with DLBCL for HBV infection status, clinicopathologic features, and the immunoglobulin variable region in HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive patients. Eighty-one (81/587, 13.8%) patients were HBsAg-positive. Compared with HBsAg-negative DLBCL, HBsAg-positive DLBCL displayed a younger median onset age (45 vs. 55 years), more frequent involvement of spleen or retroperitoneal lymph node (40.7% vs. 16.0% and 61.7% vs. 31.0% respectively, both p < 0.001), more advanced disease (stage III/IV: 76.5% vs 59.5%, p = 0.003), and significantly worse outcome (2-year overall survival: 47% versus 70%, p < 0.001). In HBsAg-positive DLBCL patients, almost all (45/47, 96%) amino acid sequences of heavy and light chain complementarity determining region 3 exhibited a high homology to antibodies specific for HBsAg, and the majority (45/50, 90%) of IgHV and IgLV genes were mutated. We conclude that 13.8% of DLBCL cases are HBV-associated in HBV-endemic China and show unique clinical features and poor outcomes. Furthermore, our study strongly suggests that HBV-associated DLBCL might arise from HBV antigen-selected B cells.

  20. How semantic biases in simple adjacencies affect learning a complex structure with non-adjacencies in AGL: a statistical account

    PubMed Central

    Poletiek, Fenna H.; Lai, Jun

    2012-01-01

    A major theoretical debate in language acquisition research regards the learnability of hierarchical structures. The artificial grammar learning methodology is increasingly influential in approaching this question. Studies using an artificial centre-embedded AnBn grammar without semantics draw conflicting conclusions. This study investigates the facilitating effect of distributional biases in simple AB adjacencies in the input sample—caused in natural languages, among others, by semantic biases—on learning a centre-embedded structure. A mathematical simulation of the linguistic input and the learning, comparing various distributional biases in AB pairs, suggests that strong distributional biases might help us to grasp the complex AnBn hierarchical structure in a later stage. This theoretical investigation might contribute to our understanding of how distributional features of the input—including those caused by semantic variation—help learning complex structures in natural languages. PMID:22688639

  1. Lung Injury Induced by TiO2 Nanoparticles Depends on Their Structural Features: Size, Shape, Crystal Phases, and Surface Coating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiangxue; Fan, Yubo

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, a variety of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are being produced. Nanotoxicology has become a hot topic in many fields, as researchers attempt to elucidate the potential adverse health effects of NPs. The biological activity of NPs strongly depends on physicochemical parameters but these are not routinely considered in toxicity screening, such as dose metrics. In this work, nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO2), one of the most commonly produced and widely used NPs, is put forth as a representative. The correlation between the lung toxicity and pulmonary cell impairment related to TiO2 NPs and its unusual structural features, including size, shape, crystal phases, and surface coating, is reviewed in detail. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in pulmonary inflammation in response to the properties of TiO2 NPs is also briefly described. To fully understand the potential biological effects of NPs in toxicity screening, we highly recommend that the size, crystal phase, dispersion and agglomeration status, surface coating, and chemical composition should be most appropriately characterized. PMID:25479073

  2. Exchange coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Bernstein, G. H.; Porod, W.

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate exchange-coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets. Our results show that two neighboring nanomagnets that are each antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled to a common ferromagnetic bottom layer can be brought into strong ferromagnetic interaction. Simulations show that interlayer exchange coupling effectively promotes ferromagnetic alignment between the two nanomagnets, as opposed to antiferromagnetic alignment due to dipole-coupling. In order to experimentally demonstrate the proposed scheme, we fabricated arrays of pairs of elongated, single-domain nanomagnets. Magnetic force microscopy measurements show that most of the pairs are ferromagnetically ordered. The results are in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. The presented scheme can achieve coupling strengths that are significantly stronger than dipole coupling, potentially enabling far-reaching applications in Nanomagnet Logic, spin-wave devices and three-dimensional storage and computing.

  3. Surface Textures and Features Indicative of Endogenous Growth at the McCartys Flow Field, NM, as an Analog to Martian Volcanic Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Garry, W. B.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Self, S.; Aubele, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic lavas typically form channels or tubes, which are recognized on the Earth and Mars. Although largely unrecognized in the planetary community, terrestrial inflated sheet flows also display morphologies that share many commonalities with lava plains on Mars. The McCartys lava flow field is among the youngest (approx.3000 yrs) basaltic flows in the continental United States. The southwest sections of the flow displays smooth, flat-topped plateaus with irregularly shaped pits and hummocky inter-plateau units that form a polygonal surface. Plateaus are typically elongate in map view, up to 20 m high and display lineations within the glassy crust. Lineated surfaces occasionally display small < 1m diameter lava coils. Lineations are generally straight and parallel each other, sometimes for over 100 meters. The boundaries between plateaus and depressions are also lineated and tilted to angles sometimes approaching vertical. Plateau-parallel cracks, sometimes containing squeeze-ups, mark the boundary between tilted crust and plateau. Some plateau depressions display level floors with hummocky surfaces, while some are bowl shaped with floors covered in broken lava slabs. The lower walls of pits sometimes display lateral, sagged lava wedges. Infrequently, pit floors display the upper portion of a tumulus from an older flow. In some places the surface crust has been disrupted forming a slabby texture. Slabs are typically on the scale of a meter or less across and no less than 7-10 cm thick. The slabs preserve the lineated textures of the undisturbed plateau crust. It appears that this style of terrain represents the emplacement of an extensive sheet that experiences inflation episodes within preferred regions where lateral spreading of the sheet is inhibited, thereby forming plateaus. Rough surfaces represent inflation-related disruption of pahoehoe lava and not a a lava. Depressions are often the result of non-inflation and can be clearly identified by lateral

  4. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  5. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  6. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  7. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  9. Spring land temperature anomalies in northwestern US and the summer drought over Southern Plains and adjacent areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yongkang; Oaida, Catalina M.; Diallo, Ismaila; Neelin, J. David; Li, Suosuo; De Sales, Fernando; Gu, Yu; Robinson, David A.; Vasic, Ratko; Yi, Lan

    2016-04-01

    Recurrent drought and associated heatwave episodes are important features of the US climate. Many studies have examined the connection between ocean surface temperature changes and conterminous US droughts. However, remote effects of large-scale land surface temperature variability, over shorter but still considerable distances, on US regional droughts have been largely ignored. The present study combines two types of evidence to address these effects: climate observations and model simulations. Our analysis of observational data shows that springtime land temperature in northwest US is significantly correlated with summer rainfall and surface temperature changes in the US Southern Plains and its adjacent areas. Our model simulations of the 2011 Southern Plains drought using a general circulation model and a regional climate model confirm the observed relationship between land temperature anomaly and drought, and suggest that the long-distance effect of land temperature changes in the northwest US on Southern Plains droughts is probably as large as the more familiar effects of ocean surface temperatures and atmospheric internal variability. We conclude that the cool 2011 springtime climate conditions in the northwest US increased the probability of summer drought and abnormal heat in the Southern Plains. The present study suggests a strong potential for more skillful intra-seasonal predictions of US Southern Plains droughts when such facts as ones presented here are considered.

  10. Possible Factors affecting the Thermal Contrast between Middle-Latitude Asian Continent and Adjacent Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Huaqiong; Wu, Tongwen; Dong, Wenjie

    2015-04-01

    A middle-latitude Land-Sea thermal contrast Index was used in this study which has close connection to the East Asian summer precipitation. The index has two parts which are land thermal index defined as JJA 500-hPa geopotential height anomalies at a land area (75°-90° E, 40° -55°N ) and ocean thermal index defined as that at an oceanic area (140° -150°E, 35° -42.5°N). The impact of the surface heat flux and atmospheric diabatic heating over the land and the ocean on the index was studied. The results show that the surface heat flux over Eurasian inner land has little influence to the land thermal index, while the variation of the surface latent heat flux and long-wave radiation over the Pacific adjacent to Japan has highly correlation with the ocean thermal index. The changes with height of the atmospheric diabatic heating rates over the Eurasian inner land and the Pacific adjacent to Japan have different features. The variations of the middle troposphere atmospheric long-wave and short-wave radiation heating have significantly influences on land thermal index, and that of the low troposphere atmospheric long-wave radiation, short-wave radiation and deep convective heating also have impact on the yearly variation of the land thermal index. For the ocean thermal index, the variations of the surface layer atmospheric vertical diffuse heating, large-scale latent heating and long-wave radiation heating are more important, low and middle troposphere atmospheric large-scale latent heating and shallow convective heating also have impact on the yearly variation of the ocean thermal index. And then the ocean thermal index has closely connection with the low troposphere atmospheric temperature, while the land thermal index has closely connection with the middle troposphere atmospheric temperature. The Effect of the preceding global SST anomalies on the index also was analyzed. The relations of land thermal index and ocean thermal index and the global SST anomalies

  11. Adjacency-blurring-effect of scenes modeled by the radiosity method

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1992-05-01

    In this paper we describe a method to simulate images through a scattering atmosphere. We compute the scattering of light from adjacent surfaces into the field-of-view (FOV) with the extended radiosity method. Our simulation takes aerosol scattering phase functions and ground bidirectional reflectance distributions (BRDF) into account. 10 refs.

  12. Positive adjacency effects mediated by seed disperser birds in pine plantations.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Regino; Hódar, José Antonio; Matías, Luís; Mendoza, Irene

    2010-06-01

    This study examines the consequences of adjacent elements for a given patch, through their effects on zoochorous dispersion by frugivorous birds. The case study consists of pine plantations (the focal patch) adjacent to other patches of native vegetation (mixed patches of native forest and shrublands), and/or pine plantations. Our hypothesis is that input of native woody species propagules generated by frugivorous birds within plantations strongly depends on the nature of the surrounding vegetation. To test this hypothesis, we studied frugivorous-bird abundance, seed dispersion, and seedling establishment in nine pine plantation plots in contact with patches of native vegetation. To quantify adjacency arrangement effects, we used the percentage of common border between a patch and each of its adjacent elements. Frugivorous bird occurrence in pine plantations is influenced by the adjacent vegetation: the greater the contact with native vegetation patches, the more abundant were the frugivorous birds within pine plantations. Furthermore, frugivorous birds introduce into plantations the seeds of a large sample of native fleshy-fruited species. The results confirm the hypothesis that zoochorous seed rain is strongly determined by the kind of vegetation surrounding a given plantation. This finding underlines the importance of the composition of the mosaic surrounding plantations and the availability of mobile link species as key landscape features conditioning passive restoration processes. PMID:20597289

  13. Strength of mineral absorption features in the transmitted component of near-infrared reflected light - First results from RELAB. [spectrogoniometer for planetary and lunar surface composition experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Bidirectional reflectance measurements are the only type of reflectance data available to the remote observer. For compositional interpretations, data are desired not only for identification of possible mineral components but also for modal abundance. The latter requires detailed information about the strength of absorption features. Using a new laboratory facility, the RELAB, laboratory data in the near infrared are presented that document effects of particle size, mineral mixtures, and viewing geometry for selected materials with well-developed absorption bands. The commonly observed increase in reflectance with decrease in particle size is also observed for absorption bands as well as a related decrease in absorption strength. For small particles in parts of the spectrum of maximum reflectance, however, a minor decrease in reflectance with a decrese in particle size is sometimes observed. Small particles dominate the observed characteristics of particulate surfaces, which contain a range of particle sizes. The mean optical path length (transmission through particles) of reflected radiation measured for a variety of particle sizes has an apparent upper limit of about 2 mm for particles of less than 250 microns. The typical number of particles involved in the optical path is less than 50.

  14. Layer by layer H-bonded assembly of P4VP with various hydroxylated PPFS: impact of the donor strength on growth mechanism and surface features.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Duchet, Jannick; Portinha, Daniel; Charlot, Aurélia

    2014-09-01

    Hydrogen bond mediated films made by step by step deposition of poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) and hydroxylated poly(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene) (PPFS) copolymers prepared by thiol para-fluoro coupling, bearing either one (PPFSME) or two (PPFSMPD) hydrogenated hydroxyl groups or a (poly)fluorinated hydroxyl (PPFSOH), respectively, were successfully constructed. The influence of the structural parameters, such as the hydroxyl environment (which dictates the H-bond strength) was in-depth investigated in terms of their impact on (i) growth mechanism, (ii) internal organization, and (iii) surface features. The use of the weaker H-bond donor partner (PPFSME) leads to low quality films composed of irregularly distributed aggregates. While [PPFSMPD/P4VP] multilayer films are comparatively thick and composed of stratified layers with smooth topology, the use of PPFSOH with P4VP yields thin films made of mixed and interpenetrated polymer layers. Playing on the interaction strength appears as a powerful tool to elaborate tailored multilayer films with molecularly tunable properties.

  15. Relative Path Impact Index (RPII): a morphometric approach to quantify the effect of anthropogenic features on surface flow processes in agricultural landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarolli, P.; Prosdocimi, M.; Sofia, G.; Preti, F.; Dalla Fontana, G.

    2014-12-01

    Soil erosion in cultivated land is one of the main critical issue because of its significant economic consequences, especially whether it occurs in hilly and mountainous environments. Among the cultivated lands, vineyards deserve a particular attention. In fact, they not only represent one of the most important crop in terms of income and employment, but they also constitute the form of agricultural land use that causes the highest soil loss. In these cultivated lands, the construction of terraces is one of the most widely used system for soil and water conservation measures. However, while favoring agricultural activities, terraces may cause local instabilities as well, if they are not properly maintained. Terraced fields are also served by agricultural roads and the construction of these anthropogenic features can have deep effects on water flows and instabilities. In fact, the plane surface of roads can intercept the overland and the subsurface flow and can modify the natural flow directions expanding the drainage network. The main objective of this work is to use high-resolution topography derived from lidar technology for a hydro-geomorphological analysis of terraced vineyards. We considered few case studies located in Italy. At first, the Relative Path Impact Index (RPII) is used to identify likely sections of terraces and agricultural roads subject to potential landsliding or erosion. Statistical thresholds of RPII are then defined to label the most critical areas. Afterwards, using the index and the defined thresholds, different scenarios of soil conservation measures are simulated, to establish the optimal solution for erosion reduction. The results prove the effectiveness of high-resolution topography in the analysis of surface erosion in terraced vineyards, when the surface water flow is the main factor triggering the instabilities. This preliminary analysis can help in scheduling a suitable planning to mitigate the consequences of the anthropogenic

  16. Microemulsions as model fluids for enhanced oil recovery: dynamics adjacent to planar hydrophilic walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frielinghaus, H.; Holderer, O.; Lipfert, F.; Kerscher, M.; Mattauch, S.; Richter, D.

    2012-10-01

    After the dynamics of microemulsions adjacent to a planar hydrophilic wall have been characterized using grazing incidence neutron spin echo spectroscopy, the model of Seifert was employed to explain the discovered acceleration for the surface near lamellar ordered membranes. Reflections of hydrodynamic waves by the wall - or the volume conservation between the membrane and the wall - explain faster relaxations and, therefore, a lubrication effect that is important for flow fields in narrow pores. The whole scenery is now spectated by using different scenarios of a bicontinuous microemulsion exposed to clay particles and of a lamellar microemulsion adjacent to a planar wall. The Seifert concept could successfully be transferred to the new problems.

  17. Prevention of enamel demineralization adjacent to glass ionomer filling materials.

    PubMed

    Forss, H; Seppä, L

    1990-04-01

    In order to study the release of fluoride and prevention of enamel demineralization by different filling materials, standardized cavities were prepared in 80 extracted human molars. The cavities were filled as follows: 1. Fuji II F; 2. Ketac-Fil; 3. Ketac-Silver; 4. Silar. Twenty molars were used as controls (no filling). Enamel slabs with the fillings were subjected to 9 days of demineralization (30 min daily) and remineralization (artificial saliva, replaced daily). Fluoride release in the saliva was determined on days 1, 3, 5, and 9. Enamel fluoride content adjacent to the cavities was determined initially and after the de-remineralization using the acid etch technique. On day 1, the largest amount of fluoride in the saliva was released by Fuji, but on day 9 the largest amount was released by Ketac-Fil. Ketac-Silver released significantly less fluoride than Fuji and Ketac-Fil. The average initial fluoride content of enamel was 2200 ppm. After the test period, fluoride contents adjusted for biopsy depth were 1822, 1690, 1693, 1337, and 888 ppm in groups 1-5, respectively. The amounts of phosphorus dissolved by the second acid etch were 28.9 (SE 2.6), 30.2 (2.0), 34.4 (2.8), 44.1 (2.7), and 42.2 (2.4) micrograms, respectively. Softening of surface enamel during the test period was clearly reduced in teeth filled with Fuji and Ketac-Fil. The results show that glass ionomer materials release considerable amounts of fluoride and prevent demineralization of the adjacent enamel in vitro. Fuji and Ketac-Fil seem to be more effective than Ketac-Silver.

  18. Characterization of distinctive features of oceanic light fields associated with inelastic radiative processes in the near-surface, euphotic, and mesopelagic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linhai

    A thorough understanding of the oceanic light fields is required to support studies of various biological, chemical, and physical processes and phenomena in the ocean. The interaction of light with seawater and its constituents involves absorption (change of radiant energy into another form of energy), elastic scattering (change in light propagation direction but not wavelength), and inelastic radiative processes (change in light wavelength and propagation direction). The absorption and elastic scattering have been the primary research focus for decades. The inelastic processes have been less investigated and often ignored in oceanographic studies or applications. The inelastic processes, including Raman scattering and fluorescence, have been demonstrated to significantly affect the oceanic light fields. However, a systematic examination of these influences within different ocean layers is lacking. I studied the effects of inelastic processes on oceanic light fields in the near-surface (0-10 m), euphotic (0-200 m), and mesopelagic (200-1000 m) layers. I modeled the upwelling radiance within the top 10 m of the ocean surface layer. The inelastic processes dramatically affect the upwelling radiance and its attenuation coefficient in the red and near-infrared spectral regions, indicating that common approaches for estimating water-leaving radiance from extrapolating measurements of upwelling radiance are inadequate. A new strategy is proposed for more accurate in-situ determinations of water-leaving radiance, which is critical for ocean color applications. Using both a unique field dataset and radiative transfer modeling I examined the effects of inelastic processes in the euphotic layer. I demonstrate distinctive features caused by inelastic processes in the irradiance and radiance fields as well as apparent optical properties for realistic scenarios of optically non-uniform water column. I also demonstrate the role of inelastic processes in photosynthetically

  19. Surface Mesohighs and Mesolows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Richard H.

    2001-01-01

    Through detailed and remarkably insightful analyses of surface data, Tetsuya Theodore Fujita pioneered modern mesoanalysis, unraveling many of the mysteries of severe storms. In this paper Fujita's contributions to the analysis and description of surface pressure features accompanying tornadic storms and squall lines are reviewed.On the scale of individual thunderstorm cells Fujita identified pressure couplets: a mesolow associated with the tornado cyclone and a mesohigh in the adjacent heavy precipitation area to the north. On larger scales, he found that squall lines contain mesohighs associated with the convective line and wake depressions (now generally called wake lows) to the rear of storms. Fujita documented the structure and life cycles of these phenomena using time-to-space conversion of barograph data.Subsequent investigations have borne out many of Fujita's findings of nearly 50 years ago. His analyses of the surface pressure field accompanying tornadic supercells have been validated by later studies, in part because of the advent of mobile mesonetworks. The analyses of squall-line mesohighs and wake lows have been confirmed and extended, particularly by advances in radar observations. These surface pressure features appear to be linked to processes both in the convective line and attendant stratiform precipitation regions, as well as to rear-inflow jets, gravity currents, and gravity waves, but specific roles of each of these phenomena in the formation of mesohighs and wake lows have yet to be fully resolved.

  20. Ius Chasma Tributary Valleys and Adjacent Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image covers valley tributaries of Ius Chasma, as well as the plains adjacent to the valleys. Ius Chasma is one of several canyons that make up the Valles Marineris canyon system. Valles Marineris likely formed by extension associated with the growth of the large volcanoes and topographic high of Tharsis to the northwest. As the ground was pulled apart, large and deep gaps resulted in the valleys seen in the top and bottom of this HiRISE image. Ice that was once in the ground could have also melted to create additional removal of material in the formation of the valleys. HiRISE is able to see the rocks along the walls of both these valleys and also impact craters in the image. Rock layers that appear lower down in elevation appear rougher and are shedding boulders. Near the top of the walls and also seen in patches along the smooth plains are brighter layers. These brighter layers are not shedding boulders so they must represent a different kind of rock formed in a different kind of environment than those further down the walls. Because they are highest in elevation, the bright layers are youngest in age. HiRISE is able to see dozens of the bright layers, which are perhaps only a meter in thickness. Darker sand dunes and ripples cover most of the plains and fill the floors of impact craters.

    Image PSP_001351_1715 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 9, 2006. The complete image is centered at -8.3 degrees latitude, 275.4 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 254.3 km (158.9 miles). At this distance the image scale ranges from 25.4 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) to 101.8 cm/pixel (with 4 x 4 binning). The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 3:32 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 59 degrees, thus the sun was about

  1. Learning Non-Adjacent Regularities at Age 0 ; 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F.

    2013-01-01

    One important mechanism suggested to underlie the acquisition of grammar is rule learning. Indeed, infants aged 0 ; 7 are able to learn rules based on simple identity relations (adjacent repetitions, ABB: "wo fe fe" and non-adjacent repetitions, ABA: "wo fe wo", respectively; Marcus et al., 1999). One unexplored issue is…

  2. View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, bottom cut off by fringed buildings, view facing south-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Delayed Acquisition of Non-Adjacent Vocalic Distributional Regularities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compute non-adjacent regularities is key in the acquisition of a new language. In the domain of phonology/phonotactics, sensitivity to non-adjacent regularities between consonants has been found to appear between 7 and 10 months. The present study focuses on the emergence of a posterior-anterior (PA) bias, a regularity involving two…

  4. Surface- and Ground-Water Monitoring and Mapping of Selected Features at the Blue Ridge Parkway Mt. Pisgah Campground, Haywood County, North Carolina, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Douglas G.

    2004-01-01

    During 2002, a baseline study of hydrologic conditions was conducted, and selected features were mapped within the Mt. Pisgah campground on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Haywood County, North Carolina. Field surveys were performed by using global positioning system equipment one time (January 2002) during the study to locate hydrologic and other types of features in the study area. Water-level and streamflow data and seasonal water-quality samples were collected from a stream that receives all surface-water drainage from the campground area. During 2002, water levels (stage) in the stream ranged from 1.09 to 1.89 feet above gage datum (4,838.06 to 4,838.86 feet above mean sea level). Flow in the stream ranged from 0.05 to 9.7 cubic feet per second. Annual daily mean flow for calendar year 2002 was approximately 0.35 cubic foot per second (about 226,000 gallons per day). Samples collected from the stream had low concentrations of all constituents measured. Four compounds associated with human activity (camphor, N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (the insect repellent DEET), tributylphosphate, and methylsalicylate) were detected in the stream samples; however, concentrations were less than detection levels. Stream samples collected in April and September and analyzed for fecal coliform bacteria had densities of 76 and 110 colonies per 100 milliliters of water, respectively. No violations of water-quality standards were noted for any constituent measured in the stream samples. Seven shallow ground-water wells were installed near a natural area in the center of the campground. Ground-water levels measured periodically in these wells and in two existing shallow piezometers generally were highest in the spring and lowest in the fall. Water temperature, pH, and specific conductance were measured in samples collected from the shallow wells in April and September 2002. Measured pH values were consistently lowest in samples from two wells on the west side of the natural area and highest

  5. Geomorphology and structural geology of Saturnalia Fossae and adjacent structures in the northern hemisphere of Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Yin, A.; Russell, C. T.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Williams, D. A.; Blewett, D. T.; Ruesch, O.; Hiesinger, H.; Le Corre, L.; Mercer, C.; Yingst, R. A.; Garry, W. B.; Jaumann, R.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Gaskell, R. W.; Schröder, S. E.; Ammannito, E.; Pieters, C. M.; Raymond, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Vesta is a unique, intermediate class of rocky body in the Solar System, between terrestrial planets and small asteroids, because of its size (average radius of ∼263 km) and differentiation, with a crust, mantle and core. Vesta's low surface gravity (0.25 m/s2) has led to the continual absence of a protective atmosphere and consequently impact cratering and impact-related processes are prevalent. Previous work has shown that the formation of the Rheasilvia impact basin induced the equatorial Divalia Fossae, whereas the formation of the Veneneia impact basin induced the northern Saturnalia Fossae. Expanding upon this earlier work, we conducted photogeologic mapping of the Saturnalia Fossae, adjacent structures and geomorphic units in two of Vesta's northern quadrangles: Caparronia and Domitia. Our work indicates that impact processes created and/or modified all mapped structures and geomorphic units. The mapped units, ordered from oldest to youngest age based mainly on cross-cutting relationships, are: (1) Vestalia Terra unit, (2) cratered highlands unit, (3) Saturnalia Fossae trough unit, (4) Saturnalia Fossae cratered unit, (5) undifferentiated ejecta unit, (6) dark lobate unit, (7) dark crater ray unit and (8) lobate crater unit. The Saturnalia Fossae consist of five separate structures: Saturnalia Fossa A is the largest (maximum width of ∼43 km) and is interpreted as a graben, whereas Saturnalia Fossa B-E are smaller (maximum width of ∼15 km) and are interpreted as half grabens formed by synthetic faults. Smaller, second-order structures (maximum width of <1 km) are distinguished from the Saturnalia Fossae, a first-order structure, by the use of the general descriptive term 'adjacent structures', which encompasses minor ridges, grooves and crater chains. For classification purposes, the general descriptive term 'minor ridges' characterizes ridges that are not part of the Saturnalia Fossae and are an order of magnitude smaller (maximum width of <1 km vs

  6. Matrix intensification alters avian functional group composition in adjacent rainforest fragments.

    PubMed

    Deikumah, Justus P; McAlpine, Clive A; Maron, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Conversion of farmland land-use matrices to surface mining is an increasing threat to the habitat quality of forest remnants and their constituent biota, with consequences for ecosystem functionality. We evaluated the effects of matrix type on bird community composition and the abundance and evenness within avian functional groups in south-west Ghana. We hypothesized that surface mining near remnants may result in a shift in functional composition of avifaunal communities, potentially disrupting ecological processes within tropical forest ecosystems. Matrix intensification and proximity to the remnant edge strongly influenced the abundance of members of several functional guilds. Obligate frugivores, strict terrestrial insectivores, lower and upper strata birds, and insect gleaners were most negatively affected by adjacent mining matrices, suggesting certain ecosystem processes such as seed dispersal may be disrupted by landscape change in this region. Evenness of these functional guilds was also lower in remnants adjacent to surface mining, regardless of the distance from remnant edge, with the exception of strict terrestrial insectivores. These shifts suggest matrix intensification can influence avian functional group composition and related ecosystem-level processes in adjacent forest remnants. The management of matrix habitat quality near and within mine concessions is important for improving efforts to preserveavian biodiversity in landscapes undergoing intensification such as through increased surface mining. PMID:24058634

  7. The motion of a rough particle in a Stokes flow adjacent to a boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Seddon, J. R. T.; Mullin, T.; Del Pino, C.; Ashmore, J.

    2006-06-01

    Results are presented of experimental investigations into the motion of a heavy sphere in a rotating cylinder which is completely filled with highly viscous fluid. For a given cylinder rotation rate, the sphere adopts a fixed position and rotates adjacent to the cylinder wall. For the case of a smooth sphere the motion is consistent with that predicted by a Stokes flow model. Artificially roughened spheres exhibit particle boundary contact caused by impacts of surface asperities with the boundary for low cylinder surface speeds. For higher cylinder surface speeds the behaviour of the roughened spheres crosses smoothly from the particle boundary contact regime to motion with hydrodynamically lubricated flow.

  8. Survival of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 in topographical features on stainless steel surfaces from gas and liquid phase chemical treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To identify microenvironments that harbor and potentially protect pathogens from intervention strategies and in turn become a source of microbial recontamination. Examining factors such as fluid dynamics and topographical features which form microenvironments and promote pathogen survival will all...

  9. Seabed drifter movement in San Diego Bay and adjacent waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Robert R.; Wallace, William J.

    1982-06-01

    The seabed drifter has been used successfully to provide valuable information in many estuarine and open sea environments. It was therefore selected for use in the San Diego area. Five hundred drifters were released in San Diego Bay and adjacent ocean waters to delineate bottom flow patterns. Four significant bottom drift regimes are differentiated: off-coastal, main bay channel, open and semi-enclosed docking basins. Mean residual bottom drift ranged between 0·17km day -1 off the coast to essentially zero in the docking basins. Off-coast drifter results (31% recovery) showed a persistent northmoving bottom current with shallow near-coast drift distances between 4 and 25 km. This nearshore north moving bottom current appears to cause a net bottom water inflow into the main San Diego Bay channel (44% recovery). In the open bay a reverse trend was observed from the 16% of the drifters recovered. At the head of the estuary, evaporative densification is believed to occur, with the heavier water sinking and moving outward, towards the estuary mouth, resulting in an area of opposing bottom water currents. In this area San Diego Gas and Electric power plant takes in an average 150 million gallons of cooling water daily which, discharged as warm surface water, is suggested as the surface divergence mode required to reconcile the observed flow. With the three San Diego Bay electric power plants utilizing more than 5% of the maximum tidal prism for cooling purposes, this flow may play a major role in the overall bay circulation and requires quantitative investigation.

  10. Hydrogeologic characteristics of the alluvial aquifer and adjacent deposits of the Fountain Creek valley, El Paso County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radell, Mary Jo; Lewis, Michael E.; Watts, Kenneth R.

    1994-01-01

    The alluvial aquifer in Fountain Creek Valley between Colorado Springs and Widefield is the source for several public-supply systems. Because of the importance of this aquifer, defining aquifer boundaries, areas where underflow occurs, and where Fountain Creek is hydraulically connected to the aquifer will greatly add to the understanding of the alluvial aquifer and management of the public- supply systems. Bedrock altitude, water-table altitude for October 1991, saturated thickness for October 1991, selected hydrogeologic sections in the alluvial aquifer and adjacent deposits of the Fountain Creek Valley, and estimated underflow rates are mapped or tabulated for the area between Colorado Springs and Widefield, Colorado. Results from test drilling indicate that the bedrock surface is highly irregular and that several ridges and buried channels exist in the study area. These features affect the direction of ground-water flow on a local scale. In places, a shale ridge prevents exchange of water between Fountain Creek and the aquifer. Generally, ground water flowed toward Fountain Creek during the study (June 1991 to September 1992) in response to relatively high hydraulic heads in the aquifer and the steep gradients on the boundaries of the study area. Water levels, which were measured monthly, varied little during the study, except in areas near pumping wells or adjacent to Fountain Creek. Hydraulic-conductivity values, estimated from 30 bail tests in wells completed in the alluvial aquifer, were used to determine underflow across the saturated boundaries of the alluvial aquifer. Estimated hydraulic-conductivity values range from 1 to about 1,300 feet per day; the larger values occur in the buried channel of the alluvial aquifer and the smaller values occur near the boundaries of the saturated alluvium. Estimated underflow into the study area exceeded underflow out of the study area by about 10 times. Gain-loss investigations along Fountain Creek indicated that the

  11. Simulations using terrestrial geological analogues to assess interpretability of potential geological features of the Hermean surface restituted by the STereo imaging Camera of the SIMBIOSYS package (BepiColombo mission)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massironi, M.; Forlani, G.; Cremonese, G.; Capria, M. T.; Da Deppo, V.; Giacomini, L.; Naletto, G.; Pasquaré, G.; Roncella, R.; Flamini, E.

    2008-06-01

    The BepiColombo space mission is one of the European Space Agency's cornerstone projects; it is planned for launch in 2013 to study the planet Mercury. One of the imaging instruments of BepiColombo is a STereo Camera (STC), whose main scientific objective is the global stereo mapping of the entire surface of Mercury. STC will permit the generation of a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of Mercury's surface, improving the interpretation of morphological features at different scales and clarifying the stratigraphic relationships between different geological units. To evaluate the effectiveness of the STC-derived DTM for geological purposes, a series of simulations has been performed to find out to what extent the errors expected in the DTM may prevent the correct classification and interpretation of geological features. To meet this objective, Earth analogues (a crater, a lava cone and an endogenous dome) of likely components of the Hermean surface, small enough to be near the detection limit of the STC, were selected and a photorealistic three-dimensional (3D) model of each feature was generated using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) stereo images. Stereoscopic pairs of synthetic images of each feature were then generated from the 3D model at different locations along the BepiColombo orbit. For each stereo pair, the corresponding Hermean DTM was computed using image correlation and compared to the reference data to assess the loss of detail and interpretability. Results show that interpretation and quantitative analysis of simple craters morphologies and small volcanic features should be possible all along the periherm orbit arc. At the apoherm only the larger features can be unequivocally distinguished, but they will be reconstructed to a poor approximation.

  12. Structured Water Layers Adjacent to Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael J.; Polcik, Martin; Fukuma, Takeshi; Sader, John E.; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Jarvis, Suzanne P.

    2006-01-01

    Water amid the restricted space of crowded biological macromolecules and at membrane interfaces is essential for cell function, though the structure and function of this “biological water” itself remains poorly defined. The force required to remove strongly bound water is referred to as the hydration force and due to its widespread importance, it has been studied in numerous systems. Here, by using a highly sensitive dynamic atomic force microscope technique in conjunction with a carbon nanotube probe, we reveal a hydration force with an oscillatory profile that reflects the removal of up to five structured water layers from between the probe and biological membrane surface. Further, we find that the hydration force can be modified by changing the membrane fluidity. For 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine gel (Lβ) phase bilayers, each oscillation in the force profile indicates the force required to displace a single layer of water molecules from between the probe and bilayer. In contrast, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine fluid (Lα) phase bilayers at 60°C and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine fluid (Lα) phase bilayers at 24°C seriously disrupt the molecular ordering of the water and result predominantly in a monotonic force profile. PMID:16798815

  13. Hypoxia Adjacent to the Mississippi River Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabalais, N. N.; Turner, R. E.

    2005-05-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico receives the freshwater and constituent flux from the Mississippi River, which integrates 40% of the lower 48 United States. In the last half of the 20th century, the flux of nitrogen tripled, phosphorus concentration appears to have increased, and silicate concentration decreased. These changes result from landscape alterations over two centuries with an intensification of human activities that increased the flux of nitrogen and phosphorus particularly in the 1960s to 1980s. Evidence for eutrophication in the coastal ecosystem includes an increase in algal biomass, carbon accumulation from nutrient-enhanced production, worsening oxygen deficiency in the lower water column, and shifts in food web structure. The extent of the oxygen deficiency reaches 20,000 km2 of the inner continental shelf over long periods in summer with the potential for affecting commercially important fisheries in the Gulf. There is daily, weekly and seasonal variability in currents and stratification on the shelf and, therefore, no simple description of the couplings between nutrient delivery, carbon production in surface waters and delivery to and cycling in bottom waters. There are, however, multiple lines of evidence to implicate changes in riverine nutrient loads with overall primary and secondary production, carbon accumulation at the seabed, and low oxygen conditions on the shelf. The change in nutrient loads and responses of the northern Gulf coastal ecosystem, including widespread, severe seasonal hypoxia, parallel similar conditions in the coastal ocean on a global scale.

  14. Fast microcalcification detection in ultrasound images using image enhancement and threshold adjacency statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Baek Hwan; Chang, Chuho; Lee, Jong-Ha; Ko, Eun Young; Seong, Yeong Kyeong; Woo, Kyoung-Gu

    2013-02-01

    The existence of microcalcifications (MCs) is an important marker of malignancy in breast cancer. In spite of the benefits in mass detection for dense breasts, ultrasonography is believed that it might not reliably detect MCs. For computer aided diagnosis systems, however, accurate detection of MCs has the possibility of improving the performance in both Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon description for calcifications and malignancy classification. We propose a new efficient and effective method for MC detection using image enhancement and threshold adjacency statistics (TAS). The main idea of TAS is to threshold an image and to count the number of white pixels with a given number of adjacent white pixels. Our contribution is to adopt TAS features and apply image enhancement to facilitate MC detection in ultrasound images. We employed fuzzy logic, tophat filter, and texture filter to enhance images for MCs. Using a total of 591 images, the classification accuracy of the proposed method in MC detection showed 82.75%, which is comparable to that of Haralick texture features (81.38%). When combined, the performance was as high as 85.11%. In addition, our method also showed the ability in mass classification when combined with existing features. In conclusion, the proposed method exploiting image enhancement and TAS features has the potential to deal with MC detection in ultrasound images efficiently and extend to the real-time localization and visualization of MCs.

  15. Features of Red Sea Water Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartadikaria, Aditya; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Features of Red Sea water mass can be divided into three types but best to be grouped into two different classes that are split at the potential density line σθ=27.4. The surface water (0-50 m) and the intermediate water (50-200 m) have nearly identical types of water mass. They appear as a maxima salinity layer for the water mass that has σθ > 26.0, and as a minimum salinity layer for water mass that has σθ < 26.0. These types of water masses are strongly affected by mixing that is controlled by seasonal variability, fresh water intrusion of the Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water (GAIW), and eddies variability. Two types of mixing; isopycnal and diapycnal mixing are part of important physical phenomena that explain the change of water mass in the Red Sea. The isopycnal mixing occurs at the neutral potential density line, connecting the Red Sea with its adjacent channel, the Gulf of Aden. Diapycnal mixing is found as a dominant mixing mode in the surface of the Red Sea Water and mainly due to energetic eddy activity. Density gradients, across which diapycnal mixing occurs, in the Red Sea are mainly due to large variations in salinity. The isolation of an extreme haline water mass below the thermocline contributes to the generation of the latitudinal shift and low diapycnal mixing. This finding further explains the difference of spatial kinetic mixing between the RSW and the Indian Ocean basin.

  16. Lock 4 View east of lock wall and adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 4 - View east of lock wall and adjacent roadway built atop tow path. The gate pocket can be seen at center. - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  17. 14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen he designed and installed in the Congdon Canal, facing southeast. Photo dates ca. late 1920's. - Congdon Canal, Fish Screen, Naches River, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  18. 3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent vacant property. Original wood lap siding and trim is covered by aluminum siding. Recessed side porch is in middle. - 645 South Eighteenth Street (House), Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  19. View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips (Facility Nos. S375 & S376) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Boat House, Hornet Avenue at Independence Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY 391 IN THE FOREGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to northwest cell: granite and brick threshold, poured concrete floors, plastered finished walls, vaulted veiling; northwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  2. View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking garage. - Mulberry Street Viaduct, Spanning Paxton Creek & Cameron Street (State Route 230) at Mulberry Street (State Route 3012), Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  3. Cement Leakage into Adjacent Vertebral Body Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hoo; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) is a minimally invasive procedure for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures that fail to respond to conventional conservative treatment. It significantly improves intolerable back pain within hours, and has a low complication rate. Although rare, PV is not free of complications, most of which are directly related to cement leakage. Because of its association with new adjacent fracture, the importance of cement leakage into the adjacent disc space is paramount. Here, we report an interesting case of cement leakage into the adjacent upper vertebral body as well as disc space following PV. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of cement leakage into the adjacent vertebral body following PV. This rare case is presented along with a review of the literature. PMID:27437018

  4. 2. DETAIL OF CONTROL GATE ADJACENT TO LIFT LOCK NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF CONTROL GATE ADJACENT TO LIFT LOCK NO. 7; THIS CONTROL GATE IS A 1980s RECONSTRUCTION. - Illinois & Michigan Canal, Lift Lock No. 7 & Control Gate, East side of DuPage River, Channahon, Will County, IL

  5. 33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY WITH CONCRETE CULVERT LEADING NORTH OUT OF RAVINE TOWARD JOHNSTON MEMORIAL SITE. VIEW NW. - Shiloh National Military Park Tour Roads, Shiloh, Hardin County, TN

  6. VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING 23, FACING NORTH - Roosevelt Base, Auditorium-Gymnasium, West Virginia Street between Richardson & Reeves Avenues, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO BUILDING 199 (POLICE STATION) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Post Office, Avenue A near Eleventh Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. 73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, LOOKING WEST BY NORTHWEST, SHOWING EASTERNMOST ARCH OF FORMER GREAT HALL NORTH ARCADE - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. 28. TOP VIEW OF CIRCUIT BREAKER ADJACENT TO BRIDGE, CATENARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. TOP VIEW OF CIRCUIT BREAKER ADJACENT TO BRIDGE, CATENARY ANCHOR BRIDGE 310, COS COB POWER PLANT - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  10. 1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE OF THE ADIT OPENINGS (VIEW TO THE NORTH). - Foster Gulch Mine, Fan Housing, Bear Creek 1 mile Southwest of Town of Bear Creek, Red Lodge, Carbon County, MT

  11. GENERAL VIEW OF WAREHOUSE ADJACENT TO BATCH PLANT, LOOKING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF WAREHOUSE ADJACENT TO BATCH PLANT, LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM DREY STREET PLANT, INSIDE WELCOME WALL - Chambers Window Glass Company, Warehouse & Shipping, North of Drey (Nineteenth) Street, West of Constitution Boulevard, Arnold, Westmoreland County, PA

  12. 10. SLATE PATIO ADJACENT TO SOUTH PORCH OF HOUSE, FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SLATE PATIO ADJACENT TO SOUTH PORCH OF HOUSE, FROM SOUTHEAST CORNER OF REAR PORCH. SHED IS VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Butt Valley Dam, Gate Tender's House, Butt Valley Reservoir Road, Caribou, Plumas County, CA

  13. Detail of fire alarm boxes located adjacent to the entrance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of fire alarm boxes located adjacent to the entrance of the northwest wing - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  14. Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to engine house. Gas cooling system is on far right. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  15. 1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is the 9th Street facade of 816 E Street. Both buildings were originally one property. - Riley Building, Rendezvous Adult Magazines & Films, 437 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. 2. THREEQUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. THREE-QUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS AND NORTHWEST APPROACH SPANS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Red River Bridge, Spanning Red River at U.S. Highway 82, Garland, Miller County, AR

  17. 31. VAL, DETAIL OF LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO LAUNCHER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VAL, DETAIL OF LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING WEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with soundproof walls and pedestal flooring - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  19. 52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  20. 7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH (NOT IN STUDY AREA) - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  1. Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example is located between Buildings 26 and 27. Facing northeast - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Adjacent Segment Disease Perspective and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra-Pozo, Fanor M.; Deusdara, Renato A. M.; Benzel, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adjacent segment disease has become a common topic in spine surgery circles because of the significant increase in fusion surgery in recent years and the development of motion preservation technologies that theoretically should lead to a decrease in this pathology. The purpose of this review is to organize the evidence available in the current literature on this subject. Methods For this literature review, a search was conducted in PubMed with the following keywords: adjacent segment degeneration and disease. Selection, review, and analysis of the literature were completed according to level of evidence. Results The PubMed search identified 850 articles, from which 41 articles were selected and reviewed. The incidence of adjacent segment disease in the cervical spine is close to 3% without a significant statistical difference between surgical techniques (fusion vs arthroplasty). Authors report the incidence of adjacent segment disease in the lumbar spine to range from 2% to 14%. Damage to the posterior ligamentous complex and sagittal imbalances are important risk factors for both degeneration and disease. Conclusion Insufficient evidence exists at this point to support the idea that total disc arthroplasty is superior to fusion procedures in minimizing the incidence of adjacent segment disease. The etiology is most likely multifactorial but it is becoming abundantly clear that adjacent segment disease is not caused by motion segment fusion alone. Fusion plus the presence of abnormal end-fusion alignment appears to be a major factor in creating end-fusion stresses that result in adjacent segment degeneration and subsequent disease. The data presented cast further doubt on previously established rationales for total disc arthroplasty, at least with regard to the effect of total disc arthroplasty on adjacent segment degeneration pathology. PMID:24688337

  3. Development and functional evaluation of biomimetic silicone surfaces with hierarchical micro/nano-topographical features demonstrates favourable in vitro foreign body response of breast-derived fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Daniel J T; Oikonomou, Antonios; Hill, Ernie; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-06-01

    Reproducing extracellular matrix topographical cues, such as those present within acellular dermal matrix (ADM), in synthetic implant surfaces, may augment cellular responses, independent of surface chemistry. This could lead to enhanced implant integration and performance while reducing complications. In this work, the hierarchical micro and nanoscale features of ADM were accurately and reproducibly replicated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), using an innovative maskless 3D grayscale fabrication process not previously reported. Human breast derived fibroblasts (n=5) were cultured on PDMS surfaces and compared to commercially available smooth and textured silicone implant surfaces, for up to one week. Cell attachment, proliferation and cytotoxicity, in addition to immunofluorescence staining, SEM imaging, qRT-PCR and cytokine array were performed. ADM PDMS surfaces promoted cell adhesion, proliferation and survival (p=<0.05), in addition to increased focal contact formation and spread fibroblast morphology when compared to commercially available implant surfaces. PCNA, vinculin and collagen 1 were up-regulated in fibroblasts on biomimetic surfaces while IL8, TNFα, TGFβ1 and HSP60 were down-regulated (p=<0.05). A reduced inflammatory cytokine response was also observed (p=<0.05). This study represents a novel approach to the development of functionalised biomimetic prosthetic implant surfaces which were demonstrated to significantly attenuate the acute in vitro foreign body reaction to silicone. PMID:25818416

  4. Corneal Dendritic Cell Density Is Associated with Subbasal Nerve Plexus Features, Ocular Surface Disease Index, and Serum Vitamin D in Evaporative Dry Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Rohit; Sethu, Swaminathan; Deshmukh, Rashmi; Deshpande, Kalyani; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Agrawal, Aarti; Shroff, Rushad

    2016-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) has evolved into a major public health concern with ocular discomfort and pain being responsible for significant morbidity associated with DED. However, the etiopathological factors contributing to ocular pain associated with DED are not well understood. The current IVCM based study investigated the association between corneal dendritic cell density (DCD), corneal subbasal nerve plexus (SBNP) features, and serum vitamin D and symptoms of evaporative dry eye (EDE). The study included age and sex matched 52 EDE patients and 43 heathy controls. A significant increase in the OSDI scores (discomfort subscale) was observed between EDE (median, 20.8) and control (median, 4.2) cohorts (P < 0.001). Similarly, an increase in DCD was observed between EDE (median, 48.1 cells/mm2) patients and controls (median, 5.6 cells/mm2) (P < 0.001). A significant decrease in SBNP features (corneal nerve fiber length, fiber density, fiber width, total branch density, nerve branch density, and fiber area) was observed in EDE patients with OSDI score >23 (P < 0.05). A positive correlation was observed between DCD and OSDI discomfort subscale (r = 0.348; P < 0.0003) and SBNP features. An inverse correlation was observed between vitamin D and OSDI scores (r = −0.332; P = 0.0095) and DCD with dendritic processes (r = −0.322; P = 0.0122). The findings implicate DCD, SBNP features, and vitamin D with EDE symptoms. PMID:26904676

  5. The interpretation of SIR-B imagery of surface waves and other oceanographic features using in-situ, meteorological satellite, and infrared satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, T.; Guymer, T.; Muller, P.

    1984-01-01

    The overall aim is to interpret Shuttle Imaging Radar-B imagery of selected ocean areas near the United Kingdom using available data from ships and buoys, with particular emphasis on understanding the mechanisms involved in the backscattering of microwaves from the sea surface and their relationship to surface gravity waves. The secondary objective is to use a multispectral approach to study sea-surface expressions such as slicks, internal waves, and eddies. Data acquisition, handling, and analysis approaches and expected results are discussed.

  6. Seismotectonics of Northeastern United States and adjacent Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Aggarwal, Y.P.

    1981-06-10

    Data for local earthquakes recorded by a network of stations in northeastern United States and adjacent Canada were analyzed to study the seismicity, the relationship between earthquakes and known faults, the state of stress, and crustal and upper mantle velocity structure. In addition, portable seismographs were deployed in the field to study aftershocks. As a result, accurate locations for about 364 local earthquakes (2< or =m/sub b/< or =5) and 22 focal mechanism solutions were determined. A comparison of the spatial distribution of these events (1970--1979) with historical earthquakes (1534--1959) reveals that seismic activity in the northeast is relatively stationary in space: those areas that have had little or no seismicity historically are relatively aseismic today, whereas the historically active areas are also active today. The instrumental locations, historical seismicity, and focal mechanism solutions show an internal consistency that help us distinguish two distinct seismogenic provinces. (1) The Adirondack-western Quebec province is a northwesterly trending zone of seismic activity, about 200 km wide and at least 500 km long, extending from the SE Adirondacks into western Quebec, Canada. Thrust faulting on planes striking NNW to NW appears to predominate, and the inferred axis of maximum horizontal compression is largely uniform and trends WSW, nearly parallel to the calculated absolute plate motion of North America. Little or no seismicity is found where anorthosite outcrops at the surface. Correlations between gravity anomalies and earthquake locations suggest that seismic activity in this zone is localized to regions of steep NE or SW gradient in Bouguer anomalies. This zone does not appear to extend southeastward to Boston, as proposed by some workers. (2) The Appalachian province is a northeasterly trending zone of seismic activity extending from northern Virginia to New Brunswick, Canada.

  7. Analysis of adjacent segment reoperation after lumbar total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Scott; Blumenthal, Scott L.; Zigler, Jack E.; Guyer, Richard D.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusion has long been used for treating chronic back pain unresponsive to nonoperative care. However, potential development of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation is a concern. Total disc replacement (TDR) has been proposed as a method for addressing back pain and preventing or reducing adjacent segment degeneration. The purpose of the study was to determine the reoperation rate at the segment adjacent to a level implanted with a lumbar TDR and to analyze the pre-TDR condition of the adjacent segment. Methods This study was based on a retrospective review of charts and radiographs from a consecutive series of 1000 TDR patients to identify those who underwent reoperation because of adjacent segment degeneration. Some of the patients were part of randomized studies comparing TDR with fusion. Adjacent segment reoperation data were also collected from 67 patients who were randomized to fusion in those studies. The condition of the adjacent segment before the index surgery was compared with its condition before reoperation based on radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography. Results Of the 1000 TDR patients, 20 (2.0%) underwent reoperation. The mean length of time from arthroplasty to reoperation was 28.3 months (range, 0.5–85 months). Of the adjacent segments evaluated on preoperative MRI, 38.8% were normal, 38.8% were moderately diseased, and 22.2% were classified as having severe degeneration. None of these levels had a different grading at the time of reoperation compared with the pre-TDR MRI study. Reoperation for adjacent segment degeneration was performed in 4.5% of the fusion patients. Conclusions The 2.0% rate of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation in this study is similar to the 2.0% to 2.8% range in other studies and lower than the published rates of 7% to 18% after lumbar fusion. By carefully assessing the presence of pre-existing degenerative changes before performing arthroplasty

  8. Classification of simulated and actual NOAA-6 AVHRR data for hydrologic land-surface feature definition. [Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    An examination of the possibilities of using Landsat data to simulate NOAA-6 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data on two channels, as well as using actual NOAA-6 imagery, for large-scale hydrological studies is presented. A running average was obtained of 18 consecutive pixels of 1 km resolution taken by the Landsat scanners were scaled up to 8-bit data and investigated for different gray levels. AVHRR data comprising five channels of 10-bit, band-interleaved information covering 10 deg latitude were analyzed and a suitable pixel grid was chosen for comparison with the Landsat data in a supervised classification format, an unsupervised mode, and with ground truth. Landcover delineation was explored by removing snow, water, and cloud features from the cluster analysis, and resulted in less than 10% difference. Low resolution large-scale data was determined useful for characterizing some landcover features if weekly and/or monthly updates are maintained.

  9. Musculoskeletal mnemonics: differentiating features.

    PubMed

    Currie, Jonathan W; Davis, Kirkland W; Lafita, Vaishali S; Blankenbaker, Donna G; De Smet, Arthur A; Rosas, Humberto; Lee, Kenneth S

    2011-01-01

    Mnemonics are often used in musculoskeletal radiology to help radiologists remember long differential diagnoses. However, unless the specific appearance of each entity on a differential is also recalled, mnemonics become useless. This article presents 8 mnemonics with their corresponding differential diagnoses and distinguishing features. Bubbly lucent lesions of bone are recalled with the FEGNOMASHIC mnemonic, but when only lucent lesions of the diaphysis are included, a more appropriate mnemonic is FEMALE. The lucent lesions of bone differentials often can be narrowed based on specific characteristics of the lesion but radiographic findings elsewhere and clinical information often help. Osseous metastases may present as lucent or sclerotic lesions; when sclerotic, the differential is best remembered with the mnemonic 5 "BEES" Like Pollen. The mnemonic for Wormian bones is PORKCHOPS. The Wormian bones in most of these entities are indistinguishable, so one must rely on radiographic findings outside the skull for diagnosis. By contrast, differentiating causes of acro-osteolysis is often possible with findings seen only on the hand radiographs; the mnemonic for acro-osteolysis is RADSHIP. In skeletally immature patients with frayed metaphyses, the mnemonic is CHARMS. Although the appearance of the fraying is seldom diagnostic, findings in the adjacent portions of the long bones may be characteristic. FETISH is the mnemonic used to remember the entities for the differential diagnosis of vertebra plana. Age of the patient, clinical history, and findings in the adjacent spine often help to provide the specific diagnosis. Nearly all the entities on the differential diagnosis for distal clavicle erosion (mnemonic: SHIRT Pocket) are included in other differentials in this article. PMID:21266270

  10. Hydrologic Connection Between Geysers and Adjacent Thermal Pools, Two Examples: El Tatio, Chile and Yellowstone, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Saez, C.; Fauria, K.; Manga, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Namiki, A.

    2014-12-01

    Geyser eruption cycles can be influenced by adjacent and distant thermals sources, suggesting a hydraulic connection through permeable pathways. Diffusion of fluid pressure can be responsible for the communication between geysers. In this study we examine the processes linking two different geysers with adjacent thermal pools. The first was Vega Rinconada, located at El Tatio geyser field, Chile, where we measured temperature inside the conduit between the ground surface and a depth of seven meters, at one-meter intervals. The second was Lone Star Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, where we measured temperature of the overflow water at the base of the cone. Concurrently, we measured temperature and the water level in pools adjacent to both geysers. We found common elements in both geyser - pool systems: First, water temperature in both adjacent pools was below the boiling point and cooler than water in the geysers. Second, changes in pool water levels were correlated with eruptions of the geysers. During the quiescent period of the geysers, the water level increased in adjacent pools, while water level in the pools deceased during eruptions. Additionally, measurements inside of the conduit in Vega Rinconada Geyser showed that water temperature increased in the deepest part of the conduit during eruptions, while water temperature decreased in the shallow part of the geyser conduit (~1 to 2 m). These drops in temperature in the shallow conduit were coincident with the drop in water level in the adjacent pool. This suggests that after the initiation of an eruption, water may drain from the pool to the geyser. Furthermore, we observed a temperature drop of 3oC in the shallow conduit immediately preceding the end of an eruption. This suggests that flow from the pool to geyser contributes to eruption shut off. Our observations of geyser-pool systems indicate a hydrologic connection between the geysers and their adjacent pools. In the case of Vega Rinconada, cold water

  11. Effect of 79 MeV Br ion irradiation on the surface features of rutile TiO{sub 2} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, H.; Dash, P.; Som, T.; Dash, B. N.; Singh, U. P.; Kanjilal, D.; Mishra, N. C.

    2012-07-23

    In this study, rutile titanium dioxide thin films deposited on Si (100) substrates by DC magnetron sputtering are irradiated by 79 MeV Br ions. Though each Br ion is expected to amorphize the medium along its path, the film remains crystalline even at the highest fluence of irradiation. The evolution of surface of the films with Br ion fluence is studied using atomicforce microscopy. The films were found to smoothen under dense electronic excitation of Br ions. The irregular shape grain of the pristine films convert to circular shape at a fluence of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Br ions cm{sup -2}. Power spectral density (PSD) analysis of the AFM images indicates that irradiation induced smoothing of the surfaces is governed by the surface diffusion process.

  12. General features

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault system, a complex of faults that display predominantly large-scale strike slip, is part of an even more complex system of faults, isolated segments of the East Pacific Rise, and scraps of plates lying east of the East Pacific Rise that collectively separate the North American plate from the Pacific plate. This chapter briefly describes the San Andreas fault system, its setting along the Pacific Ocean margin of North America, its extent, and the patterns of faulting. Only selected characteristics are described, and many features are left for depictions on maps and figures.

  13. A field study of the effects of inhomogeneities of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C.; Barnes, F.J.; Coulter, R.L.; Crawford, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, the problem of characterizing turbulent fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture over inhomogeneous surfaces has received increasing attention. This issue is relevant to the performance of general circulation models (GCMs), in which a single grid element can encompass a variety of surface and topographical features. Although considerable progress has been made in describing the energy balance at a surface partially covered by vegetation, less is known about how to treat adjacent regions of sharply contrasting surface characteristics. One difficulty is the scarcity of suitable data sets with which to study the problem, particularly on scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers.

  14. Testing wetland axioms at a watershed scale: Case studies of the aggregate hydrologic effects of non-adjacent wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenson, G.; Golden, H. E.; Lane, C.; D'Amico, E.

    2015-12-01

    Wetlands not adjacent to streams (i.e. "non-adjacent wetlands") are hypothesized to affect downgradient hydrology in a number of ways. Non-adjacent wetlands may, for example, attenuate peak flows, serve as focal points for groundwater recharge, and decrease streamflow variability. The lack of spatially and temporally continuous data elucidating these relationships makes hydrological models an important medium for testing these hypotheses at broad spatial scales (e.g., mesoscale watersheds). We present results from two case studies that apply a hydrological model modified to represent non-adjacent wetland hydrological processes and thereby evaluate their watershed-scale aggregate hydrological effects. We focus on non-adjacent wetlands in two North American landscapes: (1) a ~202 km2 watershed in the Coastal Plain with an extensive distribution of Carolina Bay wetlands and (2) a ~1672 km2 watershed in the Great Plains, which is characterized by a dense distribution of landscape depressions (i.e., prairie potholes). Preliminary results suggest that non-adjacent wetlands significantly affect downgradient hydrology in both landscapes - specifically the baseflow and quickflow components of the hydrograph. However, the emergent watershed-scale hydrological effects of non-adjacent wetlands in the two diverse landscapes differ widely, primarily in response to the varying importance of wetland (e.g., discharge, recharge, flow-through) and wetland to stream transport (e.g., surface, shallow subsurface, deep groundwater flows) functions in these systems. We highlight the watershed-scale hydrological effects of non-adjacent wetlands in these two physiographic settings and describe the need for additional analyses of wetlands in disparate landscapes, using alternative conceptual and simulation models.

  15. Surface and subsurface features of the upper Pleistocene Beaumont Formation as studied in a proposed super collider site in Liberty and Hardin counties, southeastern Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Aronow, S.

    1994-12-31

    In 1987 an area in Hardin and Libery Counties in southeastern Texas was a much-studied candidate site for the ill-fated Superconducting Super Collider. The site is on the outcrop of the upper Pleistocene Beaumont Formation, which locally was deposited by a sequence of meandering, avulsing, suspended-load, paleo-Trinity River courses, now preserved as a well-defined to poorly defined depositional topography. Test holes in meanderbelt ridges showed that channel and point-bar silty fine to very fine sands are almost everywhere covered by approximately 10 to 40 ft ({approximately}3 to 12 m) of CH and CL overbank clays. Where completely penetrated, sand bodies are approximately 20 to 50 ft ({approximately}6 to 15 m) thick. Pedogenic calcareous deposits and slickensides at depths well below any influence from present-day surface processes are probably parts of lower horizons of truncated now-buried soils generated during the accumulation of the Beaumont, or on the surface of the underlying Lissie Formation. The relationship of one of the paleo-meanderbelts to the uplifted topographic surface of the Hull salt dome suggests that the rise of the surface postdated deposition of the Beaumont.

  16. Unmixing multiple adjacent fluorescent targets with multispectral excited fluorescence molecular tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Guang, Huizhi; Pu, Huangsheng; Zhang, Jiulou; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-06-20

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can visualize biological activities at cellular and molecular levels in vivo, and has been extensively used in drug delivery and tumor detection research of small animals. The ill-posedness of the FMT inverse problem makes it difficult to reconstruct and unmix multiple adjacent fluorescent targets that have different functional features but are labeled with the same fluorochrome. A method based on independent component analysis for multispectral excited FMT was proposed in our previous study. It showed that double fluorescent targets with certain edge-to-edge distance (EED) could be unmixed by the method. In this study, the situation is promoted to unmix multiple adjacent fluorescent targets (i.e., more than two fluorescent targets and EED=0). Phantom experiments on the resolving ability of the proposed algorithm demonstrate that the algorithm performs well in unmixing multiple adjacent fluorescent targets in both lateral and axial directions. And also, we recovered the locational information of each independent fluorescent target and described the variable trends of the corresponding fluorescent targets under the excitation spectrum. This method is capable of unmixing multiple fluorescent targets with small EED but labeled with the same fluorochrome, and may be used in imaging of nonspecific probe targeting and metabolism of drugs. PMID:27409108

  17. Robust feature detection using sonar sensors for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jinwoo; Ahn, Sunghwan; Chung, Wan Kyun

    2005-12-01

    Sonar sensor is an attractive tool for the SLAM of mobile robot because of their economic aspects. This cheap sensor gives relatively accurate range readings if disregarding angular uncertainty and specular reflections. However, these defects make feature detection difficult for the most part of the SLAM. This paper proposed a robust sonar feature detection algorithm. This algorithm gives feature detection methods for both point features and line features. The point feature detection method was based on the TBF scheme. Moreover, three additional processes improved the performance of feature detection as follows; 1) stable intersections, 2) efficient sliding window update and 3) removal of the false point features on the wall. The line feature detection method was based on the basic property of adjacent sonar sensors. Along the line feature, three adjacent sonar sensors gave similar range readings. Using this sensor property, it proposed a novel algorithm for line feature detection, which is simple and the feature can be obtained by using only current sensor data. The proposed feature detection algorithm gives a good solution for the SLAM of mobile robots because it gives accurate feature information for both the point and line features even with sensor errors. Furthermore, a sufficient number of features are available to correct mobile robot pose. Experimental results for point feature and line feature detection demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm in a home-like environment.

  18. Structural Mapping of Paterae and Mountains on Io: Implications for Crustal Stresses and Feature Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahern, A.; Radebaugh, J.; Christiansen, E. H.; Harris, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Paterae and mountains are some of the most distinguishing and well-distributed surface features on Io, and they reveal the role of tectonism in Io's crust. Paterae, similar to calderas, are volcano-tectonic collapse features that often have straight margins. Io's mountains are some of the highest in the solar system and contain linear features that reveal crustal stresses. Paterae and mountains are often found adjacent to one another, suggesting possible genetic relationships. We have produced twelve detailed regional structural maps from high-resolution images of relevant features, where available, as well as a global structural map from the Io Global Color Mosaic. The regional structural maps identify features such as fractures, lineations, folds, faults, and mass wasting scarps, which are then interpreted in the context of global and regional stress regimes. A total of 1048 structural lineations have been identified globally. Preliminary analyses of major thrust and normal fault orientations are dominantly 90° offset from each other, suggesting the maximum contractional stresses leading to large mountain formation are not a direct result of tidal extension. Rather, these results corroborate the model of volcanic loading of the crust and global shortening, leading to thrust faulting and uplift of coherent crustal blocks. Several paterae, such as Hi'iaka and Tohil, are found adjacent to mountains inside extensional basins where lava has migrated up normal faults to erupt onto patera floors. Over time, mass wasting and volcanic resurfacing can change mountains from young, steep, and angular peaks to older, gentler, and more rounded hills. Mass wasting scarps make up 53% of all features identified. The structural maps highlight the significant effect of mass wasting on Io's surface, the evolution of mountains through time, the role of tectonics in the formation of paterae, and the formation of mountains through global contraction due to volcanism.

  19. Laplacian versus adjacency matrix in quantum walk search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Tarrataca, Luís; Nahimov, Nikolay

    2016-10-01

    A quantum particle evolving by Schrödinger's equation contains, from the kinetic energy of the particle, a term in its Hamiltonian proportional to Laplace's operator. In discrete space, this is replaced by the discrete or graph Laplacian, which gives rise to a continuous-time quantum walk. Besides this natural definition, some quantum walk algorithms instead use the adjacency matrix to effect the walk. While this is equivalent to the Laplacian for regular graphs, it is different for non-regular graphs and is thus an inequivalent quantum walk. We algorithmically explore this distinction by analyzing search on the complete bipartite graph with multiple marked vertices, using both the Laplacian and adjacency matrix. The two walks differ qualitatively and quantitatively in their required jumping rate, runtime, sampling of marked vertices, and in what constitutes a natural initial state. Thus the choice of the Laplacian or adjacency matrix to effect the walk has important algorithmic consequences.

  20. Laplacian versus adjacency matrix in quantum walk search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Tarrataca, Luís; Nahimov, Nikolay

    2016-06-01

    A quantum particle evolving by Schrödinger's equation contains, from the kinetic energy of the particle, a term in its Hamiltonian proportional to Laplace's operator. In discrete space, this is replaced by the discrete or graph Laplacian, which gives rise to a continuous-time quantum walk. Besides this natural definition, some quantum walk algorithms instead use the adjacency matrix to effect the walk. While this is equivalent to the Laplacian for regular graphs, it is different for non-regular graphs and is thus an inequivalent quantum walk. We algorithmically explore this distinction by analyzing search on the complete bipartite graph with multiple marked vertices, using both the Laplacian and adjacency matrix. The two walks differ qualitatively and quantitatively in their required jumping rate, runtime, sampling of marked vertices, and in what constitutes a natural initial state. Thus the choice of the Laplacian or adjacency matrix to effect the walk has important algorithmic consequences.

  1. Groundwater recharge to the Gulf Coast aquifer system in Montgomery and Adjacent Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oden, Timothy D.; Delin, Geoffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Simply stated, groundwater recharge is the addition of water to the groundwater system. Most of the water that is potentially available for recharging the groundwater system in Montgomery and adjacent counties in southeast Texas moves relatively rapidly from land surface to surface-water bodies and sustains streamflow, lake levels, and wetlands. Recharge in southeast Texas is generally balanced by evapotranspiration, discharge to surface waters, and the downward movement of water into deeper parts of the groundwater system; however, this balance can be altered locally by groundwater withdrawals, impervious surfaces, land use, precipitation variability, or climate, resulting in increased or decreased rates of recharge. Recharge rates were compared to the 1971–2000 normal annual precipitation measured Cooperative Weather Station 411956, Conroe, Tex.

  2. Spatial Patterns of Geomorphic Surface Features and Fault Morphology Based on Diffusion Equation Modeling of the Kumroch Fault Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinlein, S. N.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing data sets are widely used for evaluation of surface manifestations of active tectonics. This study utilizes ASTER GDEM and Landsat ETM+ data sets with Google Earth images draped over terrain models. This study evaluates 1) the surrounding surface geomorphology of the study area with these data sets and 2) the morphology of the Kumroch Fault using diffusion modeling to estimate constant diffusivity (κ) and estimate slip rates by means of real ground data measured across fault scarps by Kozhurin et al. (2006). Models of the evolution of fault scarp morphology provide time elapsed since slip initiated on a faults surface and may therefore provide more accurate estimates of slip rate than the rate calculated by dividing scarp offset by the age of the ruptured surface. Profile modeling of scarps collected by Kozhurin et al. (2006) formed by several events distributed through time and were evaluated using a constant slip rate (CSR) solution which yields a value A/κ (1/2 slip rate/diffusivity). Time elapsed since slip initiated on the fault is determined by establishing a value for κ and measuring total scarp offset. CSR nonlinear modeling estimated of κ range from 8m2/ka - 14m2/ka on the Kumroch Fault which indicates a slip rates of 0.6 mm/yr - 1.0 mm/yr since 3.4 ka -3.7 ka. This method provides a quick and inexpensive way to gather data for a regional tectonic study and establish estimated rates of tectonic activity. Analyses of the remote sensing data are providing new insight into the role of active tectonics within the region. Results from fault scarp diffusion models of Mattson and Bruhn (2001) and DuRoss and Bruhn (2004) and Kozhurin et al. (2006), Kozhurin (2007), Kozhurin et al. (2008) and Pinegina et al. 2012 trench profiles of the KF as calibrated age fault scarp diffusion rates were estimated. (-) mean that no data could be determined.

  3. Sero-epidemiology of Hepatitis B Surface Antigenaemia among Adult Nigerians with Clinical Features of Liver Diseases Attending a Primary-Care Clinic in a Resource-Constrained Setting of Eastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Iloh, Gabriel Uche Pascal; Ikwudinma, Austin Obiora

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis-B infection is not commonly perceived as a serious medical problem in Nigeria. However, chronic hepatitis-B infection, which is a subject of global concern, may lead to lethal liver diseases. Aim: The study was to determine the sero-epidemiology of hepatitis-B surface antigenaemia among adult Nigerians with clinical features of liver diseases attending a primary-care clinic in a resource-constrained setting of Eastern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out on 140 adult Nigerians with clinical features of liver diseases at the primary-care clinic of Federal Medical Centre, Owerri. They made up three groups: 44 patients, 62 patients and 34 patients with clinical features of hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, respectively. Hepatitis-B surface antigen (HBsAg) was assayed using an immunochromatographic method. Demographic variables were collected. Results: The overall sero-positivity rate was 50.7%. The sero-positivity rates for these patients were 23.9%, 39.5% and 36.6% for hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, respectively. The age group 40-60 years (P = 0.048) and artisans (P = 0.019) were significantly infected. Abdominal swelling (86.4%) and ascites (67.1%) were the most common symptoms and signs, respectively. Conclusion: HBsAg prevalence was high and has significant association with age and occupation. PMID:23724405

  4. Lipoprotein hydrophobic core lipids are partially extruded to surface in smaller HDL: “Herniated” HDL, a common feature in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Amigó, Núria; Mallol, Roger; Heras, Mercedes; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Plana, Núria; Yanes, Óscar; Masana, Lluís; Correig, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that pharmacological increases in HDL cholesterol concentrations do not necessarily translate into clinical benefits for patients, raising concerns about its predictive value for cardiovascular events. Here we hypothesize that the size-modulated lipid distribution within HDL particles is compromised in metabolic disorders that have abnormal HDL particle sizes, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). By using NMR spectroscopy combined with a biochemical volumetric model we determined the size and spatial lipid distribution of HDL subclasses in a cohort of 26 controls and 29 DM2 patients before and after two drug treatments, one with niacin plus laropiprant and another with fenofibrate as an add-on to simvastatin. We further characterized the HDL surface properties using atomic force microscopy and fluorescent probes to show an abnormal lipid distribution within smaller HDL particles, a subclass particularly enriched in the DM2 patients. The reduction in the size, force cholesterol esters and triglycerides to emerge from the HDL core to the surface, making the outer surface of HDL more hydrophobic. Interestingly, pharmacological interventions had no effect on this undesired configuration, which may explain the lack of clinical benefits in DM2 subjects. PMID:26778677

  5. Hydrogeochemical features of surface water and groundwater contaminated with acid mine drainage (AMD) in coal mining areas: a case study in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Galhardi, Juliana Aparecida; Bonotto, Daniel Marcos

    2016-09-01

    Effects of acid mine drainage (AMD) were investigated in surface waters (Laranjinha River and Ribeirão das Pedras stream) and groundwaters from a coal mining area sampled in two different seasons at Figueira city, Paraná State, Brazil. The spatial data distribution indicated that the acid effluents favor the chemical elements leaching and transport from the tailings pile into the superficial water bodies or aquifers, modifying their quality. The acid groundwaters in both sampling periods (dry: pH 2.94-6.04; rainy: pH 3.25-6.63) were probably due to the AMD generation and infiltration, after the oxidation of sulfide minerals. Such acid effluents cause an increase of the solubilization rate of metals, mainly iron and aluminum, contributing to both groundwater and surface water contamination. Sulfate in high levels is a result of waters' pollution due to AMD. In some cases, high sulfate and low iron contents, associated with less acidic pH values, could indicate that AMD, previously generated, is nowadays being neutralized. The chemistry of the waters affected by AMD is controlled by the pH, sulfide minerals' oxidation, oxygen, iron content, and microbial activity. It is also influenced by seasonal variations that allow the occurrence of dissolution processes and the concentration of some chemical elements. Under the perspective of the waters' quality evaluation, the parameters such as conductivity, dissolved sodium, and sulfate concentrations acted as AMD indicators of groundwaters and surface waters affected by acid effluents.

  6. Hydrogeochemical features of surface water and groundwater contaminated with acid mine drainage (AMD) in coal mining areas: a case study in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Galhardi, Juliana Aparecida; Bonotto, Daniel Marcos

    2016-09-01

    Effects of acid mine drainage (AMD) were investigated in surface waters (Laranjinha River and Ribeirão das Pedras stream) and groundwaters from a coal mining area sampled in two different seasons at Figueira city, Paraná State, Brazil. The spatial data distribution indicated that the acid effluents favor the chemical elements leaching and transport from the tailings pile into the superficial water bodies or aquifers, modifying their quality. The acid groundwaters in both sampling periods (dry: pH 2.94-6.04; rainy: pH 3.25-6.63) were probably due to the AMD generation and infiltration, after the oxidation of sulfide minerals. Such acid effluents cause an increase of the solubilization rate of metals, mainly iron and aluminum, contributing to both groundwater and surface water contamination. Sulfate in high levels is a result of waters' pollution due to AMD. In some cases, high sulfate and low iron contents, associated with less acidic pH values, could indicate that AMD, previously generated, is nowadays being neutralized. The chemistry of the waters affected by AMD is controlled by the pH, sulfide minerals' oxidation, oxygen, iron content, and microbial activity. It is also influenced by seasonal variations that allow the occurrence of dissolution processes and the concentration of some chemical elements. Under the perspective of the waters' quality evaluation, the parameters such as conductivity, dissolved sodium, and sulfate concentrations acted as AMD indicators of groundwaters and surface waters affected by acid effluents. PMID:27335014

  7. On the Adjacent Eccentric Distance Sum Index of Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hui; Cao, Shujuan

    2015-01-01

    For a given graph G, ε(v) and deg(v) denote the eccentricity and the degree of the vertex v in G, respectively. The adjacent eccentric distance sum index of a graph G is defined as ξsv(G)=∑v∈V(G)ε(v)D(v)deg(v), where D(v)=∑u∈V(G)d(u,v) is the sum of all distances from the vertex v. In this paper we derive some bounds for the adjacent eccentric distance sum index in terms of some graph parameters, such as independence number, covering number, vertex connectivity, chromatic number, diameter and some other graph topological indices. PMID:26091095

  8. Molecular disorganization of axons adjacent to human lacunar infarcts.

    PubMed

    Hinman, Jason D; Lee, Monica D; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral microvascular disease predominantly affects brain white matter and deep grey matter, resulting in ischaemic damage that ranges from lacunar infarcts to white matter hyperintensities seen on magnetic resonance imaging. These lesions are common and result in both clinical stroke syndromes and accumulate over time, resulting in cognitive deficits and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that these lesions progress over time, accumulate adjacent to prior lesions and have a penumbral region susceptible to further injury. The pathological correlates of this adjacent injury in surviving myelinated axons have not been previously defined. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular organization of axons in tissue adjacent to lacunar infarcts and in the regions surrounding microinfarcts, by determining critical elements in axonal function: the morphology and length of node of Ranvier segments and adjacent paranodal segments. We examined post-mortem brain tissue from six patients with lacunar infarcts and tissue from two patients with autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy (previously known as hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke) who accumulate progressive white matter ischaemic lesions in the form of lacunar and microinfarcts. In axons adjacent to lacunar infarcts yet extending up to 150% of the infarct diameter away, both nodal and paranodal length increase by ∼20% and 80%, respectively, reflecting a loss of normal cell-cell adhesion and signalling between axons and oligodendrocytes. Using premorbid magnetic resonance images, brain regions from patients with retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy that harboured periventricular white matter hyperintensities were selected and the molecular organization of axons was determined within these regions. As in regions adjacent to lacunar infarcts, nodal and paranodal length in white matter of these patients is

  9. Molecular disorganization of axons adjacent to human lacunar infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Monica D.; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V.; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral microvascular disease predominantly affects brain white matter and deep grey matter, resulting in ischaemic damage that ranges from lacunar infarcts to white matter hyperintensities seen on magnetic resonance imaging. These lesions are common and result in both clinical stroke syndromes and accumulate over time, resulting in cognitive deficits and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that these lesions progress over time, accumulate adjacent to prior lesions and have a penumbral region susceptible to further injury. The pathological correlates of this adjacent injury in surviving myelinated axons have not been previously defined. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular organization of axons in tissue adjacent to lacunar infarcts and in the regions surrounding microinfarcts, by determining critical elements in axonal function: the morphology and length of node of Ranvier segments and adjacent paranodal segments. We examined post-mortem brain tissue from six patients with lacunar infarcts and tissue from two patients with autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy (previously known as hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke) who accumulate progressive white matter ischaemic lesions in the form of lacunar and microinfarcts. In axons adjacent to lacunar infarcts yet extending up to 150% of the infarct diameter away, both nodal and paranodal length increase by ∼20% and 80%, respectively, reflecting a loss of normal cell-cell adhesion and signalling between axons and oligodendrocytes. Using premorbid magnetic resonance images, brain regions from patients with retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy that harboured periventricular white matter hyperintensities were selected and the molecular organization of axons was determined within these regions. As in regions adjacent to lacunar infarcts, nodal and paranodal length in white matter of these patients is

  10. Nonlinear spin wave coupling in adjacent magnonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, A. V.; Beginin, E. N.; Morozova, M. A.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Grishin, S. V.; Sheshukova, S. E.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    We have experimentally studied the coupling of spin waves in the adjacent magnonic crystals. Space- and time-resolved Brillouin light-scattering spectroscopy is used to demonstrate the frequency and intensity dependent spin-wave energy exchange between the side-coupled magnonic crystals. The experiments and the numerical simulation of spin wave propagation in the coupled periodic structures show that the nonlinear phase shift of spin wave in the adjacent magnonic crystals leads to the nonlinear switching regime at the frequencies near the forbidden magnonic gap. The proposed side-coupled magnonic crystals represent a significant advance towards the all-magnonic signal processing in the integrated magnonic circuits.

  11. Form drag in rivers due to small-scale natural topographic features: 2. Irregular sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kean, J.W.; Smith, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    The size, shape, and spacing of small-scale topographic features found on the boundaries of natural streams, rivers, and floodplains can be quite variable. Consequently, a procedure for determining the form drag on irregular sequences of different-sized topographic features is essential for calculating near-boundary flows and sediment transport. A method for carrying out such calculations is developed in this paper. This method builds on the work of Kean and Smith (2006), which describes the flow field for the simpler case of a regular sequence of identical topographic features. Both approaches model topographic features as two-dimensional elements with Gaussian-shaped cross sections defined in terms of three parameters. Field measurements of bank topography are used to show that (1) the magnitude of these shape parameters can vary greatly between adjacent topographic features and (2) the variability of these shape parameters follows a lognormal distribution. Simulations using an irregular set of topographic roughness elements show that the drag on an individual element is primarily controlled by the size and shape of the feature immediately upstream and that the spatial average of the boundary shear stress over a large set of randomly ordered elements is relatively insensitive to the sequence of the elements. In addition, a method to transform the topography of irregular surfaces into an equivalently rough surface of regularly spaced, identical topographic elements also is given. The methods described in this paper can be used to improve predictions of flow resistance in rivers as well as quantify bank roughness.

  12. Form drag in rivers due to small-scale natural topographic features: 2. Irregular sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, Jason W.; Smith, J. Dungan

    2006-12-01

    The size, shape, and spacing of small-scale topographic features found on the boundaries of natural streams, rivers, and floodplains can be quite variable. Consequently, a procedure for determining the form drag on irregular sequences of different-sized topographic features is essential for calculating near-boundary flows and sediment transport. A method for carrying out such calculations is developed in this paper. This method builds on the work of Kean and Smith (2006), which describes the flow field for the simpler case of a regular sequence of identical topographic features. Both approaches model topographic features as two-dimensional elements with Gaussian-shaped cross sections defined in terms of three parameters. Field measurements of bank topography are used to show that (1) the magnitude of these shape parameters can vary greatly between adjacent topographic features and (2) the variability of these shape parameters follows a lognormal distribution. Simulations using an irregular set of topographic roughness elements show that the drag on an individual element is primarily controlled by the size and shape of the feature immediately upstream and that the spatial average of the boundary shear stress over a large set of randomly ordered elements is relatively insensitive to the sequence of the elements. In addition, a method to transform the topography of irregular surfaces into an equivalently rough surface of regularly spaced, identical topographic elements also is given. The methods described in this paper can be used to improve predictions of flow resistance in rivers as well as quantify bank roughness.

  13. Geomorphic features of active faults around the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, and no evidence of surface rupture associated with the 2015 Gorkha earthquake along the faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumahara, Yasuhiro; Chamlagain, Deepak; Upreti, Bishal Nath

    2016-04-01

    The M7.8 April 25, 2015, Gorkha earthquake in Nepal was produced by a slip on the low-angle Main Himalayan Thrust, a décollement below the Himalaya that emerges at the surface in the south as the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT). The analysis of the SAR interferograms led to the interpretations that the event was a blind thrust and did not produce surface ruptures associated with the seismogenic fault. We conducted a quick field survey along four active faults near the epicentral area around the Kathmandu Valley (the Jhiku Khola fault, Chitlang fault, Kulekhani fault, Malagiri fault and Kolphu Khola fault) from July 18-22, 2015. Those faults are located in the Lesser Himalaya on the hanging side of the HFT. Based on our field survey carried out in the area where most typical tectonic landforms are developed, we confirmed with local inhabitants the lack of any new surface ruptures along these faults. Our observations along the Jhiku Khola fault showed that the fault had some definite activities during the Holocene times. Though in the past it was recognized as a low-activity thrust fault, our present survey has revealed that it has been active with a predominantly right-lateral strike-slip with thrust component. A stream dissecting a talus surface shows approximately 7-m right-lateral offset, and a charcoal sample collected from the upper part of the talus deposit yielded an age of 870 ± 30 y.B.P, implying that the talus surface formed close to 870 y.B.P. Accordingly, a single or multiple events of the fault must have occurred during the last 900 years, and the slip rate we estimate roughly is around 8 mm/year. The fault may play a role to recent right-lateral strike-slip tectonic zone across the Himalayan range. Since none of the above faults showed any relationship corresponding to the April 25 Gorkha earthquake, it is possibility that a potential risk of occurrence of large earthquakes does exist close to the Kathmandu Valley due to movements of these active

  14. Method for photolithographic definition of recessed features on a semiconductor wafer utilizing auto-focusing alignment

    DOEpatents

    Farino, Anthony J.; Montague, Stephen; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Smith, James H.; McWhorter, Paul J.

    1998-01-01

    A method is disclosed for photolithographically defining device features up to the resolution limit of an auto-focusing projection stepper when the device features are to be formed in a wafer cavity at a depth exceeding the depth of focus of the stepper. The method uses a focusing cavity located in a die field at the position of a focusing light beam from the auto-focusing projection stepper, with the focusing cavity being of the same depth as one or more adjacent cavities wherein a semiconductor device is to be formed. The focusing cavity provides a bottom surface for referencing the focusing light beam and focusing the stepper at a predetermined depth below the surface of the wafer, whereat the device features are to be defined. As material layers are deposited in each device cavity to build up a semiconductor structure such as a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device, the same material layers are deposited in the focusing cavity, raising the bottom surface and re-focusing the stepper for accurately defining additional device features in each succeeding material layer. The method is especially applicable for forming MEMS devices within a cavity or trench and integrating the MEMS devices with electronic circuitry fabricated on the wafer surface.

  15. Method for photolithographic definition of recessed features on a semiconductor wafer utilizing auto-focusing alignment

    DOEpatents

    Farino, A.J.; Montague, S.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Smith, J.H.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for photolithographically defining device features up to the resolution limit of an auto-focusing projection stepper when the device features are to be formed in a wafer cavity at a depth exceeding the depth of focus of the stepper. The method uses a focusing cavity located in a die field at the position of a focusing light beam from the auto-focusing projection stepper, with the focusing cavity being of the same depth as one or more adjacent cavities wherein a semiconductor device is to be formed. The focusing cavity provides a bottom surface for referencing the focusing light beam and focusing the stepper at a predetermined depth below the surface of the wafer, whereat the device features are to be defined. As material layers are deposited in each device cavity to build up a semiconductor structure such as a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device, the same material layers are deposited in the focusing cavity, raising the bottom surface and re-focusing the stepper for accurately defining additional device features in each succeeding material layer. The method is especially applicable for forming MEMS devices within a cavity or trench and integrating the MEMS devices with electronic circuitry fabricated on the wafer surface. 15 figs.

  16. Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-28

      Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction This routine demonstrates extraction of the ... in a CALIPSO Lidar Level 2 Vertical Feature Mask feature classification flag value. It is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) ...

  17. Seismotectonics of northeastern United States and adjacent Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jih-Ping; Aggarwal, Yash Pal

    1981-06-01

    Data for local earthquakes recorded by a network of stations in northeastern United States and adjacent Canada were analyzed to study the seismicity, the relationship between earthquakes and known faults, the state of stress, and crustal and upper mantle velocity structure. In addition, portable seismographs were deployed in the field to study aftershocks. As a result, accurate locations for about 364 local earthquakes (2 ≤ mb ≤ 5) and 22 focal mechanism solutions were determined. A comparison of the spatial distribution of these events (1970-1979) with historical earthquakes (1534-1959) reveals that seismic activity in the northeast is relatively stationary in space: those areas that have had little or no seismicity historically are relatively aseismic today, whereas the historically active areas are also active today. The instrumental locations, historical seismicity, and focal mechanism solutions show an internal consistency that help us distinguish two distinct seismogenic provinces. (1) The Adirondack-western Quebec province is a northwesterly trending zone of seismic activity, about 200 km wide and at least 500 km long, extending from the SE Adirondacks into western Quebec, Canada. Thrust faulting on planes striking NNW to NW appears to predominate, and the inferred axis of maximum horizontal compression is largely uniform and trends WSW, nearly parallel to the calculated absolute plate motion of North America. Little or no seismicity is found where anorthosite outcrops at the surface. Correlations between gravity anomalies and earthquake locations suggest that seismic activity in this zone is localized to regions of steep NE or SW gradient in Bouguer anomalies. This zone does not appear to extend southeastward to Boston, as proposed by some workers. (2) The Appalachian province is a northeasterly trending zone of seismic activity extending from northern Virginia to New Brunswick, Canada. Highangle reverse or thrust faulting on N to NE trending planes

  18. Maximizing power to track Alzheimer’s disease and MCI progression by LDA-based weighting of longitudinal ventricular surface features

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, Boris A.; Hua, Xue; Rajagopalan, Priya; Chou, Yi-Yu; Wang, Yalin; Yanovsky, Igor; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new method to maximize biomarker efficiency for detecting anatomical change over time in serial MRI. Drug trials using neuroimaging become prohibitively costly if vast numbers of subjects must be assessed, so it is vital to develop efficient measures of brain change. A popular measure of efficiency is the minimal sample size (n80) needed to detect 25% change in a biomarker, with 95% confidence and 80% power. For multivariate measures of brain change, we can directly optimize n80 based on a Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA). Here we use a supervised learning framework to optimize n80, offering two alternative solutions. With a new medial surface modeling method, we track 3D dynamic changes in the lateral ventricles in 2065 ADNI scans. We apply our LDA-based weighting to the results. Our best average n80—in two-fold nested cross-validation—is 104 MCI subjects (95% CI: [94,139]) for a 1-year drug trial, and 75 AD subjects [64,102]. This compares favorably with other MRI analysis methods. The standard “statistical ROI” approach applied to the same ventricular surfaces requires 165 MCI or 94 AD subjects. At 2 years, the best LDA measure needs only 67 MCI and 52 AD subjects, versus 119 MCI and 80 AD subjects for the stat-ROI method. Our surface-based measures are unbiased: they give no artifactual additive atrophy over three time points. Our results suggest that statistical weighting may boost efficiency of drug trials that use brain maps. PMID:23296188

  19. Basic approach to define signal-to-noise ratio for adjacent pixels for an uncooled microbolometer FPA detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürüm, Ulas

    2013-09-01

    To define the ratio of the signal of the desired pixel and the noise of adjacent pixels, noise and signal sources are theoretically identified. While defining these values, atmospheric attenuation, losses at transmitting surfaces and wave characteristics of light are considered. For presentation purposes, a standard NATO target is chosen as source object. The model has been developed for a simple optical design which is intentionally left defective to better address effects of aberrations to signal to noise ratio of adjacent pixels especially caused by diffraction.

  20. 4. Elevation looking southwest from adjacent hills on northeast side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Elevation looking southwest from adjacent hills on northeast side of bridge, taken from river level. Note entire east side and substructure. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  1. 12. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM THE PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM THE PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO THE STEEL PLANT OFFICES. BAR AND BILLET MILLS AND, IN THE DISTANCE, THE BASIC OXYGEN FURNACES MAY BE SEEN. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. 8. Exterior view, showing tank and associated piping adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Exterior view, showing tank and associated piping adjacent to Test Cell 6, Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28), looking south. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Systems Integration Laboratory Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  3. 10. Detail and contextual view of bridge and adjacent farmstead ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail and contextual view of bridge and adjacent farmstead setting. Note laced vertical compression members, latticed portal strut, decorative strut bracing, and lightness of diagonal and lateral tension members. View to southeast through southeast portal from truss mid-span. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  4. 11. Interior detail, Boiler Room, fire door to the adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Interior detail, Boiler Room, fire door to the adjacent Blacksmith Shop, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to southwest (90mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  5. 1. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION, ADJACENT LOUGHRAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION, ADJACENT LOUGHRAN BUILDING (BASSIN'S RESTAURANT) (HABS No. DC-357), 501-511 14TH STREET (THE LOCKER ROOM) HABS No. DC-356) ON CORNER, AND MUNSEY BUILDING (HABS No. DC-358) - William J. Stone Building, 1345 E Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA AND ENTRY TO NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ROAD WITH BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA ON RIGHT, AND HOUSING AREA ON LEFT. VIEW FACING EAST/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING WESTERN SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING WESTERN SIDE OF NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. 1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION TOWER. WATER BRAKE TROUGH SEGMENT AT LOWER RIGHT. Looking north northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. The float actuates a valve that maintains water level over the bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  12. 7. VIEW OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, ADJACENT TO THE COAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, ADJACENT TO THE COAL CONVEYOR; IN THE DISTANCE IS THE FREQUENCY CHANGER HOUSE, WHICH IS ATTACHED TO SWITCH HOUSE NO. 1; LOOKING WEST. - Commonwealth Electric Company, Fisk Street Electrical Generating Station, 1111 West Cermak Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  13. 4. REAR ELEVATION, DETAIL OF CONSTRUCTION, ADJACENT CORNER POSTS BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. REAR ELEVATION, DETAIL OF CONSTRUCTION, ADJACENT CORNER POSTS BETWEEN BUILDING PERIODS 1 AND 3. NOTE REUSED WOOD STRIP NAILED TO BUILDING PERIOD 1 POST INSCRIBED 'ST. LEONARD'. THERE ARE NO NAIL HOLES IN THE PERIOD 3 POST, THE FARRING STRIPS ADJUST FOR CLADDING - Charles' Gift, State Routes 2 & 4, Lusby, Calvert County, MD

  14. Biogeochemistry of hydrothermally and adjacent non-altered soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a field/lab project, students in the Soil Biogeochemistry class of the University of Nevada, Reno described and characterized seven pedons, developed in hydrothermally and adjacent non-hydrothermally altered andesitic parent material near Reno, NV. Hydrothermally altered soils had considerably lo...

  15. 12. LOG FOUNDATION ELEMENTS OF THE SAWMILL ADJACENT TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. LOG FOUNDATION ELEMENTS OF THE SAWMILL ADJACENT TO THE CANAL, LOOKING EAST. BARREN AREA IN FOREGROUND IS DECOMPOSING SAWDUST. DIRT PILE IN BACKGROUND IS THE EDGE OF THE SUMMIT COUNTY LANDFILL. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  16. LEHR NO. 2 AND LEHR NO. 3 ADJACENT TO FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LEHR NO. 2 AND LEHR NO. 3 ADJACENT TO FURNACE ROOM; THE PIPES AT THE BOTTOM ARE PART OF THE RADIANT HEATING SYSTEM USED FOR HEATING THE FACTORY DURING COLD WEATHER. - Westmoreland Glass Company, Seventh & Kier Streets, Grapeville, Westmoreland County, PA

  17. Growth and decline of shoreline industry in Sydney estuary (Australia) and influence on adjacent estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Birch, G F; Lean, J; Gunns, T

    2015-06-01

    Sydney estuary (Australia), like many urbanised waterways, is degraded due to an extended history of anthropogenic activity. Two major sources of contamination to this estuary are discharge by former shoreline industries and historic and contemporary catchment stormwater. The objectives of the present study were to document changes in shoreline land use from European settlement to the present day and determine the influence of this trend on the metal content of adjacent estuarine sediments. Temporal analysis of land use for seven time horizons between 1788 and 2010 showed rapid expansion of industry along much of the Sydney estuary foreshore soon after European settlement due to the benefits of easy and inexpensive access and readily available water for cooling and power. Shoreline industry attained maximum development in 1978 (32-km length) and declined rapidly to the present-day (9-km length) through redevelopment of industrial sites into medium- to high-density, high-value residential housing. Cores taken adjacent to 11 long-term industrial sites showed that past industrial practices contributed significantly to contamination of estuarine sediment. Subsurface metal concentrations were up to 35 times that of present-day surface sediment and over 100 times greater than natural background concentrations. Sedimentation rates for areas adjacent to shoreline industry were between 0.6 and 2.5 cm/year, and relaxation times were estimated at 50 to 100 years. Natural relaxation and non-disturbance of sediments may be the best management practice in most locations.

  18. Modelling and optimising of physicochemical features of walnut-oil beverage emulsions by implementation of response surface methodology: effect of preparation conditions on emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Homayoonfal, Mina; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Mousavi, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    The major purpose of this study is to apply response surface methodology to model and optimise processing conditions for the preparation of beverage emulsions with maximum emulsion stability and viscosity, minimum particle size, turbidity loss rate, size index and peroxide value changes. A three-factor, five-level central composite design was conducted to estimate the effects of three independent variables: ultrasonic time (UT, 5-15 min), walnut-oil content (WO, 4-10% (w/w)) and Span 80 content (S80, 0.55-0.8). The results demonstrated the empirical models were satisfactorily (p < 0.0001) fitted to the experimental data. Evaluation of responses by analysis of variance indicated high coefficient determination values. The overall optimisation of preparation conditions was an UT of 14.630 min, WO content of 8.238% (w/w), and S80 content of 0.782% (w/w). Under this optimum region, responses were found to be 219.198, 99.184, 0.008, 0.008, 2.43 and 16.65 for particle size, emulsion stability, turbidity loss rate, size index, viscosity and peroxide value changes, respectively.

  19. Can artificial reefs mimic natural reef communities? The roles of structural features and age.

    PubMed

    Perkol-Finkel, S; Shashar, N; Benayahu, Y

    2006-03-01

    In light of the deteriorating state of coral reefs worldwide, the need to rehabilitate marine environments has greatly increased. Artificial reefs (ARs) have been suggested as a tool for reef conservation and rehabilitation. Although successions of AR communities have been thoroughly studied, current understanding of the interactions between artificial and natural reefs (NRs) is poor and a fundamental question still to be answered is that of whether AR communities can mimic adjacent NR communities. We suggest three alternative hypotheses: Neighboring ARs and NRs will (1) achieve a similar community structure given sufficient time; (2) be similar only if they possess similar structural features; (3) always differ, regardless of age or structural features. We examined these hypotheses by comparing the community structure on a 119-year old shipwreck to a neighboring NR. Fouling organisms, including stony and soft corals, sponges, tunicates, sea anemones and hydrozoans were recorded and measured along belt transects. The ahermatypic stony coral Tubastrea micrantha dominated vertical AR regions while the soft corals Nephthea sp. and Xenia sp. dominated both artificial and natural horizontal surfaces. Our results support the second hypothesis, indicating that even after a century an AR will mimic its adjacent NR communities only if it possesses structural features similar to those of the natural surroundings. However, if the two differ structurally, their communities will remain distinct.

  20. Can artificial reefs mimic natural reef communities? The roles of structural features and age.

    PubMed

    Perkol-Finkel, S; Shashar, N; Benayahu, Y

    2006-03-01

    In light of the deteriorating state of coral reefs worldwide, the need to rehabilitate marine environments has greatly increased. Artificial reefs (ARs) have been suggested as a tool for reef conservation and rehabilitation. Although successions of AR communities have been thoroughly studied, current understanding of the interactions between artificial and natural reefs (NRs) is poor and a fundamental question still to be answered is that of whether AR communities can mimic adjacent NR communities. We suggest three alternative hypotheses: Neighboring ARs and NRs will (1) achieve a similar community structure given sufficient time; (2) be similar only if they possess similar structural features; (3) always differ, regardless of age or structural features. We examined these hypotheses by comparing the community structure on a 119-year old shipwreck to a neighboring NR. Fouling organisms, including stony and soft corals, sponges, tunicates, sea anemones and hydrozoans were recorded and measured along belt transects. The ahermatypic stony coral Tubastrea micrantha dominated vertical AR regions while the soft corals Nephthea sp. and Xenia sp. dominated both artificial and natural horizontal surfaces. Our results support the second hypothesis, indicating that even after a century an AR will mimic its adjacent NR communities only if it possesses structural features similar to those of the natural surroundings. However, if the two differ structurally, their communities will remain distinct. PMID:16198411