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Sample records for adjacent vertebral fracture

  1. Altered disc pressure profile after an osteoporotic vertebral fracture is a risk factor for adjacent vertebral body fracture.

    PubMed

    Tzermiadianos, Michael N; Renner, Susan M; Phillips, Frank M; Hadjipavlou, Alexander G; Zindrick, Michael R; Havey, Robert M; Voronov, Michael; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of endplate deformity after an osteoporotic vertebral fracture in increasing the risk for adjacent vertebral fractures. Eight human lower thoracic or thoracolumbar specimens, each consisting of five vertebrae were used. To selectively fracture one of the endplates of the middle VB of each specimen a void was created under the target endplate and the specimen was flexed and compressed until failure. The fractured vertebra was subjected to spinal extension under 150 N preload that restored the anterior wall height and vertebral kyphosis, while the fractured endplate remained significantly depressed. The VB was filled with cement to stabilize the fracture, after complete evacuation of its trabecular content to ensure similar cement distribution under both the endplates. Specimens were tested in flexion-extension under 400 N preload while pressure in the discs and strain at the anterior wall of the adjacent vertebrae were recorded. Disc pressure in the intact specimens increased during flexion by 26 +/- 14%. After cementation, disc pressure increased during flexion by 15 +/- 11% in the discs with un-fractured endplates, while decreased by 19 +/- 26.7% in the discs with the fractured endplates. During flexion, the compressive strain at the anterior wall of the vertebra next to the fractured endplate increased by 94 +/- 23% compared to intact status (p < 0.05), while it did not significantly change at the vertebra next to the un-fractured endplate (18.2 +/- 7.1%, p > 0.05). Subsequent flexion with compression to failure resulted in adjacent fracture close to the fractured endplate in six specimens and in a non-adjacent fracture in one specimen, while one specimen had no adjacent fractures. Depression of the fractured endplate alters the pressure profile of the damaged disc resulting in increased compressive loading of the anterior wall of adjacent vertebra that predisposes it to wedge fracture. This data suggests that correction of

  2. Cascading Adjacent Level Vertebral Compression Fractures Necessitating a Series of Eleven Kyphoplasties.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Evan; Reuter, Matthew; Samad, Adil; Flynn, Daniel; Menkowitz, Marc; Paragioudakis, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral kyphoplasty is a procedure used for the treatment of compression fractures. While early randomized-controlled trials were equivocal regarding its benefits, more recent RCTs have shown favorable results for kyphoplasty with regard to pain relief, functional recovery, and health-care related quality of life compared to control patients. Risks of kyphoplasty include but are not limited to cement extrusion, infection, hematoma, and vertebral body fracture of adjacent levels. We describe a case of a 66-year-old male attorney who underwent eleven kyphoplasties in an approximately one-year period, the majority of which were for fractures of vertebrae adjacent to those previously treated with kyphoplasty. Information on treatment was gathered from the patient's hospital chart and outpatient office notes. Following the last of the eleven kyphoplasties (two at T8, one each at all vertebrae from T9 to L5), the patient was able to function without pain and return to work. His physiologic thoracic kyphosis of 40 degrees prior to the first procedure was maintained, as were his lung and abdominal volumes. We conclude that kyphoplasty is an appropriate procedure for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures and can be used repeatedly to address fractures of levels adjacent to a previous kyphoplasty. PMID:26509091

  3. Risk Factors Associated with Adjacent and Remote- Level Pathologic Vertebral Compression Fracture Following Balloon Kyphoplasty: 2-Year Follow-Up Comparison Versus Conservative Treatment.

    PubMed

    Faloon, Michael J; Ruoff, Mark; Deshpande, Chetan; Hohman, Donald; Dunn, Conor; Beckloff, Nicholas; Patel, Dipak V

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral compression fractures are a significant source of morbidity and mortality among patients of all age groups. These fractures result in both acute and chronic pain. Patients who sustain such fractures are known to suffer from more comorbidities and have a higher mortality rate compared with healthy people in the same age group. In recent years, balloon kyphoplasty has become a popular method for treating vertebral compression fractures. However, as longer-term follow-up becomes available, the effects of cement augmentation on adjacent spinal segments require investigation. Here, we have performed a retrospective chart review of 258 consecutive patients with pathologic vertebral compression fractures secondary to osteoporosis, treated by either conservative measures or balloon kyphoplasty with polymethylmethacrylate cement augmentation. Multivariate analysis of patient comorbidities was performed to assess the risks associated with subsequent adjacent and remote compression fracture at a minimum of 2 years follow-up. A total of 258 patients had 361 vertebral compression fractures. A total of 121 patients were treated nonoperatively and 137 underwent balloon kyphoplasty with polymethylmethacrylate cement augmentation. The mean follow-up for both cohorts was 2.7 years (range, 2-6 years). The kyphoplasty cohort was significantly older than the nonoperative cohort (mean age, 78.5 versus 74.2 years; p = 0.02), had 24 more patients with diabetes mellitus (37 versus 13; p = 0.05), and had 34 more patients with a history of smoking (50 versus 16; p = 0.05). However, the kyphoplasty cohort had less patients with a history of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use (45 versus 71; p = 0.07). There were no demographic differences between groups in patients with secondary fractures. Nonoperative treatment was identified as a statistically significant independent risk factor for subsequent vertebral compression fracture [odds ratio (OR), 2.28]. Univariate

  4. Osteoporotic vertebral fractures redux.

    PubMed

    Lentle, B C; Gordon, P; Ward, L

    2008-02-01

    Osteoporosis remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality especially in the elderly. This fact is largely due to fractures of the proximal femur and spine. As recently recognized, vertebral fractures are as much a threat to health and longevity as fractures of the proximal femur. In recent decades, the development of tools to evaluate fracture risk as well as medications to treat osteoporosis has altered the management of people who are at fracture risk. At the same time identification and management procedures concerning spinal fracturing are not very clear. Besides there is not even clear consensus about what exactly constitutes a vertebral fracture, particularly those of minor degree. While height loss is a simple and valuable tool to detect vertebral fractures, it is neither sensitive nor specific enough to replace radiographs. Some 65% of fractures cause no symptoms. Often vertebral fractures are misdiagnosed, especially if they have occurred silently and if the opportunity for diagnosis arises fortuitously. It is to the patient's benefit that radiologists report and physicians identify vertebral fractures evident on a chest or other radiograph, no matter how incidental to the immediate clinical indication for the examination. Technological evolution now allows dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry machines to be used to take spine images while doing a densitometry. The images are adequate, even if not of high radiographic quality, and, more important, the patient undergoes a smaller radiation dose than with conventional spinal radiographs. Such technology may promote fracture recognition. The recognition of vertebral fractures, as well as the prevention and treatment of further fractures, will likely do much to reduce both the burden of osteoporosis-related morbidity and mortality, as well as fracture-related costs to healthcare systems.

  5. Management of osteoporotic vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dionyssiotis, Yannis

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporotic vertebral fractures are associated with considerable reduction of quality of life, morbidity, and mortality. The management of patients with vertebral fractures should include treatment for osteoporosis and measures to reduce pain and improve mobility. This article provides information for management and rehabilitation of vertebral fractures based on clinical experience and literature. PMID:20689689

  6. Cement Leakage into Adjacent Vertebral Body Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hoo; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) is a minimally invasive procedure for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures that fail to respond to conventional conservative treatment. It significantly improves intolerable back pain within hours, and has a low complication rate. Although rare, PV is not free of complications, most of which are directly related to cement leakage. Because of its association with new adjacent fracture, the importance of cement leakage into the adjacent disc space is paramount. Here, we report an interesting case of cement leakage into the adjacent upper vertebral body as well as disc space following PV. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of cement leakage into the adjacent vertebral body following PV. This rare case is presented along with a review of the literature. PMID:27437018

  7. Vertebral fracture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; Pettersen, Paola C.; Tankó, László B.; Nielsen, Mads

    2007-03-01

    A novel method for classification and quantification of vertebral fractures from X-ray images is presented. Using pairwise conditional shape models trained on a set of healthy spines, the most likely unfractured shape is estimated for each of the vertebrae in the image. The difference between the true shape and the reconstructed normal shape is an indicator for the shape abnormality. A statistical classification scheme with the two shapes as features is applied to detect, classify, and grade various types of deformities. In contrast with the current (semi-)quantitative grading strategies this method takes the full shape into account, it uses a patient-specific reference by combining population-based information on biological variation in vertebra shape and vertebra interrelations, and it provides a continuous measure of deformity. Good agreement with manual classification and grading is demonstrated on 204 lateral spine radiographs with in total 89 fractures.

  8. Opportunistic Identification of Vertebral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Adams, Judith E

    2016-01-01

    Vertebral fractures are powerful predictors of future fracture, so, their identification is important to ensure that patients are commenced on appropriate bone protective or bone-enhancing therapy. Risk factors (e.g., low bone mineral density and increasing age) and symptoms (back pain, loss of height) may herald the presence of vertebral fractures, which are usually confirmed by performing spinal radiographs or, increasingly, using vertebral fracture assessment with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanners. However, a large number (30% or more) of vertebral fractures are asymptomatic and do not come to clinical attention. There is, therefore, scope for opportunistic (fortuitous) identification of vertebral fractures from various imaging modalities (radiographs, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and radionuclide scans) performed for other clinical indications and which include the spine in the field of view, with midline sagittal reformatted images from computed tomography having the greatest potential for such opportunistic detection. Numerous studies confirm this potential for identification but consistently find underreporting of vertebral fractures. So, a valuable opportunity to improve the management of patients at increased risk of future fracture is being squandered. Educational training programs for all clinicians and constant reiteration, stressing the importance of the accurate and clear reporting of vertebral fractures ("you only see what you look for"), can improve the situation, and automated computer-aided diagnostic tools also show promise to solve the problem of this underreporting of vertebral fractures.

  9. Opportunistic Identification of Vertebral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Adams, Judith E

    2016-01-01

    Vertebral fractures are powerful predictors of future fracture, so, their identification is important to ensure that patients are commenced on appropriate bone protective or bone-enhancing therapy. Risk factors (e.g., low bone mineral density and increasing age) and symptoms (back pain, loss of height) may herald the presence of vertebral fractures, which are usually confirmed by performing spinal radiographs or, increasingly, using vertebral fracture assessment with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanners. However, a large number (30% or more) of vertebral fractures are asymptomatic and do not come to clinical attention. There is, therefore, scope for opportunistic (fortuitous) identification of vertebral fractures from various imaging modalities (radiographs, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and radionuclide scans) performed for other clinical indications and which include the spine in the field of view, with midline sagittal reformatted images from computed tomography having the greatest potential for such opportunistic detection. Numerous studies confirm this potential for identification but consistently find underreporting of vertebral fractures. So, a valuable opportunity to improve the management of patients at increased risk of future fracture is being squandered. Educational training programs for all clinicians and constant reiteration, stressing the importance of the accurate and clear reporting of vertebral fractures ("you only see what you look for"), can improve the situation, and automated computer-aided diagnostic tools also show promise to solve the problem of this underreporting of vertebral fractures. PMID:26412139

  10. Clinical consequences of vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Ross, P D

    1997-08-18

    People with vertebral fractures have greater pain, disability, and healthcare utilization, on average, than those without fractures. Most studies of acute pain and disability have been limited to patients with clinically diagnosed fractures (a subset of all symptomatic patients), representing about one third of all patients with fractures identified radiographically. Acute symptoms vary widely. Some patients experience intolerable pain that can be completely debilitating for several weeks or months, whereas about half of all patients with radiographically identified fractures report having had no symptoms. The reasons for this variability are unknown. Chronic pain and disability among patients with vertebral fractures are significantly greater on average than among people without fractures, even after adjusting for comorbid conditions that are common among the elderly. Similar to acute symptoms, chronic symptoms vary widely and often persist for at least several years. The risk of pain and disability increases progressively with the number and severity of vertebral deformities: the risk is multiplied several times with each additional fracture. On average, physical function is impaired among people with vertebral fractures, whether or not they currently report back pain. Declines in physical function and changes in appearance contribute to social isolation and loss of self-esteem, impairing quality of life. The cumulative impact of vertebral fractures on quality of life may rival that of hip fractures because hip fractures are less frequent and occur later in life. As many as 40% of symptomatic vertebral fractures are initially misdiagnosed, signaling a need for greater awareness among physicians and patients. Prevention of initial vertebral fractures should be actively encouraged; even if the initial fracture is asymptomatic, it indicates a greatly increased risk of subsequent fractures, pain, and physical impairment. PMID:9302895

  11. The clinical effect of percutaneous kyphoplasty for the treatment of multiple osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures and the prevention of new vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Weifeng; Jia, Yongwei; Wang, Jianjie; Cheng, Liming; Zeng, Zhili; Yu, Yan; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical effect of percutaneous kyphoplasty and the precautions against adjacent vertebral refractures in the treatment of multiple osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. 54 cases (128 vertebrae) with multiple osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures from July 2007 to December 2013 treated with percutaneous kyphoplasty were retrospectively reviewed. 36 cases of them suffered from bi-segment vertebral fractures, 16 cases with tri-segment vertebral fractures and 2 cases with quadri-segment vertebral fractures. The operative effect was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS) score and oswestry disability index (ODI) score. Then the reasons for adjacent vertebral refractures were analyzed and the precautions were proposed. 54 cases (128 vertebrae) were admitted with percutaneous kyphoplasty successfully. No pulmonary embolism, spinal cord injury and other serious complications were found. The follow-up took 3-33 months with the average of 12 months. There was significant difference of VAS scores and ODI scores between pre-operation and post-operation (P<0.05). Bone cement leakage occurred in 23 vertebrae, and the incidence rate was 18.0%. 8 cases sustained adjacent vertebral refractures including 3 cases in the contiguous vertebral bodies and 5 cases in the interval vertebral bodies, and the incidence rate was 14.8%. 5 cases gained fracture healing after additional percutaneous kyphoplasty procedures while the other 3 cases were healed basically after conservative treatment for three months. In conclusion, percutaneous kyphoplasty is safe and effective to treat multiple osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. However, the risk of new adjacent vertebral fractures in the multiple osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures is higher than that in the single osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture. Timely and proper treatment can reduce refractures. PMID:26550284

  12. Vertebral fracture assessment in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Miguel; Neto, Leonardo Vieira; Torres, Carolina Hammes; de Mendonça, Laura Maria Carvalho; Gadelha, Mônica Roberto; de Farias, Maria Lúcia Fleiuss

    2013-01-01

    Most vertebral fractures (VFs) are asymptomatic and incidentally found on X-rays. The effects of acromegaly on bone mineral density (BMD) are still controversial, and the prevalence of VFs in this specific population remains uncertain. The objective of this study was to assess VFs in acromegaly through vertebral fracture assessment (VFA) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Seventy-five acromegalic patients from the same center (53 female; age: 48.9±14.5yr) were enrolled in this study. None of them referred previous fragility fracture. They were divided according to the presence or absence of moderate or severe VFs on VFA, a densitometric spine imaging. Age, gender, estimated duration of disease, insulin-like growth factor I levels, disease control and gonadal status, as well as BMD and body composition (analyzed by DXA) were compared between these 2 groups. A prevalence of 10.6% of clinically unapparent VFs was observed. Eight patients had 13 moderate or severe VFs, and only one of them had osteoporosis at densitometry. There was a trend to longer duration of acromegaly before diagnosis, higher prevalence of hypogonadism, and higher BMD Z-score at lumbar spine and femoral neck in fractured patients, without reaching statistical significance. There is a significant prevalence of moderate and severe VFs in acromegalic patients, independently of BMD. More longitudinal and controlled studies are needed to recommend the use of VFA in all acromegalic patients submitted to DXA scan. VFA is simple, practical, uses low radiation, and may provide important information in the management of acromegaly.

  13. Nanotechnology for treating osteoporotic vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chunxia; Wei, Donglei; Yang, Huilin; Chen, Tao; Yang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a serious public health problem affecting hundreds of millions of aged people worldwide, with severe consequences including vertebral fractures that are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To augment or treat osteoporotic vertebral fractures, a number of surgical approaches including minimally invasive vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty have been developed. However, these approaches face problems and difficulties with efficacy and long-term stability. Recent advances and progress in nanotechnology are opening up new opportunities to improve the surgical procedures for treating osteoporotic vertebral fractures. This article reviews the improvements enabled by new nanomaterials and focuses on new injectable biomaterials like bone cements and surgical instruments for treating vertebral fractures. This article also provides an introduction to osteoporotic vertebral fractures and current clinical treatments, along with the rationale and efficacy of utilizing nanomaterials to modify and improve biomaterials or instruments. In addition, perspectives on future trends with injectable bone cements and surgical instruments enhanced by nanotechnology are provided. PMID:26316746

  14. Nanotechnology for treating osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunxia; Wei, Donglei; Yang, Huilin; Chen, Tao; Yang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a serious public health problem affecting hundreds of millions of aged people worldwide, with severe consequences including vertebral fractures that are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To augment or treat osteoporotic vertebral fractures, a number of surgical approaches including minimally invasive vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty have been developed. However, these approaches face problems and difficulties with efficacy and long-term stability. Recent advances and progress in nanotechnology are opening up new opportunities to improve the surgical procedures for treating osteoporotic vertebral fractures. This article reviews the improvements enabled by new nanomaterials and focuses on new injectable biomaterials like bone cements and surgical instruments for treating vertebral fractures. This article also provides an introduction to osteoporotic vertebral fractures and current clinical treatments, along with the rationale and efficacy of utilizing nanomaterials to modify and improve biomaterials or instruments. In addition, perspectives on future trends with injectable bone cements and surgical instruments enhanced by nanotechnology are provided. PMID:26316746

  15. Vertebral fractures in males with prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Porcelli, Teresa; Mormando, Marilda; De Menis, Ernesto; Bianchi, Antonio; Mejia, Carola; Mancini, Tatiana; De Marinis, Laura; Giustina, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Data on osteoporotic fractures in hyperprolactinemia are limited. An increased prevalence of radiological vertebral fractures was recently observed in women with prolactin (PRL)-secreting adenoma, whereas it is unknown whether this observation may reflect a more general increased risk of fractures in this disease and whether the prevalence of fractures in males is affected by gonadal status. Thirty-two males (median age 47 years, range: 22-79) with PRL-secreting pituitary adenoma (10 with microadenoma and 22 with macroadenoma) and 64 control males, with normal PRL values and with comparable age to patients with hyperprolactinemia, were evaluated for vertebral fractures by a morphometric approach and for bone mineral density (BMD) by a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at lumbar spine. Vertebral fractures were shown in 12 patients with PRL-secreting adenoma (37.5%) and in 5 controls (7.8%, P < 0.001). Fractured patients had lower BMD T-score (P = 0.007) and longer duration of disease (P < 0.001) as compared to patients who did not fracture. Fractures occurred more frequently (P = 0.03) in patients with untreated hyperprolactinemia versus patients treated with cabergoline whose frequency of vertebral fractures was still higher than control subjects. The prevalence of vertebral fractures was not significantly different between eugonadal and hypogonadal patients (33.3% vs. 38.5%; P = 0.8). Moreover, no significant (P = 0.4) difference in serum testosterone values was found between fractured and not fractured males. Hyperprolactinemia is associated with high prevalence of radiological vertebral fractures in men with PRL-secreting adenoma. These findings would also suggest that PRL excess may produce negative skeletal effects independently of hypogonadism.

  16. The biomechanical effect of vertebroplasty on the adjacent vertebral body: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, R K

    2006-05-01

    The increased use of vertebroplasty for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures has led to concerns that the technique may increase the risk of fracture in the adjacent vertebrae. The aim of this study was to simulate the biomechanical effects of vertebroplasty using an osteoporotic two-vertebrae finite element model. Following a simulated compression fracture, the model was augmented with one of three volumes of PMMA-based cement or left untreated. Upon reloading, an increase in segment stiffness was found with increasing volumes of cement. However, in all the treated models there was an increase in endplate deflection into the adjacent vertebra causing plastic failure of the surrounding trabecular bone. More damage was caused in the adjacent vertebra of the treated models than in the untreated model. The model results suggest that clinicians should be wary of using standard vertebroplasty cements to treat compression fractures in patients with highly osteoporotic bone.

  17. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty for Osteoporotic Compression Fracture: Multivariate Study of Predictors of New Vertebral Body Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Komemushi, Atsushi Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Shomura, Yuzo; Komemushi, Sadao; Sawada, Satoshi

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. To investigate the risk factors and relative risk of new compression fractures following vertebroplasty. Methods. Initially, we enrolled 104 consecutive patients with vertebral compression fractures caused by osteoporosis. A total of 83 of the 104 patients visited our hospital for follow-up examinations for more than 4 weeks after vertebroplasty. Logistic regression analysis of the data obtained from these 83 patients was used to determine relative risks of recurrent compression fractures, using 13 different factors. Results. We identified 59 new fractures in 30 of the 83 patients: 41 new fractures in vertebrae adjacent to treated vertebrae; and 18 new fractures in vertebrae not adjacent to treated vertebrae. New fractures occurred in vertebrae adjacent to treated vertebrae significantly more frequently than in vertebrae not adjacent to treated vertebrae. Only cement leakage into the disk was a significant predictor of new vertebral body fracture after vertebroplasty (odds ratio = 4.633). None of the following covariates were associated with increased risk of new fracture: age, gender, bone mineral density, the number of vertebroplasty procedures, the number of vertebrae treated per procedure, the cumulative number of vertebrae treated, the presence of a single untreated vertebra between treated vertebrae, the presence of multiple untreated vertebrae between treated vertebrae, the amount of bone cement injected per procedure, the cumulative amount of bone cement injected, cement leakage into the soft tissue around the vertebra, and cement leakage into the vein.

  18. Evaluation and Management of Vertebral Compression Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Alexandru, Daniela; So, William

    2012-01-01

    Compression fractures affect many individuals worldwide. An estimated 1.5 million vertebral compression fractures occur every year in the US. They are common in elderly populations, and 25% of postmenopausal women are affected by a compression fracture during their lifetime. Although these fractures rarely require hospital admission, they have the potential to cause significant disability and morbidity, often causing incapacitating back pain for many months. This review provides information on the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of compression fractures, as well as clinical manifestations and treatment options. Among the available treatment options, kyphoplasty and percutaneous vertebroplasty are two minimally invasive techniques to alleviate pain and correct the sagittal imbalance of the spine. PMID:23251117

  19. Computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs based on morphometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li, Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Straus, Christopher; Vokes, Tamara; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    Vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporosis-related fractures. It is important to detect vertebral fractures, because they are associated with increased risk of subsequent fractures, and because pharmacologic therapy can reduce the risk of subsequent fractures. Although vertebral fractures are often not clinically recognized, they can be visualized on lateral chest radiographs taken for other purposes. However, only 15-60% of vertebral fractures found on lateral chest radiographs are mentioned in radiology reports. The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs in order to assist radiologists' image interpretation. Our computerized method is based on the automated identification of upper and lower vertebral edges. In order to develop the scheme, radiologists provided morphometric data for each identifiable vertebra, which consisted of six points for each vertebra, for 25 normals and 20 cases with severe fractures. Anatomical information was obtained from morphometric data of normal cases in terms of vertebral heights, heights of vertebral disk spaces, and vertebral centerline. Computerized detection of vertebral fractures was based on the reduction in the heights of fractured vertebrae compared to adjacent vertebrae and normal reference data. Vertebral heights from morphometric data on normal cases were used as reference. On 138 chest radiographs (20 with fractures) the sensitivity of our method for detection of fracture cases was 95% (19/20) with 0.93 (110/118) false-positives per image. In conclusion, the computerized method would be useful for detection of potentially overlooked vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs.

  20. Diagnosis and Management of Vertebral Compression Fractures.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Jason; Davis, Amy

    2016-07-01

    Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are the most common complication of osteoporosis, affecting more than 700,000 Americans annually. Fracture risk increases with age, with four in 10 white women older than 50 years experiencing a hip, spine, or vertebral fracture in their lifetime. VCFs can lead to chronic pain, disfigurement, height loss, impaired activities of daily living, increased risk of pressure sores, pneumonia, and psychological distress. Patients with an acute VCF may report abrupt onset of back pain with position changes, coughing, sneezing, or lifting. Physical examination findings are often normal, but can demonstrate kyphosis and midline spine tenderness. More than two-thirds of patients are asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally on plain radiography. Acute VCFs may be treated with analgesics such as acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, narcotics, and calcitonin. Physicians must be mindful of medication adverse effects in older patients. Other conservative therapeutic options include limited bed rest, bracing, physical therapy, nerve root blocks, and epidural injections. Percutaneous vertebral augmentation, including vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty, is controversial, but can be considered in patients with inadequate pain relief with nonsurgical care or when persistent pain substantially affects quality of life. Family physicians can help prevent vertebral fractures through management of risk factors and the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27386723

  1. Cement augmentation in vertebral burst fractures.

    PubMed

    Zaryanov, Anton V; Park, Daniel K; Khalil, Jad G; Baker, Kevin C; Fischgrund, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    As a result of axial compression, traumatic vertebral burst fractures disrupt the anterior column, leading to segmental instability and cord compression. In situations with diminished anterior column support, pedicle screw fixation alone may lead to delayed kyphosis, nonunion, and hardware failure. Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty (balloon-assisted vertebroplasty) have been used in an effort to provide anterior column support in traumatic burst fractures. Cited advantages are providing immediate stability, improving pain, and reducing hardware malfunction. When used in isolation or in combination with posterior instrumentation, these techniques theoretically allow for improved fracture reduction and maintenance of spinal alignment while avoiding the complications and morbidity of anterior approaches. Complications associated with cement use (leakage, systemic effects) are similar to those seen in the treatment of osteoporotic compression fractures; however, extreme caution must be used in fractures with a disrupted posterior wall.

  2. Management of Vertebral Re-Fractures after Vertebroplasty in Osteoporotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, G.; Ambrosanio, G.; Pezzullo, M.G.; Zeccolini, F.; Vassallo, P.; Galasso, R.; Lavanga, A.; Muto, M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This study illustrates the usefulness of vertebral biopsy in osteoporotic patients previously treated with vertebroplasty (VP) who present at follow-up with a new fracture in a vertebral soma adjacent or distant from the collapsed vertebral body. Five hundred and fifty patients with osteoporotic vertebral collapse underwent a minimally invasive treatment with vertebroplasty (VP) for a total of980 vertebral bodies. The approach was unipedicular in 520 patients and bipedicular in 30. Only cases with unclear findings at MR or CT (23 patients) were scheduled for a vertebral biopsy before VP treatment. The biopsy results were positive for haematological disease in only eight patients. A vertebral biopsy was carried out during re-treatment with VP in all patients who presented a vertebral refracture in the three month follow-up at a site adjacent to or distant from the previously treated vertebra (21 patients). We have found new fractures of adjacent vertebrae in 15 patients and new fractures of distant vertebrae in 16 patients at three month follow-up examination. Five of the 31 cases (16%) of spinal refracture, where during vertebroplasty treatment a bone biopsy and a sternal medullary aspiration had been carried out, an anatomopathological response to multiple myeloma was responsible for the refracture. It is useful to perform a spinal bone biopsy during re-treatment of the vertebroplasty procedure to rule out multiple myeloma or other disease as the cause of the new collapse in patients with osteoporotic disease presenting a new vertebral fracture in an adjacent or distant site from the previously collapsed vertebral body. PMID:20465892

  3. Incidence of Symptomatic Vertebral Fractures in Patients After Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Hierholzer, Johannes Fuchs, Heiko; Westphalen, Kerstin; Baumann, Clemens; Slotosch, Christine; Schulz, Rudolf

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of secondary symptomatic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) in patients previously treated by percutaneous vertebroplasty (VTP). Three hundred sixteen patients with 486 treated VCFs were included in the study according to the inclusion criteria. Patients were kept in regular follow-up using a standardized questionairre before, 1 day, 7 days, 6 months, and 1 year after, and, further on, on a yearly basis after VTP. The incidence of secondary symptomatic VCF was calculated, and anatomical distribution with respect to previous fractures characterized. Mean follow-up was 8 months (6-56 months) after VTP. Fifty-two of 316 (16.4 %) patients (45 female, 7 male) returned for treatment of 69 secondary VCFs adjacent to (35/69; 51%) or distant from (34/69; 49%) previously treated levels. Adjacent secondary VCF occurred significantly more often compared to distant secondary VCF. Of the total 69 secondary VCFs, 35 of 69 occurred below and 27 of 69 above pretreated VCFs. Of the 65 sandwich levels generated, in 7 of 65 (11%) secondary VCFs were observed. Secondary VCF below pretreated VCF occurred significantly earlier in time compared to VCF above and compared to sandwich body fractures. No major complication occurred during initial or follow-up intervention. We conclude that secondary VCFs do occur in individuals after VTP but the rate found in our study remains below the level expected from epidemiologic studies. Adjacent fractures occur more often and follow the cluster distribution of VCF as expected from the natural history of the underlying osteoporosis. No increased rate of secondary VCF after VTP was observed in this retrospective analysis. In accordance with the pertinent literature, short-term and also midterm clinical results are encouraging and provide further support for the usefulness and the low complication rate of this procedure as an adjunct to the spectrum of pain management in patients with severe

  4. Vertebral fracture after aircraft ejection during Operation Desert Storm.

    PubMed

    Osborne, R G; Cook, A A

    1997-04-01

    During Operation Desert Storm, 21 United States and 2 Italian military personnel were held in Iraq as prisoners of war. Of these, 18 had ejected from fixed-wing, ejection seat-equipped, combat aircraft prior to their capture. Of the 18, 6 (33%) had sustained vertebral fractures; 4 of these were compression fractures. This fracture rate is comparable to that of previously studied groups. Fractures were noted to be at several different vertebral sites and after ejecting from a variety of aircraft. Apart from contusions and abrasions, vertebral fractures were the most common injuries discovered in this repatriated population. None of the vertebral fractures produced recognizable neurological disability. The development of vertebral fractures was neither associated with the use of any particular ejection system or aircraft nor did the development of vertebral fractures appear dependent on the age, height or length of service of the affected personnel. Ejected aircrew with low altitude mission profiles seemed more predisposed to vertebral fracture than those at high altitudes, but with a small sample population, this relationship was not statistically significant (p > 0.25). Reliable data were unavailable on aircrew positioning and preparation time for ejection. PMID:9096832

  5. Adjacent vertebral failure after vertebroplasty: a biomechanical study of low-modulus PMMA cement

    PubMed Central

    Heini, Paul; Windolf, Markus; Schneider, Erich

    2007-01-01

    PMMA is the most common bone substitute used for vertebroplasty. An increased fracture rate of the adjacent vertebrae has been observed after vertebroplasty. Decreased failure strength has been noted in a laboratory study of augmented functional spine units (FSUs), where the adjacent, non-augmented vertebral body always failed. This may provide evidence that rigid cement augmentation may facilitate the subsequent collapse of the adjacent vertebrae. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the decrease in failure strength of augmented FSUs can be avoided using low-modulus PMMA bone cement. In cadaveric FSUs, overall stiffness, failure strength and stiffness of the two vertebral bodies were determined under compression for both the treated and untreated specimens. Augmentation was performed on the caudal vertebrae with either regular or low-modulus PMMA. Endplate and wedge-shaped fractures occurred in the cranial and caudal vertebrae in the ratios endplate:wedge (cranial:caudal): 3:8 (5:6), 4:7 (7:4) and 10:1 (10:1) for control, low-modulus and regular cement group, respectively. The mean failure strength was 3.3 ± 1 MPa with low-modulus cement, 2.9 ± 1.2 MPa with regular cement and 3.6 ± 1.3 MPa for the control group. Differences between the groups were not significant (p = 0.754 and p = 0.375, respectively, for low-modulus cement vs. control and regular cement vs. control). Overall FSU stiffness was not significantly affected by augmentation. Significant differences were observed for the stiffness differences of the cranial to the caudal vertebral body for the regular PMMA group to the other groups (p < 0.003). The individual vertebral stiffness values clearly showed the stiffening effect of the regular cement and the lesser alteration of the stiffness of the augmented vertebrae using the low-modulus PMMA compared to the control group (p = 0.999). In vitro biomechanical study and biomechanical evaluation of the hypothesis state that the

  6. Role of Transpedicular Percutaneous Vertebral Biopsy for Diagnosis of Pathology in Vertebral Compression Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Sunil; Hardikar, Sharad Moreshwar; Hardikar, Madan Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective observational study. Purpose To identify the role of percutaneous vertebral biopsy in histopathological diagnosis of vertebral compression fractures and to identify the frequency of unexpected malignancy in vertebral compression fractures. Overview of Literature Vertebral compression fractures are common in the Indian population. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear imaging have some limitations in the diagnosis of definitive pathology of vertebral compression fractures. Therefore, histological confirmation is necessary for definitive diagnosis and to plan appropriate management for patient. Methods A retrospective observational study was conducted involving 84 patients who underwent percutaneous vertebral biopsy between 2010 and 2014. We performed C-arm guided percutaneous transpedicular core vertebral biopsy of vertebral compression fractures under combination of local anesthesia and intravenous conscious sedation. Results Sufficient biopsy material was obtained in 79 of the 84 cases. In the other five cases, biopsy material was not sufficient for reporting. Out of the 79 cases, osteoporotic pathology was detected in 69 patients, malignancy was detected in 8 patients and no pathology was found in 2 patients. Two patients with distant metastases to vertebra were identified. Primary spinal malignancy was detected in 6 patients (1 unsuspected plasmacytoma, 5 diagnosed malignancy preoperatively). So, the frequency of unsuspected malignancy of this study was 1.19% (1/84). None of the patients had any complications. Conclusions C-arm guided percutaneous transpedicular vertebral biopsy is useful in obtaining definitive histopathological diagnosis of vertebral compression fractures, especially in differentiating malignant and non-malignant vertebral compression fractures and helping plan appropriate management of patients. The rate of unexpected malignancy in vertebral compression fracture was 1.19%. PMID:27790322

  7. Is intervertebral cement leakage a risk factor for new adjacent vertebral collapse?

    PubMed

    Churojana, Anchalee; Songsaeng, Dittapong; Khumtong, Rujimas; Suwanbundit, Anek; Saliou, Guillaume

    2014-10-31

    This retrospective study evaluated the relationship between intervertebral cement leakage and new adjacent vertebral fracture and describes the different characteristics of cement leakage. Increased risk of new adjacent vertebral fracture (NF) has been reported to be a complication of cement leakage in vertebroplasty. In our observation, an incidental intervertebral cement leakage may occur during vertebroplasty but is commonly asymptomatic. The study focused on osteoporotic collapse patients who had percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) between 2005 and 2007. We divided patients into leakage and non-leakage groups and compared the incidence of NF. Leakage characteristics were divided into three types: Type I intervertebral-extradiscal leakage, Type II intradiscal leakage and Type III combined leakage. Visual analog scale for pain and the Karnofsky Performance Status at 24 h, three months, six months and one year were compared between groups and types of leakages. Among 148 PVs (102 patients) there were 30 leakages (20.27%) and 21(14.19%) NFs. The incidence of NF did not significantly differ between leakage and non-leakage groups (P<0.05). Type II was the most common type of leakage (15/30). Reduction of average pain and improvement of Karnofsky Performance Status score did not differ between groups (P< 0.05). Type II had decreased pain score < type I and III at 24 h (P < 0.01), three months and six months (P < 0.1) but not at one year (P<0.10). Type II also had decreased pain score < non-leakage group only at 24 h (P<0.05). Intervertebral cement leakage is not an increased risk for NF, influenced outcomes of pain relief or improvement of physical function. Intradiscal leakage (Type II) is the most common characteristic of cement leakage and probably related to delayed pain relief.

  8. New vertebral fractures after vertebroplasty: 2 year results from a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Staples, MP; Howe, BM; Ringler, MD; Mitchell, P; Wriedt, CHR; Wark, JD; Ebeling, PR; Osborne, RH; Kallmes, DF; Buchbinder, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effect of vertebroplasty (VP) on the risk of further radiologically apparent vertebral fracture within two years of the procedure. Methods We conducted a randomised placebo-controlled trial of VP in people with acute osteoporotic vertebral fracture. Eligible participants were randomly assigned to VP (n=38) or placebo (n=40). Cement volume and leakage were recorded for the VP group. Plain thoracolumbar radiographs were taken at baseline, 12 and 24 months. Two independent radiologists assessed these for new and progressed fractures at the same, adjacent and non-adjacent levels. Results At 12 and 24 months, radiographs were available for 45 (58%) and 47 (60%) participants respectively. There were no between-group differences for new or progressed fractures: 32 and 40 in the VP group after 12 and 24 months compared with 21 and 33 in the placebo group (hazard ratio (HR) 1.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82 to 3.94). Similar results were seen when considering only adjacent (HR (95% CI): 2.30 (0.57 to 9.29)), and non-adjacent (HR (95% CI): 1.45 (0.55 to 3.81) levels. In all comparisons there was a consistent trend towards higher risk of any type of fracture in the group undergoing VP. Within the VP group, fracture risk was unrelated to total (HR (95% CI): 0.91 (0.71 to 1.17)) or relative (HR (95% CI): 1.31 (0.15 to 11.48)) cement volume, or cement leakage (HR (95% CI): 1.20 (0.63 to 2.31)). Conclusion For patients undergoing VP our study did not demonstrate significant increases in subsequent fracture risk beyond that experienced by those with vertebral fractures who did not undergo the procedure. However, because of the non-significant numerical increases observed, studies with adequate power are needed to draw definite conclusions about fracture risk. PMID:26272712

  9. FRAX and the effect of teriparatide on vertebral and non-vertebral fracture

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Nicholas C; Kanis, John A; Odén, Anders; Burge, Russel T; Mitlak, Bruce H; Johansson, Helena; McCloskey, Eugene V

    2016-01-01

    Summary Daily teriparatide injections have been shown to reduce vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of fracture risk reduction is independent of baseline fracture probability assessed by FRAX. Background Daily administration of 20μg or 40μg teriparatide has been shown to significantly decrease the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fracture compared with placebo. The aim of the present study was to evaluate fracture risk assessed at baseline using the FRAX® tool and to determine the efficacy of teriparatide as a function of baseline fracture risk. Methods 1637 postmenopausal women in the pivotal phase 3 trial, randomly assigned to receive placebo (n=544), teriparatide 20 μg per day (n=541) or teriparatide 40 μg per day (n=552), were studied. Baseline clinical risk factors were entered into country-specific FRAX models to compute the 10-year probability of major osteoporotic fractures with or without input of femoral neck BMD. Because there was no difference in effect of 20 and 40μg teriparatide daily on fracture occurrence, the two active groups were merged. The interaction between probability of a major fracture and treatment efficacy was examined by Poisson regression. Results The 10-year probability of major osteoporotic fractures (with BMD) ranged from 2.2-67.2%. Treatment with teriparatide was associated with a 37% decrease in all non-vertebral fractures (95% CI:10-56 %) and a 56% decrease in low energy non-vertebral fractures (95% CI:24-75%) compared with placebo. The risk of morphometric vertebral fractures decreased significantly by 66% (95% CI:50-77%). Hazard ratios for the effect of teriparatide on the fracture outcome did not change significantly with increasing fracture probability (p>0.30). Similar findings were noted for the interaction when BMD was excluded from the FRAX model, or when probability of hip fracture was used as the marker of baseline risk. Conclusion We conclude that teriparatide

  10. Outcome of percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty in vertebral compression fractures

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, B Praveen; Shah, B Viral; Joshi, S Prateek

    2015-01-01

    Background: Incidence of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) is increasing due to increase in human life expectancy and prevalence of osteoporosis. Vertebroplasty had been traditional treatment for pain, but it neither attempts to restore vertebral body height nor eliminates spinal deformity and is associated with a high rate of cement leakage. Balloon kyphoplasty involves introduction of inflatable balloon into the fractured body of vertebra for elevation of the end-plates prior to fixation of the fracture with bone cement. This study evaluates short term functional and radiological outcomes of balloon kyphoplasty. The secondary aim is to explore short-term complications of the procedure. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of 199 kyphoplasty procedures in 135 patients from March 2009 to March 2012 were evaluated with short form-36 (SF-36) score, visual analogue scale (VAS), detailed neurological and radiological evaluations. The mean followup was 18 months (range 12–20 months). Statistical analysis including paired sample t-test was done with statistical package for social sciences. Results: Statistically significant improvements in SF-36 (from 34.29 to 48.53, an improvement of 14.24, standard deviation (SD) - 20.08 P < 0.0001), VAS (drop of 4.49, from 6.74 to 2.24, SD - 1.44, P < 0.0001), percentage restoration of lost vertebral height (from 30.62% to 16.19%, improvement of 14.43%, SD - 15.37, P < 0.0001) and kyphotic angle correction (from 17.41° to 10.59°, improvement of 6.82, SD - 7.26°, P < 0.0001) were noted postoperatively. Six patients had cement embolism, 65 had cement leak and three had adjacent level fracture which required repeat kyphoplasty later. One patient with history of ischemic heart disease had cardiac arrest during the procedure. No patients had neurological deterioration in the followup period. Conclusions: Kyphoplasty is a safe and effective treatment for VCFs. It improves physical function, reduces pain and corrects

  11. Cortical screw trajectory for instrumentation and fusion in the setting of osteopathic compression fracture allows for percutaneous kyphoplasty for adjacent level compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Pacione, Donato; Kim, Irene; Wilson, Taylor A; Frempong-Boadu, Anthony

    2015-05-01

    Spinal fixation in the osteoporotic patient can be challenging due to the poor trabecular bone quality of the vertebral body. Patients with osteoporotic vertebral body compression fractures are at risk for future compression fractures at adjacent levels, especially after cement augmentation. The purpose of this technical report is to describe the utilization of a cortical screw trajectory along with kyphoplasty for a patient with an osteoporotic compression fracture as well as degenerative spinal disease. This trajectory allows for the possibility of percutaneous pedicle access in the event of future compression fractures. Our patient underwent a decompressive laminectomy and kyphoplasty at the level of an osteoporotic compression fracture. The fracture was stabilized with cortical screw instrumentation and fusion at a level above and a level below the fracture. Subsequently the patient developed an adjacent level fracture within the fusion construct. Due to the utilization of a cortical screw trajectory for the initial fusion, the traditional pedicle trajectory was still accessible. As a result, the new fracture was treated with a percutaneous kyphoplasty through a standard pedicle trajectory. In conclusion, the use of a cortical screw trajectory for stabilization of osteoporotic compression fractures provides for a stronger bone screw interface and avoids osteoporotic trabecular vertebral body bone. At the same time this trajectory allows for future percutaneous pedicular access in the event that the patient suffers future compression fractures.

  12. Repeated adjacent segment diseases and fractures in osteoporotic patients: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yao; Chen, Chiu-Liang; Chen, Wei-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background Pedicle screw instrumentation for treating spinal disorder is becoming increasingly widespread. Many studies have advocated its use to facilitate rigid fixation for spine; however, adjacent segmental disease is a known complication. Instrumented fusion for osteoporotic spines remains a significant challenge for spine surgeons. Prophylactic vertebroplasty for adjacent vertebra has been reported to reduce the complications of junctional compression fractures but has raised a new problem of vertebral subluxation. This case report is a rare and an extreme example with many surgical complications caused by repeated instrumented fusion for osteoporotic spine in a single patient. This patient had various complications including adjacent segmental disease, vertebral subluxation, and junctional fractures on radiographs and magnetic resonance images. Case presentation An 81-year-old Taiwanese woman underwent decompression and instrumented fusion of L4-L5 in Taiwan 10 years ago. Due to degenerative spinal stenosis of L3-L4 and L2-L3, she had decompression with instrumented fusion from L5 to L1 at the previous hospital. However, catastrophic vertebral subluxations with severe neurologic compromise occurred, and she underwent salvage surgeries twice with prolonged instrumented fusion from L5 to T2. The surgeries did not resolve her problems of spinal instability and neurologic complications. Eventually, the patient remained with a Frankel Grade C spinal cord injury. Conclusion Adjacent segmental disease, junctional fracture, and vertebral subluxation are familiar complications following instrumented spinal fusion surgeries for osteoporotic spines. Neurologic injuries following long instrumentation are often serious and difficult to address with surgery alone. Conservative treatments should always be contemplated as an alternative method for patients with poor bone stock. PMID:27555778

  13. L1 burst fracture with associated vertebral angioma.

    PubMed

    Armaganian, G; Adetchessi, T; Pech-Gourg, G; Blondel, B; Dufour, H; Fuentes, S

    2013-04-01

    Vertebral angioma is a common bone tumor. We report a case of L1 vertebral angioma revealed by type A3.2 traumatic pathological fracture of the same vertebra. Management comprised emergency percutaneous osteosynthesis and, after stabilization of the multiple trauma, arterial embolization and percutaneous kyphoplasty.

  14. Supine vs decubitus lateral patient positioning in vertebral fracture assessment.

    PubMed

    Paggiosi, Margaret Anne; Finigan, Judith; Peel, Nicola; Eastell, Richard; Ferrar, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    In vertebral fracture assessment (VFA), lateral scans are obtained with the patient positioned supine (C-arm densitometers) or lateral decubitus (fixed-arm densitometers). We aimed to determine the impact of positioning on image quality and fracture definition. We performed supine and decubitus lateral VFA in 50 postmenopausal women and used the algorithm-based qualitative method to identify vertebral fractures. We compared the 2 techniques for the identification of fractures (kappa analysis) and compared the numbers of unreadable vertebrae (indiscernible endplates) and vertebrae that were projected obliquely (Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test). The kappa score for agreement between the VFA techniques (to identify women with vertebral fractures) was 0.84 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68-0.99), and for agreement with fracture assessments made from radiographs, kappa was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.57-0.94) for both supine and decubitus lateral VFA. There were more unreadable vertebrae with supine lateral (48 vertebrae in supine lateral compared with 14 in decubitus lateral; p=0.001), but oblique projection was less common (93 vertebrae compared with 145 in decubitus lateral; p=0.002). We conclude that there were significantly different projection effects with supine and decubitus lateral VFA, but these differences did not influence the identification of vertebral fractures in our study sample.

  15. Prevalent Morphometric Vertebral Fractures in Professional Male Rugby Players

    PubMed Central

    Hind, Karen; Birrell, Fraser; Beck, Belinda

    2014-01-01

    There is an ongoing concern about the risk of injury to the spine in professional rugby players. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of vertebral fracture using vertebral fracture assessment (VFA) dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) imaging in professional male rugby players. Ninety five professional rugby league (n = 52) and union (n = 43) players (n = 95; age 25.9 (SD 4.3) years; BMI: 29.5 (SD 2.9) kg.m2) participated in the research. Each participant received one VFA, and one total body and lumbar spine DXA scan (GE Lunar iDXA). One hundred and twenty vertebral fractures were identified in over half of the sample by VFA. Seventy four were graded mild (grade 1), 40 moderate (grade 2) and 6 severe (grade 3). Multiple vertebral fractures (≥2) were found in 37 players (39%). There were no differences in prevalence between codes, or between forwards and backs (both 1.2 v 1.4; p>0.05). The most common sites of fracture were T8 (n = 23), T9 (n = 18) and T10 (n = 21). The mean (SD) lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score was 2.7 (1.3) indicating high player bone mass in comparison with age- and sex-matched norms. We observed a high number of vertebral fractures using DXA VFA in professional rugby players of both codes. The incidence, aetiology and consequences of vertebral fractures in professional rugby players are unclear, and warrant timely, prospective investigation. PMID:24846310

  16. Midterm Follow-Up of Vertebral Geometry and Remodeling of the Vertebral Bidisk Unit (VDU) After Percutaneous Vertebroplasty of Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Pitton, Michael Bernhard Koch, Ulrike; Drees, Philip; Dueber, Christoph

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate geometrical stability and preservation of height gain of vertebral bodies after percutaneous vertebroplasty during 2 years' follow-up and to elucidate the geometric remodeling process of the vertebral bidisk unit (VDU) of the affected segment. Patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with pain resistant to analgetic drugs were treated with polymethylmethacrylate vertebroplasty. Mean {+-} standard error cement volume was 5.1 {+-} 2.0 ml. Vertebral geometry was documented by sagittal and coronal reformations from multidetector computed tomography data sets: anterior, posterior, and lateral vertebral heights, end plate angles, and compression index (CI = anterior/posterior height). Additionally, the VDU (vertebral bodies plus both adjacent disk spaces) was calculated from the multidetector computed tomography data sets: anterior, posterior, and both lateral aspects. Patients were assigned to two groups: moderate compression with CI of >0.75 (group 1) and severe compression with CI of <0.75 (group 2). A total of 83 vertebral bodies of 30 patients (7 men, 23 women, age 70.7 {+-} 9.7 years, range 40-82 years) were treated with vertebroplasty and prospectively followed for 24 months. In the moderate compression group (group 1), the vertebral heights were stabilized over time at the preinterventional levels. Compared with group 1, group 2 showed a greater anterior height gain (+2.8 {+-} 2.2 mm vs. +0.8 {+-} 2.0 mm, P < 0.001), better reduction of end plate angle (-4.9 {+-} 4.8{sup o} vs. -1.0 {+-} 2.7{sup o}, P < 0.01), and improved CI (+0.12 {+-} 0.13 vs. +0.02 {+-} 0.07, P < 0.01) and demonstrated preserved anterior height gain at 2 years (+1.2 {+-} 3.2 mm, P < 0.01) as well as improved end plate angles (-5.2 {+-} 5.0{sup o}, P < 0.01) and compression indices (+0.11 {+-} 0.15, P < 0.01). Thus, posterior height loss of vertebrae and adjacent intervertebral disk spaces contributed to a remodeling of the VDU

  17. Paraspinal muscle control in people with osteoporotic vertebral fracture

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Alison M.; Hodges, Paul W.

    2007-01-01

    The high risk of sustaining subsequent vertebral fractures after an initial fracture cannot be explained solely by low bone mass. Extra-osseous factors, such as neuromuscular characteristics may help to explain this clinical dilemma. Elderly women with (n = 11) and without (n = 14) osteoporotic vertebral fractures performed rapid shoulder flexion to perturb the trunk while standing on a flat and short base. Neuromuscular postural responses of the paraspinal muscles at T6 and T12, and deep lumbar multifidus at L4 were recorded using intramuscular electromyography (EMG). Both groups demonstrated bursts of EMG that were initiated either before or shortly after the onset of shoulder flexion (P < 0.05). Paraspinal and multifidus onset occurred earlier in the non-fracture group (50–0 ms before deltoid onset) compared to the fracture group (25 ms before and 25 ms after deltoid onset) in the flat base condition. In the short base condition, EMG amplitude increased significantly above baseline earlier in the non-fracture group (75–25 ms before deltoid onset) compared to the fracture group (25–0 ms before deltoid onset) at T6 and T12; yet multifidus EMG increased above baseline earlier in the fracture group (50–25 ms before deltoid) compared to the non-fracture group (25–0 ms before deltoid). Time to reach maximum amplitude was shorter in the fracture group. Hypothetically, the longer time to initiate a postural response and shorter time to reach maximum amplitude in the fracture group may indicate a neuromuscular contribution towards subsequent fracture aetiology. This response could also be an adaptive characteristic of the central nervous system to minimise vertebral loading time. PMID:17203276

  18. Vertebral Augmentation Involving Vertebroplasty or Kyphoplasty for Cancer-Related Vertebral Compression Fractures: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Untreated vertebral compression fractures can have serious clinical consequences and impose a considerable impact on patients' quality of life and on caregivers. Since non-surgical management of these fractures has limited effectiveness, vertebral augmentation procedures are gaining acceptance in clinical practice for pain control and fracture stabilization. The objective of this analysis was to determine the cost-effectiveness and budgetary impact of kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty compared with non-surgical management for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures in patients with cancer. Methods We performed a systematic review of health economic studies to identify relevant studies that compare the cost-effectiveness of kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty with non-surgical management for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures in adults with cancer. We also performed a primary cost-effectiveness analysis to assess the clinical benefits and costs of kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty compared with non-surgical management in the same population. We developed a Markov model to forecast benefits and harms of treatments, and corresponding quality-adjusted life years and costs. Clinical data and utility data were derived from published sources, while costing data were derived using Ontario administrative sources. We performed sensitivity analyses to examine the robustness of the results. In addition, a 1-year budget impact analysis was performed using data from Ontario administrative sources. Two scenarios were explored: (a) an increase in the total number of vertebral augmentation procedures performed among patients with cancer in Ontario, maintaining the current proportion of kyphoplasty versus vertebroplasty; and (b) no increase in the total number of vertebral augmentation procedures performed among patients with cancer in Ontario but an increase in the proportion of kyphoplasties versus vertebroplasties. Results The base case considered each of

  19. Vertebral burst fractures: CT analysis of the retropulsed fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Guerra, J. Jr.; Garfin, S.R.; Resnick, D.

    1984-12-01

    Ten cases of retropulsed thoracolumbar vertebral body fragments that had been documented by CT were reviewed to define and characterize the nature, appearance, and position of the retropulsed fragment. All of the retropulsed fragments arose from the superior aspect of the vertebral body. Five of ten patients had a vertical fracture within the retropulsed fragment. Six of ten patients had an associated vertical or Y-shaped fracture originating from the region of the basivertebral foramen and passing into the inferior one-half of the vertebral body. The presence of a retropulsed fragment is nearly pathognomonic of an axial compression injury. Characteristics of this lesion that may hinder surgical reduction are the intra-fragment fracture, rotation, and craniocaudad movement.

  20. Uniextrapedicular kyphoplasty for the treatment of thoracic osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhaohui; Ma, Rong; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Huiyong; Ding, Huiqiang; Liang, Siming; Suo, Zhigang

    2013-08-01

    Osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures are common and cause pain and disability. Most osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures occur in the lower thoracic and thoracolumbar spine. Percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty through a transpedicular approach is a classic procedure performed to treat osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. However, due to the slender morphology of the pedicles, small pedicle size, and the angular severity of thoracic kyphosis, performing kyphoplasty in middle and high thoracic levels is technically challenging. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of single-balloon kyphoplasty for the treatment of thoracic osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures via an extrapedicular approach. Between July 2004 and May 2008, thirty-eight patients with thoracic osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures underwent percutaneous kyphoplasty via a unilateral extrapedicular approach. Average patient age was 60.3 years. Symptomatic levels ranged from T4 to T12. All affected vertebrae were identified via physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and radiographs. Pain relief, vertebral height restoration, and kyphosis correction were compared pre- and postoperatively using the visual analog scale and radiographs. The operation was successful in all patients. Average injected bone cement volume was 3.2±1.4 mL. Mean follow-up was 9.5 months. Visual analog scale pain score improved in 36 of 38 patients postoperatively. Mean visual analog scale pain score was 8.92±0.682 preoperatively and 2.40±0.31 postoperatively and remained at 2.80±0.34 until last follow-up. Mean middle body height correction ratio was 50.9%±34.6%. No lateral wedging was found in the coronal alignment of the treated vertebrae. Three (7.9%) patients sustained cement extravasation with no adverse events. Kyphoplasty through a unilateral extrapedicular approach can achieve convergent and proper cement filling in the affected

  1. Vertebral Augmentation Involving Vertebroplasty or Kyphoplasty for Cancer-Related Vertebral Compression Fractures: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancers that metastasize to the spine and primary cancers such as multiple myeloma can result in vertebral compression fractures or instability. Conservative strategies, including bed rest, bracing, and analgesic use, can be ineffective, resulting in continued pain and progressive functional disability limiting mobility and self-care. Surgery is not usually an option for cancer patients in advanced disease states because of their poor medical health or functional status and limited life expectancy. The objectives of this review were to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous image-guided vertebral augmentation techniques, vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty, for palliation of cancer-related vertebral compression fractures. Methods We performed a systematic literature search for studies on vertebral augmentation of cancer-related vertebral compression fractures published from January 1, 2000, to October 2014; abstracts were screened by a single reviewer. For those studies meeting the eligibility criteria, full-text articles were obtained. Owing to the heterogeneity of the clinical reports, we performed a narrative synthesis based on an analytical framework constructed for the type of cancer-related vertebral fractures and the diversity of the vertebral augmentation interventions. Results The evidence review identified 3,391 citations, of which 111 clinical reports (4,235 patients) evaluated the effectiveness of vertebroplasty (78 reports, 2,545 patients) or kyphoplasty (33 reports, 1,690 patients) for patients with mixed primary spinal metastatic cancers, multiple myeloma, or hemangiomas. Overall the mean pain intensity scores often reported within 48 hours of vertebral augmentation (kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty), were significantly reduced. Analgesic use, although variably reported, usually involved parallel decreases, particularly in opioids, and mean pain-related disability scores were also significantly improved. In a randomized controlled

  2. Jack vertebral dilator kyphoplasty for treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Huang, Yonghui; Yang, Huilin; Chen, Qi; Sun, Taicun; Wu, Yan; Li, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs) are common in the elderly population and often involve the thoracolumbar vertebrae. Clinical symptoms of OVCFs include severe pain, loss of vertebral height, progressive kyphosis and increased mortality. Jack vertebral dilator kyphoplasty is a recently developed OVCFs treatment modality, with few systematic studies present in the literature. This retrospective study was designed to investigate the safety and efficacy of Jack vertebral dilator kyphoplasty for treating thoracolumbar OVCFs. Sixteen elderly patients (55-85 years) with solitary thoracolumbar OVCFs were treated with this procedure and followed-up (10-27 months). The amount of injected bone cement and operative time, preoperative and postoperative visual analogue scores, anterior and middle vertebral body heights, local kyphosis angle, and complications was analysed. The results showed that the method provided long-term pain relief and restoration of the vertebral body height and spinal alignment. No serious complications occurred, but two patients experienced recompression of the vertebral body, and one patient experienced cement leakage into a disc. In conclusion, Jack vertebral dilator kyphoplasty is a safe and effective minimally invasive procedure for treatment of OVCFs.

  3. Quantitative vertebral compression fracture evaluation using a height compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Burns, Joseph E.; Wiese, Tatjana; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-03-01

    Vertebral compression fractures can be caused by even minor trauma in patients with pathological conditions such as osteoporosis, varying greatly in vertebral body location and compression geometry. The location and morphology of the compression injury can guide decision making for treatment modality (vertebroplasty versus surgical fixation), and can be important for pre-surgical planning. We propose a height compass to evaluate the axial plane spatial distribution of compression injury (anterior, posterior, lateral, and central), and distinguish it from physiologic height variations of normal vertebrae. The method includes four steps: spine segmentation and partition, endplate detection, height compass computation and compression fracture evaluation. A height compass is computed for each vertebra, where the vertebral body is partitioned in the axial plane into 17 cells oriented about concentric rings. In the compass structure, a crown-like geometry is produced by three concentric rings which are divided into 8 equal length arcs by rays which are subtended by 8 common central angles. The radius of each ring increases multiplicatively, with resultant structure of a central node and two concentric surrounding bands of cells, each divided into octants. The height value for each octant is calculated and plotted against octants in neighboring vertebrae. The height compass shows intuitive display of the height distribution and can be used to easily identify the fracture regions. Our technique was evaluated on 8 thoraco-abdominal CT scans of patients with reported compression fractures and showed statistically significant differences in height value at the sites of the fractures.

  4. Trunk Muscle Activity Is Modified in Osteoporotic Vertebral Fracture and Thoracic Kyphosis with Potential Consequences for Vertebral Health

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Alison M.; Briggs, Andrew M.; Bennell, Kim L.; Hodges, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored inter-relationships between vertebral fracture, thoracic kyphosis and trunk muscle control in elderly people with osteoporosis. Osteoporotic vertebral fractures are associated with increased risk of further vertebral fractures; but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Several factors may explain this association, including changes in postural alignment (thoracic kyphosis) and altered trunk muscle contraction patterns. Both factors may increase risk of further fracture because of increased vertebral loading and impaired balance, which may increase falls risk. This study compared postural adjustments in 24 individuals with osteoporosis with and without vertebral fracture and with varying degrees of thoracic kyphosis. Trunk muscle electromyographic activity (EMG) associated with voluntary arm movements was recorded and compared between individuals with and without vertebral fracture, and between those with low and high thoracic kyphosis. Overall, elderly participants in the study demonstrated co-contraction of the trunk flexor and extensor muscles during forwards arm movements, but those with vertebral fractures demonstrated a more pronounced co-contraction than those without fracture. Individuals with high thoracic kyphosis demonstrated more pronounced alternating flexor and extensor EMG bursts than those with less kyphosis. Co-contraction of trunk flexor and extensor muscles in older individuals contrasts the alternating bursts of antagonist muscle activity in previous studies of young individuals. This may have several consequences, including altered balance efficacy and the potential for increased compressive loads through the spine. Both of these outcomes may have consequences in a population with fragile vertebrae who are susceptible to fracture. PMID:25285908

  5. Specter of the crone: the experience of vertebral fracture.

    PubMed

    Paier, G S

    1996-03-01

    This study sought to document the experience of women who suffer postmenopausal vertebral fractures. As the women described it, the essential structure of the experience of postmenopausal spinal fractures was an abrupt descent into disease, disability, and deformity. Each informant described significant challenges to her ability to continue to function as a whole, independent person. Constant pain, loss of independent function, changes in physical appearance, feelings of isolation, a sense of vulnerability, and an uncertain future were the hallmarks of the experience. This study identified specific areas of concern and suggests new focuses for nursing intervention with women with spinal fractures. An intervention program that incorporates education, programs to regain or maintain function, pain management, techniques to reduce stress and isolation, and promotion of self-care ability has the potential to enhance the quality of life for women with postmenopausal spinal fractures. PMID:8660010

  6. Traumatic Vertebral Fractures and Concomitant Fractures of the Rib in Southwest China, 2001 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwei; Zhou, Yue; Ou, Lan; Li, Changqing; Liu, Jun; Xiang, Liangbi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To our knowledge, the clinical characteristics of traumatic vertebral fractures and concomitant fractures of the rib (TVF-RF) have not been described in previous studies. To investigate the clinical characteristics of patients managed for TVF-RF. A retrospective study of 3142 patients who presented with traumatic vertebral fractures was performed. Two hundred twenty-six patients (7.2%) suffered from TVF-RF. Incidence rate ratios were then calculated with respect to the level of injury to the spine, the ASIA classification of neurological deficits and age. There were 171 male (75.7%) and 55 female (24.3%) patients with a mean age of 43.8 years. The most common mechanisms were falls from high heights in 81 cases and road traffic crashes in 67 cases. Right-sided rib injury occurred in 106 cases, left-sided injury occurred in 76 cases, and bilateral injury occurred in 44 cases. The most frequent location of the rib fractures was from the fourth rib to the ninth rib (70.3%, 510/725). Initial pulmonary complications (IPC) after trauma occurred in 116 cases (51.3%). The mortality rate for the entire group was 1.3% (3/226). The patients with thoracic vertebral fractures and neurological deficits had a higher frequency of multiple rib fractures and IPC than the other patients (P < 0.05). With the increased number of rib fractures, the frequency of IPC and mean intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay also increased. The rates of complications for patients with rib fractures were significantly different from those without rib fractures. We should pay much attention to the patients who presented with thoracic vertebral fractures and neurological deficits for minimizing further complications and mortality in such patients who had a higher frequency of multiple rib fractures and IPC than the other patients. PMID:26554809

  7. Complete cage migration/subsidence into the adjacent vertebral body after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Corniola, Marco V; Jägersberg, Max; Stienen, Martin N; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2015-03-01

    A variety of implant-related short and long-term complications after lumbar fusion surgery are recognized. Mid to long-term complications due to cage migration and/or cage subsidence are less frequently reported. Here, we report a patient with a complete cage migration into the superior adjacent vertebral body almost 20 years after the initial posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure. In this patient, the cage migration/subsidence was clinically silent, but a selective decompression for adjacent segment degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis was performed. We discuss the risk factors for cage migration/subsidence in view of the current literature.

  8. Quantitative, 3D Visualization of the Initiation and Progression of Vertebral Fractures Under Compression and Anterior Flexion.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Timothy M; Hussein, Amira I; Curtiss, Cameron; Fein, Paul M; Camp, Anderson; De Barros, Lidia; Morgan, Elise F

    2016-04-01

    The biomechanical mechanisms leading to vertebral fractures are not well understood. Clinical and laboratory evidence suggests that the vertebral endplate plays a key role in failure of the vertebra as a whole, but how this role differs for different types of vertebral loading is not known. Mechanical testing of human thoracic spine segments, in conjunction with time-lapsed micro-computed tomography, enabled quantitative assessment of deformations occurring throughout the entire vertebral body under axial compression combined with anterior flexion ("combined loading") and under axial compression only ("compression loading"). The resulting deformation maps indicated that endplate deflection was a principal feature of vertebral failure for both loading modes. Specifically, the onset of endplate deflection was temporally coincident with a pronounced drop in the vertebra's ability to support loads. The location of endplate deflection, and also vertebral strength, were associated with the porosity of the endplate and the microstructure of the underlying trabecular bone. However, the location of endplate deflection and the involvement of the cortex differed between the two types of loading. Under the combined loading, deflection initiated, and remained the largest, at the anterior central endplate or the anterior ring apophysis, depending in part on health of the adjacent intervertebral disc. This deflection was accompanied by outward bulging of the anterior cortex. In contrast, the location of endplate deflection was more varied in compression loading. For both loading types, the earliest progression to a mild fracture according to a quantitative morphometric criterion occurred only after much of the failure process had occurred. The outcomes of this work indicate that for two physiological loading modes, the vertebral endplate and underlying trabecular bone are critically involved in vertebral fracture. These outcomes provide a strong biomechanical rationale for

  9. The impact of endplate fracture on postoperative vertebral height loss and kyphotic deformity during treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with balloon kyphoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingqing; Xiao, Long; Zhang, Jianwei; Fan, Jin; Zhou, Wei; Yin, Guoyong; Ren, Yongxin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This retrospective study investigated the impact of endplate fracture on postoperative vertebral height loss and kyphotic deformity in 144 patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (OVCF), who received balloon kyphoplasty. Patients were divided into four groups: Group 1 had no superior endplate fracture, Group 2 had fractures on the anterior portion of the superior endplate, Group 3 had fractures on the posterior portion of the superior endplate, and Group 4 had complete superior endplate fractures. Anterior and middle vertebral body height, vertebral compression ratio, vertebral height loss rate, and kyphosis Cobb angle of each patient were measured and visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores were recorded. The anterior vertebral height and kyphosis deformity of all groups significantly improved after the surgery, whereas substantial anterior vertebral height loss and increased Cobb angle were observed in all patients at the last follow-up. Although the vertebral height loss rate and the Cobb angle in Group 2, 3 and 4 were larger compared with Group 1 at the last follow-up, only the vertebral height loss rate in Group 4 and the increase in the Cobb angle in Group 2 and 4 were statistically different from those in Group 1. The VAS and ODI scores in all groups measured after the surgery and at the last follow-up were significantly lower compared with preoperative scores, but there was no significant difference among these groups. Balloon kyphoplasty significantly improved vertebral fracture height and kyphosis. Vertebral height loss and increased kyphotic deformity were observed in OVCF patients with endplate fractures after the surgery. Postoperative aggravation of kyphosis was observed in Group 2. Furthermore, severe vertebral height loss and increased kyphotic deformity were confirmed in Group 4 after the surgery. Our results suggested that postoperative vertebral height loss and aggravation of kyphosis may

  10. Vertebral compression fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Sahgal, Arjun; Whyne, Cari M; Ma, Lijun; Larson, David A; Fehlings, Michael G

    2013-07-01

    The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy for metastatic spinal tumours is increasing. Serious adverse events for this treatment include vertebral compression fracture (VCF) and radiation myelopathy. Although VCF is a fairly low-risk adverse event (approximately 5% risk) after conventional radiotherapy, crude risk estimates for VCF after spinal SBRT range from 11% to 39%. In this Review, we summarise the evidence and predictive factors for VCF induced by spinal SBRT, review the pathophysiology of VCF in the metastatic spine, and discuss strategies used to prevent and manage this potentially disabling complication. PMID:23816297

  11. Vertebral osteoporotic fractures with height loss secondary to Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, C; Souto, S B; Rios, E; Pereira, J; Vinha, E; Freitas, P; Carvalho, D

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's disease is a rare condition which may present with a variety of signs and symptoms. In this report, we present a case of a 37-year-old man referred to our department due to osteoporosis complicated with vertebral and rib fractures and loss of six centimeters in height within the previous year. Study of secondary causes of osteoporosis led to the diagnosis of Cushing's disease. The patient was submitted to transsphenoidal surgery and histological findings confirmed the diagnosis. After surgery, the symptoms improved. Glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis may be reversible, but recovery of bone loss is gradual and may continue for as long as 10 years before bone mineral density normalizes. This case illustrates the need to consider secondary causes of osteoporosis in a young man with bone fractures, namely Cushing's syndrome.

  12. Ischemic spinal cord infarction in children without vertebral fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nance, Jessica R.; Golomb, Meredith R.

    2007-01-01

    Spinal cord infarction in children is a rare condition which is becoming more widely recognized. There are few reports in the pediatric literature characterizing etiology, diagnosis, treament and prognosis. The risk factors for pediatric ischemic spinal cord infarction include obstruction of blood flow associated with cardiovascular compromise or malformation, iatrogenic or traumatic vascular inujury, cerebellar herniation, thrombotic or embolic disease, infection, and vasculitis. In many children the cause of spinal cord ischemia in the absence of vertebral fracture is unknown. Imaging diagnosis of spinal cord ischemia is often difficult due to the small transverse area of the cord, cerebrospinal fluid artifact and inadequate resolution of MRI. Physical therapy is the most important treatment option. The prognosis is dependent on the level of spinal cord damage, early identification and reversal of ischemia, and follow-up with intensive physical therapy and medical support. In addition to summarizing the literature regarding spinal cord infarction in children without vertebral fracture, this review article adds two cases to the literature which highlight the difficulties and controversies in the management of this condition. PMID:17437902

  13. Controversial Issues in Kyphoplasty and Vertebroplasty in Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Papanastassiou, Ioannis D.; Filis, Andreas; Gerochristou, Maria A.; Vrionis, Frank D.

    2014-01-01

    Kyphoplasty (KP) and vertebroplasty (VP) have been successfully employed for many years for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. The purpose of this review is to resolve the controversial issues raised by the two randomized trials that claimed no difference between VP and SHAM procedure. In particular we compare nonsurgical management (NSM) and KP and VP, in terms of clinical parameters (pain, disability, quality of life, and new fractures), cost-effectiveness, radiological variables (kyphosis correction and vertebral height restoration), and VP versus KP for cement extravasation and complications profile. Cement types and optimal filling are analyzed and technological innovations are presented. Finally unipedicular/bipedicular techniques are compared. Conclusion. VP and KP are superior to NSM in clinical and radiological parameters and probably more cost-effective. KP is superior to VP in sagittal balance improvement and cement leaking. Complications are rare but serious adverse events have been described, so caution should be exerted. Unilateral procedures should be pursued whenever feasible. Upcoming randomized trials (CEEP, OSTEO-6, STIC-2, and VERTOS IV) will provide the missing link. PMID:24724106

  14. Cement augmentation for vertebral fractures in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Haroon; Bommireddy, Rajendranath; Klezl, Zdenek

    2014-12-01

    Objective of our study was to assess the outcome of cement augmentation in patients with multiple myeloma. We reviewed 12 patients with 48 vertebral fractures. Mean age was 62.5 years. Average length of follow-up was 27.5 months. Expected survival was less than 12 months in 2 patients and more than 12 months in the remaining patients. After surgery mean survival was 32.5 months. Mean correction in vertebral angle was 3.6°. Karnofsky score was more than 70 in 5 patients, 50-70 in 6 and less than 50 in 1 patient preoperatively, while it was more than 70 in all patients postoperatively. Preoperative mean ODI was 72%. After surgery it was 46% at 6 weeks and 14% at 12 months. All patients reported improvement in their pain status after surgery. Cement augmentation is a safe and effective way of treating symptoms of multiple myeloma, which occur due to vertebral metastases. It results in excellent pain control and improvement in quality of life. PMID:26280729

  15. Early Bone Marrow Edema Pattern of the Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fracture : Can Be Predictor of Vertebral Deformity Types and Prognosis?

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sung Eun; Park, Ji Seon; Jin, Wook; Park, So Young; Kim, Sung Bum

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether an early bone marrow edema pattern predicts vertebral deformity types and prognosis in osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (OVCF). Methods This retrospective study enrolled 64 patients with 75 acute OVCFs who underwent early MRI and followed up MRI. On early MRI, the low SI pattern of OVCF on T1WI were assessed and classified into 3 types (diffuse, globular or patchy, band-like). On followed up MRI, the vertebral deformity types (anterior wedge, biconcave, crush), degree of vertebral body height loss, incidence of vertebral osteonecrosis and spinal stenosis were assessed for each vertebral fracture types. Results According to the early bone marrow edema pattern on T1WI, 26 vertebrae were type 1, 14 vertebrae were type 2 and 35 vertebrae were type 3. On followed up MRI, the crush-type vertebral deformity was most frequent among the type 1 OVCFs, the biconcave-type vertebral deformity was most frequent among the type 2 OVCFs and the anterior wedge-type vertebral deformity was most frequent among the type 3 OVCFs (p<0.001). In addition, type 1 early bone marrow edema pattern of OVCF on T1WI were associated with higher incidence of severe degree vertebral body height loss, vertebral osteonecrosis and spinal stenosis on the follow up MRI. Conclusion Early bone marrow edema pattern of OVCF on T1WI, significant correlated with vertebral deformity types on the follow up MRI. The severe degree of vertebral height loss, vertebral osteonecrosis, and spinal stenosis were more frequent in patients with diffuse low SI pattern. PMID:26962419

  16. Comparison of 50 vertebral compression fractures treated with surgical (kyphoplasty) or non surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Stefano; Carmassi, Fabio; Bottai, Vanna; Dell’Osso, Giacomo; Gazzarri, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Summary The presence of a vertebral fracture increases the risk of a new fracture within a year by at least five times and the risk further increases in case of recurrent fractures (domino effect). The pain and fracture kyphosis can compromise respiratory function. Many patients sustain serious cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, metabolic, and immune complications related to immobility and bedrest. This study is a clinical and radiological assessment of a consecutive cohort of 50 patients with vertebral fractures. We made comparison of 25 vertebral compression fractures treated with surgical (kyphoplasty) or non surgical approach. Systematic reviews of this procedure have shown significantly improved back pain and quality of life compared to conservative therapy. When performed by a well-trained practitioner in appropriately selected patients, kyphoplasty is a safe and effective treatment for fresh vertebral compression fractures. PMID:23289035

  17. Development of computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li, Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Nie, Yongkang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Several clinical trials indicated clearly that pharmacologic therapy for osteoporosis is effective for persons with vertebral fractures for preventing subsequent fractures. It is, therefore, important to diagnose vertebral fractures early. Although most vertebral fractures are asymptomatic, they can often be detected on lateral chest radiographs which may be obtained for other purposes. However, investigators have reported that vertebral fractures which were visible on lateral chest radiographs were underdiagnosed or underreported. Therefore, our purpose in this study was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs and to assist radiologists' image interpretation. Our computerized scheme is based on the detection of upper and lower edges of vertebrae on lateral chest images. A curved rectangular area which included a number of visible vertebrae was identified. This area was then straightened such that the upper and lower edges of the vertebrae were oriented horizontally. For detection of vertebral edges, line components were enhanced, and a multiple thresholding technique followed by image feature analysis was applied to the line enhanced image. Finally, vertebral heights determined from the detected vertebral edges were used for characterizing the shape of the vertebrae and for distinguishing fractured from normal vertebrae. Our preliminary results indicated that all of the severely fractured vertebrae in a small database were detected correctly by our computerized method.

  18. Vulnerability of healthy vertebrae in patients with and without previous vertebral fracture.

    PubMed

    Morosano, Mario E; Menoyo, Inés; Caferra, Digna A; Sánchez, Ariel; Tomat, María F; Bocanera, Roberto; Pezzotto, Stella M; Masoni, Ana M

    2011-04-01

    Vertebral deformities are associated with a marked increase in morbidity, mortality, and burden in terms of sanitary expenditures. Patients with vertebral fractures have a negative impact in their health, less quality of life, and loss of functional capacity and independence. The purpose of this study was to explore the vulnerability of healthy vertebrae in patients who have sustained already a compression fracture and in patients who do not have prevalent fractures in the thoracic spine; and to explore the association of the deformity in healthy vertebrae with different variables, such as bone mineral density (BMD), body mass index, age, loss of height, presence of clinical kyphosis, history of other osteoporotic fractures, and falls occurring during the last year. Clinical data and complementary studies from 175 postmenopausal outpatients were analyzed. These women (age: 69.7±11.1 years) had not received any treatment for osteoporosis. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the thoracic spine and bone densitometry of the hip were obtained; morphometry was performed in 1575 thoracic vertebrae from T4 to T12. The angle of wedging of each vertebral body was calculated using a trigonometric formula. Then, the sum of wedge angles of vertebral bodies (SWA) was determined, and Cobb angle was measured. In patients with vertebral fractures, after excluding the angles of fractured vertebral bodies, the mean wedge angle of the remaining vertebrae (MWAhealthy) was calculated. The same procedure was followed in patients without vertebral fractures. MWAhealthy was considered as an indicator of the structural vulnerability of non-fractured vertebrae. Patients with prevalent fractures had lower BMD, wider Cobb angle, and higher sum of wedge angles than patients without vertebral fractures. The proportion of patients with accentuation of clinical kyphosis was higher in the group with prevalent vertebral fractures. A highly significant difference was found in the MWAhealthy

  19. Vertebral Compression Fracture Related to Pancreatic Cancer With Osteoblastic Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chih, Yu-Pin; Wu, Wei-Ting; Lin, Chien-Lin; Jou, Herng-Jeng; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Liang-Chi; Chou, Li-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Compression fracture of the vertebral body is common in the older patients. The possible etiology like osteoporosis or cancer metastasis should be included as a possibility in the differential diagnosis for severe back pain, to prevent delays in diagnosis and treatment. More severe fractures can cause significant pain, leading to inability to perform activities of daily living, and life-threatening in the older patient. We report a rare case of a 61-year-old man suffering from severe lower back pain and intermittent abdominal fullness. He came to our clinic, where muscle power was normal, but could not stand up or change posture because of severe back pain. Plain film and magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spine both revealed osteoblastic lesion at L2 spine. Abdomen computed tomography showed a mass at the pancreatic body. The pancreatic cancer with osteoblastic metastasis was diagnosed. After receiving multimodality therapy such as percutaneous vertebroplasty and pain controlling, we provided effective palliation of symptoms, aggressive rehabilitation program, and better quality of life. Our case highlights the benefits of multidisciplinary cancer treatment for such patient, preventing the complications such as immobilization accompanied with adverse effects like musculoskeletal, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems. All clinicians should be informed of the clinical findings to provide patients with suitable therapies and surveys. PMID:26844499

  20. [Kyphoplasty method for the treatment of traumatic osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures: case report].

    PubMed

    Eser, Olcay; Aslan, Adem; Coşar, Murat; Kalkan, Erdal; Albayrak, Ramazan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the kyphoplasty method for the treatment of traumatic osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures in geriatric patients is to improve the patient's quality of life. In this report we present two elderly patients who were suffering of traumatic osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures and underwent successful kyphoplasties. Percutaneous kyphoplasty method for the surgical treatment of these fractures decreases the hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in these patients.

  1. Bone-density-specific fracture risk: A population-based study of the relationship between osteoporosis and vertebral fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, L.J.; Wahner, H.W.; Richelson, L.S.; O'Fallon, W.M.; Dunn, W.L.; Riggs, B.L.

    1985-05-01

    The search for a specific level of bone density that clearly distinguishes patients with osteoporosis from those without has been largely unsuccessful. A different, ''gradient of risk'' model was used to assess the effect of various degrees of osteoporosis on the prevalence of vertebral fractures. The authors measured spinal (L/sub 1/-L/sub 4/) bone mineral (BM) with dual photon absorptiometry in an age-stratified random sample of Rochester, Minnesota women greater than or equal to 35 years old to estimate the distribution of spinal BM in the population of adult woman. The authors also assessed BM among women in the sample who had one or more vertebral fractures to estimate both the total number of women with vertebral fractures in the population and the distribution of spinal BM in such women. These population-based estimates were then used to calculate the prevalence rate of vertebral fracture at various levels of spinal BM. Women with spinal BM greater than or equal to 1.40 g/cm/sup 2/ were free of vertebral fractures. Among women with BM between 1.00 and 1.39 g/cm/sup 2/, the prevalence of vertebral fractures was about 7%. The prevalence rate increased as spinal BM decreased further. Among women with spinal BM<0.60 g/cm/sup 2/, all had at least one vertebral fracture (prevalence=100%). These data indicate that osteoporosis is a necessary cause of age-related vertebral fractures and, at certain low levels, is a sufficient cause of such fractures in conjunction with the activities of daily living.

  2. Complications following kyphoplasty in unstable osteoporotic vertebral body fractures. A guide to correct fracture analysis.

    PubMed

    Trouillier, Hans-Heinrich; Birkenmaier, Christof; Seidl, Tamara; Jansson, Volkmar

    2013-10-01

    The possibilities offered by kyphoplasty in the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures have been widely described. Kyphoplasty is technically not very demanding, it can be easily learned and it is minimally invasive when compared to open surgical fracture treatment. Like many other simple surgical methods, it has spread rapidly and as a consequence of the above factors combined with its good reimbursement in many countries, it has experienced a widening in the indications for which it is being employed. The intial purpose of kyphoplasty was pain relief based on vertebral body stabilisation combined with restoration of vertebral body height. An increasingly uncritical use of the method can be observed and as a consequence, an increase in serious complications. During recent years, spinal surgery departments have received an increasing number of patients with serious complications following kyphoplasty, requiring major reconstructive spinal surgery. On the basis of 12 cases treated over the past 36 months, we aim to provide guidelines for the indications of the kyphoplasty procedure.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of percutaneous vertebroplasty in osteoporotic vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Masala, Salvatore; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Vinicola, Vincenzo; Mammucari, Matteo; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted in 179 consecutive patients (48 males, 131 females; mean age: 72.0 ± 8.59 years; range: 51–93) with single symptomatic acute amyelic osteoporotic vertebral fracture presenting between September 2004 and September 2005 to the Santa Lucia Foundation in Rome, Italy. Vertebral fractures usually become manifest due to pain which can be debilitating. Treatment depends on the presence or absence of spinal cord involvement. In the first case, surgical stabilization is mandatory. In the second case, treatment may be performed either by conservative medical therapy (CMT) or percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness, costs and cost-effectiveness of percutaneous vertebroplasty. After 2 weeks of analgesic therapy, 153 patients presented refractory pain and were offered treatment by PVT. A total of 58 patients accepted and underwent PVT (PVT group), while 95 refused and underwent conservative medical therapy (CMT group). Follow-up was performed by specialist consults, spine radiography and MRI and a self-assessment questionnaire evaluating pain using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and function using an ambulation and an Activities of Daily Living (ADL) scale. A 12-month follow-up was obtained in 86 of 95 (90.5%) CMT group patients and 54 of 58 (93.1%) PVT group patients. Significant reduction of VAS and improvement of ambulation and ADL was observed in both groups at 1 week and 3 and 12 months (P < 0.05; Wilcoxon signed rank test), however, these results were significantly superior in the PVT group at 1 week and 3 months (P < 0.05; Mann–Whitney U test). Average cost per patient at 1 week and 3 and 12 months were respectively 755.49 ± 661.96, 3791.95 ± 3341.97 and 4299.55 ± 3211.53 € (CMT group) and 3311.35 ± 0.32, 3745.30 ± 3.59 and 4101.05 ± 755.41 € (PVT group). PVT resulted significantly more cost-effective than CMT with regards to the three scales at

  4. Sex hormones, sex hormone binding globulin, and vertebral fractures in older men.

    PubMed

    Cawthon, Peggy M; Schousboe, John T; Harrison, Stephanie L; Ensrud, Kristine E; Black, Dennis; Cauley, Jane A; Cummings, Steven R; LeBlanc, Erin S; Laughlin, Gail A; Nielson, Carrie M; Broughton, Augusta; Kado, Deborah M; Hoffman, Andrew R; Jamal, Sophie A; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Orwoll, Eric S

    2016-03-01

    The association between sex hormones and sex hormone binding globin (SHBG) with vertebral fractures in men is not well studied. In these analyses, we determined whether sex hormones and SHBG were associated with greater likelihood of vertebral fractures in a prospective cohort study of community dwelling older men. We included data from participants in MrOS who had been randomly selected for hormone measurement (N=1463, including 1054 with follow-up data 4.6years later). Major outcomes included prevalent vertebral fracture (semi-quantitative grade≥2, N=140, 9.6%) and new or worsening vertebral fracture (change in SQ grade≥1, N=55, 5.2%). Odds ratios per SD decrease in sex hormones and per SD increase in SHBG were estimated with logistic regression adjusted for potentially confounding factors, including age, bone mineral density, and other sex hormones. Higher SHBG was associated with a greater likelihood of prevalent vertebral fractures (OR: 1.38 per SD increase, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.72). Total estradiol analyzed as a continuous variable was not associated with prevalent vertebral fractures (OR per SD decrease: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.10). Men with total estradiol values ≤17pg/ml had a borderline higher likelihood of prevalent fracture than men with higher values (OR: 1.46, 95% CI: 0.99, 2.16). There was no association between total testosterone and prevalent fracture. In longitudinal analyses, SHBG (OR: 1.42 per SD increase, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.95) was associated with new or worsening vertebral fracture, but there was no association with total estradiol or total testosterone. In conclusion, higher SHBG (but not testosterone or estradiol) is an independent risk factor for vertebral fractures in older men. PMID:26778261

  5. Sex hormones, sex hormone binding globulin, and vertebral fractures in older men.

    PubMed

    Cawthon, Peggy M; Schousboe, John T; Harrison, Stephanie L; Ensrud, Kristine E; Black, Dennis; Cauley, Jane A; Cummings, Steven R; LeBlanc, Erin S; Laughlin, Gail A; Nielson, Carrie M; Broughton, Augusta; Kado, Deborah M; Hoffman, Andrew R; Jamal, Sophie A; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Orwoll, Eric S

    2016-03-01

    The association between sex hormones and sex hormone binding globin (SHBG) with vertebral fractures in men is not well studied. In these analyses, we determined whether sex hormones and SHBG were associated with greater likelihood of vertebral fractures in a prospective cohort study of community dwelling older men. We included data from participants in MrOS who had been randomly selected for hormone measurement (N=1463, including 1054 with follow-up data 4.6years later). Major outcomes included prevalent vertebral fracture (semi-quantitative grade≥2, N=140, 9.6%) and new or worsening vertebral fracture (change in SQ grade≥1, N=55, 5.2%). Odds ratios per SD decrease in sex hormones and per SD increase in SHBG were estimated with logistic regression adjusted for potentially confounding factors, including age, bone mineral density, and other sex hormones. Higher SHBG was associated with a greater likelihood of prevalent vertebral fractures (OR: 1.38 per SD increase, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.72). Total estradiol analyzed as a continuous variable was not associated with prevalent vertebral fractures (OR per SD decrease: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.10). Men with total estradiol values ≤17pg/ml had a borderline higher likelihood of prevalent fracture than men with higher values (OR: 1.46, 95% CI: 0.99, 2.16). There was no association between total testosterone and prevalent fracture. In longitudinal analyses, SHBG (OR: 1.42 per SD increase, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.95) was associated with new or worsening vertebral fracture, but there was no association with total estradiol or total testosterone. In conclusion, higher SHBG (but not testosterone or estradiol) is an independent risk factor for vertebral fractures in older men.

  6. High prevalence of radiological vertebral fractures in adult patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, G; Dordoni, C; Doga, M; Galderisi, F; Venturini, M; Calzavara-Pinton, P; Maroldi, R; Giustina, A; Colombi, M

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have reported an increased prevalence of osteoporosis in Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS), but these were limited by a small number of patients and lack of information on fragility fractures. In this crosssectional study, we evaluated the prevalence of radiological vertebral fractures (by quantitative morphometry) and bone mineral density (BMD, at lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) in 52 consecutive patientswith EDS (10 males, 42 females; median age 41 years, range: 21–71; 12with EDS classic type, 37 with EDS hypermobility type, 1 with classic vascular-like EDS, and 2 without specific classification) and 197 control subjects (163 females and 34 males; median age 49 years, range: 26–83) attending an outpatient bone clinic. EDS patients were also evaluated for back pain by numeric pain rating scale (NRS- 11).Vertebral fractures were significantly more prevalent in EDS as compared to the control subjects (38.5% vs. 5.1%; p b 0.001) without significant differences in BMD at either skeletal sites. In EDS patients, the prevalence of vertebral fractures was not significantly (p = 0.72) different between classic and hypermobility types. BMD was not significantly different between fractured and non-fractured EDS patients either at lumbar spine (p = 0.14), total hip (p=0.08), or femoral neck (p=0.21). Severe back pain(≥7 NRS)was more frequent in EDS patients with vertebral fractures as compared to thosewithout fractures (60% vs. 28%; p=0.04). Inconclusion, this is the first study showing high prevalence of vertebral fractures in a relatively large population of EDS patients. Vertebral fractures were associated with more severe back pain suggesting a potential involvement of skeletal fragility in determining poor quality of life. The lack of correlation between vertebral fractures and BMD is consistent with the hypothesis that bone quality may be impaired in EDS.

  7. High prevalence of radiological vertebral fractures in adult patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, G; Dordoni, C; Doga, M; Galderisi, F; Venturini, M; Calzavara-Pinton, P; Maroldi, R; Giustina, A; Colombi, M

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have reported an increased prevalence of osteoporosis in Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS), but these were limited by a small number of patients and lack of information on fragility fractures. In this crosssectional study, we evaluated the prevalence of radiological vertebral fractures (by quantitative morphometry) and bone mineral density (BMD, at lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) in 52 consecutive patientswith EDS (10 males, 42 females; median age 41 years, range: 21–71; 12with EDS classic type, 37 with EDS hypermobility type, 1 with classic vascular-like EDS, and 2 without specific classification) and 197 control subjects (163 females and 34 males; median age 49 years, range: 26–83) attending an outpatient bone clinic. EDS patients were also evaluated for back pain by numeric pain rating scale (NRS- 11).Vertebral fractures were significantly more prevalent in EDS as compared to the control subjects (38.5% vs. 5.1%; p b 0.001) without significant differences in BMD at either skeletal sites. In EDS patients, the prevalence of vertebral fractures was not significantly (p = 0.72) different between classic and hypermobility types. BMD was not significantly different between fractured and non-fractured EDS patients either at lumbar spine (p = 0.14), total hip (p=0.08), or femoral neck (p=0.21). Severe back pain(≥7 NRS)was more frequent in EDS patients with vertebral fractures as compared to thosewithout fractures (60% vs. 28%; p=0.04). Inconclusion, this is the first study showing high prevalence of vertebral fractures in a relatively large population of EDS patients. Vertebral fractures were associated with more severe back pain suggesting a potential involvement of skeletal fragility in determining poor quality of life. The lack of correlation between vertebral fractures and BMD is consistent with the hypothesis that bone quality may be impaired in EDS. PMID:26708925

  8. A retrospective study evaluating the correlation between the severity of intervertebral disc injury and the anteroposterior type of thoracolumbar vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yunshan; Ren, Dong; Zou, Yan; Lu, Jian; Wang*, Pengcheng

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation between the severity of intervertebral disc injury and the anteroposterior type of thoracolumbar vertebral fractures. METHODS: Fifty-six cases of thoracolumbar vertebral fractures treated in our trauma center from October 2012 to October 2013 were included in this study. The fractures were classified by the anteroposterior classification, whereas the severity of intervertebral disc injury was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to analyze the correlation between the severity of intervertebral disc injury and the anteroposterior type of thoracolumbar fractures, whereas a χ2 test was adopted to measure the variability between different fracture types and upper and lower adjacent disc injuries. RESULTS: The Spearman correlation coefficients between fracture types and the severity of the upper and lower adjacent disc injuries were 0.739 (PU<0.001) and 0.368 (PL=0.005), respectively. It means that the more complex Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) classifications are the disc injury is more severe. There was also a significant difference in the severity of injury between the upper and lower adjacent discs near the fractured vertebrae (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In thoracolumbar spinal fractures, the severity of the adjacent intervertebral disc injury is positively correlated with the anteroposterior fracture type. The injury primarily involves intervertebral discs near the fractured end plate, with more frequent and severe injuries observed in the upper than in the lower discs. The presence of intervertebral disc injury, along with its severity, may provide useful information during the clinical decision-making process. PMID:27438561

  9. One-Stage Percutaneous Treatment in a Patient with Pelvic and Vertebral Compression Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Sedat, Jacques Chau, Yves; Razafidratsiva, Cesar; Bronsard, Nicolas; Peretti, Fernand de

    2010-02-15

    An active 38-year-old patient presenting a vertebral compression fracture associated with a pelvic fracture was treated in one stage with CT-guided fixation of the sacrum and kyphoplasty. This treatment decreased the pain, restored the vertebral height, and enabled the patient to be ambulatory. The main advantage of this double approach was to shorten the hospital stay and the nonworking period.

  10. Effect of Brace to Osteoporotic Vertebral Fracture: a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuan Zhe; Lee, Jae Hyup

    2016-10-01

    Brace is one of the most commonly used interventions to manage osteoporotic vertebral fracture. However, its authentic effectiveness remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of brace in patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures. We conducted a literature review and meta-analysis following the guideline and handbook of the Cochrane collaboration. Ten published articles were included in this study and data from 4 randomized controlled trials were analyzed. Low quality evidence proved using Spinomed brace could bring large and significant beneficial effect to patients with sub-acute osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Very low quality evidence proved no significant difference between Spinomed orthosis, rigid brace and soft brace when they were used in patients with acute fractures. Therefore, it might be applicable to recommend middle term use of Spinomed orthosis to patients with subacute fracture. In addition, this study emphasized the need for high quality randomized controlled trials. PMID:27550495

  11. Effect of Brace to Osteoporotic Vertebral Fracture: a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Brace is one of the most commonly used interventions to manage osteoporotic vertebral fracture. However, its authentic effectiveness remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of brace in patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures. We conducted a literature review and meta-analysis following the guideline and handbook of the Cochrane collaboration. Ten published articles were included in this study and data from 4 randomized controlled trials were analyzed. Low quality evidence proved using Spinomed brace could bring large and significant beneficial effect to patients with sub-acute osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Very low quality evidence proved no significant difference between Spinomed orthosis, rigid brace and soft brace when they were used in patients with acute fractures. Therefore, it might be applicable to recommend middle term use of Spinomed orthosis to patients with subacute fracture. In addition, this study emphasized the need for high quality randomized controlled trials. PMID:27550495

  12. Functional results of vertebral augmentation techniques in pathological vertebral fractures of myelomatous patients.

    PubMed Central

    Köse, Kamil Cagri; Cebesoy, Oguz; Akan, Burak; Altinel, Levent; Dinçer, Derya; Yazar, Tarik

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This is a retrospective study to determine the effects of vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty on quality of life in multiple myeloma patients with spinal compression fractures. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-four patients with primary multiple myeloma were treated for symptomatic compression fractures between June 2003 and June 2005. Kyphoplasty was applied to 22 levels in 18 and vertebroplasty to 28 levels in 16 patients. The pain-related disability was evaluated for every single daily living activity using visual analog scale (VAS) over 10 points. (pain at rest, walking, sitting-standing, taking a shower and wearing clothes). (This evaluation is performed to every patient with degenerative disorders of the spine upon admission to our clinic.) Overall VAS scores were evaluated over 50 points (0 minimum, 50 maximum) preoperatively, at postoperative six weeks, six months and at one year prior to taking analgesics. The amount of analgesic use was recorded. Data was analyzed statistically using variance analysis, Friedman's multiple comparison test and Student's t test. RESULTS: The mean overall pain score in the kyphoplasty group decreased from a preoperative value of 36 to 12.13 at the sixth postoperative week, to 8.63 at the sixth month and to 9.72 at one year. (p<0.001). The mean overall pain score in the vertebroplasty group decreased from a preoperative value of 37.83 to 15.33 at the sixth postoperative week, to 12.17 at sixth months and to 13.47 at one year. (p<0.001). Student's t test was used to analyze the percentage of differences in overall pain score. Difference between groups was not statistically significant at the sixth week (p=0.106) but was statistically significant both at the sixth month (p=0.024) and at one year (p=0.027) in favor of kyphoplasty group. No secondary collapse was observed in adjacent levels in both groups. There were no intrapostoperative neurologic/pulmonary complications in both groups. Analgesics usage significantly

  13. High prevalence of radiological vertebral fractures in women with prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Mancini, Tatiana; Mormando, Marilda; De Menis, Ernesto; Bianchi, Antonio; Doga, Mauro; Porcelli, Teresa; Vescovi, Pier Paolo; De Marinis, Laura; Giustina, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Hyperprolactinemia may cause bone loss but data on fractures are scanty. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of vertebral fractures in women with prolactin (PRL)-secreting adenoma. In this cross-sectional study, 78 women (median age 45.5 years, range: 20-81) with PRL-secreting pituitary adenoma (66 with microadenoma and 12 with macroadenoma) and 156 control subjects, with normal PRL values and with comparable age to patients with hyperprolactinemia, were evaluated for vertebral fractures by a morphometric approach and for bone mineral density (BMD) by a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at lumbar spine. Vertebral fractures were shown in 25 patients with PRL-secreting adenoma (32.6%) and in 20 controls (12.8%, P < 0.001). Fractured patients were significantly older (P < 0.001) and had lower BMD T-score (P < 0.001), longer duration of disease (P < 0.001), higher serum PRL (P = 0.004) and lower serum IGF-I (P < 0.001) values as compared to patients who did not fracture. The prevalence of vertebral fractures was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in post-menopausal women with PRL-secreting adenoma as compared to pre-menopausal patients. Fractures occurred more frequently (P = 0.01) in patients with untreated hyperprolactinemia versus patients treated with cabergoline. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that duration of disease maintained a significant correlation with vertebral fractures (odds ratio 1.16, C.I. 95% 1.02-1.33) even after correction for age, menopausal status, treatment with cabergoline, BMD, serum IGF-I and serum PRL values. Hyperprolactinemia is associated with high prevalence of radiological vertebral fractures in women with PRL-secreting adenoma.

  14. Interpedicular Approach in Percutaneous Sacroplasty for Treatment of Sacral Vertebral Body Pathologic Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    F Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I rat, Ahmet Kemal; Guemues, Burcak; Kaya, Emin Kuku, Irfan; Harma, Ahmet

    2011-02-15

    For this technique, bone needle is introduced into the S1 vertebral body through the interpedicular route by penetrating the central spinal canal at the level of S3-4 and passing through the vertebral body of S2-3 parallel to the anterior border of sacrum. With the interpedicular approach, two sacral vertebral bodies can be injected in one session and lower sacral body injection also is available. interpedicular technique is a safe, practical, and effective technique for the treatment of sacral vertebral body pathologic fractures.

  15. Computerized detection of vertebral compression fractures on lateral chest radiographs: Preliminary results with a tool for early detection of osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li Qiang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-12-15

    Vertebral fracture (or vertebral deformity) is a very common outcome of osteoporosis, which is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Early detection of vertebral fractures is important because timely pharmacologic intervention can reduce the risk of subsequent additional fractures. Chest radiographs are used routinely for detection of lung and heart diseases, and vertebral fractures can be visible on lateral chest radiographs. However, investigators noted that about 50% of vertebral fractures visible on lateral chest radiographs were underdiagnosed or under-reported, even when the fractures were severe. Therefore, our goal was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs in order to assist radiologists' image interpretation and thus allow the early diagnosis of osteoporosis. The cases used in this study were 20 patients with severe vertebral fractures and 118 patients without fractures, as confirmed by the consensus of two radiologists. Radiologists identified the locations of fractured vertebrae, and they provided morphometric data on the vertebral shape for evaluation of the accuracy of detecting vertebral end plates by computer. In our computerized method, a curved search area, which included a number of vertebral end plates, was first extracted automatically, and was straightened so that vertebral end plates became oriented horizontally. Edge candidates were enhanced by use of a horizontal line-enhancement filter in the straightened image, and a multiple thresholding technique, followed by feature analysis, was used for identification of the vertebral end plates. The height of each vertebra was determined from locations of identified vertebral end plates, and fractured vertebrae were detected by comparison of the measured vertebral height with the expected height. The sensitivity of our computerized method for detection of fracture cases was 95% (19/20), with 1.03 (139/135) false

  16. Unilateral versus bilateral percutaneous kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures: A systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui; Huang, Peng; Zhang, Xuesong; Zheng, Guoquan; Wang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare the efficacy and safety of unilateral versus bilateral PKP for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs). Six databases (Cochrane, PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SinoMed, and CNKI) were searched without language restrictions. Twelve randomized controlled trials involving a total of 1,030 patients were identified. The results indicate that unilateral PKP had a better degree of pain relief (visual analog scale) than bilateral PKP (p = 0.04; 95%CI = -0.36 to -0.00) with short-term follow-up (within 4 weeks) after operation. The radiological outcome assessment with short-term follow-up after operation indicates bilateral PKP had a better degree of anterior vertebral height restoration (p = 0.03; 95%CI = -2.58 to -0.14). Operation time and cement dosage were less for unilateral PKP (p < 0.05). There were no differences in complications such as cement leakage and adjacent vertebral fractures between two approaches (p = 0.06 and p = 0.97, respectively). Life quality assessment (SF-36) indicates unilateral PKP had a better result of bodily pain relief (p < 0.05; 95%CI = 3.93 to 7.48) and general health benefit (p < 0.05; 95%CI = 0.02 to 2.93) with short-term follow-up after operation. We suggest that a unilateral PKP is advantageous. PMID:26123667

  17. Unilateral versus bilateral percutaneous kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures: A systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui; Huang, Peng; Zhang, Xuesong; Zheng, Guoquan; Wang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare the efficacy and safety of unilateral versus bilateral PKP for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs). Six databases (Cochrane, PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SinoMed, and CNKI) were searched without language restrictions. Twelve randomized controlled trials involving a total of 1,030 patients were identified. The results indicate that unilateral PKP had a better degree of pain relief (visual analog scale) than bilateral PKP (p = 0.04; 95%CI = -0.36 to -0.00) with short-term follow-up (within 4 weeks) after operation. The radiological outcome assessment with short-term follow-up after operation indicates bilateral PKP had a better degree of anterior vertebral height restoration (p = 0.03; 95%CI = -2.58 to -0.14). Operation time and cement dosage were less for unilateral PKP (p < 0.05). There were no differences in complications such as cement leakage and adjacent vertebral fractures between two approaches (p = 0.06 and p = 0.97, respectively). Life quality assessment (SF-36) indicates unilateral PKP had a better result of bodily pain relief (p < 0.05; 95%CI = 3.93 to 7.48) and general health benefit (p < 0.05; 95%CI = 0.02 to 2.93) with short-term follow-up after operation. We suggest that a unilateral PKP is advantageous.

  18. Understanding Balloon Kyphoplasty and Myeloma-Induced Vertebral Compression Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... back and the ribs. More often than not, back pain and generalized weakness are what bring many undiagnosed ... the doctor in the first place. Sudden severe back pain can indicate that the vertebral body *Words appearing ...

  19. Multiple seizure-induced thoracic vertebral compression fractures: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Stilwell, Peter; Harman, Katherine; Hsu, William; Seaman, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal injuries stemming from forceful muscular contractions during seizures have been documented in the literature. Reports of multiple seizure-induced spinal fractures, in the absence of external trauma and without risk factors for fracture, are rare. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old male, newly diagnosed with epilepsy, presented to a chiropractic clinic with the complaint of mid-thoracic pain beginning after a tonic-clonic seizure with no associated external trauma. Radiographs revealed the impression of five new vertebral compression fractures from T4 to T8. Discussion: This report highlights the importance of a complete history and examination of patients with a history of tonic-clonic seizures and back pain, especially when considering spinal adjustments. Summary: This case report presents an argument that a tonic-clonic seizure, in the absence of external trauma or significant risk factors for fracture, resulted in multiple vertebral compression fractures. PMID:27713581

  20. Outcome and Efficacy of Height Gain and Sagittal Alignment after Kyphoplasty of Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae-One; Jo, Dae-Jean

    2007-01-01

    Objective Although a significant correction of local kyphosis has been reported previously, only a few studies have investigated whether this correction leads to an improved overall sagittal alignment. The study objective was to determine whether an improvement in the local kyphotic angle improves the overall sagittal alignment. We examined and compared the effects of thoracic and lumbar level kyphoplasty procedures on local versus overall sagittal alignment of the spine. Methods Thirty-eight patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures who showed poor response to conventional, palliative medical therapy underwent single-level kyphoplasty. The pertinent clinical data of these patients, from June 2006 to November 2006, were reviewed retrospectively. We measured preoperative and postoperative vertebral body heights, which were classified as anterior, middle, or posterior fractured vertebral body heights. Furthermore, the local and overall sagittal angles after polymethylmethacrylate deposition were measured. Results More height was gained at the thoracic level, and the middle vertebral height regained the most. A significant local kyphosis correction was observed at the fractured level, and the correction at larger spanning segments decreased with the distance from the fractured level. Conclusion The inflatable balloon kyphoplasty procedure was the most effective in regaining the height of the thoracic fractured vertebra in the middle vertebral body. The kyphosis correction by kyphoplasty was mainly achieved in the fractured vertebral body. Sagittal angular correction decreased with an increase in the distance from the fractured vertebra. No significant improvement was observed in the overall sagittal alignment after kyphoplasty. Further studies in a larger population are required to clarify this issue. PMID:19096555

  1. Vertebral Strength and Estimated Fracture Risk Across the BMI Spectrum in Women.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Katherine N; Bruno, Alexander G; Bredella, Miriam A; Schorr, Melanie; Lawson, Elizabeth A; Gill, Corey M; Singhal, Vibha; Meenaghan, Erinne; Gerweck, Anu V; Eddy, Kamryn T; Ebrahimi, Seda; Koman, Stuart L; Greenblatt, James M; Keane, Robert J; Weigel, Thomas; Dechant, Esther; Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne; Bouxsein, Mary L; Miller, Karen K

    2016-02-01

    Somewhat paradoxically, fracture risk, which depends on applied loads and bone strength, is elevated in both anorexia nervosa and obesity at certain skeletal sites. Factor-of-risk (Φ), the ratio of applied load to bone strength, is a biomechanically based method to estimate fracture risk; theoretically, higher Φ reflects increased fracture risk. We estimated vertebral strength (linear combination of integral volumetric bone mineral density [Int.vBMD] and cross-sectional area from quantitative computed tomography [QCT]), vertebral compressive loads, and Φ at L4 in 176 women (65 anorexia nervosa, 45 lean controls, and 66 obese). Using biomechanical models, applied loads were estimated for: 1) standing; 2) arms flexed 90°, holding 5 kg in each hand (holding); 3) 45° trunk flexion, 5 kg in each hand (lifting); 4) 20° trunk right lateral bend, 10 kg in right hand (bending). We also investigated associations of Int.vBMD and vertebral strength with lean mass (from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry [DXA]) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT, from QCT). Women with anorexia nervosa had lower, whereas obese women had similar, Int.vBMD and estimated vertebral strength compared with controls. Vertebral loads were highest in obesity and lowest in anorexia nervosa for standing, holding, and lifting (p < 0.0001) but were highest in anorexia nervosa for bending (p < 0.02). Obese women had highest Φ for standing and lifting, whereas women with anorexia nervosa had highest Φ for bending (p < 0.0001). Obese and anorexia nervosa subjects had higher Φ for holding than controls (p < 0.03). Int.vBMD and estimated vertebral strength were associated positively with lean mass (R = 0.28 to 0.45, p ≤ 0.0001) in all groups combined and negatively with VAT (R = -[0.36 to 0.38], p < 0.003) within the obese group. Therefore, women with anorexia nervosa had higher estimated vertebral fracture risk (Φ) for holding and bending because of inferior vertebral strength. Despite similar

  2. Classification of vertebral compression fractures in magnetic resonance images using spectral and fractal analysis.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Marques, P M; Spagnoli, H F; Frighetto-Pereira, L; Menezes-Reis, R; Metzner, G A; Rangayyan, R M; Nogueira-Barbosa, M H

    2015-08-01

    Fractures with partial collapse of vertebral bodies are generically referred to as "vertebral compression fractures" or VCFs. VCFs can have different etiologies comprising trauma, bone failure related to osteoporosis, or metastatic cancer affecting bone. VCFs related to osteoporosis (benign fractures) and to cancer (malignant fractures) are commonly found in the elderly population. In the clinical setting, the differentiation between benign and malignant fractures is complex and difficult. This paper presents a study aimed at developing a system for computer-aided diagnosis to help in the differentiation between malignant and benign VCFs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We used T1-weighted MRI of the lumbar spine in the sagittal plane. Images from 47 consecutive patients (31 women, 16 men, mean age 63 years) were studied, including 19 malignant fractures and 54 benign fractures. Spectral and fractal features were extracted from manually segmented images of 73 vertebral bodies with VCFs. The classification of malignant vs. benign VCFs was performed using the k-nearest neighbor classifier with the Euclidean distance. Results obtained show that combinations of features derived from Fourier and wavelet transforms, together with the fractal dimension, were able to obtain correct classification rate up to 94.7% with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve up to 0.95. PMID:26736364

  3. Vertebroplasty and Kyphoplasty Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Secondary Vertebral Compression Fractures A Population-based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mudano, Amy; Bian, John; Cope, Judith U.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Gross, Thomas P.; Kim, Young; Briggs, Dow; Melton, Mary Elkins; Xi, Juan; Saag, Kenneth G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Predominantly uncontrolled studies suggest that there may be a greater risk of subsequent vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) associated with vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty. To further understand the risk of VCFs, we conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using data from a large regional health insurer. Materials and Methods Administrative claims procedure codes were used to identify a treatment group of patients receiving either a vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty (treatment group) and a comparison group of patients with a primary diagnosis of VCF who did not receive treatment during the same time period. The main outcomes of interest, validated by two independent medical record reviewers and adjudicated by a physician panel, were any new VCFs within: 1) 90-days; 2) 360-days; and 3) at adjacent vertebral levels. Multivariable logistic regression examined the association of vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty with new VCFs. Results Among 48 treatment (51% vertebroplasty, 49% kyphoplasty) and 164 comparison patients, treated patients had a significantly greater risk of secondary VCFs than comparison patients for fractures within 90 days of the procedure or comparison group time point (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 6.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7 – 23.0) and within 360 days (adjusted OR = 3.1; 95% CI:1.1 – 8.4). Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty were associated with a significantly greater rate of adjacent-level fractures as well. Conclusions Patients who had undergone vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty had a greater risk of new VCFs compared to patients with prior VCFs who did not undergo either procedure. PMID:18797812

  4. Factors associated with an increased risk of vertebral fracture in monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance

    PubMed Central

    Piot, J M; Royer, M; Schmidt-Tanguy, A; Hoppé, E; Gardembas, M; Bourrée, T; Hunault, M; François, S; Boyer, F; Ifrah, N; Renier, G; Chevailler, A; Audran, M; Chappard, D; Libouban, H; Mabilleau, G; Legrand, E; Bouvard, B

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS) have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of fractures. This study describes prospectively the bone status of MGUS patients and determines the factors associated with vertebral fracture. We included prospectively 201 patients with MGUS, incidentally discovered, and with no known history of osteoporosis: mean age 66.6±12.5 years, 48.3% women, 51.7% immunoglobulin G (IgG), 33.3% IgM and 10.4% IgA. Light chain was kappa in 64.2% patients. All patients had spinal radiographs and bone mineral density measurement in addition to gammopathy assessment. At least one prevalent non-traumatic vertebral fracture was discovered in 18.4% patients and equally distributed between men and women. Fractured patients were older, had a lower bone density and had also more frequently a lambda light chain isotype. Compared with patients with κ light chain, the odds ratio of being fractured for patients with λ light chain was 4.32 (95% confidence interval 1.80–11.16; P=0.002). These results suggest a high prevalence of non-traumatic vertebral fractures in MGUS associated with lambda light chain isotype and not only explained by low bone density. PMID:26314987

  5. Vertebral fracture associated with shockwave lithotripsy in a patient with granulomatous spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kazimoğlu, H; Mungan, M U; Kirkali, Z

    2001-09-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is an accepted treatment modality in the treatment of urinary stone disease. Many complications have been reported secondary to high-energy shockwaves, but the effects of SWL on the skeletal system have rarely been investigated. We represent the first case of a burst-type vertebral fracture after SWL in an elderly osteoporotic patient with granulomatous spondylitis.

  6. Prediction of Incident Major Osteoporotic and Hip Fractures by Trabecular Bone Score (TBS) and Prevalent Radiographic Vertebral Fracture in Older Men.

    PubMed

    Schousboe, John T; Vo, Tien; Taylor, Brent C; Cawthon, Peggy M; Schwartz, Ann V; Bauer, Douglas C; Orwoll, Eric S; Lane, Nancy E; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2016-03-01

    Trabecular bone score (TBS) has been shown to predict major osteoporotic (clinical vertebral, hip, humerus, and wrist) and hip fractures in postmenopausal women and older men, but the association of TBS with these incident fractures in men independent of prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture is unknown. TBS was estimated on anteroposterior (AP) spine dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans obtained at the baseline visit for 5979 men aged ≥65 years enrolled in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study and its association with incident major osteoporotic and hip fractures estimated with proportional hazards models. Model discrimination was tested with Harrell's C-statistic and with a categorical net reclassification improvement index, using 10-year risk cutpoints of 20% for major osteoporotic and 3% for hip fractures. For each standard deviation decrease in TBS, there were hazard ratios of 1.27 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17 to 1.39) for major osteoporotic fracture, and 1.20 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.39) for hip fracture, adjusted for FRAX with bone mineral density (BMD) 10-year fracture risks and prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture. In the same model, those with prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture compared with those without prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture had hazard ratios of 1.92 (95% CI 1.49 to 2.48) for major osteoporotic fracture and 1.86 (95% CI 1.26 to 2.74) for hip fracture. There were improvements of 3.3%, 5.2%, and 6.2%, respectively, of classification of major osteoporotic fracture cases when TBS, prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture status, or both were added to FRAX with BMD and age, with minimal loss of correct classification of non-cases. Neither TBS nor prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture improved discrimination of hip fracture cases or non-cases. In conclusion, TBS and prevalent radiographic vertebral fracture are associated with incident major osteoporotic fractures in older men independent of each other

  7. Common normal variants of pediatric vertebral development that mimic fractures: a pictorial review from a national longitudinal bone health study

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, Jacob Lester; Siminoski, Kerry; Firth, Gregory; Matzinger, Mary Ann; Shenouda, Nazih; Konji, Victor N.; Roth, Johannes; Sbrocchi, Anne Marie; Reed, Martin; O’Brien, Kathleen; Nadel, Helen; McKillop, Scott; Kloiber, Reinhard; Dubois, Josée; Coblentz, Craig; Charron, Martin; Ward, Leanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Children with glucocorticoid-treated illnesses are at risk for osteoporotic vertebral fractures and growing awareness has led to increased monitoring for these fractures. However scant literature describes developmental changes in vertebral morphology that can mimic fractures. The goal of this paper is to aid in distinguishing between normal variants and fractures. We illustrate differences using lateral spine radiographs obtained annually from children recruited to the Canada-wide STeroid-Associated Osteoporosis in the Pediatric Population (STOPP) observational study, in which 400 children with glucocorticoid-treated leukemia, rheumatic disorders, and nephrotic syndrome were enrolled near glucocorticoid initiation and followed prospectively for 6 years. Normal variants mimicking fractures exist in all regions of the spine and fall into two groups. The first group comprises variants mimicking pathological vertebral height loss, including not-yet-ossified vertebral apophyses superiorly and inferiorly which can lead to a vertebral shape easily over-interpreted as anterior wedge fracture, physiologic beaking, and spondylolisthesis associated with shortened posterior vertebral height. The second group includes variants mimicking other radiologic signs of fractures: anterior vertebral artery groove resembling an anterior buckle fracture, Cupid’s bow balloon disk morphology, Schmorl nodes mimicking concave endplate fractures, and parallax artifact resembling endplate interruption or biconcavity. If an unexpected vertebral body contour is detected, careful attention to its location, detailed morphology, and (if available) serial changes over time may clarify whether it is a fracture requiring change in management or simply a normal variant. Awareness of the variants described in this paper can improve accuracy in the diagnosis of pediatric vertebral fractures. PMID:25828359

  8. Common normal variants of pediatric vertebral development that mimic fractures: a pictorial review from a national longitudinal bone health study.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, Jacob L; Siminoski, Kerry; Firth, Gregory B; Matzinger, Mary Ann; Shenouda, Nazih; Konji, Victor N; Roth, Johannes; Sbrocchi, Anne Marie; Reed, Martin H; O'Brien, Mary Kathleen; Nadel, Helen; McKillop, Scott; Kloiber, Reinhard; Dubois, Josée; Coblentz, Craig; Charron, Martin; Ward, Leanne M

    2015-04-01

    Children with glucocorticoid-treated illnesses are at risk for osteoporotic vertebral fractures, and growing awareness of this has led to increased monitoring for these fractures. However scant literature describes developmental changes in vertebral morphology that can mimic fractures. The goal of this paper is to aid in distinguishing between normal variants and fractures. We illustrate differences using lateral spine radiographs obtained annually from children recruited to the Canada-wide STeroid-Associated Osteoporosis in the Pediatric Population (STOPP) observational study, in which 400 children with glucocorticoid-treated leukemia, rheumatic disorders, and nephrotic syndrome were enrolled near glucocorticoid initiation and followed prospectively for 6 years. Normal variants mimicking fractures exist in all regions of the spine and fall into two groups. The first group comprises variants mimicking pathological vertebral height loss, including not-yet-ossified vertebral apophyses superiorly and inferiorly, which can lead to a vertebral shape easily over-interpreted as anterior wedge fracture, physiological beaking, or spondylolisthesis associated with shortened posterior vertebral height. The second group includes variants mimicking other radiologic signs of fractures: anterior vertebral artery groove resembling an anterior buckle fracture, Cupid's bow balloon disk morphology, Schmorl nodes mimicking concave endplate fractures, and parallax artifact resembling endplate interruption or biconcavity. If an unexpected vertebral body contour is detected, careful attention to its location, detailed morphology, and (if available) serial changes over time may clarify whether it is a fracture requiring change in management or simply a normal variant. Awareness of the variants described in this paper can improve accuracy in the diagnosis of pediatric vertebral fractures. PMID:25828359

  9. Staged Correction of Severe Thoracic Kyphosis in Patients with Multilevel Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Behrbalk, Eyal; Uri, Ofir; Folman, Yoram; Rickert, Marcus; Kaiser, Radek; Boszczyk, Bronek Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Technical report. Objective Multilevel osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures may lead to considerable thoracic deformity and sagittal imbalance, which may necessitate surgical intervention. Correction of advanced thoracic kyphosis in patients with severe osteoporosis remains challenging, with a high rate of failure. This study describes a surgical technique of staged vertebral augmentation with osteotomies for the treatment of advanced thoracic kyphosis in patients with osteoporotic multilevel vertebral compression fractures. Methods Five patients (average age 62 ± 6 years) with multilevel osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures and severe symptomatic thoracic kyphosis underwent staged vertebral augmentation and surgical correction of their sagittal deformity. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed retrospectively at a mean postoperative follow-up of 34 months. Results Patients' self-reported back pain decreased from 7.2 ± 0.8 to 3.0 ± 0.7 (0 to 10 numerical scale; p < 0.001). Patients' back-related disability decreased from 60 ± 10% to 29 ± 10% (0 to 100% Oswestry Disability Index; p < 0.001). Thoracic kyphosis was corrected from 89 ± 5 degrees to 40 ± 4 degrees (p < 0.001), and the sagittal vertical axis was corrected from 112 ± 83 mm to 38 ± 23 mm (p = 0.058). One patient had cement leakage without subsequent neurologic deficit. Decreased blood pressure was observed in another patient during the cement injection. No correction loss, hardware failure, or neurologic deficiency was seen in the other patients. Conclusion The surgical technique described here, despite its complexity, may offer a safe and effective method for the treatment of advanced thoracic kyphosis in patients with osteoporotic multilevel vertebral compression fractures. PMID:27781192

  10. Thoracolumbar vertebral fractures in Sweden: an analysis of 13,496 patients admitted to hospital

    PubMed Central

    Blomqvist, Paul; Svedmark, Per; Granath, Fredrik; Buskens, Erik; Larsson, Martin; Adami, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    National Longitudinal data of thoracolumbar fracture incidence, trends or mortality rates are lacking. The correlation between admissions and operations of thoracolumbar vertebral fractures has not been investigated. The aim of our nationwide population-based epidemiological study was to analyse the incidence, admissions, operations, and case fatality rate among patients with thoracolumbar vertebral fractures admitted to hospital in Sweden. The Swedish Hospital Discharge Register (SHDR) and the Cause of Death Register (CDR) were linked to determine the incidence of surgical interventions, trends, characteristics of the patients, and case fatality rate for thoracolumbar vertebral fractures based on comprehensive national data. The annual incidence of thoracolumbar fractures was on average 30 per 100,000 inhabitants and did not change considerably during the study period. Among patients younger than 60 years of age the annual incidence was 13 per 100,000 and was twice as high in men compared to women. The proportion operated on was 15%. In the age-group 60 years and older the majority were women. In this group two percent were operated on. However, males were operated on twice as often as women. The 90-day case-fatality rate after surgery was 1.4%. This information may assist health care providers in health care planning. Moreover, these data can also be used for power calculations when planning future clinical studies. PMID:20449637

  11. Acute haematogenous infection of a closed vertebral fracture.

    PubMed

    Marshman, Laurence A G; Allison, Dale; Molloy, Cynthia J

    2009-12-01

    Acute haematogenous infection of a closed fractures is rare. A 68-year-old diabetic male sustained a burst fracture of a lumbar vertebra (L2) after a fall onto his back. After 5 days of conservative management, he developed a chest infection and amoxicillin was commenced empirically. However, after 6 days his previously moderate focal L2 back pain had become more severe. Pyrexia and systemic inflammatory markers continued to rise despite administration of antibiotics. Blood cultures and a CT-guided biopsy of L2 both revealed Staphylococcus aureus which was sensitive to flucloxacillin. The patient's symptoms and signs gradually normalised following administration of flucloxacillin for 6 weeks, and the use of a cast brace. We conclude that haematogenous infection can be successfully managed non-operatively.

  12. Vertebral fracture assessment: Current research status and application in patients with kyphoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Drampalos, Efstathios; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Baltas, Christos; Balanika, Alexia; Galanos, Antonis; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Pneumaticos, Spyros

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of the spine is of paramount importance for the recognition of osteoporotic vertebral fractures (VFs), and standard radiography (SR) of the spine is the suggested diagnostic method but is not routinely used because of the cost and radiation exposure considerations. VF assessment (VFA) is an efficient, low radiation method for identifying VFs at the time of bone mineral density (BMD) measurement. Prediction models used to indicate the need for VFA may have little predictive power in subspecialty referral populations such as rheumatologic patients or patients who underwent kyphoplasty. Rheumatologic patients are frequently at increased risk for VFs, and VFA should be performed on an individual basis, also taking in account the guidelines for the general population. Kyphoplasty is a new minimal invasive procedure for the treatment of VFs and is being performed with increasing frequency. Following kyphoplasty, there may be a risk of new VFs in adjacent vertebrae. The assessment and follow-up of patients who underwent kyphoplasty requires repetitive X-ray imaging with the known limitations of SR. Thus, VFA may facilitate the evaluation of VFs in these patients because most of the kyphoplasty patients would fulfill the criteria. In a pilot study, we measured the BMD and performed VFA in 28 patients treated with kyphoplasty. Ratios of anterior to posterior (A/P) and middle to posterior (M/P) height were measured, and Genant’s method was used to classify vertebrae accordingly. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability for A/P, M/P and the Genant’s method were determined. Only 1 patient did not meet the criteria for VFA. Of the 364 available vertebrae, 295 could be analyzed. Most missing data (concerning 69 vertebrae) occurred in the upper thoracic region. Three of the 69 non-eligible vertebrae were lumbar vertebrae with cement leakage from the kyphoplasty procedure. In our hands, VFA was highly reproducible, demonstrating very good agreement in terms of

  13. Percutaneous vertebroplasty and percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture: A metaanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Shi-Ming, Guo; Wen-Juan, Luo; Yun-Mei, Huang; Yin-Sheng, Wu; Mei-Ya, Huang; Yan-Ping, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (OVCF) is the most common complication of osteoporosis, however, debate persists over which procedure of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) or balloon kyphoplasty (BKP) is a better treatment. We performed a metaanalysis of prospective, randomized controlled and clinical controlled trials of PVP and BKP to determine the efficacy and safety for the treatment of OVCFs to reach a relatively conclusive answer. Materials and Methods: We searched computerized databases comparing efficacy and safety of PVP and BKP in osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. These reports included pain relief, functional capacity (Oswestry disability index [ODI] score), anterior vertebral body height (AVBH), kyphotic angle and complications (i.e. cement leakage, incident fractures). Studies were assessed for methodological bias and potential reasons for heterogeneity were explored. Results: As of March 15, 2013, a PubMed search resulted in 761 articles, of which eleven studies encompassing 789 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The average length of followup is 17 months and 4.6% patients were lost to followup. Results of metaanalysis indicated that BKP is more effective for short term pain relief. In addition, BKP is more effective to restore the AVBH (anterior vertebral body height), ODI and kyphotic angle of OVCFs. Moreover, BKP need more polymethylmethacrylate amount. Conclusions: In terms of better effectiveness of BKP procedure, we believe BKP to be superior over PVP for the treatment of osteoporotic VCFs. PMID:26229156

  14. Vertebral artery injury in a patient with fractured C4 vertebra.

    PubMed

    Banić, Tihomir; Banić, Morana; Cvjetko, Ivan; Somun, Nenad; Bilić, Vide; Vidjak, Vinko; Pavić, Vladimir; Coc, Ivan; Kokić, Tomislav; Kejlal, Zvonko

    2014-09-01

    Vertebral artery injuries due to cervical spine trauma, although rarely described in the literature, are relatively common. While most of them will remain asymptomatic, a small percentage of patients may suffer life threatening complications. We report a case of the right vertebral artery injury in a patient with fracture of C4 vertebra, successfully treated with endovascular approach. A 78-year-old male patient was hospitalized for cervical spine injury caused by falling off the tractor. Radiological assessment revealed fracture of C4 vertebra with proximal two-thirds of C4 body dislocated five millimeters dorsally. Significant swelling of soft prevertebral tissues distally of C2 segment was also present. During emergency surgery using standard anterior approach for cervical spine, excessive bleeding started from the injured right vertebral artery. Bleeding was stopped by tamponade with oxidized regenerated cellulose sheet and C4-C5 anterior fixation; then partial reduction of displacement was done. Fifteen days later, after angiography, endovascular repair of the right vertebral artery was performed using percutaneous stent graft. Follow up computed tomography scan angiography showed valid stent patency without contrast extravasation. In cases of cervical spine trauma, surgeon should always be prepared to manage injury of vertebral artery. Bleeding can primarily be stopped by hemostatic packing, and definitive repair can be successfully achieved by endovascular approach using percutaneous stent graft. PMID:25509251

  15. Efficiency of Balloon Kyphoplasty in the Treatment of Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures.

    PubMed

    Baz, Ali Bülent; Akalin, Serdar; Kiliçaslan, Ömer Faruk; Tokatman, Bogaçhan; Arik, Hasan; Duygun, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Eighty-seven osteoporotic vertebral fractures of 82 patients were treated with balloon kyphoplasty. Preoperative, postoperative and follow-up outcomes of functional impairment, pain scores and vertebral height restorations of the patients were recorded and evaluated statistically. Seventy-two of the patients were female (87.8%) and 10 (12.2%) were male. Mean age of all patients were 66.4 years. Preoperative mean Anterior Vertebral Body Height of 48.20±13.94 % and Middle Vertebral Body Height of 59.40±14.26 % were recorded as 79.91±9.50 % and 86.90±8.38 % respectively postoperatively and noted to be 73.26±8.59 % and 84.65±8.19 % at last controls respectively. The mean Oswestry Disability Index and Visual Analog Pain Scale also improved significantly. Local Kyphosis of all the patients were also evaluated and a significant improvement was noted postoperatively. The long term results of this study suggest that balloon kyphoplasty is an effective and safe treatment option in osteoporotic vertebral fractures and should be considered for functional improvement, pain relief and height restoration. PMID:27604534

  16. Vertebroplasty Using Calcium Triglyceride Bone Cement (Kryptonite™) for Vertebral Compression Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Gianluigi; Tecame, Mario; Izzo, Roberto; Vassallo, Pasquale; Sardaro, Angela; Iasiello, Francesca; Cavaliere, Carlo; Muto, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study assessed the one-year clinical and radiographic outcomes, in terms of pain-relief, vertebral re-fracture and complications, after vertebroplasty (VP) using a new osteoconductive cement (calcium triglyceride bone cement - Kryptonite™ bone cement, Doctors Research Group Inc., Southbury, CT, USA) to treat osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. Sixteen consecutive osteoporotic patients (12 women and four men, mean age 68+/-10.5) were treated with VP using Kryptonite™ bone cement for a total of 20 vertebral fractures. All the patients complained of a pain syndrome resistant to medical therapy and all procedures were performed under fluoroscopy control with neuroleptoanalgesia using a monopedicular approach in 12 patients and bipedicular approach in four patients. All patients were studied by MR and MDCT and were evaluated with the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) before treatment and at one and 12 months after the procedure. A successful outcome was observed in 80% of patients, with a complete resolution of pain. Differences in pre and post treatment VAS and ODI at one-year follow-up were significant (P<0.0001). We observed a disk and venous leakage in 66% of patients but only in one case did an asymptomatic pulmonary embolism occur during cement injection. Two cases of vertebral re-fractures at distant metamers were observed during follow-up. VP using Kryptonite bone cement is a helpful procedure that allows complete and long-lasting resolution of painful vertebral symptoms. The cost of the material is very high and the rate of disk and venous leakage is too high compared to standard cement. PMID:25363260

  17. Complications and safety aspects of kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral fractures: a prospective follow-up study in 102 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Yohan; Tschöke, Sven Kevin; Stahel, Philip F; Kayser, Ralph; Heyde, Christoph E

    2008-01-01

    Background Kyphoplasty represents an established minimal-invasive method for correction and augmentation of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Reliable data on perioperative and postoperative complications are lacking in the literature. The present study was designed to evaluate the incidence and patterns of perioperative complications in order to determine the safety of this procedure for patients undergoing kyphoplasty. Patients and Methods We prospectively enrolled 102 consecutive patients (82 women and 20 men; mean age 69) with 135 operatively treated fractured vertebrae who underwent a kyphoplasty between January 2004 to June 2006. Clinical and radiological follow-up was performed for up 6 months after surgery. Results Preoperative pain levels, as determined by the visual analogous scale (VAS) were 7.5 +/- 1.3. Postoperative pain levels were significantly reduced at day 1 after surgery (VAS 2.3 +/- 2.2) and at 6-month follow-up (VAS 1.4 +/- 0.9). Fresh vertebral fractures at adjacent levels were detected radiographically in 8 patients within 6 months. Two patients had a loss of reduction with subsequent sintering of the operated vertebrae and secondary spinal stenosis. Accidental cement extravasation was detected in 7 patients in the intraoperative radiographs. One patient developed a postoperative infected spondylitis at the operated level, which was treated by anterior corporectomy and 360 degrees fusion. Another patient developed a superficial wound infection which required surgical revision. Postoperative bleeding resulting in a subcutaneous haematoma evacuation was seen in one patient. Conclusion The data from the present study imply that percutaneous kyphoplasty can be associated with severe intra- and postoperative complications. This minimal-invasive surgical procedure should therefore be performed exclusively by spine surgeons who have the capability of managing perioperative complications. PMID:18271950

  18. Effects of cement augmentation on the mechanical stability of multilevel spine after vertebral compression fracture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian; Pelletier, Matthew H.; Walsh, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies on the effects of cement augmentation or vertebroplasty on multi-level spine after vertebral compression fractures are lacking. This paper seeks to establish a 3-vertebrae ovine model to determine the impact of compression fracture on spine biomechanics, and to discover if cement augmentation can restore mechanical stability to fractured spine. Methods Five lumbar spine segments (L1-L3) were obtained from 5-year-old female Merino sheep. Standardized wedge-compression fractures were generated in each L2 vertebra, and then augmented with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cement mixed with 30% barium sulphate powder. Biomechanical pure moment testing in axial rotation (AR), flexion/extension (FE) and lateral bending (LB) was carried out in the intact, fractured and repaired states. Range of motion (ROM) and neutral zone (NZ) parameters were compared, and plain radiographs taken at every stage. Results Except for a significant increase in ROM between the intact and fractured states in AR between L1 and L2 (P<0.05), there were no other significant differences in ROM or NZ between the other groups. There was a trend towards an increase in ROM and NZ in all directions after fracture, but this did not reach significance. Normal biomechanics was only minimally restored after augmentation. Conclusions Results suggest that cement augmentation could not restore mechanical stability of fractured spine. Model-specific factors may have had a role in these findings. Caution should be exercised when applying these results to humans. PMID:27683707

  19. Effects of cement augmentation on the mechanical stability of multilevel spine after vertebral compression fracture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian; Pelletier, Matthew H.; Walsh, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies on the effects of cement augmentation or vertebroplasty on multi-level spine after vertebral compression fractures are lacking. This paper seeks to establish a 3-vertebrae ovine model to determine the impact of compression fracture on spine biomechanics, and to discover if cement augmentation can restore mechanical stability to fractured spine. Methods Five lumbar spine segments (L1-L3) were obtained from 5-year-old female Merino sheep. Standardized wedge-compression fractures were generated in each L2 vertebra, and then augmented with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cement mixed with 30% barium sulphate powder. Biomechanical pure moment testing in axial rotation (AR), flexion/extension (FE) and lateral bending (LB) was carried out in the intact, fractured and repaired states. Range of motion (ROM) and neutral zone (NZ) parameters were compared, and plain radiographs taken at every stage. Results Except for a significant increase in ROM between the intact and fractured states in AR between L1 and L2 (P<0.05), there were no other significant differences in ROM or NZ between the other groups. There was a trend towards an increase in ROM and NZ in all directions after fracture, but this did not reach significance. Normal biomechanics was only minimally restored after augmentation. Conclusions Results suggest that cement augmentation could not restore mechanical stability of fractured spine. Model-specific factors may have had a role in these findings. Caution should be exercised when applying these results to humans.

  20. Balloon kyphoplasty for vertebral compression fractures secondary to polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. Case report.

    PubMed

    Deen, H Gordon; Fox, Thomas P

    2005-09-01

    This 25-year-old woman with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (McCune-Albright syndrome) suffered low-back pain after a minor traumatic injury. Neurological examination demonstrated normal status. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed cystic lesions in multiple thoracic and lumbar vertebral bodies, consistent with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. Severe vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) were seen at T-8 and L-2. Balloon kyphoplasty was performed to treat the T-8 and L-2 VCFs and also prophylactically at T-9 and T-10 to forestall impending fractures at those levels. The patient tolerated the procedures very well and reported complete resolution of back pain. Balloon kyphoplasty may be an option in patients with painful VCFs caused by fibrous dysplasia.

  1. Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis with seven vertebral compression fractures, a case treated with strontium ranelate.

    PubMed

    Zarattini, Guido; Buffoli, Pierangelo; Isabelli, Giuliana; Marchese, Marcella

    2014-05-01

    This paper shows a case of pregnancy-associated osteoporosis (PAO) with seven vertebral compression fractures treated with strontium ranelate and supplementation of calcium and cholecalciferol. Clinical evaluation, laboratory and radiological results are analyzed in the case-report to demonstrate that strontium ranelate is a good option to restore quickly the value of bone mineral density in the treatment of a case of PAO. PMID:25285146

  2. Surgeon Specialty Influences Referral Rate for Osteoporosis Management following Vertebral Compression Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Daffner, Scott D.; Karnes, Jonathan M.; Watkins, Colleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Retrospective chart review. Objective  To evaluate the referral rate for long-term osteoporosis management following vertebral compression fracture treated by different specialties at a single academic institution. Methods  Patients undergoing vertebral cement augmentation for painful osteoporotic compression fractures from 2009 to 2014 were identified. Medical records were reviewed to determine if the treating surgeon discussed and/or referred the patient for long-term osteoporosis management. Any referral for or mention of medical long-term osteoporosis management was counted as a positive response. Results were statistically analyzed with chi-square test. Results  Two hundred fourteen patients underwent vertebral cement augmentation; 150 met inclusion criteria. Orthopedic surgeons treated 88 patients, neurosurgeons treated 39, and interventional radiology or pain management physicians treated 23. Orthopedic surgeons referred 82% of patients for osteoporosis management, neurosurgeons referred 36%, and interventional radiology/pain management referred 17%. The referral rate was significantly higher for orthopedic surgeons compared with either of the other two groups; there was no significant difference between neurosurgery and interventional radiology/pain management. Conclusions  Among physicians who treat osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, orthopedic surgeons more frequently address osteoporosis or refer patients for osteoporosis management compared with neurosurgeons and interventional radiologists or pain management physicians. The results of this study shed light on the disparity in how different specialties approach treatment of osteoporosis in patients with fractures painful enough to require surgery and highlight potential areas for improvement in osteoporosis awareness training. PMID:27555992

  3. Conservative Management of Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures: A Prospective Study of Thirty Patients

    PubMed Central

    Goregaonkar, Arvind B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Osteoporotic vertebral fractures relate to poorer quality of life and higher long-term mortality. In a resource-poor setup, conservative management assumes great importance as primary means of treatment. We assess the clinico-pathological epidemiology of osteoporotic vertebral fractures and prospectively evaluate the effectiveness of conservative management in their treatment. Materials & Methods    Thirty consecutive patients, diagnosed with osteoporotic vertebral fracture, underwent the predetermined protocol of conservative treatment (bed rest, titrated analgesia, antiosteoporosis pharmacotherapy, bracing, and supervised physical therapy) after assessment of basic demographic data and clinical examination. They were evaluated every three months for nine months, using visual analog scale (VAS) for backpain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and radiological and hematological parameters. Results  The mean age of the patients was 66.9 +/-7.6 years and the female: male ratio was 14:1. All (100%) women were postmenopausal and the mean time since menopause was 16.75 +/- 8.12 years. The presenting complaints were backpain (100%) and deformity (53.33%). Neurodeficit was noted in one (3.33%) patient. Higher age was correlated to greater vertebral collapse (p=0.001) and higher kyphotic angle (p=0.002). At nine months after treatment, there was a significant decrease in the VAS score (p<0.0001) and the ODI score (p<0.0001), with the final VAS score improving by 49.25% and the ODI score improving by 47.23% from the baseline. There was progressive increase in vertebral collapse (p=0.0474) with no change in kyphotic or scoliotic angles. With treatment there was a consistent increase in serum calcium (p<0.0001), phosphorous (p<0.0001), and vitamin D3 (p<0.0001) levels, and decrease in parathyroid hormone levels (p<0.0001). Conclusions  A multidisciplinary conservative treatment is effective as the primary treatment for patients with osteoporotic

  4. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Tsuyoki; Miyagi, Masayuki; Saito, Wataru; Shoji, Shintaro; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Gen; Imura, Takayuki; Minehara, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Terumasa; Kawamura, Tadashi; Namba, Takanori; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case. PMID:26989542

  5. Vertebral Compression Fracture (VCF) After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT): Analysis of Predictive Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, Marcelo V.R.; Al-Omair, Ameen; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Masucci, Giuseppina Laura; Letourneau, Daniel; Korol, Renee; Yu, Eugene; Howard, Peter; Lochray, Fiona; Costa, Leodante B. da; Fehlings, Michael G.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are increasingly observed after spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The aim of this study was to determine the risk of VCF after spine SBRT and identify clinical and dosimetric factors predictive for VCF. The analysis incorporated the recently described Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) criteria. Methods and Materials: The primary endpoint of this study was the development of a de novo VCF (ie, new endplate fracture or collapse deformity) or fracture progression based on an existing fracture at the site of treatment after SBRT. We retrospectively scored 167 spinal segments in 90 patients treated with spine SBRT according to each of the 6 SINS criteria. We also evaluated the presence of paraspinal extension, prior radiation, various dosimetric parameters including dose per fraction ({>=}20 Gy vs <20 Gy), age, and histology. Results: The median follow-up was 7.4 months. We identified 19 fractures (11%): 12 de novo fractures (63%) and 7 cases of fracture progression (37%). The mean time to fracture after SBRT was 3.3 months (range, 0.5-21.6 months). The 1-year fracture-free probability was 87.3%. Multivariate analysis confirmed that alignment (P=.0003), lytic lesions (P=.007), lung (P=.03) and hepatocellular (P<.0001) primary histologies, and dose per fraction of 20 Gy or greater (P=.004) were significant predictors of VCF. Conclusions: The presence of kyphotic/scoliotic deformity and the presence of lytic tumor were the only predictive factors of VCF based on the original 6 SINS criteria. We also report that patients with lung and hepatocellular tumors and treatment with SBRT of 20 Gy or greater in a single fraction are at a higher risk of VCF.

  6. Induced seismicity caused by hydraulic fracturing in deep geothermal wells in Germany and adjacent areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plenefisch, Thomas; Brückner, Lisa; Ceranna, Lars; Gestermann, Nicolai; Houben, Georg; Tischner, Torsten; Wegler, Ulrich; Wellbrink, Matthias; Bönnemann, Christian; Bertram, Andreas; Kirschbaum, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the BGR has worked out a study on the potential environmental impact caused by hydraulic fracturing or chemical stimulations in deep geothermal reservoirs in Germany and adjacent areas. The investigations and analyses are based on existing studies and information provided by operators. The two environmental impacts being essentially considered in the report are induced seismicity and possible contamination of the groundwater reservoirs which serve for drinking water supply. Altogether, in this study, information on 30 hydraulic frac operations and 26 chemical stimulations including information from neighboring countries were compiled and analyzed. Out of the hydraulic stimulations two thirds were carried out as waterfracs and one third as fracturing with proppants. Parameters used in the study to characterize the induced seismicity are maximum magnitude, number of seismic events, size of the seismically active volume, and the relation of this volume to fault zones and the cap rock, as well as, finally, the impacts at the Earth's surface. The response of the subsurface to hydraulic fracturing is variable: There are some activities, which cause perceptible seismic events, others, where no perceptible but instrumentally detected events occurred, and moreover activities without even any instrumentally detected events. A classification of seismic hazard with respect to tectonic region, geology, or depth of the layer is still difficult, since the number of hydraulic fracturing measures in deep geothermal wells is small making a statistically sound analysis impossible. However, there are some indications, that hydraulic fracturing in granite in tectonically active regions like the Upper Rhine Graben results in comparatively stronger, perceptible seismicity compared to hydraulic fracturing in the sedimentary rocks of the North German basin. The maximum magnitudes of induced earthquakes caused by hydraulic fracturing of deep geothermal wells in Germany are

  7. Transpedicle body augmenter for vertebral augmentation in symptomatic multiple osteoporotic compression fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Allen; Li, Kung-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Hsiang

    2010-01-01

    Background: Multiple osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) have been treated with polymethylmethacrylate augmentation; however, there are cement complications and long-term fracture healing that are unknown. Transpedicle body augmenter (a porous titanium spacer) has been reported as an internal support to reconstruct the vertebral body combining short-segment fixation in burst fracture and Kümmell's disease with cord compression. Transpedicle body augmenter for vertebral augmentation (TpBA) also has been reported successfully in treating single painful VCF and vertebral metastasis lesions including pending fractures and pathologic compression fractures. To test the hypothesis that TpBA can effectively and safely treat the symptomatic multiple VCFs, this retrospective study was done by analyzing the radiographic and clinical results. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed clinical and radiographic results of TpBA for symptomatic multiple (more than two levels) VCFs in 62 patients with a total of 236 levels, i.e. 3.8 VCFs per patient. Manual reduction and TpBA via paramedian incisions with blunt dissection were done. One incision was made for two continuous levels and alternative side was selected for next incision. Mean age was 74.3 years (range, 62-87 years), and female-male ratio was 5.2:1. Anterior vertebral height and wedge angle by radiographic findings were measured at preoperative, initial follow-up and final follow-up. Clinical results were assessed by questionnaires and clinical observations. By July 2008, 58 patients returned to answer the questionnaire including quantification of pain on the visual analog scale, the response to operations (better, same, or worse after operation), returned to their pre-fracture function (yes/no) and satisfaction (a scale of 0 = completely dissatisfied to 10 = completely satisfied). Results: The mean symptom duration was 7 months, and follow-up, 48 months. The average operation time was 21 min per

  8. Multiple Cerebral Infarctions due to Unilateral Traumatic Vertebral Artery Dissection after Cervical Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang-Youl; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of multiple symptomatic cerebral infarctions from a traumatic vertebral artery dissection (VAD) after cervical fractures. A 73-year-old man was admitted with stuporous mentality and left hemiparesis after a motor-vehicle accident. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan at admission showed a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage on the left parietal lobe. A cervical CT scan showed left lateral mass fractures on C2, C5, and C6, involving the transverse foramen. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed loss of signal void on the left vertebral artery. Neck CT angiography showed left VAD starting at the C5 level. Brain MRI revealed acute, multiple cerebral infarctions involving the pons, midbrain, thalamus, corpus callosum, and parietal and frontal lobes on diffusion weighted images. The patient was treated conservatively at the intensive care unit in the acute stage to prevent extent of stroke. Aspirin was started for antiplatelet therapy in the chronic stage. The possibility of symptomatic cerebral infarctions due to traumatic VAD following cervical fracture should be considered. PMID:27182500

  9. Multiple Cerebral Infarctions due to Unilateral Traumatic Vertebral Artery Dissection after Cervical Fractures.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sang-Youl; Park, Seong-Hyun; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of multiple symptomatic cerebral infarctions from a traumatic vertebral artery dissection (VAD) after cervical fractures. A 73-year-old man was admitted with stuporous mentality and left hemiparesis after a motor-vehicle accident. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan at admission showed a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage on the left parietal lobe. A cervical CT scan showed left lateral mass fractures on C2, C5, and C6, involving the transverse foramen. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed loss of signal void on the left vertebral artery. Neck CT angiography showed left VAD starting at the C5 level. Brain MRI revealed acute, multiple cerebral infarctions involving the pons, midbrain, thalamus, corpus callosum, and parietal and frontal lobes on diffusion weighted images. The patient was treated conservatively at the intensive care unit in the acute stage to prevent extent of stroke. Aspirin was started for antiplatelet therapy in the chronic stage. The possibility of symptomatic cerebral infarctions due to traumatic VAD following cervical fracture should be considered. PMID:27182500

  10. Late vertebral body fracture after lumbar transpedicular fixation. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Missori, Paolo; Ramieri, Alessandro; Costanzo, Giuseppe; Peschillo, Simone; Paolini, Sergio; Miscusi, Massimo; D'Andrea, Giancarlo; Delfini, Roberto

    2005-07-01

    Late-onset vertebral body (VB) fracture after lumbar transpedicular fixation has not been previously described in the literature. The authors present three cases in which VB fracture occurred several months after posterolateral fixation in patients with degenerative disease or traumatic injury. The authors suggest that postoperative osteopenia, modified load-sharing function, and intravertebral clefts were responsible for the fractures. Two women and one man were evaluated at a mean follow-up interval of 3 months. Two patients suffered recurrent lumbar pain. Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fracture of some of the instrumentation-treated VBs. These two patients underwent surgical superior or inferior extension of instrumentation. The third, an asymptomatic patient, received conservative management. The two patients who underwent reoperation made complete recoveries, and there was no evidence of further bone collapse in any case. The authors speculate that alterations in the VBs may occur following application of spinal instrumentation. In rare cases, the device can fracture and consequently lead to recurrent lumbar back pain. Recovery can be achieved by extending the instrumentation in the appropriate direction.

  11. Vertebral Compression Fracture with Intravertebral Vacuum Cleft Sign: Pathogenesis, Image, and Surgical Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ai-Min; Ni, Wen-Fei

    2013-01-01

    The intravertebral vacuum cleft (IVC) sign in vertebral compression fracture patients has obtained much attention. The pathogenesis, image character and efficacy of surgical intervention were disputed. Many pathogenesis theories were proposed, and its image characters are distinct from malignancy and infection. Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) or percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) have been the main therapeutic methods for these patients in recent years. Avascular necrosis theory is the most supported; PVP could relieve back pain, restore vertebral body height and correct the kyphotic angulation (KA), and is recommended for these patients. PKP seems to be more effective for the correction of KA and lower cement leakage. The Kümmell's disease with IVC sign reported by modern authors was incomplete consistent with syndrome reported by Dr. Hermann Kümmell. PMID:23741556

  12. Factors affecting neurological deficits and intractable back pain in patients with insufficient bone union following osteoporotic vertebral fracture

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Masatoshi; Terai, Hidetomi; Tsujio, Tadao; Nabeta, Masaharu; Namikawa, Takashi; Matsumura, Akira; Suzuki, Akinobu; Takayama, Kazushi; Takaoka, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors affecting the severity of neurological deficits and intractable back pain in patients with insufficient bone union following osteoporotic vertebral fracture (OVF). Reports of insufficient union following OVF have recently increased. Patients with this lesion have various degrees of neurological deficits and back pain. However, the factors contributing to the severity of these are still unknown. A total of 45 patients with insufficient union following OVF were included in this study. Insufficient union was diagnosed based on the findings of vertebral cleft on plain radiography or CT, as well as fluid collection indicating high-intensity change on T2-weighted MRI. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the factors contributing to the severity of neurological deficits and back pain in the patients. Age, sex, level of fracture, duration after onset of symptoms, degree of local kyphosis, degree of angular instability, ratio of occupation by bony fragments, presence or absence of protrusion of flavum, and presence or absence of ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament (OALL) in the adjacent level were used as explanatory variables, while severity of neurological deficits and back pain were response variables. On multivariate analysis, factors significantly affecting the severity of neurological deficits were angular instability of more than 15° [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 9.24 (95% confidence interval, CI 1.49–57.2); P < 0.05] and ratio of occupation by bony fragments in the spinal canal of more than 42% [adjusted OR 9.23 (95%CI 1.15–74.1); P < 0.05]. The factor significantly affecting the severity of back pain was angular instability of more than 15° [adjusted OR 14.9 (95%CI 2.11–105); P < 0.01]. On the other hand, presence of OALL in the adjacent level reduced degree of back pain [adjusted OR 0.14 (95%CI 0.03–0.76); P < 0.05]. In this study, pronounced angular

  13. Single-balloon versus double-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Sun, Zhenzhong; Wang, Zhiwen; Jiang, Weimin

    2015-04-01

    Twenty-eight patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCF) were treated with single-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty (Group A), and 40 patients were treated with double-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty (Group B). Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score, vertebral height, and kyphotic angle (KA) were evaluated pre-operatively, post-operatively (3 days after surgery) and at final follow-up. Operative time, X-ray exposure frequency and costs were recorded. The mean operative time and X-ray exposure frequency in Group A were greater than in Group B (p<0.05). Significant improvement of the VAS score was noted in each group, and remained unchanged at final follow-up. Mean increases of anterior and middle height of the fractured vertebral body were 5.14mm and 4.14mm in Group A, respectively, and 6.22mm and 5.06mm in Group B, respectively, and the differences between the groups were statistically significant (p<0.05). Mean reduction of KA was 6.9° in Group A and 8.8° in Group B, which was statistically significant (p<0.05). No statistically significant difference was observed in terms of cement leakage between groups. The mean cost of Group A (US$4202) was significantly less than that of Group B (US$6220) (p<0.001). Single-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty is a safe and cost-effective surgical method for the treatment of OVCF. It can achieve pain relief comparable with double-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty. However, double-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty is more efficacious in terms of the restoration of vertebral height and reduction of KA, and the operative time and X-ray exposure frequency are lower.

  14. A predictive mechanical model for evaluating vertebral fracture probability in lumbar spine under different osteoporotic drug therapies.

    PubMed

    López, E; Ibarz, E; Herrera, A; Puértolas, S; Gabarre, S; Más, Y; Mateo, J; Gil-Albarova, J; Gracia, L

    2016-07-01

    Osteoporotic vertebral fractures represent a major cause of disability, loss of quality of life and even mortality among the elderly population. Decisions on drug therapy are based on the assessment of risk factors for fracture from bone mineral density (BMD) measurements. A previously developed model, based on the Damage and Fracture Mechanics, was applied for the evaluation of the mechanical magnitudes involved in the fracture process from clinical BMD measurements. BMD evolution in untreated patients and in patients with seven different treatments was analyzed from clinical studies in order to compare the variation in the risk of fracture. The predictive model was applied in a finite element simulation of the whole lumbar spine, obtaining detailed maps of damage and fracture probability, identifying high-risk local zones at vertebral body. For every vertebra, strontium ranelate exhibits the highest decrease, whereas minimum decrease is achieved with oral ibandronate. All the treatments manifest similar trends for every vertebra. Conversely, for the natural BMD evolution, as bone stiffness decreases, the mechanical damage and fracture probability show a significant increase (as it occurs in the natural history of BMD). Vertebral walls and external areas of vertebral end plates are the zones at greatest risk, in coincidence with the typical locations of osteoporotic fractures, characterized by a vertebral crushing due to the collapse of vertebral walls. This methodology could be applied for an individual patient, in order to obtain the trends corresponding to different treatments, in identifying at-risk individuals in early stages of osteoporosis and might be helpful for treatment decisions. PMID:27265047

  15. Kyphoplasty versus vertebroplasty in the treatment of painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures: two-year follow-up in a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Du, Junhua; Li, Xigong; Lin, Xiangjin

    2014-12-01

    A total of 112 patients with a single-level osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture who did not respond to conservative therapy were included and allocated to either kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty treatment. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used to assess back pain and disability. Anterior, midline, posterior vertebral body heights, and kyphotic angle at the fractured vertebra were measured for radiographic evaluation. Clinical and radiographic follow-up examinations were performed postoperatively at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months. Complications and patient satisfaction with the surgical procedure were also recorded. The follow-up rate was 73.3% in the kyphoplasty group and 80.8% in the vertebroplasty group (P = 0.737). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups with regard to improvement in VAS and ODI scores (P > 0.05) at all postoperative intervals. Both treatment groups achieved marked vertebral height restoration and kyphotic angle reduction, but the radiographic parameters were significantly better in the kyphoplasty group (P < 0.05). The incidence of asymptomatic cement leakage per treated vertebrae in the kyphoplasty group was 11.4% versus 31% in the vertebroplasty group (P < 0.001). Three adjacent level fractures in the kyphoplasty group and 2 in the vertebroplasty group occurred during 2-year follow-up, and no difference in patient satisfaction was detected between the 2 groups. Kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty achieved similar improvement of clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction at 2 years after surgery, albeit kyphoplasty had more ability to markedly reduce vertebral deformity and resulted in less cement leaks compared with vertebroplasty.

  16. Unilateral versus bilateral balloon kyphoplasty in the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Tang, Peifu; Zhao, Yanpeng; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Yan

    2014-09-01

    Bilateral and unilateral approaches are the main methods for balloon kyphoplasty. However, controversy exists about which leads to superior outcomes. The goal of this study was to compare the clinical effects and safety of unilateral vs bilateral balloon kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. Five databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Chinese Biomedical Database) were searched without language, publication, or date restrictions. Randomized controlled trials involving a total of 876 patients and comparing the efficacy of unilateral vs bilateral balloon kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures were identified. Meta-analysis revealed no significant differences in visual analog scale pain score up to 2-year follow-up (mean difference at 1 week, 0.17 [95% confidence interval (CI), -0.11 to 0.44]; mean difference at 1 year, 0.01 [95% CI, -0.29 to 0.32]; mean difference at 2 years, 0.28 [95% CI, -0.13 to 0.70]), Oswestry Disability Index pain score up to 1-year follow-up (mean difference at 1 week, 1.28 [95% CI, -2.62 to 5.17]; mean difference at 1 year, 1.87 (95% CI, -5.33 to 9.06]), anterior and middle vertebral height (mean difference anterior, -0.13 [95% CI, -0.32 to 0.06]; mean difference middle, -0.16 [95% CI, -0.36 to 0.03]), or kyphotic angle (mean difference, -0.02 [95% CI, -0.65 to 0.61]); however, the unilateral approach resulted in a shorter operative time (mean difference, -19.33 [95% CI, -4.42 to -14.24]), smaller amount of cement injected (mean difference, -2.07 [95% CI, -2.42 to -1.71]), and lower risk of cement leakage (mean difference, 0.47 [95% CI, 0.24-0.92]) than the bilateral approach. The unilateral approach resulted in pain relief and vertebral height and kyphotic angle restoration comparable with that of bilateral kyphoplasty. The unilateral approach should be considered an effective option for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. PMID:25350627

  17. Unilateral versus bilateral balloon kyphoplasty in the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Tang, Peifu; Zhao, Yanpeng; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Yan

    2014-09-01

    Bilateral and unilateral approaches are the main methods for balloon kyphoplasty. However, controversy exists about which leads to superior outcomes. The goal of this study was to compare the clinical effects and safety of unilateral vs bilateral balloon kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. Five databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Chinese Biomedical Database) were searched without language, publication, or date restrictions. Randomized controlled trials involving a total of 876 patients and comparing the efficacy of unilateral vs bilateral balloon kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures were identified. Meta-analysis revealed no significant differences in visual analog scale pain score up to 2-year follow-up (mean difference at 1 week, 0.17 [95% confidence interval (CI), -0.11 to 0.44]; mean difference at 1 year, 0.01 [95% CI, -0.29 to 0.32]; mean difference at 2 years, 0.28 [95% CI, -0.13 to 0.70]), Oswestry Disability Index pain score up to 1-year follow-up (mean difference at 1 week, 1.28 [95% CI, -2.62 to 5.17]; mean difference at 1 year, 1.87 (95% CI, -5.33 to 9.06]), anterior and middle vertebral height (mean difference anterior, -0.13 [95% CI, -0.32 to 0.06]; mean difference middle, -0.16 [95% CI, -0.36 to 0.03]), or kyphotic angle (mean difference, -0.02 [95% CI, -0.65 to 0.61]); however, the unilateral approach resulted in a shorter operative time (mean difference, -19.33 [95% CI, -4.42 to -14.24]), smaller amount of cement injected (mean difference, -2.07 [95% CI, -2.42 to -1.71]), and lower risk of cement leakage (mean difference, 0.47 [95% CI, 0.24-0.92]) than the bilateral approach. The unilateral approach resulted in pain relief and vertebral height and kyphotic angle restoration comparable with that of bilateral kyphoplasty. The unilateral approach should be considered an effective option for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

  18. Incident vertebral fractures and risk factors in the first three years following glucocorticoid initiation among pediatric patients with rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Claire MA; Ma, Jinhui; Taljaard, Monica; Roth, Johannes; Scuccimarri, Rosie; Miettunen, Paivi; Lang, Bianca; Huber, Adam M; Houghton, Kristin; Jaremko, Jacob L; Ho, Josephine; Shenouda, Nazih; Matzinger, Mary Ann; Lentle, Brian; Stein, Robert; Sbrocchi, Anne Marie; Oen, Kiem; Rodd, Celia; Jurencak, Roman; Cummings, Elizabeth; Couch, Robert; Cabral, David A; Atkinson, Stephanie; Alos, Nathalie; Rauch, Frank; Siminoski, Kerry; Ward, Leanne M

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral fractures are an important yet under-recognized manifestation of osteoporosis in children with chronic, glucocorticoid-treated illnesses. Our goal was to determine the incidence and clinical predictors of vertebral fractures in the three years following glucocorticoid initiation among pediatric patients with rheumatic disorders. Incident vertebral fractures were evaluated according to the Genant semi-quantitative method on lateral radiographs at baseline and then annually in the 3 years following glucocorticoid initiation. Extended Cox models were used to assess the association between vertebral fractures and clinical risk predictors. A total of 134 children with rheumatic disorders were enrolled in the study (mean ± standard deviation (SD) age 9.9±4.4 years, 65% girls). The unadjusted vertebral fracture incidence rate was 4.4 per 100 person-years, with a three-year incidence proportion of 12.4%. The highest annual incidence occurred in the first year (6.0%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.9–11.7). Almost one-half of the patients with fractures were asymptomatic. Every 0.5 mg/kg increase in average daily glucocorticoid (prednisone equivalents) dose was associated with a 2.0-fold increased fracture risk (hazard ratio (HR) 2.0, 95% CI 1.1–3.5). Other predictors of increased vertebral fracture risk included: (1) Increases in disease severity scores between baseline and 12 months, (2) Increases in body mass index Z-scores in the first 6 of each 12-month period preceding the annual fracture assessment, and (3) Decreases in lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-scores in the first 6 months of glucocorticoid therapy. As such, we observed that a clinically significant number of children with rheumatic disorders developed incident vertebral fractures in the three years following glucocorticoid initiation. Almost half of the children were asymptomatic and thereby would have been undiagnosed in the absence of radiographic monitoring. In addition, discrete

  19. Does Metaphyseal Cement Augmentation in Fracture Management Influence the Adjacent Subchondral Bone and Joint Cartilage?

    PubMed Central

    Goetzen, Michael; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Arens, Daniel; Zeiter, Stephan; Stadelmann, Vincent; Nehrbass, Dirk; Richards, R. Geoff; Blauth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Augmentation of implants with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement in osteoporotic fractures is a promising approach to increase implant purchase. Side effects of PMMA for the metaphyseal bone, particularly for the adjacent subchondral bone plate and joint cartilage, have not yet been studied. The following experimental study investigates whether subchondral PMMA injection compromises the homeostasis of the subchondral bone and/or the joint cartilage. Ten mature sheep were used to simulate subchondral PMMA injection. Follow-ups of 2 (4 animals) and 4 (6 animals) months were chosen to investigate possible cartilage damage and subchondral plate alterations in the knee. Evaluation was completed by means of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) imaging, histopathological osteoarthritis scoring, and determination of glycosaminoglycan content in the joint cartilage. Results were compared with the untreated contralateral knee and statistically analyzed using nonparametric tests. Evaluation of the histological osteoarthritis score revealed no obvious cartilage damage for the treated knee; median histological score after 2 months 0 (range 4), after 4 months 1 (range 5). There was no significant difference when compared with the untreated control site after 2 and 4 months (P = 0.23 and 0.76, respectively). HRpQCT imaging showed no damage to the metaphyseal trabeculae. Glycosaminoglycan measurements of the treated joint cartilage after 4 months revealed no significant difference compared with the untreated cartilage (P = 0.24). The findings of this study support initial clinical observation that PMMA implant augmentation of metaphyseal fractures appears to be a safe procedure for fixation without harming the subchondral bone plate and adjacent joint cartilage. PMID:25621690

  20. Combined posterior-anterior surgery for osteoporotic delayed vertebral fracture with neurologic deficit.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroaki; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Ito, Keigo; Machino, Masaaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kato, Fumihiko

    2014-08-01

    With the aging of society, osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fracture is a concern. This fracture occurs occasionally; however, some cases progress to neural compromise due to delayed vertebral body collapse requiring surgery. Surgical treatment and postoperative care are difficult because of patients' serious comorbidities and poor bone quality, and hence, optimum treatment is not clear, even though some surgical approaches have been reported. There were 35 consecutive patients (5 males and 30 females) with osteoporotic delayed vertebral fractures and associated neurological deficit. Mean age at surgery was 70.7 years (range 60-84 years). Average postoperative follow-up was 3.8 years (range 0.6-11.3 years). All patients experienced a single vertebra collapse, except for 1 with a 2-level collapse of lumbar vertebrae. One thoracic (Th7), 19 thoracolumbar (Th12-L1), and 16 lumbar (L2-5) fractures were treated with combined posterior-anterior surgery. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale, activities of daily living (ADL) status, and local sagittal angle were evaluated both before and after surgery. Forty-six percent of all patients showed an improvement of more than 1 grade postoperatively on the ASIA impairment scale, and 74% demonstrated an improvement in ADL status. No deterioration was observed in neurological or ADL status after surgery. With regard to sagittal alignment, preoperative kyphosis of 18.4 degrees was corrected to 2.4 degrees of kyphosis postoperatively. However, 11.5 degrees loss of correction was observed at final follow-up observation. Combined posterior-anterior surgery could provide reliable improvement in both neurological and ADL status, although maintenance of postoperative alignment was difficult to achieve in some cases.

  1. Balloon kyphoplasty in the management of vertebral compression fractures: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fritzell, Peter; Taylor, Rebecca J.

    2007-01-01

    This systematic review updates the understanding of the evidence base for balloon kyphoplasty (BKP) in the management of vertebral compression fractures. Detailed searches of a number of electronic databases were performed from March to April 2006. Citation searches of included studies were undertaken and no language restrictions were applied. All controlled and uncontrolled studies were included with the exception of case reports. Prognostic factors responsible for pain relief and cement leakage were examined using meta-regression. Combined with previous evidence, a total of eight comparative studies (three against conventional medical therapy and five against vertebroplasty) and 35 case series were identified. The majority of studies were undertaken in older women with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with long-term pain that was refractory to medical treatment. In direct comparison to conventional medical management, patients undergoing BKP experienced superior improvements in pain, functionality, vertebral height and kyphotic angle at least up to 3-years postprocedure. Reductions in pain with BKP appeared to be greatest in patients with newer fractures. Uncontrolled studies suggest gains in health-related quality of life at 6 and 12-months following BKP. Although associated with a finite level of cement leakage, serious adverse events appear to be rare. Osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures appear to be associated with a higher level of cement leakage following BKP than non-osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. In conclusion, there are now prospective studies of low bias, with follow-up of 12 months or more, which demonstrate balloon kyphoplasty to be more effective than medical management of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures and as least as effective as vertebroplasty. Results from ongoing RCTs will provide further information in the near future. PMID:17277923

  2. Vertebral augmentation treatment of painful osteoporotic compression fractures with the Kiva VCF Treatment System

    PubMed Central

    Olivarez, Luis M. Rosales; Dipp, Juan M.; Escamilla, Ricardo Flores; Bajares, Guillermo; Perez, Alejandro; Stubbs, Harrison A.; Block, Jon E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) can cause significant pain and functional impairment, and their cumulative effect can lead to progressive morbidity. This single-arm, prospective feasibility trial, conducted at 4 clinical sites, was undertaken to evaluate the clinical outcomes associated with the use of an innovative vertebral augmentation device, the Kiva VCF Treatment System (Benvenue Medical, Santa Clara, California), in the management of symptomatic VCFs associated with osteoporosis. Methods Vertebral augmentation treatment was performed for persistent back pain symptoms in 57 patients (mean age, 71.9 ± 10.4 years), including 46 women, with radiologically confirmed VCFs; 36 of these patients (63%) had reached 12 months of follow-up at this data analysis. There were 51 one-level cases, 5 two-level cases, and 1 three-level case, representing 64 treated levels. Back pain severity and condition-specific functional impairment were evaluated with a standard 100-mm visual analog scale and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), respectively, before device implantation as well as at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months. Results Marked clinical improvements were realized in back pain severity and functional impairment through 12 months of follow-up. The mean back pain score on the visual analog scale improved from 79.3 ± 17.2 before treatment to 21.9 ± 21.3, 21.9 ± 24.6, and 23.2 ± 23.3 at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months, respectively. The mean decrease at 12 months was 49.9 ± 30.3 mm, or approximately 66% (P < .0001). Similarly, the mean ODI score improved from 68.1% ± 16.9% before treatment to 27.4% ± 17.2%, 23.8% ± 18.7%, and 23.3% ± 15.5% at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months, respectively, representing a mean change of 39.2 ± 19.6 percentage points, or approximately 63%, at 12 months. Overall clinical success rates based on a 30% improvement in pain severity or greater and maintenance or improvement in the ODI were 91%, 88%, and 89% at 6 weeks

  3. Discordance between Prevalent Vertebral Fracture and Vertebral Strength Estimated by the Finite Element Method Based on Quantitative Computed Tomography in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Bone fragility is increased in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but a useful method to estimate bone fragility in T2DM patients is lacking because bone mineral density alone is not sufficient to assess the risk of fracture. This study investigated the association between prevalent vertebral fractures (VFs) and the vertebral strength index estimated by the quantitative computed tomography-based nonlinear finite element method (QCT-based nonlinear FEM) using multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) for clinical practice use. Research Design and Methods A cross-sectional observational study was conducted on 54 postmenopausal women and 92 men over 50 years of age, all of whom had T2DM. The vertebral strength index was compared in patients with and without VFs confirmed by spinal radiographs. A standard FEM procedure was performed with the application of known parameters for the bone material properties obtained from nondiabetic subjects. Results A total of 20 women (37.0%) and 39 men (42.4%) with VFs were identified. The vertebral strength index was significantly higher in the men than in the women (P<0.01). Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the vertebral strength index was significantly and positively correlated with the spinal bone mineral density (BMD) and inversely associated with age in both genders. There were no significant differences in the parameters, including the vertebral strength index, between patients with and without VFs. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, spine BMD, BMI, HbA1c, and duration of T2DM did not indicate a significant relationship between the vertebral strength index and the presence of VFs. Conclusion The vertebral strength index calculated by QCT-based nonlinear FEM using material property parameters obtained from nondiabetic subjects, whose risk of fracture is lower than that of T2DM patients, was not significantly associated with bone fragility in patients with T2DM. This discordance

  4. Kyphoplasty in the treatment of osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures (VCF) : procedure description and analysis of the outcomes in 128 patients.

    PubMed

    Molina, Guillermo Saul Fernandez; Campero, A; Feito, R; Pombo, S

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the advent of percutaneous techniques in the management of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures has proven to be a great step forward in the evolution of patients suffering from this pathology.Vertebroplasty, which was developed in 1984 by Galibert and Deramond, presents the disadvantage of leakage of the cementation material and the impossibility to restore spinal deformity. Kyphoplasty has shown to be almost a definite solution to these problems. The description of the technique, its indications, and the outcomes resulting from our series of 200 vertebral fractures in 128 patients are presented in this paper. PMID:21107953

  5. Kyphoplasty in the treatment of osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures (VCF) : procedure description and analysis of the outcomes in 128 patients.

    PubMed

    Molina, Guillermo Saul Fernandez; Campero, A; Feito, R; Pombo, S

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the advent of percutaneous techniques in the management of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures has proven to be a great step forward in the evolution of patients suffering from this pathology.Vertebroplasty, which was developed in 1984 by Galibert and Deramond, presents the disadvantage of leakage of the cementation material and the impossibility to restore spinal deformity. Kyphoplasty has shown to be almost a definite solution to these problems. The description of the technique, its indications, and the outcomes resulting from our series of 200 vertebral fractures in 128 patients are presented in this paper.

  6. Percutaneous Dorsal Instrumentation of Vertebral Burst Fractures: Value of Additional Percutaneous Intravertebral Reposition—Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Antonio; Schmuck, Maya; Noriega, David C.; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Baroud, Gamal; Oberkircher, Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The treatment of vertebral burst fractures is still controversial. The aim of the study is to evaluate the purpose of additional percutaneous intravertebral reduction when combined with dorsal instrumentation. Methods. In this biomechanical cadaver study twenty-eight spine segments (T11-L3) were used (male donors, mean age 64.9 ± 6.5 years). Burst fractures of L1 were generated using a standardised protocol. After fracture all spines were allocated to four similar groups and randomised according to surgical techniques (posterior instrumentation; posterior instrumentation + intravertebral reduction device + cement augmentation; posterior instrumentation + intravertebral reduction device without cement; and intravertebral reduction device + cement augmentation). After treatment, 100000 cycles (100–600 N, 3 Hz) were applied using a servohydraulic loading frame. Results. Overall anatomical restoration was better in all groups where the intravertebral reduction device was used (p < 0.05). In particular, it was possible to restore central endplates (p > 0.05). All techniques decreased narrowing of the spinal canal. After loading, clearance could be maintained in all groups fitted with the intravertebral reduction device. Narrowing increased in the group treated with dorsal instrumentation. Conclusions. For height and anatomical restoration, the combination of an intravertebral reduction device with dorsal instrumentation showed significantly better results than sole dorsal instrumentation. PMID:26137481

  7. Radioecology of Vertebrate Animals in the Area Adjacent to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Site in 1986-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, E. B.; Gashchak, S. P.; Makliuk, Y. A.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Jannik, G. T.; Marra, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    A widespread environmental contamination of the areas adjacent to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) site attracted a great deal of publicity to the biological consequences of the ChNPP catastrophe. However, only a few studies focused on a detailed analysis of radioactive contamination of the local wild fauna and most of them were published in Eastern European languages, making them poorly accessible for Western scientists. In addition, evaluation of this information appears difficult due to significant differences in raw data acquisition and analysis methodologies and final data presentation formats. Using an integrated approach to assessment of all available information, the International Radioecology Laboratory scientists showed that the ChNPP accident had increased the average values of the animals 137Cs and 90Sr contamination by a factor of thousands, followed by its decrease by a factor of tens, primarily resulting from a decrease in the biological accessibility of the radionuclides. However, this trend depended on many factors. Plant and bottom feeding fish species were the first to reach the maximum contamination levels. No data are available on other vertebrates, but it can be assumed that the same trend was true for all plant feeding animals and animals searching for food on the soil surface. The most significant decrease of the average values occurred during the first 3-5 years after the accident and it was the most pronounced for elks and plant and plankton feeding fish. Their diet included elements “alienated” from the major radionuclide inventory; for example, upper soil layers and bottom deposits where the fallout that had originally precipitated on plants, water and soils gradually migrated. Further radionuclide penetration into deeper layers of soils and its bonding with their mineral components intensified decontamination of the fauna. It took a while for the contamination of predatory fish and mammals (wolves) to reach the maximum

  8. CAPACITIVE COUPLING ELECTRIC FIELDS IN THE TREATMENT OF VERTEBRAL COMPRESSION FRACTURES.

    PubMed

    Piazzolla, A; Solarino, G; Bizzoca, D; Garofalo, N; Dicuonzo, F; Setti, S; Moretti, B

    2015-01-01

    Positive effects of Capacitive Coupling Electric Field (CCEF) stimulation are described for several orthopedic indications such as the healing of recent fractures, non-unions and spinal fusion, due to the capacity to involve the up-regulation of osteopromotive factors. In vitro studies on MC3T3-E1 bone cells showed that CCEF acts opening the plasma membrane voltage gated calcium channels, thus increasing the cytosolic calcium concentration and the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity. Cytosolic calcium activates the calmodulin pathway, thus resulting in an up-regulated expression of osteogenic genes, such as transforming growth factor-β superfamily genes (TGF-β1, -β2 -β3, bone morphogenetic protein-2 and -4), fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, osteocalcin (BGP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). PLA2 acts increasing the synthesis of Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which promotes osteogenesis by raising the cellular L-ascorbic acid uptake through the membrane carrier sodium vitamin C transporter-2 (SVCT-2). In vivo, Brighton et al. in a castration-induced osteoporosis animal model, demonstrated that CCEF was able to restore bone mass/unit volume in the rat vertebral body. To investigate the role of CCEF stimulation in vertebral bone marrow edema (VBME) its percentage was assessed in 24 patients with 25 acute vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) conservatively treated with CCEF (group A) or without CCEF (group B) using serial MR imaging follow-up at 0, 30, 60, 90 days. Pain and quality of life were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry Low Back Disability Index (ODI) in the same periods. At 90 day follow-up the complete resolution of VBME was found only in group A (p=0.0001). A significant improvement of VAS (p=0.007) and ODI (p=0.002) was also observed in group A. This preliminary observational study shows that patients treated with CCEF stimulation present an improvement of clinical symptoms with faster fracture healing and a complete VBME resolution. PMID

  9. Segmental Deformity Correction after Balloon Kyphoplasty in the Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kwon, Jeong-Taik; Suk, Jong-Sik

    2007-01-01

    Objective Balloon kyphoplasty can effectively relieve the symptomatic pain and correct the segmental deformity of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. While many articles have reported on the effectiveness of the procedure, there has not been any research on the factors affecting the deformity correction. Here, we evaluated both the relationship between postoperative pain relief and restoration of the vertebral height, and segmental kyphosis, as well as the various factors affecting segmental deformity correction after balloon kyphoplasty. Methods Between January 2004 and December 2006, 137 patients (158 vertebral levels) underwent balloon kyphoplasty. We analyzed various factors such as the age and sex of the patient, preoperative compression ratio, kyphotic angle of compressed segment, injected PMMA volume, configuration of compression, preoperative bone mineral density (BMD) score, time interval between onset of symptom and the procedure, visual analogue scale (VAS) score for pain rating and surgery-related complications. Results The mean postoperative VAS score improvement was 4.93±0.17. The mean postoperative height restoration rate was 17.8±1.57% and the kyphotic angle reduction was 1.94±0.38°. However, there were no significant statistical correlations among VAS score improvement, height restoration rate, and kyphotic angle reduction. Among the various factors, the configuration of the compressed vertebral body (p=0.002) was related to the height restoration rate and the direction of the compression (p=0.006) was related with the kyphotic angle reduction. The preoperative compression ratio (p=0.023, p=0.006) and injected PMMA volume (p<0.001, p=0.035) affected both the height restoration and kyphotic angle reduction. Only the preoperative compression ratio was found to be as an independent affecting factor (95% CI : 1.064-5.068). Conclusion The two major benefits of balloon kyphoplasty are immediate pain relief and local deformity correction

  10. The implantation of a Nickel-Titanium shape memory alloy ameliorates vertebral body compression fractures: a cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Zheng, Yue-Huang; Zheng, Tao; Sun, Chang-Hui; Lu, Jiong; Cao, Peng; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti) shape memory alloy in the treatment of vertebral body compression fractures. Methods: The experimental thoracic-lumbar fracture units were made with adult human fresh-frozen vertebral specimens. A total of 30 fresh-frozen vertebral units were randomly assigned to 3 experimental groups: control group, percutaneous kyphoplasty group (PKP group), and percutaneous Ni-Ti shape memory alloys implant group (Ni-Ti implant group). Vertebral height and ultimate compression load of the vertebral body before and after procedures were measured to determine the restoration of vertebral heights and compressive strength, respectively. Results: The Ni-Ti implant group achieved a vertebrae endplate reduction effect comparable to the PKP group. The vertebral height of the PKP group was restored from 2.01±0.21 cm to 2.27±0.18 cm after procedure, whereas that of the Ni-Ti implant group was restored from 2.00±0.18 cm to 2.31±0.17 cm. The ultimate loads of the vertebrae body of the PKP and the Ni-Ti implant groups were 2880.75±126.17 N and 2888.00±144.69 N, respectively, both of which were statistically significantly higher than that of the control group (2017.17±163.71 N). There was no significant difference in ultimate compression load of vertebrae body between the Ni-Ti implant and PKP groups. Conclusions: The implantation of Ni-Ti shape memory alloys of vertebral body induced effective endplate reduction, restored vertebral height, and provided immediate biomechanical spinal stability. PMID:26629241

  11. Homocysteine, folate, and vitamin B12 levels and vertebral fracture risk in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    El Maghraoui, Abdellah; Ghozlani, Imad; Mounach, Aziza; Rezqi, Asmaa; Oumghar, Khalid; Achemlal, Lahsen; Bezza, Ahmed; Ouzzif, Zhor

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of homocysteine, vitamin B(12), and folate on the prevalence of asymptomatic osteoporotic vertebral fractures (VFs) using vertebral fracture assessment (VFA) in postmenopausal women. The study cohort consisted of 188 consecutive postmenopausal women (mean age, weight, and body mass index of 57.9 ± 8.5 [41-91]yr, 74.4 ± 13.5 [38-150]kg, and 30.4 ± 5.2 [17.1-50.7]kg/m(2), respectively). Lateral VFA images and scans of the lumbar spine and proximal femur were obtained using a Lunar Prodigy Vision densitometer (GE Healthcare Inc., Waukesha, WI). VFs were defined using a combination of Genant's semiquantitative approach and morphometry. Fifty-eight (30.9%) patients had densitometric osteoporosis. VFs were identified using VFA in 76 (40.4%) patients: 61 women had grade 1 VFs and 15 had grade 2 or 3 VFs. No statistical difference was shown between the 3 groups (absence of VFs, VFs grade 1, and VFs grade 2/3) concerning the biological parameters. Comparison of patients according to quartiles of homocysteine levels showed that women in the highest quartile were older and had a lower bone mineral density (BMD); however, the prevalence of VFs was not statistically different from that of women in the other quartile groups. Stepwise regression analysis showed that homocysteine was not independently associated with the presence of VFs, which was mainly related to the osteoporotic status. Although a weak association was observed between hyperhomocysteinemia and low BMD and a trend to higher prevalence of grade 2/3 VFs was observed, our study did not confirm that homocysteine, vitamin B(12), and folate status are important determinants of prevalent asymptomatic VFs in postmenopausal women.

  12. Vertebral Compression Fracture Related to Pancreatic Cancer With Osteoblastic Metastasis: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Chih, Yu-Pin; Wu, Wei-Ting; Lin, Chien-Lin; Jou, Herng-Jeng; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Liang-Chi; Chou, Li-Wei

    2016-02-01

    Compression fracture of the vertebral body is common in the older patients. The possible etiology like osteoporosis or cancer metastasis should be included as a possibility in the differential diagnosis for severe back pain, to prevent delays in diagnosis and treatment. More severe fractures can cause significant pain, leading to inability to perform activities of daily living, and life-threatening in the older patient.We report a rare case of a 61-year-old man suffering from severe lower back pain and intermittent abdominal fullness. He came to our clinic, where muscle power was normal, but could not stand up or change posture because of severe back pain. Plain film and magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spine both revealed osteoblastic lesion at L2 spine. Abdomen computed tomography showed a mass at the pancreatic body. The pancreatic cancer with osteoblastic metastasis was diagnosed. After receiving multimodality therapy such as percutaneous vertebroplasty and pain controlling, we provided effective palliation of symptoms, aggressive rehabilitation program, and better quality of life.Our case highlights the benefits of multidisciplinary cancer treatment for such patient, preventing the complications such as immobilization accompanied with adverse effects like musculoskeletal, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems. All clinicians should be informed of the clinical findings to provide patients with suitable therapies and surveys.

  13. Assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography by geometric characterization of trabecular bone structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    The current clinical standard for measuring Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is dual X-ray absorptiometry, however more recently BMD derived from volumetric quantitative computed tomography has been shown to demonstrate a high association with spinal fracture susceptibility. In this study, we propose a method of fracture risk assessment using structural properties of trabecular bone in spinal vertebrae. Experimental data was acquired via axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) from 12 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. Common image processing methods were used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the vertebral slices creating a circular region of interest (ROI) that excluded cortical bone for each slice. The pixels inside the ROI were converted to values indicative of BMD. High dimensional geometrical features were derived using the scaling index method (SIM) at different radii and scaling factors (SF). The mean BMD values within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a support vector machine to predict the failure load of the specimens. Prediction performance was measured using the root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric and determined that SIM combined with mean BMD features (RMSE = 0.82 +/- 0.37) outperformed MDCT-measured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 +/- 0.33) (p < 10-4). These results demonstrate that biomechanical strength prediction in vertebrae can be significantly improved through the use of SIM-derived texture features from trabecular bone.

  14. Fatal case of cervical blunt vascular injury with cervical vertebral fracture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Okura, Toshiaki; Yoshihara, Hisatake; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Ukai, Junichi; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Muramoto, Akio; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) is usually caused by neck trauma that predominantly occurs in high-impact injuries. BCVI may occur due to damage to both the vertebral and carotid arteries, and may be fatal in the absence of appropriate treatment and early diagnosis. Here, we describe a case of cerebral infarction caused by a combination of a lower cervical spinal fracture and traumatic injury to the carotid artery by a direct blunt external force in a 52-year-old man. Initially, there was no effect on consciousness, but 6 hours later loss of consciousness occurred due to traumatic dissection of the carotid artery that resulted in a cerebral infarction. Brain edema was so extensive that decompression by emergency craniectomy and internal decompression were performed by a neurosurgeon, but with no effect, and the patient died on day 7. This is a rare case of cerebral infarction caused by a combination of a lower cervical spinal fracture and traumatic injury to the carotid artery. The case suggests that cervical vascular injury should be considered in a patient with a blunt neck trauma and that additional imaging should be performed. PMID:26412898

  15. Deterioration of trabecular plate-rod and cortical microarchitecture and reduced bone stiffness at distal radius and tibia in postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji; Stein, Emily M; Zhou, Bin; Nishiyama, Kyle K; Yu, Y Eric; Shane, Elizabeth; Guo, X Edward

    2016-07-01

    Postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures have abnormal bone microarchitecture at the distal radius and tibia by HR-pQCT, independent of areal BMD. However, whether trabecular plate and rod microarchitecture is altered in women with vertebral fractures is unknown. This study aims to characterize the abnormalities of trabecular plate and rod microarchitecture, cortex, and bone stiffness in postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures. HR-pQCT images of distal radius and tibia were acquired from 45 women with vertebral fractures and 45 control subjects without fractures. Trabecular and cortical compartments were separated by an automatic segmentation algorithm and subjected to individual trabecula segmentation (ITS) analysis for measuring trabecular plate and rod morphology and cortical bone evaluation for measuring cortical thickness and porosity, respectively. Whole bone and trabecular bone stiffness were estimated by finite element analysis. Fracture and control subjects did not differ according to age, race, body mass index, osteoporosis risk factors, or medication use. Women with vertebral fractures had thinner cortices, and larger trabecular area compared to the control group. By ITS analysis, fracture subjects had fewer trabecular plates, less axially aligned trabeculae and less trabecular connectivity at both the radius and the tibia. Fewer trabecular rods were observed at the radius. Whole bone stiffness and trabecular bone stiffness were 18% and 22% lower in women with vertebral fractures at the radius, and 19% and 16% lower at the tibia, compared with controls. The estimated failure load of the radius and tibia were also reduced in the fracture subjects by 13% and 14%, respectively. In summary, postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures had both trabecular and cortical microstructural deterioration at the peripheral skeleton, with a preferential loss of trabecular plates and cortical thinning. These microstructural deficits translated into lower

  16. Characterizing trabecular bone structure for assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Tsai, Halley; Wang, Xixi; Hobbs, Susan K.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    While the proximal femur is preferred for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) in fracture risk estimation, the introduction of volumetric quantitative computed tomography has revealed stronger associations between BMD and spinal fracture status. In this study, we propose to capture properties of trabecular bone structure in spinal vertebrae with advanced second-order statistical features for purposes of fracture risk assessment. For this purpose, axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) images were acquired from 28 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. A semi-automated method was used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the central vertebral slice with a circular region of interest (ROI) to exclude cortical bone; pixels within were converted to values indicative of BMD. Six second-order statistical features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) and the mean BMD within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a generalized radial basis functions (GRBF) neural network to predict the failure load of the specimens; true failure load was measured through biomechanical testing. Prediction performance was evaluated with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric. The best prediction performance was observed with GLCM feature `correlation' (RMSE = 1.02 ± 0.18), which significantly outperformed all other GLCM features (p < 0.01). GLCM feature correlation also significantly outperformed MDCTmeasured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 ± 0.17) (p< 10-4). These results suggest that biomechanical strength prediction in spinal vertebrae can be significantly improved through characterization of trabecular bone structure with GLCM-derived texture features.

  17. Trabecular bone score (TBS) predicts vertebral fractures in Japanese women over 10 years independently of bone density and prevalent vertebral deformity: the Japanese Population-Based Osteoporosis (JPOS) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Iki, Masayuki; Tamaki, Junko; Kadowaki, Eiko; Sato, Yuho; Dongmei, Namiraa; Winzenrieth, Renaud; Kagamimori, Sadanobu; Kagawa, Yoshiko; Yoneshima, Hideo

    2014-02-01

    Bone strength is predominantly determined by bone density, but bone microarchitecture also plays an important role. We examined whether trabecular bone score (TBS) predicts the risk of vertebral fractures in a Japanese female cohort. Of 1950 randomly selected women aged 15 to 79 years, we analyzed data from 665 women aged 50 years and older, who completed the baseline study and at least one follow-up survey over 10 years, and who had no conditions affecting bone metabolism. Each survey included spinal imaging by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for vertebral fracture assessment and spine areal bone mineral density (aBMD) measurement. TBS was obtained from spine DXA scans archived in the baseline study. Incident vertebral fracture was determined when vertebral height was reduced by 20% or more and satisfied McCloskey-Kanis criteria or Genant's grade 2 fracture at follow-up. Among eligible women (mean age 64.1 ± 8.1 years), 92 suffered incident vertebral fractures (16.7/10(3) person-years). These women were older with lower aBMD and TBS values relative to those without fractures. The unadjusted odds ratio of vertebral fractures for one standard deviation decrease in TBS was 1.98 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.56, 2.51) and remained significant (1.64, 95% CI 1.25, 2.15) after adjusting for aBMD. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of TBS and aBMD combined was 0.700 for vertebral fracture prediction and was not significantly greater than that of aBMD alone (0.673). However, reclassification improvement measures indicated that TBS and aBMD combined significantly improved risk prediction accuracy compared with aBMD alone. Further inclusion of age and prevalent vertebral deformity in the model improved vertebral fracture prediction, and TBS remained significant in the model. Thus, lower TBS was associated with higher risk of vertebral fracture over 10 years independently of aBMD and clinical risk factors including prevalent vertebral

  18. Contribution of vertebral deformities to chronic back pain and disability. The Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Research Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ettinger, B.; Black, D. M.; Nevitt, M. C.; Rundle, A. C.; Cauley, J. A.; Cummings, S. R.; Genant, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    Among 2992 white women aged 65-70 years recruited from population-based listings, we measured radiographic vertebral dimensions of T5-L4 and calculated ratios of heights: anterior/posterior, mid/posterior, and posterior/posterior of either adjacent vertebra. The degree of deformity for each vertebra was analyzed in terms of the number of standard deviations (SD) that ratio differed from the mean ratio calculated for the same vertebral level in this population. We correlated the severity of each woman's worst vertebral deformity with back pain, back disability in six activities of daily living, and height loss since age 25. Only 39.4% of the cohort had no vertebral deformity; 10.2% had a deformity greater than or equal to 4 SD. Vertebral deformities less than 4 SD below the mean were not associated with increased back pain, disability, or loss of height. In contrast, women whose deformity was greater than or equal to 4 SD had a 1.9 (95% CI, 1.5-2.4) times higher risk of moderate to severe back pain and a 2.6 (95% CI, 1.7-3.9) times higher risk of disability involving the back; they were also 2.5 (95% CI, 2.0-3.2) times more likely to have lost greater than or equal to 4 cm in height. All three types of vertebral deformity (wedge, end plate, and crush) were equally associated with these outcomes. Multiple deformities less than 4 SD did not increase the likelihood of these three outcomes, but multiple deformities greater than or equal to 4 SD tended to be associated with increased back pain, disability, and height loss. This large cross-sectional study suggests that vertebral deformities cause substantial pain, disability, or loss of height only if vertebral height ratios fall 4 SD below the normal mean. Much back pain could not be attributed to vertebral deformities, suggesting other causes.

  19. Efficacy of a specific rehabilitation protocol in postural control of a young woman with multiple fragility vertebral fractures: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Raffaetà, Gloria; Falossi, Francesca; Menconi, Agnese; Genovesi, Chiara; Mazzantini, Maurizio; Bottai, Vanna; Guido, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Summary The fragility vertebral fractures have a considerable impact on an individual’s health-related quality of life due to pain, limitations in activity, social participation, altered mood and balance impairment. Physiotherapy interventions may have an important role in improving quality of life, balance and reducing the fracture risk in people with osteoporotic vertebral fractures. In literature there are only a few studies that examine exercise interventions in osteoporotic populations with vertebral fracture and few studies that examine the effects on balance with instrumental measurements. In this paper we present a case of a woman with fragility vertebral fractures and a related balance impairment and the effects of a specific rehabilitation program using both clinical evaluations that instrumental measurements. PMID:27252752

  20. Clinical evaluation of Crosstrees pod kyphoplasty in the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianwei; Zhang, Zheng; Huasong, Ma; Tan, Rong; Zou, Dewei

    2013-08-01

    Although percutaneous vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty have improved the management of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs), these techniques still suffer from inherent disadvantages and complications, such as cement leakage. This prospective pilot study evaluated the clinical outcomes of 15 OVCF patients treated with a new technique, the Crosstrees pod kyphoplasty (C-pod kyphoplasty). This is in fact a balloon kyphoplasty, where the balloon is filled with cement, then opened and removed. The VAS for back pain decreased significantly from 8.9 +/- 1.4 preoperatively to 2.1 +/- 13 at 24hrs postoperatively, and to 2.2 +/-1.5 at final followup (p = 0.001). Likewise, the ODI score decreased significantly from 86.1 +/- 8.7 preoperatively to 30.5+/-7.5 at 24 h, and to 32.8 +/- 8.3 at final follow up (p = 0.001). The average vertebral height increased significantly from 14.50 1.34 mm preoperatively to 23.20 1.12 mm 24 h postoperatively and to 22.82 +/- 0.85 mm at final follow-up (p = 0.002). The kyphotic angle decreased significantly from preoperatively (28.50 +/-1.85 degrees) to 24 h postoperatively (11.30 +/-1.40 degrees) and to final follow-up (12.48 +/- 0.70 degrees) (p = 0.005). Cement leakage, infection, pulmonary embolism or nerve injury were not seen. The C-pod kyphoplasty may be an effective minimally invasive procedure to treat OVCFs, with a decreased complication rate compared with vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty.

  1. High prevalence of spine–femur bone mineral density discordance and comparison of vertebral fracture risk assessment using femoral neck and lumbar spine bone density in Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Seok, Hannah; Kim, Kwang Joon; Kim, Kyoung Min; Rhee, Yumie; Cha, Bong Soo; Lim, Sung-Kil

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of spine–femur discordance, and to compare the effectiveness of femoral neck (FN) and lumbar spine (LS) bone mineral density (BMD) for estimation of the risk of vertebral fractures. Women who were evaluated with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry between January 2001 and December 2005 were enrolled in this study. Vertebral fracture risk was calculated using initial FN and LS BMD. The follow-up vertebral X-rays from all subjects were reviewed, and the calculated estimated risk using the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX(®)) was compared with the actual prevalence of vertebral fractures during the follow-up period. Among a total of 443 women with a mean age of 58.5 years, 130 women (29.3 %) demonstrated femur–spine discordance (i.e., a difference between FN and LS BMD of [1 SD). Most subjects having discordance showed lower LS BMD (73.1 %) compared to FN BMD. During the mean 7-year follow-up period, 12 (2.7 %) vertebral fractures occurred. In cases with high estimated fracture risk ([20 % for estimated fracture risk), using LSBMD significantly reflected the actual vertebral fracture in total subjects [odds ratio (OR) 19.29, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 4.21–88.46], in subjects with spine–femur discordance (OR 16.00, 95 % CI 1.91–134.16), and in subjects with spine–femur discordance having lower LSBMD (OR 20.67, 95 % CI 1.63–262.71). In comparison, the estimated risk using FN BMD did not reflect the actual occurrence of vertebral fractures. In conclusion, a significant number of Korean subjects exhibited spine–femur discordance, and LS BMD might be more appropriate for estimation of vertebral fracture risk.

  2. Orthotics and taping in the management of vertebral fractures in people with osteoporosis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Victoria A; Hall, Abigail J; Rogers, Emily; Bethel, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Objective To establish the current evidence base for the use of orthotics and taping for people with osteoporotic vertebral fracture (OVF). Design Systematic review of quantitative and qualitative studies. Data sources Medline, Medline-In Process, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, PEDro, TRIP, EThOS, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses and Cochrane (CDSR, DARE, CMR, HTA, EED) plus Cochrane Central, UK Clinical Research Network portfolio, Controlled Clinical Trials register and the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials register. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies All study designs were considered if they reported in English and evaluated the impact of using an external support, such as a spinal brace, orthosis or postural tape, with adults with OVF. All outcomes were considered. Results Nine studies were included comprising two parallel-group randomised controlled trials, four randomised cross-over trials, two before-after (single arm) studies and a parallel group observational study. No qualitative studies were identified. A wide range of outcomes assessing impairments, activities and participation were assessed but the findings were mixed. The quality of studies was limited. Conclusions The current evidence for using orthotic devices or taping for people with OVF is inconsistent and of limited quality and therefore careful consideration should be taken by clinicians before prescribing them in practice. Systematic review registration number CRD42015020893. PMID:27147384

  3. Unilateral posterior vertebral column resection for severe thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity caused by old compressive vertebrae fracture: a technical improvement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Di; Sun, Ya-Peng; Ma, Lei; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Severe thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity caused by old compressive vertebrae fracture remains a big challenge for spine surgeons. When symptoms related to significant deformities cannot be adequately managed conservatively, posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR) is required, but with long operating time and severe blood loss. We develop a UPVCR technique, which is done through a unilateral approach instead of a bilateral approach, vertebral body resection advancing to cross the midline in an abrasive way from an extreme oblique orientation enable the resection of most contralateral vertebral body. In the present study, the effects of UPVCR for severe thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity were investigated. We did find that satisfactory correction of sagittal deformity, functional improvement and pain relief can be achieved by UPVCR, and it has the advantage of shortening surgery time, reducing blood loss and incidence of nerve root impingement over PVCR.

  4. Automatic Vertebral Fracture Assessment System (AVFAS) for Spinal Pathologies Diagnosis Based on Radiograph X-Ray Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustapha, Aouache; Hussain, Aini; Samad, Salina Abd; Bin Abdul Hamid, Hamzaini; Ariffin, Ahmad Kamal

    Nowadays, medical imaging has become a major tool in many clinical trials. This is because the technology enables rapid diagnosis with visualization and quantitative assessment that facilitate health practitioners or professionals. Since the medical and healthcare sector is a vast industry that is very much related to every citizen's quality of life, the image based medical diagnosis has become one of the important service areas in this sector. As such, a medical diagnostic imaging (MDI) software tool for assessing vertebral fracture is being developed which we have named as AVFAS short for Automatic Vertebral Fracture Assessment System. The developed software system is capable of indexing, detecting and classifying vertebral fractures by measuring the shape and appearance of vertebrae of radiograph x-ray images of the spine. This paper describes the MDI software tool which consists of three main sub-systems known as Medical Image Training & Verification System (MITVS), Medical Image and Measurement & Decision System (MIMDS) and Medical Image Registration System (MIRS) in term of its functionality, performance, ongoing research and outstanding technical issues.

  5. Adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  6. Vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty versus conservative treatment for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei-Hsin; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Lai, Kaun-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Although the majority of available evidence suggests that vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty can relieve pain associated with vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) and improve function, some studies have suggested results are similar to those of placebo. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare the outcomes of vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty with conservative treatment in patients with osteoporotic VCFs. Methods: Medline, Cochrane, and Embase databases were searched until January 31, 2015 using the keywords: vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty, compression fracture, osteoporotic, and osteoporosis. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which patients with osteoporosis, and VCFs were treated with vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty or conservative management. Outcome measures were pain, function, and quality of life. Standardized differences in means were calculated as a measure of effect size. Main results: Ten RCTs were included. The total number of patients in the treatment and control groups was 626 and 628, respectively, the mean patient age ranged from 64 to 80 years, and the majority was female. Vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty was associated with greater pain relief (pooled standardized difference in means = 0.82, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.374–1.266, P < 0.001) and a significant improvement in daily function (pooled standardized difference in means = 1.273, 95% CI: 1.028–1.518, P < 0.001) as compared with conservative treatment. The pooled estimate indicated vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty was associated with higher quality of life (pooled standardized difference in means = 1.545, 95% CI: 1.293–1.798, P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis of 8 vertebroplasty studies and 2 kyphoplasty studies that reported pain data, however, indicated that vertebroplasty provided greater pain relief than conservative treatment but kyphoplasty did not. Conclusion: Vertebroplasty may provide better pain relief than balloon

  7. Balloon kyphoplasty for the treatment of acute vertebral compression fractures: 2-year results from a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Boonen, Steven; Van Meirhaeghe, Jan; Bastian, Leonard; Cummings, Steven R; Ranstam, Jonas; Tillman, John B; Eastell, Richard; Talmadge, Karen; Wardlaw, Douglas

    2011-07-01

    Vertebral fractures are often painful and lead to reduced quality of life and disability. We compared the efficacy and safety of balloon kyphoplasty to nonsurgical therapy over 24 months in patients with acute painful fractures. Adults with one to three vertebral fractures were randomized within 3 months from onset of pain to undergo kyphoplasty (n = 149) or nonsurgical therapy (n = 151). Quality of life, function, disability, and pain were assessed over 24 months. Kyphoplasty was associated with greater improvements in Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Physical Component Summary (PCS) scores when averaged across the 24-month follow-up period compared with nonsurgical therapy [overall treatment effect 3.24 points, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.47-5.01, p = .0004]; the treatment difference remained statistically significant at 6 months (3.39 points, 95% CI 1.13-5.64, p = .003) but not at 12 months (1.70 points, 95% CI -0.59 to 3.98, p = .15) or 24 months (1.68 points, 95% CI -0.63 to 3.99, p = .15). Greater improvement in back pain was observed over 24 months for kyphoplasty (overall treatment effect -1.49 points, 95% CI -1.88 to -1.10, p < .0001); the difference between groups remained statistically significant at 24 months (-0.80 points, 95% CI -1.39 to -0.20, p = .009). There were two device-related serious adverse events in the second year that occurred at index vertebrae (a spondylitis and an anterior cement migration). There was no statistically significant difference between groups in the number of patients (47.5% for kyphoplasty, 44.1% for control) with new radiographic vertebral fractures; fewer fractures occurred (~18%) within the second year. Compared with nonsurgical management, kyphoplasty rapidly reduces pain and improves function, disability, and quality of life without increasing the risk of additional vertebral fractures. The differences from nonsurgical management are statistically significant when averaged across 24 months. Most outcomes are not

  8. Incident Vertebral Fractures in Children with Leukemia During the Four Years Following Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Elizabeth A; Ma, Jinhui; Fernandez, Conrad V; Halton, Jacqueline; Alos, Nathalie; Miettunen, Paivi M; Jaremko, Jacob L; Ho, Josephine; Shenouda, Nazih; Matzinger, Mary Ann; Lentle, Brian; Stephure, David; Stein, Robert; Sbrocchi, Ann Marie; Rodd, Celia; Lang, Bianca; Israels, Sara; Grant, Ronald M; Couch, Robert; Barr, Ronald; Hay, John; Rauch, Frank; Siminoski, Kerry; Ward, Leanne M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this article was to determine the incidence and predictors of vertebral fractures (VF) during the four years following diagnosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients and Methods Children were enrolled within 30 days of chemotherapy initiation, with incident VF assessed annually on lateral spine radiographs according to the Genant method. Extended Cox’s models were used to assess the association between incident VF and clinical predictors. Results 186 children with ALL completed the baseline evaluation (median age 5.3 years, interquartile range 3.4 to 9.7, 58% boys). The VF incidence rate was 8.7 per 100 person-years, with a four-year cumulative incidence of 26.4%. The highest annual incidence occurred at 12 months (16.1%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 11.2 – 22.7), falling to 2.9% at four years (95% CI, 1.1 – 7.3). Half of the children with incident VF had moderate or severe VF and 39% of those with incident VF were asymptomatic. Every 10 mg/m2 increase in average daily glucocorticoid dose (prednisone equivalents) was associated with a 5.9-fold increased VF risk (95% CI, 3.0–11.8; p < 0.01). Other predictors of increased VF risk included: VF at diagnosis, younger age, and lower spine bone mineral density Z-scores at baseline and each annual assessment. Conclusions One quarter of children with ALL developed incident VF in the four years following diagnosis; most of the VF burden was in the first year. Over one third of children with incident VF were asymptomatic. Discrete clinical predictors of VF were evident early in the patient’s clinical course, including VF at diagnosis. PMID:26171800

  9. Impact of Instrumented Spinal Fusion on the Development of Vertebral Compression Fracture.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yen-Chun; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Hung-Shu; Kao, Yu-Hsien; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2016-04-01

    Instrumented spinal fusion has become one of the most common surgeries for patients with various spinal disorders. Only few studies have reported subsequent vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) after instrumented spinal fusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of new VCFs in patients undergoing instrumented spinal fusion.We obtained claims data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan and retrospectively reviewed 6949 patients with instrumented spinal fusion as the spinal fusion cohort. Control subjects were individually matched at a ratio of 10:1 with those of the spinal fusion cohort according to age, sex, and the index day. Comorbidities were classified as those existing before the index day, and these included diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis, and cerebrovascular accident. The end of the follow-up period for the analyses was marked on the day new VCFs developed, enrolment in the National Health Insurance was terminated, on the day of death, or until the end of 2012. We used the Cox proportion hazards model to analyze the hazard ratio (HR) for developing new VCFs.Patients with instrumented spinal fusion were significantly more likely to develop new VCFs (1.87% vs .25%, HR: 8.56; P < 0.001). Female, elderly, and osteoporotic patients had a high incidence of new VCFs after spinal fusion. The HR for developing new VCFs after instrumented spinal fusion was higher in patients younger than 65 years than in those 65 years or older (HR: 10.61 vs 8.09). Male patients with instrumented spinal fusion also had a higher HR of developing new VCFs than female patients (men, HR: 26.42; women, HR: 7.53).In our retrospective cohort study, patients who had undergone instrumented spinal fusion surgery exhibited an increased risk of developing new VCFs. Particularly, the HR increased in young (age <65 years) and male patients. PMID:27124040

  10. Impact of Instrumented Spinal Fusion on the Development of Vertebral Compression Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yen-Chun; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Hung-Shu; Kao, Yu-Hsien; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Instrumented spinal fusion has become one of the most common surgeries for patients with various spinal disorders. Only few studies have reported subsequent vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) after instrumented spinal fusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of new VCFs in patients undergoing instrumented spinal fusion. We obtained claims data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan and retrospectively reviewed 6949 patients with instrumented spinal fusion as the spinal fusion cohort. Control subjects were individually matched at a ratio of 10:1 with those of the spinal fusion cohort according to age, sex, and the index day. Comorbidities were classified as those existing before the index day, and these included diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis, and cerebrovascular accident. The end of the follow-up period for the analyses was marked on the day new VCFs developed, enrolment in the National Health Insurance was terminated, on the day of death, or until the end of 2012. We used the Cox proportion hazards model to analyze the hazard ratio (HR) for developing new VCFs. Patients with instrumented spinal fusion were significantly more likely to develop new VCFs (1.87% vs .25%, HR: 8.56; P < 0.001). Female, elderly, and osteoporotic patients had a high incidence of new VCFs after spinal fusion. The HR for developing new VCFs after instrumented spinal fusion was higher in patients younger than 65 years than in those 65 years or older (HR: 10.61 vs 8.09). Male patients with instrumented spinal fusion also had a higher HR of developing new VCFs than female patients (men, HR: 26.42; women, HR: 7.53). In our retrospective cohort study, patients who had undergone instrumented spinal fusion surgery exhibited an increased risk of developing new VCFs. Particularly, the HR increased in young (age <65 years) and male patients. PMID:27124040

  11. Impact of Instrumented Spinal Fusion on the Development of Vertebral Compression Fracture.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yen-Chun; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Hung-Shu; Kao, Yu-Hsien; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2016-04-01

    Instrumented spinal fusion has become one of the most common surgeries for patients with various spinal disorders. Only few studies have reported subsequent vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) after instrumented spinal fusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of new VCFs in patients undergoing instrumented spinal fusion.We obtained claims data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan and retrospectively reviewed 6949 patients with instrumented spinal fusion as the spinal fusion cohort. Control subjects were individually matched at a ratio of 10:1 with those of the spinal fusion cohort according to age, sex, and the index day. Comorbidities were classified as those existing before the index day, and these included diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis, and cerebrovascular accident. The end of the follow-up period for the analyses was marked on the day new VCFs developed, enrolment in the National Health Insurance was terminated, on the day of death, or until the end of 2012. We used the Cox proportion hazards model to analyze the hazard ratio (HR) for developing new VCFs.Patients with instrumented spinal fusion were significantly more likely to develop new VCFs (1.87% vs .25%, HR: 8.56; P < 0.001). Female, elderly, and osteoporotic patients had a high incidence of new VCFs after spinal fusion. The HR for developing new VCFs after instrumented spinal fusion was higher in patients younger than 65 years than in those 65 years or older (HR: 10.61 vs 8.09). Male patients with instrumented spinal fusion also had a higher HR of developing new VCFs than female patients (men, HR: 26.42; women, HR: 7.53).In our retrospective cohort study, patients who had undergone instrumented spinal fusion surgery exhibited an increased risk of developing new VCFs. Particularly, the HR increased in young (age <65 years) and male patients.

  12. [Difference of anti-fracture mechanical characteristics between lateral-root branches and adjacent upper straight roots of four plant species in vigorous growth period].

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng-fei; Liu, Jing; Zhu, Hong-hui; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Ge; Li, You-fang; Su, Yu; Wang, Chen-jia

    2016-01-01

    Taking four plant species, Caragana korshinskii, Salix psammophila, Hippophae rhamnides and Artemisia sphaerocephala, which were 3-4 years old and in vigorous growth period, as test materials, the anti-fracture forces of lateral-root branches and adjacent upper straight roots were measured with the self-made fixture and the instrument of TY 8000. The lateral-root branches were vital and the diameters were 1-4 mm. The results showed that the anti-fracture force and anti-fracture strength of lateral-root branches were lesser than those of the adjacent upper straight roots even though the average diameter of lateral-root branches was greater. The ratios of anti-fracture strength of lateral-root branches to the adjacent upper straight roots were 71.5% for C. korshinskii, 62.9% for S. psammophila, 45.4% for H. rhamnides and 35.4% for A. sphaerocephala. For the four plants, the anti-fracture force positively correlated with the diameter in a power function, while the anti-fracture strength negatively correlated with diameter in a power function. The anti-fracture strengths of lateral-root branches and adjacent upper straight roots for the four species followed the sequence of C. korshinskii (33.66 and 47.06 MPa) > S. psammophila (17.31 and 27.54 MPa) > H. rhamnides (3.97 and 8.75 MPa) > A. sphaerphala (2.18 and 6.15 MPa).

  13. [Difference of anti-fracture mechanical characteristics between lateral-root branches and adjacent upper straight roots of four plant species in vigorous growth period].

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng-fei; Liu, Jing; Zhu, Hong-hui; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Ge; Li, You-fang; Su, Yu; Wang, Chen-jia

    2016-01-01

    Taking four plant species, Caragana korshinskii, Salix psammophila, Hippophae rhamnides and Artemisia sphaerocephala, which were 3-4 years old and in vigorous growth period, as test materials, the anti-fracture forces of lateral-root branches and adjacent upper straight roots were measured with the self-made fixture and the instrument of TY 8000. The lateral-root branches were vital and the diameters were 1-4 mm. The results showed that the anti-fracture force and anti-fracture strength of lateral-root branches were lesser than those of the adjacent upper straight roots even though the average diameter of lateral-root branches was greater. The ratios of anti-fracture strength of lateral-root branches to the adjacent upper straight roots were 71.5% for C. korshinskii, 62.9% for S. psammophila, 45.4% for H. rhamnides and 35.4% for A. sphaerocephala. For the four plants, the anti-fracture force positively correlated with the diameter in a power function, while the anti-fracture strength negatively correlated with diameter in a power function. The anti-fracture strengths of lateral-root branches and adjacent upper straight roots for the four species followed the sequence of C. korshinskii (33.66 and 47.06 MPa) > S. psammophila (17.31 and 27.54 MPa) > H. rhamnides (3.97 and 8.75 MPa) > A. sphaerphala (2.18 and 6.15 MPa). PMID:27228590

  14. Inadvertent Complication of a Pipeline Embolization Device for Treatment with Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysm : Distal Tip Fracture of Delivery Wire

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Soo; Lee, Jong Myong

    2016-01-01

    Use of the Pipeline embolization device (PED) has increased based on studies about its safety and effectiveness, and new reports that describe peri- or postprocedural complications are now emerging. We report a rare periprocedural device-related complication that occurred during endovascular treatment with the pipeline embolization device for a dissecting aneurysm on the vertebral artery. A 55-year old woman was admitted due to left medullary infarction, and angiography showed a fusiform dilatation in the left vertebral artery that was suspicious for dissecting aneurysm. Endovascular treatment with PED was planned. Under general anesthesia, the procedure was performed without significant problems and a PED was deployed in an appropriate position. However, in the final step of the procedure, the distal tip of the PED delivery wire became engaged within a small branch of the posterior cerebral artery and fractured. Fortunately, imaging studies after the procedure revealed neither hemorrhagic nor ischemic stroke, and the patient recovered without neurological morbidities except initial symptoms.

  15. Inadvertent Complication of a Pipeline Embolization Device for Treatment with Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysm : Distal Tip Fracture of Delivery Wire.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Soo; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Lee, Jong Myong

    2016-09-01

    Use of the Pipeline embolization device (PED) has increased based on studies about its safety and effectiveness, and new reports that describe peri- or postprocedural complications are now emerging. We report a rare periprocedural device-related complication that occurred during endovascular treatment with the pipeline embolization device for a dissecting aneurysm on the vertebral artery. A 55-year old woman was admitted due to left medullary infarction, and angiography showed a fusiform dilatation in the left vertebral artery that was suspicious for dissecting aneurysm. Endovascular treatment with PED was planned. Under general anesthesia, the procedure was performed without significant problems and a PED was deployed in an appropriate position. However, in the final step of the procedure, the distal tip of the PED delivery wire became engaged within a small branch of the posterior cerebral artery and fractured. Fortunately, imaging studies after the procedure revealed neither hemorrhagic nor ischemic stroke, and the patient recovered without neurological morbidities except initial symptoms.

  16. Inadvertent Complication of a Pipeline Embolization Device for Treatment with Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysm : Distal Tip Fracture of Delivery Wire

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Soo; Lee, Jong Myong

    2016-01-01

    Use of the Pipeline embolization device (PED) has increased based on studies about its safety and effectiveness, and new reports that describe peri- or postprocedural complications are now emerging. We report a rare periprocedural device-related complication that occurred during endovascular treatment with the pipeline embolization device for a dissecting aneurysm on the vertebral artery. A 55-year old woman was admitted due to left medullary infarction, and angiography showed a fusiform dilatation in the left vertebral artery that was suspicious for dissecting aneurysm. Endovascular treatment with PED was planned. Under general anesthesia, the procedure was performed without significant problems and a PED was deployed in an appropriate position. However, in the final step of the procedure, the distal tip of the PED delivery wire became engaged within a small branch of the posterior cerebral artery and fractured. Fortunately, imaging studies after the procedure revealed neither hemorrhagic nor ischemic stroke, and the patient recovered without neurological morbidities except initial symptoms. PMID:27651873

  17. Inadvertent Complication of a Pipeline Embolization Device for Treatment with Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysm : Distal Tip Fracture of Delivery Wire.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Soo; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Lee, Jong Myong

    2016-09-01

    Use of the Pipeline embolization device (PED) has increased based on studies about its safety and effectiveness, and new reports that describe peri- or postprocedural complications are now emerging. We report a rare periprocedural device-related complication that occurred during endovascular treatment with the pipeline embolization device for a dissecting aneurysm on the vertebral artery. A 55-year old woman was admitted due to left medullary infarction, and angiography showed a fusiform dilatation in the left vertebral artery that was suspicious for dissecting aneurysm. Endovascular treatment with PED was planned. Under general anesthesia, the procedure was performed without significant problems and a PED was deployed in an appropriate position. However, in the final step of the procedure, the distal tip of the PED delivery wire became engaged within a small branch of the posterior cerebral artery and fractured. Fortunately, imaging studies after the procedure revealed neither hemorrhagic nor ischemic stroke, and the patient recovered without neurological morbidities except initial symptoms. PMID:27651873

  18. Permanent pacing system malfunction due to hidden adjacent fractures of atrial and ventricular leads.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Davis, M J

    1997-03-01

    Periods of failure of ventricular pacing and atrial sensing were discovered on Holter recording in a 10-year-old boy 4 years after the implantation of a dual-chamber pacemaker with endocardial bipolar leads brought out through the right atrial wall. The old generator was explanted and the old leads tested. There was considerable atrial oversensing of an electrical artefact. The pacing threshold of ventricular lead was 1.8 V compared with 0.3 V 6 days post implantation. Post-operative lateral chest X-ray disclosed fractures of both atrial and ventricular leads at the approximate site of exit from the right atriotomy. Review of the preoperative lateral film showed that the fractures had been hidden by an ECG electrode.

  19. Association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and smoking status with bone density and vertebral fractures in male lung cancer screening participants.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Werner U; de Jong, Pim A; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Isgum, Ivana; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van der Aalst, Carlijn; de Koning, Harry J; Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus A

    2014-10-01

    We studied the vertebral fracture prevalence on low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) in male lung cancer screening participants and the association of fractures and bone density with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and smoking. 1140 male current and former smokers with ≥ 16.5 packyears from the NELSON lung cancer screening trial were included. Age, body mass index, and smoking status were registered. CT scans and pulmonary function tests were obtained on the same day. On CT, vertebral fractures and bone density were measured. The cohort had a mean age of 62.5 years (standard deviation 5.2) old; 531 (46.6%) had quit smoking; and 437 (38.3%) had COPD. Of the group, 100 (8.8%) participants had a vertebral fracture. Fracture prevalence was higher in current compared to former smokers (11.3% versus 5.8%, p = 0.001), but similar in participants with COPD compared to those without (9.6% versus 8.3%, p = 0.430). The multivariable adjusted odds ratio for fracture presence was 1.79 (95% CI: 1.13-2.84) in current smokers and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.69-1.67) in COPD participants. Bone density was lower in current compared to former smokers (103.2 HU versus 108.7 HU, p = 0.006) and in participants with COPD compared to those without [100.7 Hounsfield Units (HU) versus 108.9 HU, p < 0.001]. In multivariate analysis, smoking status and COPD status were independently associated with bone density, corrected for age and body mass index. In conclusion, our study shows that lung cancer screening participants have a substantial vertebral fracture burden. Fractures are more common in current smokers, who also have lower bone density. We could not confirm that COPD is independently associated with vertebral fractures.

  20. Associations of self-reported height loss and kyphosis with vertebral fractures in Japanese women 60 years and older: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Mikio; Nakamura, Yukio; Sugino, Noriyuki; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Komatsu, Masatoshi; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki; Taguchi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Some vertebral fractures come to clinical attention but most do not. This cross-sectional survey aimed to clarify the associations of self-reported height loss and kyphosis with vertebral fractures. We enrolled 407 women aged 60–92 years who visited our orthopaedic clinic between June and August 2014 in our study. Inclusion criteria were lateral radiography followed by completion of a structured questionnaire in this study. The primary outcome was vertebral fracture diagnosed on lateral radiography and graded using a semiquantitative grading method, from SQ0 (normal) to SQ3 (severe). Self-reported kyphosis was defined as none, mild to moderate, severe. Self-reported height loss was defined as <4 cm or ≥4 cm. Number of SQ1 fracture was associated only with kyphosis. Self-reported severe kyphosis was significantly associated with increased numbers of ≥SQ2 vertebral fractures (p = 0.007). Height loss ≥4 cm was significantly associated with increased ≥SQ2 grade fractures (p < 0.001). Odds ratios (ORs) for fractures associated with mild-to-moderate and severe kyphosis were 2.1 [95% confidence interval 1.4 to 3.3) and 4.2 (1.8 to 9.5), respectively. OR for fractures associated with height loss ≥4 cm was 2.3 (1.4 to 3.7). Self-reported kyphosis may be useful for identifying Japanese women aged ≥60 years who have undetected vertebral fractures. PMID:27381354

  1. Viscoplastic Deformation of the Bakken and Adjacent Formations and Its Relation to Hydraulic Fracture Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Zoback, Mark

    2016-02-01

    We report laboratory studies of the time-dependent deformation of core samples from four different formations in the Williston Basin—the Lodgepole Formation, the Middle and Lower Bakken Formations, and Three Forks Formation. The laboratory tests reveal varying amounts of viscoplastic deformation in response to applied differential stress. The time-dependent deformation is generally greater in rocks with higher clay and organic content and can be described by a power-law function. Because the magnitude of the creep strain is linearly proportional to the applied differential stress, we can utilize viscoelastic theory and geophysical logs to estimate the degree to which tectonic stress is affected by viscoplastic stress relaxation. We suggest that viscoplastic stress relaxation results in the Upper and Lower Bakken Formations acting as frac barriers during hydraulic fracture stimulation in the Middle Bakken, but the Lodgepole and the Three Forks Formations are not frac barriers.

  2. Turbines and terrestrial vertebrates: variation in tortoise survivorship between a wind energy facility and an adjacent undisturbed wildland area in the desert southwest (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agha, Mickey; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Ennen, Joshua R.; Augustine, Benjamin J.; Arundel, Terry; Murphy, Mason O.; Meyer-Wilkins, Kathie; Bjurlin, Curtis; Delaney, David F.; Briggs, Jessica; Austin, Meaghan; Madrak, Sheila V.; Price, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    With the recent increase in utility-scale wind energy development, researchers have become increasingly concerned how this activity will affect wildlife and their habitat. To understand the potential impacts of wind energy facilities (WEF) post-construction (i.e., operation and maintenance) on wildlife, we compared differences in activity centers and survivorship of Agassiz's desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) inside or near a WEF to neighboring tortoises living near a wilderness area (NWA) and farther from the WEF. We found that the size of tortoise activity centers varied, but not significantly so, between the WEF (6.25 ± 2.13 ha) and adjacent NWA (4.13 ± 1.23 ha). However, apparent survival did differ significantly between the habitat types: over the 18 year study period apparent annual survival estimates were 0.96 ± 0.01 for WEF tortoises and 0.92 ± 0.02 for tortoises in the NWA. High annual survival suggests that operation and maintenance of the WEF has not caused considerable declines in the adult population over the past two decades. Low traffic volume, enhanced resource availability and decreased predator populations may influence annual survivorship at this WEF. Further research on these proximate mechanisms and population recruitment would be useful for mitigating and managing post-development impacts of utility scale wind energy on long-lived terrestrial vertebrates.

  3. Turbines and Terrestrial Vertebrates: Variation in Tortoise Survivorship Between a Wind Energy Facility and an Adjacent Undisturbed Wildland Area in the Desert Southwest (USA).

    PubMed

    Agha, Mickey; Lovich, Jeffrey E; Ennen, Joshua R; Augustine, Benjamin; Arundel, Terence R; Murphy, Mason O; Meyer-Wilkins, Kathie; Bjurlin, Curtis; Delaney, David; Briggs, Jessica; Austin, Meaghan; Madrak, Sheila V; Price, Steven J

    2015-08-01

    With the recent increase in utility-scale wind energy development, researchers have become increasingly concerned how this activity will affect wildlife and their habitat. To understand the potential impacts of wind energy facilities (WEF) post-construction (i.e., operation and maintenance) on wildlife, we compared differences in activity centers and survivorship of Agassiz's desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) inside or near a WEF to neighboring tortoises living near a wilderness area (NWA) and farther from the WEF. We found that the size of tortoise activity centers varied, but not significantly so, between the WEF (6.25 ± 2.13 ha) and adjacent NWA (4.13 ± 1.23 ha). However, apparent survival did differ significantly between the habitat types: over the 18-year study period apparent annual survival estimates were 0.96 ± 0.01 for WEF tortoises and 0.92 ± 0.02 for tortoises in the NWA. High annual survival suggests that operation and maintenance of the WEF has not caused considerable declines in the adult population over the past two decades. Low traffic volume, enhanced resource availability, and decreased predator populations may influence annual survivorship at this WEF. Further research on these proximate mechanisms and population recruitment would be useful for mitigating and managing post-development impacts of utility-scale wind energy on long-lived terrestrial vertebrates. PMID:25894273

  4. Turbines and Terrestrial Vertebrates: Variation in Tortoise Survivorship Between a Wind Energy Facility and an Adjacent Undisturbed Wildland Area in the Desert Southwest (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agha, Mickey; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Ennen, Joshua R.; Augustine, Benjamin; Arundel, Terence R.; Murphy, Mason O.; Meyer-Wilkins, Kathie; Bjurlin, Curtis; Delaney, David; Briggs, Jessica; Austin, Meaghan; Madrak, Sheila V.; Price, Steven J.

    2015-08-01

    With the recent increase in utility-scale wind energy development, researchers have become increasingly concerned how this activity will affect wildlife and their habitat. To understand the potential impacts of wind energy facilities (WEF) post-construction (i.e., operation and maintenance) on wildlife, we compared differences in activity centers and survivorship of Agassiz's desert tortoises ( Gopherus agassizii) inside or near a WEF to neighboring tortoises living near a wilderness area (NWA) and farther from the WEF. We found that the size of tortoise activity centers varied, but not significantly so, between the WEF (6.25 ± 2.13 ha) and adjacent NWA (4.13 ± 1.23 ha). However, apparent survival did differ significantly between the habitat types: over the 18-year study period apparent annual survival estimates were 0.96 ± 0.01 for WEF tortoises and 0.92 ± 0.02 for tortoises in the NWA. High annual survival suggests that operation and maintenance of the WEF has not caused considerable declines in the adult population over the past two decades. Low traffic volume, enhanced resource availability, and decreased predator populations may influence annual survivorship at this WEF. Further research on these proximate mechanisms and population recruitment would be useful for mitigating and managing post-development impacts of utility-scale wind energy on long-lived terrestrial vertebrates.

  5. Turbines and Terrestrial Vertebrates: Variation in Tortoise Survivorship Between a Wind Energy Facility and an Adjacent Undisturbed Wildland Area in the Desert Southwest (USA).

    PubMed

    Agha, Mickey; Lovich, Jeffrey E; Ennen, Joshua R; Augustine, Benjamin; Arundel, Terence R; Murphy, Mason O; Meyer-Wilkins, Kathie; Bjurlin, Curtis; Delaney, David; Briggs, Jessica; Austin, Meaghan; Madrak, Sheila V; Price, Steven J

    2015-08-01

    With the recent increase in utility-scale wind energy development, researchers have become increasingly concerned how this activity will affect wildlife and their habitat. To understand the potential impacts of wind energy facilities (WEF) post-construction (i.e., operation and maintenance) on wildlife, we compared differences in activity centers and survivorship of Agassiz's desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) inside or near a WEF to neighboring tortoises living near a wilderness area (NWA) and farther from the WEF. We found that the size of tortoise activity centers varied, but not significantly so, between the WEF (6.25 ± 2.13 ha) and adjacent NWA (4.13 ± 1.23 ha). However, apparent survival did differ significantly between the habitat types: over the 18-year study period apparent annual survival estimates were 0.96 ± 0.01 for WEF tortoises and 0.92 ± 0.02 for tortoises in the NWA. High annual survival suggests that operation and maintenance of the WEF has not caused considerable declines in the adult population over the past two decades. Low traffic volume, enhanced resource availability, and decreased predator populations may influence annual survivorship at this WEF. Further research on these proximate mechanisms and population recruitment would be useful for mitigating and managing post-development impacts of utility-scale wind energy on long-lived terrestrial vertebrates.

  6. What Proportion of Incident Radiographic Vertebral Fractures in Older Men Is Clinically Diagnosed and Vice Versa: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Ensrud, Kristine E; Blackwell, Terri L; Fink, Howard A; Zhang, Jie; Cauley, Jane A; Cawthon, Peggy M; Black, Dennis M; Bauer, Douglas C; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Orwoll, Eric S; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Kado, Deborah M; Marshall, Lynn M; Shikany, James M; Schousboe, John T

    2016-08-01

    To determine the proportion of incident radiographic vertebral fractures (vfx) also diagnosed as incident clinical vfx in older men and vice-versa, we used data from 4398 community-dwelling men age ≥65 years enrolled in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study. Incident radiographic vfx were identified by comparing baseline and follow-up lateral thoracic and lumbar spine study films (average 4.6 years between films) using a semiquantitative (SQ) method and defined as a change in SQ reading of ≥1 at a given vertebral level from baseline to follow-up study radiograph. Participants were contacted triannually to ascertain incident clinical vfx; community spinal imaging studies were obtained and clinical vfx were confirmed when the study radiologist determined that the community imaging study showed a new deformity of higher grade than was present in the same vertebra on the baseline study radiograph. A total of 237 incident radiographic vfx were identified in 197 men, whereas 31 men experienced 37 confirmed incident clinical vfx. Of incident radiographic vfx, 13.5% were also clinically diagnosed as incident fractures, with clinical diagnoses made for 16.3% of the radiographic vfx with SQ grade change ≥2. Of incident clinical vfx, 86.5% were identified as incident radiographic vfx, most of them with SQ grade change ≥2. In summary, less than 15% of incident radiographic vfx were also clinically diagnosed, whereas the majority of incident clinical vfx were identified as severe radiographic vfx. These results in men supplement those previously published for women and suggest a complex relationship between clinical and radiographic vfx in older adults. Published 2016.(†) American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26969847

  7. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty of the Entire Thoracic and Lumbar Vertebrae for Vertebral Compression Fractures Related to Chronic Glucocorticosteriod Use: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Qing-Hua; Xiao, Quan-Ping; He, Cheng-Jian; Gu, Yi-Feng; Wang, Tao; Li, Ming-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroid-induced osteoporosis is the most frequent of all secondary types of osteoporosis, and can increase the risk of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). There are promising additions to current medical treatment for appropriately selected osteoporotic patients. Few studies have reported on the efficiency of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) or kyphoplasty for whole thoracic and lumbar glucocorticosteroid-induced osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. We report a case of a 67-year-old man with intractable pain caused by successional VCFs treated by PVP. PMID:25469092

  8. Health-related quality of life in postmenopausal women with low BMD with or without prevalent vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Oleksik, A; Lips, P; Dawson, A; Minshall, M E; Shen, W; Cooper, C; Kanis, J

    2000-07-01

    Fractures and subsequent morbidity determine the impact of established postmenopausal osteoporosis. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has become an important outcome criterion in the assessment and follow-up of osteoporotic patients. As part of the baseline measurements of the Multiple Outcomes of Raloxifene Evaluation (MORE) study, HRQOL was assessed in 751 osteoporotic (bone mineral density [BMD] T score > or = -2.5) women from Europe with or without vertebral fractures (VFX). This was done using the quality of life questionnaire of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis (QUALEFFO), Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and the EQ-5D (former EuroQol). QUALEFFO contains questions in five domains: pain, physical function, social function, general health perception, and mental function. Each domain score and QUALEFFO total scores are expressed on a 100-point scale, with 0 corresponding to the best HRQOL. In comparison with patients without VFX, those with VFX were older (66.2 +/- 5.9 years vs. 68.8 +/- 6.3 years; p < 0.001), had higher prevalence of nonvertebral fractures (25% vs. 36%; p = 0.002), and higher QUALEFFO scores (worse HRQOL; total score, 26 +/- 14 vs. 36 +/- 17; p < 0.001). QUALEFFO scores increased progressively with increasing number of VFX, especially lumbar fractures (p < 0.001). Patients with a single VFX already had a significant increase in QUALEFFO scores (p < 0.05). Similar, though weaker, associations were seen for NHP and EQ-5D scores. This study confirms decreased HRQOL for patients with prevalent VFX. In osteoporotic patients, QUALEFFO scores change in relation to the number of VFX. QUALEFFO is suitable for clinical studies in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  9. Relevant signs of stable and unstable thoracolumbar vertebral column trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Gehweiler, J.A.; Daffner, R.H.; Osborne, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    One-hundred and seventeen patients with acute thoracolumbar vertebral column fracture or fracture-dislocations were analyzed and classified into stable (36%) and unstable (64%). Eight helpful roentgen signs were observed that may serve to direct attention to serious underlying, often occult, fractures and dislocations. The changes fall into four principal groups: abnormal soft tissues, abnormal vertebral alignment, abnormal joints, and widened vertebral canal. All stable and unstable lesions showed abnormal soft tissues, while 70% demonstrated kyphosis and/or scoliosis, and an abnormal adjacent intervertebral disk space. All unstable lesions showed one or more of the following signs: displaced vertebra, widened interspinous space, abnormal apophyseal joint(s), and widened vertebral canal.

  10. Fuzzy logic structure analysis of trabecular bone of the calcaneus to estimate proximal femur fracture load and discriminate subjects with and without vertebral fractures using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 T and 3 T.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priyesh V; Eckstein, Felix; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Phan, Catherine; Matsuura, Maiko; Lochmüller, Eva-Maria; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M

    2007-10-01

    Newly developed fuzzy logic-derived structural parameters were used to characterize trabecular bone architecture in high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) of human cadaver calcaneus specimens. These parameters were compared to standard histomorphological structural measures and analyzed concerning performance in discriminating vertebral fracture status and estimating proximal femur fracture load. Sets of 60 sagittal 1.5 T and 3.0 T HR-MRI images of the calcaneus were obtained in 39 cadavers using a fast gradient recalled echo sequence. Structural parameters equivalent to bone histomorphometry and fuzzy logic-derived parameters were calculated using two chosen regions of interest. Calcaneal, spine, and hip bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were also obtained. Fracture status of the thoracic and lumbar spine was assessed on lateral radiographs. Finally, mechanical strength testing of the proximal femur was performed. Diagnostic performance in discriminating vertebral fracture status and estimating femoral fracture load was calculated using regression analyses, two-tailed t-tests of significance, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses. Significant correlations were obtained at both field strengths between all structural and fuzzy logic parameters (r up to 0.92). Correlations between histomorphological or fuzzy logic parameters and calcaneal BMD were mostly significant (r up to 0.78). ROC analyses demonstrated that standard structural parameters were able to differentiate persons with and without vertebral fractures (area under the curve [A(Z)] up to 0.73). However, none of the parameters obtained in the 1.5-T images and none of the fuzzy logic parameters discriminated persons with and without vertebral fractures. Significant correlations were found between fuzzy or structural parameters and femoral fracture load. Using multiple regression analysis, none of the structural or fuzzy parameters were found to add discriminative value to BMD

  11. The effect of interleukin-1alpha polymorphisms on bone mineral density and the risk of vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, S; Harsløf, T; Husted, L B; Carstens, M; Stenkjaer, L; Langdahl, B L

    2007-01-01

    Interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha) stimulates bone resorption via osteoclasts. Mononuclear cells from patients with osteoporosis show increased IL-1alpha production, and IL-1alpha mRNA is more often detected in bone biopsies from osteoporotic compared to normal postmenopausal women. Polymorphisms have been identified in the IL-1alpha gene; however, none of these has been examined for an effect on bone phenotypes in Caucasians. We investigated if the polymorphisms in the IL-1alpha gene affect the risk of osteoporotic fractures, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone turnover in 462 osteoporotic patients and 336 normal controls. Based on previous studies of polymorphisms in the gene and data from the International Hap-Map Project, four polymorphisms needed examination in order to investigate the effect of known polymorphisms in the IL-1alpha gene. We examined C(-1202)-T(rs1800794), C(-889)-T(rs1800587), T(155 + 209)-C(rs2071373), C(155 + 320)-T(rs2856838), and G(398)-T(rs 17561) by Taqman and restriction fragment-length polymorphism assays. BMD was examined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone turnover was evaluated by serum osteocalcin, serum carboxy-terminal propeptide of human type I procollagen, serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, serum carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen, and urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine. Genotype distributions were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. All polymorphisms were in strong linkage disequilibrium. The C allele of the C(155 + 320)-T polymorphism tended to be more common among patients with vertebral fractures (P = 0.06) and patients with BMD T score <-2.5 (P = 0.05). Furthermore, haplotype 1 was associated with reduced risk of having BMD T score <-2.5 (P = 0.02). None of the other polymorphisms or haplotypes was associated with fracture risk or BMD T score <-2.5. BMD and bone turnover were not associated with any of the genetic variants. In conclusion, all the polymorphisms within the IL-1alpha gene are in strong

  12. Genome-wide Association Study for Radiographic Vertebral Fractures: A Potential Role for the 16q24 BMD Locus versus Lessons Learned from Challenging Phenotype Definition.

    PubMed

    Oei, Ling; Estrada, Karol; Duncan, Emma L; Christiansen, Claus; Liu, Ching-Ti; Langdahl, Bente L; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Riancho, José A; Prince, Richard L; van Schoor, Natasja M; McCloskey, Eugene; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Evangelou, Evangelos; Ntzani, Evangelia; Evans, David M; Alonso, Nerea; Husted, Lise B; Valero, Carmen; Hernandez, Jose L; Lewis, Joshua R; Kaptoge, Stephen K; Zhu, Kun; Cupples, L Adrienne; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Kim, Ghi Su; Lee, Seung Hun; Castaño-Betancourt, Martha C; Oei, Edwin H G; Martinez, Josefina; Daroszewska, Anna; van der Klift, Marjolein; Mellström, Dan; Herrera, Lizbeth; Karlsson, Magnus K; Hofman, Albert; Ljunggren, Osten; Pols, Huibert A P; Stolk, Lisette; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Ioannidis, John P A; Zillikens, M Carola; Lips, Paul; Karasik, David; Uitterlinden, André G; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Brown, Matthew A; Koh, Jung-Min; Richards, J Brent; Reeve, Jonathan; Ohlsson, Claes; Ralston, Stuart H; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2013-10-25

    Vertebral fracture risk is a heritable complex trait. The aim of this study was to identify genetic susceptibility factors for osteoporotic vertebral fractures applying a genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach. The GWAS discovery was based on the Rotterdam Study, a population-based study of elderly Dutch individuals aged >55years; and comprising 329 cases and 2,666 controls with radiographic scoring (McCloskey-Kanis) and genetic data. Replication of one top-associated SNP was pursued by de-novo genotyping of 15 independent studies across Europe, the United States, Australia and one Asian study. Radiographic vertebral fracture assessment was performed using McCloskey-Kanis or Genant semi-quantitative definitions. SNPs were analyzed in relation to vertebral fracture using logistic regression models corrected for age and sex. Fixed effects inverse variance and Han-Eskin alternative random effects meta-analyses were applied. Genome-wide significance was set at P<5x10(-8). In the discovery, a SNP (rs11645938) on chromosome 16q24 was associated with the risk for vertebral fractures at p=4.6 x 10(-8). However, the association was not significant across 5,720 cases and 21,791 controls from 14 studies. Fixed-effects meta analyses summary estimate was 1.06 (95% CI: 0.98-1.14; P=0.17), displaying high degree of heterogeneity (I(2)=57%; Qhet p= 0.0006). Under Han-Eskin alternative random effects model the summary effect was significant (P=0.0005). The SNP maps to a region previously found associated with lumbar spine bone mineral density (LS-BMD) in two large meta-analyses from the GEFOS consortium. A false positive association in the GWAS discovery cannot be excluded, yet, the low-powered setting of the discovery and replication settings (appropriate to identify risk effect size > 1.25) may still be consistent with an effect size <1.10, more of the type expected in complex traits. Larger effort in studies with standardized phenotype definitions are needed to confirm or

  13. Percutaneous vertebral augmentation and reconstruction with an intravertebral mesh and morcelized bone graft.

    PubMed

    Chiu, John C; Stechison, Michael T

    2005-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebral augmentation (VA) and reconstruction with intravertebral polyethylene mesh sac (OptiMesh) and morcelized bone graft provided a minimally invasive efficacious and controlled delivery mechanism to stabilize and treat painful osteoporotic, traumatic and neoplastic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs), as well as avoided serious complications from Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) of Vertebroplasty and Kyphoplasty. Osteoconductive and osteoinductive and can be used to create biologic vertebral reconstruction. The adjacent vertebra integrity should be more protected by the construct with a similar elasticity and physical characteristics of the morcelized bone, more matched to that of adjacent bone than PMMA. The indications and surgical techniques are described herein.

  14. ENDPLATE DEFLECTION IS A DEFINING FEATURE OF VERTEBRAL FRACTURE AND IS ASSOCIATED WITH PROPERTIES OF THE UNDERLYING TRABECULAR BONE

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Timothy M; Hussein, Amira I; Adams, Alexander M; Makhnejia, Kamil K; Morgan, Elise F

    2015-01-01

    Endplate deflection frequently occurs with vertebral failure, but the relationship between the two remains poorly defined. This study examined associations between endplate deflection under compressive loading and characteristics of the neighboring subchondral bone and intervertebral disc (IVD). Ten L1 vertebrae with adjacent IVDs were dissected, compressed axially in a stepwise manner to failure, and imaged with micro-computed tomography before each loading step. From the images, deflection was measured across the surface of each endplate at each step. Trabecular microstructure and endplate volume fraction were evaluated in 5mm regions just under the superior endplate. IVDs were assessed using computed tomography and histology. A marked increase in superior endplate deflection coincided with a drop in the load-displacement curve. Endplate deflection was higher in regions with less robust bone microstructure (p<0.009), though these associations tended to weaken as loading progressed. Immediately following the ultimate point, endplate deflection was higher in regions underlying the nucleus pulposus vs. annulus fibrosus (p=0.035), irrespective of disc grade (p=0.346). These results indicate that a sudden increase in endplate deflection signals that the mechanical competence of the vertebra has been compromised. The mechanisms of endplate failure likely relate to anatomical features of the endplate, neighboring trabecular bone, and IVD. PMID:24700382

  15. [Case of painful muscle spasm induced by thoracic vertebral fracture: successful treatment with lumbar sympathetic ganglia block].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Fumitaka; Kawai, Motoharu; Koga, Michiaki; Ogasawara, Jun-ichi; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Kanda, Takashi

    2008-10-01

    We report a 70-year-old man, who developed painful involuntary muscle contraction of the left leg after the lumbar discectomy, which exacerbated after a vertebral fracture of Th12. This involuntary movement was accompanied with the abnormal position of left leg simulating triple flexion response, and was induced by active or passive movement of his left knee and foot joints. Several drugs including benzodiazepines and dantrolene were ineffective, although treatment with baclofen or carbamazepine was effective. These findings suggest that hyperexcitability of the anterior horn cells following the disturbance of spinal inhibitory interneurons was involved. Electophysiological studies suggested the disturbance of left lumber nerve roots. The spinal root blocks from L3 to S1 were performed, after which the painful involuntary muscle spasm was resolved. The lumbar sympathetic ganglia block was also effective; suggesting that abnormal afferent neuronal input to spinal cord was caused by the nerve root trauma which triggered the formation of secondary abnormal network in the spine. Lumbar sympathetic ganglia block should be recommended to a therapeutic option for the refractory painful muscle spasm of the leg.

  16. Does Balloon Kyphoplasty Deliver More Cement Safely into Osteoporotic Vertebrae with Compression Fractures Compared with Vertebroplasty? A Study in Vertebral Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Abduljabbar, Fahad H.; Al-jurayyan, Abdulaziz; Alqahtani, Saad; Sardar, Zeeshan M.; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Ouellet, Jean; Weber, Michael; Steffen, Thomas; Beckman, Lorne; Jarzem, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A biomechanical and radiographic study using vertebral analogues. Objectives Kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty are widely used techniques to alleviate pain in fractures secondary to osteoporosis. However, cement leakage toward vital structures like the spinal cord can be a major source of morbidity and even mortality. We define safe cement injection as the volume of the cement injected into a vertebra before the cement leakage occurs. Our objective is to compare the amount of cement that can be safely injected into an osteoporotic vertebra with simulated compression fracture using either vertebroplasty or balloon kyphoplasty techniques. Methods Forty artificial vertebral analogues made of polyurethane with osteoporotic cancellous matrix representing the L3 vertebrae were used for this study and were divided into four groups of 10 vertebrae each. The four groups tested were: low-viscosity cement injected using vertebroplasty, high-viscosity cement injected using vertebroplasty, low-viscosity cement injected using balloon kyphoplasty, and high-viscosity cement injected using balloon kyphoplasty. The procedures were performed under fluoroscopic guidance. The injection was stopped when the cement started protruding from the created vascular channel in the osteoporotic vertebral fracture model. The main outcome measured was the volume of the cement injected safely into a vertebra before leakage through the posterior vascular channel. Results The highest volume of the cement injected was in the vertebroplasty group using high-viscosity cement, which was almost twice the injected volume in the other three groups. One-way analysis of variance comparing the four groups showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.005). Conclusions High-viscosity cement injected using vertebroplasty delivers more cement volume before cement leakage and fills the vertebral body more uniformly when compared with balloon kyphoplasty in osteoporotic vertebrae with

  17. Critique of the analysis of UpToDate.com on the treatment of painful vertebral compression fractures: time to update UpToDate.

    PubMed

    Beall, D P; McRoberts, W P; Berven, S H; Ledlie, J T; Tutton, S M; Parsons, B P

    2015-04-01

    The treatment of painful vertebral compression fractures has changed substantially since the introduction of vertebroplasty in the mid-1980s and balloon kyphoplasty in the late 1990s. Both procedures were widely accepted with the vertebral fractures treated reaching 150,000 per annum in 2009 prior to the publication of 2 randomized controlled trials comparing vertebroplasty with a sham treatment published in the New England Journal of Medicine in August 2009. Since then, there has been a flood of information on vertebral augmentation and balloon kyphoplasty. It is worth evaluating this information especially because it relates to current recommendations that are often followed blindly by medical and administrative groups unfamiliar with either the procedure or the high level of evidence surrounding vertebral augmentation. To streamline the evaluation of some current recommendations, we limited the analysis to the recommendations found on UpToDate.com. This Web site is an evidence-based, peer-reviewed source of information available for patients, doctors, health insurance companies, and population-based medical decision-making.

  18. The Reverse Thomas Position for Thoracolumbar Fracture Height Restoration: Relative Contribution of Patient Positioning in Percutaneous Balloon Kyphoplasty for Acute Vertebral Compressions

    PubMed Central

    Cawley, Derek T.; Beecher, Suzanne M.; Baker, Joseph F.; McCabe, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Standard positioning for percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty requires placing a patient prone with supports under the iliac crests and upper thorax. The authors believe that hip hyperextension maximises pelvic anteversion creating anterior longitudinal ligamentotaxis, thus facilitating restoration of vertebral height. Methods Radiographic imaging including pre-operative, post-positioning, post balloon tamp inflation and post-operative lateral radiographs were analysed for anterior and posterior column height, wedge angle of the affected vertebra and 3-level Cobb angle in patients with recent fractures of T11-L1. Fracture dimensions of the index vertebra were expressed as percentage of the analogous dimension of the referent vertebra. Results From a total of 149 patients, a full imaging sequence was available on 21 cases of vertebral compression fractures. The described positioning technique created a mean anterior column height increase from 68.3% to 75.3% with positioning (p = 0.15), increasing to 82.3% post balloon inflation. Average Cobb and wedge angle improvement of 4.7° (p = 0.004)and 3.6° (p = 0.002) from positioning along were also recorded. Conclusion The Reverse Thomas Position is a safe and effective technique for augmenting thoracolumbar fracture height restoration in percutaneous balloon kyphoplasty. PMID:27441179

  19. Vertebral Augmentation: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Nabhane, Linda; Issa El Khoury, Fouad; Kreichati, Gaby; El Rachkidi, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVF) are an increasing public health problem. Cement augmentation (vertebroplasty of kyphoplasty) helps stabilize painful OVF refractory to medical treatment. This stabilization is thought to improve pain and functional outcome. Vertebroplasty consists of injecting cement into a fractured vertebra using a percutaneous transpedicular approach. Balloon kyphoplasty uses an inflatable balloon prior to injecting the cement. Although kyphoplasty is associated with significant improvement of local kyphosis and less cement leakage, this does not result in long-term clinical and functional improvement. Moreover, vertebroplasty is favored by some due to the high cost of kyphoplasty. The injection of cement increases the stiffness of the fracture vertebrae. This can lead, in theory, to adjacent OVF. However, many studies found no increase of subsequent fracture when comparing medical treatment to cement augmentation. Kyphoplasty can have a protective effect due to restoration of sagittal balance. PMID:27114782

  20. A comparative study of high-viscosity cement percutaneous vertebroplasty vs. low-viscosity cement percutaneous kyphoplasty for treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Liu, Yang; Peng, Hao; Tan, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Mi; Zheng, Xian-Nian; Chen, Fang-Zhou; Li, Ming-Hui

    2016-06-01

    The clinical effects of two different methods-high-viscosity cement percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) and low-viscosity cement percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) in the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs) were investigated. From June 2010 to August 2013, 98 cases of OVCFs were included in our study. Forty-six patients underwent high-viscosity PVP and 52 patients underwent low-viscosity PKP. The occurrence of cement leakage was observed. Pain relief and functional activity were evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), respectively. Restoration of the vertebral body height and angle of kyphosis were assessed by comparing preoperative and postoperative measurements of the anterior heights, middle heights and the kyphotic angle of the fractured vertebra. Nine out of the 54 vertebra bodies and 11 out of the 60 vertebra bodies were observed to have cement leakage in the high-viscosity PVP and low-viscosity PKP groups, respectively. The rate of cement leakage, correction of anterior vertebral height and kyphotic angles showed no significant differences between the two groups (P>0.05). Low-viscosity PKP had significant advantage in terms of the restoration of middle vertebral height as compared with the high-viscosity PVP (P<0.05). Both groups showed significant improvements in pain relief and functional capacity status after surgery (P<0.05). It was concluded that high-viscosity PVP and low-viscosity PKP have similar clinical effects in terms of the rate of cement leakage, restoration of the anterior vertebral body height, changes of kyphotic angles, functional activity, and pain relief. Low-viscosity PKP is better than high-viscosity PVP in restoring the height of the middle vertebra.

  1. A comparative study of high-viscosity cement percutaneous vertebroplasty vs. low-viscosity cement percutaneous kyphoplasty for treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Liu, Yang; Peng, Hao; Tan, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Mi; Zheng, Xian-Nian; Chen, Fang-Zhou; Li, Ming-Hui

    2016-06-01

    The clinical effects of two different methods-high-viscosity cement percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) and low-viscosity cement percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) in the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs) were investigated. From June 2010 to August 2013, 98 cases of OVCFs were included in our study. Forty-six patients underwent high-viscosity PVP and 52 patients underwent low-viscosity PKP. The occurrence of cement leakage was observed. Pain relief and functional activity were evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), respectively. Restoration of the vertebral body height and angle of kyphosis were assessed by comparing preoperative and postoperative measurements of the anterior heights, middle heights and the kyphotic angle of the fractured vertebra. Nine out of the 54 vertebra bodies and 11 out of the 60 vertebra bodies were observed to have cement leakage in the high-viscosity PVP and low-viscosity PKP groups, respectively. The rate of cement leakage, correction of anterior vertebral height and kyphotic angles showed no significant differences between the two groups (P>0.05). Low-viscosity PKP had significant advantage in terms of the restoration of middle vertebral height as compared with the high-viscosity PVP (P<0.05). Both groups showed significant improvements in pain relief and functional capacity status after surgery (P<0.05). It was concluded that high-viscosity PVP and low-viscosity PKP have similar clinical effects in terms of the rate of cement leakage, restoration of the anterior vertebral body height, changes of kyphotic angles, functional activity, and pain relief. Low-viscosity PKP is better than high-viscosity PVP in restoring the height of the middle vertebra. PMID:27376809

  2. Similar relationship between the time course of bone mineral density improvement and vertebral fracture risk reduction with denosumab treatment in postmenopausal osteoporosis and prostate cancer patients on androgen deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Pérez Ruixo, Juan Jose; Zheng, Jenny; Mandema, Jaap W

    2014-05-01

    Denosumab has received approval in many countries and indications include treating women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) at increased or high risk for fracture and men at high risk for fracture receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for non-metastatic prostate cancer. Increases in total hip bone mineral density (BMD) with denosumab explained a large percentage of new vertebral fracture risk reduction in women with PMO; however, this effect has not been studied in men with prostate cancer receiving ADT. We compared the relationship between the time course of BMD changes and new vertebral fracture risk reduction with denosumab in women with PMO and men with prostate cancer. After adjusting for different baseline hazards, a significant and similar relationship between time course of total hip and lumbar spine BMD changes and new vertebral fracture risk was observed in both patient populations. Time course of total hip BMD changes with denosumab was the best predictor for changes in fracture risk and explained 88% of the new vertebral fracture risk reduction in women with PMO and 91% in men with prostate cancer. Therefore, total hip BMD is a useful surrogate to measure the clinical impact of denosumab on fracture risk reduction in both patient populations.

  3. Bone turnover markers are associated with higher cortical porosity, thinner cortices, and larger size of the proximal femur and non-vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Shigdel, Rajesh; Osima, Marit; Ahmed, Luai A; Joakimsen, Ragnar M; Eriksen, Erik F; Zebaze, Roger; Bjørnerem, Åshild

    2015-12-01

    Bone turnover markers (BTM) predict bone loss and fragility fracture. Although cortical porosity and cortical thinning are important determinants of bone strength, the relationship between BTM and cortical porosity has, however, remained elusive. We therefore wanted to examine the relationship of BTM with cortical porosity and risk of non-vertebral fracture. In 211 postmenopausal women aged 54-94 years with non-vertebral fractures and 232 age-matched fracture-free controls from the Tromsø Study, Norway, we quantified femoral neck areal bone mineral density (FN aBMD), femoral subtrochanteric bone architecture, and assessed serum levels of procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP) and C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX). Fracture cases exhibited higher PINP and CTX levels, lower FN aBMD, larger total and medullary cross-sectional area (CSA), thinner cortices, and higher cortical porosity of the femoral subtrochanter than controls (p≤0.01). Each SD increment in PINP and CTX was associated with 0.21-0.26 SD lower total volumetric BMD, 0.10-0.14 SD larger total CSA, 0.14-0.18 SD larger medullary CSA, 0.13-0.18 SD thinner cortices, and 0.27-0.33 SD higher porosity of the total cortex, compact cortex, and transitional zone (all p≤0.01). Moreover, each SD of higher PINP and CTX was associated with increased odds for fracture after adjustment for age, height, and weight (ORs 1.49; 95% CI, 1.20-1.85 and OR 1.22; 95% CI, 1.00-1.49, both p<0.05). PINP, but not CTX, remained associated with fracture after accounting for FN aBMD, cortical porosity or cortical thickness (OR ranging from 1.31 to 1.39, p ranging from 0.005 to 0.028). In summary, increased BTM levels are associated with higher cortical porosity, thinner cortices, larger bone size and higher odds for fracture. We infer that this is produced by increased periosteal apposition, intracortical and endocortical remodeling; and that these changes in bone architecture are predisposing to

  4. Bone turnover markers are associated with higher cortical porosity, thinner cortices, and larger size of the proximal femur and non-vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Shigdel, Rajesh; Osima, Marit; Ahmed, Luai A; Joakimsen, Ragnar M; Eriksen, Erik F; Zebaze, Roger; Bjørnerem, Åshild

    2015-12-01

    Bone turnover markers (BTM) predict bone loss and fragility fracture. Although cortical porosity and cortical thinning are important determinants of bone strength, the relationship between BTM and cortical porosity has, however, remained elusive. We therefore wanted to examine the relationship of BTM with cortical porosity and risk of non-vertebral fracture. In 211 postmenopausal women aged 54-94 years with non-vertebral fractures and 232 age-matched fracture-free controls from the Tromsø Study, Norway, we quantified femoral neck areal bone mineral density (FN aBMD), femoral subtrochanteric bone architecture, and assessed serum levels of procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP) and C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX). Fracture cases exhibited higher PINP and CTX levels, lower FN aBMD, larger total and medullary cross-sectional area (CSA), thinner cortices, and higher cortical porosity of the femoral subtrochanter than controls (p≤0.01). Each SD increment in PINP and CTX was associated with 0.21-0.26 SD lower total volumetric BMD, 0.10-0.14 SD larger total CSA, 0.14-0.18 SD larger medullary CSA, 0.13-0.18 SD thinner cortices, and 0.27-0.33 SD higher porosity of the total cortex, compact cortex, and transitional zone (all p≤0.01). Moreover, each SD of higher PINP and CTX was associated with increased odds for fracture after adjustment for age, height, and weight (ORs 1.49; 95% CI, 1.20-1.85 and OR 1.22; 95% CI, 1.00-1.49, both p<0.05). PINP, but not CTX, remained associated with fracture after accounting for FN aBMD, cortical porosity or cortical thickness (OR ranging from 1.31 to 1.39, p ranging from 0.005 to 0.028). In summary, increased BTM levels are associated with higher cortical porosity, thinner cortices, larger bone size and higher odds for fracture. We infer that this is produced by increased periosteal apposition, intracortical and endocortical remodeling; and that these changes in bone architecture are predisposing to

  5. Transpedicular vertebral body augmentation reinforced with pedicle screw fixation in fresh traumatic A2 and A3 lumbar fractures: comparison between two devices and two bone cements.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Vardakastanis, Konstantinos; Repantis, Thomas; Vitsas, Vasilios

    2014-07-01

    This retrospective study compares efficacy and safety of balloon kyphoplasty (BK) with calcium phosphate (Group A) versus KIVA implant with PMMA (Group B) reinforced with three vertebrae pedicle screw constructs for A2 and A3 single fresh non-osteoporotic lumbar (L1-L4) fractures in 38 consecutive age- and diagnosis-matched patient populations. Extracanal leakage of both low-viscosity PMMA and calcium phosphate (CP) as well as the following roentgenographic parameters: segmental kyphosis (SKA), anterior (AVBHr) and posterior (PVBHr) vertebral body height ratio, spinal canal encroachment (SCE) clearance, and functional outcome measures: VAS and SF-36, were recorded and compared between the two groups. All patients in both groups were followed for a minimum 26 (Group A) and 25 (Group B) months. Extracanal CP and PMMA leakage was observed in four (18 %) and three (15 %) vertebrae/patients of group A and B, respectively. Hybrid fixation improved AVBHr, SKA, SCE, but PVBHr only in group B. VAS and SF-36 improved postoperatively in the patients of both groups. Short-segment construct with the novel KIVA implant restored better than BK-fractured lumbar vertebral body, but this had no impact in functional outcome. Since there was no leakage difference between PMMA and calcium phosphate and no short-term adverse related to PMMA use were observed, we advice the use of PMMA in fresh traumatic lumbar fractures.

  6. Vertebral Compression Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... you stand up or walk, or bend over • Chronic back pain that doesn’t seem to get better • Loss of height • Worsening of pre-existing spine curves • Other signs can include hip pain, and ... people only report a chronic backache • Some people will continue to have pain ...

  7. Surgical Versus Non-Surgical Treatment for Vertebral Compression Fracture with Osteopenia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing-Lin; Xie, Bin; Zhang, Wen-Yi; Yang, Yu-Jie; Yue, Yu-Shan; Wang, Xue-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical and non-surgical interventions are the two categories for treatment of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). However, there is clinical uncertainty over optimal management. This study aimed to examine the safety and effectiveness of surgical management for treatment of VCFs with osteopenia compared with non-surgical treatment. Methods We conducted a systematic search through electronic databases from inception to June 2014, with no limits on study data or language. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating surgical versus non-surgical interventions for treatment of patients with VCFs due to osteopenia were considered. Primary outcomes were pain and adverse effects. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled mean difference (MD) or risk ratios with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Sixteen reports (11 studies) met the inclusion criteria, and provided data for the meta-analysis with a total of 1,401 participants. Compared with conservative treatment, surgical treatment was more effective in reducing pain (short-term: MD -2.05, 95% CI -3.55 to -0.56, P=0.007; mid-term: MD -1.70, 95% CI -2.78 to -0.62, P=0.002; long-term: MD -1.24, 95% CI -2.20 to -0.29, P=0.01) and disability on the Roland–Morris Disability score (short-term: MD -4.97, 95% CI -8.71 to -1.23, P=0.009), as well as improving quality of life on the Short-Form 36 Physical Component Summary score (short-term: MD 5.53, 95% CI 1.45 to 9.61, P=0.008) and the Quality of Life Questionnaire of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis score (short-term: MD -5.01, 95% CI -8.11 to -1.91, P=0.002). Indirect comparisons between vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty found no evidence that the treatment effect differed across the two interventions for any outcomes assessed. Compared with the sham procedure, surgical treatment showed no evidence of improvement in pain relief and physical function. Based on these two comparisons, no significant difference between groups was noted in

  8. Quality of life in patients with vertebral fractures: validation of the Quality of Life Questionnaire of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis (QUALEFFO). Working Party for Quality of Life of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lips, P; Cooper, C; Agnusdei, D; Caulin, F; Egger, P; Johnell, O; Kanis, J A; Kellingray, S; Leplege, A; Liberman, U A; McCloskey, E; Minne, H; Reeve, J; Reginster, J Y; Scholz, M; Todd, C; de Vernejoul, M C; Wiklund, I

    1999-01-01

    Vertebral fractures may be minor or lead to pain, decreased physical function, immobility, social isolation and depression, which together contribute to quality of life. A Working Party of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis has developed a specific questionnaire for patients with vertebral fractures. This questionnaire, QUALEFFO, includes questions in the domains pain, physical function, social function, general health perception and mental function. QUALEFFO was validated in a multicenter study in seven countries. The study was done in 159 patients aged 55-80 years with clinical osteoporosis, i.e., back pain and other complaints with at least one vertebral fracture and lumbar bone mineral density T-score <-1. Patients with a recent vertebral fracture were excluded because of unstable disease. Controls were age- and sex-matched, and did not have chronic back pain or vertebral fractures. Subjects with conditions exerting a major influence on quality of life were excluded. The QUALEFFO was administered twice within 4 weeks and compared with a generic questionnaire, the Short Form 36 of the Medical Outcomes Study (SF-36). Standard spinal radiographs were made for assessment of vertebral height. Seven questions were removed from the analysis because of low response rate, linguistic ambiguities or redundancy. The 41 remaining questions were analyzed for repeatability, internal consistency and the capacity to discriminate between patients with vertebral fractures and controls. Comparison with the SF-36 was performed within similar domains by conditional logistic regression and by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The repeatability of QUALEFFO was good (kappa statistics 0.54-0.90) and 26 of 41 questions had a kappa score >/=0.70. The internal consistency of the five domains was adequate, with Crohnbach alpha around 0.80. All except five questions discriminated significantly between patients and controls. The median scores of QUALEFFO were significantly

  9. Does metaphyseal cement augmentation in fracture management influence the adjacent subchondral bone and joint cartilage?: an in vivo study in sheep stifle joints.

    PubMed

    Goetzen, Michael; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Arens, Daniel; Zeiter, Stephan; Stadelmann, Vincent; Nehrbass, Dirk; Richards, R Geoff; Blauth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation of implants with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement in osteoporotic fractures is a promising approach to increase implant purchase. Side effects of PMMA for the metaphyseal bone, particularly for the adjacent subchondral bone plate and joint cartilage, have not yet been studied. The following experimental study investigates whether subchondral PMMA injection compromises the homeostasis of the subchondral bone and/or the joint cartilage.Ten mature sheep were used to simulate subchondral PMMA injection. Follow-ups of 2 (4 animals) and 4 (6 animals) months were chosen to investigate possible cartilage damage and subchondral plate alterations in the knee. Evaluation was completed by means of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) imaging, histopathological osteoarthritis scoring, and determination of glycosaminoglycan content in the joint cartilage. Results were compared with the untreated contralateral knee and statistically analyzed using nonparametric tests.Evaluation of the histological osteoarthritis score revealed no obvious cartilage damage for the treated knee; median histological score after 2 months 0 (range 4), after 4 months 1 (range 5). There was no significant difference when compared with the untreated control site after 2 and 4 months (P = 0.23 and 0.76, respectively). HRpQCT imaging showed no damage to the metaphyseal trabeculae. Glycosaminoglycan measurements of the treated joint cartilage after 4 months revealed no significant difference compared with the untreated cartilage (P = 0.24).The findings of this study support initial clinical observation that PMMA implant augmentation of metaphyseal fractures appears to be a safe procedure for fixation without harming the subchondral bone plate and adjacent joint cartilage.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Universal Serological Screening to Prevent Non-Traumatic Hip and Vertebral Fractures in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, KT; Tsai, Raymond; Wang, Louise; Khavari, Nasim; Bachrach, Laura; Bass, Dorsey

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with asymptomatic or poorly managed celiac disease can experience bone loss, placing them at risk for hip and vertebral fractures. We analyzed the cost-effectiveness of universal serologic screening (USS) vs symptomatic at-risk screening (SAS) strategies for celiac disease, given the risk of non-traumatic hip and vertebral fractures if untreated or undiagnosed. Method We developed a lifetime Markov model of the screening strategies, each with male or female cohorts of 1000 patients, 12 years old when screening began. We screened serum samples for levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA), compared with tissue transglutaminase and total IgA, and findings were confirmed by mucosal biopsy. Transition probabilities and quality of life estimates were obtained from the literature. We used generalizable cost estimates and Medicare reimbursement rates, and ran deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Result For men, the average life-time costs were $8532 and $8472 for USS and SAS strategies, respectively, corresponding to average quality adjusted life years (QALY) gains of 25.511 and 25.515. Similarly, for women, costs were $11,383 and $11,328 for USS and SAS strategies, corresponding to QALY gains of 25.74 and 25.75. Compared to the current standard of care (SAS), USS produced higher average lifetime costs and lower quality of life for each sex. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses showed that the model was robust to realistic changes in all the variables, making USS cost ineffective, based on these outcomes. Conclusion USS and SAS are similar in lifetime costs and quality of life, although the current SAS strategy was overall more cost effective in preventing bone loss and fractures among patients with undiagnosed or subclinical disease. Based on best available supportive evidence, it is more cost effective to maintain the standard celiac screening practices, although future robust population-based evidence in other health

  11. Validation of three tools for identifying painful new osteoporotic vertebral fractures in older Chinese men: bone mineral density, Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians, and fracture risk assessment tool

    PubMed Central

    Lin, JiSheng; Yang, Yong; Fei, Qi; Zhang, XiaoDong; Ma, Zhao; Wang, Qi; Li, JinJun; Li, Dong; Meng, Qian; Wang, BingQiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective This cross-sectional study compared three tools for predicting painful new osteoporotic vertebral fractures (PNOVFs) in older Chinese men: bone mineral density (BMD), the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians (OSTA), and the World Health Organization fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) (without BMD). Methods Men aged ≥50 years were apportioned to a group for men with fractures who had undergone percutaneous vertebroplasty (n=111), or a control group of healthy men (n=385). Fractures were verified on X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging. BMD T-scores were determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Diagnosis of osteoporosis was determined by a BMD T-score of ≤2.5 standard deviations below the average for a young adult at peak bone density at the femoral neck, total hip, or L1–L4. Demographic and clinical risk factor data were self-reported through a questionnaire. BMD, OSTA, and FRAX scores were assessed for identifying PNOVFs via receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Optimal cutoff points, sensitivity, specificity, and areas under the ROC curves (AUCs) were determined. Results Between the men with fractures and the control group, there were significant differences in BMD T-scores (at femoral neck, total hip, and L1–L4), and OSTA and FRAX scores. In those with fractures, only 53.15% satisfied the criteria for osteoporosis. Compared to BMD or OSTA, the FRAX score had the best predictive value for PNOVFs: the AUC of the FRAX score (cutoff =2.9%) was 0.738, and the sensitivity and specificity were 82% and 62%, respectively. Conclusion FRAX may be a valuable tool for identifying PNOVFs in older Chinese men. PMID:27217730

  12. Fracture risk assessment: improved evaluation of vertebral integrity among metastatic cancer patients to aid in surgical decision-making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Camp, Jon J.; Holmes, David R.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Lu, Lichun; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2012-03-01

    Failure of the spine's structural integrity from metastatic disease can lead to both pain and neurologic deficit. Fractures that require treatment occur in over 30% of bony metastases. Our objective is to use computed tomography (CT) in conjunction with analytic techniques that have been previously developed to predict fracture risk in cancer patients with metastatic disease to the spine. Current clinical practice for cancer patients with spine metastasis often requires an empirical decision regarding spinal reconstructive surgery. Early image-based software systems used for CT analysis are time consuming and poorly suited for clinical application. The Biomedical Image Resource (BIR) at Mayo Clinic, Rochester has developed an image analysis computer program that calculates from CT scans, the residual load-bearing capacity in a vertebra with metastatic cancer. The Spine Cancer Assessment (SCA) program is built on a platform designed for clinical practice, with a workflow format that allows for rapid selection of patient CT exams, followed by guided image analysis tasks, resulting in a fracture risk report. The analysis features allow the surgeon to quickly isolate a single vertebra and obtain an immediate pre-surgical multiple parallel section composite beam fracture risk analysis based on algorithms developed at Mayo Clinic. The analysis software is undergoing clinical validation studies. We expect this approach will facilitate patient management and utilization of reliable guidelines for selecting among various treatment option based on fracture risk.

  13. Association of the formiminotransferase N-terminal sub-domain containing gene and thrombospondin, type 1, domain-containing 7A gene with the prevalence of vertebral fracture in 2427 consecutive autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heying; Mori, Seijiro; Kou, Ikuyo; Fuku, Noriyuki; Naka Mieno, Makiko; Honma, Naoko; Arai, Tomio; Sawabe, Motoji; Tanaka, Masashi; Ikegawa, Shiro; Ito, Hideki

    2013-02-01

    We previously reported 2 osteoporosis-susceptibility genes--formiminotransferase N-terminal sub-domain containing gene (FONG) and thrombospondin, type 1, domain-containing 7A (THSD7A)--in which we identified two common single-nucleotide polymorphisms, rs7605378 (FONG) and rs12673692 (THSD7A). The former was associated with a predisposition to osteoporosis and the latter with bone mineral density. To further elucidate the importance of these polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, we examined their association with the incidence of vertebral fracture. DNA extracted from the renal cortex of 2427 consecutive Japanese autopsies (1331 men, mean age: 79 years; 1096 women, mean age: 82 years) were examined in this study. The presence or absence of vertebral fracture during each subject's lifetime was determined by a thorough examination of the clinical records, as well as autopsy reports. After adjustments for sex and age at autopsy, logistic regression analysis revealed that homozygotes for the risk alleles of rs7605378 (A-allele) or rs12673629 (A-allele) possess an increased risk of vertebral fracture. The subjects simultaneously homozygous for both the risk alleles of rs7605378 (AA genotype) and rs12673629 (AA genotype) showed significantly higher risk of vertebral fracture (odds ratio 2.401, 95% confidence interval 1.305-4.416, P = 0.0048) than those who had at least one non-risk allele of either rs7605378 (AC/CC genotypes) or rs12673629 (AG/GG genotypes). The results suggest that Japanese subjects homozygous for the risk alleles of rs7605378 and rs12673629 have a higher risk of vertebral fracture.

  14. Vertebral fracture definition from population-based data: preliminary results from the Canadian Multicenter Osteoporosis Study (CaMos).

    PubMed

    Jackson, S A; Tenenhouse, A; Robertson, L

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Multicenter Osteoporosis Study is a large population-based prospective study of osteoporosis in the Canadian population. The study involves 9424 subjects, both male and female, from nine centers and seven regions of Canada. Each subject completed an extensive interview to obtain medical, demographic and lifestyle information, and was examined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of the spine and hip, ultrasound of the heel and, for subjects over 50 years of age, lateral spine radiographs. Spinal morphometry of the initial radiographs was performed to determine the prevalence of vertebral deformity. A method is utilized to extract reference norms for vertebral shape from a subset of the population data, which is then used to categorize any deformity within the whole data set. Using 3 standard deviations (SD) as a limit of normality', the male prevalence of 21.5% was similar to the female prevalence of 23.5%. Using 4 SD this reduced to 7.3% and 9.3% respectively. The younger men (50-59 years) showed a higher prevalence of deformity than the women and a lower increase of prevalence with age. In the older age group (over 80 years) the female prevalence of 45% compared with 36% for the men using 3 SD (grade 1) to define the limit of normality. The female group presented with more severe deformities on average than the male group. This continuing study will provide longitudinal information regarding the development of osteoporosis and associated risk factors which will eventually be of use to develop public health policies.

  15. Radiological Follow-up of New Compression Fractures Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, Noboru Komemushi, Atsushi; Kariya, Shuji; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Shomura, Yuzo; Sawada, Satoshi

    2006-02-15

    The purpose of the present study was to ascertain chronological changes in the analgesic effects of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) on osteoporotic vertebral compression factures and to radiologically follow new compression fractures after PVP. Seventy-six patients (206 vertebral bodies) were followed radiologically for a mean of 11.5 months. A visual analog scale (VAS; 0-10) was used to assess pain severity, and frontal and lateral plain radiographs of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae were taken 1-3 days and 1, 4, 10, and 22 months after PVP.The average VAS score was 7.2 {+-} 2.0 (mean pain score {+-} standard deviation) before PVP, 2.5 {+-} 2.3 at 1-3 days after PVP, 2.2 {+-} 2.3 at 1 month, 1.9 {+-} 2.2 at 4 months, 1.8 {+-} 2.4 at 10 months, and 1.0 {+-} 0.2 at 22 months. A new compression fracture was confirmed in 56 vertebral bodies in 28 patients (36.8%), affecting 38 adjacent vertebral bodies (67.8%), 17 nonadjacent vertebral bodies (30.4%), and 1 treated vertebral body (1.8%). A new compression fracture occurred within 1 week of PVP in 2 vertebral bodies (3.6%), between 1 week and 1 month after PVP in 22 (39.3%), between 1 and 3 months in 12 (21.4%), between 3 and 6 months in 12 (21.4%), and after more than 6 months in 8 (14.3%). PVP was highly effective in relieving the pain associated with osteoporosis-induced vertebral compression fractures, and this analgesia was long lasting. Radiological follow-up observation revealed new compression fractures in about one-third of patients. More than half of these new compression fractures occurred in adjacent vertebral bodies within 3 months of PVP.

  16. Comparative Prospective Study of Load Distribution Projection Among Patients with Vertebral Fractures Treated with Percutaneous Vertebroplasty and a Control Group of Healthy Volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Kelekis, Alexios Filippiadis, Dimitrios K. Vergadis, Chrysovalantis Tsitskari, Maria Nasis, Nikolaos Malagari, Aikaterini Kelekis, Nikolaos

    2013-04-12

    PurposeThrough a prospective comparison of patients with vertebral fractures and normal population, we illustrate effect of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) upon projection of load distribution changes.MethodsVertebroplasty group (36 symptomatic patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures) was evaluated on an electronic baropodometer registering projection of weight bearing areas on feet. Load distribution between right and left foot (including rear-front of the same foot) during standing and walking was recorded and compared before (group V1) and the day after (group V2) PV. Control group (30 healthy asymptomatic volunteers-no surgery record) were evaluated on the same baropodometer.ResultsMean value of load distribution difference between rear-front of the same foot was 9.45 ± 6.79 % (54.72–45.28 %) upon standing and 14.76 ± 7.09 % (57.38–42.62 %) upon walking in the control group. Respective load distribution values before PV were 16.52 ± 11.23 and 30.91 ± 19.26 % and after PV were 10.08 ± 6.26 and 14.25 ± 7.68 % upon standing and walking respectively. Mean value of load distribution variation between the two feet was 6.36 and 14.6 % before and 4.62 and 10.4 % after PV upon standing and walking respectively. Comparison of load distribution variation (group V1–V2, group V1-control group) is statistically significant. Comparison of load distribution variation (group V2-control group) is not statistically significant. Comparison of load distribution variation among the two feet is statistically significant during walking but not statistically significant during standing.ConclusionsThere is a statistically significant difference when comparing load distribution variation prior vertebroplasty and that of normal population. After vertebroplasty, this difference normalizes in a statistically significant way. PV is efficient on equilibrium-load distribution improvement as well.

  17. The Choice of Normative Pediatric Reference Database Changes Spine Bone Mineral Density Z-scores But Not The Relationship Between Bone Mineral Density and Prevalent Vertebral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jinhui; Siminoski, Kerry; Alos, Nathalie; Halton, Jacqueline; Ho, Josephine; Lentle, Brian; Matzinger, MaryAnn; Shenouda, Nazih; Atkinson, Stephanie; Barr, Ronald; Cabral, David A.; Couch, Robert; Cummings, Elizabeth A.; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Grant, Ronald M.; Rodd, Celia; Sbrocchi, Anne Marie; Scharke, Maya; Rauch, Frank; Ward, Leanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Our objectives were to assess the magnitude of the disparity in lumbar spine bone mineral density (LSBMD) Z-scores generated by different reference databases and to evaluate whether the relationship between LSBMD Z-scores and vertebral fractures (VF) varies by choice of database. Patients and Design Children with leukemia underwent LSBMD by cross-calibrated dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, with Z-scores generated according to Hologic and Lunar databases. VF were assessed by the Genant method on spine radiographs. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between fractures and LSBMD Z-scores. Net reclassification improvement (NRI) and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were calculated to assess the predictive accuracy of LSBMD Z-scores for VF. Results For the 186 children from 0–18 years of age, 6 different age ranges were studied. The Z-scores generated for the 0 to 18 group were highly correlated (r ≥ 0.90), but the proportion of children with LSBMD Z-scores ≤ −2.0 among those with VF varied substantially (from 38 to 66%). Odds ratios (OR) for the association between LSBMD Z-score and VF were similar regardless of database (OR = 1.92, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.44, 2.56 to OR = 2.70, 95% CI: 1.70, 4.28). AUC and NRI ranged from 0.71 to 0.75 and −0.15 to 0.07 respectively. Conclusions Although the use of a LSBMD Z-score threshold as part of the definition of osteoporosis in a child with VF does not appear valid, the study of relationships between BMD and VF is valid regardless of the BMD database that is used. PMID:25494661

  18. Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael C.

    1963-01-01

    Recent studies on the epidemiology and repair of fractures are reviewed. The type and severity of the fracture bears a relation to the age, sex and occupation of the patient. Bone tissue after fracture shows a process of inflammation and repair common to all members of the connective tissue family, but it repairs with specific tissue. Cartilage forms when the oxygen supply is outgrown. After a fracture, the vascular bed enlarges. The major blood supply to healing tissue is from medullary vessels and destruction of them will cause necrosis of the inner two-thirds of the cortex. Callus rapidly mineralizes, but full mineralization is achieved slowly; increased mineral metabolism lasts several years after fracture. PMID:13952119

  19. Safety and Efficacy Studies of Vertebroplasty, Kyphoplasty, and Mesh-Container-Plasty for the Treatment of Vertebral Compression Fractures: Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Li, Donghua; Wang, Zhiguo; Li, Tong; Liu, Xunwei; Zhong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical safety and efficacies of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP), percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP), and percutaneous mesh-container-plasty (PMCP) for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs), a retrospective study of 90 patients with VCFs who had been treated by PVP (n = 30), PKP (n = 30), and PMCP (n = 30) was conducted. The clinical efficacies of these three treatments were evaluated by comparing their PMMA cement leakages, cement patterns, height restoration percentages, wedge angles, visual analogue scales (VAS), and oswestry disability index (ODI) at the pre- and post-operative time points. 6.67%, 3.33%, and 0% of patients had PMMA leakage in PVP, PKP, and PMCP groups, respectively. Three (solid, trabecular, and mixed patterns), two (solid and mixed patterns), and one (mixed patterns) types of cement patterns were observed in PVP, PKP, and PMCP groups, respectively. PKP and PMCP treatments had better height restoration ability than PVP treatment. PVP, PKP, and PMCP treatments had significant and similar ability in pain relief and functional recovery ability for the treatment of VCFs. These results indicate minimally invasive techniques were effective methods for the treatment of VCFs. Moreover, these initial outcomes suggest PMCP treatment may be better than both PVP treatment and PKP treatment.

  20. Safety and Efficacy Studies of Vertebroplasty, Kyphoplasty, and Mesh-Container-Plasty for the Treatment of Vertebral Compression Fractures: Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Li, Donghua; Wang, Zhiguo; Li, Tong; Liu, Xunwei; Zhong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical safety and efficacies of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP), percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP), and percutaneous mesh-container-plasty (PMCP) for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs), a retrospective study of 90 patients with VCFs who had been treated by PVP (n = 30), PKP (n = 30), and PMCP (n = 30) was conducted. The clinical efficacies of these three treatments were evaluated by comparing their PMMA cement leakages, cement patterns, height restoration percentages, wedge angles, visual analogue scales (VAS), and oswestry disability index (ODI) at the pre- and post-operative time points. 6.67%, 3.33%, and 0% of patients had PMMA leakage in PVP, PKP, and PMCP groups, respectively. Three (solid, trabecular, and mixed patterns), two (solid and mixed patterns), and one (mixed patterns) types of cement patterns were observed in PVP, PKP, and PMCP groups, respectively. PKP and PMCP treatments had better height restoration ability than PVP treatment. PVP, PKP, and PMCP treatments had significant and similar ability in pain relief and functional recovery ability for the treatment of VCFs. These results indicate minimally invasive techniques were effective methods for the treatment of VCFs. Moreover, these initial outcomes suggest PMCP treatment may be better than both PVP treatment and PKP treatment. PMID:26963808

  1. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the ...

  2. Dual-Energy CT-based Display of Bone Marrow Edema in Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures: Impact on Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiologists with Varying Levels of Experience in Correlation to MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaup, Moritz; Wichmann, Julian L; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Beeres, Martin; Kromen, Wolfgang; Albrecht, Moritz H; Lehnert, Thomas; Boettcher, Marie; Vogl, Thomas J; Bauer, Ralf W

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether a dual-energy (DE) computed tomographic (CT) virtual noncalcium technique can improve the detection rate of acute thoracolumbar vertebral compression fractures in patients with osteoporosis compared with that at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging depending on the level of experience of the reading radiologist. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. Forty-nine patients with osteoporosis who were suspected of having acute vertebral fracture underwent DE CT and MR imaging. Conventional linear-blended CT scans and corresponding virtual noncalcium reconstructions were obtained. Five radiologists with varying levels of experience evaluated gray-scale CT scans for the presence of fractures and their suspected age. Then, virtual noncalcium images were evaluated to detect bone marrow edema. Findings were compared with those from MR imaging (the standard of reference). Sensitivity and specificity analyses for diagnostic performance and matched pair analyses were performed on vertebral fracture and patient levels. Results Sixty-two fractures were classified as fresh and 52 as old at MR imaging. The diagnostic performance of all readers in the detection of fresh fractures improved with the addition of virtual noncalcium reconstructions compared with that with conventional CT alone. Although the diagnostic accuracy of the least experienced reader with virtual noncalcium CT (accuracy with CT alone, 61%; accuracy with virtual noncalcium technique, 83%) was within the range of that of the most experienced reader with CT alone, the latter improved his accuracy with the noncalcium technique (from 81% to 95%), coming close to that with MR imaging. The number of vertebrae rated as unclear decreased by 59%-90% or from 15-53 to 2-13 in absolute numbers across readers. The number of patients potentially referred to MR imaging decreased by 36%-87% (from 11

  3. Improvement in Pulmonary Function of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients With Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures (OVCFs) After Kyphoplasty Under Local Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Song; Zhenzhong, Sun; Weimin, Jiang; Yimeng, Wang; Qudong, Yin; Jinhui, Shi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the changes in respiratory function of COPD patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs) after kyphoplasty (KP). Pain scores, pulmonary function parameters (PFT), and local kyphotic angle (LKA) were measured in 31 older patients (25 women, 6 men) with OVCFs before, 3 days after and 3 months after kyphoplasty. The preoperative and postoperative (3 days, 3 months) PFT parameters were as follows: % pred FVC, 74.33 ± 12.35, 85.23.8 ± 13.23, and 84.86 ± 14.01; % pred FEV1, 60.23 ± 11.2, 60.02 ± 11.90, and 60.78 ± 12.70; FEV1/FVC ratio (%), 68.22 ± 16.74, 59.56 ± 13.23, and 60.77 ±12.28, % pred MVV 52.46 ± 14.37, 55.23 ± 15.68, and 62.12 ± 14.48, respectively. The preoperative mean VAS score was 8.01 ± 1.41 and significantly decreased to 2.52 ± 0.89 and 2.34 ± 0.78 at 3 days, 3 months after kyphoplasty, respectively. The preoperative local kyphotic angle degree was 21.96 ± 5.75°, significantly decreased to 13.48 ± 6.12° 3 days after KP, and maintained 3 month after KP. The decrease in the VAS scores correlated with the PFT parameters; however, there were no significant correlations between the PFT parameters and the LKA, the VAS scores and the LKA. Kyphoplasty under local anesthesia is a safety treatment for the COPD patients with OVCFS, and is able to improve the lung function impaired by OVCFs. PMID:25785335

  4. Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty--a systematic review of cement augmentation techniques for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures compared to standard medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Yohan; Olerud, Claes

    2012-05-01

    After more than two decades the treatment effect of cement augmentation of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (VCF) has now been questioned by two blinded randomised placebo-controlled trials. Thus many practitioners are uncertain on the recommendation for cement augmentation techniques in elderly patients with osteoporotic VCF. This systematic review analyses randomised controlled trials on vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty to provide an overview on the current evidence. From an electronic database research 8 studies could be identified meeting our inclusion criteria of osteoporotic VCF in elderly (age>60 years), treatment with vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty, controlled with placebo or standard medical therapy, quality of life, function, or pain as primary parameter, and randomisation. Only two studies were properly blinded using a sham-operation as control. The other studies were using a non-surgical treatment control group. Further possible bias may be caused by manufacturer involvement in financing of three published RCT. There is level Ib evidence that vertebroplasty is no better than placebo, which is conflicting with the available level IIb evidence that there is a positive short-term effect of cement augmentation compared to standard medical therapy with regard to QoL, function and pain. Kyphoplasty is not superior to vertebroplasty with regard to pain, but with regard to VCF reduction (evidence level IIb). Kyphoplasty is probably not cost-effective (evidence level IIb), and vertebroplasty has not more than short-term cost-effectiveness (evidence level IV). Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty cannot be recommended as standard treatment for osteoporotic VCF. Ongoing sham-controlled trials may provide further evidence in this regard.

  5. Improvement in Pulmonary Function of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients With Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures (OVCFs) After Kyphoplasty Under Local Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Song; Zhenzhong, Sun; Weimin, Jiang; Yimeng, Wang; Qudong, Yin; Jinhui, Shi

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the changes in respiratory function of COPD patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs) after kyphoplasty (KP). Pain scores, pulmonary function parameters (PFT), and local kyphotic angle (LKA) were measured in 31 older patients (25 women, 6 men) with OVCFs before, 3 days after and 3 months after kyphoplasty. The preoperative and postoperative (3 days, 3 months) PFT parameters were as follows: % pred FVC, 74.33 ± 12.35, 85.23.8 ± 13.23, and 84.86 ± 14.01; % pred FEV1, 60.23 ± 11.2, 60.02 ± 11.90, and 60.78 ± 12.70; FEV1/FVC ratio (%), 68.22 ± 16.74, 59.56 ± 13.23, and 60.77 ± 12.28, % pred MVV 52.46 ± 14.37, 55.23 ± 15.68, and 62.12 ± 14.48, respectively. The preoperative mean VAS score was 8.01 ± 1.41 and significantly decreased to 2.52 ± 0.89 and 2.34 ± 0.78 at 3 days, 3 months after kyphoplasty, respectively. The preoperative local kyphotic angle degree was 21.96 ± 5.75°, significantly decreased to 13.48 ± 6.12° 3 days after KP, and maintained 3 month after KP. The decrease in the VAS scores correlated with the PFT parameters; however, there were no significant correlations between the PFT parameters and the LKA, the VAS scores and the LKA. Kyphoplasty under local anesthesia is a safety treatment for the COPD patients with OVCFS, and is able to improve the lung function impaired by OVCFs.

  6. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty and Bone Cement Leakage: Clinical Experience with a New High-Viscosity Bone Cement and Delivery System for Vertebral Augmentation in Benign and Malignant Compression Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo; Zoarski, Gregg; Manca, Antonio; Masala, Salvatore; Eminefendic, Haris; Russo, Filippo; Regge, Daniele

    2008-09-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of and venous leakage reduction in percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) using a new high-viscosity bone cement (PMMA). PV has been used effectively for pain relief in osteoporotic and malignant vertebral fractures. Cement extrusion is a common problem and can lead to complications. Sixty patients (52 female; mean age, 72.2 {+-} 7.2) suffering from osteoporosis (46), malignancy (12), and angiomas (2), divided into two groups (A and B), underwent PV on 190 vertebrae (86 dorsal, 104 lumbar). In Group A, PV with high-viscosity PMMA (Confidence, Disc-O-Tech, Israel) was used. This PMMA was injected by a proprietary delivery system, a hydraulic saline-filled screw injector. In Group B, a standard low-viscosity PMMA was used. Postprocedural CT was carried out to detect PMMA leakages and complications. Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon rank test were used to assess significant differences (p < 0.05) in leakages and to evaluate the clinical outcome. PV was feasible, achieving good clinical outcome (p < 0.0001) without major complications. In Group A, postprocedural CT showed an asymptomatic leak in the venous structures of 8 of 98 (8.2%) treated vertebrae; a discoidal leak occurred in 6 of 98 (6.1%). In Group B, a venous leak was seen in 38 of 92 (41.3%) and a discoidal leak in 12 of 92 (13.0%). Reduction of venous leak obtained by high-viscosity PMMA was highly significant (p < 0.0001), whereas this result was not significant (p = 0.14) related to the disc. The high-viscosity PMMA system is safe and effective for clinical use, allowing a significant reduction of extravasation rate and, thus, leakage-related complications.

  7. Percutaneous vertebroplasty and bone cement leakage: clinical experience with a new high-viscosity bone cement and delivery system for vertebral augmentation in benign and malignant compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo; Zoarski, Gregg; Manca, Antonio; Masala, Salvatore; Eminefendic, Haris; Russo, Filippo; Regge, Daniele

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of and venous leakage reduction in percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) using a new high-viscosity bone cement (PMMA). PV has been used effectively for pain relief in osteoporotic and malignant vertebral fractures. Cement extrusion is a common problem and can lead to complications. Sixty patients (52 female; mean age, 72.2 +/- 7.2) suffering from osteoporosis (46), malignancy (12), and angiomas (2), divided into two groups (A and B), underwent PV on 190 vertebrae (86 dorsal, 104 lumbar). In Group A, PV with high-viscosity PMMA (Confidence, Disc-O-Tech, Israel) was used. This PMMA was injected by a proprietary delivery system, a hydraulic saline-filled screw injector. In Group B, a standard low-viscosity PMMA was used. Postprocedural CT was carried out to detect PMMA leakages and complications. Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon rank test were used to assess significant differences (p < 0.05) in leakages and to evaluate the clinical outcome. PV was feasible, achieving good clinical outcome (p < 0.0001) without major complications. In Group A, postprocedural CT showed an asymptomatic leak in the venous structures of 8 of 98 (8.2%) treated vertebrae; a discoidal leak occurred in 6 of 98 (6.1%). In Group B, a venous leak was seen in 38 of 92 (41.3%) and a discoidal leak in 12 of 92 (13.0%). Reduction of venous leak obtained by high-viscosity PMMA was highly significant (p < 0.0001), whereas this result was not significant (p = 0.14) related to the disc. The high-viscosity PMMA system is safe and effective for clinical use, allowing a significant reduction of extravasation rate and, thus, leakage-related complications. PMID:18389186

  8. Medical treatment of vertebral osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lippuner, K

    2003-10-01

    Although osteoporosis is a systemic disease, vertebral fractures due to spinal bone loss are a frequent, sometimes early and often neglected complication of the disease, generally associated with considerable disability and pain. As osteoporotic vertebral fractures are an important predictor of future fracture risk, including at the hip, medical management is targeted at reducing fracture risk. A literature search for randomized, double-blind, prospective, controlled clinical studies addressing medical treatment possibilities of vertebral fractures in postmenopausal Caucasian women was performed on the leading medical databases. For each publication, the number of patients with at least one new vertebral fracture and the number of randomized patients by treatment arm was retrieved. The relative risk (RR) and the number needed to treat (NNT, i.e. the number of patients to be treated to avoid one radiological vertebral fracture over the duration of the study), together with the respective 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated for each study. Treatment of steroid-induced osteoporosis and treatment of osteoporosis in men were reviewed separately, based on the low number of publications available. Forty-five publications matched with the search criteria, allowing for analysis of 15 different substances tested regarding their anti-fracture efficacy at the vertebral level. Bisphosphonates, mainly alendronate and risedronate, were reported to have consistently reduced the risk of a vertebral fracture over up to 50 months of treatment in four (alendronate) and two (risedronate) publications. Raloxifene reduced vertebral fracture risk in one study over 36 months, which was confirmed by 48 months' follow-up data. Parathormone (PTH) showed a drastic reduction in vertebral fracture risk in early studies, while calcitonin may also be a treatment option to reduce fracture risk. For other substances published data are conflicting (calcitriol, fluoride) or insufficient

  9. Radiographic and safety details of vertebral body stenting: results from a multicenter chart review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Up to one third of BKP treated cases shows no appreciable height restoration due to loss of both restored height and kyphotic realignment after balloon deflation. This shortcoming has called for an improved method that maintains the height and realignment reached by the fully inflated balloon until stabilization of the vertebral body by PMMA-based cementation. Restoration of the physiological vertebral body height for pain relief and for preventing further fractures of adjacent and distant vertebral bodies must be the main aim for such a method. A new vertebral body stenting system (VBS) stabilizes the vertebral body after balloon deflation until cementation. The radiographic and safety results of the first 100 cases where VBS was applied are presented. Methods During the planning phase of an ongoing international multicenter RCT, radiographic, procedural and followup details were retrospectively transcribed from charts and xrays for developing and testing the case report forms. Radiographs were centrally assessed at the institution of the first/senior author. Results 100 patients (62 with osteoporosis) with a total of 103 fractured vertebral bodies were treated with the VBS system. 49 were females with a mean age of 73.2 years; males were 66.7 years old. The mean preoperative anterior-middle-posterior heights were 20.3-17.6-28.0 mm, respectively. The mean local kyphotic angle was 13.1°. The mean preoperative Beck Index (anterior edge height/posterior edge height) was 0.73, the mean alternative Beck Index (middle height/posterior edge height) was 0.63. The mean postoperative heights were restored to 24.5-24.6-30.4 mm, respectively. The mean local kyphotic angle was reduced to 8.9°. The mean postoperative Beck Index was 0.81, the mean alternative one was 0.82. The overall extrusion rate was 29.1%, the symptomatic one was 1%. In the osteoporosis subgroup there were 23.8% extrusions. Within the three months followup interval there were 9% of adjacent

  10. Augmentation Improves Human Cadaveric Vertebral Body Compression Mechanics For Lumbar Total Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Jonathon H.; Auerbach, Joshua D.; Maurer, Philip M.; Erbe, Erik M.; Entrekin, Dean; Balderston, Richard A.; Bertagnoli, Rudolf; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Cadaveric biomechanical study. Objectives Quantify the effects of vertebral body augmentation on biomechanics under axial compression by a total disc replacement (TDR) implant. Summary of Background Data TDR is a surgical alternative to lumbar spinal fusion to treat degenerative disc disease. Osteoporosis in the adjacent vertebrae to the interposed TDR may lead to implant subsidence or vertebral body fracture. Vertebral augmentation is used to treat osteoporotic compression fracture. The study sought to evaluate whether vertebral augmentation improves biomechanics under TDR axial loading. Methods Forty-five L1-L5 lumbar vertebral body segments with intact posterior elements were used. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans were performed to determine bone density, block randomizing specimens by bone density into augmentation and control groups. A semi-constrained keeled lumbar disc replacement device was implanted providing 50% endplate coverage. Vertebral augmentation of 17.6 ± 0.9% vertebral volume fill with Cortoss was performed on augmentation group. All segments underwent axial compression at a rate of 0.2 mm/s to 6mm. Results The load-displacement response for all specimens was non-linear. Subfailure mechanical properties with augmentation were significantly different from control; in all cases the augmented group was 2× higher than control. At failure, the maximum load and stiffness with augmentation was not significantly different from control. The maximum apparent stress and modulus with augmentation were 2× and 1.3× greater than control, respectively. The subfailure stress and apparent modulus with augmentation was moderately correlated with bone density while the control subfailure properties were not. The augmented maximum stress was not correlated with bone density, while the control was weakly correlated. The maximum apparent modulus was moderately correlated with bone density for both the augmented and control groups

  11. Third-generation percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems.

    PubMed

    Vanni, Daniele; Galzio, Renato; Kazakova, Anna; Pantalone, Andrea; Grillea, Giovanni; Bartolo, Marcello; Salini, Vincenzo; Magliani, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    Currently, there is no general consensus about the management of osteoporotic vertebral fractures (OVF). In the past, conservative treatment for at least one month was deemed appropriate for the majority of vertebral fractures. When pain persisted after conservative treatment, it was necessary to consider surgical interventions including: vertebroplasty for vertebral fractures with less than 30% loss of height of the affected vertebral body and kyphoplasty for vertebral fractures with greater than 30% loss of height. Currently, this type of treatment is not feasible. Herein we review the characteristics and methods of operation of three of the most common percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems (PVAS) for the treatment of OVF: Vertebral Body Stenting(®) (VBS), OsseoFix(®) and Spine Jack(®). VBS is a titanium device accompanied by a hydraulic (as opposed to mechanical) working system which allows a partial and not immediate possibility to control the opening of the device. On the other hand, OsseoFix(®) and Spine Jack(®) are accompanied by a mechanical working system which allows a progressive and controlled reduction of the vertebral fracture. Another important aspect to consider is the vertebral body height recovery. OsseoFix(®) has an indirect mechanism of action: the compaction of the trabecular bone causes an increase in the vertebral body height. Unlike the Vertebral Body Stenting(®) and Spine Jack(®), the OsseoFix(®) has no direct lift mechanism. Therefore, for these characteristics and for the force that this device is able to provide. In our opinion, Spine Jack(®) is the only device also suitable for the treatment OVF, traumatic fracture (recent, old or inveterate) and primary or secondary bone tumors. PMID:27683690

  12. Third-generation percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems

    PubMed Central

    Galzio, Renato; Kazakova, Anna; Pantalone, Andrea; Grillea, Giovanni; Bartolo, Marcello; Salini, Vincenzo; Magliani, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no general consensus about the management of osteoporotic vertebral fractures (OVF). In the past, conservative treatment for at least one month was deemed appropriate for the majority of vertebral fractures. When pain persisted after conservative treatment, it was necessary to consider surgical interventions including: vertebroplasty for vertebral fractures with less than 30% loss of height of the affected vertebral body and kyphoplasty for vertebral fractures with greater than 30% loss of height. Currently, this type of treatment is not feasible. Herein we review the characteristics and methods of operation of three of the most common percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems (PVAS) for the treatment of OVF: Vertebral Body Stenting® (VBS), OsseoFix® and Spine Jack®. VBS is a titanium device accompanied by a hydraulic (as opposed to mechanical) working system which allows a partial and not immediate possibility to control the opening of the device. On the other hand, OsseoFix® and Spine Jack® are accompanied by a mechanical working system which allows a progressive and controlled reduction of the vertebral fracture. Another important aspect to consider is the vertebral body height recovery. OsseoFix® has an indirect mechanism of action: the compaction of the trabecular bone causes an increase in the vertebral body height. Unlike the Vertebral Body Stenting® and Spine Jack®, the OsseoFix® has no direct lift mechanism. Therefore, for these characteristics and for the force that this device is able to provide. In our opinion, Spine Jack® is the only device also suitable for the treatment OVF, traumatic fracture (recent, old or inveterate) and primary or secondary bone tumors.

  13. Third-generation percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems

    PubMed Central

    Galzio, Renato; Kazakova, Anna; Pantalone, Andrea; Grillea, Giovanni; Bartolo, Marcello; Salini, Vincenzo; Magliani, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no general consensus about the management of osteoporotic vertebral fractures (OVF). In the past, conservative treatment for at least one month was deemed appropriate for the majority of vertebral fractures. When pain persisted after conservative treatment, it was necessary to consider surgical interventions including: vertebroplasty for vertebral fractures with less than 30% loss of height of the affected vertebral body and kyphoplasty for vertebral fractures with greater than 30% loss of height. Currently, this type of treatment is not feasible. Herein we review the characteristics and methods of operation of three of the most common percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems (PVAS) for the treatment of OVF: Vertebral Body Stenting® (VBS), OsseoFix® and Spine Jack®. VBS is a titanium device accompanied by a hydraulic (as opposed to mechanical) working system which allows a partial and not immediate possibility to control the opening of the device. On the other hand, OsseoFix® and Spine Jack® are accompanied by a mechanical working system which allows a progressive and controlled reduction of the vertebral fracture. Another important aspect to consider is the vertebral body height recovery. OsseoFix® has an indirect mechanism of action: the compaction of the trabecular bone causes an increase in the vertebral body height. Unlike the Vertebral Body Stenting® and Spine Jack®, the OsseoFix® has no direct lift mechanism. Therefore, for these characteristics and for the force that this device is able to provide. In our opinion, Spine Jack® is the only device also suitable for the treatment OVF, traumatic fracture (recent, old or inveterate) and primary or secondary bone tumors. PMID:27683690

  14. Treatment of vertebral body compression fractures using percutaneous kyphoplasty guided by a combination of computed tomography and C-arm fluoroscopy with finger-touch guidance to determine the needle entry point.

    PubMed

    Wang, G Y; Zhang, C C; Ren, K; Zhang, P P; Liu, C H; Zheng, Z A; Chen, Y; Fang, R

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the results and complications of image-guided percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) using computed tomography (CT) and C-arm fluoroscopy, with finger-touch guidance to determine the needle entry point. Of the 86 patients (106 PKP) examined, 56 were treated for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures and 30 for vertebral tumors. All patients underwent image-guided treatment using CT and conventional fluoroscopy, with finger-touch identification of a puncture point within a small incision (1.5 to 2 cm). Partial or complete pain relief was achieved in 98% of patients within 24 h of treatment. Moreover, a significant improvement in functional mobility and reduction in analgesic use was observed. CT allowed the detection of cement leakage in 20.7% of the interventions. No bone cement leakages with neurologic symptoms were noted. All work channels were made only once, and bone cement was distributed near the center of the vertebral body. Our study confirms the efficacy of PKP treatment in osteoporotic and oncological patients. The combination of CT and C-arm fluoroscopy with finger-touch guidance reduces the risk of complications compared with conventional fluoroscopy alone, facilitates the detection of minor cement leakage, improves the operative procedure, and results in a favorable bone cement distribution.

  15. Risk of Fracture After Single Fraction Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy to Spinal Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Peter S.; Laufer, Ilya; Boland, Patrick J.; Hanover, Andrew; Bilsky, Mark H.; Yamada, Josh; Lis, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Single-fraction image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows for tumoricidal treatment of traditionally radioresistant cancers while sparing critical adjacent structures. Risk of vertebral fracture after IG-IMRT for spinal metastases has not been defined. Patients and Methods We evaluated 62 consecutive patients undergoing single fraction IG-IMRT at 71 sites for solid organ metastases. A neuroradiologist and three spine surgeons evaluated prospectively obtained magnetic resonance/computed tomography (CT) imaging studies for post-treatment fracture development and tumor recurrence. Results Fracture progression was noted in 27 vertebrae (39%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that CT appearance, lesion location, and percent vertebral body involvement independently predicted fracture progression. Lesions located between T10 and the sacrum were 4.6 times more likely to fracture than were lesions above T10 (95% CI, 1.1 to 19.7). Lytic lesions were 6.8 times more likely to fracture than were sclerotic and mixed lesions (95% CI, 1.4 to 33.3). As percent vertebral body involvement increased, odds of fracture also increased. Patients with fracture progression had significantly higher narcotic use, change in Karnofsky performance score, and a strong trend toward higher pain scores. Local tumor progression occurred in seven patients and contributed to one fracture. Obesity, posterior element involvement, bisphosphonate use, and local kyphosis did not confer increased risk. Conclusion Vertebral fracture is common after single fraction IG-IMRT for metastatic spine lesions. Lytic disease involving more than 40% of the vertebral body and location at or below T10 confer a high risk of fracture, the presence of which yields significantly poorer clinical outcomes. These results may help clinicians identify high-risk patients who would benefit from prophylactic vertebro- or kyphoplasty. PMID:19738130

  16. Effects of an exercise and manual therapy program on physical impairments, function and quality-of-life in people with osteoporotic vertebral fracture: a randomised, single-blind controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This randomised, single-blind controlled pilot trial aimed to determine the effectiveness of a physiotherapy program, including exercise and manual therapy, in reducing impairments and improving physical function and health-related quality of life in people with a history of painful osteoporotic vertebral fracture. Methods 20 participants were randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 11) or control (n = 9) group. The intervention group attended individual sessions with an experienced clinician once a week for 10 weeks and performed daily home exercises with adherence monitored by a self-report diary. The control group received no treatment. Blinded assessment was conducted at baseline and 11 weeks. Questionnaires assessed self-reported changes in back pain, physical function, and health-related quality of life. Objective measures of thoracic kyphosis, back and shoulder muscle endurance (Timed Loaded Standing Test), and function (Timed Up and Go test) were also taken. Results Compared with the control group, the intervention group showed significant reductions in pain during movement (mean difference (95% CI) -1.8 (-3.5 to -0.1)) and at rest (-2.0 (-3.8 to -0.2)) and significantly greater improvements in Qualeffo physical function (-4.8 (-9.2 to -0.5)) and the Timed Loaded Standing test (46.7 (16.1 to 77.3) secs). For the perceived change in back pain over the 10 weeks, 9/11 (82%) participants in the intervention group rated their pain as 'much better' compared with only 1/9 (11%) participants in the control group. Conclusion Despite the modest sample size, these results support the benefits of exercise and manual therapy in the clinical management of patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures, but need to be confirmed in a larger sample. Trail registration NCT00638768 PMID:20163739

  17. Fatigue Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Morris, James M.

    1968-01-01

    Fatigue (or stress) fracture of bone in military recruits has been recognized for many years. Most often it is a metatarsal bone that is involved but the tarsal bones, calcaneus, tibia, fibula, femur, and pelvis are occasionally affected. Reports of such fractures in the ribs, ulna and vertebral bodies may be found in the literature. In recent years, there has been increasing awareness of the occurrence of fatigue fractures in the civilian population. Weekend sportsmen, athletes in an early phase of training, and persons engaged in unaccustomed, repetitive, vigorous activity are potential victims of such a fracture. The signs and symptoms, roentgenographic findings, treatment and etiology of fatigue fractures are dealt with in this presentation. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:5652745

  18. The intravertebral distribution of bone density: correspondence to intervertebral disc health and implications for vertebral strength

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, T. M.; Morgan, S. R.; Barest, G. D.; Morgan, E. F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This study's goal was to determine associations among the intravertebral heterogeneity in bone density, bone strength, and intervertebral disc (IVD) health. Results indicated that predictions of vertebral strength can benefit from considering the magnitude of the density heterogeneity and the congruence between the spatial distribution of density and IVD health. Introduction This study aims to determine associations among the intravertebral heterogeneity in bone density, bone strength, and IVD health Methods Regional measurements of bone density were performed throughout 30 L1 vertebral bodies using microcomputed tomography (μCT) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT). The magnitude of the intravertebral heterogeneity in density was defined as the interquartile range and quartile coefficient of variation in regional densities. The spatial distribution of density was quantified using ratios of regional densities representing different anatomical zones (e.g., anterior to posterior regional densities). Cluster analysis was used to identify groups of vertebrae with similar spatial distributions of density. Vertebral strength was measured in compression. IVD health was assessed using two scoring systems. Results QCT- and μCT-based measures of the magnitude of the intravertebral heterogeneity in density were strongly correlated with each other (p<0.005). Accounting for the interquartile range in regional densities improved predictions of vertebral strength as compared to predictions based only on mean density (R2=0.59 vs. 0.43; F-test p-value=0.018). Specifically, after adjustment for mean density, vertebral bodies with greater heterogeneity in density exhibited higher strength. No single spatial distribution of density was associated with high vertebral strength. Analyses of IVD scores suggested that the health of the adjacent IVDs may modulate the effect of a particular spatial distribution of density on vertebral strength. Conclusions Noninvasive

  19. Fentanyl in a pectin gel treating breakthrough pain in vertebral compression fracture due to multiple myeloma: A descriptive study of three cases.

    PubMed

    Bujedo, Borja Mugabure; Karlsson, Brynjar

    2016-01-01

    Breakthrough pain (BTP) currently represents a challenge for health professionals dedicated to the treatment of pain. In this descriptive 1-year follow-up study on three patients with BTP from vertebral crush, in the context of multiple myeloma, the authors have observed the great either efficacy or tolerability profile of fentanyl pectin nasal spray. The most relevant findings in this study were better adherence to treatment compared to previously opioids and also great personal satisfaction. Because of common pathophysiological mechanism for noncancerous pain of bone origin, these good results could open the door to investigation of the use of this drug in this patient's group. PMID:27435440

  20. Management of hyper-flexion injury-related teardrop fracture in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Monish; Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a flexion teardrop fracture managed surgically with anterior stabilisation and fusion between the affected vertebral body to its posteriorly adjacent level. A 14-year-old girl presented with severe neck pain following a fall from a bunk bed. MRI investigation showed signs of axial loading and hyper-flexion yielding a teardrop fracture at the body of the C5 vertebra. Using a novel technique, the patient was treated surgically with an anterior fusion of the C5-C6 vertebra. Her 12-month follow-up demonstrated full functional ability. PMID:26822787

  1. Delayed Traumatic Diaphragm Hernia after Thoracolumbar Fracture in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoun-Ho; Kim, Sang Woo; Jung, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragm hernia can occur in rare cases and generally accompanies thoracic or abdominal injuries. When suffering from ankylosing spondylitis, a small force can develop into vertebral fracture and an adjacent structural injury, and lead to diaphragm hernia without accompanying concomitant thoracoabdominal injury. A high level of suspicion may be a most reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of a diaphragm injury, and we need to keep in mind a possibility in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis and a thoracolumbar fracture, even in the case of minor trauma. PMID:25733996

  2. Apophyseal ring fracture associated with two levels extruded disc herniation: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Alvarenga, José Alexandre Lopes; Ueta, Fernando Tadashi Salvioni; Curto, David Del; Ueta, Renato Hiroshi Salvioni; Martins, Delio Eulalio; Wajchenberg, Marcelo; Puertas, Eduardo Barros

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apophyseal ring fractures are rare injuries that may be associated with lumbar disc herniation in young patients. We report a unique case in the literature of a 15-year-old male patient who played football and was admitted at our service complaining of sciatica radiating into the left leg. An apophysial ring injury of L5 vertebral body was observed. This injury caused two extruded disc herniation in adjacent levels. Surgical procedure was indicated after failure of conservative treatment. PMID:25003931

  3. Percutaneous Vertebral Body Augmentation: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    There are many medical conditions like osteoporosis, tumor, or osteonecrosis that weaken the structural strength of the vertebral body and prone it to fracture. Percutaneous vertebral augmentation that is usually applied by polymethylmethacrylate is a relatively safe, effective, and long lasting procedure commonly performed in these situations. In this paper, we updated a review of biomechanics, indications, contraindications, surgical techniques, complications, and overall prognosis of these minimally invasive spinal procedures. PMID:25379561

  4. Vertebral body stenting: a new method for vertebral augmentation versus kyphoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Heiner; Fuerderer, Sebastian; Gabl, Michael; Roeder, Christoph; Heini, Paul; Mittlmeier, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are well-established minimally invasive treatment options for compression fractures of osteoporotic vertebral bodies. Possible procedural disadvantages, however, include incomplete fracture reduction or a significant loss of reduction after balloon tamp deflation, prior to cement injection. A new procedure called “vertebral body stenting” (VBS) was tested in vitro and compared to kyphoplasty. VBS uses a specially designed catheter-mounted stent which can be implanted and expanded inside the vertebral body. As much as 24 fresh frozen human cadaveric vertebral bodies (T11-L5) were utilized. After creating typical compression fractures, the vertebral bodies were reduced by kyphoplasty (n = 12) or by VBS (n = 12) and then stabilized with PMMA bone cement. Each step of the procedure was performed under fluoroscopic control and analysed quantitatively. Finally, static and dynamic biomechanical tests were performed. A complete initial reduction of the fractured vertebral body height was achieved by both systems. There was a significant loss of reduction after balloon deflation in kyphoplasty compared to VBS, and a significant total height gain by VBS (mean ± SD in %, p < 0.05, demonstrated by: anterior height loss after deflation in relation to preoperative height [kyphoplasty: 11.7 ± 6.2; VBS: 3.7 ± 3.8], and total anterior height gain [kyphoplasty: 8.0 ± 9.4; VBS: 13.3 ± 7.6]). Biomechanical tests showed no significant stiffness and failure load differences between systems. VBS is an innovative technique which allows for the possibly complete reduction of vertebral compression fractures and helps maintain the restored height by means of a stent. The height loss after balloon deflation is significantly decreased by using VBS compared to kyphoplasty, thus offering a new promising option for vertebral augmentation. PMID:20191393

  5. [Radiation diagnosis of uncomplicated compression spinal fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Ignat'ev, Iu T; Novikov, V P; Konev, V P; Polishchuk, T I

    2002-01-01

    Experiments on rabbits compared the X-ray, morphological, and magnetic resonance imaging of compression fractures of the vertebral body. Edema of the bone marrow of the vertebral body was ascertained to be a basic morphological substrate that evokes a modified MR signal. The data on 178 children with suspected compression fracture of the vertebral body were used to consider the potentialities of MRI and X-ray study in this pathology. The MRI semiotics of uncomplicated compression fractures of vertebral bodies is presented. The sensitivities of MRI and spondylography in the diagnosis of compression fractures of vertebral bodies were 100 and 62.5%, respectively.

  6. [Scapular and vertebral osteopathies during acute myoclonic bismuth encephalopathies. Apropos of 8 cases].

    PubMed

    Emile, J; De Bray, J M; Bernat, M; Morer, T; Allain, P

    1979-01-01

    Among 59 cases of bismuth encephalopathy, 8 patients were observed to have osteo-articular lesions of the shoulders and dorsal vertebral. These included osteonecrosis of the head of the humerus, which has been reported previously, uni- or bi-lateral fractures of the upper end of the humerus, and vertebral fractures. Severe and repeated myoclonic spasms appear to be capable of causing fractures; microscopic fractures in the spongy bone could explain the osteonecrotic images observed. PMID:434718

  7. [Gas dissection of the vertebral body or the vertebral intrasomatic space phenomenon. Physiopathological arguments].

    PubMed

    Michel, J L; Bouzat, J; Rivoal, A; de Pradel de Lamaze, P; Viallet, J F; Belin, J; Merle, P

    1982-01-01

    Some features concerning the ischemic origin of the gaseous dissection of the vertebral body and the physiopathology of the necrose, are considered in the adult: --in the way, the anterior topography of vaccum phenomenon is on the model of the arterial distribution in the vertebral body, implying ischemic origin of gaseous dissection; --further, two cases of intravertebral vaccum cleft, noticed after minor trauma, suggest the major role of fractures at the origin of ischemia.

  8. Single-Shot Echo-Planar Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging at 3T and 1.5T for Differentiation of Benign Vertebral Fracture Edema and Tumor Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jin; Rho, Myung Ho; Chung, Eun Chul; Kim, Mi Sung; Kwon, Heon Ju; Youn, In Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value using single-shot echo-planar imaging sequences at 3T and 1.5T for differentiation of benign fracture edema and tumor infiltration of the vertebral body. Materials and Methods A total of 46 spinal examinations were included in the 1.5T MRI group, and a total of 40 spinal examinations were included in the 3T MRI group. The ADC values of the lesion were measured and calculated. The diagnostic performance of the conventional MR image containing sagittal T2-weighted fat saturated image and each diffusion weighted image (DWI) with an ADC value with different b values were evaluated. Results The mean ADC value of the benign lesions was higher than that of the malignant lesions on 1.5T and 3T (p < 0.05). The sensitivity of the diagnostic performance was higher with an additional DWI in both 1.5T and 3T, but the sensitivities were similar with the addition of b values of 400 and 1000. The specificities of the diagnostic performances did not show significant differences (p value > 0.05). The diagnostic accuracies were higher when either of the DWIs (b values of 400 and 1000) was added to routine MR image for 1.5T and 3T. Statistical differences between 1.5T and 3T or between b values of 400 and 1000 were not seen. Conclusion The ADC values of the benign lesions were significantly higher than those of the malignant lesions on 1.5T and 3T. There was no statistically significant difference in the diagnostic performances when either of the DWIs (b values of 400 and 1000) was added to the routine MR image for 1.5T and 3T. PMID:27587948

  9. Mathematical model for predicting human vertebral fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    Mathematical model has been constructed to predict dynamic response of tapered, curved beam columns in as much as human spine closely resembles this form. Model takes into consideration effects of impact force, mass distribution, and material properties. Solutions were verified by dynamic tests on curved, tapered, elastic polyethylene beam.

  10. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It ... with other fractures of the face. Sometimes a blunt injury can ...

  11. Coccygeoplasty: treatment for fractures of the coccyx.

    PubMed

    Dean, L Mark; Syed, Mubin I; Jan, Solomon A; Patel, Neel A; Shaikh, Azim; Morar, Kamal; Shah, Omar

    2006-05-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty and sacroplasty are becoming common modalities of treatment for vertebral body compression fractures and sacral insufficiency fractures, respectively. The present report describes a case of a coccygeal fracture treated with injection of polymethylmethacrylate cement, which resulted in immediate relief of symptoms. It is suggested that this procedure be called coccygeoplasty.

  12. Kyphoplasty Increases Vertebral Height, Decreases Both Pain Score and Opiate Requirements While Improving Functional Status

    PubMed Central

    Tolba, Reda; Bolash, Robert B.; Shroll, Joshua; Costandi, Shrif; Dalton, Jarrod E.; Sanghvi, Chirag; Mekhail, Nagy

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral compression fractures can result from advanced osteoporosis, or less commonly from metastatic or traumatic insults to the vertebral column, and result in disabling pain and decreased functional capacity. Various vertebral augmentation options including kyphoplasty aim at preventing the sequelae of pain and immobility that can develop as the result of the vertebral fractures. The mechanism for pain relief following kyphoplasty is not entirely understood, and the restoration of a portion of the lost vertebral height is a subject of debate. We retrospectively reviewed radiographic imaging, pain relief, analgesic intake and functional outcomes in 67 consecutive patients who underwent single- or multilevel kyphoplasty with the primary goal of quantifying the restoration of lost vertebral height. We observed a mean of 45% of the lost vertebral height restored postprocedurally. Secondarily, kyphoplasty was associated with significant decreases in pain scores, daily morphine consumption and improvement in patient-reported functional measures. PMID:24165285

  13. Kyphoplasty increases vertebral height, decreases both pain score and opiate requirements while improving functional status.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Reda; Bolash, Robert B; Shroll, Joshua; Costandi, Shrif; Dalton, Jarrod E; Sanghvi, Chirag; Mekhail, Nagy

    2014-03-01

    Vertebral compression fractures can result from advanced osteoporosis, or less commonly from metastatic or traumatic insults to the vertebral column, and result in disabling pain and decreased functional capacity. Various vertebral augmentation options including kyphoplasty aim at preventing the sequelae of pain and immobility that can develop as the result of the vertebral fractures. The mechanism for pain relief following kyphoplasty is not entirely understood, and the restoration of a portion of the lost vertebral height is a subject of debate. We retrospectively reviewed radiographic imaging, pain relief, analgesic intake and functional outcomes in 67 consecutive patients who underwent single- or multilevel kyphoplasty with the primary goal of quantifying the restoration of lost vertebral height. We observed a mean of 45% of the lost vertebral height restored postprocedurally. Secondarily, kyphoplasty was associated with significant decreases in pain scores, daily morphine consumption and improvement in patient-reported functional measures.

  14. Kyphoplasty increases vertebral height, decreases both pain score and opiate requirements while improving functional status.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Reda; Bolash, Robert B; Shroll, Joshua; Costandi, Shrif; Dalton, Jarrod E; Sanghvi, Chirag; Mekhail, Nagy

    2014-03-01

    Vertebral compression fractures can result from advanced osteoporosis, or less commonly from metastatic or traumatic insults to the vertebral column, and result in disabling pain and decreased functional capacity. Various vertebral augmentation options including kyphoplasty aim at preventing the sequelae of pain and immobility that can develop as the result of the vertebral fractures. The mechanism for pain relief following kyphoplasty is not entirely understood, and the restoration of a portion of the lost vertebral height is a subject of debate. We retrospectively reviewed radiographic imaging, pain relief, analgesic intake and functional outcomes in 67 consecutive patients who underwent single- or multilevel kyphoplasty with the primary goal of quantifying the restoration of lost vertebral height. We observed a mean of 45% of the lost vertebral height restored postprocedurally. Secondarily, kyphoplasty was associated with significant decreases in pain scores, daily morphine consumption and improvement in patient-reported functional measures. PMID:24165285

  15. Testing Skills in Vertebrates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funk, Mildred Sears; Tosto, Pat

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a project that gives students examples of basic skills that many vertebrate species develop as they grow and function in their ecosystem. These activities involve information gathering about surroundings, learning how to use objects, and tracking and searching skills. Different vertebrate species may acquire…

  16. Thoracolumbar Spine Fractures in the Geriatric Fracture Center

    PubMed Central

    Folbert, E. C.; Kraai, M.; Smit, R. S.; Hegeman, J. H.; van der Velde, D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Thoracolumbar spine fractures are common osteoporotic fractures among elderly patients. Several studies suggest that these fractures can be treated successfully with a nonoperative management. The aim of this study is to evaluate the conservative treatment of elderly patients with a vertebral fracture. Methods: This study is a retrospective cohort study, which included all patients with an age of 65 years and older, who were diagnosed with a vertebral fracture and where therefore admitted to the Geriatric Fracture Center over a period of 2 years. Primary outcome was the level of functioning 6 weeks and 3 months after admission. Results: We included 106 patients with 143 vertebral fractures, of which 61 patients were evaluated after 3 months. In our population, 53% of the patients had a fracture involving both middle and anterior columns. The majority of the patients functioned sufficiently 6 weeks and 3 months after admission. Analysis showed that age <80 years is an independent predictor of a sufficient level of functioning after 6 weeks. Discussion: The nonoperative treatment of elderly patients with a vertebral fracture leads to a sufficient level of functioning 6 weeks and 3 months after admission. In our population, only age <80 years is an independent predictor for a sufficient level of functioning 6 weeks after admission. The level of functioning at 6 weeks predicts the level of functioning 3 months after admission. On comparison, the level of functioning after early ambulation is equal to the level of functioning after immobilization. Where immobilization may lead to complications, early ambulation was not associated with new complications or neurological damage. Based on these advantages, the treatment of elderly patients with a fracture involving both middle and anterior columns may be altered from immobilization to mobilization in the future. PMID:25360330

  17. The incidence of fragility fractures in Italy.

    PubMed

    Ratti, Chiara; Vulcano, Ettore; La Barbera, Giuseppe; Canton, Gianluca; Murena, Luigi; Cherubino, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    Osteoporosis can significantly impact on the risk of developing a fracture. Thus, fragility fractures represent a challenge for health professionals and decision makers of the twenty-first century. The aim of this work is to review the literature concerning osteoporotic fractures in Italy in terms of incidence, rate of hospitalization, relative risk of a new fragility fracture, and costs for the national health system. It was estimated that the costs of treating proximal femur fragility fractures in 2002 summed up to 1 billion Euros. The number of fragility fractures in Italy was calculated as follows: 91.494 hip fractures, 61.009 clinical vertebral fractures, 57.401 humeral fragility fractures, and 94.045 forearm/wrist fragility fractures. The incidence of fragility fractures in Italy is very high, and osteoporosis is the leading cause of morbidity in the Italian population. PMID:24046040

  18. Atypical vertebral Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Beaudouin, Constance; Dohan, Anthony; Nasrallah, Toufic; Parlier, Caroline; Touraine, Sébastien; Ea, Korng; Kaci, Rachid; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2014-07-01

    A 40-year-old Mauritanian man consulted for back pain. A computed tomography of the spine showed patchy sclerosis of the fifth and seventh thoracic vertebral bodies with normal neural arch of T5 and sclerosis and hypertrophy of the neural arch of T7, as well as diffuse sclerosis of the T11 vertebral body with a normal neural arch. At MRI, low signal-intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal-intensity on T2-weighted images involved the whole T5 and T7 vertebrae and the vertebral body of T11. Working diagnoses included metastatic disease and lymphoma, and a biopsy of T7 and then T11 was carried out. Both showed pathological findings very suggestive of Paget's disease. Since CT is usually the more specific radiological examination in vertebral Paget's disease, we thought it could be useful to report this atypical CT presentation (patchy sclerosis of the vertebral body without diffuse bone texture changes and isolated involvement of the vertebral body) of vertebral Paget's disease. PMID:24445956

  19. Fatal Vertebral Artery Injury in Penetrating Cervical Spine Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Tannoury, Chadi; Degiacomo, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. This case illustrates complications to a vertebral artery injury (VAI) resulting from penetrating cervical spine trauma. Objectives. To discuss the management of both VAI and cervical spine trauma after penetrating gunshot wound to the neck. Summary of Background Data. Vertebral artery injury following cervical spine trauma is infrequent, and a unilateral VAI often occurs without neurologic sequela. Nevertheless, devastating complications of stroke and death do occur. Methods. A gunshot wound to the neck resulted in a C6 vertebral body fracture and C5–C7 transverse foramina fractures. Neck CT angiogram identified a left vertebral artery occlusion. A cerebral angiography confirmed occlusion of the left extracranial vertebral artery and patency of the remaining cerebrovascular system. Following anterior cervical corpectomy and stabilization, brainstem infarction occurred and resulted in death. Results. A fatal outcome resulted from vertebral artery thrombus propagation with occlusion of the basilar artery triggering basilar ischemia and subsequent brainstem and cerebellar infarction. Conclusions. Vertebral artery injury secondary to cervical spine trauma can lead to potentially devastating neurologic sequela. Early surgical stabilization, along with anticoagulation therapy, contributes towards managing the combination of injuries. Unfortunately, despite efforts, a poor outcome is sometimes inevitable when cervical spine trauma is coupled with a VAI. PMID:26640731

  20. [Vertebral vacuum phenomena].

    PubMed

    Hamzé, B; Leaute, F; Wybier, M; Laredo, J D

    1995-01-01

    The spinal vacuum phenomenon is a collection of gas within the disk space, the vertebral body, the apophyseal joint or the spinal canal. The intradiscal vacuum phenomenon is frequently observed in degenerative disk disease and crystal-induced diskopathy. This has obvious significance to the radiologist, who, on observing a narrowed disk space or collapsed vertebral body, might otherwise consider infectious or neoplastic spondylitis, a likely possibility. The presence of vacuum phenomenon militates against the diagnosis of infection or tumor.

  1. Hay balers' fractures.

    PubMed

    Mayba, I I

    1984-03-01

    Two cases of fractures of the sternum and T12 vertebra are presented, which appear to be a characteristic combination of injuries to farmers when hay bales fall on them. The mechanism of injury proposed is a severe forward flexion, producing vertebral collapse at the dorsolumbar junction, and fracture of the sternum from direct trauma against the steering wheel. These fractures should always be suspected in persons injured while baling hay. It is proposed to call this complex of injuries hay balers' fractures. Preventive measures suggested are: operator caution when hay bales are lifted; addition of locks to the loader forks; increasing the size of the loader, or placing a screen or cage over the operators to keep hay bales from falling on them.

  2. Hay balers' fractures.

    PubMed

    Mayba, I I

    1984-03-01

    Two cases of fractures of the sternum and T12 vertebra are presented, which appear to be a characteristic combination of injuries to farmers when hay bales fall on them. The mechanism of injury proposed is a severe forward flexion, producing vertebral collapse at the dorsolumbar junction, and fracture of the sternum from direct trauma against the steering wheel. These fractures should always be suspected in persons injured while baling hay. It is proposed to call this complex of injuries hay balers' fractures. Preventive measures suggested are: operator caution when hay bales are lifted; addition of locks to the loader forks; increasing the size of the loader, or placing a screen or cage over the operators to keep hay bales from falling on them. PMID:6708148

  3. Pleistocene vertebrates of the Yukon Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harington, C. R.

    2011-08-01

    Unglaciated parts of the Yukon constitute one of the most important areas in North America for yielding Pleistocene vertebrate fossils. Nearly 30 vertebrate faunal localities are reviewed spanning a period of about 1.6 Ma (million years ago) to the close of the Pleistocene some 10 000 BP (radiocarbon years before present, taken as 1950). The vertebrate fossils represent at least 8 species of fishes, 1 amphibian, 41 species of birds and 83 species of mammals. Dominant among the large mammals are: steppe bison ( Bison priscus), horse ( Equus sp.), woolly mammoth ( Mammuthus primigenius), and caribou ( Rangifer tarandus) - signature species of the Mammoth Steppe fauna ( Fig. 1), which was widespread from the British Isles, through northern Europe, and Siberia to Alaska, Yukon and adjacent Northwest Territories. The Yukon faunas extend from Herschel Island in the north to Revenue Creek in the south and from the Alaskan border in the west to Ketza River in the east. The Yukon holds evidence of the earliest-known people in North America. Artifacts made from bison, mammoth and caribou bones from Bluefish Caves, Old Crow Basin and Dawson City areas show that people had a substantial knowledge of making and using bone tools at least by 25 000 BP, and possibly as early as 40 000 BP. A suggested chronological sequence of Yukon Pleistocene vertebrates ( Table 1) facilitates comparison of selected faunas and indicates the known duration of various taxa.

  4. Dynamic epithelia of the developing vertebrate face

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Chong Pyo; Crump, J. Gage

    2015-01-01

    A segmental series of endoderm-derived pouch and ectoderm-derived cleft epithelia act as signaling centers in the developing face. Their precise morphogenesis is therefore essential for proper patterning of the vertebrate head. Intercellular adhesion and polarity are highly dynamic within developing facial epithelial cells, with signaling from the adjacent mesenchyme controlling both epithelial character and directional migration. Endodermal and ectodermal epithelia fuse to form the primary mouth and gill slits, which involves basement membrane dissolution, cell intercalations, and apoptosis, as well as undergo further morphogenesis to generate the middle ear cavity and glands of the neck. Recent studies of facial epithelia are revealing both core programs of epithelial morphogenesis and insights into the coordinated assembly of the vertebrate head. PMID:25748249

  5. A Classification System for the Spread of Polymethyl Methacrylate in Vertebral Bodies Treated with Vertebral Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Frankl, Joseph; Sakata, Michael P.; Choudhary, Gagandeep; Hur, Seung; Peterson, Andrew; Hennemeyer, Charles T.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we develop a classification system for describing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) spread in vertebral bodies after kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty for vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) and for assessing whether PMMA spread varies between operators, VCF etiology, or vertebral level. Intraoperative fluoroscopic images of 198 vertebral levels were reviewed in 137 patients (women, 84; men, 53; mean age, 75.8 ± 12.5; and those with a diagnosis of osteoporosis, 63%) treated with kyphoplasty between January 01, 2015 and May 31, 2015 at a single center to create a 5-class descriptive system. PMMA spread patterns in the same images were then classified by 2 board-certified radiologists, and a third board-certified radiologist resolved conflicts. A total of 2 primary PMMA spread patterns were identified, namely, acinar and globular, with subtypes of localized acinar, diffuse globular, and mixed, to describe an equal combination of patterns. Interrater reliability using the system was moderate (κ = 0.47). After resolving conflicts, the most common spread class was globular (n = 63), followed by mixed (n = 58), diffuse globular (n = 30), acinar (n = 27), and localized acinar (n = 20). The spread class after treatment by the 2 most frequent operators differed significantly (n1 = 63, n2 = 70; P < .0001). There was no difference in the spread class between VCF etiologies or vertebral levels. PMMA spread may, therefore, be a modifiable parameter that affects kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty efficacy and adverse events. PMID:27795998

  6. Biomechanical Evaluation of an Injectable and Biodegradable Copolymer P(PF-co-CL) in a Cadaveric Vertebral Body Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhong; Giambini, Hugo; Zeng, Heng; Camp, Jon J.; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Robb, Richard A.; An, Kai-Nan; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    A novel biodegradable copolymer, poly(propylene fumarate-co-caprolactone) [P(PF-co-CL)], has been developed in our laboratory as an injectable scaffold for bone defect repair. In the current study, we evaluated the ability of P(PF-co-CL) to reconstitute the load-bearing capacity of vertebral bodies with lytic lesions. Forty vertebral bodies from four fresh-frozen cadaveric thoracolumbar spines were used for this study. They were randomly divided into four groups: intact vertebral body (intact control), simulated defect without treatment (negative control), defect treated with P(PF-co-CL) (copolymer group), and defect treated with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA group). Simulated metastatic lytic defects were made by removing a central core of the trabecular bone in each vertebral body with an approximate volume of 25% through an access hole in the side of the vertebrae. Defects were then filled by injecting either P(PF-co-CL) or PMMA in situ crosslinkable formulations. After the spines were imaged with quantitative computerized tomography, single vertebral body segments were harvested for mechanical testing. Specimens were compressed until failure or to 25% reduction in body height and ultimate strength and elastic modulus of each specimen were then calculated from the force–displacement data. The average failure strength of the copolymer group was 1.83 times stronger than the untreated negative group and it closely matched the intact vertebral bodies (intact control). The PMMA-treated vertebrae, however, had a failure strength 1.64 times larger compared with the intact control. The elastic modulus followed the same trend. This modulus mismatch between PMMA-treated vertebrae and the host vertebrae could potentially induce a fracture cascade and degenerative changes in adjacent intervertebral discs. In contrast, P(PF-co-CL) restored the mechanical properties of the treated segments similar to the normal, intact, vertebrae. Therefore, P(PF-co-CL) may be a suitable

  7. Experiment K307: Vertebral body strength of rat spinal columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazarian, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of space flight on vertebral body bone strength excised were investigated. Comparative biomechanical investigations of vertebral body strength for flight, synchronous, and vivarium rats following spacecraft recovery (R+0), at R+6 and R+29 days post flight recovery are presented. Statistical analyses are presented for the mechanical properties of stiffness, ultimate load, displacement to ultimate load, and energy to ultimate load. At R+0 all of the above properties show that the vertebral body exhibits an increasing susceptibility to fracture. The reduction of bone strength is inhomogeneous and dependent on vertebral level. The R+6 recovery data was inconclusive since it varied above and below the R+0 data. At R+29 ultimate load values showed a statistically significant increase in bone strength approaching that of the vivarium or control group.

  8. Risk Factors for Vertebral Artery Injuries in Cervical Spine Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (i.e. involvement of carotid and vertebral arteries) are increasingly being recognized in setting of cervical spine trauma/fractures and are associated with high incidence of stroke/morbidity and mortality. The incidence of vertebral artery injuries (VAI) is more common than previously thought and regular screening is seldom performed. However there exists no screening criteria and conflicting reports exists between spine and trauma literature. Many clinicians do not routinely screen/evaluate patients presenting with cervical spine trauma for potential VAI. This article provides a brief summary of existing evidence regarding the incidence of VAI in the background of cervical trauma/fractures. The type and fracture pattern that is associated with a high risk of VAI warranting mandatory screening/further work-up is discussed. A brief overview of diagnostic modalities and their respective sensitivity/specificity along with available treatment options is also summarized. PMID:25317310

  9. Compression fractures of the back

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meirhaeghe J, et al. Efficacy and safety of balloon kyphoplasty compared with non-surgical care for vertebral compression fracture (FREE): a randomised controlled trial. Lancet . 2009;373(9668):1016-24. PMID: 19246088 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19246088 .

  10. Adult orbital trapdoor fracture.

    PubMed

    Kum, Clarissa; McCulley, Timothy J; Yoon, Michael K; Hwang, Thomas N

    2009-01-01

    Trapdoor fractures occur almost exclusively in the pediatric population. The authors describe an adult with an entrapped inferior rectus muscle sheath in a trapdoor fracture. A 37-year-old man presented with persistent diplopia 3 weeks after blunt right orbital trauma. The only abnormal findings on clinical examination were limited vertical ductions. No bony defect or displacement was evident on CT. However, several small pockets of air were visible adjacent to the inferior rectus muscle. On surgical exploration, a linear nondisplaced orbital floor fracture was confirmed, and the entrapped inferior rectus muscle was released. One month postoperatively, extraocular motility had improved with no diplopia in primary or reading positions. This case demonstrates that trapdoor fractures can occur in adults and should be considered when suggestive findings are encountered. Clinicians should be aware of this because timely diagnosis and treatment might achieve more favorable outcomes.

  11. Epidemiology of fracture risk with advancing age.

    PubMed

    Ensrud, Kristine E

    2013-10-01

    Bone loss and structural damage with advancing age lead to skeletal fragility as manifested by low bone mass and deficits in bone geometry, microarchitecture, and material properties. Skeletal fragility, in combination with a greater propensity to fall, results in an increased susceptibility to fractures with aging, known as fragility fractures. Fragility fractures exceed 2 million per year in number and account for nearly 20 billion dollars per year in health care costs in the United States. Advanced age, low bone mass, and previous fracture are strong risk factors for fractures at nearly all skeletal sites, but each type of fracture also has its own set of unique risk factors. Hip fractures are most strongly associated with adverse consequences, but these account for only a minority of fragility fractures. Vertebral fractures comprise the most common manifestation of fragility fracture, but the majority of these fractures are asymptomatic. Most research has focused on the epidemiology of fractures at the hip, vertebrae, and wrist and less is known about other fracture types, which account for 40% of total fragility fractures that are clinically recognized. Future research focused on identification of older adults at high risk of disabling fractures is warranted. PMID:23833201

  12. An interactive tutorial-based training technique for vertebral morphometry.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J C; von Ingersleben, G; Heyano, S L; Chesnut, C H

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a computer-based procedure for training technologists in vertebral morphometry. The utility of the resulting interactive, tutorial based training method was evaluated in this study. The training program was composed of four steps: (1) review of an online tutorial, (2) review of analyzed spine images, (3) practice in fiducial point placement and (4) testing. During testing, vertebral heights were measured from digital, lateral spine images containing osteoporotic fractures. Inter-observer measurement precision was compared between research technicians, and between technologists and radiologist. The technologists participating in this study had no prior experience in vertebral morphometry. Following completion of the online training program, good inter-observer measurement precision was seen between technologists, showing mean coefficients of variation of 2.33% for anterior, 2.87% for central and 2.65% for posterior vertebral heights. Comparisons between the technicians and radiologist ranged from 2.19% to 3.18%. Slightly better precision values were seen with height measurements compared with height ratios, and with unfractured compared with fractured vertebral bodies. The findings of this study indicate that self-directed, tutorial-based training for spine image analyses is effective, resulting in good inter-observer measurement precision. The interactive tutorial-based approach provides standardized training methods and assures consistency of instructional technique over time.

  13. Head segmentation in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Schilling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Classic theories of vertebrate head segmentation clearly exemplify the idealistic nature of comparative embryology prior to the 20th century. Comparative embryology aimed at recognizing the basic, primary structure that is shared by all vertebrates, either as an archetype or an ancestral developmental pattern. Modern evolutionary developmental (Evo-Devo) studies are also based on comparison, and therefore have a tendency to reduce complex embryonic anatomy into overly simplified patterns. Here again, a basic segmental plan for the head has been sought among chordates. We convened a symposium that brought together leading researchers dealing with this problem, in a number of different evolutionary and developmental contexts. Here we give an overview of the outcome and the status of the field in this modern era of Evo-Devo. We emphasize the fact that the head segmentation problem is not fully resolved, and we discuss new directions in the search for hints for a way out of this maze. PMID:20607135

  14. [Vertebral hydatidosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Varela, R; Santelices, J P; Cuzmar, D; Aldunate, J T; Plaza-Guzmán, N; Lizama-Calvo, P

    2015-01-01

    Hydatidosis caused by echinococcus granulosus may affect any organ in the body, with the lungs and the liver as the most commonly affected organs. Vertebral compromise resulting from echinococcus granulosus has a low prevalence and accounts for less than 1% of bone compromise. We report the case of a 50 year-old female who presented at the Trauma Service with progressive low back pain with 5 months of duration that irradiated to the right lower limb, and led to neurologic compromise of the limb. Imaging studies showed spondylodiscitis at T12-L1, confirmed by a biopsy. Treatment of this condition is both orthopedic and surgical. The recurrence rate is high, between 30 and 40%. The objective of describing this case is to propose the differential diagnosis of a vertebral mass of unknown origin and provide details as to how to manage this condition. PMID:27012085

  15. Viruses of lower vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Essbauer, S; Ahne, W

    2001-08-01

    Viruses of lower vertebrates recently became a field of interest to the public due to increasing epizootics and economic losses of poikilothermic animals. These were reported worldwide from both wildlife and collections of aquatic poikilothermic animals. Several RNA and DNA viruses infecting fish, amphibians and reptiles have been studied intensively during the last 20 years. Many of these viruses induce diseases resulting in important economic losses of lower vertebrates, especially in fish aquaculture. In addition, some of the DNA viruses seem to be emerging pathogens involved in the worldwide decline in wildlife. Irido-, herpes- and polyomavirus infections may be involved in the reduction in the numbers of endangered amphibian and reptile species. In this context the knowledge of several important RNA viruses such as orthomyxo-, paramyxo-, rhabdo-, retro-, corona-, calici-, toga-, picorna-, noda-, reo- and birnaviruses, and DNA viruses such as parvo-, irido-, herpes-, adeno-, polyoma- and poxviruses, is described in this review. PMID:11550762

  16. Vertebral venous channels: CT appearance and differential considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.; Guerra, J. Jr.

    1985-06-01

    A comprehensive study of the anatomy, radiologic images, and pathology of venous channels in the thoracic and lumbar vertebral bodies was performed using cadavers and patients. These structures may be mistaken for fractures, lytic lesions, or other abnormalities on high-resolution axial computed tomographic (CT) scans of the spine. A distinct osseous wall, absence of extension over multiple contiguous levels, lack of displacement, and predominant localization in the mid-axial plane of the vertebral body are characteristic features of venous channels. An understanding of the normal intraosseous venous anatomy should prevent misinterpretation of clinical CT studies in most instances.

  17. Can initial clinical assessment exclude thoracolumbar vertebral injury?

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Dinendra Singh; Mitra, Biswadev; Reeves, Fairleigh; Cameron, Peter A; Fitzgerald, Mark; Liew, Susan; Varma, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that all blunt trauma patients, presenting with a Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score of 15, without intoxication or neurological deficit, and no pain or tenderness on log-roll can have any thoracolumbar fracture excluded without imaging. Materials and Methods All patients diagnosed with a thoracolumbar fracture presenting to the emergency department of a major trauma centre and having an initial GCS score of 15 were included in the study. Variables collected included type of fracture, mechanism of injury, the presence of pain or tenderness on log-roll, ethanol levels and prehospital opioid analgesia. Results There were 536 patients with thoracolumbar fractures, of which 508 (94.8%) patients had either pain, tenderness or had received prehospital opioid analgesia. A small subgroup of 28 (5.2%) patients who received no prehospital opioid analgesia, did not complain of pain and had no tenderness to the thoracolumbar spine elicited on log-roll. This subgroup was significantly older (p=0.033) and a high proportion of patients (64.3%) had a concurrent fracture of the cervical spine. Within this subgroup, a clinically significant unstable thoracic fracture was present in three patients, with all three patients exhibiting symptoms and signs of neurological injury or having a concurrent cervical vertebral fracture. Conclusions In this population of blunt trauma patients with a GCS score of 15, not under the influence of alcohol or prehospital morphine administration, the absence of pain or tenderness on log-roll can exclude a clinically significant lumbar vertebral fracture, but does not exclude a thoracic fracture. PMID:22915226

  18. Building the Vertebrate Spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourquié, Olivier

    2008-03-01

    The vertebrate body can be subdivided along the antero-posterior (AP) axis into repeated structures called segments. This periodic pattern is established during embryogenesis by the somitogenesis process. Somites are generated in a rhythmic fashion from the paraxial mesoderm and subsequently differentiate to give rise to the vertebrae and skeletal muscles of the body. Somite formation involves an oscillator-the segmentation clock-whose periodic signal is converted into the periodic array of somite boundaries. This clock drives the dynamic expression of cyclic genes in the presomitic mesoderm and requires Notch and Wnt signaling. Microarray studies of the mouse presomitic mesoderm transcriptome reveal that the segmentation clock drives the periodic expression of a large network of cyclic genes involved in cell signaling. Mutually exclusive activation of the Notch/FGF and Wnt pathways during each cycle suggests that coordinated regulation of these three pathways underlies the clock oscillator. In humans, mutations in the genes associated to the function of this oscillator such as Dll3 or Lunatic Fringe result in abnormal segmentation of the vertebral column such as those seen in congenital scoliosis. Whereas the segmentation clock is thought to set the pace of vertebrate segmentation, the translation of this pulsation into the reiterated arrangement of segment boundaries along the AP axis involves dynamic gradients of FGF and Wnt signaling. The FGF signaling gradient is established based on an unusual mechanism involving mRNA decay which provides an efficient means to couple the spatio-temporal activation of segmentation to the posterior elongation of the embryo. Another striking aspect of somite production is the strict bilateral symmetry of the process. Retinoic acid was shown to control aspects of this coordination by buffering destabilizing effects from the embryonic left-right machinery. Defects in this embryonic program controlling vertebral symmetry might lead

  19. Delayed Neurologic Deficit due to Foraminal Stenosis following Osteoporotic Late Collapse of a Lumbar Spine Vertebral Body.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yu; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakajima, Arata; Shibata, Yoshifumi; Sonobe, Masato; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji; Nakagawa, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    We report an 85-year-old woman with an L3 vertebral body fracture who presented with back pain, bilateral leg pain, and weakness after four months of conservative treatment. Because of unstable pseudoarthrosis, the L3 vertebral body collapsed in the standing position and the L3 nerve root was compressed. The indicated surgery decompressed the L3-L4 foramen and fused the unstable segment. The back pain and neurologic symptoms improved significantly following surgery. We propose that delayed neurologic deficit following an osteoporotic fracture of the lumbar body may be caused not only by retropulsion of vertebral body fragments with significant canal compromise, but also by foraminal stenosis with the late collapse of the vertebral fracture. This new pathomechanism for delayed neurologic deficit has not been previously described. If a collapse takes place in the caudal part of the vertebral body below the base of the pedicle, spine surgeons should be aware of the possibility of foraminal stenosis.

  20. A central role for the notochord in vertebral patterning.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Angeleen; Keynes, Roger; Tannahill, David

    2004-02-01

    The vertebrates are defined by their segmented vertebral column, and vertebral periodicity is thought to originate from embryonic segments, the somites. According to the widely accepted 'resegmentation' model, a single vertebra forms from the recombination of the anterior and posterior halves of two adjacent sclerotomes on both sides of the embryo. Although there is supporting evidence for this model in amniotes, it remains uncertain whether it applies to all vertebrates. To explore this, we have investigated vertebral patterning in the zebrafish. Surprisingly, we find that vertebral bodies (centra) arise by secretion of bone matrix from the notochord rather than somites; centra do not form via a cartilage intermediate stage, nor do they contain osteoblasts. Moreover, isolated, cultured notochords secrete bone matrix in vitro, and ablation of notochord cells at segmentally reiterated positions in vivo prevents the formation of centra. Analysis of fss mutant embryos, in which sclerotome segmentation is disrupted, shows that whereas neural arch segmentation is also disrupted, centrum development proceeds normally. These findings suggest that the notochord plays a key, perhaps ancient, role in the segmental patterning of vertebrae.

  1. Which Fractures Are Most Attributable to Osteoporosis?

    PubMed Central

    Warriner, Amy H.; Patkar, Nivedita M.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Delzell, Elizabeth; Gary, Lisa; Kilgore, Meredith; Saag, Kenneth G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Determining anatomic sites and circumstances under which a fracture may be a consequence of osteoporosis is a topic of ongoing debate and controversy that is important to both clinicians and researchers. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review and generated an evidence report on fracture risk based on specific anatomic bone sites as well as fracture diagnosis codes. Using the RAND/UCLA appropriateness process, we convened a multi-disciplinary panel of 11 experts who rated fractures according to their likelihood of being due to osteoporosis based on the evidence report. Fracture sites (as determined by ICD-CM codes) were stratified by four clinical risk factor categories based on age, sex, race/ethnicity (African- American and Caucasian) and presence or absence of trauma. Results Consistent with current clinical experience, the fractures rated most likely due to osteoporosis were the femoral neck, pathologic fractures of the vertebrae, and lumbar and thoracic vertebral fractures. The fractures rated least likely due to osteoporosis were open proximal humerus fractures, skull, and facial bones. The expert panel rated open fractures of the arm (except proximal humerus) and fractures of the tibia/fibula, patella, ribs, and sacrum as being highly likely due to osteoporosis in older Caucasian women but a lower likelihood in younger African American men. Conclusion Osteoporosis attribution scores for all fracture sites were determined by a multidisciplinary expert panel to provide an evidence-based continuum of the likelihood of a fracture being associated with osteoporosis. PMID:21130353

  2. NFFLOW: A reservoir simulator incorporating explicit fractures (SPE 153890)

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, E.J.; Sams, W.N.

    2012-01-01

    NFFLOW is a research code that quickly and inexpensively simulates flow in moderately fractured reservoirs. It explicitly recognizes fractures separately from rock matrix. In NFFLOW fracture flow is proportional to the pressure gradient along the fracture, and flow in the rock matrix is determined by Darcy’s Law. The two flow mechanisms are coupled through the pressure gradient between a fracture and its adjacent rock matrix. Presented is a promising change to NFFLOW that allows for flow across a rock matrix block.

  3. Cementless Titanium Mesh Fixation of Osteoporotic Burst Fractures of the Lumbar Spine Leads to Bony Healing: Results of an Experimental Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Roepenack, Paula; Roesner, Jan; Herlyn, Philipp Karl Ewald; Martin, Heiner; Reichel, Martin; Rotter, Robert; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gradl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Current treatment strategies for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) focus on cement-associated solutions. Complications associated with cement application are leakage, embolism, adjacent fractures, and compromise in bony healing. This study comprises a validated VCF model in osteoporotic sheep in order to (1) evaluate a new cementless fracture fixation technique using titanium mesh implants (TMIs) and (2) demonstrate the healing capabilities in osteoporotic VCFs. Methods. Twelve 5-year-old Merino sheep received ovariectomy, corticosteroid injections, and a calcium/phosphorus/vitamin D-deficient diet for osteoporosis induction. Standardized VCFs (type AO A3.1) were created, reduced, and fixed using intravertebral TMIs. Randomly additional autologous spongiosa grafting (G1) or no augmentation was performed (G2, n = 6 each). Two months postoperatively, macroscopic, micro-CT and biomechanical evaluation assessed bony consolidation. Results. Fracture reduction succeeded in all cases without intraoperative complications. Bony consolidation was proven for all cases with increased amounts of callus development for G2 (58.3%). Micro-CT revealed cage integration. Neither group showed improved results with biomechanical testing. Conclusions. Fracture reduction/fixation using TMIs without cement in osteoporotic sheep lumbar VCF resulted in bony fracture healing. Intravertebral application of autologous spongiosa showed no beneficial effects. The technique is now available for clinical use; thus, it offers an opportunity to abandon cement-associated complications. PMID:27019848

  4. Refracture of osteoporotic vertebral body concurrent with cement fragmentation at the previously treated vertebral level after balloon kyphoplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Li, Xigong; Lou, Xianfeng; Lin, Xiangjin; Du, Junhua

    2014-05-01

    Kyphoplasty has been shown to provide symptomatic relief of vertebral compression fractures refractory to medical therapy. However, few reports have focused on refracture of cemented vertebrae after kyphoplasty. The presence of cemented vertebrae refracture concurrent with cement fragmentation is an extremely rare condition. We reported an 86-year-old man with a T12 osteoporotic compression fracture undergoing the kyphoplasty treatment. The patient postoperatively continued to have back pain at the same level. The solid lumped polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) mass and inadequate use and insufficient filling of PMMA cement were observed in postoperative radiographs and magnetic resonance image (MRI) examination. He refused to receive the surgical intervention, but had not strict compliance with oral anti-osteoporotic medications. Ten months postoperatively, refracture of osteoporotic vertebral body concurrent with cement fragmentation occurred at the previously kyphoplasty-treated vertebral level. Bone mineral analysis showed severe osteoporosis with a T-score of -4.0. The patient finally obtained therapeutic benefit of pain relief and bony union of T12 vertebral body by consistently adhering to anti-osteoporotic medication treatment. This case illustrated that patients who underwent kyphoplasty to treat osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with intravertebral fracture should be strictly followed up and supervised in their anti-osteoporotic medication treatment. The interdigitation injection pattern of PMMA and sufficient PMMA filling with trabeculae in the kyphoplasty procedure also might prevent refracture of the cemented vertebrae concurrent with PMMA fragmentation.

  5. Evaluation and management of toe fractures.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Robert L; Hacking, Scott

    2003-12-15

    Fractures of the toe are one of the most common lower extremity fractures diagnosed by family physicians. Toe fractures most frequently are caused by a crushing injury or axial force such as stubbing a toe. Joint hyperextension and stress fractures are less common. Most patients have point tenderness at the fracture site or pain with gentle axial loading of the digit. Anteroposterior and oblique radiographs generally are most useful for identifying fractures, determining displacement, and evaluating adjacent phalanges and digits. Referral is indicated in patients with circulatory compromise, open fractures, significant soft tissue injury, fracture-dislocations, displaced intra-articular fractures, or fractures of the first toe that are unstable or involve more than 25 percent of the joint surface. Most children with fractures of the physis should be referred, but children with selected nondisplaced Salter-Harris types I and II fractures may be treated by family physicians. Stable, nondisplaced toe fractures should be treated with buddy taping and a rigid-sole shoe to limit joint movement. Displaced fractures of the lesser toes should be treated with reduction and buddy taping. Patients with displaced fractures of the first toe often require referral for stabilization of the reduction.

  6. Biomechanics of vertebral level, geometry, and transcortical tumors in the metastatic spine.

    PubMed

    Tschirhart, Craig E; Finkelstein, Joel A; Whyne, Cari M

    2007-01-01

    Metastatic involvement can disrupt the mechanical integrity of the spine, rendering vertebrae susceptible to burst fracture and neurologic damage. Fracture risk assessment for patients with spinal metastases is important in considering prophylactic treatment options. Stability of thoracic vertebrae affected by metastatic disease has been shown to be dependent on tumor size and bone density, but additional structural and geometric factors may also play a role in fracture risk assessment. The objective of this study was to use parametric finite element modeling to determine the effects of vertebral level, geometry, and metastatic compromise to the cortical shell on the risk of burst fracture in the thoracic spine. Analysis of vertebral level and geometry was assessed by investigation of seven scenarios ranging in geometry from T2-T4 to T10-T12. The effects of cortical shell compromised were assessed by comparison of four transcortical scenarios to a fully contained central vertebral body tumor scenario. Results demonstrated that upper thoracic vertebrae are at greater risk of burst fracture and that kyphotic motion segments are at decreased risk of burst fracture. Vertebrae with transcortical lesions are up to 30% less likely to lead to burst fracture initiation. The findings of this study are important for improving the understanding of burst fracture mechanics in metastatically involved vertebrae and guiding future modeling efforts.

  7. Vertebral function during tadpole locomotion.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Emanuel; Landberg, Tobias; Wassersug, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    Most anuran larvae show large lateral oscillations at both the tip of the tail and the snout while swimming in a straight line. Although the lateral deflections at the snout have long been considered an inefficient aspect of tadpole locomotion, a recent hydrodynamic model suggests that they may in fact help generate thrust. It is not clear though exactly where this bending takes place. The vertebral column is extremely short and seemingly inflexible in anurans, and any axial flexion that might occur there is hidden within the globose body of the tadpole. Here we test the hypothesis that lateral deflections of the snout correlate with bending of the vertebral column within the torso of tadpoles. To quantify vertebral curvature, three sonomicrometry crystals were surgically implanted along the dorsal midline in locations corresponding to the anterior, middle, and posterior region of the presacral vertebral column. Swimming trials were conducted in a flume where synchronized video recordings were collected in dorsal view. Our results confirm that cyclic lateral bending occurs along the vertebral column during swimming and indicate that vertebral curvature is temporally in phase with lateral oscillation of the snout. Lateral oscillation of the snout increased significantly with increasing vertebral curvature. Similarly, tail beat amplitude also increases significantly with increasing vertebral curvature. Our results suggest that cyclic lateral flexion of the vertebral column, activated by the axial muscle within the torso of tadpoles contributes to snout oscillations and the generation of thrust during undulatory swimming in anuran larvae.

  8. Chemical ecology of vertebrate carrion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vertebrate carrion is a nutrient-rich, ephemeral resource that is utilized by many different organisms ranging from vertebrate and invertebrate scavengers to microbes. The organisms that consume carrion play an important ecological role, as decomposition is vital to ecosystem function. Without the...

  9. Flexible device for vertebral body replacement.

    PubMed

    Main, J A; Wells, M E; Spengler, D M; Strauss, A M; Keller, T S

    1989-03-01

    A novel vertebral prosthesis is presented. The prosthesis was developed for surgical procedures requiring the resection of a complete vertebral body and the adjacent intervertebral discs, the design objective being to develop a flexible implant that would be robust enough to withstand the in vivo stress environment of the human spine. In theory, a flexible implant should preserve a more normal range of motion and apply less stress to surrounding tissue than a rigid implant. A prototype implant was constructed so as to combine a rigid stainless steel structure with flexible silicon rubber elements in order to form an implant with static and dynamic mechanical characteristics similar to those of the anterior spinal column. Implant flexibility characteristics were determined from ex vivo stress-strain behaviour during bending and compressive creep testing. Results from the bending tests indicated good agreement for the lateral and sagittal bending characteristics in comparison with in vitro bending tests of human lumbar motion segments. Comparison of the implant compressive creep response with similar in vitro tests on human lumbar intervertebral discs also demonstrated similarities in the time-dependent mechanical parameters. PMID:2704210

  10. Vertebral artery anomalies at the craniovertebral junction: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, Amir M; Brodke, Darrel S; Lawrence, Brandon D

    2014-10-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The objective of this study was to report a case of an unstable C1 burst fracture in the setting of a vertebral artery anomaly at the craniovertebral junction. Methods A 55-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with severe neck pain after falling approximately 15 feet and landing on his head. Computed tomography scan of the cervical spine revealed an unstable fracture of the C1 ring with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of a transverse ligament rupture as well as a congenital synchondrosis of the posterior arch of C1. He was neurologically intact. CT angiography (CTA) of the neck revealed an anomalous course of the right vertebral artery at the C1-C2 level. Results Surgical intervention consisted of occiput-C3 fusion, thus avoiding the placement of C1 lateral mass screws and risking vertebral artery injury. Conclusion We present a case of an unstable C1 burst fracture with an anomalous course of the right vertebral artery demonstrated by CTA. The presence of vertebral artery anomalies at the craniovertebral junction may prevent safe placement of C1 lateral mass screws and therefore influence the treatment options for upper cervical spine pathologies. To minimize the risk of vertebral artery injury, we elected to perform an occiput to C3 fusion. Thorough assessment of the vascular anatomy is recommended before operative intervention in the upper cervical spine to minimize the risk of complications. PMID:25364325

  11. Comparative anatomy: all vertebrates do have vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Janvier, Philippe

    2011-09-13

    In contrast to lampreys and jawed vertebrates, hagfishes were thought to lack vertebrae. Now, long overlooked vertebral rudiments have been analysed in hagfish, suggesting that vertebrae existed in the last common ancestor of all vertebrates.

  12. Rupture and Migration of an Endovascular Stent in the Brachiocephalic Trunk Causing a Vertebral Steal Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Periard, D. Haesler, E.; Hayoz, D.; Von Segesser, L. K.; Qanadli, S. D.

    2008-07-15

    Delayed stent fracture has been observed in many different arteries and may represent a risk factor for restenosis. We describe the case of a delayed rupture of an endovascular brachiocephalic trunk stent. The complete fracture allowed a fragment to migrate distally and tilt, resulting in a hemodynamic pattern similar to that of a prevertebral stenosis with complete inversion of the homolateral vertebral blood flow. The induced vertebral steal syndrome as well as the risk of cerebral embolism was corrected by an aortobrachiocephalic bypass and resection of the ruptured stent.

  13. Vertebral pathology in an ornithopod dinosaur: a hemivertebra in Dysalotosaurus lettowvorbecki from the Jurassic of Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Witzmann, Florian; Asbach, Patrick; Remes, Kristian; Hampe, Oliver; Hilger, André; Paulke, Andreas

    2008-09-01

    A vertebral fragment of the Late Jurassic ornithopod dinosaur Dysalotosaurus lettowvorbecki from Tanzania is described. It consists of a hemivertebra that is co-ossified with a complete vertebral centrum. The hemivertebra causes a hyperkyphotic posture of the vertebral column with an angle of approximately 35 degrees between the end plates of the vertebra, that is, a dorsal bending of the vertebral column. Associated with this is a 15 degrees lateral bending, which suggests a scoliosis. Micro-CT scans reveal thickening of the cortical bone in the hemivertebra and the complete vertebral centrum as compared to a "normal" vertebra. This can be interpreted as a reaction of the bone to the abnormal direction of forces arising from the defective configuration of the vertebral column. No signs of vertebral fracture are present. The arrangement of the Foramina venosa and the trapezoidal outline of the complete centrum that is co-ossified with the hemivertebra indicate that the hemivertebra in Dysalotosaurus developed early in embryogenesis probably by "hemimetameric segmental shift", that is, a defect of the fusion of the paired vertebral anlagen. This finding illustrates that hemivertebrae represent a fundamental defect of the vertebrate ontogenetic program.

  14. Spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Leone, Antonio; Marino, Marzia; Dell'Atti, Claudia; Zecchi, Viola; Magarelli, Nicola; Colosimo, Cesare

    2016-10-01

    The ankylosed spine is prone to fracture even after minor trauma due to its changed biomechanical properties. The two central features of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) that promote the pathological remodeling of the spine are inflammation and new bone formation. AS is also associated with osteoporosis that is attributed to an uncoupling of the bone formation and bone resorption processes. Therefore, bone resorption occurs and promotes weakening of the spine as well as increased risk of vertebral fractures which can be hugely different in terms of clinical relevance. Even in the presence of symptomatic clinical vertebral fractures, the diagnosis can be overruled by attributing the pain to disease activity. Furthermore, given the highly abnormal structure of the spine, vertebral fracture diagnosis can be difficult on the basis of radiography alone. CT can show the fractures in detail. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered the method of choice for the imaging of spinal cord injuries, and a reasonable option for exclusion of occult fractures undetected by CT. Since it is equally important for radiologists and clinicians to have a common knowledge base rather than a compartmentalized view, the aim of this review article was to provide the required clinical knowledge that radiologists need to know and the relevant radiological semiotics that clinicians require in diagnosing clinically significant injury to the ankylosed spine.

  15. Spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Leone, Antonio; Marino, Marzia; Dell'Atti, Claudia; Zecchi, Viola; Magarelli, Nicola; Colosimo, Cesare

    2016-10-01

    The ankylosed spine is prone to fracture even after minor trauma due to its changed biomechanical properties. The two central features of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) that promote the pathological remodeling of the spine are inflammation and new bone formation. AS is also associated with osteoporosis that is attributed to an uncoupling of the bone formation and bone resorption processes. Therefore, bone resorption occurs and promotes weakening of the spine as well as increased risk of vertebral fractures which can be hugely different in terms of clinical relevance. Even in the presence of symptomatic clinical vertebral fractures, the diagnosis can be overruled by attributing the pain to disease activity. Furthermore, given the highly abnormal structure of the spine, vertebral fracture diagnosis can be difficult on the basis of radiography alone. CT can show the fractures in detail. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered the method of choice for the imaging of spinal cord injuries, and a reasonable option for exclusion of occult fractures undetected by CT. Since it is equally important for radiologists and clinicians to have a common knowledge base rather than a compartmentalized view, the aim of this review article was to provide the required clinical knowledge that radiologists need to know and the relevant radiological semiotics that clinicians require in diagnosing clinically significant injury to the ankylosed spine. PMID:27379763

  16. Compression fracture in the middle of a chronic instrumented fusion that developed into pseudarthrosis after balloon kyphoplasty.

    PubMed

    Pirris, Stephen M; Kimes, Sherri M

    2014-06-01

    There are only 2 documented cases of vertebral compression fractures occurring within a solid lumbar fusion mass: one within the fusion mass after hardware removal and the other within the levels of the existing instrumentation 1 year postoperatively. The authors report a case of fracture occurring in a chronic (> 30 years) solid instrumented fusion mass in a patient who underwent kyphoplasty. The pain did not improve after the kyphoplasty procedure, and the patient developed a posterior cleft in the fusion mass postoperatively. The patient, a 46-year-old woman, had undergone a T4-L4 instrumented fusion with placement of a Harrington rod when she was 12 years old. Adjacent-segment breakdown developed, and her fusion was extended to the pelvis, with pedicle screws placed up to L-3 to capture the existing fusion mass. Almost 2 years after fusion extension, she fell down the stairs and suffered an L-2 compression fracture, which is when kyphoplasty was performed without pain relief, and she then developed a cleft in the posterior fusion mass that was previously intact. She refused further surgical options. This case report is meant to alert surgeons of this possibility and allow them to consider the rare occurrence of fracture within the fusion mass when planning extension of chronic spinal fusions.

  17. Elbow Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... and held together with pins and wires or plates and screws. Fractures of the distal humerus (see ... doctor. These fractures usually require surgical repair with plates and/or screw, unless they are stable. SIGNS ...

  18. Facial fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M. M.; Freiberg, A.; Martin, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Emergency room physicians frequently see facial fractures that can have serious consequences for patients if mismanaged. This article reviews the signs, symptoms, imaging techniques, and general modes of treatment of common facial fractures. It focuses on fractures of the mandible, zygomaticomaxillary region, orbital floor, and nose. Images p520-a p522-a PMID:8199509

  19. Indication for Partial Vertebral Osteotomy and Realignment in Posterior Spinal Fixation for Osteoporotic Thoracolumbar Vertebral Collapse with Neurological Deficits

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; HANAKITA, Junya; KAWAOKA, Taigo; OHTAKE, Yasufumi; ADACHI, Hiromasa; SHIMIZU, Kampei

    2016-01-01

    Instrumented spinal fixation is ordinarily required in patients who present with myelopathy or cauda equina syndrome secondary to vertebral collapse following osteoporotic thoracolumbar fracture. Posterior spinal fixation is a major surgical option, and partial vertebral osteotomy (PVO) through a posterior approach is occasionally reasonable for achievement of complete neural decompression and improvement of excessive local kyphosis. However, the indications and need for PVO remain unclear. The objectives of this retrospective study were to determine the efficacy and safety of posterior spinal fixation with or without PVO for osteoporotic thoracolumbar vertebral collapse and identify patients who require neural decompression and alignment correction by PVO. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 20 patients (13 females, 7 males; mean age, 67.1 years) who underwent instrumented posterior fixation for osteoporotic thoracolumbar vertebral fracture. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the Japanese Orthopedic Association score and visual analog scale scores in the lumbar and leg areas. PVO was added with posterior spinal fixation in eight patients because neural decompression was incomplete after laminectomy as indicated by intraoperative echo imaging. Neurological and functional recovery significantly improved during follow-up. Clinical outcomes in patients who underwent PVO were similar to those in patients who did not undergo PVO. However, correction of the local kyphotic angle and improvement of spinal canal compromise after surgery was significant in patients who underwent PVO. The patients who required PVO had a less local kyphotic angle in the supine position and higher occupation rate of the fractured fragment in the spinal canal in the preoperative examination. PMID:27021642

  20. Trabecular mineral content of the spine in women with hip fracture: CT measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Golimbu, C.; Schwartz, M.S.; Ort, P.

    1986-06-01

    The trabecular bone mineral content (BMC) of the spine was measured by computed tomography in 185 women aged 47-84 years with vertebral fracture (n = 74), hip fracture (n = 83), and both vertebral and hip fracture (n = 28). Eighty-seven percent of vertebral-fracture patients, 38% of hip-fracture patients, and 82% of vertebral- and hip-fracture patients had spinal BMC values below the fifth percentile for healthy premenopausal women and values 64%, 9%, and 68% below the fifth percentile for age-matched control subjects. No significant loss of spinal trabecular bone was seen in patients with hip fracture. If it is assumed that the rate of trabecular bone loss is the same in the spine and femoral neck, then hip fracture (unlike osteoporotic vertebral fracture) is not associated with disproportionate loss of trabecular bone. Hip fracture occurs secondary to weakening of bone and increased incidence of falls. Bone weakening may be due to disproportionate loss of trabecular or cortical bone, proportionate loss of both, or other as yet undetermined qualitative changes in bone.

  1. Effects of Leisure-Time Physical Activity on Vertebral Dimensions in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966

    PubMed Central

    Oura, Petteri; Paananen, Markus; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Tammelin, Tuija; Herrala, Sauli; Auvinen, Juha; Korpelainen, Raija; Junno, Juho-Antti; Karppinen, Jaro

    2016-01-01

    Vertebral fractures are a common burden amongst elderly and late middle aged people. Vertebral cross-sectional area (CSA) is a major determinant of vertebral strength and thus associated with vertebral fracture risk. Previous studies suggest that physical activity affects vertebral CSA. We aimed to investigate the relationship between leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) from adolescence to middle age and vertebral dimensions in adulthood. We utilized the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966, of which 1188 subjects had records of LTPA at 14, 31 and 46 years, and had undergone lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the mean age of 47 years. Using MRI data, we measured eight dimensions of the L4 vertebra. Socioeconomic status, smoking habits, height and weight were also recorded at 14, 31 and 46 years. We obtained lifetime LTPA (14–46 years of age) trajectories using latent class analysis, which resulted in three categories (active, moderately active, inactive) in both genders. Linear regression analysis was used to analyze the association between LTPA and vertebral CSA with adjustments for vertebral height, BMI, socioeconomic status and smoking. High lifetime LTPA was associated with larger vertebral CSA in women but not men. Further research is needed to investigate the factors behind the observed gender-related differences. PMID:27282350

  2. Effects of Leisure-Time Physical Activity on Vertebral Dimensions in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

    PubMed

    Oura, Petteri; Paananen, Markus; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Tammelin, Tuija; Herrala, Sauli; Auvinen, Juha; Korpelainen, Raija; Junno, Juho-Antti; Karppinen, Jaro

    2016-01-01

    Vertebral fractures are a common burden amongst elderly and late middle aged people. Vertebral cross-sectional area (CSA) is a major determinant of vertebral strength and thus associated with vertebral fracture risk. Previous studies suggest that physical activity affects vertebral CSA. We aimed to investigate the relationship between leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) from adolescence to middle age and vertebral dimensions in adulthood. We utilized the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966, of which 1188 subjects had records of LTPA at 14, 31 and 46 years, and had undergone lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the mean age of 47 years. Using MRI data, we measured eight dimensions of the L4 vertebra. Socioeconomic status, smoking habits, height and weight were also recorded at 14, 31 and 46 years. We obtained lifetime LTPA (14-46 years of age) trajectories using latent class analysis, which resulted in three categories (active, moderately active, inactive) in both genders. Linear regression analysis was used to analyze the association between LTPA and vertebral CSA with adjustments for vertebral height, BMI, socioeconomic status and smoking. High lifetime LTPA was associated with larger vertebral CSA in women but not men. Further research is needed to investigate the factors behind the observed gender-related differences. PMID:27282350

  3. Metatarsal fractures.

    PubMed

    Rammelt, Stefan; Heineck, Jan; Zwipp, Hans

    2004-09-01

    Metatarsal fractures are relatively common and if malunited, a frequent source of pain and disability. Nondisplaced fractures and fractures of the second to fourth metatarsal with displacement in the horizontal plane can be treated conservatively with protected weight bearing in a cast shoe for 4-6 weeks. In most displaced fractures, closed reduction can be achieved but maintenance of the reduction needs internal fixation. Percutaneous pinning is suitable for most fractures of the lesser metatarsals. Fractures with joint involvement and multiple fragments frequently require open reduction and plate fixation. Transverse fractures at the metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction of the fifth metatarsal ("Jones fractures") require an individualized approach tailored to the level of activity and time to union. Avulsion fractures of the fifth metatarsal bone are treated by open reduction and tension-band wiring or screw fixation if displaced more than 2 mm or with more that 30% of the joint involved. The metatarsals are the most common site of stress fractures, most of which are treated nonoperatively. Symptomatic posttraumatic deformities need adequate correction, in most cases by osteotomy across the former fracture site.

  4. Lymphatic regulation in nonmammalian vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Michael S; Hillman, Stanley S; Drewes, Robert C; Withers, Philip C

    2013-08-01

    All vertebrate animals share in common the production of lymph through net capillary filtration from their closed circulatory system into their tissues. The balance of forces responsible for net capillary filtration and lymph formation is described by the Starling equation, but additional factors such as vascular and interstitial compliance, which vary markedly among vertebrates, also have a significant impact on rates of lymph formation. Why vertebrates show extreme variability in rates of lymph formation and how nonmammalian vertebrates maintain plasma volume homeostasis is unclear. This gap hampers our understanding of the evolution of the lymphatic system and its interaction with the cardiovascular system. The evolutionary origin of the vertebrate lymphatic system is not clear, but recent advances suggest common developmental factors for lymphangiogenesis in teleost fishes, amphibians, and mammals with some significant changes in the water-land transition. The lymphatic system of anuran amphibians is characterized by large lymphatic sacs and two pairs of lymph hearts that return lymph into the venous circulation but no lymph vessels per se. The lymphatic systems of reptiles and some birds have lymph hearts, and both groups have extensive lymph vessels, but their functional role in both lymph movement and plasma volume homeostasis is almost completely unknown. The purpose of this review is to present an evolutionary perspective in how different vertebrates have solved the common problem of the inevitable formation of lymph from their closed circulatory systems and to point out the many gaps in our knowledge of this evolutionary progression.

  5. Lymphatic regulation in nonmammalian vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Michael S; Hillman, Stanley S; Drewes, Robert C; Withers, Philip C

    2013-08-01

    All vertebrate animals share in common the production of lymph through net capillary filtration from their closed circulatory system into their tissues. The balance of forces responsible for net capillary filtration and lymph formation is described by the Starling equation, but additional factors such as vascular and interstitial compliance, which vary markedly among vertebrates, also have a significant impact on rates of lymph formation. Why vertebrates show extreme variability in rates of lymph formation and how nonmammalian vertebrates maintain plasma volume homeostasis is unclear. This gap hampers our understanding of the evolution of the lymphatic system and its interaction with the cardiovascular system. The evolutionary origin of the vertebrate lymphatic system is not clear, but recent advances suggest common developmental factors for lymphangiogenesis in teleost fishes, amphibians, and mammals with some significant changes in the water-land transition. The lymphatic system of anuran amphibians is characterized by large lymphatic sacs and two pairs of lymph hearts that return lymph into the venous circulation but no lymph vessels per se. The lymphatic systems of reptiles and some birds have lymph hearts, and both groups have extensive lymph vessels, but their functional role in both lymph movement and plasma volume homeostasis is almost completely unknown. The purpose of this review is to present an evolutionary perspective in how different vertebrates have solved the common problem of the inevitable formation of lymph from their closed circulatory systems and to point out the many gaps in our knowledge of this evolutionary progression. PMID:23640588

  6. Evolution of vertebrate opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dreborg, Susanne; Sundström, Görel; Larsson, Tomas A.; Larhammar, Dan

    2008-01-01

    The opioid peptides and receptors have prominent roles in pain transmission and reward mechanisms in mammals. The evolution of the opioid receptors has so far been little studied, with only a few reports on species other than tetrapods. We have investigated species representing a broader range of vertebrates and found that the four opioid receptor types (delta, kappa, mu, and NOP) are present in most of the species. The gene relationships were deduced by using both phylogenetic analyses and chromosomal location relative to 20 neighboring gene families in databases of assembled genomes. The combined results show that the vertebrate opioid receptor gene family arose by quadruplication of a large chromosomal block containing at least 14 other gene families. The quadruplication seems to coincide with, and, therefore, probably resulted from, the two proposed genome duplications in early vertebrate evolution. We conclude that the quartet of opioid receptors was already present at the origin of jawed vertebrates ≈450 million years ago. A few additional opioid receptor gene duplications have occurred in bony fishes. Interestingly, the ancestral receptor gene duplications coincide with the origin of the four opioid peptide precursor genes. Thus, the complete vertebrate opioid system was already established in the first jawed vertebrates. PMID:18832151

  7. Prevalence of exclusively and concomitant pelvic fractures at magnetic resonance imaging of suspect and occult hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Collin, David; Geijer, Mats; Göthlin, Jan H

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic fractures may occur together with hip fractures as a result of low energy trauma. It is unclear whether they do require special attention. There are conflicting results in the literature about the prevalence of both concomitant hip and pelvic fractures as well as exclusive pelvic fractures. It has been reported that hip fractures and obturator ring fractures are mutually exclusive. To retrospectively analyze the prevalence of exclusively pelvic as well as concomitant hip and pelvic fractures in patients examined with MRI after low-energy trauma in elderly. During 9 years, 316 elderly patients had been examined with MRI for suspected or occult hip fracture after a fall. A fracture was diagnosed when MRI showed focal signal abnormalities in the subcortical bone marrow, with or without disruption of adjacent cortices. One observer reviewed all studies. A second observer verified all studies with hip fractures. Follow-up was available for all but two patients that died prior to hip surgery. The prevalence of concomitant pelvic and femoral neck or trochanteric fractures was statistically compared using chi-squared test for categorical variables. Hip fractures were found in 161 (51 %) patients of which 29 (9 %) had concomitant pelvic fractures. There were exclusively pelvic fractures in 82 (26 %) patients of which 65 (79 %) were on the traumatized side only. In 73 patients, there were no fractures. Occult or suspected hip fractures are not infrequently associated with pelvic fractures. Exclusively pelvic fractures are not uncommon.

  8. Acute intervertebral gas following vertebral fracture: CT demonstration.

    PubMed

    Tash, R R; Weitzner, I

    1986-01-01

    The occurrence of intervertebral gas secondary to the vacuum phenomenon has been previously described and is thought to be pathognomonic of degenerative disk disease. The case reported here illustrates that the intervertebral vacuum phenomenon may occur following trauma, suggesting that it is not exclusive to degenerative disk disease.

  9. Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Acinetobacter Spp. Paravertebral Soft Tissue Infection in a 4-Year-Old Boy With X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Bhattad, Sagar; Shandilya, Jitendra-Kumar; Vyas, Sameer; Garg, Rashi; Rawat, Amit

    2016-09-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis is known to occur in chronic granulomatous disease, a phagocytic disorder and the etiology is usually a fungus. Indolent spread of fungal infection from lungs to adjacent ribs and vertebra often results in persistent pneumonia and vertebral deformities. We report a 4-year-old boy with chronic cough and kyphosis, who had a fungal vertebral osteomyelitis and Acinetobacter spp. paravertebral soft tissue infection related to X-linked chronic granulomatous disease.

  10. Evolution of neural crest and placodes: amphioxus as a model for the ancestral vertebrate?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. Z.; Holland, N. D.

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies of protochordates (ascidian tunicates and amphioxus) have given insights into possible ancestors of 2 of the characteristic features of the vertebrate head: neural crest and placodes. The neural crest probably evolved from cells on either side of the neural plate-epidermis boundary in a protochordate ancestral to the vertebrates. In amphioxus, homologues of several vertebrate neural crest marker genes (BMP2/4, Pax3/7, Msx, Dll and Snail) are expressed at the edges of the neural plate and/or adjacent nonneural ectoderm. Some of these markers are also similarly expressed in tunicates. In protochordates, however, these cells, unlike vertebrate neural crest, neither migrate as individuals through embryonic tissues nor differentiate into a wide spectrum of cell types. Therefore, while the protochordate ancestor of the vertebrates probably had the beginnings of a genetic programme for neural crest formation, this programme was augmented in the earliest vertebrates to attain definitive neural crest. Clear homologues of vertebrate placodes are lacking in protochordates. However, both amphioxus and tunicates have ectodermal sensory cells. In tunicates these are all primary neurons, sending axons to the central nervous system, while in amphioxus, the ectodermal sensory cells include both primary neurons and secondary neurons lacking axons. Comparisons of developmental gene expression suggest that the anterior ectoderm in amphioxus may be homologous to the vertebrate olfactory placode, the only vertebrate placode with primary, not secondary, neurons. Similarly, biochemical, morphological and gene expression data suggest that amphioxus and tunicates also have homologues of the adenohypophysis, one of the few vertebrate structures derived from nonneurogenic placodes. In contrast, the origin of the other vertebrate placodes is very uncertain.

  11. One-stage partial vertebrectomy, titanium mesh implantation and pedicle screw fixation in the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures through a posterior approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueju; Li, Guangbin; Dong, Tianhua; Zhang, Yingze; Li, Heng

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical results of a partial vertebrectomy with titanium mesh implantation and pedicle screw fixation using a posterior approach to reconstruct the spine in the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures. METHOD: From January 2006 to August 2008, 20 patients with severe thoracolumbar fractures were treated.For vertebral bodies associated with one injured intervertebral disk, subtotal vertebrectomy surgery and single-segment fusion were performed. For vertebral bodies with two injured adjacent intervertebral disks, partial vertebrectomy surgery and two-segment fusion were performed. RESULTS: All 20 patients were followed up for 12 to 24 months (average of 18 months). There were no complications such as wound infections, hemopneumothorax or abdominal infections in any of the patients. The neurological status of all of the patients was improved by at least one American Spinal Injury Association grade by the last follow-up. The anterior vertebral body height was an average of 50.77% before surgery, 88.51% after surgery and 87.86% at the last follow up; the sagittal Cobb angle was improved, on average, from 26.15° to 5.39° and was 5.90° at the last follow up. The percentage of spinal stenosis was improved, on average, from 26.07% to 4.93%° and was 6.15% at the last follow up. There were significant differences in the anterior vertebral body height pre- and post-surgery and in the sagittal Cobb angle and the percentage of spinal stenosis (p<0) in all patients. CONCLUSIONS: This surgical procedure is simple and can accomplish decompression, reduction, fixation and fusion of the spine in one stage. This approach could be widely used in orthopedics. PMID:25627991

  12. Vertebral shape: automatic measurement with dynamically sequenced active appearance models.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M G; Cootes, T F; Adams, J E

    2005-01-01

    The shape and appearance of vertebrae on lateral dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans were statistically modelled. The spine was modelled by a sequence of overlapping triplets of vertebrae, using Active Appearance Models (AAMs). To automate vertebral morphometry, the sequence of trained models was matched to previously unseen scans. The dataset includes a significant number of pathologies. A new dynamic ordering algorithm was assessed for the model fitting sequence, using the best quality of fit achieved by multiple sub-model candidates. The accuracy of the search was improved by dynamically imposing the best quality candidate first. The results confirm the feasibility of substantially automating vertebral morphometry measurements even with fractures or noisy images.

  13. Thoracolumbar Spine Fractures in Frontal Impact Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Pintar, Frank A.; Yoganandan, Narayan; Maiman, Dennis J.; Scarboro, Mark; Rudd, Rodney W.

    2012-01-01

    There is currently no injury assessment for thoracic or lumbar spine fractures in the motor vehicle crash standards throughout the world. Compression-related thoracolumbar fractures are occurring in frontal impacts and yet the mechanism of injury is poorly understood. The objective of this investigation was to characterize these injuries using real world crash data from the US-DOT-NHTSA NASS-CDS and CIREN databases. Thoracic and lumbar AIS vertebral body fracture codes were searched for in the two databases. The NASS database was used to characterize population trends as a function of crash year and vehicle model year. The CIREN database was used to examine a case series in more detail. From the NASS database there were 2000–4000 occupants in frontal impacts with thoracic and lumbar vertebral body fractures per crash year. There was an increasing trend in incidence rate of thoracolumbar fractures in frontal impact crashes as a function of vehicle model year from 1986 to 2008; this was not the case for other crash types. From the CIREN database, the thoracolumbar spine was most commonly fractured at either the T12 or L1 level. Major, burst type fractures occurred predominantly at T12, L1 or L5; wedge fractures were most common at L1. Most CIREN occupants were belted; there were slightly more females involved; they were almost all in bucket seats; impact location occurred approximately half the time on the road and half off the road. The type of object struck also seemed to have some influence on fractured spine level, suggesting that the crash deceleration pulse may be influential in the type of compression vector that migrates up the spinal column. Future biomechanical studies are required to define mechanistically how these fractures are influenced by these many factors. PMID:23169137

  14. Evolution of the head-trunk interface in tetrapod vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sefton, Elizabeth M; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Mohaddes, Zahra; Hanken, James

    2016-04-19

    Vertebrate neck musculature spans the transition zone between head and trunk. The extent to which the cucullaris muscle is a cranial muscle allied with the gill levators of anamniotes or is instead a trunk muscle is an ongoing debate. Novel computed tomography datasets reveal broad conservation of the cucullaris in gnathostomes, including coelacanth and caecilian, two sarcopterygians previously thought to lack it. In chicken, lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) adjacent to occipital somites is a recently identified embryonic source of cervical musculature. We fate-map this mesoderm in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), which retains external gills, and demonstrate its contribution to posterior gill-levator muscles and the cucullaris. Accordingly, LPM adjacent to the occipital somites should be regarded as posterior cranial mesoderm. The axial position of the head-trunk border in axolotl is congruent between LPM and somitic mesoderm, unlike in chicken and possibly other amniotes.

  15. Evolution of the head-trunk interface in tetrapod vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sefton, Elizabeth M; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Mohaddes, Zahra; Hanken, James

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate neck musculature spans the transition zone between head and trunk. The extent to which the cucullaris muscle is a cranial muscle allied with the gill levators of anamniotes or is instead a trunk muscle is an ongoing debate. Novel computed tomography datasets reveal broad conservation of the cucullaris in gnathostomes, including coelacanth and caecilian, two sarcopterygians previously thought to lack it. In chicken, lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) adjacent to occipital somites is a recently identified embryonic source of cervical musculature. We fate-map this mesoderm in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), which retains external gills, and demonstrate its contribution to posterior gill-levator muscles and the cucullaris. Accordingly, LPM adjacent to the occipital somites should be regarded as posterior cranial mesoderm. The axial position of the head-trunk border in axolotl is congruent between LPM and somitic mesoderm, unlike in chicken and possibly other amniotes. PMID:27090084

  16. Vertebral body recollapse without trauma after kyphoplasty with calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Piazzolla, Andrea; De Giorgi, Giuseppe; Solarino, Giuseppe

    2011-08-01

    Traditionally, immobilization and external bracing has been recommended for patients with type A traumatic and non-osteoporotic fractures that do not present neurological deficits or significant instability. Nevertheless, several authors have recently suggested the possibility to treat thoraco-lumbar and lumbar vertebral compression post-traumatic fractures using standalone balloon kyphoplasty with osteoconductive filler materials, such as calcium phosphate (CPC). Maestretti and Huang have demonstrated the advantages of this technique showing an almost immediate return to daily activities without the inconvenience of wearing a brace, pain reduction, minimal operative risks and maintenance of stability, therefore proposing this as a first-choice technique in young patient needing rapid spine stability. The authors present a case of vertebral body recollapse after kyphoplasty with calcium phosphate cement (CPC) in a 47-year-old man with an A1.2 post-traumatic L1 compression fracture.

  17. Stress fractures in rheumatological practice: clinical significance and localizations.

    PubMed

    Peris, Pilar

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical characteristics, associated disorders, and the most common sites of stress fractures in rheumatological patients. Over a 3-year period, 35 patients with 44 stress fractures were prospectively recruited from an outpatient rheumatological department (32 postmenopausal women and three men aged 47 to 86 years, mean 70+/-10.6 years). Clinical diagnosis was established by compatible clinical and radiological data. In addition, previous skeletal fractures were recorded in all patients. Bone mass assessment was performed in 23 patients and spinal X-ray in 21. The diagnosis of osteoporosis was defined by the presence of atraumatic vertebral fractures and/or densitometric criteria (lumbar or femoral bone mass <-2.5 T score). The most frequent stress fractures were: pelvic ring (13 sacrum and eight pubic) and metatarsal (11 fractures), followed by tibia (seven fractures), calcaneus (three fractures), femur (one), and tarsal (one). Nine patients (26%) presented simultaneous stress fractures. Twenty-four patients (69%) suffered previous osteoporotic fractures, vertebral and Colles' fractures being the most frequent. Most of the evaluated patients (25 out of 30) had osteoporosis (83%). Six patients had associated disorders (glucocorticoids use in three patients, neurologic disorders in two, and rheumatoid arthritis in one). Except for the patient with a femur fracture which required internal fixation, no other clinical complications were observed after conservative treatment. In conclusion, fractures of the pelvic ring, especially sacrum, and metatarsal are the most frequent stress fractures in rheumatological practice. The association with osteoporosis and the history of prior low-trauma fractures are common in these patients.

  18. Femoral neck shaft angle in men with fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Tuck, S P; Rawlings, D J; Scane, A C; Pande, I; Summers, G D; Woolf, A D; Francis, R M

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Femoral neck shaft angle (NSA) has been reported to be an independent predictor of hip fracture risk in men. We aimed to assess the role of NSA in UK men. Methods. The NSA was measured manually from the DXA scan printout in men with hip (62, 31 femoral neck and 31 trochanteric), symptomatic vertebral (91), and distal forearm (67) fractures and 389 age-matched control subjects. Age, height, weight, and BMD (g/cm(2): lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total femur) measurements were performed. Results. There was no significant difference in mean NSA between men with femoral neck and trochanteric hip fractures, so all further analyses of hip fractures utilised the combined data. There was no difference in NSA between those with hip fractures and those without (either using the combined data or analysing trochanteric and femoral neck shaft fractures separately), nor between fracture subjects as a whole and controls. Mean NSA was smaller in those with vertebral fractures (129.2° versus 131°: P = 0.001), but larger in those with distal forearm fractures (129.8° versus 128.5°: P = 0.01). Conclusions. The conflicting results suggest that femoral NSA is not an important determinant of hip fracture risk in UK men.

  19. Learning about Vertebrate Limb Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Jennifer O.; Noll, Matthew; Olsen, Shayna

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an upper-level undergraduate laboratory exercise that enables students to replicate a key experiment in developmental biology. In this exercise, students have the opportunity to observe live chick embryos and stain the apical ectodermal ridge, a key tissue required for development of the vertebrate limb. Impressively, every…

  20. Repeated adjacent-segment degeneration after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Shinya; Oda, Takenori; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Maeno, Takafumi; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important sequelae affecting long-term results is adjacent-segment degeneration (ASD) after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Although several reports have described the incidence rate, there have been no reports of repeated ASD. The purpose of this report was to describe 1 case of repeated ASD after PLIF. A 62-year-old woman with L-4 degenerative spondylolisthesis underwent PLIF at L4-5. At the second operation, L3-4 PLIF was performed for L-3 degenerative spondylolisthesis 6 years after the primary operation. At the third operation, L2-3 PLIF was performed for L-2 degenerative spondylolisthesis 1.5 years after the primary operation. Vertebral collapse of L-1 was detected 1 year after the third operation, and the collapse had progressed. At the fourth operation, 3 years after the third operation, vertebral column resection of L-1 and replacement of titanium mesh cages with pedicle screw fixation between T-4 and L-5 was performed. Although the patient's symptoms resolved after each operation, the time between surgeries shortened. The sacral slope decreased gradually although each PLIF achieved local lordosis at the fused segment.

  1. Shape regression for vertebra fracture quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Michael Tillge; de Bruijne, Marleen; Tanko, Laszlo B.; Nielsen, Mads

    2005-04-01

    Accurate and reliable identification and quantification of vertebral fractures constitute a challenge both in clinical trials and in diagnosis of osteoporosis. Various efforts have been made to develop reliable, objective, and reproducible methods for assessing vertebral fractures, but at present there is no consensus concerning a universally accepted diagnostic definition of vertebral fractures. In this project we want to investigate whether or not it is possible to accurately reconstruct the shape of a normal vertebra, using a neighbouring vertebra as prior information. The reconstructed shape can then be used to develop a novel vertebra fracture measure, by comparing the segmented vertebra shape with its reconstructed normal shape. The vertebrae in lateral x-rays of the lumbar spine were manually annotated by a medical expert. With this dataset we built a shape model, with equidistant point distribution between the four corner points. Based on the shape model, a multiple linear regression model of a normal vertebra shape was developed for each dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation. The reconstructed shape was calculated for each dataset using these regression models. The average prediction error for the annotated shape was on average 3%.

  2. Fracture Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... to hold the fracture in the correct position. • Fiberglass casting is lighter and stronger and the exterior ... with your physician if this occurs. • When a fiberglass cast is used in conjunction with a GORE- ...

  3. Lisfranc fractures.

    PubMed

    Wright, Amanda; Gerhart, Ann E

    2009-01-01

    Injuries of the tarsometatarsal, or Lisfranc, joint are rarely seen. Lisfranc fractures and fracture dislocations are among the most frequently misdiagnosed foot injuries in the emergency department. A misdiagnosed injury may have severe consequences including chronic pain and loss of foot biomechanics. Evaluation of a foot injury should include a high level of suspicion of a Lisfranc injury, and a thorough work-up is needed for correct diagnosis.

  4. Thoracic compression fracture in a basketball player.

    PubMed

    McHugh-Pierzina, V L; Zillmer, D A; Giangarra, C E

    1995-06-01

    Thoracolumbar pain is a frequent complaint of many athletes, but the cause is often difficult to diagnose. Compression fractures of the spine are rarely seen in athletics and are not always recognized as a potential cause of the symptoms. Reported here is a case of a T12 compression fracture in a male basketball player. Pain films revealed the percentage of loss of vertebral body height, thereby determining the stability of the fracture. If treated with a thoracolumbar spinal orthosis brace and activity restrictions, stable compression fractures heal without surgical intervention and athletes can return to activity within a number of months. Athletic trainers and physicians should maintain a level of suspicion for this injury when violent trunk flexion or lateral flexion is the mechanism of injury.

  5. Vertebral Augmentation with Nitinol Endoprosthesis: Clinical Experience in 40 Patients with 1-Year Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo; Manca, Antonio; Marcia, Stefano; Chiara, Gabriele; Marini, Stefano; Baroud, Gamal; Regge, Daniele; Montemurro, Filippo

    2013-05-08

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the clinical outcomes of patients treated by vertebral augmentation with nitinol endoprosthesis (VNE) to treat painful vertebral compression fractures.MethodsForty patients with one or more painful osteoporotic VCF, confirmed by MRI and accompanied by back-pain unresponsive to a minimum 2 months of conservative medical treatment, underwent VNE at 42 levels. Preoperative and postoperative pain measured with Visual Analog Scale (VAS), disability measured by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and vertebral height restoration (measured with 2-dimensional reconstruction CT) were compared at last follow-up (average follow-up 15 months). Cement extravasation, subsequent fractures, and implant migration were recorded.ResultsLong-term follow-up was obtained in 38 of 40 patients. Both VAS and ODI significantly improved from a median of 8.0 (range 5–10) and 66 % (range 44–88 %) to 0.5 (range 0–8) and 6 % (range 6–66 %), respectively, at 1 year (p < 0.0001). Vertebral height measurements comparing time points increased in a statistically significant manner (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Overall cement extravasation rate was 9.5 %. Discal and venous leakage rates were 7.1 and 0 % respectively. No symptomatic extravasations occurred. Five of 38 (13.1 %) patients experienced new spontaneous, osteoporotic fractures. No device change or migration was observed.ConclusionsVNE is a safe and effective procedure that is able to provide long-lasting pain relief and durable vertebral height gain with a low rate of new fractures and cement leakages.

  6. Morphological castes in a vertebrate.

    PubMed

    O'Riain, M J; Jarvis, J U; Alexander, R; Buffenstein, R; Peeters, C

    2000-11-21

    Morphological specialization for a specific role has, until now, been assumed to be restricted to social invertebrates. Herein we show that complete physical dimorphism has evolved between reproductives and helpers in the eusocial naked mole-rat. Dimorphism is a consequence of the lumbar vertebrae lengthening after the onset of reproduction in females. This is the only known example of morphological castes in a vertebrate and is distinct from continuous size variation between breeders and helpers in other species of cooperatively breeding vertebrates. The evolution of castes in a mammal and insects represents a striking example of convergent evolution for enhanced fecundity in societies characterized by high reproductive skew. Similarities in the selective environment between naked mole-rats and eusocial insect species highlight the selective conditions under which queen/worker castes are predicted to evolve in animal societies.

  7. Climate change and marine vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sydeman, William J; Poloczanska, Elvira; Reed, Thomas E; Thompson, Sarah Ann

    2015-11-13

    Climate change impacts on vertebrates have consequences for marine ecosystem structures and services. We review marine fish, mammal, turtle, and seabird responses to climate change and discuss their potential for adaptation. Direct and indirect responses are demonstrated from every ocean. Because of variation in research foci, observed responses differ among taxonomic groups (redistributions for fish, phenology for seabirds). Mechanisms of change are (i) direct physiological responses and (ii) climate-mediated predator-prey interactions. Regional-scale variation in climate-demographic functions makes range-wide population dynamics challenging to predict. The nexus of metabolism relative to ecosystem productivity and food webs appears key to predicting future effects on marine vertebrates. Integration of climate, oceanographic, ecosystem, and population models that incorporate evolutionary processes is needed to prioritize the climate-related conservation needs for these species. PMID:26564847

  8. Climate change and marine vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sydeman, William J; Poloczanska, Elvira; Reed, Thomas E; Thompson, Sarah Ann

    2015-11-13

    Climate change impacts on vertebrates have consequences for marine ecosystem structures and services. We review marine fish, mammal, turtle, and seabird responses to climate change and discuss their potential for adaptation. Direct and indirect responses are demonstrated from every ocean. Because of variation in research foci, observed responses differ among taxonomic groups (redistributions for fish, phenology for seabirds). Mechanisms of change are (i) direct physiological responses and (ii) climate-mediated predator-prey interactions. Regional-scale variation in climate-demographic functions makes range-wide population dynamics challenging to predict. The nexus of metabolism relative to ecosystem productivity and food webs appears key to predicting future effects on marine vertebrates. Integration of climate, oceanographic, ecosystem, and population models that incorporate evolutionary processes is needed to prioritize the climate-related conservation needs for these species.

  9. Microscale Material Properties of Bone and the Mineralized Tissues of the Intervertebral Disc-Vertebral Body Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paietta, Rachel C.

    The objective of this dissertation is to understand the influences of material structure on the properties, function and failure of biological connective tissues. Biological interfaces are becoming an increasingly studied system within mechanics and tissue engineering as a model for attaching dissimilar materials. The elastic modulus of bone (≈ 20 GPa) and cartilage (≈ 0.1-1 MPa) differ over orders of magnitude, which should intuitively create high stress concentrations and failure at the interface. Yet, these natural interface systems rarely fail in vivo, and the mechanism by which loads are transferred between tissues has not yet been established. Tissue quality is one major contributor to the mechanical behavior of bone and cartilage, and is defined by properties such as collagen orientation, mineral volume fraction, porosity and tissue geometry. These properties have yet to be established at the bone-cartilage interface in the spine, and the lack of quantitative data on material microstructure and behavior limits treatments and tissue engineering construct design. In this dissertation, second harmonic generation imaging, quantitative backscattered scanning electron imaging and nanoindentation are combined to characterize micrometer scale tissue quality and modulus in both bone and calcified cartilage. These techniques are utilized to: 1) determine the hierarchical micrometer to millimeter scale properties of lamellar bone, 2) quantify changes throughout development and aging at the human intervertebral disc-vertebral body junction, and 3) explore compressive fractures at this interface. This work is the first to provide quantitative data on the mineral volume fraction, collagen orientation and modulus from the same, undecalcified sections of tissue to corroborate tissue structure and mineralization and describe quantitative parameters of the interface. The principal findings from this work indicate that the underlying matrix, or collagen, organization in

  10. Vertebral development and amphibian evolution.

    PubMed

    Carroll, R L; Kuntz, A; Albright, K

    1999-01-01

    Amphibians provide an unparalleled opportunity to integrate studies of development and evolution through the investigation of the fossil record of larval stages. The pattern of vertebral development in modern frogs strongly resembles that of Paleozoic labyrinthodonts in the great delay in the ossification of the vertebrae, with the centra forming much later than the neural arches. Slow ossification of the trunk vertebrae in frogs and the absence of ossification in the tail facilitate the rapid loss of the tail during metamorphosis, and may reflect retention of the pattern in their specific Paleozoic ancestors. Salamanders and caecilians ossify their centra at a much earlier stage than frogs, which resembles the condition in Paleozoic lepospondyls. The clearly distinct patterns and rates of vertebral development may indicate phylogenetic separation between the ultimate ancestors of frogs and those of salamanders and caecilians within the early radiation of ancestral tetrapods. This divergence may date from the Lower Carboniferous. Comparison with the molecular regulation of vertebral development described in modern mammals and birds suggests that the rapid chondrification of the centra in salamanders relative to that of frogs may result from the earlier migration of sclerotomal cells expressing Pax1 to the area surrounding the notochord.

  11. Extraneural Glioblastoma Multiforme Vertebral Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, C. Rory; Liang, Lydia; Abu-Bonsrah, Nancy; Hdeib, Alia; Elder, Benjamin D.; Kosztowski, Thomas; Bettegowda, Chetan; Laterra, John; Burger, Peter; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor; however, extraneural metastasis is uncommon. Of those that metastasize extraneurally, metastases to the vertebral bodies represent a significant proportion. We present a review of 28 cases from the published literature of GBM metastasis to the vertebra. The mean age at presentation was 38.4 years with an average overall survival of 26 months. Patients were either asymptomatic with metastasis discovered at autopsy or presented with varying degrees of pain, weakness of the extremities, or other neurologic deficits. Of the cases that included the time to spinal metastasis, the average time was 26.4 months with a reported survival of 10 months after diagnosis of vertebral metastasis. A significant number of patients had no treatments for their spinal metastasis, although the intracranial lesions were treated extensively with surgery and/or adjuvant therapy. With increasing incremental gains in the survival of patients with GBM, clinicians will encounter patients with extracranial metastasis. As such, this review presents timely information concerning the presentation and outcomes of patients with vertebral metastasis. PMID:26704201

  12. Vertebral development and amphibian evolution.

    PubMed

    Carroll, R L; Kuntz, A; Albright, K

    1999-01-01

    Amphibians provide an unparalleled opportunity to integrate studies of development and evolution through the investigation of the fossil record of larval stages. The pattern of vertebral development in modern frogs strongly resembles that of Paleozoic labyrinthodonts in the great delay in the ossification of the vertebrae, with the centra forming much later than the neural arches. Slow ossification of the trunk vertebrae in frogs and the absence of ossification in the tail facilitate the rapid loss of the tail during metamorphosis, and may reflect retention of the pattern in their specific Paleozoic ancestors. Salamanders and caecilians ossify their centra at a much earlier stage than frogs, which resembles the condition in Paleozoic lepospondyls. The clearly distinct patterns and rates of vertebral development may indicate phylogenetic separation between the ultimate ancestors of frogs and those of salamanders and caecilians within the early radiation of ancestral tetrapods. This divergence may date from the Lower Carboniferous. Comparison with the molecular regulation of vertebral development described in modern mammals and birds suggests that the rapid chondrification of the centra in salamanders relative to that of frogs may result from the earlier migration of sclerotomal cells expressing Pax1 to the area surrounding the notochord. PMID:11324019

  13. Extraneural Glioblastoma Multiforme Vertebral Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Liang, Lydia; Abu-Bonsrah, Nancy; Hdeib, Alia; Elder, Benjamin D; Kosztowski, Thomas; Bettegowda, Chetan; Laterra, John; Burger, Peter; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor; however, extraneural metastasis is uncommon. Of those that metastasize extraneurally, metastases to the vertebral bodies represent a significant proportion. We present a review of 28 cases from the published literature of GBM metastasis to the vertebra. The mean age at presentation was 38.4 years with an average overall survival of 26 months. Patients were either asymptomatic with metastasis discovered at autopsy or presented with varying degrees of pain, weakness of the extremities, or other neurologic deficits. Of the cases that included the time to spinal metastasis, the average time was 26.4 months with a reported survival of 10 months after diagnosis of vertebral metastasis. A significant number of patients had no treatments for their spinal metastasis, although the intracranial lesions were treated extensively with surgery and/or adjuvant therapy. With increasing incremental gains in the survival of patients with GBM, clinicians will encounter patients with extracranial metastasis. As such, this review presents timely information concerning the presentation and outcomes of patients with vertebral metastasis. PMID:26704201

  14. Bilateral mechanical rotational vertebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Dargon, Phong T; Liang, Conrad W; Kohal, Anmol; Dogan, Aclan; Barnwell, Stanley L; Landry, Gregory J

    2013-10-01

    Rotational vertebral artery occlusion, or bow hunter's stroke, is reversible, positional symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischemia. The typical mechanism of action is obstruction of a dominant vertebral artery with contralateral head rotation in the setting of baseline ipsilateral vertebral artery stenosis or occlusion. Here we present a rare case of mechanical occlusion of bilateral patent vertebral arteries manifesting as near syncope with rightward head rotation. Diagnostic cerebral angiography showed dynamic right C5 vertebral occlusion and left C2 vertebral occlusion. The patient underwent right C4/5 transverse process decompression. Postoperative angiogram showed patent flow through the right vertebral artery in neutral position and with head turn with resultant resolution of symptoms. PMID:23465174

  15. Anterior D-rod and titanium mesh fixation for acute mid-lumbar burst fracture with incomplete neurologic deficits: A prospective study of 56 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhe-yuan; Ding, Zhen-qi; Liu, Hao-yuan; Fang, Jun; Liu, Hui; Sha, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anterior decompression and reconstruction have gained wide acceptance as viable alternatives for unstable mid-lumbar burst fracture, but there are no mid and long term prospective studies regarding clinical and radiologic results of mid-lumbar burst fractures. Materials and Methods: An Institutional Review Board-approved prospective study of 56 consecutive patients of mid-lumbar burst fractures with a load-sharing score of 7 or more treated with anterior plating was carried out. All patients were evaluated for radiologic and clinical outcomes. The fusion status, spinal canal compromise, segmental kyphotic angle (SKA), vertebral body height loss (VBHL), and adjacent segment degeneration was examined for radiologic outcome, whereas the American Spinal Injury Association scale, the visual analog scale (VAS), and the employment status were used for clinical evaluation. Results: The patients underwent clinical and radiologic followup for at least 5 years after the surgery. At the last followup, there was no case of internal fixation failure, adjacent segment degeneration, and other complications. Interbody fusion was achieved in all cases. The average fusion time was 4.5 months. No patient suffered neurological deterioration and the average neurologic recovery was 1.3 grades on final observation. Based on VAS pain scores, canal compromise, percentage of VBHL and SKA, the difference was statistically significant between the preoperative period and postoperative or final followup (P < 0.05). Results at postoperative and final followup were better than the preoperative period. However, the difference was not significant between postoperative and final followup (P > 0.05). Thirty-four patients who were employed before the injury returned to work after the operation, 15 had changed to less strenuous work. Conclusion: Good mid term clinicoradiological results of anterior decompression with D-rod and titanium mesh fixation for suitable patients with mid

  16. A systematic review of the outcomes of osteoporotic fracture patients after hospital discharge: morbidity, subsequent fractures, and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Nazrun, Ahmad Shuid; Tzar, Mohd Nizam; Mokhtar, Sabarul Afian; Mohamed, Isa Naina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Osteoporotic fracture is the main complication of osteoporosis. The current management is to discharge patients as early as possible so they can get back to their daily activities. Once discharged, there are three main issues relating to morbidity, mortality, and risk of a subsequent fracture that need to be addressed and discussed. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to summarize and evaluate the evidence from published literature, to determine the outcome of osteoporotic fracture patients after their hospital discharge. Methods The MEDLINE and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases were searched, using the terms “osteoporosis”, “fracture”, “osteoporotic fracture”, “hip fracture”, and “vertebral fracture”. We included only human studies published in English between 2004 and 2014. The reference lists of included studies were thoroughly reviewed in search for other relevant studies. Results A total of 18 studies met the selection criteria. Most were observational and cohort studies. Out of all the studies, five studies looked into the morbidity, six studies looked into the risk of subsequent fractures, and seven studies looked into mortality. Vertebral fracture caused the greatest health burden, but hip fracture patients were the main users of informal care after hospital discharge. There was an increased risk of a subsequent fracture after a primary fracture compared with the control group, a cohort comparison, or the general population. Osteoporotic fractures, especially hip fractures, are associated with higher mortality rate despite the advances in the management of osteoporotic fracture cases. Conclusion There is strong evidence to show that after hospital discharge, osteoporotic fracture patients are faced with higher morbidity, subsequent fractures, and mortality. PMID:25429224

  17. Galeazzi fracture.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc I; Jupiter, Jesse B; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2011-10-01

    Galeazzi fracture is a fracture of the radial diaphysis with disruption at the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Typically, the mechanism of injury is forceful axial loading and torsion of the forearm. Diagnosis is established on radiographic evaluation. Underdiagnosis is common because disruption of the ligamentous restraints of the DRUJ may be overlooked. Nonsurgical management with anatomic reduction and immobilization in a long-arm cast has been successful in children. In adults, nonsurgical treatment typically fails because of deforming forces acting on the distal radius and DRUJ. Open reduction and internal fixation is the preferred surgical option. Anatomic reduction and rigid fixation should be followed by intraoperative assessment of the DRUJ. Further intraoperative interventions are based on the reducibility and postreduction stability of the DRUJ. Misdiagnosis or inadequate management of Galeazzi fracture may result in disabling complications, such as DRUJ instability, malunion, limited forearm range of motion, chronic wrist pain, and osteoarthritis.

  18. Pediatric Thighbone (Femur) Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... fractures in infants under 1 year old is child abuse. Child abuse is also a leading cause of thighbone fracture ... contact sports • Being in a motor vehicle accident • Child abuse Types of Femur Fractures (Classification) Femur fractures vary ...

  19. The 'Tully monster' is a vertebrate.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Victoria E; Saupe, Erin E; Lamsdell, James C; Tarhan, Lidya G; McMahon, Sean; Lidgard, Scott; Mayer, Paul; Whalen, Christopher D; Soriano, Carmen; Finney, Lydia; Vogt, Stefan; Clark, Elizabeth G; Anderson, Ross P; Petermann, Holger; Locatelli, Emma R; Briggs, Derek E G

    2016-04-28

    Problematic fossils, extinct taxa of enigmatic morphology that cannot be assigned to a known major group, were once a major issue in palaeontology. A long-favoured solution to the 'problem of the problematica', particularly the 'weird wonders' of the Cambrian Burgess Shale, was to consider them representatives of extinct phyla. A combination of new evidence and modern approaches to phylogenetic analysis has now resolved the affinities of most of these forms. Perhaps the most notable exception is Tullimonstrum gregarium, popularly known as the Tully monster, a large soft-bodied organism from the late Carboniferous Mazon Creek biota (approximately 309-307 million years ago) of Illinois, USA, which was designated the official state fossil of Illinois in 1989. Its phylogenetic position has remained uncertain and it has been compared with nemerteans, polychaetes, gastropods, conodonts, and the stem arthropod Opabinia. Here we review the morphology of Tullimonstrum based on an analysis of more than 1,200 specimens. We find that the anterior proboscis ends in a buccal apparatus containing teeth, the eyes project laterally on a long rigid bar, and the elongate segmented body bears a caudal fin with dorsal and ventral lobes. We describe new evidence for a notochord, cartilaginous arcualia, gill pouches, articulations within the proboscis, and multiple tooth rows adjacent to the mouth. This combination of characters, supported by phylogenetic analysis, identifies Tullimonstrum as a vertebrate, and places it on the stem lineage to lampreys (Petromyzontida). In addition to increasing the known morphological disparity of extinct lampreys, a chordate affinity for T. gregarium resolves the nature of a soft-bodied fossil which has been debated for more than 50 years. PMID:26982721

  20. The 'Tully monster' is a vertebrate.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Victoria E; Saupe, Erin E; Lamsdell, James C; Tarhan, Lidya G; McMahon, Sean; Lidgard, Scott; Mayer, Paul; Whalen, Christopher D; Soriano, Carmen; Finney, Lydia; Vogt, Stefan; Clark, Elizabeth G; Anderson, Ross P; Petermann, Holger; Locatelli, Emma R; Briggs, Derek E G

    2016-04-28

    Problematic fossils, extinct taxa of enigmatic morphology that cannot be assigned to a known major group, were once a major issue in palaeontology. A long-favoured solution to the 'problem of the problematica', particularly the 'weird wonders' of the Cambrian Burgess Shale, was to consider them representatives of extinct phyla. A combination of new evidence and modern approaches to phylogenetic analysis has now resolved the affinities of most of these forms. Perhaps the most notable exception is Tullimonstrum gregarium, popularly known as the Tully monster, a large soft-bodied organism from the late Carboniferous Mazon Creek biota (approximately 309-307 million years ago) of Illinois, USA, which was designated the official state fossil of Illinois in 1989. Its phylogenetic position has remained uncertain and it has been compared with nemerteans, polychaetes, gastropods, conodonts, and the stem arthropod Opabinia. Here we review the morphology of Tullimonstrum based on an analysis of more than 1,200 specimens. We find that the anterior proboscis ends in a buccal apparatus containing teeth, the eyes project laterally on a long rigid bar, and the elongate segmented body bears a caudal fin with dorsal and ventral lobes. We describe new evidence for a notochord, cartilaginous arcualia, gill pouches, articulations within the proboscis, and multiple tooth rows adjacent to the mouth. This combination of characters, supported by phylogenetic analysis, identifies Tullimonstrum as a vertebrate, and places it on the stem lineage to lampreys (Petromyzontida). In addition to increasing the known morphological disparity of extinct lampreys, a chordate affinity for T. gregarium resolves the nature of a soft-bodied fossil which has been debated for more than 50 years.

  1. Evolution of vertebrate colour vision.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Gerald H; Rowe, Mickey P

    2004-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in learning how colour vision has evolved. This trend has been fuelled by an enhanced understanding of the nature and extent of colour vision among contemporary species, by a deeper understanding of the paleontological record and by the application of new tools from molecular biology. This review provides an assessment of the progress in understanding the evolution of vertebrate colour vision. In so doing, we offer accounts of the evolution of three classes of mechanism important for colour vision--photopigment opsins, oil droplets and retinal organisation--and then examine details of how colour vision has evolved among mammals and, more specifically, among primates.

  2. EVALUATION OF TERMINAL VERTEBRAL PLATE ON CERVICAL SPINE AT DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS AND ITS CORRELATION WITH INTERVERTEBRAL DISC THICKNESS

    PubMed Central

    Luiz Vieira, Juliano Silveira; da Silva Herrero, Carlos Fernando Pereira; Porto, Maximiliano Aguiar; Nogueira Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Garcia, Sérgio Britto; Zambelli Ramalho, Leandra Náira; Aparecido Defino, Helton Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate, by means of histomorphometry, terminal vertebral plate thickness, intervertebral disc thickness and its correlation on different age groups, seeking to identify its correlation. Methods: C4-C5 and C5-C6 cervical segments removed from human cadavers of both genders were assessed and divided into five groups of 10-year age intervals, from 21 years old. TVP and intervertebral disc thickness evaluation was made by means of histomorphometry of histological slides stained with hematoxylin and eosyn. Lower C4 TVP, upper C5 TVP, and upper C6 TVP de were compared between each other and to the interposed intervertebral disc thickness between relevant TVP. Results: The thickness of terminal vertebral plates adjacent to the same ID did not show statistic differences. However, the comparison of upper and lower vertebral plates thickness on the same cervical vertebra (C5), showed statistical difference on all age groups studied. We found a statistical correlation coefficient above 80% between terminal vertebral plate and adjacent intervertebral disc, with a proportional thickness reduction of both structures on the different cervical levels studied, and also on the different age groups assessed. Conclusion: Terminal vertebral plate shows a morphologic correlation with the intervertebral disc next to it, and does not show correlation with the terminal vertebral plate on the same vertebra. PMID:26998448

  3. Combined Measures of Dynamic Bone Quality and Postural Balance--A Fracture Risk Assessment Approach in Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Amit; Watts, Nelson B; Dwivedi, Alok; Shukla, Rakesh; Mani, Ashutosh; Diab, Dima

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated functional measures of neuromuscular integrity and bone's resistance to fracture as a combined tool in discriminating osteoporosis patients with and without fractures. Functional aspects of neuromuscular integrity were quantified with a noninvasive measure of static and dynamic functional postural stability (FPS), and fracture resistance was obtained with bone shock absorption in patients with osteoporosis aged 65-85 and compared our measures with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX [World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Metabolic Bone Diseases, Sheffield, UK]) in women with osteoporosis, some with and some without vertebral fractures. Patients with vertebral fracture showed larger static FPS (postural sway excursion) in the mediolateral and anterior-posterior directions, suggesting poorer balance. Most of the variables of dynamic FPS showed significant differences between fracture and no-fracture groups (e.g., the fracture group took significantly longer during turning, implying poorer dynamic balance control). Also, compared with healthy control subjects, all 4 dynamic FPS responses for osteoporosis patients with and without fracture were significantly poorer, suggesting potential risk for falls. In summary, patients with osteoporosis who have vertebral fractures (compared with patients with similarly low bone mineral density and other nonfracture risk fractures) have not only lower bone shock absorption damping (ζ) but also increased postural imbalance.

  4. Rigid fixation with teeth in the line of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Gerbino, G; Tarello, F; Fasolis, M; De Gioanni, P P

    1997-06-01

    The treatment results and the incidence of complications were evaluated retrospectively in a group of 68 patients. They all had mandibular fractures with a tooth in the line of fracture and were treated using miniplates for fixation. The follow up ranged from 1 to 6 years (mean 2.6 years) and 90 fracture sites were involved. Results showed that the incidence of complications when the tooth was extracted was higher (3/12) than when it was left in place (8/78). With regard to both healing of the fracture and fate of the tooth in the line of fracture, it is recommended to retain teeth in the line of fracture, unless there is an absolute indication for extraction. It is advisable to monitor the vitality of teeth adjacent to the fracture line for at least one year.

  5. A Case Report of Long-Term Bisphosphonate Therapy and Atypical Stress Fracture of Bilateral Femur

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yil Ryun; Kim, Hye Won; Moon, Seock Ho

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are potent inhibitors of bone resorption and considered as a gold standard and are generally recommended as first-line therapy in patients with osteoporosis. Though bisphosphonates are shown to significantly reduce the risk of vertebral, non-vertebral and hip fractures, recent reports suggest a possible correlation between long-term bisphosphonate therapy and the occurrence of insufficiency fractures owing to prolonged bone turnover suppression. We report a patient with non-traumatic stress fractures of bilateral femoral shafts related to long-term bisphosphonate therapy indicating the need for a critical evaluation of patients with long-term bisphosphonate therapy. PMID:23869343

  6. Endocrine disruption in aquatic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kloas, Werner; Urbatzka, Ralph; Opitz, Robert; Würtz, Sven; Behrends, Thomas; Hermelink, Björn; Hofmann, Frauke; Jagnytsch, Oana; Kroupova, Hana; Lorenz, Claudia; Neumann, Nadja; Pietsch, Constanze; Trubiroha, Achim; Van Ballegooy, Christoph; Wiedemann, Caterina; Lutz, Ilka

    2009-04-01

    Environmental compounds can interfere with endocrine systems of wildlife and humans. The main sink of such substances, called endocrine disrupters (ED), are surface waters. Thus, aquatic vertebrates, such as fish and amphibians, are most endangered. ED can adversely affect reproductive biology and the thyroid system. ED act by (anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic modes of action, resulting in abnormal sexual differentiation and impaired reproduction. These effects are mainly driven by direct interferences of ED with sex steroid receptors rather than indirectly by impacting synthesis and bioavailability of sex steroids, which in turn might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Recent findings reveal that, in addition to the human-produced waste of ED, natural sources, such as parasites and decomposition of leaves, also might act as ED, markedly affecting sexual differentiation and reproduction in fish and amphibians. Although the thyroid system has essential functions in both fish and amphibians, amphibian metamorphosis has been introduced as the most sensitive model to detect thyroidal ED; no suitable fish model exists. Whereas ED may act primarily on only one specific endocrine target, all endocrine systems will eventually be deregulated as they are intimately connected to each other. The recent ecotoxicological issue of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) present in the aquatic environment indicates a high potential for further endocrine modes of action on aquatic vertebrates by ED derived from PhACs, such as glucocorticoids, progestins, and beta-agonists.

  7. Computer aided diagnosis for osteoporosis based on vertebral column structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Eiji; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakano, Yasutaka; Harada, Masafumi; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2012-03-01

    Patients of osteoporosis are comprised of about 11 million people in Japan and it is one of the problems that have gained society. For preventing the osteoporosis, obtaining early detection and treatment are necessary. Multi-slice CT technology has been improving for three dimensional (3D) image analysis, higher body axis resolution and shorter scan time. 3D image analysis using multi-slice CT images of thoracic vertebra can be used for supporting diagnosis of osteoporosis. Simultaneously, this analysis can be used for lung cancer diagnosis which may lead to early detection. We develop automatic extraction and partitioning algorithm for spinal column by analyzing vertebral body structure, and the analysis algorithm of the vertebral body using shape analysis and a bone density measurement for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. An effective result was provided for the case including an insufficient complicated vertebral body bone fracture by the conventional method.

  8. Photoelastic analisys in the lower region of vertebral body L4

    PubMed Central

    Fakhouri, Sarah Fakher; Zamarioli, Ariane; Shimano, Marcos Massao; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido; Araujo, Cleudmar Amaral; Shimano, Antonio Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the shear forces on the vertebral body L4 when submitted to a compression force by means of transmission photoelasticity. Methods Twelve photoelastic models were divided into three groups, with four models per group, according to the positioning of the sagittal section vertebrae L4-L5 (sections A, B and C). The simulation was performed using a 15N compression force, and the fringe orders were evaluated in the vertebral body L4 by the Tardy compensation method. Results Photoelastic analysis showed, in general, a homogeneous distribution in the vertebral bodies. The shear forces were higher in section C than B, and higher in B than A. Conclusion The posterior area of L4, mainly in section C, showed higher shear concentrations, corresponding to a more susceptible area for bone fracture and spondylolisthesis. Economic and Decision Analyses - Development of an Economic or Decision Model. Level I PMID:24453574

  9. Surgery in extensive vertebral hemangioma: case report, literature review and a new algorithm proposal.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Roberto; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Nigro, Lorenzo; Delfini, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Hemangiomas are benign dysplasias or vascular tumors consisting of vascular spaces lined with endothelium. Nowadays, radiotherapy for vertebral hemangiomas (VHs) is widely accepted as primary treatment for painful lesions. Nevertheless, the role of surgery is still unclear. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel algorithm of treatment about VHs. This is a case report of an extensive VH and a review of the literature. A case of vertebral fracture during radiotherapy at a total dose of 30 Gy given in 10 fractions (treatment time 2 weeks) using a linear accelerator at 15 MV high-energy photons for extensive VH is reported. Using PubMed database, a review of the literature is done. The authors have no study funding sources. The authors have no conflicting financial interests. In the literature, good results in terms of pain and neurological deficits are reported. No cases of vertebral fractures are described. However, there is no consensus regarding the treatment for VHs. Radiotherapy is widely utilized in VHs determining pain. Surgery for VHs determining neurological deficit is also widely accepted. Perhaps, regarding the width of the lesion, no indications are given. We consider it important to make an evaluation before initiating the treatment for the risk of pathologic vertebral fracture, since in radiotherapy, there is no convention regarding structural changes determined in VHs. We propose a new algorithm of treatment. We recommend radiotherapy only for small lesions in which vertebral stability is not concerned. Kyphoplasty can be proposed for asymptomatic patients in which VHs are small and in patients affected by VHs determining pain without spinal canal invasion in which the VH is small. In patients affected by pain without spinal canal invasion but in which the VH is wide or presented with spinal canal invasion and in patients affected by neurological deficits, we propose surgery. PMID:25720346

  10. Surgery in extensive vertebral hemangioma: case report, literature review and a new algorithm proposal.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Roberto; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Nigro, Lorenzo; Delfini, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Hemangiomas are benign dysplasias or vascular tumors consisting of vascular spaces lined with endothelium. Nowadays, radiotherapy for vertebral hemangiomas (VHs) is widely accepted as primary treatment for painful lesions. Nevertheless, the role of surgery is still unclear. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel algorithm of treatment about VHs. This is a case report of an extensive VH and a review of the literature. A case of vertebral fracture during radiotherapy at a total dose of 30 Gy given in 10 fractions (treatment time 2 weeks) using a linear accelerator at 15 MV high-energy photons for extensive VH is reported. Using PubMed database, a review of the literature is done. The authors have no study funding sources. The authors have no conflicting financial interests. In the literature, good results in terms of pain and neurological deficits are reported. No cases of vertebral fractures are described. However, there is no consensus regarding the treatment for VHs. Radiotherapy is widely utilized in VHs determining pain. Surgery for VHs determining neurological deficit is also widely accepted. Perhaps, regarding the width of the lesion, no indications are given. We consider it important to make an evaluation before initiating the treatment for the risk of pathologic vertebral fracture, since in radiotherapy, there is no convention regarding structural changes determined in VHs. We propose a new algorithm of treatment. We recommend radiotherapy only for small lesions in which vertebral stability is not concerned. Kyphoplasty can be proposed for asymptomatic patients in which VHs are small and in patients affected by VHs determining pain without spinal canal invasion in which the VH is small. In patients affected by pain without spinal canal invasion but in which the VH is wide or presented with spinal canal invasion and in patients affected by neurological deficits, we propose surgery.

  11. Arcuate Fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    In the upper left corner of this VIS image are a series of fractures. Where the fractures are exposed on the surface it is impossible to tell the plane of the fracture; however where the fractures are visible in the cliff wall it is possible to see that the fractures dip to the north. This image shows part of the caldera of Tharsis Tholus.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 1.7, Longitude 176.5 East (183.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. The relative efficacy of nine osteoporosis medications for reducing the rate of fractures in post-menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the absence of head-to-head trials, indirect comparisons of randomized placebo-controlled trials may provide a viable option to assess relative efficacy. The purpose was to estimate the relative efficacy of reduction of fractures in post-menopausal women, and to assess robustness of the results. Methods A systematic literature review of multiple databases identified randomized placebo-controlled trials with nine drugs for post-menopausal women. Odds ratio and 95% credibility intervals for the rates of hip, non-vertebral, vertebral, and wrist fractures for each drug and between drugs were derived using a Bayesian approach. A drug was ranked as the most efficacious if it had the highest posterior odds ratio, or had the highest effect size. Results 30 studies including 59,209 patients reported fracture rates for nine drugs: alendronate (6 studies), denosumab (1 study), etidronate (8 studies), ibandronate (4 studies), raloxifene (1 study), risedronate (7 studies), strontium (2 study), teriparatide (1 study), and zoledronic acid (1 study). The drugs with the highest probability of reducing non-vertebral fractures was etidronate and teriparatide while the drugs with the highest probability of reducing vertebral, hip or wrist fractures were teriparatide, zoledronic acid and denosumab. The drugs with the largest effect size for vertebral fractures were zoledronic acid, teriparatide and denosumab, while the drugs with the highest effect size for non-vertebral, hip or wrist fractures were alendronate or risedronate. Estimates were consistent between Bayesian and classical approaches. Conclusion Teriparatide, zoledronic acid and denosumab have the highest probabilities of being most efficacious for non-vertebral and vertebral fractures, and having the greatest effect sizes. The estimates from indirect comparisons were robust to differences in methodology. PMID:21943363

  13. Ghrelin Receptors in Non-Mammalian Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R) was discovered in humans and pigs in 1996. The endogenous ligand, ghrelin, was discovered 3 years later, in 1999, and our understanding of the physiological significance of the ghrelin system in vertebrates has grown steadily since then. Although the ghrelin system in non-mammalian vertebrates is a subject of great interest, protein sequence data for the receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates has been limited until recently, and related biological information has not been well organized. In this review, we summarize current information related to the ghrelin receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates. PMID:23882259

  14. Invasive Fire Ants Reduce Reproductive Success and Alter the Reproductive Strategies of a Native Vertebrate Insectivore

    PubMed Central

    Ligon, Russell A.; Siefferman, Lynn; Hill, Geoffrey E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Introduced organisms can alter ecosystems by disrupting natural ecological relationships. For example, red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) have disrupted native arthropod communities throughout much of their introduced range. By competing for many of the same food resources as insectivorous vertebrates, fire ants also have the potential to disrupt vertebrate communities. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore the effects of fire ants on a native insectivorous vertebrate, we compared the reproductive success and strategies of eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) inhabiting territories with different abundances of fire ants. We also created experimental dyads of adjacent territories comprised of one territory with artificially reduced fire ant abundance (treated) and one territory that was unmanipulated (control). We found that more bluebird young fledged from treated territories than from adjacent control territories. Fire ant abundance also explained significant variation in two measures of reproductive success across the study population: number of fledglings and hatching success of second clutches. Furthermore, the likelihood of bluebird parents re-nesting in the same territory was negatively influenced by the abundance of foraging fire ants, and parents nesting in territories with experimentally reduced abundances of fire ants produced male-biased broods relative to pairs in adjacent control territories. Conclusions/Significance Introduced fire ants altered both the reproductive success (number of fledglings, hatching success) and strategies (decision to renest, offspring sex-ratio) of eastern bluebirds. These results illustrate the negative effects that invasive species can have on native biota, including species from taxonomically distant groups. PMID:21799904

  15. Baseline age and time to major fracture in younger postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Gourlay, Margaret L.; Overman, Robert A.; Fine, Jason P.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Crandall, Carolyn J.; Gass, Margery L.; Robbins, John; Johnson, Karen C.; LeBlanc, Erin S.; Womack, Catherine R.; Schousboe, John T.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of first hip or clinical vertebral fracture or major osteoporotic (hip, clinical vertebral, proximal humerus or wrist) fracture in postmenopausal women receiving their first bone mineral density (BMD) test before age 65. Methods We studied 4068 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 64 without hip or clinical vertebral fracture or antifracture treatment at baseline, participating in the Women's Health Initiative BMD cohort study. BMD tests were performed between October 1993 and April 2005, with fracture follow-up through 2012. The outcomes were the times for 1% of women to sustain a hip or clinical vertebral fracture, and for 3% to sustain a major osteoporotic fracture before initiating treatment, adjusting for clinical risk factors and accounting for competing risks. Women without and with osteoporosis on their first BMD test were analyzed separately. Results During a maximum 11.2 years of concurrent BMD and fracture follow-up, the adjusted estimated time for 1% of women to have a hip or clinical vertebral fracture was 12.8 years (95% CI, 8.0, 20.4) for aged 50 to 54 and 7.6 years (95% CI, 4.8 to 12.1) for aged 60 to 64 for those without baseline osteoporosis, and 3.0 years (95% CI, 1.3, 7.1) for all women aged 50 to 64 with baseline osteoporosis. Results were similar for major osteoporotic fracture. Conclusion Due to very low rates of major osteoporotic fracture, postmenopausal women age 50 and 64 without osteoporosis on a first BMD test are unlikely to benefit from frequent rescreening before age 65. PMID:25349960

  16. Long-term investigation of nonsurgical treatment for thoracolumbar and lumbar burst fractures: an outcome analysis in sight of spinopelvic balance

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank; Hempfing, Axel; Rohrmüller, David; Tauber, Mark; Lederer, Stefan; Resch, Herbert; Zenner, Juliane; Klampfer, Helmut; Schwaiger, Robert; Bogner, Robert; Hitzl, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The nonsurgical treatment of thoracolumbar (TLB) and lumbar burst (LB) fractures remains to be of interest, though it is not costly and avoids surgical risks. However, a subset of distinct burst fracture patterns tend to go with a suboptimal radiographic and clinical long-term outcome. Detailed fracture pattern and treatment-related results in terms of validated outcome measures are still lacking. In addition, there are controversial data on the impact of local posttraumatic kyphosis that is associated, in particular, with nonsurgical treatment. The assessment of global spinal balance following burst fractures has not been assesed, yet. Therefore, the current study intended to investigate the radiographical and clinical long-term outcome in neurologically intact patients with special focus on the impact of regional posttraumatic kyphosis, adjacent-level compensatoric mechanisms, and global spine balance on the clinical outcome. For the purpose of a homogenous sample, strong in- and exclusion criteria were applied that resulted in a final study sample of 21 patients with a mean follow-up of 9.5 years. Overall, clinical outcome evaluated by validated measures was diminished, with 62% showing a good or excellent outcome and 38% a moderate or poor outcome in terms of the Greenough Low Back Outcome Scale. Notably, vertebral comminution in terms of the load-sharing classification, posttraumatic kyphosis, and an overall decreased lumbopelvic lordosis showed a significant effect on clinical outcome. A global and segmental curve analysis of the spine T9 to S1 revealed significant alterations as compared to normals. But, the interdependence of spinopelvic parameters was not disrupted. The patients’ spinal adaptability to compensate for the posttraumatic kyphotic deformity varied in the ranges dictated by pelvic geometry, in particular the pelvic incidence. The study substantiates the concept that surgical reconstruction and maintenance of a physiologically shaped spinal

  17. When, Where and How Osteoporosis-Associated Fractures Occur: An Analysis from the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW)

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Aline G.; Wyman, Allison; Siris, Ethel S.; Watts, Nelson B.; Silverman, Stuart; Saag, Kenneth G.; Roux, Christian; Rossini, Maurizio; Pfeilschifter, Johannes; Nieves, Jeri W.; Netelenbos, J. Coen; March, Lyn; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Hooven, Frederick H.; Greenspan, Susan L.; Gehlbach, Stephen H.; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Cooper, Cyrus; Compston, Juliet E.; Chapurlat, Roland D.; Boonen, Steven; Anderson, Frederick A.; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Adami, Silvano

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine when, where and how fractures occur in postmenopausal women. Methods We analyzed data from the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW), including women aged ≥55 years from the United States of America, Canada, Australia and seven European countries. Women completed questionnaires including fracture data at baseline and years 1, 2 and 3. Results Among 60,393 postmenopausal women, 4122 incident fractures were reported (86% non-hip, non-vertebral [NHNV], 8% presumably clinical vertebral and 6% hip). Hip fractures were more likely to occur in spring, with little seasonal variation for NHNV or spine fractures. Hip fractures occurred equally inside or outside the home, whereas 65% of NHNV fractures occurred outside and 61% of vertebral fractures occurred inside the home. Falls preceded 68–86% of NHNV and 68–83% of hip fractures among women aged ≤64 to ≥85 years, increasing with age. About 45% of vertebral fractures were associated with falls in all age groups except those ≥85 years, when only 24% occurred after falling. Conclusion In this multi-national cohort, fractures occurred throughout the year, with only hip fracture having a seasonal variation, with a higher proportion in spring. Hip fractures occurred equally within and outside the home, spine fractures more often in the home, and NHNV fractures outside the home. Falls were a proximate cause of most hip and NHNV fractures. Postmenopausal women at risk for fracture need counseling about reducing potentially modifiable fracture risk factors, particularly falls both inside and outside the home and during all seasons of the year. PMID:24349484

  18. Vascular Plant and Vertebrate Inventory of Tuzigoot National Monument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Brian F.; Albrecht, E.W.; Halvorson, William Lee; Schmidt, Cecilia A.; Anning, P.; Docherty, K.

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary From 2002 to 2004, we surveyed for plants and vertebrates (amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals) at Tuzigoot National Monument (NM) and adjacent areas in Arizona. This was the first effort of its kind in the area and was part of a larger effort to inventory vascular plants and vertebrates in eight National Park Service units in Arizona and New Mexico. In addition to our own surveys, we also compiled a complete list of species that have been found by previous studies. We found 330 species, including 142 that had not previously been recorded at the monument (Table 1). We found 39 species of non-native plants, 11 non-native fishes, three non-native birds, and one non-native species each of amphibian and mammal. Based on our work and that of others, there have been 597 species of plants and vertebrates found at the monument. The bird community at the monument had the highest species richness of any national park unit in central and southern Arizona. We found all other taxa to have intermediate species richness compared to other park units in the region. This extraordinary species richness observed for birds, as well as for some other taxa, is due primarily to Tavasci Marsh and the Verde River, two critical sources of perennial water, which provide habitat for many regionally rare or uncommon species. The location of the monument at the northern edge of the Sonoran Desert and at the southern edge of the Mogollon Rim also plays an important role in determining the distribution and community composition of the plant and vertebrate communities. Based on our findings, we believe the high number of non-native species, especially fish and plants, should be of particular management concern. We detail other management challenges, most notably the rapid increase in housing and associated commercial development near the monument, which will continue to impact the plant and vertebrate communities. Based on our data and a review of past studies, we believe the

  19. Collagenous Fibroma (Desmoplastic Fibroblastoma) with Vertebral Body Erosion

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Vladimir; Carrera, Guillermo F.

    2009-01-01

    Collagenous fibroma (desmoplastic fibroblastoma) is a recently described rare benign tumor affecting mainly males in the fifth through seventh decades. This tumor occurs predominantly in the peripheral sites, with predilection for upper and lower extremities. The patients present with a painless mass of involving subcutis, with one quarter of all cases involving skeletal muscle. Both radiographically and histologically these tumors are well-circumscribed small lesions from one to several centimeters in diameter, though lesions as large as 20 cm have been reported. We report a case of collagenous fibroma presenting symptomatically as a 2.4 cm mass within the pedicle and adjacent transverse process of the L5 vertebral segment. Bone erosion by desmoplastic fibroblastoma is very rare event. This tumor should be in the differential diagnosis of the soft tissue lesions presenting with bony erosion. PMID:19503798

  20. Modulation of Fgf8 activity during vertebrate brain development.

    PubMed

    Echevarria, Diego; Belo, Jose Antonio; Martinez, Salvador

    2005-09-01

    In recent years much emphasis has been placed on investigation of the precise control of FGF signaling during brain development. Such control is achieved in part by regulatory elements that determine the domains and levels of expression of genes coding for the diverse FGF ligands via specific molecular signaling pathways. There is new knowledge on the operation of such mechanisms in regions of the neural tube involved in the correct patterning of adjacent territories (known as secondary organizers of neural tube pattern). In the present minireview we intend to summarize recent evidence and emerging conclusions on potent modulators that govern the activity of Fgf8 signals in the developing vertebrate brain, focusing our attention on the best known secondary organizer, the isthmic organizer.

  1. Building the backbone: the development and evolution of vertebral patterning.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Angeleen; Kishida, Marcia G; Kimmel, Charles B; Keynes, Roger J

    2015-05-15

    The segmented vertebral column comprises a repeat series of vertebrae, each consisting of two key components: the vertebral body (or centrum) and the vertebral arches. Despite being a defining feature of the vertebrates, much remains to be understood about vertebral development and evolution. Particular controversy surrounds whether vertebral component structures are homologous across vertebrates, how somite and vertebral patterning are connected, and the developmental origin of vertebral bone-mineralizing cells. Here, we assemble evidence from ichthyologists, palaeontologists and developmental biologists to consider these issues. Vertebral arch elements were present in early stem vertebrates, whereas centra arose later. We argue that centra are homologous among jawed vertebrates, and review evidence in teleosts that the notochord plays an instructive role in segmental patterning, alongside the somites, and contributes to mineralization. By clarifying the evolutionary relationship between centra and arches, and their varying modes of skeletal mineralization, we can better appreciate the detailed mechanisms that regulate and diversify vertebral patterning.

  2. Building the backbone: the development and evolution of vertebral patterning.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Angeleen; Kishida, Marcia G; Kimmel, Charles B; Keynes, Roger J

    2015-05-15

    The segmented vertebral column comprises a repeat series of vertebrae, each consisting of two key components: the vertebral body (or centrum) and the vertebral arches. Despite being a defining feature of the vertebrates, much remains to be understood about vertebral development and evolution. Particular controversy surrounds whether vertebral component structures are homologous across vertebrates, how somite and vertebral patterning are connected, and the developmental origin of vertebral bone-mineralizing cells. Here, we assemble evidence from ichthyologists, palaeontologists and developmental biologists to consider these issues. Vertebral arch elements were present in early stem vertebrates, whereas centra arose later. We argue that centra are homologous among jawed vertebrates, and review evidence in teleosts that the notochord plays an instructive role in segmental patterning, alongside the somites, and contributes to mineralization. By clarifying the evolutionary relationship between centra and arches, and their varying modes of skeletal mineralization, we can better appreciate the detailed mechanisms that regulate and diversify vertebral patterning. PMID:25968309

  3. Human Evolution and Osteoporosis-Related Spinal Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Meghan M.; Loomis, David A.; Simpson, Scott W.; Latimer, Bruce; Hernandez, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The field of evolutionary medicine examines the possibility that some diseases are the result of trade-offs made in human evolution. Spinal fractures are the most common osteoporosis-related fracture in humans, but are not observed in apes, even in cases of severe osteopenia. In humans, the development of osteoporosis is influenced by peak bone mass and strength in early adulthood as well as age-related bone loss. Here, we examine the structural differences in the vertebral bodies (the portion of the vertebra most commonly involved in osteoporosis-related fractures) between humans and apes before age-related bone loss occurs. Vertebrae from young adult humans and chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and gibbons (T8 vertebrae, n = 8–14 per species, male and female, humans: 20–40 years of age) were examined to determine bone strength (using finite element models), bone morphology (external shape), and trabecular microarchitecture (micro-computed tomography). The vertebrae of young adult humans are not as strong as those from apes after accounting for body mass (p<0.01). Human vertebrae are larger in size (volume, cross-sectional area, height) than in apes with a similar body mass. Young adult human vertebrae have significantly lower trabecular bone volume fraction (0.26±0.04 in humans and 0.37±0.07 in apes, mean ± SD, p<0.01) and thinner vertebral shells than apes (after accounting for body mass, p<0.01). Since human vertebrae are more porous and weaker than those in apes in young adulthood (after accounting for bone mass), even modest amounts of age-related bone loss may lead to vertebral fracture in humans, while in apes, larger amounts of bone loss would be required before a vertebral fracture becomes likely. We present arguments that differences in vertebral bone size and shape associated with reduced bone strength in humans is linked to evolutionary adaptations associated with bipedalism. PMID:22028933

  4. Differential diagnosis of multiple vertebral compression: butterfly vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Ozaras, Nihal; Gumussu, Kevser; Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Rezvani, Aylin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] A butterfly vertebra is a rare congenital anomaly resulting from a symmetric fusion defect. Only a few cases of butterfly vertebra have been described. This anomaly may be isolated or associated with Pfeiffer, Jarcho-Levins, Crouzon, or Alagille syndrome. [Subject and Methods] We herein describe a 38-year-old man who presented with neck and low back pain and was found to have butterfly vertebrae at the T9 and L3 levels. He also had Behçet’s disease and psoriasis. [Results] The patient’s symptoms improved with analgesics and physiotherapy. [Conclusion] To our knowledge, butterfly vertebrae at two levels have never been reported. Butterfly vertebrae may be confused with vertebral fractures in lateral radiographs, and awareness of this anomaly is important for a correct diagnosis. PMID:26696746

  5. Differential diagnosis of multiple vertebral compression: butterfly vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Ozaras, Nihal; Gumussu, Kevser; Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Rezvani, Aylin

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] A butterfly vertebra is a rare congenital anomaly resulting from a symmetric fusion defect. Only a few cases of butterfly vertebra have been described. This anomaly may be isolated or associated with Pfeiffer, Jarcho-Levins, Crouzon, or Alagille syndrome. [Subject and Methods] We herein describe a 38-year-old man who presented with neck and low back pain and was found to have butterfly vertebrae at the T9 and L3 levels. He also had Behçet's disease and psoriasis. [Results] The patient's symptoms improved with analgesics and physiotherapy. [Conclusion] To our knowledge, butterfly vertebrae at two levels have never been reported. Butterfly vertebrae may be confused with vertebral fractures in lateral radiographs, and awareness of this anomaly is important for a correct diagnosis. PMID:26696746

  6. A case of posterior element fracture in Kummell's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, S W; Kim, H-S

    2012-05-01

    Kummell's disease is a rare, delayed posttraumatic collapse of a vertebral body that can occur several months or even years after an osteoporotic compression fracture. However, there are few reports of posterior element fractures associated with Kummell's disease. A 72-year-old man who had sustained an L1 osteoporotic compression fracture 14 months prior was admitted to our institution with incapacitating back pain. Plain radiographs showed progressive collapse of the L1 vertebral body and severe kyphosis at the thoracolumbar junction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a posterior element fracture as well as osteonecrosis of the L1 vertebral body. An L1 percutaneous vertebroplasty was performed, followed by bone cement-augmented screw fixation to maintain stability and correct the kyphotic deformity. After surgery, pain relief was immediate, and the patient was able to walk unassisted. This case illustrates that continuous axial distraction stress caused by aggravated kyphosis secondary to Kummell's disease may result in posterior element fractures. Our discussion concludes with a literature review.

  7. Idiopathic segmental sclerosis of vertebral bodies

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, E.F.; Dorfman, H.D.

    1982-12-01

    Five cases of idiopathic vetebral sclerosis are presented. The features of this condition are segmental vertebral sclerosis of a single lumbar vertebra in a young adult without disc space narrowing or alteration of vertebral contour. The differential diagnosis is discussed. Lumbar vertebra biopsies of three patients showed reactive nonspecific osteosclerosis.

  8. Diversity and Community Composition of Vertebrates in Desert River Habitats.

    PubMed

    Free, C L; Baxter, G S; Dickman, C R; Lisle, A; Leung, L K-P

    2015-01-01

    Animal species are seldom distributed evenly at either local or larger spatial scales, and instead tend to aggregate in sites that meet their resource requirements and maximise fitness. This tendency is likely to be especially marked in arid regions where species could be expected to concentrate at resource-rich oases. In this study, we first test the hypothesis that productive riparian sites in arid Australia support higher vertebrate diversity than other desert habitats, and then elucidate the habitats selected by different species. We addressed the first aim by examining the diversity and composition of vertebrate assemblages inhabiting the Field River and adjacent sand dunes in the Simpson Desert, western Queensland, over a period of two and a half years. The second aim was addressed by examining species composition in riparian and sand dune habitats in dry and wet years. Vertebrate species richness was estimated to be highest (54 species) in the riverine habitats and lowest on the surrounding dune habitats (45 species). The riverine habitats had different species pools compared to the dune habitats. Several species, including the agamid Gowidon longirostris and tree frog Litoria rubella, inhabited the riverine habitats exclusively, while others such as the skinks Ctenotus ariadnae and C. dux were captured only in the dune habitats. The results suggest that, on a local scale, diversity is higher along riparian corridors and that riparian woodland is important for tree-dependent species. Further, the distribution of some species, such as Mus musculus, may be governed by environmental variables (e.g. soil moisture) associated with riparian corridors that are not available in the surrounding desert environment. We conclude that inland river systems may be often of high conservation value, and that management should be initiated where possible to alleviate threats to their continued functioning. PMID:26637127

  9. Diversity and Community Composition of Vertebrates in Desert River Habitats.

    PubMed

    Free, C L; Baxter, G S; Dickman, C R; Lisle, A; Leung, L K-P

    2015-01-01

    Animal species are seldom distributed evenly at either local or larger spatial scales, and instead tend to aggregate in sites that meet their resource requirements and maximise fitness. This tendency is likely to be especially marked in arid regions where species could be expected to concentrate at resource-rich oases. In this study, we first test the hypothesis that productive riparian sites in arid Australia support higher vertebrate diversity than other desert habitats, and then elucidate the habitats selected by different species. We addressed the first aim by examining the diversity and composition of vertebrate assemblages inhabiting the Field River and adjacent sand dunes in the Simpson Desert, western Queensland, over a period of two and a half years. The second aim was addressed by examining species composition in riparian and sand dune habitats in dry and wet years. Vertebrate species richness was estimated to be highest (54 species) in the riverine habitats and lowest on the surrounding dune habitats (45 species). The riverine habitats had different species pools compared to the dune habitats. Several species, including the agamid Gowidon longirostris and tree frog Litoria rubella, inhabited the riverine habitats exclusively, while others such as the skinks Ctenotus ariadnae and C. dux were captured only in the dune habitats. The results suggest that, on a local scale, diversity is higher along riparian corridors and that riparian woodland is important for tree-dependent species. Further, the distribution of some species, such as Mus musculus, may be governed by environmental variables (e.g. soil moisture) associated with riparian corridors that are not available in the surrounding desert environment. We conclude that inland river systems may be often of high conservation value, and that management should be initiated where possible to alleviate threats to their continued functioning.

  10. Threats from climate change to terrestrial vertebrate hotspots in Europe.

    PubMed

    Maiorano, Luigi; Amori, Giovanni; Capula, Massimo; Falcucci, Alessandra; Masi, Monica; Montemaggiori, Alessandro; Pottier, Julien; Psomas, Achilleas; Rondinini, Carlo; Russo, Danilo; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Boitani, Luigi; Guisan, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    We identified hotspots of terrestrial vertebrate species diversity in Europe and adjacent islands. Moreover, we assessed the extent to which by the end of the 21(st) century such hotspots will be exposed to average monthly temperature and precipitation patterns which can be regarded as extreme if compared to the climate experienced during 1950-2000. In particular, we considered the entire European sub-continent plus Turkey and a total of 1149 species of terrestrial vertebrates. For each species, we developed species-specific expert-based distribution models (validated against field data) which we used to calculate species richness maps for mammals, breeding birds, amphibians, and reptiles. Considering four global circulation model outputs and three emission scenarios, we generated an index of risk of exposure to extreme climates, and we used a bivariate local Moran's I to identify the areas with a significant association between hotspots of diversity and high risk of exposure to extreme climates. Our results outline that the Mediterranean basin represents both an important hotspot for biodiversity and especially for threatened species for all taxa. In particular, the Iberian and Italian peninsulas host particularly high species richness as measured over all groups, while the eastern Mediterranean basin is particularly rich in amphibians and reptiles; the islands (both Macaronesian and Mediterranean) host the highest richness of threatened species for all taxa occurs. Our results suggest that the main hotspots of biodiversity for terrestrial vertebrates may be extensively influenced by the climate change projected to occur over the coming decades, especially in the Mediterranean bioregion, posing serious concerns for biodiversity conservation.

  11. Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Maiorano, Luigi; Amori, Giovanni; Capula, Massimo; Falcucci, Alessandra; Masi, Monica; Montemaggiori, Alessandro; Pottier, Julien; Psomas, Achilleas; Rondinini, Carlo; Russo, Danilo; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    2013-01-01

    We identified hotspots of terrestrial vertebrate species diversity in Europe and adjacent islands. Moreover, we assessed the extent to which by the end of the 21st century such hotspots will be exposed to average monthly temperature and precipitation patterns which can be regarded as extreme if compared to the climate experienced during 1950-2000. In particular, we considered the entire European sub-continent plus Turkey and a total of 1149 species of terrestrial vertebrates. For each species, we developed species-specific expert-based distribution models (validated against field data) which we used to calculate species richness maps for mammals, breeding birds, amphibians, and reptiles. Considering four global circulation model outputs and three emission scenarios, we generated an index of risk of exposure to extreme climates, and we used a bivariate local Moran’s I to identify the areas with a significant association between hotspots of diversity and high risk of exposure to extreme climates. Our results outline that the Mediterranean basin represents both an important hotspot for biodiversity and especially for threatened species for all taxa. In particular, the Iberian and Italian peninsulas host particularly high species richness as measured over all groups, while the eastern Mediterranean basin is particularly rich in amphibians and reptiles; the islands (both Macaronesian and Mediterranean) host the highest richness of threatened species for all taxa occurs. Our results suggest that the main hotspots of biodiversity for terrestrial vertebrates may be extensively influenced by the climate change projected to occur over the coming decades, especially in the Mediterranean bioregion, posing serious concerns for biodiversity conservation. PMID:24066162

  12. Diversity and Community Composition of Vertebrates in Desert River Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Free, C. L.; Baxter, G. S.; Dickman, C. R.; Lisle, A.; Leung, L. K.-P.

    2015-01-01

    Animal species are seldom distributed evenly at either local or larger spatial scales, and instead tend to aggregate in sites that meet their resource requirements and maximise fitness. This tendency is likely to be especially marked in arid regions where species could be expected to concentrate at resource-rich oases. In this study, we first test the hypothesis that productive riparian sites in arid Australia support higher vertebrate diversity than other desert habitats, and then elucidate the habitats selected by different species. We addressed the first aim by examining the diversity and composition of vertebrate assemblages inhabiting the Field River and adjacent sand dunes in the Simpson Desert, western Queensland, over a period of two and a half years. The second aim was addressed by examining species composition in riparian and sand dune habitats in dry and wet years. Vertebrate species richness was estimated to be highest (54 species) in the riverine habitats and lowest on the surrounding dune habitats (45 species). The riverine habitats had different species pools compared to the dune habitats. Several species, including the agamid Gowidon longirostris and tree frog Litoria rubella, inhabited the riverine habitats exclusively, while others such as the skinks Ctenotus ariadnae and C. dux were captured only in the dune habitats. The results suggest that, on a local scale, diversity is higher along riparian corridors and that riparian woodland is important for tree-dependent species. Further, the distribution of some species, such as Mus musculus, may be governed by environmental variables (e.g. soil moisture) associated with riparian corridors that are not available in the surrounding desert environment. We conclude that inland river systems may be often of high conservation value, and that management should be initiated where possible to alleviate threats to their continued functioning. PMID:26637127

  13. Hyperkyphosis, Kyphosis Progression, and Risk of Non-Spine Fractures in Older Community Dwelling Women: The Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF)

    PubMed Central

    Kado, Deborah M.; Miller-Martinez, Dana; Lui, Li-Yung; Cawthon, Peggy; Katzman, Wendy B.; Hillier, Teresa A.; Fink, Howard A.; Ensrud, Kristine E.

    2014-01-01

    While accentuated kyphosis is associated with osteoporosis, it is unknown whether it increases risk of future fractures, independent of bone mineral density (BMD) and vertebral fractures. We examined the associations of baseline Cobb angle kyphosis and 15 year change in kyphosis with incident non-spine fractures using data from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures. A total of 994 predominantly white women, aged 65 or older, were randomly sampled from 9,704 original participants to have repeated Cobb angle measurements of kyphosis measured from lateral spine radiographs at baseline and an average of 15 years later. Non-spine fractures, confirmed by radiographic report, were assessed every four months for up to 21.3 years. Compared with women in the lower three quartiles of kyphosis, women with kyphosis greater than 53 degrees (top quartile) had a 50% increased risk of non-spine fracture (95% CI, 1.10 –2.06 after adjusting for BMD, prevalent vertebral fractures, prior history of fractures, and other fracture risk factors. Cobb angle kyphosis progressed an average of 7 degrees (SD = 6.8) over 15 years. Per 1 SD increase in kyphosis change, there was a multivariable adjusted 28% increased risk of fracture (95% CI, 1.06 – 1.55) that was attenuated by further adjustment for baseline BMD (HR per SD increase in kyphosis change, 1.19; 95% CI 0.99 –1.44). Greater kyphosis is associated with an elevated non-spine fracture risk independent of traditional fracture risk factors in older women. Furthermore, worsening kyphosis is also associated with increased fracture risk that is partially mediated by low baseline BMD that itself is a risk factor for kyphosis progression. These results suggest that randomized controlled fracture intervention trials should consider implementing kyphosis measures to: 1) further study kyphosis and kyphosis change as an additional fracture risk factor; and 2) test whether therapies may improve or delay its progression. PMID:24715607

  14. Lamprey: a model for vertebrate evolutionary research.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Zhu, Si-Wei; Li, Qing-Wei

    2016-09-18

    Lampreys belong to the superclass Cyclostomata and represent the most ancient group of vertebrates. Existing for over 360 million years, they are known as living fossils due to their many evolutionally conserved features. They are not only a keystone species for studying the origin and evolution of vertebrates, but also one of the best models for researching vertebrate embryonic development and organ differentiation. From the perspective of genetic information, the lamprey genome remains primitive compared with that of other higher vertebrates, and possesses abundant functional genes. Through scientific and technological progress, scientists have conducted in-depth studies on the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems of lampreys. Such research has significance for understanding and revealing the origin and evolution of vertebrates, and could contribute to a greater understanding of human diseases and treatments. This review presents the current progress and significance of lamprey research. PMID:27686784

  15. Lamprey: a model for vertebrate evolutionary research

    PubMed Central

    XU, Yang; ZHU, Si-Wei; LI, Qing-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Lampreys belong to the superclass Cyclostomata and represent the most ancient group of vertebrates. Existing for over 360 million years, they are known as living fossils due to their many evolutionally conserved features. They are not only a keystone species for studying the origin and evolution of vertebrates, but also one of the best models for researching vertebrate embryonic development and organ differentiation. From the perspective of genetic information, the lamprey genome remains primitive compared with that of other higher vertebrates, and possesses abundant functional genes. Through scientific and technological progress, scientists have conducted in-depth studies on the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems of lampreys. Such research has significance for understanding and revealing the origin and evolution of vertebrates, and could contribute to a greater understanding of human diseases and treatments. This review presents the current progress and significance of lamprey research. PMID:27686784

  16. Lamprey: a model for vertebrate evolutionary research.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Zhu, Si-Wei; Li, Qing-Wei

    2016-09-18

    Lampreys belong to the superclass Cyclostomata and represent the most ancient group of vertebrates. Existing for over 360 million years, they are known as living fossils due to their many evolutionally conserved features. They are not only a keystone species for studying the origin and evolution of vertebrates, but also one of the best models for researching vertebrate embryonic development and organ differentiation. From the perspective of genetic information, the lamprey genome remains primitive compared with that of other higher vertebrates, and possesses abundant functional genes. Through scientific and technological progress, scientists have conducted in-depth studies on the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems of lampreys. Such research has significance for understanding and revealing the origin and evolution of vertebrates, and could contribute to a greater understanding of human diseases and treatments. This review presents the current progress and significance of lamprey research.

  17. Cellular automata segmentation of the boundary between the compacta of vertebral bodies and surrounding structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Jan; Nimsky, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Due to the aging population, spinal diseases get more and more common nowadays; e.g., lifetime risk of osteoporotic fracture is 40% for white women and 13% for white men in the United States. Thus the numbers of surgical spinal procedures are also increasing with the aging population and precise diagnosis plays a vital role in reducing complication and recurrence of symptoms. Spinal imaging of vertebral column is a tedious process subjected to interpretation errors. In this contribution, we aim to reduce time and error for vertebral interpretation by applying and studying the GrowCut - algorithm for boundary segmentation between vertebral body compacta and surrounding structures. GrowCut is a competitive region growing algorithm using cellular automata. For our study, vertebral T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans were first manually outlined by neurosurgeons. Then, the vertebral bodies were segmented in the medical images by a GrowCut-trained physician using the semi-automated GrowCut-algorithm. Afterwards, results of both segmentation processes were compared using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and the Hausdorff Distance (HD) which yielded to a DSC of 82.99+/-5.03% and a HD of 18.91+/-7.2 voxel, respectively. In addition, the times have been measured during the manual and the GrowCut segmentations, showing that a GrowCutsegmentation - with an average time of less than six minutes (5.77+/-0.73) - is significantly shorter than a pure manual outlining.

  18. Response of thoracolumbar vertebral bodies to high rate compressive loading - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Dooley, C J; Wester, B A; Wing, I D; Voo, L M; Armiger, R S; Merkle, A C

    2013-01-01

    Underbody blast (UBB) events created by improvised explosive devices are threats to warfighter survivability. High intensity blast waves emitted from these devices transfer large forces through vehicle structures to occupants, often resulting in injuries including debilitating spinal fractures. The vertical loading vector through the spine generates significant compressive forces at high strain rates. To better understand injury mechanisms and ultimately better protect vehicle occupants against UBB attacks, high-fidelity computational models are being developed to predict the human response to dynamic loading characteristic of these events. This effort details the results from a series of 23 high-rate compression tests on vertebral body specimen. A high-rate servo-hydraulic test system applied a range of compressive loading rates (.01 mm/s to 1238 mm/s) to vertebral bodies in the thoracolumbar region (T7-L5). The force-deflection curves generated indicate rate dependent sensitivity of vertebral stiffness, ultimate load and ultimate deflection. Specimen subjected to high-rate dynamic loading to failure experienced critical structural damage at 5.5% ± 2.1% deflection. Compared to quasi-static loading, vertebral bodies had greater stiffness, greater force to failure, and lower ultimate failure deflection at high rates. Post-failure, an average loss in height of 15% was observed, along with a mean reduction in strength of 48%. The resulting data from these tests will allow for enhanced biofidelity of computational models by characterizing the vertebral stiffness response and ultimate deflection at rates representative of UBB events.

  19. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  20. Whole Genome Duplications Shaped the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Repertoire of Jawed Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Frédéric G.; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Schartl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) gene family, involved primarily in cell growth and differentiation, comprises proteins with a common enzymatic tyrosine kinase intracellular domain adjacent to a transmembrane region. The amino-terminal portion of RTKs is extracellular and made of different domains, the combination of which characterizes each of the 20 RTK subfamilies among mammals. We analyzed a total of 7,376 RTK sequences among 143 vertebrate species to provide here the first comprehensive census of the jawed vertebrate repertoire. We ascertained the 58 genes previously described in the human and mouse genomes and established their phylogenetic relationships. We also identified five additional RTKs amounting to a total of 63 genes in jawed vertebrates. We found that the vertebrate RTK gene family has been shaped by the two successive rounds of whole genome duplications (WGD) called 1R and 2R (1R/2R) that occurred at the base of the vertebrates. In addition, the Vegfr and Ephrin receptor subfamilies were expanded by single gene duplications. In teleost fish, 23 additional RTK genes have been retained after another expansion through the fish-specific third round (3R) of WGD. Several lineage-specific gene losses were observed. For instance, birds have lost three RTKs, and different genes are missing in several fish sublineages. The RTK gene family presents an unusual high gene retention rate from the vertebrate WGDs (58.75% after 1R/2R, 64.4% after 3R), resulting in an expansion that might be correlated with the evolution of complexity of vertebrate cellular communication and intracellular signaling. PMID:27260203

  1. The Tromsø Study: body height, body mass index and fractures.

    PubMed

    Joakimsen, R M; Fønnebø, V; Magnus, J H; Tollan, A; Søgaard, A J

    1998-01-01

    Tall persons suffer more hip fractures than shorter persons, and high body mass index is associated with fewer hip and forearm fractures. We have studied the association between body height, body mass index and all non-vertebral fractures in a large, prospective, population-based study. The middle-aged population of Tromsø, Norway, was invited to surveys in 1979/80, 1986/87 and 1994/95 (The Tromsø Study). Of 16,676 invited to the first two surveys, 12,270 attended both times (74%). Height and weight were measured without shoes at the surveys, and all non-vertebral fractures in the period 1988-1995 were registered (922 persons with fractures) and verified by radiography. The risk of a low-energy fracture was found to be positively associated with increasing body height and with decreasing body mass index. Furthermore, men who had gained weight had a lower risk of hip fractures, and women who had gained weight had a lower risk of fractures in the lower extremities. High body height is thus a risk factor for fractures, and 1 in 4 low-energy fractures among women today might be ascribed to the increase in average stature since the turn of the century. Low body mass index is associated with a higher risk of fractures, but the association is probably too weak to have any clinical relevance in this age category.

  2. Application of borehole geophysics to fracture identification and characterization in low porosity limestones and dolostones

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, C.S.; King, H.L.

    1986-01-01

    Geophysical logging was conducted in exploratory core holes drilled for geohydrological investigations at three sites used for waste disposal on the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation. Geophysical log response was calibrated to borehole geology using the drill core. Subsequently, the logs were used to identify fractures and fractured zones and to characterize the hydrologic activity of such zones. Results of the study were used to identify zones of ground water movement and to select targets for subsequent piezometer and monitoring well installation. Neutron porosity, long- and short-normal resistivity, and density logs exhibit anomalies only adjacent to pervasively fractured zones and rarely exhibit anomalies adjacent to individual fractures, suggesting that such logs have insufficient resolution to detect individual fractures. Spontaneous potential, single point resistance, acoustic velocity, and acoustic variable density logs, however, typically exhibit anomalies adjacent to both individual fractures and fracture zones. Correlation is excellent between fracture density logs prepared from the examination of drill core and fractures identified by the analysis of a suite of geophysical logs that have differing spatial resolution characteristics. Results of the study demonstrate the importance of (1) calibrating geophysical log response to drill core from a site, and (2) running a comprehensive suite of geophysical logs that can evaluate both large- and small-scale rock features. Once geophysical log responses to site-specific geological features have been established, logs provide a means of identifying fracture zones and discriminating between hydrologically active and inactive fracture zones. 9 figs.

  3. Risks of all-cause and site-specific fractures among hospitalized patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Liang, Fu-Wen; Li, Chung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high prevalence of osteoporosis. The clinical sequel of osteoporosis is fracture. Patients with COPD who experience a fracture also have increased morbidity and mortality. Currently, the types of all-cause and site-specific fracture among patients with COPD are unknown. Thus, we elucidated the all-cause and site-specific fractures among patients with COPD. A retrospective, population-based, cohort study was conducted utilizing the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database. Patients with COPD were defined as those who were hospitalized with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code of 490 to 492 or 496 between 2001 and 2011. The index date was set as the date of discharge. The study patients were followed from the index date to the date when they sought care for any type of fracture, date of death, date of health insurance policy termination, or the last day of 2013. The types of fracture analyzed in this study included vertebral, rib, humeral, radial and ulnar/wrist, pelvic, femoral, and tibial and fibular fractures. The cohort consisted of 11,312 patients with COPD. Among these patients, 1944 experienced fractures. The most common site-specific fractures were vertebral, femoral, rib, and forearm fractures (radius, ulna, and wrist) at 32.4%, 31%, 12%, and 11.8%, respectively. The adjusted hazard ratios of fracture were 1.71 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.56–1.87] for female patient with COPD and 1.50 (95% CI = 1.39–1.52) for patients with osteoporosis after covariate adjustment. Vertebral and hip fractures are common among patients with COPD, especially among males with COPD. Many comorbidities contribute to the high risk of fracture among patients with COPD. PMID:27749576

  4. Automatic lumbar vertebra segmentation from clinical CT for wedge compression fracture diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subarna; Alomari, Raja'S.; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2011-03-01

    Lumbar vertebral fractures vary greatly in types and causes and usually result from severe trauma or pathological conditions such as osteoporosis. Lumbar wedge compression fractures are amongst the most common ones where the vertebra is severely compressed forming a wedge shape and causing pain and pressure on the nerve roots and the spine. Since vertebral segmentation is the first step in any automated diagnosis task, we present a fully automated method for robustly localizing and segmenting the vertebrae for preparation of vertebral fracture diagnosis. Our segmentation method consists of five main steps towards the CAD(Computer-Aided Diagnosis) system: 1) Localization of the intervertebral discs. 2) Localization of the vertebral skeleton. 3) Segmentation of the individual vertebra. 4) Detection of the vertebrae center line and 5) Detection of the vertebrae major boundary points. Our segmentation results are promising with an average error of 1.5mm (modified Hausdorff distance metric) on 50 clinical CT cases i.e. a total of 250 lumbar vertebrae. We also present promising preliminary results for automatic wedge compression fracture diagnosis on 15 cases, 7 of which have one or more vertebral compression fracture, and obtain an accuracy of 97.33%.

  5. Specimen-Specific Nonlinear Finite Element Modeling to Predict Vertebrae Fracture Loads after Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Y.; Giambini, H.; Ogawa, Y.; Fang, Z.; Thoreson, A.R.; Yaszemski, M.J.; Lu, L.; An, K.N.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Vertebral fracture load and stiffness from a metastatic vertebral defect model were predicted using nonlinear finite element models (FEM) and validated experimentally. Objective The study objective was to develop and validate an FEM-based tool for predicting polymer-augmented lytic vertebral fracture load and stiffness and the influence of metastatic filling materials. Summary of Background Data Percutaneous vertebroplasty has the potential to reduce vertebral fracture risk affected with lytic metastases by providing mechanical stabilization. However, it has been shown that the mismatch in mechanical properties between poly(methyl-methacrylate) (PMMA) and bone induces secondary fractures and intervertebral disc degeneration. A biodegradable co-polymer, poly(propylene fumarate-co-caprolactone) [P(PF-co-CL)], has been shown to possess the appropriate mechanical properties for bone defect repair. Methods Simulated metastatic lytic defects were created in 40 cadaveric vertebral bodies, which were randomized into four groups: intact vertebral body (Intact), simulated defect without treatment (Negative), defect treated with P(PF-co-CL) (Co-polymer), and defect treated with PMMA (PMMA). Spines were imaged with quantitative computerized tomography (QCT), and QCT/FEM-subject-specific, non-linear models were created. Predicted fracture loads and stiffness were identified and compared to experimentally measured values using Pearson’s correlation analysis and paired t-test. Results There was no significant difference between the measured and predicted fracture loads and stiffness for each group. Predicted fracture loads were larger for PMMA-augmentation (3960 N (1371 N)) compared to that of the co-polymer, negative and intact groups (3484 N (1497 N), 3237 N (1744 N) and 1747 N (702 N)). A similar trend was observed in the predicted stiffness. Moreover, predicted and experimental fracture loads were strongly correlated (R2 = 0.78), while stiffness showed moderate

  6. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes of

  7. Influence of Vertebral Bone Marrow Edema on Outcome in Non-Acute Osteoporotic Patients Treated with Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To prospectively investigate the influence of presence of bone marrow edema (BME) in non acute osteoporotic verterbral compression fractures on postoperative clinical outcome in patients treated by percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV). Overview of Literature Although PV is widely used to treat osteoporotic collapsed vertebral compression fractures (VCF); little is known about the influence of BME in osteoporotic VCF or about its relation with relief of pain. Methods Sixty seven patients with non acute osteoporotic verterbral compression fractures treated with PV. They were divided into edema group (56 patients with apparent vertebral BME in their magnetic resonance [MR] images), and non edema group (11 patients with no vertebral BME detected in their MR images). Pain was evaluated one week, one month, six months, and one year post procedure using visual analogue scale. Statistical analysis including a 2-tailed t test comparing postoperative data with preoperative values was done. Results A good clinical response to PV procedure was seen in all patients. Significant difference was seen between two groups in one week, and one month follow up periods. Regarding pain relief in the other periods of follow up, no significant difference was seen between two groups. Conclusions PV resulted in significantly clinical improvement in patients with BME pattern than in those without in one week and one month follow up periods. But the absence of vertebral BME did not influence pain relief in patients with osteoporotic VCFs in six months, and one year post procedure. PMID:27340521

  8. Evolution of the head-trunk interface in tetrapod vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sefton, Elizabeth M; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Mohaddes, Zahra; Hanken, James

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate neck musculature spans the transition zone between head and trunk. The extent to which the cucullaris muscle is a cranial muscle allied with the gill levators of anamniotes or is instead a trunk muscle is an ongoing debate. Novel computed tomography datasets reveal broad conservation of the cucullaris in gnathostomes, including coelacanth and caecilian, two sarcopterygians previously thought to lack it. In chicken, lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) adjacent to occipital somites is a recently identified embryonic source of cervical musculature. We fate-map this mesoderm in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), which retains external gills, and demonstrate its contribution to posterior gill-levator muscles and the cucullaris. Accordingly, LPM adjacent to the occipital somites should be regarded as posterior cranial mesoderm. The axial position of the head-trunk border in axolotl is congruent between LPM and somitic mesoderm, unlike in chicken and possibly other amniotes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09972.001 PMID:27090084

  9. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  10. Vertebral numbers and human evolution.

    PubMed

    Williams, Scott A; Middleton, Emily R; Villamil, Catalina I; Shattuck, Milena R

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Tyson (1699), anatomists have noted and compared differences in the regional numbers of vertebrae among humans and other hominoids. Subsequent workers interpreted these differences in phylogenetic, functional, and behavioral frameworks and speculated on the history of vertebral numbers during human evolution. Even in a modern phylogenetic framework and with greatly expanded sample sizes of hominoid species, researchers' conclusions vary drastically, positing that hominins evolved from either a "long-backed" (numerically long lumbar column) or a "short-backed" (numerically short lumbar column) ancestor. We show that these disparate interpretations are due in part to the use of different criteria for what defines a lumbar vertebra, but argue that, regardless of which lumbar definition is used, hominins are similar to their great ape relatives in possessing a short trunk, a rare occurrence in mammals and one that defines the clade Hominoidea. Furthermore, we address the recent claim that the early hominin thoracolumbar configuration is not distinct from that of modern humans and conclude that early hominins show evidence of "cranial shifting," which might explain the anomalous morphology of several early hominin fossils. Finally, we evaluate the competing hypotheses on numbers of vertebrae and argue that the current data support a hominin ancestor with an African ape-like short trunk and lower back.

  11. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Di Yan; Smith, David Glenn; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Yang, Ming Yao; Xu, Huai Liang; Zhang, Long; Yin, Hua Dong; Zhu, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A) and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B) receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C), has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor. PMID:23712359

  12. Rotations in a Vertebrate Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollum, Gin

    2003-05-01

    Rotational movements of the head are often considered to be measured in a single three dimensional coordinate system implemented by the semicircular canals of the vestibular system of the inner ear. However, the vertebrate body -- including the nervous system -- obeys rectangular symmetries alien to rotation groups. At best, nervous systems mimic the physical rotation group in a fragmented way, only partially reintegrating physical movements in whole organism responses. The vestibular canal reference frame is widely used in nervous systems, for example by eye movements. It is used to some extent even in the cerebrum, as evidenced by the remission of hemineglect -- in which half of space is ignored -- when the vestibular system is stimulated. However, reintegration of space by the organism remains incomplete. For example, compensatory eye movements (which in most cases aid visual fixation) may disagree with conscious self-motion perception. In addition, movement-induced nausea, illusions, and cue-free perceptions demonstrate symmetry breaking or incomplete spatial symmetries. As part of a long-term project to investigate rotation groups in nervous systems, we have analyzed the symmetry group of a primary vestibulo-spinal projection.

  13. Aging and regeneration in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sousounis, Konstantinos; Baddour, Joelle A; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2014-01-01

    Aging is marked by changes that affect organs and resident stem cell function. Shorting of telomeres, DNA damage, oxidative stress, deregulation of genes and proteins, impaired cell-cell communication, and an altered systemic environment cause the eventual demise of cells. At the same time, reparative activities also decline. It is intriguing to correlate aging with the decline of regenerative abilities. Animal models with strong regenerative capabilities imply that aging processes might not be affecting regeneration. In this review, we selectively present age-dependent changes in stem/progenitor cells that are vital for tissue homeostasis and repair. In addition, the aging effect on regeneration following injury in organs such as lung, skeletal muscle, heart, nervous system, cochlear hair, lens, and liver are discussed. These tissues are also known for diseases such as heart attack, stroke, cognitive impairment, cataract, and hearing loss that occur mostly during aging in humans. Conclusively, vertebrate regeneration declines with age with the loss of stem/progenitor cell function. Future studies on improving the function of stem cells, along with studies in fish and amphibians where regeneration does not decline with age, will undoubtedly provide insights into both processes. PMID:24512711

  14. Nuss procedure for surgical stabilization of flail chest with horizontal sternal body fracture and multiple bilateral rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Kwang; Kang, Do Kyun

    2016-06-01

    Flail chest is a life-threatening situation that paradoxical movement of the thoracic cage was caused by multiply fractured ribs in two different planes, or a sternal fracture, or a combination of the two. The methods to achieve stability of the chest wall are controversy between surgical fixation and mechanical ventilation. We report a case of a 33-year-old man who fell from a high place with fail chest due to multiple rib fractures bilaterally and horizontal sternal fracture. The conventional surgical stabilization using metal plates by access to the front of the sternum could not provide stability of the flail segment because the fracture surface was obliquely upward and there were multiple bilateral rib fractures adjacent the sternum. The Nuss procedure was performed for supporting the flail segment from the back. Flail chest was resolved immediately after the surgery. The patient was weaned from the mechanical ventilation on third postoperative day successfully and was ultimately discharged without any complications.

  15. Fractured Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03084 Fractured Surface

    These fractures and graben are part of Gordii Fossae, a large region that has undergone stresses which have cracked the surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16.6S, Longitude 234.3E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Vertebral augmentation by kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty: 8 years experience outcomes and complications

    PubMed Central

    Yaltirik, Kaan; Ashour, Ahmed M; Reis, Conner R; Özdoğan, Selçuk; Atalay, Başar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Context: Minimally invasive percutaneous vertebral augmentation techniques; vertebroplasty, and kyphoplasty have been treatment choices for vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of the patients who underwent vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty regarding complications, correction of vertebral body height, kyphosis angle and pain relief assessment using visual analog score (VAS) for pain. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the hospital records for 100 consecutive patients treated with kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty in our department database. Patients with osteoporotic compression fractures, traumatic compressions, and osteolytic vertebral lesions, including metastases, hemangiomas, and multiple myeloma, were included in the study. Preoperative and postoperative VAS pain scores, percentages of vertebral compression and kyphotic angles were measured and compared as well as demographic characteristics and postoperative complications. Mobilization and length of stay (LOS) were recorded. Results: One hundred patients were treated by 110 procedures. 64 patients were operated on due to osteoporosis (72 procedures). Twelve patients were operated on because of metastasis (13 procedures), 8 patients were operated on because of multiple myeloma (9 procedures). Five patients had two surgeries, 1 patient had 3 surgeries, and 1 patient had 5 surgeries. The mean preoperative VAS was 74.05 ± 9.8. In total, 175 levels were treated, 46 levels by kyphoplasty and 129 by vertebroplasty. The mean postoperative VAS was 20.94 ± 11.8. Most of the patients were mobilized in the same day they of surgery. Mean LOS was 1.83 days. Six patients had nonsymptomatic leakage of polymethlymethacrylate, and patient had epidural hematoma, which was operated on performing hemi-laminectomy. Conclusions: Percutaneous vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty are both effective and safe minimally invasive procedures for the

  17. Vertebral augmentation by kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty: 8 years experience outcomes and complications

    PubMed Central

    Yaltirik, Kaan; Ashour, Ahmed M; Reis, Conner R; Özdoğan, Selçuk; Atalay, Başar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Context: Minimally invasive percutaneous vertebral augmentation techniques; vertebroplasty, and kyphoplasty have been treatment choices for vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of the patients who underwent vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty regarding complications, correction of vertebral body height, kyphosis angle and pain relief assessment using visual analog score (VAS) for pain. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the hospital records for 100 consecutive patients treated with kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty in our department database. Patients with osteoporotic compression fractures, traumatic compressions, and osteolytic vertebral lesions, including metastases, hemangiomas, and multiple myeloma, were included in the study. Preoperative and postoperative VAS pain scores, percentages of vertebral compression and kyphotic angles were measured and compared as well as demographic characteristics and postoperative complications. Mobilization and length of stay (LOS) were recorded. Results: One hundred patients were treated by 110 procedures. 64 patients were operated on due to osteoporosis (72 procedures). Twelve patients were operated on because of metastasis (13 procedures), 8 patients were operated on because of multiple myeloma (9 procedures). Five patients had two surgeries, 1 patient had 3 surgeries, and 1 patient had 5 surgeries. The mean preoperative VAS was 74.05 ± 9.8. In total, 175 levels were treated, 46 levels by kyphoplasty and 129 by vertebroplasty. The mean postoperative VAS was 20.94 ± 11.8. Most of the patients were mobilized in the same day they of surgery. Mean LOS was 1.83 days. Six patients had nonsymptomatic leakage of polymethlymethacrylate, and patient had epidural hematoma, which was operated on performing hemi-laminectomy. Conclusions: Percutaneous vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty are both effective and safe minimally invasive procedures for the

  18. MINARETS WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, N. King; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Minarets Wilderness and adjacent areas in the central Sierra Nevada, California was conducted. The results of the survey indicate that the study area has a substantiated resource potential for small deposits of copper, silver, zinc, lead, and iron, and a probable mineral-resource potential for molybdenum. No energy-resource potential was identified in the study.

  19. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  20. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  1. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  2. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  3. Multiwell fracturing experiments. [Nitrogen foam fracture treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Multiwell fracturing experiments is to test and develop the technology for the efficient stimulation of tight, lenticular gas sands. This requires basic understanding of: (1) fracture behavior and geometry in this complex lithologic environment, and (2) subsequent production into the created fracture. The intricate interplay of the hydraulic fracture with the lens geometry, the internal reservoir characteristics (fractures, reservoir breaks, etc.), the in situ stresses, and the mechanical defects (fracture, bedding, etc.) need to be defined in order to develop a successful stimulation program. The stimulation phase of the Multiwell Experiment is concerned with: (1) determining important rock/reservoir properties that influence or control fracture geometry and behavior, (2) designing fracture treatments to achieve a desired size and objectives, and (3) conducting post-treatment analyses to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. Background statement, project description, results and evaluation of future plans are presented. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Burst Fractures as a Result of Attempted Suicide by Jumping

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Young; Park, Jeong Yoon; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun; Jin, Byoung Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective Jumping from high place for the purpose of suicide results in various damages to body area. A burst fracture of vertebrae is representative of them and we reviewed eight patients who were diagnosed with spinal burst fracture following suicide falling-down. The demographics, characteristics, performed operation, combined injuries, psychological past histories of the patients were analyzed. Methods A retrospective study was made of patients who are diagnosed with vertebral burst fracture from falling-down with the purpose of suicide admitted to department of neurosurgery of the author's hospital, covering the period between 2003 and 2012. Results Total eight patients were suicidal jumper. There were eleven vertebral burst fractures in eight patients and mean age was 26.5 years old. Seven patients already had psychological past history and there were various combined injuries except vertebrae burst fracture. The ankle fracture such as calcaneus, talus, navicular and malleolus was the most common injury and there were also various combined injury. Conclusion Suicidal jumper is different from incidental faller in some aspects because of different injury mechanism. For managing suicidal jumper, physician had to consider patients' age, affected site, psychiatric problem and combined injuries. Each department related to the injuries of patient have to cooperate each other with departments of psychiatry and rehabilitation from beginning to end. PMID:27169037

  5. Absolute fracture risk assessment using lumbar spine and femoral neck bone density measurements: derivation and validation of a hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Leslie, William D; Lix, Lisa M

    2011-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) computes 10-year probability of major osteoporotic fracture from multiple risk factors, including femoral neck (FN) T-scores. Lumbar spine (LS) measurements are not currently part of the FRAX formulation but are used widely in clinical practice, and this creates confusion when there is spine-hip discordance. Our objective was to develop a hybrid 10-year absolute fracture risk assessment system in which nonvertebral (NV) fracture risk was assessed from the FN and clinical vertebral (V) fracture risk was assessed from the LS. We identified 37,032 women age 45 years and older undergoing baseline FN and LS dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA; 1990-2005) from a population database that contains all clinical DXA results for the Province of Manitoba, Canada. Results were linked to longitudinal health service records for physician billings and hospitalizations to identify nontrauma vertebral and nonvertebral fracture codes after bone mineral density (BMD) testing. The population was randomly divided into equal-sized derivation and validation cohorts. Using the derivation cohort, three fracture risk prediction systems were created from Cox proportional hazards models (adjusted for age and multiple FRAX risk factors): FN to predict combined all fractures, FN to predict nonvertebral fractures, and LS to predict vertebral (without nonvertebral) fractures. The hybrid system was the sum of nonvertebral risk from the FN model and vertebral risk from the LS model. The FN and hybrid systems were both strongly predictive of overall fracture risk (p < .001). In the validation cohort, ROC analysis showed marginally better performance of the hybrid system versus the FN system for overall fracture prediction (p = .24) and significantly better performance for vertebral fracture prediction (p < .001). In a discordance subgroup with FN and LS T-score differences greater than 1 SD, there was a significant

  6. RFamide Peptides in Early Vertebrate Development

    PubMed Central

    Sandvik, Guro Katrine; Hodne, Kjetil; Haug, Trude Marie; Okubo, Kataaki; Weltzien, Finn-Arne

    2014-01-01

    RFamides (RFa) are neuropeptides involved in many different physiological processes in vertebrates, such as reproductive behavior, pubertal activation of the reproductive endocrine axis, control of feeding behavior, and pain modulation. As research has focused mostly on their role in adult vertebrates, the possible roles of these peptides during development are poorly understood. However, the few studies that exist show that RFa are expressed early in development in different vertebrate classes, perhaps mostly associated with the central nervous system. Interestingly, the related peptide family of FMRFa has been shown to be important for brain development in invertebrates. In a teleost, the Japanese medaka, knockdown of genes in the Kiss system indicates that Kiss ligands and receptors are vital for brain development, but few other functional studies exist. Here, we review the literature of RFa in early vertebrate development, including the possible functional roles these peptides may play. PMID:25538682

  7. A Case of Aerococcus Urinae Vertebral Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, Michael; Slim, Jihad; Sison, Raymund; Marton, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Aerococcus urinae is an aerobic, alpha hemolytic gram positive coccus bacterium that grows in pairs or clusters. We report the first case of vertebral osteomyelitis due to A. urinae. This has not been previously reported in the literature. PMID:26069429

  8. Sleep and orexins in nonmammalian vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Volkoff, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    Although a precise definition of "sleep" has yet to be established, sleep-like behaviors have been observed in all animals studied to date including mammals and nonmammalian vertebrates. Orexins are hypothalamic neuropeptides that are involved in the regulation of many physiological functions, including feeding, thermoregulation, cardiovascular control, as well as the control of the sleep-wakefulness cycle. To date, the knowledge on the functions of orexins in nonmammalian vertebrates is still limited, but the similarity of the structures of orexins and their receptors among vertebrates suggest that they have similar conserved physiological functions. This review describes our current knowledge on sleep in nonmammalian vertebrates (birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish) and the possible role of orexins in the regulation of their energy homeostasis and arousal states. PMID:22640621

  9. Proximal fifth metatarsal fractures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2013-01-01

    The most common fracture of the foot is a fracture of the proximal fifth metatarsal. In general, there are 3 types of fractures involving the proximal fifth metatarsal area, including a proximal diaphyseal stress fracture, a Jones fracture, and an avulsion fracture of the tuberosity. Some fractures of the fifth metatarsal heal without difficulty, whereas some have the potential for nonunion or delayed healing. Each fracture has some variation in the anatomical location on the fifth metatarsal, the mechanism of injury, the radiographic findings, and the treatment plan. Avulsion fractures of the tuberosity often heal without difficulty, yet fractures distal to the area of insertion of the peroneus brevis tendon are prone to nonunion and delayed healing (). Differential diagnosis of a fifth metatarsal midfoot injury includes ankle sprains, midfoot sprains, plantar facial ruptures, peroneus tendon ruptures, and other foot fractures.

  10. Radiotherapy in the treatment of vertebral hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, S.L.; Schlupp, W.R.; Chiminazzo, H. Jr.

    1985-02-01

    Symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas are not common. Although radiotherapy has been used as treatment, the data are sparse concerning total dose, fractionation and results. The authors report nine patients with vertebral hemangioma treated with 3000-4000 rad, 200 rad/day, 5 fractions per week, followed from 6 to 62 months. Seventy-seven percent had complete or almost complete disappearance of the symptoms. Radiotherapy schedules are discussed.

  11. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  12. SURGICAL CORRECTION OF A CERVICAL SPINAL FRACTURE IN A BENNETT'S WALLABY (MACROPUS RUFOGRISEUS).

    PubMed

    Kragness, Brandy J; Graham, Jennifer E; Bedenice, Daniela; Restifo, Melissa M; Boudrieau, Randy J

    2016-03-01

    Macropods are susceptible to trauma, and fractures of the cervical vertebrae due to collisions are relatively common. A 4-yr-old, intact male Bennett's wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) was presented acutely nonambulatory and tetraparetic but with motor function present in all limbs. Cervical radiographs revealed a C4 vertebral fracture. Surgical stabilization was obtained through a ventral midline approach whereby the vertebral bodies were distracted and then secured with screws and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Postoperative radiographs revealed restoration of the spinal canal and appropriate implant placement. The patient was discharged 4 days postoperatively and gradually recovered full neurologic function per the owner over the ensuing 10 wk. Subsequent radiographs obtained 10.5 mo postoperatively revealed a healed fracture with stable implants. The ventral spinal distraction and stabilization technique using screws and PMMA, as are used in the domestic dog, was successful in this wallaby despite its smaller vertebral size and comparable lack of soft-tissue support. PMID:27010308

  13. Retroviral Diversity and Distribution in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Herniou, Elisabeth; Martin, Joanne; Miller, Karen; Cook, James; Wilkinson, Mark; Tristem, Michael

    1998-01-01

    We used the PCR to screen for the presence of endogenous retroviruses within the genomes of 18 vertebrate orders across eight classes, concentrating on reptilian, amphibian, and piscine hosts. Thirty novel retroviral sequences were isolated and characterized by sequencing approximately 1 kb of their encoded protease and reverse transcriptase genes. Isolation of novel viruses from so many disparate hosts suggests that retroviruses are likely to be ubiquitous within all but the most basal vertebrate classes and, furthermore, gives a good indication of the overall retroviral diversity within vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that viruses clustering with (but not necessarily closely related to) the spumaviruses and murine leukemia viruses are widespread and abundant in vertebrate genomes. In contrast, we were unable to identify any viruses from hosts outside of mammals and birds which grouped with the other five currently recognized retroviral genera: the lentiviruses, human T-cell leukemia-related viruses, avian leukemia virus-related retroviruses, type D retroviruses, and mammalian type B retroviruses. There was also some indication that viruses isolated from individual vertebrate classes tended to cluster together in phylogenetic reconstructions. This implies that the horizontal transmission of at least some retroviruses, between some vertebrate classes, occurs relatively infrequently. It is likely that many of the retroviral sequences described here are distinct enough from those of previously characterized viruses to represent novel retroviral genera. PMID:9621058

  14. Evolution and development of the vertebrate neck

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, Rolf; Knight, Robert; Johanson, Zerina

    2013-01-01

    Muscles of the vertebrate neck include the cucullaris and hypobranchials. Although a functional neck first evolved in the lobe-finned fishes (Sarcopterygii) with the separation of the pectoral/shoulder girdle from the skull, the neck muscles themselves have a much earlier origin among the vertebrates. For example, lampreys possess hypobranchial muscles, and may also possess the cucullaris. Recent research in chick has established that these two muscles groups have different origins, the hypobranchial muscles having a somitic origin but the cucullaris muscle deriving from anterior lateral plate mesoderm associated with somites 1–3. Additionally, the cucullaris utilizes genetic pathways more similar to the head than the trunk musculature. Although the latter results are from experiments in the chick, cucullaris homologues occur in a variety of more basal vertebrates such as the sharks and zebrafish. Data are urgently needed from these taxa to determine whether the cucullaris in these groups also derives from lateral plate mesoderm or from the anterior somites, and whether the former or the latter represent the basal vertebrate condition. Other lateral plate mesoderm derivatives include the appendicular skeleton (fins, limbs and supporting girdles). If the cucullaris is a definitive lateral plate-derived structure it may have evolved in conjunction with the shoulder/limb skeleton in vertebrates and thereby provided a greater degree of flexibility to the heads of predatory vertebrates. PMID:22697305

  15. The origins of colour vision in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Collin, Shaun P; Trezise, Ann E O

    2004-07-01

    The capacity for colour vision is mediated by the comparison of the signal intensities from photoreceptors of two or more types that differ in spectral sensitivity. Morphological, physiological and molecular analyses of the retina in an agnathan (jawless) fish, the lamprey Geotria australis, may hold important clues to the origins of colour vision in vertebrates. Lampreys are extant representatives of an ancient group of vertebrates, the origins of which are thought to date back to at least the early Cambrian, approximately 540 million years ago. G. australis possesses five photoreceptor types, each with cone-like ultrastructural features and different spectral sensitivities. Recent molecular genetic studies have also revealed that five visual pigment (opsin) genes are expressed in the retina, each of which is orthologous to the major classes of vertebrate opsin genes. These findings reveal that multiple opsin genes originated very early in vertebrate evolution, prior to the separation of the jawed and jawless vertebrate lineages, thereby providing the genetic basis for colour vision in all vertebrates.

  16. Compressive fracture morphology and mechanism of metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-11-01

    We quantitatively investigated the fracture morphologies of Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 and Pd78Cu6Si16 metallic glasses (MGs) under compression. The characteristic features of the compressive fracture morphology were captured, and the shear vein patterns were found to be not a one-to-one correspondence between two opposing fracture surfaces in an identical sample. This finding experimentally confirms that the compressive failure behaves in a fracture mode of pure shear (mode II). Quantitative measurements show that a ˜1 μm thickness layer with materials not only inside but also adjacent to the major shear band contributes to the formation of shear vein patterns. The critical shear strain to break a shear band was found to be more than 105% and higher in more ductile MGs under compression than tension. Estimation on the temperature rise at the fracture moment indicates that only ˜5% of the total elastic energy stored in the sample converts into the heat required for melting the layer to form the vein patterns. The mode II fracture toughness was also estimated based on the quantitative measurements of shear vein pattern and found larger than the mode I fracture toughness. Finally, the deformation and fracture mechanisms of MGs under tension and compression were compared and discussed. These results may improve the understanding on the fracture behaviors and mechanisms of MGs and may provide instructions on future design for ductile MGs with high resistance for fracture.

  17. Oldest Pathology in a Tetrapod Bone Illuminates the Origin of Terrestrial Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Peter J.; Walmsley, Christopher W.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Quayle, Michelle R.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of terrestrial tetrapods was a key event in vertebrate evolution, yet how and when it occurred remains obscure, due to scarce fossil evidence. Here, we show that the study of palaeopathologies, such as broken and healed bones, can help elucidate poorly understood behavioural transitions such as this. Using high-resolution finite element analysis, we demonstrate that the oldest known broken tetrapod bone, a radius of the primitive stem tetrapod Ossinodus pueri from the mid-Viséan (333 million years ago) of Australia, fractured under a high-force, impact-type loading scenario. The nature of the fracture suggests that it most plausibly occurred during a fall on land. Augmenting this are new osteological observations, including a preferred directionality to the trabecular architecture of cancellous bone. Together, these results suggest that Ossinodus, one of the first large (>2m length) tetrapods, spent a significant proportion of its life on land. Our findings have important implications for understanding the temporal, biogeographical and physiological contexts under which terrestriality in vertebrates evolved. They push the date for the origin of terrestrial tetrapods further back into the Carboniferous by at least two million years. Moreover, they raise the possibility that terrestriality in vertebrates first evolved in large tetrapods in Gondwana rather than in small European forms, warranting a re-evaluation of this important evolutionary event. PMID:25938463

  18. Alteration-weakening leading to localized deformation in a damage aureole adjacent to a dormant shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, Nils R.; Rowe, Christie D.; Barshi, Naomi

    2016-09-01

    Deformation adjacent to faults and shear zones is traditionally thought to correlate with slip. Inherited structures may control damage geometry, localizing fluid flow and deformation in a damage aureole around structures, even after displacement has ceased. In this paper we document a post-shearing anastomosing foliation and fracture network that developed to one side of the Mesoarchean Marmion Shear Zone. This fracture network hosts the low-grade, disseminated Hammond Reef gold deposit. The shear zone juxtaposed a greenstone belt against tonalite gneiss and was locked by an intrusion that was emplaced during the final stages of suturing. After cessation of activity, fluids channeled along fault- and intrusion-related fractures led to the pervasive sericitization of feldspars. Foliated zones resulted from flattening in the weaker sericite-rich tonalite during progressive alteration without any change in the regional NW-SE shortening direction. The anastomosing pattern may have been inherited from an earlier ductile fabric, but sericite alteration and flattening fabrics all formed post-shearing. Thus, the apparent foliated fracture network adjacent to the Marmion Shear Zone is a second-order effect of shear-related damage, distinct in time from shear activity, adjacent to an effectively dormant shear zone. This phenomenon has implications for understanding the relative timing of fault zone activity, alteration and (in this case) gold mineralization related to long-term fault zone permeability.

  19. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  20. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  1. Land-Surface Subsidence and Open Bedrock Fractures in the Tully Valley, Onondaga County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackett, William R.; Gleason, Gayle C.; Kappel, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Open bedrock fractures were mapped in and near two brine field areas in Tully Valley, New York. More than 400 open fractures and closed joints were mapped for dimension, orientation, and distribution along the east and west valley walls adjacent to two former brine fields. The bedrock fractures are as much as 2 feet wide and over 50 feet deep, while linear depressions in the soil, which are 3 to 10 feet wide and 3 to 6 feet deep, indicate the presence of open bedrock fractures below the soil. The fractures are probably the result of solution mining of halite deposits about 1,200 feet below the land surface.

  2. Irradiation of Spinal Metastases: Should We Continue to Include One Uninvolved Vertebral Body Above and Below in the Radiation Field?

    SciTech Connect

    Klish, Darren S.; Grossman, Patricia; Allen, Pamela K.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Chang, Eric L.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Historically, the appropriate target volume to be irradiated for spinal metastases is 1-2 vertebral bodies above and below the level of involvement for three reasons: (1) to avoid missing the correct level in the absence of simulation or (2) to account for the possibility of spread of disease to the adjacent level, and (3) to account for beam penumbra. In this study, we hypothesized that isolated failures occurring in the level adjacent to level treated with stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRS) were infrequent and that with improved localization techniques with image-guided radiation therapy, treatment of only the involved level of spinal metastases may be more appropriate. Methods and Materials: Patients who had received SBRS treatments to only the involved level of the spine as part of a prospective trial for spinal metastases comprised the study population. Follow-up imaging with spine MRI was performed at 3-month intervals following initial treatment. Failures in the adjacent (V{+-}1, V{+-}2) and distant spine were identified and classified accordingly. Results: Fifty-eight patients met inclusion criteria for this study and harbored 65 distinct spinal metastases. At 18-month median follow-up, seven (10.7%) patients failed simultaneously at adjacent levels V{+-}1 and at multiple sites throughout the spine. Only two (3%) patients experienced isolated, solitary adjacent failures at 9 and 11 months, respectively. Conclusion: Isolated local failures of the unirradiated adjacent vertebral bodies may occur in <5% of patients with isolated spinal metastasis. On the basis of the data, the current practice of irradiating one vertebral body above and below seems unnecessary and could be revised to irradiate only the involved level(s) of the spine metastasis.

  3. More than 5-Year Follow-up Results of Two-Level and Three-Level Posterior Fixations of Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures with Load-Sharing Scores of Seven and Eight Points

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sub-Ri; Kim, Jung-Mook; Eun, Dong-Chan; Son, Eui-Young

    2016-01-01

    Background The development of pedicle screw-based posterior spinal instrumentation is recognized as one of the major surgical treatment methods for thoracolumbar burst fractures. However, the appropriate level in posterior segment instrumentation is still a point of debate. To assesses the long-term results of two-level and three-level posterior fixations of thoracolumbar burst fractures that have load-sharing scores of 7 and 8 points. Methods From January 1998 to May 2009, we retrospectively analyzed clinical and radiologic outcomes of 45 patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures of 7 and 8 points in load-sharing classification who were operated on using two-level posterior fixation (one segment above and one segment below: 28 patients, group I) or three-level posterior fixation (two segments above and one segment below: 17 patients, group II). Clinical results included the grade of the fracture using the Frankel classification, and the visual analog score was used to evaluate pain before surgery, immediately after surgery, and during follow-up period. We also evaluated pain and work status at the final follow-up using the Denis pain scale. Results In all cases, non-union or loosening of implants was not observed. There were two screw breakages in two-level posterior fixation group, but bony union was obtained at the final follow-up. There were no significant differences in loss of anterior vertebral body height, correction loss, or change in adjacent discs. Also, in clinical evaluation, there was no significant difference in the neurological deficit of any patient during the follow-up period. Conclusions In our study, two-level posterior fixation could be used successfully in selected cases of thoracolumbar burst fractures of 7 and 8 points in the load-sharing classification. PMID:26929802

  4. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion.

  5. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  6. Mortality associated with bone fractures in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Yasunaga, Hideo; Sakamoto, Yukiyo; Hasegawa, Wakae; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Urushiyama, Hirokazu; Jo, Taisuke; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Nagase, Takahide

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective COPD is well known to frequently coexist with osteoporosis. Bone fractures often occur and may affect mortality in COPD patients. However, in-hospital mortality related to bone fractures in COPD patients has been poorly studied. This retrospective study investigated in-hospital mortality of COPD patients with bone fractures using a national inpatient database in Japan. Methods Data of COPD patients admitted with bone fractures, including hip, vertebra, shoulder, and forearm fractures to 1,165 hospitals in Japan between July 2010 and March 2013, were extracted from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. The clinical characteristics and mortalities of the patients were determined. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was also performed to determine the factors associated with in-hospital mortality of COPD patients with hip fractures. Results Among 5,975 eligible patients, those with hip fractures (n=4,059) were older, had lower body mass index (BMI), and had poorer general condition than those with vertebral (n=1,477), shoulder (n=281), or forearm (n=158) fractures. In-hospital mortality was 7.4%, 5.2%, 3.9%, and 1.3%, respectively. Among the hip fracture group, surgical treatment was significantly associated with lower mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.32–0.56) after adjustment for patient backgrounds. Higher in-hospital mortality was associated with male sex, lower BMI, lower level of consciousness, and having several comorbidities, including pneumonia, lung cancer, congestive heart failure, chronic liver disease, and chronic renal failure. Conclusion COPD patients with hip fractures had higher mortality than COPD patients with other types of fracture. Surgery for hip fracture was associated with lower mortality than conservative treatment. PMID:27703343

  7. Borehole sampling of fracture populations - compensating for borehole sampling bias in crystalline bedrock aquifers, Mirror Lake, Grafton County, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, G.D.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Barton, C.C.; Johnson, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    The clustering of orientations of hydraulically conductive fractures in bedrock at the Mirror Lake, New Hampshire fractured rock study site was investigated by comparing the orientations of fracture populations in two subvertical borehole arrays with those mapped on four adjacent subvertical roadcuts. In the boreholes and the roadcuts, the orientation of fracture populations appears very similar after borehole data are compensated for undersampling of steeply dipping fractures. Compensated borehole and pavement fracture data indicate a northeast-striking population of fractures with varying dips concentrated near that of the local foliation in the adjacent rock. The data show no correlation between fracture density (fractures/linear meter) and distance from lithologic contacts in both the boreholes and the roadcuts. The population of water-producing borehole fractures is too small (28 out of 610 fractures) to yield meaningful orientation comparisons. However, the orientation of large aperture fractures (which contains all the producing fractures) contains two or three subsidiary clusters in orientation frequency that are not evident in stereographic projections of the entire population containing all aperture sizes. Further, these subsidiary orientation clusters do not coincide with the dominant (subhorizontal and subvertical) regional fracture orientations.

  8. Fractures of the forefoot.

    PubMed

    Mandracchia, Vincent J; Mandi, Denise M; Toney, Patris A; Halligan, Jennifer B; Nickles, W Ashton

    2006-04-01

    Fractures of the forefoot are common injuries of various causes. Although not crippling, forefoot fractures can be debilitating if they go undiagnosed or are mistreated. Whenever patients complain of foot pain with ambulation or difficulty ambulating, radiographs should be taken as part of a standard routine to assess for bony pathology. This article discusses the classification and treatment of metatarsal fractures, digital and sesamoid fractures, and open fractures about the forefoot.

  9. Thyroid Dysfunction in an Adult Female Population: A population-based study of Latin American Vertebral Osteoporosis Study (LAVOS) - Puerto Rico Site Hypothyroidism in LAVOS-Puerto Rico site

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Loida A.; Felici-Giovanini, Marcos E; Haddock, Lillian

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of hypothyroidism in an adult female population in Puerto Rico and to determine the relationship between hypothyroidism, bone mineral density and vertebral and non-vertebral fractures in this population. Methods Data from the 400 subjects database of the Latin American Vertebral Osteoporosis Study (LAVOS), Puerto Rico site was reviewed. Patient’s medical history, anthropometric data, current medications, laboratories, and DXA results was extracted. Subjects with thyroid dysfunction were identified based on their previous medical history and levels of TSH. Bone Mineral Density was classified using the World Health Organization criteria. Crude prevalence of thyroid dysfunction were estimated with a confidence of 95% and weighted by the population distribution by age, according to the distribution by age group in the 2000 census. Bone mineral densities and prevalence of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures were compared among the groups. Results The weighted prevalence of hyperthyroidism in this population was 0.0043% (95% CI: −0.0021%, 0.0107%). The weighted prevalence of hypothyroidism was 24.2% (95% CI: 19.9%, 28.4%). Increased prevalence of hypothyroidism was found in participants 70 years or older. The mean BMD at spine, hip and femoral neck was similar among the groups. No difference in the proportion of participants with vertebral and non-vertebral fractures was found among the groups. Conclusion Our study found a high prevalence of hypothyroidism among adult postmenopausal females in Puerto Rico. No association between hypothyroidism and decreased bone mineral densities, vertebral or non-vertebral fractures was found in this population. PMID:23781620

  10. Human Disc Nucleus Properties and Vertebral Endplate Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Azucena G.; Slichter, Chloe K.; Acosta, Frank L.; Rodriguez-Soto, Ana E.; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Lotz, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Study of human cadaveric discs quantifying endplate permeability and porosity and correlating these with measures of disc quality: cell density, proteoglycan content, and overall degeneration. Permeability and porosity increased with age and were not correlated with cell density or overall degeneration, suggesting that endplate calcification may not accelerate disc degeneration. Study Design Experimental quantification of relationships between vertebral endplate morphology, permeability, disc cell density, glycosaminoglycan content and degeneration in samples harvested from human cadaveric spines. Objective To test the hypothesis that variation in endplate permeability and porosity contribute to changes in intervertebral disc cell density and overall degeneration. Summary of Background Data Cells within the intervertebral disc are dependent on diffusive exchange with capillaries in the adjacent vertebral bone. Previous findings suggest that blocked routes of transport negatively affect disc quality, yet there are no quantitative relationships between human vertebral endplate permeability, porosity, cell density and disc degeneration. Such relationships would be valuable for clarifying degeneration risk factors, and patient features that may impede efforts at disc tissue engineering. Methods Fifty-one motion segments were harvested from 13 frozen cadaveric human lumbar spines (32 to 85 years) and classified for degeneration using the MRI-based Pfirrmann scale. A cylindrical core was harvested from the center of each motion segment that included vertebral bony and cartilage endplates along with adjacent nucleus tissue. The endplate mobility, a type of permeability, was measured directly using a custom-made permeameter before and after the cartilage endplate was removed. Cell density within the nucleus tissue was estimated using the picogreen method while the nuclear GAG content was quantified using the DMMB technique. Specimens were imaged at 8 μm resolution using

  11. Technetium-99m-HDP uptake characteristics in equine fractures: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, E; Geissbühlerl, U; Doherr, M G; Lang, J

    2006-10-01

    Bone scintigraphy is a very sensitive diagnostic tool to detect elevated bone metabolism. In cases of fractures and fissure fractures, the radiopharmaceutical uptake in the bone is said to be increased within a few hours after the injury. In this retrospective study, the scintigraphic uptake characteristics at the fracture site of 36 horses with radiographically confirmed fractures or fissure fractures were evaluated. Uptake ratios between the fracture region and adjacent normal bone or soft tissue activity respectively were calculated and compared to different anamnestic and radiographic data. The overall sensitivity of bone scintigraphy was 94.4% (34 positive cases out of 36). In the 36 horses, no correlation between the age of the fracture and the radiopharmaceutical uptake was found. However, there seems to be a lack of sensitivity in early detection of equine pelvic fractures when a standing bone scintigraphy examination protocol is used.

  12. The early origin of vertebral anomalies, as illustrated by a 'butterfly vertebra'.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, F; O'Rahilly, R; Benson, D R

    1986-01-01

    An anomalous (butterfly) eleventh thoracic vertebra in a fetus of 63 mm greatest length is described and graphic reconstructions (together with normal controls) are provided. The cartilaginous hemicentra are separated by disc-like material. Cartilaginous bars to adjacent vertebrae are present. The neural arch is complete. The notochord is not duplicated. Only one comparable case in the embryonic period has been described previously. After a discussion of cleft vertebrae in the human and in experimental animals, a developmental timetable of the appearance of several vertebral anomalies is provided. The sensitive period for butterfly vertebrae, depending on the mode of origin, seems to be 3-6 postovulatory weeks. More severe anomalies, such as the split notochord syndrome, appear earlier. It is concluded that most of the vertebral anomalies discussed arise during the embryonic period proper, although the timing of a few, such as spina bifida occulta, extends into the early fetal period. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:3693103

  13. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn

    2002-10-28

    present time, we are developing an inverse process using a simulation model to understand the fluid flow patterns in the presence of a fracture, and the interactions between fluid flow in the fracture and the adjacent matrix. Preliminary results demonstrate that the flow patterns are significantly impacted by the presence of the fracture. Bypassing is quantified and we expect to be able to extract from the modeling the distribution of properties in the fracture and the adjacent matrix.

  14. Intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS) in thoracolumbar fractures.

    PubMed

    Blumenkopf, B; Daniels, T

    1988-01-01

    The thoracolumbar levels are the second most common region for spinal trauma. A major surgical effort often entails removal of retropulsed bone fragments with decompression of the spinal contents or realignment of vertebral subluxations. The ability to determine intraoperatively the completeness of such a procedure could impact on the surgical approach and, ultimately, the operative result. The intraoperative use of ultrasonography has gained popularity and applicability. This comparison study of intraoperative ultrasonography versus postoperative computed tomography (CT) assessed the accuracy of intraoperative ultrasonography in determining the status of the spinal canal following surgical intervention in a group of 21 patients with thoracolumbar fractures. In all cases a patent ventral subarachnoid space or complete spinal canal decompression was deduced following intraoperative ultrasonography. The postoperative assessment by CT concurred in 20 of 21 (95%) situations. Intraoperative ultrasonography proved useful during the operative management of these fractures and gave good supportive evidence that the neural elements were decompressed by surgical procedure. PMID:2980067

  15. Squash(ed): Craniofacial and vertebral injury from collision on squash court.

    PubMed

    Atik, Alp; Krilis, Matthew; Parker, Geoffrey

    2012-10-01

    Squash is a popular racquet sport not usually associated with severe head or spinal injury. The incidence of squash-related injury ranges from 35.5 to 80.9 per 100,000 players, with the most common sites being the lower-limbs and eyes. We present a case of extensive traumatic craniomaxillofacial and vertebral injury resulting from collision on a squash court, without use of protective gear. The patient sustained fractures of the frontal bone, orbits, maxillae, zygomas, the first and second cervical vertebrae and the spinous process of the seventh cervical vertrebra. This is the first case of squash-related injury with such extensive craniofacial and vertebral involvement. This unique case required multiple surgical procedures as well as an extensive admission to the intensive care unit and highlights the risk of significant craniomaxillofacial trauma in sports not usually associated with such injuries.

  16. [Severe osteoporosis with vertebral crushes in juvenile dermatomyositis. Effect of oral alendronate therapy].

    PubMed

    Tau, Cristina; Russo, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are used for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, cancer, and in prevention of organ rejects. A frequent secondary effect of longterm treatment with corticoids is the loss of bone mass, caused by several mechanisms: decrease in the intestinal calcium absorption, increase of the renal calcium excretion at the distal renal tubule, suppressive effect on the osteoblast and also in apoptosis of osteoclasts, inhibition in local production of IGF I (Insulin-like growth factor) and IGFBPs (binding IGF I proteins necessary for bone metabolism), and decrease on osteocalcin production. Longterm treatment with corticoids is associated with osteoporosis and vertebral fractures. To improve this condition, treatment with bisphosphonates has been proposed. We present here a clinical case of a girl with dermatomyositis and severe osteoporosis with vertebral crushes, who responded well to oral bisphophonate treatment.

  17. Developmental mechanisms of vertebrate limb evolution.

    PubMed

    Cohn, M J

    2001-01-01

    Over the past few years, our understanding of the evolution of limbs has been improved by important new discoveries in the fossil record. Additionally, rapid progress has been made in identifying the molecular basis of vertebrate limb development. It is now possible to integrate these two areas of research in order to identify the molecular developmental mechanisms underlying the evolution of paired appendages in vertebrates. After the origin of paired appendages, several vertebrate lineages reduced or eliminated fins and limbs and returned to the limbless condition. Examples include eels, caecilians, snakes, slow worms and several marine mammals. Analyses of fossil and extant vertebrates show that evolution of limblessness frequently occurred together with elongation of the trunk and loss of clear morphological boundaries in the vertebral column. This may be suggestive of a common developmental mechanism linking these two processes. We have addressed this question by analysing python embryonic development at tissue, cellular and molecular levels, and we have identified a developmental mechanism which may account for evolution of limb loss in these animals.

  18. Developmental mechanisms of vertebrate limb evolution.

    PubMed

    Cohn, M J

    2001-01-01

    Over the past few years, our understanding of the evolution of limbs has been improved by important new discoveries in the fossil record. Additionally, rapid progress has been made in identifying the molecular basis of vertebrate limb development. It is now possible to integrate these two areas of research in order to identify the molecular developmental mechanisms underlying the evolution of paired appendages in vertebrates. After the origin of paired appendages, several vertebrate lineages reduced or eliminated fins and limbs and returned to the limbless condition. Examples include eels, caecilians, snakes, slow worms and several marine mammals. Analyses of fossil and extant vertebrates show that evolution of limblessness frequently occurred together with elongation of the trunk and loss of clear morphological boundaries in the vertebral column. This may be suggestive of a common developmental mechanism linking these two processes. We have addressed this question by analysing python embryonic development at tissue, cellular and molecular levels, and we have identified a developmental mechanism which may account for evolution of limb loss in these animals. PMID:11277086

  19. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  20. Geode development and multiple fractures in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lowthian, P J; Calin, A

    1985-02-01

    The radiological development from normal bone of geodes and subsequent fractures in phalanges of two adjacent fingers is described in a patient with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Presentation was as a septic, discharging focus, but infection was excluded; the pathology is described.

  1. Depression of the Thoracolumbar Posterior Vertebral Body on the Estimation of Cement Leakage in Vertebroplasty and Kyphoplasty Operations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Jia, Pu; Bao, Li; Feng, Fei; Yang, He; Li, Jin-Jun; Tang, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Background: The cross-section of thoracolumbar vertebral body is kidney-shaped with depressed posterior boundary. The anterior wall of the vertebral canal is separated from the posterior wall of the vertebral body on the lateral X-ray image. This study was designed to determine the sagittal distance between the anterior border of the vertebral canal and the posterior border of the vertebral body (DBCV) and to analyze the potential role of DBCV in the estimation of cement leakage during percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) or percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP). Methods: We retrospectively recruited 233 patients who had osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures and were treated with PVP or PKP. Computed tomography images of T11–L2 normal vertebrae were measured to obtain DBCV. The distance from cement to the posterior wall of the vertebral body (DCPW) of thoracolumbar vertebrae was measured from C-arm images. The selected vertebrae were divided into two groups according to DCPW, with the fracture levels, fracture grades and leakage rates of the two groups compared. A relative operating characteristic (ROC) curve was applied to determine whether the DCPW difference can be used to estimate the degree of cement leakage. The data were processed by statistical software SPSS version 21.0 using independent sample t-test and Chi-square tests. Results: The maximum DBCV was 6.40 mm and the average DBCV was 3.74 ± 0.95 mm. DBCV appeared to be longer in males than in females, but the difference was not statistically significant. The average DCPW of type-B leakage vertebrae (2.59 ± 1.20 mm) was shorter than that of other vertebrae (7.83 ± 2.38 mm, P < 0.001). The leakage rate of group DCPW ≤6.40 mm was lower than that of group DCPW >6.40 mm for type-C and type-S, but much higher for type-B. ROC curve revealed that DCPW only has a predictive value for type-B leakage (area under the curve: 0.98, 95% confidence interval: 0.95–0.99, P < 0.001), and when the cut-off value was 4

  2. A device mimicking the biomechanical characteristics of crocodile skull for lumbar fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingmin; Guo, Lihua; Li, Yuancheng; Lei, Zhenkun; Liu, Yuanchang; Shi, Weiping; Li, Tao; Li, Weikang; Liu, Chong

    2016-01-01

    Open surgery is currently the main treatment method for the lumbar burst fracture with neurological deficit but may irreversibly disrupt the lumbar anatomy. The minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques have recently gained increasing attention. However, their use is still limited to lumbar burst fractures mainly due to their difficulties in burst fracture reduction and decompression. Here we present a novel bio-inspired MIS device which can be used with an endoscope to reset the bone fragments retropulsed into the spinal canal within the wounded vertebral body. Its head jaw mimics the biomechanical characteristics of a crocodile rostrum to improve the performance in gripping and moving bone pieces in the confined space of a vertebral body. This study may be capable of converting the posterior open surgeries to the MIS procedures, and expands the use of the MIS techniques in the treatment of lumbar burst fractures. PMID:27529133

  3. Prevalent osteoporotic fractures in 622 obese and non- obese menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Poiana, C; Carsote, M; Radoi, V; Mihai, A; Capatina, C

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis. The osteoporotic fractures represent a worldwide economical issue. In order to prevent them, we need to understand the risk factors constellation. Although obesity was traditionally considered as protective against osteoporosis, recent data exposed an increased risk of falling and thus a high risk of some fractures. Objective. We aimed to analyze the body mass index (BMI) in relationship with the bone mineral density (BMD) and the prevalent fractures. Methods and Results. Between 2008 and 2014, a cross-sectional observational study included Romanian menopausal Caucasian women without a previous diagnosis of bone maladies, or specific anti-osteoporotic therapy. Prevalent fragility fractures were both self-declared and incidental vertebral. All the subjects had lumbar BMD (GE Lunar Prodigy DXA machine). Out of 622 females (mean age of 58.65 years, mean BMI of 30.30 kg/ m2), 39.22% were obese (BMI ≥ 30kg/ m2). The fracture prevalence was 1.35% versus 1.67% in obese versus non-obese patients. The correlation coefficient between lumbar BMD and BMI was r=0.165, p<0.005. BMI in the fracture group was 31.68 kg/ m2 vs. 30.04 kg/ m2 in the non-fracture group (p=0.08). 15.91% of the entire cohort had prevalent fractures. Obesity prevalence among females with fractures was 30.3% versus 40.73% in the non-fracture group. The most frequent sites were distal forearm (42.42%) and vertebral (21.21%). Discussions & Conclusions. Although the vertebral fractures might be underdiagnosed in our study and despite the fact that we enrolled a relatively young menopausal population, BMI positively correlated with BMD, regardless of the fractures' prevalence. In early menopause, the most frequent fracture is distal forearm. BMI is higher in patients with prevalent fractures vs. non-fractures (borderline significance). Obesity might not protect from any type of fracture but future evidence is necessary since one third of osteoporotic fractures are met in women with a BMI ≥ 30kg

  4. Geomechanical analysis of a welding salt layer and its effects on adjacent sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Mahdi; Nikolinakou, Maria A.; Hudec, Michael R.; Flemings, Peter B.

    2016-06-01

    We simulate welding of the source layer of a salt diapir with a forward finite-element model and study stresses and deformation in the salt layer and the diapir, as well as in their adjacent sediments. Welded salt layers are abundant in mature salt basins, where most or all of the salt has withdrawn into diapirs. However, there is little understanding of the stress field in these layers and their adjacent sediments. We show that salt flow along the source layer leads to significant stress anomalies inside the layer and in adjacent sediments. In the source layer, salt pressure becomes higher than overburden stress in nearly welded areas and becomes lower than overburden stress in adjacent thicker areas. When the source layer welds, stresses increase significantly in sediments near the weld tip, which helps compaction of these sediments and possibly their fracturing and faulting. Our model illustrates that all sediments overlying the weld experience this stress increase and the associated material changes as the weld tip propagates along the weld. We present natural examples fitting our predictions and discuss the importance of our results for the exploration, characterization, and production of reservoirs near welded salt layers.

  5. [Fractures of the forefoot].

    PubMed

    Richter, M

    2011-10-01

    Fractures of the forefoot are common and comprise approximately two thirds of all foot fractures. Forefoot fractures are caused by direct impact or the effect of indirect force. The forces exerted can range from repetitive minor load (stress fractures) to massive destructive forces (complex trauma). The clinical course in forefoot fractures is typically more favourable than in fractures of the mid- and hindfoot. The incidence of complications like infection or pseudarthrosis is low. Exceptions are rare fractures of the proximal shaft of the fifth metatarsal and the sesamoids with higher pseudarthrosis rates. Malunited metatarsal fractures can cause painful conditions that should even be treated operatively. Differences in structure and function of the different forefoot areas and specific fracture types require an adapted management of these special injuries.

  6. Experimental assessment of the sealing effectiveness of rock fracture grouting

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, A.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1987-03-01

    The objective of this investigation is to determine the effectiveness of cement grouts as sealants of fractures in rock. Laboratory experiments have been conducted on seven 15-cm granite cubes containing saw cuts, three 23-cm diameter andesite cores containing induced tension cracks, and one 15-cm diameter marble core containing a natural fracture. Prior to grouting, the hydraulic conductivity of the fractures is determined under a range of normal stresses, applied in loading and unloading cycles, from 0 to 14 MPa (2000 psi). Grout is injected through an axial borehole, at a pressure of 1.2 to 8.3 MPa (180 to 1200 psi), pressure selected to provide a likely groutable fracture aperture, while the fracture is stressed at a constant normal stress. The fracture permeability is measured after grouting. Flow tests on the ungrouted samples confirm the inverse relation between normal stress and fracture permeability. The equivalent aperture determined by these tests is a reliable indicator of groutability. Postgrouting permeability measurements as performed here, and frequently in practice, can be misleading, since incomplete grouting of fractures can result in major apparent reductions in permeability. The apparent permeability reduction is caused by grouting of a small area of a highly preferential flowpath directly adjacent to the hole used for grouting and for permeability testing. Experimental results confirm claims in the literature that ordinary portland cement inadequately penetrates fine fractures.

  7. The vertebral column of Australopithecus sediba.

    PubMed

    Williams, Scott A; Ostrofsky, Kelly R; Frater, Nakita; Churchill, Steven E; Schmid, Peter; Berger, Lee R

    2013-04-12

    Two partial vertebral columns of Australopithecus sediba grant insight into aspects of early hominin spinal mobility, lumbar curvature, vertebral formula, and transitional vertebra position. Au. sediba likely possessed five non-rib-bearing lumbar vertebrae and five sacral elements, the same configuration that occurs modally in modern humans. This finding contrasts with other interpretations of early hominin regional vertebral numbers. Importantly, the transitional vertebra is distinct from and above the last rib-bearing vertebra in Au. sediba, resulting in a functionally longer lower back. This configuration, along with a strongly wedged last lumbar vertebra and other indicators of lordotic posture, would have contributed to a highly flexible spine that is derived compared with earlier members of the genus Australopithecus and similar to that of the Nariokotome Homo erectus skeleton.

  8. Hedgehog Secretion and Signal Transduction in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Kaitlyn E.; Chiang, Chin

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by the Hedgehog (Hh) family of secreted proteins is essential for proper embryonic patterning and development. Dysregulation of Hh signaling is associated with a variety of human diseases ranging from developmental disorders such as holoprosencephaly to certain forms of cancer, including medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma. Genetic studies in flies and mice have shaped our understanding of Hh signaling and revealed that nearly all core components of the pathway are highly conserved. Although many aspects of the Drosophila Hh pathway are conserved in vertebrates, mechanistic differences between the two species have begun to emerge. Perhaps the most striking divergence in vertebrate Hh signaling is its dependence on the primary cilium, a vestigial organelle that is largely absent in flies. This minireview will provide an overview of Hh signaling and present recent insights into vertebrate Hh secretion, receptor binding, and signal transduction. PMID:22474285

  9. [Amphioxus: how to become a vertebrate].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Stéphanie; Camasses, Alain; Escriva, Hector

    2007-01-01

    Evo-devo is a young disciplin, which aims to explain the morphological evolution of organisms through developmental mechanisms and genes networks. A major question within this discipline is the origin of vertebrates. It seems now admitted that vertebrates derive from an invertebrate chordate ancestor. Several models among living chordate representatives are used today to answer this question. The small world of evo-evo interested in the emergence of vertebrates is ebullient about the advent of several totally sequenced genomes allowing comparative analyses to become evermore reliable. Furthermore "non classical" models are developed which can be submitted to refined developmental analysis. One of these is amphioxus (genus Branchyostoma), "a peaceful anchory fillet to illuminate chordate evolution" (Garcia-Fernandez, 2006a, b). The features of this model are described in this review.

  10. The vertebral column of Australopithecus sediba.

    PubMed

    Williams, Scott A; Ostrofsky, Kelly R; Frater, Nakita; Churchill, Steven E; Schmid, Peter; Berger, Lee R

    2013-04-12

    Two partial vertebral columns of Australopithecus sediba grant insight into aspects of early hominin spinal mobility, lumbar curvature, vertebral formula, and transitional vertebra position. Au. sediba likely possessed five non-rib-bearing lumbar vertebrae and five sacral elements, the same configuration that occurs modally in modern humans. This finding contrasts with other interpretations of early hominin regional vertebral numbers. Importantly, the transitional vertebra is distinct from and above the last rib-bearing vertebra in Au. sediba, resulting in a functionally longer lower back. This configuration, along with a strongly wedged last lumbar vertebra and other indicators of lordotic posture, would have contributed to a highly flexible spine that is derived compared with earlier members of the genus Australopithecus and similar to that of the Nariokotome Homo erectus skeleton. PMID:23580532

  11. The origin of the vertebrate skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivar, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The anatomy of the human and other vertebrates has been well described since the days of Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius. The causative origin of the configuration of the bones and of their shapes and forms has been addressed over the ensuing centuries by such outstanding investigators as Goethe, Von Baer, Gegenbauer, Wilhelm His and D'Arcy Thompson, who sought to apply mechanical principles to morphogenesis. However, no coherent causative model of morphogenesis has ever been presented. This paper presents a causative model for the origin of the vertebrate skeleton, based on the premise that the body is a mosaic enlargement of self-organized patterns engrained in the membrane of the egg cell. Drawings illustrate the proposed hypothetical origin of membrane patterning and the changes in the hydrostatic equilibrium of the cytoplasm that cause topographical deformations resulting in the vertebrate body form.

  12. Three Distinct Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a widely conserved signaling molecule that in animals has been adapted as a neurotransmitter. GABA is synthesized from the amino acid glutamate by the action of glutamate decarboxylases (GADs). Two vertebrate genes, GAD1 and GAD2, encode distinct GAD proteins: GAD67 and GAD65, respectively. We have identified a third vertebrate GAD gene, GAD3. This gene is conserved in fishes as well as tetrapods. We analyzed protein sequence, gene structure, synteny, and phylogenetics to identify GAD3 as a homolog of GAD1 and GAD2. Interestingly, we found that GAD3 was lost in the hominid lineage. Because of the importance of GABA as a neurotransmitter, GAD3 may play important roles in vertebrate nervous systems. PMID:27461130

  13. The efficacy of radiotherapy for vertebral hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Miszczyk, L; Ficek, K; Trela, K; Spindel, J

    2001-01-01

    Vertebral hemangiomas are benign, slowly growing tumors sometimes causing local pain in the spine and/or neurologic disorders. The present paper includes 14 cases of painful vertebral hemangiomas treated by radiotherapy. All patients were irradiated using standard fractionation scheme with a total dose 20-30 Gy. One month after the treatment complete pain relief was noted in 36% of cases, five months later in 67% of cases, but in the remaining cases partial pain relief was noted. No correlation between treatment outcome and different biological and technical factors was found. No dose-response relationship was noted. The results suggest that anti-inflamatory effect of radiation plays the major role in this kind of treatment and that radiotherapy for vertebral hemangiomas is easy, short and highly effective analgetic treatment modality.

  14. Cervical Vertebral Body Chordoma in a Cat.

    PubMed

    Hampel, R; Taylor-Brown, F; Priestnall, S L

    2016-05-01

    A 9-year-old, neutered female Maine Coon cat with a 6-week history of progressive ataxia was diagnosed with a cervical vertebral body mass using magnetic resonance imaging. The mass displaced and compressed the cervical spinal cord. The cat was humanely destroyed and necropsy examination confirmed a mass within the second cervical vertebral body. Microscopically, the mass was composed of large, clear, vacuolated ('physaliferous') cells. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells expressed both cytokeratin and vimentin and the final diagnosis was a cervical, vertebral body chordoma. This is only the third report of a chordoma in this species and the first in this location. Chordoma should be considered as a potential differential diagnosis for tumours arising from the cervical vertebrae in the cat.

  15. Chitin is endogenously produced in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Joel J.; Amemiya, Chris T.

    2015-01-01

    Chitin, a biopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is abundant in invertebrates and fungi, and is an important structural molecule. There has been a longstanding belief that vertebrates do not produce chitin, however, we have obtained compelling evidence to the contrary. Chitin synthase genes are present in numerous fishes and amphibians, and chitin is localized in situ to the lumen of the developing zebrafish gut, in epithelial cells of fish scales, and in at least three different cell types in larval salamander appendages. Chitin synthase gene knockdowns and various histochemical experiments in zebrafish further authenticated our results. Finally, a polysaccharide was extracted from scales of salmon that exhibited all the chemical hallmarks of chitin. Our data and analyses demonstrate the existence of endogenous chitin in vertebrates and suggest that it serves multiple roles in vertebrate biology. PMID:25772447

  16. Use of Oral Bisphosphonates in Primary Prevention of Fractures in Postmenopausal Women: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Real, Jordi; Galindo, Gisela; Galván, Leonardo; Lafarga, María Antonia; Rodrigo, María Dolors; Ortega, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Oral bisphosphonates are first-line drugs in the treatment of osteoporosis under most guidelines, and have been shown to decrease risk of first fracture only in asymptomatic vertebral fractures and in clinical trial populations that are generally very different from the general population. Objective To compare incidence of first osteoporotic fracture in two cohorts of postmenopausal women, one treated with bisphosphonates and the other only with calcium and vitamin D. Design Retrospective population cohort study with paired matching based on data from electronic health records. Setting Women aged 60 years and older in 2005, from 21 primary care centers in a healthcare region of Spain. Participants Two groups of women aged 60 years and older (n = 1208), prescribed either calcium and vitamin D (CalVitD) or bisphosphonates (BIPHOS) with or without calcium and vitamin D, were compared for the end point of first recorded osteoporotic-related fracture, with 5-years follow-up. Main Outcome Measure Incidence of first fracture: Vertebral fracture, osteoporosis with pathological fracture, fracture of the upper humeral epiphysis, fracture of the lower radial epiphysis, or femur fracture. Results Estimated 10-year risk of fracture was 11.4% (95% confidence interval: 9.6 to 13.2), 11.8% (9.2 to 14.3) in the BIPHOS group and 11.1% (8.6 to 13.6) in the CalVitD group. No significant differences were found between groups in total fractures (Hazard ratio = 0.934 (0.67 to 1.31)) or location (vertebral, femoral, radial or humeral). Conclusions In postmenopausal women, bisphosphonates have not been shown to better decrease risk of first fracture compared with calcium and vitamin D therapy alone. PMID:25861000

  17. Factors Associated With Kyphosis Progression in Older Women: 15 years experience in the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kado, DM; Huang, MH; Karlamangla, AS; Cawthon, P; Katzman, W; Hillier, TA; Ensrud, K; Cummings, SR

    2012-01-01

    Age-related hyperkyphosis is thought to be a result of underlying vertebral fractures, but studies suggest that among the most hyperkyphotic women, only one in three have underlying radiographic vertebral fractures. Although commonly observed, there is no widely accepted definition of hyperkyphosis in older persons, and other than vertebral fracture, no major causes have been identified. To identify important correlates of kyphosis and risk factors for its progression over time, we conducted a 15 year retrospective cohort study of 1,196 women, aged 65 years and older at baseline (1986–88), from four communities across the United States: Baltimore County, MD; Minneapolis, MN, Portland, Oregon, and the Monongahela Valley, PA. Cobb angle kyphosis was measured from radiographs obtained at baseline and an average of 3.7 and 15 years later. Repeated measures, mixed effects analyses were performed. At baseline, the mean kyphosis angle was 44.7 degrees (standard error 0.4, standard deviation 11.9) and significant correlates included a family history of hyperkyphosis, prevalent vertebral fracture, low bone mineral density, greater body weight, degenerative disc disease, and smoking. Over an average of 15 years, the mean increase in kyphosis was 7.1 degrees (standard error 0.25). Independent determinants of greater kyphosis progression were prevalent and incident vertebral fractures, low bone mineral density and concurrent bone density loss, low body weight, and concurrent weight loss. Thus, age-related kyphosis progression may be best prevented by slowing bone density loss and avoiding weight loss. PMID:22865329

  18. The importance of loading the periphery of the vertebral endplate

    PubMed Central

    Sutterlin, Chester; Dabirrahmani, Danè; Appleyard, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Commercial fusion cages typically provide support in the central region of the endplate, failing to utilize the increased compressive strength around the periphery. This study demonstrates the increase in compressive strength that can be achieved if the bony periphery of the endplate is loaded. Methods Sixteen cadaveric lumbar vertebrae (L1–L5) were randomly divided into two even groups. A different commercial mass produced implant (MPI) was allocated to each group: (I) a Polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) anterior lumber inter-body fusion (ALIF) MPI; and (II) a titanium ALIF MPI. Uniaxial compression at a displacement rate of 0.5 mm/sec was applied to all vertebrae during two phases: (I) with the allocated MPI situated in the central region of the endplate; (II) with an aluminum plate, designed to load the bony periphery of the endplate. The failure load and mode of failure was recorded. Results From phase 1 to phase 2, the failure load increased from 1.1±0.4 to 2.9±1.4 kN for group 1; and from 1.3±1.0 to 3.0±1.9 kN for group 2. The increase in strength from phase 1 to phase 2 was statistically significant for each group (group 1: P<0.01, group 2: P<0.05, paired t-test). There was no significant difference between the groups in either phase (P>0.05, t-test). The mode of failure in phase 1 was the implant being forced through the endplate for both groups. In phase 2, the mode of failure was either a fracture of the epiphyseal rim or buckling of the side wall of the vertebral body. Conclusions Loading the periphery of the vertebral endplate achieved significant increase in compressive load capacity compared to loading the central region of the endplate. Clinically, this implies that patient-specific implants which load the periphery of the vertebral endplate could decrease the incidence of subsidence and improve surgical outcomes. PMID:27757430

  19. The evolution of early vertebrate photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Collin, Shaun P; Davies, Wayne L; Hart, Nathan S; Hunt, David M

    2009-10-12

    Meeting the challenge of sampling an ancient aquatic landscape by the early vertebrates was crucial to their survival and would establish a retinal bauplan to be used by all subsequent vertebrate descendents. Image-forming eyes were under tremendous selection pressure and the ability to identify suitable prey and detect potential predators was thought to be one of the major drivers of speciation in the Early Cambrian. Based on the fossil record, we know that hagfishes, lampreys, holocephalans, elasmobranchs and lungfishes occupy critical stages in vertebrate evolution, having remained relatively unchanged over hundreds of millions of years. Now using extant representatives of these 'living fossils', we are able to piece together the evolution of vertebrate photoreception. While photoreception in hagfishes appears to be based on light detection and controlling circadian rhythms, rather than image formation, the photoreceptors of lampreys fall into five distinct classes and represent a critical stage in the dichotomy of rods and cones. At least four types of retinal cones sample the visual environment in lampreys mediating photopic (and potentially colour) vision, a sampling strategy retained by lungfishes, some modern teleosts, reptiles and birds. Trichromacy is retained in cartilaginous fishes (at least in batoids and holocephalans), where it is predicted that true scotopic (dim light) vision evolved in the common ancestor of all living gnathostomes. The capacity to discriminate colour and balance the tradeoff between resolution and sensitivity in the early vertebrates was an important driver of eye evolution, where many of the ocular features evolved were retained as vertebrates progressed on to land.

  20. The evolution of vertebrate color vision.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Gerald H

    2012-01-01

    Color vision is conventionally defined as the ability of animals to reliably discriminate among objects and lights based solely on differences in their spectral properties. Although the nature of color vision varies widely in different animals, a large majority of all vertebrate species possess some color vision and that fact attests to the adaptive importance this capacity holds as a tool for analyzing the environment. In recent years dramatic advances have been made in our understanding of the nature of vertebrate color vision and of the evolution of the biological mechanisms underlying this capacity. In this chapter I review and comment on these advances.

  1. Epidemiology of fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Susan M; Mendelson, Daniel Ari

    2014-05-01

    As the world population of older adults-in particular those over age 85-increases, the incidence of fragility fractures will also increase. It is predicted that the worldwide incidence of hip fractures will grow to 6.3 million yearly by 2050. Fractures result in significant financial and personal costs. Older adults who sustain fractures are at risk for functional decline and mortality, both as a function of fractures and their complications and of the frailty of the patients who sustain fractures. Identifying individuals at high risk provides an opportunity for both primary and secondary prevention.

  2. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarad; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi

    2002-04-20

    the presence of a fracture, and the interactions between fluid flow in the fracture and the adjacent matrix. Preliminary results demonstrate that the flow patterns are significantly impacted by the presence of the fracture. Bypassing is quantified and we expect to be able to extract from the modeling the distribution of properties in the fracture and the adjacent matrix.

  3. Biomechanics of Thoracolumbar Burst and Chance-Type Fractures during Fall from Height

    PubMed Central

    Ivancic, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design In vitro biomechanical study. Objective To investigate the biomechanics of thoracolumbar burst and Chance-type fractures during fall from height. Methods Our model consisted of a three-vertebra human thoracolumbar specimen (n = 4) stabilized with muscle force replication and mounted within an impact dummy. Each specimen was subjected to a single fall from an average height of 2.1 m with average velocity at impact of 6.4 m/s. Biomechanical responses were determined using impact load data combined with high-speed movie analyses. Injuries to the middle vertebra of each spinal segment were evaluated using imaging and dissection. Results Average peak compressive forces occurred within 10 milliseconds of impact and reached 40.3 kN at the ground, 7.1 kN at the lower vertebra, and 3.6 kN at the upper vertebra. Subsequently, average peak flexion (55.0 degrees) and tensile forces (0.7 kN upper vertebra, 0.3 kN lower vertebra) occurred between 43.0 and 60.0 milliseconds. The middle vertebra of all specimens sustained pedicle and endplate fractures with comminution, bursting, and reduced height of its vertebral body. Chance-type fractures were observed consisting of a horizontal split fracture through the laminae and pedicles extending anteriorly through the vertebral body. Conclusions We hypothesize that the compression fractures of the pedicles and vertebral body together with burst fracture occurred at the time of peak spinal compression, 10 milliseconds. Subsequently, the onset of Chance-type fracture occurred at 20 milliseconds through the already fractured and weakened pedicles and vertebral body due to flexion-distraction and a forward shifting spinal axis of rotation. PMID:25083357

  4. Osteopenia and bone fractures in a man with anorexia nervosa and hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Rigotti, N.A.; Neer, R.M.; Jameson, L.

    1986-07-18

    Women with anorexia nervosa have reduced skeletal mass. Both anorexia and osteopenia are less common in men. We describe a 22-year-old man with anorexia nervosa and severe osteopenia involving both cortical and trabecular bone who developed a pelvic fracture and multiple vertebral compression fractures. He was found to have secondary hypogonadotropic hypogonadism that was reversible with weight gain. This case illustrates the need to consider osteopenia as a potential complication of anorexia nervosa in males as well as females.

  5. The Role of Bone Cement Augmentation in the Treatment of Chronic Symptomatic Osteoporotic Compression Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeun Sung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Ju, Chang Il; Lee, Sung Myung; Shin, Ho

    2010-01-01

    Objective Bone cement augmentation procedures such as percutaneous vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty have been shown to be effective treatment for acute or subacute osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of bone cement augmentation procedures for long standing osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture with late vertebral collapse and persistent back pain. Methods Among 278 single level osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures that were treated by vertebral augmentation procedures at our institute, 18 consecutive patients were included in this study. Study inclusion was limited to initially, minimal compression fractures, but showing a poor prognosis due to late vertebral collapse, intravertebral vacuum clefts and continuous back pain despite conservative treatment for more than one year. The subjects included three men and 15 women. The mean age was 70.7 with a range from 64 to 85 years of age. After postural reduction for two days, bone cement augmentation procedures following intraoperative pressure reduction were performed. Imaging and clinical findings, including the level of the vertebra involved, vertebral height restoration, injected cement volume, local kyphosis, clinical outcome and complications were analyzed. Results The mean follow-up period after bone cement augmentation procedures was 14.3 months (range 12-27 months). The mean injected cement volume was 4.1 mL (range 2.4-5.9 mL). The unipedicular approach was possible in 15 patients. The mean pain score (visual analogue scale) prior to surgery was 7.1, which decreased to 3.1 at 7 days after the procedure. The pain relief was maintained at the final follow up. The kyphotic angle improved significantly from 21.2 ± 4.9° before surgery to 10.4 ± 3.8° after surgery. The fraction of vertebral height increased from 30% to 60% after bone cement augmentation, and the restored vertebral height was maintained at the final follow up

  6. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in a Broken Vertebral Titanium Implant (Titanium Mesh Cage)

    SciTech Connect

    Bierry, G.; Buy, X.; Mohan, P. Chandra; Cupelli, J.; Steib, J.P.; Gangi, A.

    2006-08-15

    We report the case of a percutaneous consolidation of a broken vertebral implant (Surgical Titanium Mesh Implants; DePuy Spine, Raynham, MA, USA) by vertebroplasty. Four years after anterior spondylectomy with cage implantation and stabilization with posterior instrumentation, the patient was admitted for excruciating back pain. Radiographs showed fracture of the cage, screw, and rod. An anterior surgical approach was deemed difficult and a percutaneous injection of polymethyl methacrylate into the cage was performed following posterior instrumentation replacement. This seems to be an interesting alternative to the classical anterior surgical approach, which is often difficult in postoperative conditions.

  7. Prevalent osteoporotic fractures in 622 obese and non- obese menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Poiana, C; Carsote, M; Radoi, V; Mihai, A; Capatina, C

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis. The osteoporotic fractures represent a worldwide economical issue. In order to prevent them, we need to understand the risk factors constellation. Although obesity was traditionally considered as protective against osteoporosis, recent data exposed an increased risk of falling and thus a high risk of some fractures. Objective. We aimed to analyze the body mass index (BMI) in relationship with the bone mineral density (BMD) and the prevalent fractures. Methods and Results. Between 2008 and 2014, a cross-sectional observational study included Romanian menopausal Caucasian women without a previous diagnosis of bone maladies, or specific anti-osteoporotic therapy. Prevalent fragility fractures were both self-declared and incidental vertebral. All the subjects had lumbar BMD (GE Lunar Prodigy DXA machine). Out of 622 females (mean age of 58.65 years, mean BMI of 30.30 kg/ m2), 39.22% were obese (BMI ≥ 30kg/ m2). The fracture prevalence was 1.35% versus 1.67% in obese versus non-obese patients. The correlation coefficient between lumbar BMD and BMI was r=0.165, p<0.005. BMI in the fracture group was 31.68 kg/ m2 vs. 30.04 kg/ m2 in the non-fracture group (p=0.08). 15.91% of the entire cohort had prevalent fractures. Obesity prevalence among females with fractures was 30.3% versus 40.73% in the non-fracture group. The most frequent sites were distal forearm (42.42%) and vertebral (21.21%). Discussions & Conclusions. Although the vertebral fractures might be underdiagnosed in our study and despite the fact that we enrolled a relatively young menopausal population, BMI positively correlated with BMD, regardless of the fractures’ prevalence. In early menopause, the most frequent fracture is distal forearm. BMI is higher in patients with prevalent fractures vs. non-fractures (borderline significance). Obesity might not protect from any type of fracture but future evidence is necessary since one third of osteoporotic fractures are met in women with a BMI ≥ 30

  8. Response of thoracolumbar vertebral bodies to high rate compressive loading - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Dooley, C J; Wester, B A; Wing, I D; Voo, L M; Armiger, R S; Merkle, A C

    2013-01-01

    Underbody blast (UBB) events created by improvised explosive devices are threats to warfighter survivability. High intensity blast waves emitted from these devices transfer large forces through vehicle structures to occupants, often resulting in injuries including debilitating spinal fractures. The vertical loading vector through the spine generates significant compressive forces at high strain rates. To better understand injury mechanisms and ultimately better protect vehicle occupants against UBB attacks, high-fidelity computational models are being developed to predict the human response to dynamic loading characteristic of these events. This effort details the results from a series of 23 high-rate compression tests on vertebral body specimen. A high-rate servo-hydraulic test system applied a range of compressive loading rates (.01 mm/s to 1238 mm/s) to vertebral bodies in the thoracolumbar region (T7-L5). The force-deflection curves generated indicate rate dependent sensitivity of vertebral stiffness, ultimate load and ultimate deflection. Specimen subjected to high-rate dynamic loading to failure experienced critical structural damage at 5.5% ± 2.1% deflection. Compared to quasi-static loading, vertebral bodies had greater stiffness, greater force to failure, and lower ultimate failure deflection at high rates. Post-failure, an average loss in height of 15% was observed, along with a mean reduction in strength of 48%. The resulting data from these tests will allow for enhanced biofidelity of computational models by characterizing the vertebral stiffness response and ultimate deflection at rates representative of UBB events. PMID:23686197

  9. Infant skull fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Skull fractures may occur with head injuries. Although the skull is both tough and resilient and provides excellent ... or blow can result in fracture of the skull and may be accompanied by injury to the ...

  10. Nasal fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A nasal fracture is a break in the bone over the ridge of the nose. It usually results from a blunt ... and is one of the most common facial fracture. Symptoms of a broken nose include pain, blood ...

  11. Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    The metatarsal bones are the long bones in your foot that connect your ankle to your toes. A stress fracture is a break in the bone that happens with repeated injury or stress. Stress fractures are caused ...

  12. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  13. Displaced patella fractures.

    PubMed

    Della Rocca, Gregory J

    2013-10-01

    Displaced patella fractures often result in disruption of the extensor mechanism of the knee. An intact extensor mechanism is a requirement for unassisted gait. Therefore, operative treatment of the displaced patella fracture is generally recommended. The evaluation of the patella fracture patient includes examination of extensor mechanism integrity. Operative management of patella fractures normally includes open reduction with internal fixation, although partial patellectomy is occasionally performed, with advancement of quadriceps tendon or patellar ligament to the fracture bed. Open reduction with internal fixation has historically been performed utilizing anterior tension band wiring, although comminution of the fracture occasionally makes this fixation construct inadequate. Supplementation or replacement of the tension band wire construct with interfragmentary screws, cerclage wire or suture, and/or plate-and-screw constructs may add to the stability of the fixation construct. Arthrosis of the patellofemoral joint is very common after healing of patella fractures, and substantial functional deficits may persist long after fracture healing has occurred.

  14. Transposon-mediated Genome Manipulations in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Ivics, Zoltán; Li, Meng Amy; Mátés, Lajos; Boeke, Jef D.; Bradley, Allan; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2010-01-01

    Transposable elements are segments of DNA with the unique ability to move about in the genome. This inherent feature can be exploited to harness these elements as gene vectors for diverse genome manipulations. Transposon-based genetic strategies have been established in vertebrate species over the last decade, and current progress in this field indicates that transposable elements will serve as indispensable tools in the genetic toolkit of vertebrate models. In particular, transposons can be applied as vectors for somatic and germline transgenesis, and as insertional mutagens in both loss-of-function and gain-of-function forward mutagenesis screens. The major advantage of using transposons as genetic tools is that they facilitate analysis of gene function in an easy, controlled and scalable manner. Transposon-based technologies are beginning to be exploited to link sequence information to gene functions in vertebrate models. In this article, we provide an overview of transposon-based methods used in vertebrate model organisms, and highlight the most important considerations concerning genetic applications of the transposon systems. PMID:19478801

  15. Vertebral choristoma in lipomyelomeningocele: a case report.

    PubMed

    Joshua, S P; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Mahapatra, A K

    2012-01-01

    Lipomeningocele is a type of occult spinal dysraphism characterized by a subcutaneous lipomatous mass that protrudes through a midline bony defect. We report a rare presentation of this condition--a vertebral choristoma wherein the lipomatous mass displaced the normally formed posterior elements--lamina and spinous process of L4 vertebra dorsally to an abnormal location in the absence of a bony defect.

  16. Vertebral osteomyelitis due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis.

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, D R; Everts, R J; Chambers, S T; Cowan, I A

    1996-01-01

    We present the first reported case of vertebral osteomyelitis due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis. The infection occurred in an 80-year-old woman who had been taking glucocorticosteroids. S. lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus with considerable potential as a human pathogen. Isolation of this organism should be regarded as significant unless evidence suggests otherwise. PMID:8815128

  17. [Sex inversion and epigenetic regulation in Vertebrates].

    PubMed

    Trukhina, A V; Lukina, N A; Nekrasova, A A; Smirnov, A F

    2015-03-01

    This review discusses issues related to the regulation of sex determination and differentiation in various groups of Vertebrates. Special attention was paid to factors of external and internal control for various genetic systems of sex determination, as well as to the epigenetic control of this process. Opportunities for sex inversion in various animals were also discussed.

  18. Control of Vertebrate Pests of Agricultural Crops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingard, Robert G.; Studholme, Clinton R.

    This agriculture extension service publication of Pennsylvania State University discusses the damage from and control of vertebrate pests. Specific discussions describe the habits, habitat, and various control measures for blackbirds and crows, deer, meadow and pine mice, European starlings, and woodchucks. Where confusion with non-harmful species…

  19. A Cambrian origin for vertebrate rods

    PubMed Central

    Asteriti, Sabrina; Grillner, Sten; Cangiano, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrates acquired dim-light vision when an ancestral cone evolved into the rod photoreceptor at an unknown stage preceding the last common ancestor of extant jawed vertebrates (∼420 million years ago Ma). The jawless lampreys provide a unique opportunity to constrain the timing of this advance, as their line diverged ∼505 Ma and later displayed high-morphological stability. We recorded with patch electrodes the inner segment photovoltages and with suction electrodes the outer segment photocurrents of Lampetra fluviatilis retinal photoreceptors. Several key functional features of jawed vertebrate rods are present in their phylogenetically homologous photoreceptors in lamprey: crucially, the efficient amplification of the effect of single photons, measured by multiple parameters, and the flow of rod signals into cones. These results make convergent evolution in the jawless and jawed vertebrate lines unlikely and indicate an early origin of rods, implying strong selective pressure toward dim-light vision in Cambrian ecosystems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07166.001 PMID:26095697

  20. A comparative analysis of vertebrate sex determination.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Andrew; Smith, Craig; Western, Patrick; McClive, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Sex determination in vertebrates is controlled by a variety of mechanisms. We compared the expression of SF1, DAX1, DMRT1, SOX9 and AMH during gonadogenesis in the mouse, chicken and alligator embryo. In contrast to the expression profile of Sf1 in mouse embryos, chicken and alligator embryos show higher levels of Sf1 expression in the developing ovaries compared to testes. This may reflect the higher level of sex hormone synthesis in the ovary compared to the testis in chickens and alligators. The DAX1 gene has a similar expression profile in all three vertebrate species but appears to have different gene structure. As in mouse, DMRT1 was expressed at very high levels in the chicken and alligator male gonad. The male-specific up-regulation of SOX9 expression appears to be a common feature in all three vertebrates. In the chicken and alligator AMH is expressed prior to SOX9, suggesting that in these species SOX9 cannot initiate AMH expression as it does in mammals. SOX9 acts at multiple points in the vertebrate testis pathway but it appears that only some of these functions have been conserved through evolution. PMID:11990786

  1. Vertebrate Pest Control. Sale Publication 4077.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stimmann, M. W.; Clark, Dell O.

    This guide gives descriptions of common vertebrate pests and guidelines for using some common pesticides. The pests discussed are rats, mice, bats, moles, muskrats, ground squirrels, and gophers. Information is given for each pest on the type of damage the pest can do, the habitat and biology of the pest, and the most effective control methods.…

  2. The Chinese skeleton: insights into microstructure that help to explain the epidemiology of fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Elaine; Walker, Marcella D

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are a major public health problem worldwide, but incidence varies greatly across racial groups and geographic regions. Recent work suggests that the incidence of osteoporotic fracture is rising among Asian populations. Studies comparing areal bone mineral density and fracture across races generally indicate lower bone mineral density in Asian individuals including the Chinese, but this does not reflect their relatively low risk of non-vertebral fractures. In contrast, the Chinese have relatively high vertebral fracture rates similar to that of Caucasians. The paradoxically low risk for some types of fractures among the Chinese despite their low areal bone mineral density has been elucidated in part by recent advances in skeletal imaging. New techniques for assessing bone quality non-invasively demonstrate that the Chinese compensate for smaller bone size by differences in hip geometry and microstructural skeletal organization. Studies evaluating factors influencing racial differences in bone remodeling, as well as bone acquisition and loss, may further elucidate racial variation in bone microstructure. Advances in understanding the microstructure of the Chinese skeleton have not only helped to explain the epidemiology of fracture in the Chinese, but may also provide insight into the epidemiology of fracture in other races as well. PMID:26273521

  3. The Chinese skeleton: insights into microstructure that help to explain the epidemiology of fracture.

    PubMed

    Cong, Elaine; Walker, Marcella D

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are a major public health problem worldwide, but incidence varies greatly across racial groups and geographic regions. Recent work suggests that the incidence of osteoporotic fracture is r