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Sample records for adjoint shielding code

  1. A user's manual for MASH 1. 0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the dose importance'' of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  2. A User's Manual for MASH V1.5 - A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    SciTech Connect

    C. O. Slater; J. M. Barnes; J. O. Johnson; J.D. Drischler

    1998-10-01

    The Monte Carlo ~djoint ~ielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma- ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air- over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system includes the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. The current version, MASH v 1.5, is the successor to the original MASH v 1.0 code system initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the "dose importance" of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response as a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem.

  3. A user`s manual for MASH 1.0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the ``dose importance`` of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user`s manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  4. Preliminary Results from the Application of Automated Adjoint Code Generation to CFL3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, Alan; Fagan, Mike; Green, Lawrence L.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes preliminary results obtained using an automated adjoint code generator for Fortran to augment a widely-used computational fluid dynamics flow solver to compute derivatives. These preliminary results with this augmented code suggest that, even in its infancy, the automated adjoint code generator can accurately and efficiently deliver derivatives for use in transonic Euler-based aerodynamic shape optimization problems with hundreds to thousands of independent design variables.

  5. Point-Kernel Shielding Code System.

    1982-02-17

    Version 00 QAD-BSA is a three-dimensional, point-kernel shielding code system based upon the CCC-48/QAD series. It is designed to calculate photon dose rates and heating rates using exponential attenuation and infinite medium buildup factors. Calculational provisions include estimates of fast neutron penetration using data computed by the moments method. Included geometry routines can describe complicated source and shield geometries. An internal library contains data for many frequently used structural and shielding materials, enabling the codemore » to solve most problems with only source strengths and problem geometry required as input. This code system adapts especially well to problems requiring multiple sources and sources with asymmetrical geometry. In addition to being edited separately, the total interaction rates from many sources may be edited at each detector point. Calculated photon interaction rates agree closely with those obtained using QAD-P5A.« less

  6. Demonstration of Automatically-Generated Adjoint Code for Use in Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence; Carle, Alan; Fagan, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Gradient-based optimization requires accurate derivatives of the objective function and constraints. These gradients may have previously been obtained by manual differentiation of analysis codes, symbolic manipulators, finite-difference approximations, or existing automatic differentiation (AD) tools such as ADIFOR (Automatic Differentiation in FORTRAN). Each of these methods has certain deficiencies, particularly when applied to complex, coupled analyses with many design variables. Recently, a new AD tool called ADJIFOR (Automatic Adjoint Generation in FORTRAN), based upon ADIFOR, was developed and demonstrated. Whereas ADIFOR implements forward-mode (direct) differentiation throughout an analysis program to obtain exact derivatives via the chain rule of calculus, ADJIFOR implements the reverse-mode counterpart of the chain rule to obtain exact adjoint form derivatives from FORTRAN code. Automatically-generated adjoint versions of the widely-used CFL3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code and an algebraic wing grid generation code were obtained with just a few hours processing time using the ADJIFOR tool. The codes were verified for accuracy and were shown to compute the exact gradient of the wing lift-to-drag ratio, with respect to any number of shape parameters, in about the time required for 7 to 20 function evaluations. The codes have now been executed on various computers with typical memory and disk space for problems with up to 129 x 65 x 33 grid points, and for hundreds to thousands of independent variables. These adjoint codes are now used in a gradient-based aerodynamic shape optimization problem for a swept, tapered wing. For each design iteration, the optimization package constructs an approximate, linear optimization problem, based upon the current objective function, constraints, and gradient values. The optimizer subroutines are called within a design loop employing the approximate linear problem until an optimum shape is found, the design loop

  7. Advances in space radiation shielding codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Qualls, Garry D.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Prael, Richard E.; Norbury, John W.; Heinbockel, John H.; Tweed, John; De Angelis, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    Early space radiation shield code development relied on Monte Carlo methods and made important contributions to the space program. Monte Carlo methods have resorted to restricted one-dimensional problems leading to imperfect representation of appropriate boundary conditions. Even so, intensive computational requirements resulted and shield evaluation was made near the end of the design process. Resolving shielding issues usually had a negative impact on the design. Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary concept to the final design. For the last few decades, we have pursued deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard Finite Element Method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design methods. A single ray trace in such geometry requires 14 milliseconds and limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given.

  8. Advances in space radiation shielding codes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John W; Tripathi, Ram K; Qualls, Garry D; Cucinotta, Francis A; Prael, Richard E; Norbury, John W; Heinbockel, John H; Tweed, John; De Angelis, Giovanni

    2002-12-01

    Early space radiation shield code development relied on Monte Carlo methods and made important contributions to the space program. Monte Carlo methods have resorted to restricted one-dimensional problems leading to imperfect representation of appropriate boundary conditions. Even so, intensive computational requirements resulted and shield evaluation was made near the end of the design process. Resolving shielding issues usually had a negative impact on the design. Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary concept to the final design. For the last few decades, we have pursued deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard Finite Element Method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design methods. A single ray trace in such geometry requires 14 milliseconds and limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given. PMID:12793737

  9. The efficiency of geophysical adjoint codes generated by automatic differentiation tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasenko, A. V.; Köhl, A.; Stammer, D.

    2016-02-01

    The accuracy of numerical models that describe complex physical or chemical processes depends on the choice of model parameters. Estimating an optimal set of parameters by optimization algorithms requires knowledge of the sensitivity of the process of interest to model parameters. Typically the sensitivity computation involves differentiation of the model, which can be performed by applying algorithmic differentiation (AD) tools to the underlying numerical code. However, existing AD tools differ substantially in design, legibility and computational efficiency. In this study we show that, for geophysical data assimilation problems of varying complexity, the performance of adjoint codes generated by the existing AD tools (i) Open_AD, (ii) Tapenade, (iii) NAGWare and (iv) Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran (TAF) can be vastly different. Based on simple test problems, we evaluate the efficiency of each AD tool with respect to computational speed, accuracy of the adjoint, the efficiency of memory usage, and the capability of each AD tool to handle modern FORTRAN 90-95 elements such as structures and pointers, which are new elements that either combine groups of variables or provide aliases to memory addresses, respectively. We show that, while operator overloading tools are the only ones suitable for modern codes written in object-oriented programming languages, their computational efficiency lags behind source transformation by orders of magnitude, rendering the application of these modern tools to practical assimilation problems prohibitive. In contrast, the application of source transformation tools appears to be the most efficient choice, allowing handling even large geophysical data assimilation problems. However, they can only be applied to numerical models written in earlier generations of programming languages. Our study indicates that applying existing AD tools to realistic geophysical problems faces limitations that urgently need to be solved to allow the

  10. Description of transport codes for space radiation shielding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Wilson, John W; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-11-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation in the space environment is one of the hazards faced by crews in space missions. As space radiations traverse spacecraft, habitat shielding, or tissues, their energies and compositions are altered by interactions with the shielding. Modifications to the radiation fields arise from atomic interactions of charged particles with orbital electrons and nuclear interactions leading to projectile and target fragmentation, including secondary particles such as neutrons, protons, mesons, and nuclear recoils. The transport of space radiation through shielding can be simulated using Monte Carlo techniques or deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation. To determine shielding requirements and to resolve radiation constraints for future human missions, the shielding evaluation of a spacecraft concept is required as an early step in the design process. To do this requires (1) accurate knowledge of space environmental models to define the boundary condition for transport calculations, (2) transport codes with detailed shielding and body geometry models to determine particle transmission into areas of internal shielding and at each critical body organ, and (3) the assessment of organ dosimetric quantities and biological risks by applying the corresponding response models for space radiation against the particle spectra that have been accurately determined from the transport code. This paper reviews current transport codes and analyzes their accuracy through comparison to laboratory and spaceflight data. This paper also introduces a probabilistic risk assessment approach for the evaluation of radiation shielding. PMID:23032892

  11. Description of Transport Codes for Space Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation describes transport codes and their use for studying and designing space radiation shielding. When combined with risk projection models radiation transport codes serve as the main tool for study radiation and designing shielding. There are three criteria for assessing the accuracy of transport codes: (1) Ground-based studies with defined beams and material layouts, (2) Inter-comparison of transport code results for matched boundary conditions and (3) Comparisons to flight measurements. These three criteria have a very high degree with NASA's HZETRN/QMSFRG.

  12. Implementation of hybrid variance reduction methods in a multi group Monte Carlo code for deep shielding problems

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, E.; Palmer, T. S.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the work that has been done to implement variance reduction techniques in a three dimensional, multi group Monte Carlo code - Tortilla, that works within the frame work of the commercial deterministic code - Attila, is presented. This project is aimed to develop an integrated Hybrid code that seamlessly takes advantage of the deterministic and Monte Carlo methods for deep shielding radiation detection problems. Tortilla takes advantage of Attila's features for generating the geometric mesh, cross section library and source definitions. Tortilla can also read importance functions (like adjoint scalar flux) generated from deterministic calculations performed in Attila and use them to employ variance reduction schemes in the Monte Carlo simulation. The variance reduction techniques that are implemented in Tortilla are based on the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling) method and the LIFT (Local Importance Function Transform) method. These methods make use of the results from an adjoint deterministic calculation to bias the particle transport using techniques like source biasing, survival biasing, transport biasing and weight windows. The results obtained so far and the challenges faced in implementing the variance reduction techniques are reported here. (authors)

  13. Parallelizing the MARS15 Code with MPI for shielding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhail A. Kostin and Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2004-05-12

    The MARS15 Monte Carlo code capabilities to deal with time-consuming deep penetration shielding problems and other computationally tough tasks in accelerator, detector and shielding applications, have been enhanced by a parallel processing option. It has been developed, implemented and tested on the Fermilab Accelerator Division Linux cluster and network of Sun workstations. The code uses MPI. It is scalable and demonstrates good performance. The general architecture of the code, specific uses of message passing, and effects of a scheduling on the performance and fault tolerance are described.

  14. Application to MISR Land Products of an RPV Model Inversion Package Using Adjoint and Hessian Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavergne, T.; Kaminski, T.; Pinty, B.; Taberner, M.; Gobron, N.; Verstraete, M. M.; Vossbeck, M.; Widlowski, J.-L.; Giering, R.

    The capability of the non-linear Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete RPV model to 1 accurately fit a large variety of Bidirectional Reflectance Factor BRF fields and 2 return parameter values of interest for land surface applications motivate the development of a computer efficient inversion package The present paper describes such a package based on the 3 and 4 parameter versions of the RPV model This software environment implements the adjoint code generated using automatic differentiation techniques of the cost function This cost function itself balances two main contributions reflecting 1 the a priori knowledge on the model parameter values and 2 BRF uncertainties together with the requirement to minimize the mismatch between the measurements and the RPV simulations The individual weights of these contributions are specified notably via covariance matrices of the uncertainties in the a priori knowledge on the model parameters and the observations This package also reports on the probability density functions of the retrieved model parameter values that thus permit the user to evaluate the a posteriori uncertainties on these retrievals This is achieved by evaluating the Hessian of the cost function at its minimum Results from a variety of tests are shown in order to document and analyze software performance against complex synthetic BRF fields simulated by radiation transfer models as well as against actual MISR-derived surface BRF products

  15. Accelerator-based validation of shielding codes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, Cary; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Miller, Jack; Wilson, John W.

    2002-08-12

    The space radiation environment poses risks to astronaut health from a diverse set of sources, ranging from low-energy protons and electrons to highly-charged, high-energy atomic nuclei and their associated fragmentation products, including neutrons. The low-energy protons and electrons are the source of most of the radiation dose to Shuttle and ISS crews, while the more energetic particles that comprise the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (protons, He, and heavier nuclei up to Fe) will be the dominant source for crews on long-duration missions outside the earth's magnetic field. Because of this diversity of sources, a broad ground-based experimental effort is required to validate the transport and shielding calculations used to predict doses and dose-equivalents under various mission scenarios. The experimental program of the LBNL group, described here, focuses principally on measurements of charged particle and neutron production in high-energy heavy-ion fragmentation. Other aspects of the program include measurements of the shielding provided by candidate spacesuit materials against low-energy protons (particularly relevant to extra-vehicular activities in low-earth orbit), and the depth-dose relations in tissue for higher-energy protons. The heavy-ion experiments are performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron and the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba in Japan. Proton experiments are performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88'' Cyclotron with a 55 MeV beam, and at the Loma Linda University Proton Facility with 100 to 250 MeV beam energies. The experimental results are an important component of the overall shielding program, as they allow for simple, well-controlled tests of the models developed to handle the more complex radiation environment in space.

  16. A Radiation Shielding Code for Spacecraft and Its Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Singleterry, R. C.; Wilson, J. W.; Badavi, F. F.; Badhwar, G. D.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    The HZETRN code, which uses a deterministic approach pioneered at NASA Langley Research Center, has been developed over the past decade to evaluate the local radiation fields within sensitive materials (electronic devices and human tissue) on spacecraft in the space environment. The code describes the interactions of shield materials with the incident galactic cosmic rays, trapped protons, or energetic protons from solar particle events in free space and low Earth orbit. The content of incident radiations is modified by atomic and nuclear reactions with the spacecraft and radiation shield materials. High-energy heavy ions are fragmented into less massive reaction products, and reaction products are produced by direct knockout of shield constituents or from de-excitation products. An overview of the computational procedures and database which describe these interactions is given. Validation of the code with recent Monte Carlo benchmarks, and laboratory and flight measurement is also included.

  17. A New Method for Computing Three-Dimensional Capture Fraction in Heterogeneous Regional Systems using the MODFLOW Adjoint Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemo, T. M.; Ramarao, B.; Kelly, V. A.; Lavenue, M.

    2011-12-01

    Capture is a measure of the impact of groundwater pumping upon groundwater and surface water systems. The computation of capture through analytical or numerical methods has been the subject of articles in the literature for several decades (Bredehoeft et al., 1982). Most recently Leake et al. (2010) described a systematic way to produce capture maps in three-dimensional systems using a numerical perturbation approach in which capture from streams was computed using unit rate pumping at many locations within a MODFLOW model. The Leake et al. (2010) method advances the current state of computing capture. A limitation stems from the computational demand required by the perturbation approach wherein days or weeks of computational time might be required to obtain a robust measure of capture. In this paper, we present an efficient method to compute capture in three-dimensional systems based upon adjoint states. The efficiency of the adjoint method will enable uncertainty analysis to be conducted on capture calculations. The USGS and INTERA have collaborated to extend the MODFLOW Adjoint code (Clemo, 2007) to include stream-aquifer interaction and have applied it to one of the examples used in Leake et al. (2010), the San Pedro Basin MODFLOW model. With five layers and 140,800 grid blocks per layer, the San Pedro Basin model, provided an ideal example data set to compare the capture computed from the perturbation and the adjoint methods. The capture fraction map produced from the perturbation method for the San Pedro Basin model required significant computational time to compute and therefore the locations for the pumping wells were limited to 1530 locations in layer 4. The 1530 direct simulations of capture require approximately 76 CPU hours. Had capture been simulated in each grid block in each layer, as is done in the adjoint method, the CPU time would have been on the order of 4 years. The MODFLOW-Adjoint produced the capture fraction map of the San Pedro Basin model

  18. Spectral-Element Seismic Wave Propagation Codes for both Forward Modeling in Complex Media and Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Peter, D. B.; Tromp, J.; Komatitsch, D.; Lefebvre, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    We present both SPECFEM3D_Cartesian and SPECFEM3D_GLOBE open-source codes, representing high-performance numerical wave solvers simulating seismic wave propagation for local-, regional-, and global-scale application. These codes are suitable for both forward propagation in complex media and tomographic imaging. Both solvers compute highly accurate seismic wave fields using the continuous Galerkin spectral-element method on unstructured meshes. Lateral variations in compressional- and shear-wave speeds, density, as well as 3D attenuation Q models, topography and fluid-solid coupling are all readily included in both codes. For global simulations, effects due to rotation, ellipticity, the oceans, 3D crustal models, and self-gravitation are additionally included. Both packages provide forward and adjoint functionality suitable for adjoint tomography on high-performance computing architectures. We highlight the most recent release of the global version which includes improved performance, simultaneous MPI runs, OpenCL and CUDA support via an automatic source-to-source transformation library (BOAST), parallel I/O readers and writers for databases using ADIOS and seismograms using the recently developed Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) with built-in provenance. This makes our spectral-element solvers current state-of-the-art, open-source community codes for high-performance seismic wave propagation on arbitrarily complex 3D models. Together with these solvers, we provide full-waveform inversion tools to image the Earth's interior at unprecedented resolution.

  19. Self-shielding models of MICROX-2 code

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, J.; Ivanov, K.; Choi, H.

    2013-07-01

    The MICROX-2 is a transport theory code that solves for the neutron slowing-down and thermalization equations of a two-region lattice cell. In the previous study, a new fine-group cross section library of the MICROX-2 was generated and tested against reference calculations and measurement data. In this study, existing physics models of the MICROX-2 are reviewed and updated to improve the physics calculation performance of the MICROX-2 code, including the resonance self-shielding model and spatial self-shielding factor. The updated self-shielding models have been verified through a series of benchmark calculations against the Monte Carlo code, using homogeneous and pin cell models selected for this study. The results have shown that the updates of the self-shielding factor calculation model are correct and improve the physics calculation accuracy even though the magnitude of error reduction is relatively small. Compared to the existing models, the updates reduced the prediction error of the infinite multiplication factor by approximately 0.1 % and 0.2% for the homogeneous and pin cell models, respectively, considered in this study. (authors)

  20. Overview of HZETRN and BRNTRN Space Radiation Shielding Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Shinn, J. L.; Simonsen, L. C.; Badavi, F. F.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Health Program has supported basic research over the last decade in radiation physics to develop ionizing radiation transport codes and corresponding data bases for the protection of astronauts from galactic and solar cosmic rays on future deep space missions. The codes describe the interactions of the incident radiations with shield materials where their content is modified by the atomic and nuclear reactions through which high energy heavy ions are fragmented into less massive reaction products and reaction products are produced as radiations as direct knockout of shield constituents or produced as de-excitation products in the reactions. This defines the radiation fields to which specific devices are subjected onboard a spacecraft. Similar reactions occur in the device itself which is the initiating event for the device response. An overview of the computational procedures and data base with some applications to photonic and data processing devices will be given.

  1. MCNP: Multigroup/adjoint capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Redmond, E.L. II; Palmtag, S.P.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-04-01

    This report discusses various aspects related to the use and validity of the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP for multigroup/adjoint calculations. The increased desire to perform comparisons between Monte Carlo and deterministic codes, along with the ever-present desire to increase the efficiency of large MCNP calculations has produced a greater user demand for the multigroup/adjoint capabilities. To more fully utilize these capabilities, we review the applications of the Monte Carlo multigroup/adjoint method, describe how to generate multigroup cross sections for MCNP with the auxiliary CRSRD code, describe how to use the multigroup/adjoint capability in MCNP, and provide examples and results indicating the effectiveness and validity of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint treatment. This information should assist users in taking advantage of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint capabilities.

  2. A Flexible Point-Kernel Shielding Code System.

    1991-01-01

    Version 00 MARMER is a point-kernel shielding code which can be used to calculate the dose rate, energy absorption rate, energy flux or gamma-ray flux due to several sources at any point in a complex geometry. The geometry is described by the MARS geometry system which makes use of combinatorial geometry and an array repeating feature. Source spectra may be defined in several ways including an option to read a binary file containing nuclide concentrations,more » which has been calculated by ORIGEN-S. Therefore, MARMER makes use of a nuclide data library containing half life times, decay energies and gamma yields for over 1000 nuclides. To facilitate the use of ORIGEN-S in the VAX version, a preprocessor named PREORI is included for simple irradiation and decay problems. The spatial description of the source may be done in cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; and the source strength as a function of the distance along the coordinate axes may be done in many different ways. Several sources with different spectra may be treated simultaneously. As many calculational points as needed may be defined.« less

  3. Adjoint acceleration of Monte Carlo simulations using SCALE: A radiation shielding evaluation of the neutron generator room at Missouri S&T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish K.; Alajo, Ayodeji B.; Liu, Xin

    2015-08-01

    A deuterium-deuterium accelerator-type neutron generator was installed in the Nuclear Engineering Department at Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T). This generator is shielded by different hydrogenated and non-hydrogenated materials to reduce the dose rates in the vicinity of the facility. In the work presented in this paper, both SCALE6 and MCNP5 radiation transport codes were used to conduct two independent simulations. The new shielding analysis tool of SCALE6-MAVRIC, with the automatic variance reduction technique of SCALE6, was utilized to estimate and compare the dose rates from the unbiased MCNP simulation. The ultimate goal of this study was to compare the computational effectiveness offered by employing the MAVRIC sequence in the modeling of the neutron generator facility at Missouri S&T.

  4. Radiation shielding and transport codes and data libraries for personal computers available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, B.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In nuclear applications, the conversion of mainframe software to the personal computer (PC) environment has seen an accelerated pace. Credit has to be extended to the software companies that have made the scientific language FORTRAN available on PCs. Not to be neglected are the scientists who dedicate their time in the conversion of codes and are challenged by the limited PC memory and disk space. The Radiation shielding Information Center (RSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has encouraged these developments, and the shielding community has cooperated by making these new tools available via RSIC. The PC codes in the shielding and radiation transport area are divided into five categories (these categories are not mutually exclusive): (1) gamma-ray scattering; (2) neutron and gamma-ray transport (also coupled); (3) environmental dose; (4) medical applications; and (5) reactor physics. Each category is discussed.

  5. Continuous-Energy Adjoint Flux and Perturbation Calculation using the Iterated Fission Probability Method in Monte Carlo Code TRIPOLI-4® and Underlying Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchet, G.; Leconte, P.; Peneliau, Y.; Santamarina, A.; Malvagi, F.

    2014-06-01

    Pile-oscillation experiments are performed in the MINERVE reactor at the CEA Cadarache to improve nuclear data accuracy. In order to precisely calculate small reactivity variations (<10 pcm) obtained in these experiments, a reference calculation need to be achieved. This calculation may be accomplished using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® by using the eigenvalue difference method. This "direct" method has shown limitations in the evaluation of very small reactivity effects because it needs to reach a very small variance associated to the reactivity in both states. To answer this problem, it has been decided to implement the exact perturbation theory in TRIPOLI-4® and, consequently, to calculate a continuous-energy adjoint flux. The Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) method was chosen because it has shown great results in some other Monte Carlo codes. The IFP method uses a forward calculation to compute the adjoint flux, and consequently, it does not rely on complex code modifications but on the physical definition of the adjoint flux as a phase-space neutron importance. In the first part of this paper, the IFP method implemented in TRIPOLI-4® is described. To illustrate the effciency of the method, several adjoint fluxes are calculated and compared with their equivalent obtained by the deterministic code APOLLO-2. The new implementation can calculate angular adjoint flux. In the second part, a procedure to carry out an exact perturbation calculation is described. A single cell benchmark has been used to test the accuracy of the method, compared with the "direct" estimation of the perturbation. Once again the method based on the IFP shows good agreement for a calculation time far more inferior to the "direct" method. The main advantage of the method is that the relative accuracy of the reactivity variation does not depend on the magnitude of the variation itself, which allows us to calculate very small reactivity perturbations with high

  6. Multiparticle Monte Carlo Code System for Shielding and Criticality Use.

    2015-06-01

    Version 00 COG is a modern, full-featured Monte Carlo radiation transport code that provides accurate answers to complex shielding, criticality, and activation problems.COG was written to be state-of-the-art and free of physics approximations and compromises found in earlier codes. COG is fully 3-D, uses point-wise cross sections and exact angular scattering, and allows a full range of biasing options to speed up solutions for deep penetration problems. Additionally, a criticality option is available for computingmore » Keff for assemblies of fissile materials. ENDL or ENDFB cross section libraries may be used. COG home page: http://cog.llnl.gov. Cross section libraries are included in the package. COG can use either the LLNL ENDL-90 cross section set or the ENDFB/VI set. Analytic surfaces are used to describe geometric boundaries. Parts (volumes) are described by a method of Constructive Solid Geometry. Surface types include surfaces of up to fourth order, and pseudo-surfaces such as boxes, finite cylinders, and figures of revolution. Repeated assemblies need be defined only once. Parts are visualized in cross-section and perspective picture views. A lattice feature simplifies the specification of regular arrays of parts. Parallel processing under MPI is supported for multi-CPU systems. Source and random-walk biasing techniques may be selected to improve solution statistics. These include source angular biasing, importance weighting, particle splitting and Russian roulette, pathlength stretching, point detectors, scattered direction biasing, and forced collisions. Criticality – For a fissioning system, COG will compute Keff by transporting batches of neutrons through the system. Activation – COG can compute gamma-ray doses due to neutron-activated materials, starting with just a neutron source. Coupled Problems – COG can solve coupled problems involving neutrons, photons, and electrons. COG 11.1 is an updated version of COG11.1 BETA 2 (RSICC C00777MNYCP02

  7. Multiparticle Monte Carlo Code System for Shielding and Criticality Use.

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    Version 00 COG is a modern, full-featured Monte Carlo radiation transport code that provides accurate answers to complex shielding, criticality, and activation problems.COG was written to be state-of-the-art and free of physics approximations and compromises found in earlier codes. COG is fully 3-D, uses point-wise cross sections and exact angular scattering, and allows a full range of biasing options to speed up solutions for deep penetration problems. Additionally, a criticality option is available for computing Keff for assemblies of fissile materials. ENDL or ENDFB cross section libraries may be used. COG home page: http://cog.llnl.gov. Cross section libraries are included in the package. COG can use either the LLNL ENDL-90 cross section set or the ENDFB/VI set. Analytic surfaces are used to describe geometric boundaries. Parts (volumes) are described by a method of Constructive Solid Geometry. Surface types include surfaces of up to fourth order, and pseudo-surfaces such as boxes, finite cylinders, and figures of revolution. Repeated assemblies need be defined only once. Parts are visualized in cross-section and perspective picture views. A lattice feature simplifies the specification of regular arrays of parts. Parallel processing under MPI is supported for multi-CPU systems. Source and random-walk biasing techniques may be selected to improve solution statistics. These include source angular biasing, importance weighting, particle splitting and Russian roulette, pathlength stretching, point detectors, scattered direction biasing, and forced collisions. Criticality – For a fissioning system, COG will compute Keff by transporting batches of neutrons through the system. Activation – COG can compute gamma-ray doses due to neutron-activated materials, starting with just a neutron source. Coupled Problems – COG can solve coupled problems involving neutrons, photons, and electrons. COG 11.1 is an updated version of COG11.1 BETA 2 (RSICC C00777MNYCP02). New

  8. DOPEX-1D2C: A one-dimensional, two-constraint radiation shield optimization code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahti, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    A one-dimensional, two-constraint radiation sheild weight optimization procedure and a computer program, DOPEX-1D2C, is described. The DOPEX-1D2C uses the steepest descent method to alter a set of initial (input) thicknesses of a spherical shield configuration to achieve a minimum weight while simultaneously satisfying two dose-rate constraints. The code assumes an exponential dose-shield thickness relation with parameters specified by the user. Code input instruction, a FORTRAN-4 listing, and a sample problem are given. Typical computer time required to optimize a seven-layer shield is less than 1/2 minute on an IBM 7094.

  9. SOC-DS computer code provides tool for design evaluation of homogeneous two-material nuclear shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disney, R. K.; Ricks, L. O.

    1967-01-01

    SOC-DS Code /Shield Optimization Code-Direc Search/, selects a nuclear shield material of optimum volume, weight, or cost to meet the requirments of a given radiation dose rate or energy transmission constraint. It is applicable to evaluating neutron and gamma ray shields for all nuclear reactors.

  10. A Line Source Shielding Code for Personal Computers.

    1990-12-22

    Version 00 LINEDOSE computes the gamma-ray dose from a pipe source modeled as a line. The pipe is assumed to be iron and has a concrete shield of arbitrary thickness. The calculation is made for eight source energies between 0.1 and 3.5 MeV.

  11. Point Kernel Gamma-Ray Shielding Code With Geometric Progression Buildup Factors.

    1990-11-30

    Version 00 QADMOD-GP is a PC version of the mainframe code CCC-396/QADMOD-G, a point-kernel integration code for calculating gamma ray fluxes and dose rates or heating rates at specific detector locations within a three-dimensional shielding geometry configuration due to radiation from a volume-distributed source.

  12. HETC radiation transport code development for cosmic ray shielding applications in space.

    PubMed

    Townsend, L W; Miller, T M; Gabriel, Tony A

    2005-01-01

    In order to facilitate three-dimensional analyses of space radiation shielding scenarios for future space missions, the Monte Carlo radiation transport code HETC is being extended to include transport of energetic heavy ions, such as are found in the galactic cosmic ray spectrum in space. Recently, an event generator capable of providing nuclear interaction data for use in HETC was developed and incorporated into the code. The event generator predicts the interaction product yields and production angles and energies using nuclear models and Monte Carlo techniques. Testing and validation of the extended transport code has begun. In this work, the current status of code modifications, which enable energetic heavy ions and their nuclear reaction products to be transported through thick shielding, are described. Also, initial results of code testing against available laboratory beam data for energetic heavy ions interacting in thick targets are presented. PMID:16604614

  13. A Code For Calculating Self-Shielded Multigroup Neutron Cross Sections and Self-Shielding Factors From Preprocessed ENDF/B Basic Data Files.

    1990-11-20

    Version 00 REX2-87 is a computer code developed for the calculation of self-shielded multigroup average cross sections, and self-shielding factors for total, elastic, fission and capture processes from an ENDF/B formatted nuclear data file in which the tabulated cross sections follow linear interpolation throughout.

  14. Introduction to Adjoint Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Errico, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, some fundamentals of adjoint models will be described. This includes a basic derivation of tangent linear and corresponding adjoint models from a parent nonlinear model, the interpretation of adjoint-derived sensitivity fields, a description of methods of automatic differentiation, and the use of adjoint models to solve various optimization problems, including singular vectors. Concluding remarks will attempt to correct common misconceptions about adjoint models and their utilization.

  15. Three-Dimensional Point Kernel Gamma-Ray Shielding Code.

    1981-01-29

    Version 00 QAD-QC is similar in all respects to QAD-P5 (CCC-48/QAD) except that all neutron moments data and heating calculations have been eliminated, the number of regions and boundaries has been reduced, and various changes to the output formats have been changed. This code version was developed for quick and fairly inexpensive direct-beam gamma-ray dose calculations. QAD-QC calculates the direct-beam gamma-ray dose rates at points in three-dimensional space from point, volumetric, and cosine intensity functionmore » sources. The source and dose points can be described in either cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates, while the geometry description is limited to Cartesian only.« less

  16. The SWAN/NPSOL code system for multivariable multiconstraint shield optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E.

    1995-12-31

    SWAN is a useful code for optimization of source-driven systems, i.e., systems for which the neutron and photon distribution is the solution of the inhomogeneous transport equation. Over the years, SWAN has been applied to the optimization of a variety of nuclear systems, such as minimizing the thickness of fusion reactor blankets and shields, the weight of space reactor shields, the cost for an ICF target chamber shield, and the background radiation for explosive detection systems and maximizing the beam quality for boron neutron capture therapy applications. However, SWAN`s optimization module can handle up to a single constraint and was inefficient in handling problems with many variables. The purpose of this work is to upgrade SWAN`s optimization capability.

  17. Extraction of macroscopic and microscopic adjoint concepts using a lattice Boltzmann method and discrete adjoint approach.

    PubMed

    Hekmat, Mohamad Hamed; Mirzaei, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    In the present research, we tried to improve the performance of the lattice Boltzmann (LB) -based adjoint approach by utilizing the mesoscopic inherent of the LB method. In this regard, two macroscopic discrete adjoint (MADA) and microscopic discrete adjoint (MIDA) approaches are used to answer the following two challenging questions. Is it possible to extend the concept of the macroscopic and microscopic variables of the flow field to the corresponding adjoint ones? Further, similar to the conservative laws in the LB method, is it possible to find the comparable conservation equations in the adjoint approach? If so, then a definite framework, similar to that used in the flow solution by the LB method, can be employed in the flow sensitivity analysis by the MIDA approach. This achievement can decrease the implementation cost and coding efforts of the MIDA method in complicated sensitivity analysis problems. First, the MADA and MIDA equations are extracted based on the LB method using the duality viewpoint. Meanwhile, using an elementary case, inverse design of a two-dimensional unsteady Poiseuille flow in a periodic channel with constant body forces, the procedure of analytical evaluation of the adjoint variables is described. The numerical results show that similar correlations between the distribution functions can be seen between the corresponding adjoint ones. Besides, the results are promising, emphasizing the flow field adjoint variables can be evaluated via the adjoint distribution functions. Finally, the adjoint conservative laws are introduced. PMID:25679735

  18. Coupling of Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with three-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.; Lillie, R.A.; Johnson, J.O.; Simpson, D.B.

    1998-04-01

    A computer code, DRC3, has been developed for coupling Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with three-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences in order to solve a special category of geometrically-complex deep penetration shielding problems. The code extends the capabilities of earlier methods that coupled Monte Carlo adjoint leakages with two-dimensional discrete ordinates forward fluences. The problems involve the calculation of fluences and responses in a perturbation to an otherwise simple two- or three-dimensional radiation field. In general, the perturbation complicates the geometry such that it cannot be modeled exactly using any of the discrete ordinates geometry options and thus a direct discrete ordinates solution is not possible. Also, the calculation of radiation transport from the source to the perturbation involves deep penetration. One approach to solving such problems is to perform the calculations in three steps: (1) a forward discrete ordinates calculation, (2) a localized adjoint Monte Carlo calculation, and (3) a coupling of forward fluences from the first calculation with adjoint leakages from the second calculation to obtain the response of interest (fluence, dose, etc.). A description of this approach is presented along with results from test problems used to verify the method. The test problems that were selected could also be solved directly by the discrete ordinates method. The good agreement between the DRC3 results and the direct-solution results verify the correctness of DRC3.

  19. The DOPEX code: An application of the method of steepest descent to laminated-shield-weight optimization with several constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahti, G. P.

    1972-01-01

    A two- or three-constraint, two-dimensional radiation shield weight optimization procedure and a computer program, DOPEX, is described. The DOPEX code uses the steepest descent method to alter a set of initial (input) thicknesses for a shield configuration to achieve a minimum weight while simultaneously satisfying dose constaints. The code assumes an exponential dose-shield thickness relation with parameters specified by the user. The code also assumes that dose rates in each principal direction are dependent only on thicknesses in that direction. Code input instructions, FORTRAN 4 listing, and a sample problem are given. Typical computer time required to optimize a seven-layer shield is about 0.1 minute on an IBM 7094-2.

  20. Code System to Solve the Few-Group Neutron Diffusion Equation Utilizing the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM) for Eigenvalue, Adjoint, and Fixed-Source

    2004-04-21

    Version 04 NESTLE solves the few-group neutron diffusion equation utilizing the NEM. The NESTLE code can solve the eigenvalue (criticality), eigenvalue adjoint, external fixed-source steady-state, and external fixed-source or eigenvalue initiated transient problems. The eigenvalue problem allows criticality searches to be completed, and the external fixed-source steady-state problem can search to achieve a specified power level. Transient problems model delayed neutrons via precursor groups. Several core properties can be input as time dependent. Two- ormore » four-energy groups can be utilized, with all energy groups being thermal groups (i.e., upscatter exits) if desired. Core geometries modeled include Cartesian and hexagonal. Three-, two-, and one-dimensional models can be utilized with various symmetries. The thermal conditions predicted by the thermal-hydraulic model of the core are used to correct cross sections for temperature and density effects. Cross sections are parameterized by color, control rod state (i.e., in or out), and burnup, allowing fuel depletion to be modeled. Either a macroscopic or microscopic model may be employed.« less

  1. A Visualization Code System for Gamma and Neutron Shielding Calculations, Version 2.0

    2008-08-01

    EASYQAD, Version 2.0, is a standalone Windows XP or Windows 7 code system which facilitates gamma and neutron shielding calculations with user friendly graphical interfaces. It is used to analyze radiation shielding problems and includes: - 8 kinds of geometry types - Various flexible source options - Common material library - Various detector types The update contents of EASYQAD Version 2.0 are below: - Addition of starting option with ‘P-code’ files - Addition of multi-sourcemore » calculation function - Expansion of source geometries - Addition of warning message - Modifications of EASYQAD program errors a. Coordination application problem in source division b. Source position error c. Rotation problem of source geometry d. Program running error in using more than six gamma energy distribution e. EASYQAD display problem of the right elliptic cylinder, ellipsoid and truncated right cone geometries Through intuitive windows and their interactions inside EASYQAD, the user can specify the dimensions of 3D-shapes, their material compositions, their densities, the type of radioactive sources, the locations of the sources, the type and positions of detectors. With the ease of using these sequences, shielding problems will become simpler and more clearly understandable to the analyzer. Furthermore, the error checking system can prevent users from making mistakes by automatically debugging the user inputs and giving modal dialog windows. The included AECL implementation of QAD-CGGP-A, Version 95.2 (C00645MNYCP00), is run from the user interface.« less

  2. Shielding evaluation for solar particle events using MCNPX, PHITS and OLTARIS codes.

    PubMed

    Aghara, S K; Sriprisan, S I; Singleterry, R C; Sato, T

    2015-01-01

    Detailed analyses of Solar Particle Events (SPE) were performed to calculate primary and secondary particle spectra behind aluminum, at various thicknesses in water. The simulations were based on Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes, MCNPX 2.7.0 and PHITS 2.64, and the space radiation analysis website called OLTARIS (On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space) version 3.4 (uses deterministic code, HZETRN, for transport). The study is set to investigate the impact of SPEs spectra transporting through 10 or 20 g/cm(2) Al shield followed by 30 g/cm(2) of water slab. Four historical SPE events were selected and used as input source spectra particle differential spectra for protons, neutrons, and photons are presented. The total particle fluence as a function of depth is presented. In addition to particle flux, the dose and dose equivalent values are calculated and compared between the codes and with the other published results. Overall, the particle fluence spectra from all three codes show good agreement with the MC codes showing closer agreement compared to the OLTARIS results. The neutron particle fluence from OLTARIS is lower than the results from MC codes at lower energies (E<100 MeV). Based on mean square difference analysis the results from MCNPX and PHITS agree better for fluence, dose and dose equivalent when compared to OLTARIS results. PMID:26177623

  3. Shielding evaluation for solar particle events using MCNPX, PHITS and OLTARIS codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghara, S. K.; Sriprisan, S. I.; Singleterry, R. C.; Sato, T.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed analyses of Solar Particle Events (SPE) were performed to calculate primary and secondary particle spectra behind aluminum, at various thicknesses in water. The simulations were based on Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes, MCNPX 2.7.0 and PHITS 2.64, and the space radiation analysis website called OLTARIS (On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space) version 3.4 (uses deterministic code, HZETRN, for transport). The study is set to investigate the impact of SPEs spectra transporting through 10 or 20 g/cm2 Al shield followed by 30 g/cm2 of water slab. Four historical SPE events were selected and used as input source spectra particle differential spectra for protons, neutrons, and photons are presented. The total particle fluence as a function of depth is presented. In addition to particle flux, the dose and dose equivalent values are calculated and compared between the codes and with the other published results. Overall, the particle fluence spectra from all three codes show good agreement with the MC codes showing closer agreement compared to the OLTARIS results. The neutron particle fluence from OLTARIS is lower than the results from MC codes at lower energies (E < 100 MeV). Based on mean square difference analysis the results from MCNPX and PHITS agree better for fluence, dose and dose equivalent when compared to OLTARIS results.

  4. Coupling of Sph and Finite Element Codes for Multi-Layer Orbital Debris Shield Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1997-01-01

    Particle-based hydrodynamics models offer distinct advantages over Eulerian and Lagrangian hydrocodes in particular shock physics applications. Particle models are designed to avoid the mesh distortion and state variable diffusion problems which can hinder the effective use of Lagrangian and Eulerian codes respectively. However conventional particle-in-cell and smooth particle hydrodynamics methods employ particles which are actually moving interpolation points. A new particle-based modeling methodology, termed Hamiltonian particle hydrodynamics, was developed by Fahrenthold and Koo (1997) to provide an alternative, fully Lagrangian, energy-based approach to shock physics simulations. This alternative formulation avoids the tensile and boundary instabilities associated with standard smooth particle hydrodynamics formulations and the diffusive grid- to-particle mapping schemes characteristic of particle-in-cell methods. In the work described herein, the method of Fahrenthold and Koo has been extended, by coupling the aforementioned hydrodynamic particle model to a hexahedral finite element based description of the continuum dynamics. The resulting continuum model retains all of the features (including general contact-impact effects) of Hamiltonian particle hydrodynamics, while in addition accounting for tensile strength, plasticity, and damage effects important in the simulation of hypervelocity impact on orbital debris shielding. A three dimensional, vectorized, and autotasked implementation of the extended particle method described here has been coded for application to orbital debris shielding design. Source code for the pre-processor (PREP), analysis code (EXOS), post-processor (POST), and rezoner (ZONE), have been delivered separately, along with a User's Guide describing installation and application of the software.

  5. Assessment of shielding analysis methods, codes, and data for spent fuel transport/storage applications. [Radiation dose rates from shielded spent fuels and high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hermann, O.W.; Tang, J.S.; Cramer, S.N.; Gauthey, J.C.; Kirk, B.L.; Roussin, R.W.

    1988-07-01

    This report provides a preliminary assessment of the computational tools and existing methods used to obtain radiation dose rates from shielded spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Particular emphasis is placed on analysis tools and techniques applicable to facilities/equipment designed for the transport or storage of spent nuclear fuel or HLW. Applications to cask transport, storage, and facility handling are considered. The report reviews the analytic techniques for generating appropriate radiation sources, evaluating the radiation transport through the shield, and calculating the dose at a desired point or surface exterior to the shield. Discrete ordinates, Monte Carlo, and point kernel methods for evaluating radiation transport are reviewed, along with existing codes and data that utilize these methods. A literature survey was employed to select a cadre of codes and data libraries to be reviewed. The selection process was based on specific criteria presented in the report. Separate summaries were written for several codes (or family of codes) that provided information on the method of solution, limitations and advantages, availability, data access, ease of use, and known accuracy. For each data library, the summary covers the source of the data, applicability of these data, and known verification efforts. Finally, the report discusses the overall status of spent fuel shielding analysis techniques and attempts to illustrate areas where inaccuracy and/or uncertainty exist. The report notes the advantages and limitations of several analysis procedures and illustrates the importance of using adequate cross-section data sets. Additional work is recommended to enable final selection/validation of analysis tools that will best meet the US Department of Energy's requirements for use in developing a viable HLW management system. 188 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  6. Spacecraft Solar Particle Event (SPE) Shielding: Shielding Effectiveness as a Function of SPE model as Determined with the FLUKA Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steve; Atwell, William; Reddell, Brandon; Rojdev, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of both satellite and surface neutron monitor data demonstrate that the widely utilized Exponential model of solar particle event (SPE) proton kinetic energy spectra can seriously underestimate SPE proton flux, especially at the highest kinetic energies. The more recently developed Band model produces better agreement with neutron monitor data ground level events (GLEs) and is believed to be considerably more accurate at high kinetic energies. Here, we report the results of modeling and simulation studies in which the radiation transport code FLUKA (FLUktuierende KAskade) is used to determine the changes in total ionizing dose (TID) and single-event environments (SEE) behind aluminum, polyethylene, carbon, and titanium shielding masses when the assumed form (i. e., Band or Exponential) of the solar particle event (SPE) kinetic energy spectra is changed. FLUKA simulations have fully three dimensions with an isotropic particle flux incident on a concentric spherical shell shielding mass and detector structure. The effects are reported for both energetic primary protons penetrating the shield mass and secondary particle showers caused by energetic primary protons colliding with shielding mass nuclei. Our results, in agreement with previous studies, show that use of the Exponential form of the event

  7. Fully automatic adjoints: a robust and efficient mechanism for generating adjoint ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Funke, S. W.; Rognes, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    The problem of generating and maintaining adjoint models is sufficiently difficult that typically only the most advanced and well-resourced community ocean models achieve it. There are two current technologies which each suffer from their own limitations. Algorithmic differentiation, also called automatic differentiation, is employed by models such as the MITGCM [2] and the Alfred Wegener Institute model FESOM [3]. This technique is very difficult to apply to existing code, and requires a major initial investment to prepare the code for automatic adjoint generation. AD tools may also have difficulty with code employing modern software constructs such as derived data types. An alternative is to formulate the adjoint differential equation and to discretise this separately. This approach, known as the continuous adjoint and employed in ROMS [4], has the disadvantage that two different model code bases must be maintained and manually kept synchronised as the model develops. The discretisation of the continuous adjoint is not automatically consistent with that of the forward model, producing an additional source of error. The alternative presented here is to formulate the flow model in the high level language UFL (Unified Form Language) and to automatically generate the model using the software of the FEniCS project. In this approach it is the high level code specification which is differentiated, a task very similar to the formulation of the continuous adjoint [5]. However since the forward and adjoint models are generated automatically, the difficulty of maintaining them vanishes and the software engineering process is therefore robust. The scheduling and execution of the adjoint model, including the application of an appropriate checkpointing strategy is managed by libadjoint [1]. In contrast to the conventional algorithmic differentiation description of a model as a series of primitive mathematical operations, libadjoint employs a new abstraction of the simulation

  8. Multigroup Three-Dimensional Direct Integration Method Radiation Transport Analysis Code System.

    1987-09-18

    Version 00 TRISTAN solves the three-dimensional, fixed-source, Boltzmann transport equation for neutrons or gamma rays in rectangular geometry. The code can solve an adjoint problem as well as a usual transport problem. TRISTAN is a suitable tool to analyze radiation shielding problems such as streaming and deep penetration problems.

  9. DRC2: A code with specialized applications for coupling localized Monte Carlo adjoint calculations with fluences from two-dimensional R-Z discrete ordinates air-over-ground calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    1992-01-01

    The DRC2 code, which couples MASH or MASHX adjoint leakages with DORT 2-D discrete ordinates forward directional fluences, is described. The forward fluences are allowed to vary both axially and radially over the coupling surface, as opposed to the strictly axial variation allowed by the predecessor DRC code. Input instructions are presented along with descriptions and results from several sample problems. Results from the sample problems are used to compare DRC2 with DRC, DRC2 with DORT, and DRC2 with itself for the case of x-y dependence versus no x-y dependence of the forward fluence. The test problems demonstrate that for small systems DRC and DRC2 give essentially the same results. Some significant differences are noted for larger systems. Additionally, DRC2 results with no x-y dependence of the forward directional fluences are practically the same as those calculated by DRC.

  10. CEM2k and LAQGSM Codes as Event-Generators for Space Radiation Shield and Cosmic Rays Propagation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashnik, S. G.; Gudima, K. K.; Sierk, A. J.; Moskalenko, I. V.

    2002-01-01

    Space radiation shield applications and studies of cosmic ray propagation in the Galaxy require reliable cross sections to calculate spectra of secondary particles and yields of the isotopes produced in nuclear reactions induced both by particles and nuclei at energies from threshold to hundreds of GeV per nucleon. Since the data often exist in a very limited energy range or sometimes not at all, the only way to obtain an estimate of the production cross sections is to use theoretical models and codes. Recently, we have developed improved versions of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) of nuclear reactions: the codes CEM97 and CEM2k for description of particle-nucleus reactions at energies up to about 5 GeV. In addition, we have developed a LANL version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) to describe reactions induced both by particles and nuclei at energies up to hundreds of GeVhucleon. We have tested and benchmarked the CEM and LAQGSM codes against a large variety of experimental data and have compared their results with predictions by other currently available models and codes. Our benchmarks show that CEM and LAQGSM codes have predictive powers no worse than other currently used codes and describe many reactions better than other codes; therefore both our codes can be used as reliable event-generators for space radiation shield and cosmic ray propagation applications. The CEM2k code is being incorporated into the transport code MCNPX (and several other transport codes), and we plan to incorporate LAQGSM into MCNPX in the near future. Here, we present the current status of the CEM2k and LAQGSM codes, and show results and applications to studies of cosmic ray propagation in the Galaxy.

  11. Adjoint methods for external beam inverse treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalok, Michael E.

    Forward and adjoint radiation transport methods may both be used to determine the dosimetric relationship between source parameters and voxel elements of a phantom. Forward methods consider one specific tuple of source parameters and calculate the response in all voxels of interest. This response is often cast as the dose delivered per unit source-weight. Adjoint transport methods, conversely, consider one particular voxel and calculate the response of that voxel in relation to all possible source parameters. In this regard, adjoint methods provide an "adjoint function" in addition to a dose value. Although the dose is for a single voxel only, the adjoint function illustrates the source parameters, (e.g. beam positions and directions) that are most important to delivering the dose to that voxel. In this regard, adjoint methods of analysis lend themselves in a natural way to optimization problems and perturbation studies. This work investigates the utility of adjoint analytic methods for treatment planning and for Monte Carlo dose calculations. Various methods for implementing this approach are discussed, along with their strengths and weaknesses. The complementary nature of adjoint and forward techniques is illustrated and exploited. Also, several features of the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and MCNPX are reviewed for treatment planning applications.

  12. Spacecraft Solar Particle Event (SPE) Shielding: Shielding Effectiveness as a Function of SPE Model as Determined with the FLUKA Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, S. L.; Atwell, W. A.; Reddell, B.; Rojdev, K.

    2010-12-01

    In the this paper, we report the results of modeling and simulation studies in which the radiation transport code FLUKA (FLUktuierende KAskade) is used to determine the changes in total ionizing dose (TID) and single-event effect (SEE) environments behind aluminum, polyethylene, carbon, and titanium shielding masses when the assumed form (i.e., Band or Exponential) of the solar particle event (SPE) kinetic energy spectra is changed. FLUKA simulations are fully three dimensional with an isotropic particle flux incident on a concentric spherical shell shielding mass and detector structure. FLUKA is a fully integrated and extensively verified Monte Carlo simulation package for the interaction and transport of high-energy particles and nuclei in matter. The effects are reported of both energetic primary protons penetrating the shield mass and secondary particle showers caused by energetic primary protons colliding with shielding mass nuclei. SPE heavy ion spectra are not addressed. Our results, in agreement with previous studies, show that use of the Exponential form of the event spectra can seriously underestimate spacecraft SPE TID and SEE environments in some, but not all, shielding mass cases. The SPE spectra investigated are taken from four specific SPEs that produced ground-level events (GLEs) during solar cycle 23 (1997-2008). GLEs are produced by highly energetic solar particle events (ESP), i.e., those that contain significant fluences of 700 MeV to 10 GeV protons. Highly energetic SPEs are implicated in increased rates of spacecraft anomalies and spacecraft failures. High-energy protons interact with Earth’s atmosphere via nuclear reaction to produce secondary particles, some of which are neutrons that can be detected at the Earth’s surface by the global neutron monitor network. GLEs are one part of the overall SPE resulting from a particular solar flare or coronal mass ejection event on the sun. The ESP part of the particle event, detected by spacecraft

  13. Diagnositcs With Adjoint Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blessing, S.; Fraedrich, K.; Kirk, E.; Lunkeit, F.

    The potential usefulness of an adjoint primitive equations global atmospheric circu- lation model for climate diagnostics is demonstrated in a feasibility study. A daily NAO-type index is calculated as one-point correlation of the 300 hPa streamfunction anomaly. By application of the adjoint model we diagnose its temperature forcing on short timescales in terms of spatial temperature sensitivity patterns at different time lags, which, in a first order approximation, induce growth of the index. The dynamical relevance of these sensitivity patterns is confirmed by lag-correlating the index time series and the projection time series of the model temperature on these sensitivity patterns.

  14. General Purpose Kernel Integration Shielding Code System-Point and Extended Gamma-Ray Sources.

    1981-06-11

    PELSHIE3 calculates dose rates from gamma-emitting sources with different source geometries and shielding configurations. Eight source geometries are provided and are called by means of geometry index numbers. Gamma-emission characteristics for 134 isotopes, attenuation coefficients for 57 elements or shielding materials and Berger build-up parameters for 17 shielding materials can be obtained from a direct access data library by specifying only the appropriate library numbers. A different option allows these data to be read frommore » cards. For extended sources, constant source strengths as well as exponential and Bessel function source strength distributions are allowed in most cases.« less

  15. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  16. Automated variance reduction for Monte Carlo shielding analyses with MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, Georgeta

    Variance reduction techniques are employed in Monte Carlo analyses to increase the number of particles in the space phase of interest and thereby lower the variance of statistical estimation. Variance reduction parameters are required to perform Monte Carlo calculations. It is well known that adjoint solutions, even approximate ones, are excellent biasing functions that can significantly increase the efficiency of a Monte Carlo calculation. In this study, an automated method of generating Monte Carlo variance reduction parameters, and of implementing the source energy biasing and the weight window technique in MCNP shielding calculations has been developed. The method is based on the approach used in the SAS4 module of the SCALE code system, which derives the biasing parameters from an adjoint one-dimensional Discrete Ordinates calculation. Unlike SAS4 that determines the radial and axial dose rates of a spent fuel cask in separate calculations, the present method provides energy and spatial biasing parameters for the entire system that optimize the simulation of particle transport towards all external surfaces of a spent fuel cask. The energy and spatial biasing parameters are synthesized from the adjoint fluxes of three one-dimensional Discrete Ordinates adjoint calculations. Additionally, the present method accommodates multiple source regions, such as the photon sources in light-water reactor spent nuclear fuel assemblies, in one calculation. With this automated method, detailed and accurate dose rate maps for photons, neutrons, and secondary photons outside spent fuel casks or other containers can be efficiently determined with minimal efforts.

  17. BUMPERII - DESIGN ANALYSIS CODE FOR OPTIMIZING SPACECRAFT SHIELDING AND WALL CONFIGURATION FOR ORBITAL DEBRIS AND METEOROID IMPACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    BUMPERII is a modular program package employing a numerical solution technique to calculate a spacecraft's probability of no penetration (PNP) from man-made orbital debris or meteoroid impacts. The solution equation used to calculate the PNP is based on the Poisson distribution model for similar analysis of smaller craft, but reflects the more rigorous mathematical modeling of spacecraft geometry, orientation, and impact characteristics necessary for treatment of larger structures such as space station components. The technique considers the spacecraft surface in terms of a series of flat plate elements. It divides the threat environment into a number of finite cases, then evaluates each element of each threat. The code allows for impact shielding (shadowing) of one element by another in various configurations over the spacecraft exterior, and also allows for the effects of changing spacecraft flight orientation and attitude. Four main modules comprise the overall BUMPERII package: GEOMETRY, RESPONSE, SHIELD, and CONTOUR. The GEOMETRY module accepts user-generated finite element model (FEM) representations of the spacecraft geometry and creates geometry databases for both meteoroid and debris analysis. The GEOMETRY module expects input to be in either SUPERTAB Universal File Format or PATRAN Neutral File Format. The RESPONSE module creates wall penetration response databases, one for meteoroid analysis and one for debris analysis, for up to 100 unique wall configurations. This module also creates a file containing critical diameter as a function of impact velocity and impact angle for each wall configuration. The SHIELD module calculates the PNP for the modeled structure given exposure time, operating altitude, element ID ranges, and the data from the RESPONSE and GEOMETRY databases. The results appear in a summary file. SHIELD will also determine the effective area of the components and the overall model, and it can produce a data file containing the probability

  18. Shielding analysis of the NAC-MPC storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, D.G.; Romano, N.J.; Hertel, N.E.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents the shielding analyses of the NAC-MPC dry cask storage system. The NAC-MPC dry cask storage system consists of a transportable storage canister, a transfer cask, and a vertical concrete storage cask. The NAC-MPC is designed to accommodate 36 {open_quotes}Yankee Class{close_quotes} fuel assemblies with a maximum burnup of 36,000 MWd/tonne U burnup and 8 yr cooling time. The shielding analysis is performed with the SCALE 4.3 code package which includes SAS2H for source term generation and SAS4A, a modification of SAS4, for shielding evaluations. SAS4 utilizes a one-dimensional XSDRNPM adjoint calculation of the cask to generate biasing parameters for a three-dimensional MORSE-SGC Monte Carlo model of the cask geometry.

  19. Theory and verification for the GRASP II code for adjoint-sensitivity analysis of steady-state and transient ground-water flow

    SciTech Connect

    RamaRao, B.S.; Reeves, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Calibration of a numerical model of the regional ground-water flow in the Culebra dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico, has been performed by an interative parameter-fitting procedure. Parameterization has been secured by choosing to assign the transmissivity values at a limited number of selected locations, designated as pilot points. The transmissivity distribution in the model is derived by kriging the combined pool of measured and pilot-plant transmissivities. Iterating on the twin steps of sequentially adding additional pilot point(s) and kriging leads to the model of required accuracy, as judged by a weighted least-square-error objective function. At the end of calibration, it must be ensured that the correlation structure of the measured transmissivities is broadly preserved by the pilot-plant transmissivities. Adjoint-sensitivity analysis of the model has been coupled with kriging to provide objectively the optimal location of the pilot points during an iteration. The pilot-point transmissivities have been adjusted by modeler's judgement incorporating information, where available, on local geologic conditions and large-scale hydraulic interference tests, in order to minimize the objective function. 43 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Simulations of an Accelerator-based Shielding Shielding Experiment Using theParticle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Sihver, L.; Iwase, H.; Nakashima, H.; Niita, K.

    In order to estimate the biological effects of HZE particles, an accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction of HZE particles is necessary. Since the heavy ion transport problem is a complex one, there is a need for both experimental and theoretical studies to develop accurate transport models. RIST and JAERI (Japan), GSI (Germany) and Chalmers (Sweden) are therefore currently developing and bench marking the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS), which is based on the NMTC and MCNP for nucleon/meson and neutron transport respectively, and the JAM hadron cascade model. PHITS uses JAERI Quantum Molecular Dynamics (JQMD) and the GEM (Generalized Evaporation Model) for calculations of fission and evaporation processes, the SHEN model for calculation of total reaction cross sections, and the SPAR model for dE/dx calculations. The development of PHITS includes better parameterization in the JQMD model used for the nucleus-nucleus reactions, improvement of the models used for calculating total reaction cross sections and dE/dx distributions, and adding routines for calculating elastic scattering of heavy ions, dose and track average LET distributions. As part of an extensive bench marking of PHITS, we have compared energy spectra of secondary neutrons created by reactions of HZE particles with different targets, with thicknesses ranging from < 1 cm to 200 cm. We have also compared simulated and measured spatial, fluence and depth-dose distributions from different high energy heavy ion reactions. In this paper we report simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment, in which a beam of 1 GeV/n Fe-ions has passed through slabs of polyethylene, PMMA, Al, and Pb, with thicknesses ranging from 5 to 30 g/cm2 at an acceptance angle of 0°± 3°. The simulated survival fraction of the primary Fe-ions, fragment spectrum for 23 g/cm2, and dose behind the shield per incident Fe-ion on the shield has been compared with measurements.

  1. Point Kernel Code System for Neutron and Gamma-Ray Shielding Calculations in Complex Geometry, Including a Graphical User Interface.

    2001-10-01

    Version 01 GUI2QAD is an aid in preparation of input for the included QAD-CGPIC program, which is based on CCC-493/QAD-CGGP and PICTURE. QAD-CGPIC is a Fortran code for fast neutron and gamma-ray shielding calculations through various shield configurations defined by combinatorial geometry specifications. Provision is available to interactively input the geometry and view the same in three dimensions with arbitrary rotations along x,y,z axis. The salient features of the present package include: a) Handles offmore » centered multiple identical sources b) Axis of cylindrical sources can be parallel to any of the axes. c) Provides plots of buildup factors (ANSI-1990) and material cross sections d) Estimates dose rate for point source-slab shield situations e) Interactive input of CG geometry with 3D view and rotation f) Fission product decay power computation and plots for source term calculations. g) Provision to read and graphical 1y display picture input file.« less

  2. Coupling of MASH-MORSE Adjoint Leakages with Space- and Time-Dependent Plume Radiation Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    2001-04-20

    In the past, forward-adjoint coupling procedures in air-over-ground geometry have typically involved forward fluences arising from a point source a great distance from a target or vehicle system. Various processing codes were used to create localized forward fluence files that could be used to couple with the MASH-MORSE adjoint leakages. In recent years, radiation plumes that result from reactor accidents or similar incidents have been modeled by others, and the source space and energy distributions as a function of time have been calculated. Additionally, with the point kernel method, they were able to calculate in relatively quick fashion free-field radiation doses for targets moving within the fluence field or for stationary targets within the field, the time dependence for the latter case coming from the changes in position, shape, source strength, and spectra of the plume with time. The work described herein applies the plume source to the MASH-MORSE coupling procedure. The plume source replaces the point source for generating the forward fluences that are folded with MASH-MORSE adjoint leakages. Two types of source calculations are described. The first is a ''rigorous'' calculation using the TORT code and a spatially large air-over-ground geometry. For each time step desired, directional fluences are calculated and are saved over a predetermined region that encompasses a structure within which it is desired to calculate dose rates. Processing codes then create the surface fluences (which may include contributions from radiation sources that deposit on the roof or plateout) that will be coupled with the MASH-MORSE adjoint leakages. Unlike the point kernel calculations of the free-field dose rates, the TORT calculations in practice include the effects of ground scatter on dose rates and directional fluences, although the effects may be underestimated or overestimated because of the use of necessarily coarse mesh and quadrature in order to reduce computational

  3. A simple code for use in shielding and radiation dosage analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    A simple code for use in analyses of gamma radiation effects in laminated materials is described. Simple and good geometry is assumed so that all multiple collision and scattering events are excluded from consideration. The code is capable of handling laminates up to six layers. However, for laminates of more than six layers, the same code may be used to incorporate two additional layers at a time, making use of punch-tape outputs from previous computation on all preceding layers. Spectrum of attenuated radiation are obtained as both printed output and punch tape output as desired.

  4. Comparison of the Monte Carlo adjoint-weighted and differential operator perturbation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedrowski, Brian C; Brown, Forrest B

    2010-01-01

    Two perturbation theory methodologies are implemented for k-eigenvalue calculations in the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, MCNP6. A comparison of the accuracy of these techniques, the differential operator and adjoint-weighted methods, is performed numerically and analytically. Typically, the adjoint-weighted method shows better performance over a larger range; however, there are exceptions.

  5. Global Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdag, Ebru; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Lei, Wenjie; Peter, Daniel; Smith, James; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    We will present our initial results of global adjoint tomography based on 3D seismic wave simulations which is one of the most challenging examples in seismology in terms of intense computational requirements and vast amount of high-quality seismic data that can potentially be assimilated in inversions. Using a spectral-element method, we incorporate full 3D wave propagation in seismic tomography by running synthetic seismograms and adjoint simulations to compute exact sensitivity kernels in realistic 3D background models. We run our global simulations on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system taking advantage of the GPU version of the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package. We have started iterations with initially selected 253 earthquakes within the magnitude range of 5.5 < Mw < 7.0 and numerical simulations having resolution down to ~27 s to invert for a transversely isotropic crust and mantle model using a non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm. The measurements are currently based on frequency-dependent traveltime misfits. We use both minor- and major-arc body and surface waves by running 200 min simulations where inversions are performed with more than 2.6 million measurements. Our initial results after 12 iterations already indicate several prominent features such as enhanced slab (e.g., Hellenic, Japan, Bismarck, Sandwich), plume/hotspot (e.g., the Pacific superplume, Caroline, Yellowstone, Hawaii) images, etc. To improve the resolution and ray coverage, particularly in the lower mantle, our aim is to increase the resolution of numerical simulations first going down to ~17 s and then to ~9 s to incorporate high-frequency body waves in inversions. While keeping track of the progress and illumination of features in our models with a limited data set, we work towards to assimilate all available data in inversions from all seismic networks and earthquakes in the global CMT catalogue.

  6. Reentry-Vehicle Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Adjoint Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A DJOINT solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (e.g., geometric parameters that control the shape). Classic aerodynamic applications of gradient-based optimization include the design of cruise configurations for transonic and supersonic flow, as well as the design of high-lift systems. are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric computer-aided design (CAD). In previous work on Cartesian adjoint solvers, Melvin et al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the two-dimensional Euler equations using a ghost-cell method to enforce the wall boundary conditions. In Refs. 18 and 19, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm were the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The accuracy of the gradient computation was verified using several three-dimensional test cases, which included design

  7. Towards Global Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdag, E.; Zhu, H.; Peter, D. B.; Tromp, J.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic tomography is at a stage where we can harness entire seismograms using the opportunities offered by advances in numerical wave propagation solvers and high-performance computing. Adjoint methods provide an efficient way for incorporating full nonlinearity of wave propagation and 3D Fréchet kernels in iterative seismic inversions which have so far given promising results at continental and regional scales. Our goal is to take adjoint tomography forward to image the entire planet. Using an iterative conjugate gradient scheme, we initially set the aim to obtain a global crustal and mantle model with confined transverse isotropy in the upper mantle. We have started with around 255 global CMT events having moment magnitudes between 5.8 and 7, and used GSN stations as well as some local networks such as USArray, European stations etc. Prior to the structure inversion, we reinvert global CMT solutions by computing Green functions in our 3D reference model to take into account effects of crustal variations on source parameters. Using the advantages of numerical simulations, our strategy is to invert crustal and mantle structure together to avoid any bias introduced into upper-mantle images due to "crustal corrections", which are commonly used in classical tomography. 3D simulations dramatically increase the usable amount of data so that, with the current earthquake-station setup, we perform each iteration with more than two million measurements. Multi-resolution smoothing based on ray density is applied to the gradient to better deal with the imperfect source-station distribution on the globe and extract more information underneath regions with dense ray coverage and vice versa. Similar to frequency domain approach, we reduce nonlinearities by starting from long periods and gradually increase the frequency content of data after successive model updates. To simplify the problem, we primarily focus on the elastic structure and therefore our measurements are based on

  8. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis for reactor-safety applications

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.

    1985-01-01

    The application and usefulness of an adjoint-based methodology for performing sensitivity analysis on reactor safety computer codes is investigated. The adjoint-based methodology, referred to as differential sensitivity theory (DST), provides first-order derivatives of the calculated quantities of interest (responses) with respect to the input parameters. The basic theoretical development of DST is presented along with the needed general extensions for consideration of model discontinuities and a variety of useful response definitions. A simple analytic problem is used to highlight the general DST procedures. Finally, DST procedures presented in this work are applied to two highly nonlinear reactor accident analysis codes: (1) FASTGAS, a relatively small code for analysis of loss-of-decay-heat-removal accident in a gas-cooled fast reactor, and (2) an existing code called VENUS-II which is typically employed for analyzing the core disassembly phase of a hypothetical fast reactor accident. The two codes are different both in terms of complexity and in terms of the facets of DST which can be illustrated. Sensitivity results from the adjoint codes ADJGAS and VENUS-ADJ are verified with direct recalculations using perturbed input parameters. The effectiveness of the DST results for parameter ranking, prediction of response changes, and uncertainty analysis are illustrated. The conclusion drawn from this study is that DST is a viable, cost-effective methodology for accurate sensitivity analysis.

  9. Simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment using the particle and heavy-ion transport code system PHITS.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Sihver, L; Iwase, H; Nakashima, H; Niita, K

    2005-01-01

    In order to estimate the biological effects of HZE particles, an accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction of HZE particles is necessary. Since the heavy ion transport problem is a complex one, there is a need for both experimental and theoretical studies to develop accurate transport models. RIST and JAERI (Japan), GSI (Germany) and Chalmers (Sweden) are therefore currently developing and bench marking the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS), which is based on the NMTC and MCNP for nucleon/meson and neutron transport respectively, and the JAM hadron cascade model. PHITS uses JAERI Quantum Molecular Dynamics (JQMD) and the Generalized Evaporation Model (GEM) for calculations of fission and evaporation processes, a model developed at NASA Langley for calculation of total reaction cross sections, and the SPAR model for stopping power calculations. The future development of PHITS includes better parameterization in the JQMD model used for the nucleus-nucleus reactions, and improvement of the models used for calculating total reaction cross sections, and addition of routines for calculating elastic scattering of heavy ions, and inclusion of radioactivity and burn up processes. As a part of an extensive bench marking of PHITS, we have compared energy spectra of secondary neutrons created by reactions of HZE particles with different targets, with thicknesses ranging from <1 to 200 cm. We have also compared simulated and measured spatial, fluence and depth-dose distributions from different high energy heavy ion reactions. In this paper, we report simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment, in which a beam of 1 GeV/n Fe-ions has passed through thin slabs of polyethylene, Al, and Pb at an acceptance angle up to 4 degrees. PMID:15934196

  10. Simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment using the particle and heavy-ion transport code system PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Sihver, L.; Iwase, H.; Nakashima, H.; Niita, K.

    In order to estimate the biological effects of HZE particles, an accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction of HZE particles is necessary. Since the heavy ion transport problem is a complex one, there is a need for both experimental and theoretical studies to develop accurate transport models. RIST and JAERI (Japan), GSI (Germany) and Chalmers (Sweden) are therefore currently developing and bench marking the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS), which is based on the NMTC and MCNP for nucleon/meson and neutron transport respectively, and the JAM hadron cascade model. PHITS uses JAERI Quantum Molecular Dynamics (JQMD) and the Generalized Evaporation Model (GEM) for calculations of fission and evaporation processes, a model developed at NASA Langley for calculation of total reaction cross sections, and the SPAR model for stopping power calculations. The future development of PHITS includes better parameterization in the JQMD model used for the nucleus-nucleus reactions, and improvement of the models used for calculating total reaction cross sections, and addition of routines for calculating elastic scattering of heavy ions, and inclusion of radioactivity and burn up processes. As a part of an extensive bench marking of PHITS, we have compared energy spectra of secondary neutrons created by reactions of HZE particles with different targets, with thicknesses ranging from <1 to 200 cm. We have also compared simulated and measured spatial, fluence and depth-dose distributions from different high energy heavy ion reactions. In this paper, we report simulations of an accelerator-based shielding experiment, in which a beam of 1 GeV/n Fe-ions has passed through thin slabs of polyethylene, Al, and Pb at an acceptance angle up to 4°.

  11. Three-Dimensional (X,Y,Z) Deterministic Analysis of the PCA-Replica Neutron Shielding Benchmark Experiment using the TORT-3.2 Code and Group Cross Section Libraries for LWR Shielding and Pressure Vessel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescarini, Massimo; Orsi, Roberto; Frisoni, Manuela

    2016-02-01

    The PCA-Replica 12/13 (H2O/Fe) neutron shielding benchmark experiment was analysed using the ORNL TORT-3.2 3D SN code. PCA-Replica, specifically conceived to test the accuracy of nuclear data and transport codes employed in LWR shielding and radiation damage calculations, reproduces a PWR ex-core radial geometry with alternate layers of water and steel including a PWR pressure vessel simulator. Three broad-group coupled neutron/photon working cross section libraries in FIDO-ANISN format with the same energy group structure (47 n + 20 γ) and based on different nuclear data were alternatively used: the ENEA BUGJEFF311.BOLIB (JEFF-3.1.1) and BUGENDF70.BOLIB (ENDF/B-VII.0) libraries and the ORNL BUGLE-96 (ENDF/B-VI.3) library. Dosimeter cross sections derived from the IAEA IRDF-2002 dosimetry file were employed. The calculated reaction rates for the Rh-103(n,n')Rh-103 m, In-115(n,n')In-115m and S-32(n,p)P-32 threshold activation dosimeters and the calculated neutron spectra are compared with the corresponding experimental results.

  12. Adjoint Based Data Assimilation for an Ionospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, I. G.; Hajj, G. A.; Hajj, G. A.; Pi, X.; Pi, X.; Wang, C.; Wilson, B. D.

    2001-05-01

    The success of ionospheric modeling depends primarily on accurate knowledge of the forces (drivers) which enter into the collisional plasma hydrodynamic equations for the ionosphere and control the ionization as well as other dynamical and chemical processes. These include solar EUV and UV radiation, magnetospheric electric fields, particle precipitation, dynamo electric fields, thermospheric winds, neutral densities, and temperature. The determination of these model parameters from observational data is known as data assimilation. The data assimilation problem is formulated as a problem of minimizing a nonlinear functional, J (typically least squares) under a system of constraints consisting primarily of the underlying model equations. The performance index, J, can, in principle, be minimized using standard techniques such as the Newton's steepest decent method. There are however major technical challenges in practice. Since J is highly nonlinear and each evaluation of the functional requires the integration of the ionospheric model equations, computing the gradient vector of J with respect to the unknown parameters is time consuming. This problem is solved by use of the adjoint method. The ionospheric model used in this effort is for mid- and low-latitudes and consists of solving the continuity and momentum partial differential equations in four dimensional (three spatial dimensions and time) to compute the O+ density in the ionosphere and plasmasphere. We have developed codes for solving the forward model on a fixed grid. This makes it relatively straight forward to apply the adjoint method for computing gradients when doing nonlinear least squares based data assimilation. Because of the significant cost (in computational effort and CPU time) involved in performing a forward integration of the underlying 3-D model at any reasonable grid resolution, the use of the adjoint method for computing the gradients is indispensable. The adjoint method provides an elegant

  13. Self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators

    SciTech Connect

    Much, Albert

    2015-09-15

    We consider deformations of unbounded operators by using the novel construction tool of warped convolutions. By using the Kato-Rellich theorem, we show that unbounded self-adjoint deformed operators are self-adjoint if they satisfy a certain condition. This condition proves itself to be necessary for the oscillatory integral to be well-defined. Moreover, different proofs are given for self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators in the context of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory.

  14. Interfaces MATXS Cross-Section Libraries to Nuclear Transport Codes for Fusion Systems Analysis.

    1985-04-10

    Version: 00 TRANSX-CTR is a computer code that reads nuclear data from a library in MATXS format and produces transport tables with many discrete-ordinates (Sn) and diffusion codes. Tables can be produced for neutron, photon, or coupled transport. Options include adjoint tables, mixtures, self-shielding, group collapse, homogenization, thermal upscatter, prompt or steady-state fission, transport corrections, elastic removal corrections, and flexible response-function edits. The ability to prepare coupled tables and response edits for heating, damage, gasmore » production, and delayed activity makes TRANSX-CTR especially useful for fusion reactor studies.« less

  15. Discrete Adjoint-Based Design Optimization of Unsteady Turbulent Flows on Dynamic Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris; Yamaleev, Nail K.

    2009-01-01

    An adjoint-based methodology for design optimization of unsteady turbulent flows on dynamic unstructured grids is described. The implementation relies on an existing unsteady three-dimensional unstructured grid solver capable of dynamic mesh simulations and discrete adjoint capabilities previously developed for steady flows. The discrete equations for the primal and adjoint systems are presented for the backward-difference family of time-integration schemes on both static and dynamic grids. The consistency of sensitivity derivatives is established via comparisons with complex-variable computations. The current work is believed to be the first verified implementation of an adjoint-based optimization methodology for the true time-dependent formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations in a practical computational code. Large-scale shape optimizations are demonstrated for turbulent flows over a tiltrotor geometry and a simulated aeroelastic motion of a fighter jet.

  16. A Generalized Adjoint Approach for Quantifying Reflector Assembly Discontinuity Factor Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Yankov, Artem; Collins, Benjamin; Jessee, Matthew Anderson; Downar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Sensitivity-based uncertainty analysis of assembly discontinuity factors (ADFs) can be readily performed using adjoint methods for infinite lattice models. However, there is currently no adjoint-based methodology to obtain uncertainties for ADFs along an interface between a fuel and reflector region. To accommodate leakage effects in a reflector region, a 1D approximation is usually made in order to obtain the homogeneous interface flux required to calculate the ADF. Within this 1D framework an adjoint-based method is proposed that is capable of efficiently calculating ADF uncertainties. In the proposed method the sandwich rule is utilized to relate the covariance of the input parameters of 1D diffusion theory in the reflector region to the covariance of the interface ADFs. The input parameters covariance matrix can be readily obtained using sampling-based codes such as XSUSA or adjoint-based codes such as TSUNAMI. The sensitivity matrix is constructed using a fixed-source adjoint approach for inputs characterizing the reflector region. An analytic approach is then used to determine the sensitivity of the ADFs to fuel parameters using the neutron balance equation. A stochastic approach is used to validate the proposed adjoint-based method.

  17. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis for reactor safety applications

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.

    1986-08-01

    The application and usefulness of an adjoint-based methodology for performing sensitivity analysis on reactor safety computer codes is investigated. The adjoint-based methodology, referred to as differential sensitivity theory (DST), provides first-order derivatives of the calculated quantities of interest (responses) with respect to the input parameters. The basic theoretical development of DST is presented along with the needed general extensions for consideration of model discontinuities and a variety of useful response definitions. A simple analytic problem is used to highlight the general DST procedures. finally, DST procedures presented in this work are applied to two highly nonlinear reactor accident analysis codes: (1) FASTGAS, a relatively small code for analysis of a loss-of-decay-heat-removal accident in a gas-cooled fast reactor, and (2) an existing code called VENUS-II which has been employed for analyzing the core disassembly phase of a hypothetical fast reactor accident. The two codes are different both in terms of complexity and in terms of the facets of DST which can be illustrated. Sensitivity results from the adjoint codes ADJGAS and VENUS-ADJ are verified with direct recalcualtions using perturbed input parameters. The effectiveness of the DST results for parameter ranking, prediction of response changes, and uncertainty analysis are illustrated. The conclusion drawn from this study is that DST is a viable, cost-effective methodology for accurate sensitivity analysis. In addition, a useful sensitivity tool for use in the fast reactor safety area has been developed in VENUS-ADJ. Future work needs to concentrate on combining the accurate first-order derivatives/results from DST with existing methods (based solely on direct recalculations) for higher-order response surfaces.

  18. Skyshine analysis using energy and angular dependent dose-contribution fluxes obtained from air-over-ground adjoint calculation.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Mikio; Kurosawa, Masahiko

    2005-01-01

    A generalised and convenient skyshine dose analysis method has been developed based on forward-adjoint folding technique. In the method, the air penetration data were prepared by performing an adjoint DOT3.5 calculation with cylindrical air-over-ground geometry having an adjoint point source (importance of unit flux to dose rate at detection point) in the centre. The accuracy of the present method was certified by comparing with DOT3.5 forward calculation. The adjoint flux data can be used as generalised radiation skyshine data for all sorts of nuclear facilities. Moreover, the present method supplies plenty of energy-angular dependent contribution flux data, which will be useful for detailed shielding design of facilities. PMID:16604693

  19. Adjoint Formulation for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Murman, Scott M.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Many problems in aerodynamic design can be characterized by smooth and convex objective functions. This motivates the use of gradient-based algorithms, particularly for problems with a large number of design variables, to efficiently determine optimal shapes and configurations that maximize aerodynamic performance. Accurate and efficient computation of the gradient, however, remains a challenging task. In optimization problems where the number of design variables dominates the number of objectives and flow- dependent constraints, the cost of gradient computations can be significantly reduced by the use of the adjoint method. The problem of aerodynamic optimization using the adjoint method has been analyzed and validated for both structured and unstructured grids. The method has been applied to design problems governed by the potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes equations and can be subdivided into the continuous and discrete formulations. Giles and Pierce provide a detailed review of both approaches. Most implementations rely on grid-perturbation or mapping procedures during the gradient computation that explicitly couple changes in the surface shape to the volume grid. The solution of the adjoint equation is usually accomplished using the same scheme that solves the governing flow equations. Examples of such code reuse include multistage Runge-Kutta schemes coupled with multigrid, approximate-factorization, line-implicit Gauss-Seidel, and also preconditioned GMRES. The development of the adjoint method for aerodynamic optimization problems on Cartesian grids has been limited. In contrast to implementations on structured and unstructured grids, Cartesian grid methods decouple the surface discretization from the volume grid. This feature makes Cartesian methods well suited for the automated analysis of complex geometry problems, and consequently a promising approach to aerodynamic optimization. Melvin e t al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code

  20. Wake shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannister, Tommy; Karr, Gerald R.

    1987-01-01

    Progress on the modeling of the flow field around a wake shield using a recently obtained code based on the Monte Carlo method is discussed. The direct simulation Monte Carlo method is a method for solving the Boltzman Equation using an approximation to the collision integral term. The collision integrand is evaluated for randomly selected values of its arguments and the summation will approach the integral for large enough samples. The collision effects may be modeled for either hard sphere or various power law potentials. The convective side of the Boltzman equation is approximated over a time step using a simple trajectory calculation of molecules as they travel through the domain of interest.

  1. Numerical Computation of Sensitivities and the Adjoint Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the numerical computation of sensitivities via the adjoint approach in optimization problems governed by differential equations. We focus on the adjoint problem in its weak form. We show how one can avoid some of the problems with the adjoint approach, such as deriving suitable boundary conditions for the adjoint equation. We discuss the convergence of numerical approximations of the costate computed via the weak form of the adjoint problem and show the significance for the discrete adjoint problem.

  2. Adjoint Error Estimation for Linear Advection

    SciTech Connect

    Connors, J M; Banks, J W; Hittinger, J A; Woodward, C S

    2011-03-30

    An a posteriori error formula is described when a statistical measurement of the solution to a hyperbolic conservation law in 1D is estimated by finite volume approximations. This is accomplished using adjoint error estimation. In contrast to previously studied methods, the adjoint problem is divorced from the finite volume method used to approximate the forward solution variables. An exact error formula and computable error estimate are derived based on an abstractly defined approximation of the adjoint solution. This framework allows the error to be computed to an arbitrary accuracy given a sufficiently well resolved approximation of the adjoint solution. The accuracy of the computable error estimate provably satisfies an a priori error bound for sufficiently smooth solutions of the forward and adjoint problems. The theory does not currently account for discontinuities. Computational examples are provided that show support of the theory for smooth solutions. The application to problems with discontinuities is also investigated computationally.

  3. Wake Shield Target Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-05-15

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed.

  4. Activities of the Radiation Shielding Information Center and a report on codes/data for high energy radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Roussin, R.W.

    1993-03-01

    From the very early days in its history Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) has been involved with high energy radiation transport. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was an early sponsor of RSIC until the completion of the Apollo Moon Exploration Program. In addition, the intranuclear cascade work of Bertini at Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided valuable resources which were made available through RSIC. Over the years, RSIC has had interactions with many of the developers of high energy radiation transport computing technology and data libraries and has been able to collect and disseminate this technology. The current status of this technology will be reviewed and prospects for new advancements will be examined.

  5. Activities of the Radiation Shielding Information Center and a report on codes/data for high energy radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Roussin, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    From the very early days in its history Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) has been involved with high energy radiation transport. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was an early sponsor of RSIC until the completion of the Apollo Moon Exploration Program. In addition, the intranuclear cascade work of Bertini at Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided valuable resources which were made available through RSIC. Over the years, RSIC has had interactions with many of the developers of high energy radiation transport computing technology and data libraries and has been able to collect and disseminate this technology. The current status of this technology will be reviewed and prospects for new advancements will be examined.

  6. Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling using Space, Energy and Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Peplow, Douglas E.; Mosher, Scott W; Evans, Thomas M

    2012-08-01

    For challenging radiation transport problems, hybrid methods combine the accuracy of Monte Carlo methods with the global information present in deterministic methods. One of the most successful hybrid methods is CADIS Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling. This method uses a deterministic adjoint solution to construct a biased source distribution and consistent weight windows to optimize a specific tally in a Monte Carlo calculation. The method has been implemented into transport codes using just the spatial and energy information from the deterministic adjoint and has been used in many applications to compute tallies with much higher figures-of-merit than analog calculations. CADIS also outperforms user-supplied importance values, which usually take long periods of user time to develop. This work extends CADIS to develop weight windows that are a function of the position, energy, and direction of the Monte Carlo particle. Two types of consistent source biasing are presented: one method that biases the source in space and energy while preserving the original directional distribution and one method that biases the source in space, energy, and direction. Seven simple example problems are presented which compare the use of the standard space/energy CADIS with the new space/energy/angle treatments.

  7. Adjoint Algorithm for CAD-Based Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Adjoint solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape optimization. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (geometric parameters that control the shape). More recently, emerging adjoint applications focus on the analysis problem, where the adjoint solution is used to drive mesh adaptation, as well as to provide estimates of functional error bounds and corrections. The attractive feature of this approach is that the mesh-adaptation procedure targets a specific functional, thereby localizing the mesh refinement and reducing computational cost. Our focus is on the development of adjoint-based optimization techniques for a Cartesian method with embedded boundaries.12 In contrast t o implementations on structured and unstructured grids, Cartesian methods decouple the surface discretization from the volume mesh. This feature makes Cartesian methods well suited for the automated analysis of complex geometry problems, and consequently a promising approach to aerodynamic optimization. Melvin et developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the Euler equations. In both approaches, a boundary condition is introduced to approximate the effects of the evolving surface shape that results in accurate gradient computation. Central to automated shape optimization algorithms is the issue of geometry modeling and control. The need to optimize complex, "real-life" geometry provides a strong incentive for the use of parametric-CAD systems within the optimization procedure. In previous work, we presented

  8. A practical discrete-adjoint method for high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan; Bodony, Daniel J.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-03-01

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvements. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs, though this is predicated on the availability of a sufficiently accurate solution of the forward and adjoint systems. These are challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. Here, we analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space-time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge-Kutta-like scheme, though it would be just first-order accurate if used outside the adjoint formulation for time integration, with finite-difference spatial operators for the adjoint system. Its computational cost only modestly exceeds that of the flow equations. We confirm that its

  9. A practical discrete-adjoint method for high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan; Bodony, Daniel J.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-03-15

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvements. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs, though this is predicated on the availability of a sufficiently accurate solution of the forward and adjoint systems. These are challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. Here, we analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space–time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge–Kutta-like scheme, though it would be just first-order accurate if used outside the adjoint formulation for time integration, with finite-difference spatial operators for the adjoint system. Its computational cost only modestly exceeds that of the flow equations. We confirm that

  10. Southern California Adjoint Source Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, J.; Kim, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Southern California Centroid-Moment Tensor (CMT) solutions with 9 components (6 moment tensor elements, latitude, longitude, and depth) are sought to minimize a misfit function computed from waveform differences. The gradient of a misfit function is obtained based upon two numerical simulations for each earthquake: one forward calculation for the southern California model, and an adjoint calculation that uses time-reversed signals at the receivers. Conjugate gradient and square-root variable metric methods are used to iteratively improve the earthquake source model while reducing the misfit function. The square-root variable metric algorithm has the advantage of providing a direct approximation to the posterior covariance operator. We test the inversion procedure by perturbing each component of the CMT solution, and see how the algorithm converges. Finally, we demonstrate full inversion capabilities using data for real Southern California earthquakes.

  11. Code System to Create Broad-Group Cross Sections with Resonance Interference and Self-Shielding from Fine-Group and Pointwise Cross Sections.

    2007-10-31

    Version: 02 RSICC received MICROX‑2 through the NEADB (identifier is NEA‑1562/02.) This is an improved version of the original MICROX-2 two-region spectrum code, which was developed at General Atomic, to prepare broad group neutron cross sections for use in diffusion-and/or transport theory codes from an input library of fine group and pointwise cross sections. The MICROX-2 code can explicitly account for the overlap and interference effects between resonances in both the resonance and thermal neutronmore » energy ranges and allows the simulta?neous treatment of leakage and resonance self-shielding in doubly heterogeneous lattice cells. MICROR runs as a module of NJOY 89.62; the NJOY calling module is included in the package. This release has been changed in that the MODER module from NJOY 94.0, too, has been included as subprogramm of NJOY 89.62, so as to make the code system completely selfconsistent, i.e. without requiring the use of some NJOY version to convert pendf and gendf from coded to binary. Using data from pointwise and groupwise NJOY tapes, the stand-alone MICROR reformatting program produces files containing basic nuclear data to be used by MICROX-2. MICROR edits PENDF and GENDF data files from NJOY to create FDTAP?E, GGTA?PE and GARTA?PE input files for MICROX-2. NJOY is not included in this package. Some data libraries are included for example cases; these data were generated from data in 193 groups as well as from point-wise cross sections from NJOY (Edition 89.62).« less

  12. Adjoint-Based Sensitivity Maps for the Nearshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzech, Mark; Veeramony, Jay; Ngodock, Hans

    2013-04-01

    The wave model SWAN (Booij et al., 1999) solves the spectral action balance equation to produce nearshore wave forecasts and climatologies. It is widely used by the coastal modeling community and is part of a variety of coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere model systems. A variational data assimilation system (Orzech et al., 2013) has recently been developed for SWAN and is presently being transitioned to operational use by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office. This system is built around a numerical adjoint to the fully nonlinear, nonstationary SWAN code. When provided with measured or artificial "observed" spectral wave data at a location of interest on a given nearshore bathymetry, the adjoint can compute the degree to which spectral energy levels at other locations are correlated with - or "sensitive" to - variations in the observed spectrum. Adjoint output may be used to construct a sensitivity map for the entire domain, tracking correlations of spectral energy throughout the grid. When access is denied to the actual locations of interest, sensitivity maps can be used to determine optimal alternate locations for data collection by identifying regions of greatest sensitivity in the mapped domain. The present study investigates the properties of adjoint-generated sensitivity maps for nearshore wave spectra. The adjoint and forward SWAN models are first used in an idealized test case at Duck, NC, USA, to demonstrate the system's effectiveness at optimizing forecasts of shallow water wave spectra for an inaccessible surf-zone location. Then a series of simulations is conducted for a variety of different initializing conditions, to examine the effects of seasonal changes in wave climate, errors in bathymetry, and variations in size and shape of the inaccessible region of interest. Model skill is quantified using two methods: (1) a more traditional correlation of observed and modeled spectral statistics such as significant wave height, and (2) a recently developed RMS

  13. 1DB, a one-dimensional diffusion code for nuclear reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Little, W.W. Jr. )

    1991-09-01

    1DB is a multipurpose, one-dimensional (plane, cylinder, sphere) diffusion theory code for use in reactor analysis. The code is designed to do the following: To compute k{sub eff} and perform criticality searches on time absorption, reactor composition, reactor dimensions, and buckling by means of either a flux or an adjoint model; to compute collapsed microscopic and macroscopic cross sections averaged over the spectrum in any specified zone; to compute resonance-shielded cross sections using data in the shielding factor format; and to compute isotopic burnup using decay chains specified by the user. All programming is in FORTRAN. Because variable dimensioning is employed, no simple restrictions on problem complexity can be stated. The number of spatial mesh points, energy groups, upscattering terms, etc. is limited only by the available memory. The source file contains about 3000 cards. 4 refs.

  14. Determination and Fabrication of New Shield Super Alloys Materials for Nuclear Reactor Safety by Experiments and Cern-Fluka Monte Carlo Simulation Code, Geant4 and WinXCom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygun, Bünyamin; Korkut, Turgay; Karabulut, Abdulhalik

    2016-05-01

    Despite the possibility of depletion of fossil fuels increasing energy needs the use of radiation tends to increase. Recently the security-focused debate about planned nuclear power plants still continues. The objective of this thesis is to prevent the radiation spread from nuclear reactors into the environment. In order to do this, we produced higher performanced of new shielding materials which are high radiation holders in reactors operation. Some additives used in new shielding materials; some of iron (Fe), rhenium (Re), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), boron (B), copper (Cu), tungsten (W), tantalum (Ta), boron carbide (B4C). The results of this experiments indicated that these materials are good shields against gamma and neutrons. The powder metallurgy technique was used to produce new shielding materials. CERN - FLUKA Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation code and WinXCom were used for determination of the percentages of high temperature resistant and high-level fast neutron and gamma shielding materials participated components. Super alloys was produced and then the experimental fast neutron dose equivalent measurements and gamma radiation absorpsion of the new shielding materials were carried out. The produced products to be used safely reactors not only in nuclear medicine, in the treatment room, for the storage of nuclear waste, nuclear research laboratories, against cosmic radiation in space vehicles and has the qualities.

  15. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yanhua O.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wavespeed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings, and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding nonuniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and in practice. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relative (and thus higher-resolution) structural variations in areas close to the stations. Whereas in conventional tomography a measurement made on a single earthquake-station pair provides very limited structural information, in double-difference tomography one earthquake can actually resolve significant details of the structure. The double-difference methodology can be incorporated into the usual adjoint tomography workflow by simply pairing up all conventional measurements; the computational cost of the necessary adjoint simulations is largely unaffected. Rather than adding to the computational burden, the inversion of double-difference measurements merely modifies the construction of the adjoint sources for data assimilation.

  16. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2016-06-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7 ) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here

  17. General Purpose Monte Carlo Multigroup Neutron and Gamma-Ray Transport Code System. We recommend C00474/ALLCP/02 MORSE-CGA.

    1991-08-01

    Version: 00 The original MORSE code was a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. It was designed as a tool for solving most shielding problems. Through the use of multigroup cross sections, the solution of neutron, gamma-ray, or coupled neutron-gamma-ray problems could be obtained in either the forward or adjoint mode. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry could be used with an albedo option available atmore » any material surface. Isotropic or anisotropic scattering up to a P16 expansion of the angular distribution was allowed. MORSE-CG incorporated the Mathematical Applications, Inc. (MAGI) combinatorial geometry routines. MORSE-B modifies the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport computer code MORSE-CG by adding routines which allow various flexible options.« less

  18. General Purpose Monte Carlo Multigroup Neutron and Gamma-Ray Transport Code System with Array Geometry Capability. We recommend C00474/ALLCP/02 MORSE-CGA.

    1991-05-01

    Version 00 MORSE-CGA was developed to add the capability of modelling rectangular lattices for nuclear reactor cores or for multipartitioned structures. It thus enhances the capability of the MORSE code system. The MORSE code is a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. It has been designed as a tool for solving most shielding problems. Through the use of multigroup cross sections, the solution of neutron, gamma-ray, or coupled neutron-gamma-ray problems may be obtainedmore » in either the forward or adjoint mode. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry may be used with an albedo option available at any material surface. Isotropic or anisotropic scattering up to a P16 expansion of the angular distribution is allowed.« less

  19. Shielding analysis of a small compact space nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Lee L., Jr.

    1987-08-01

    The SP-100 reactor, currently in its developmental stage, has a layered tungsten-lithium hydride shield. Studies indicate that this shield configuration is the lightest weight shield. This configuration and three other shielding concepts were analyzed to determine the lightest shield and to determine the shield configuration with the smallest volume. The other concepts were a boron carbide-beryllium layered shield, and a lithium hydride-beryllium shield. FEMP2D and FEMP1D codes were used in this analysis. These codes were developed at Sandia National Laboatory (SNL), using the input from another code, RFCC, which produced enery dependent dose conversion factors, and determined the shields' ability to attenuate the neutron and gamma radiation to permissible dose limits. The results of this analysis show that the lithium hydribe-tungsten layered shield was indeed the lightest weight shield. Volume, not weight, may be the driving factor in determining the shield configuration.

  20. ADGEN: ADjoint GENerator for computer models

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, B.A.; Pin, F.G.; Horwedel, J.E.; Oblow, E.M.

    1989-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a FORTRAN compiler and an associated supporting software library called ADGEN. ADGEN reads FORTRAN models as input and produces and enhanced version of the input model. The enhanced version reproduces the original model calculations but also has the capability to calculate derivatives of model results of interest with respect to any and all of the model data and input parameters. The method for calculating the derivatives and sensitivities is the adjoint method. Partial derivatives are calculated analytically using computer calculus and saved as elements of an adjoint matrix on direct assess storage. The total derivatives are calculated by solving an appropriate adjoint equation. ADGEN is applied to a major computer model of interest to the Low-Level Waste Community, the PRESTO-II model. PRESTO-II sample problem results reveal that ADGEN correctly calculates derivatives of response of interest with respect to 300 parameters. The execution time to create the adjoint matrix is a factor of 45 times the execution time of the reference sample problem. Once this matrix is determined, the derivatives with respect to 3000 parameters are calculated in a factor of 6.8 that of the reference model for each response of interest. For a single 3000 for determining these derivatives by parameter perturbations. The automation of the implementation of the adjoint technique for calculating derivatives and sensitivities eliminates the costly and manpower-intensive task of direct hand-implementation by reprogramming and thus makes the powerful adjoint technique more amenable for use in sensitivity analysis of existing models. 20 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  1. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Quasi self-adjoint nonlinear wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, N. H.; Torrisi, M.; Tracinà, R.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we generalize the classification of self-adjoint second-order linear partial differential equation to a family of nonlinear wave equations with two independent variables. We find a class of quasi self-adjoint nonlinear equations which includes the self-adjoint linear equations as a particular case. The property of a differential equation to be quasi self-adjoint is important, e.g. for constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries of the differential equation.

  2. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Seifried, Jeffrey E.

    2011-09-01

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  3. Application of adjoint operators to neural learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhen, J.; Toomarian, N.; Gulati, S.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for the efficient analytical computation of such parameters of the neural architecture as synaptic weights and neural gain is presented as a single solution of a set of adjoint equations. The learning model discussed concentrates on the adiabatic approximation only. A problem of interest is represented by a system of N coupled equations, and then adjoint operators are introduced. A neural network is formalized as an adaptive dynamical system whose temporal evolution is governed by a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. An approach based on the minimization of a constrained neuromorphic energylike function is applied, and the complete learning dynamics are obtained as a result of the calculations.

  4. Adjoint Techniques for Topology Optimization of Structures Under Damage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akgun, Mehmet A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this cooperative agreement was to seek computationally efficient ways to optimize aerospace structures subject to damage tolerance criteria. Optimization was to involve sizing as well as topology optimization. The work was done in collaboration with Steve Scotti, Chauncey Wu and Joanne Walsh at the NASA Langley Research Center. Computation of constraint sensitivity is normally the most time-consuming step of an optimization procedure. The cooperative work first focused on this issue and implemented the adjoint method of sensitivity computation (Haftka and Gurdal, 1992) in an optimization code (runstream) written in Engineering Analysis Language (EAL). The method was implemented both for bar and plate elements including buckling sensitivity for the latter. Lumping of constraints was investigated as a means to reduce the computational cost. Adjoint sensitivity computation was developed and implemented for lumped stress and buckling constraints. Cost of the direct method and the adjoint method was compared for various structures with and without lumping. The results were reported in two papers (Akgun et al., 1998a and 1999). It is desirable to optimize topology of an aerospace structure subject to a large number of damage scenarios so that a damage tolerant structure is obtained. Including damage scenarios in the design procedure is critical in order to avoid large mass penalties at later stages (Haftka et al., 1983). A common method for topology optimization is that of compliance minimization (Bendsoe, 1995) which has not been used for damage tolerant design. In the present work, topology optimization is treated as a conventional problem aiming to minimize the weight subject to stress constraints. Multiple damage configurations (scenarios) are considered. Each configuration has its own structural stiffness matrix and, normally, requires factoring of the matrix and solution of the system of equations. Damage that is expected to be tolerated is local

  5. Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 11; Documentation of the Tangent Linear and Adjoint Models of the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert Moisture Parameterization of the NASA GEOS-1 GCM; 5.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Max J. (Editor); Yang, Wei-Yu; Todling, Ricardo; Navon, I. Michael

    1997-01-01

    A detailed description of the development of the tangent linear model (TLM) and its adjoint model of the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert moisture parameterization package used in the NASA GEOS-1 C-Grid GCM (Version 5.2) is presented. The notational conventions used in the TLM and its adjoint codes are described in detail.

  6. Shielding considerations for satellite microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.C.; Drumm, C.R.; Roeske, S.B.; Scrivner, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    Shielding for space microelectronics needs to provide an acceptable dose rate with minimum shield mass. The analysis presented here shows that the best approach is, in general, to use a graded-Z shield, with a high-Z layer sandwiched between two low-Z materials. A graded-Z shield is shown to reduce the electron dose rate by more than sixty percent over a single-material shield of the same areal density. For protons, the optimal shield would consist of a single, low-Z material layer. However, it is shown that a graded-Z shield is nearly as effective as a single-material shield, as long as a low-Z layer is located adjacent to the microelectronics. A specific shield design depends upon the details of the radiation environment, system model, design margins/levels, compatibility of shield materials, etc. Therefore, the authors present here general principles for designing effective shields and describe how the computer codes are used for this application.

  7. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Shawn; Lipinksi, Ronald; McAlpine, William

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor system could provide power to support a long term human exploration to the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency (Wright, 2003). The goals of the shielding studies were to provide optimal material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX code, a Monte Carlo transport code.

  8. Bumper shield analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oyer, A.T.

    1986-07-01

    To initially examine the effectiveness of a shield surrounding a reentry vehicle, we used the hypervelocity hydrodynamic impact code, LASOIL. We completed a four-by-four matrix of 16 two-dimensional numerical impact simulations of 1-g tungsten cylinders striking circular plates. The variable parameters were the projectile impact velocity (10, 20, 40, and 80 km/s) and the plate thickness (1, 2, 4, and 8 mm). In each case, the projectile was destroyed in the impact. The shield was penetrated but retained negliible momentum from the impact. The resultant debris cloud was low-density debris and vapor.

  9. Analysis of Correlated Coupling of Monte Carlo Forward and Adjoint Histories

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, Taro; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Kloosterman, J. L.

    2001-02-15

    In Monte Carlo correlated coupling, forward and adjoint particle histories are initiated in exactly opposite directions at an arbitrarily placed surface between a physical source and a physical detector. It is shown that this coupling calculation can become more efficient than standard forward calculations. In many cases, the basic form of correlated coupling is less efficient than standard forward calculations. This inherent inefficiency can be overcome by applying a black absorber perturbation to either the forward or the adjoint problem and by processing the product of batch averages as one statistical entity. The usage of the black absorber is based on the invariance of the response flow integral with a material perturbation in either the physical detector side volume in the forward problem or the physical source side volume in the adjoint problem. The batch-average product processing makes use of a quadratic increase of the nonzero coupled-score probability. All the developments have been done in such a way that improved efficiency schemes available in widely distributed Monte Carlo codes can be applied to both the forward and adjoint simulations. Also, the physical meaning of the black absorber perturbation is interpreted based on surface crossing and is numerically validated. In addition, the immediate reflection at the intermediate surface with a controlled direction change is investigated within the invariance framework. This approach can be advantageous for a void streaming problem.

  10. Modular shield

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Keith W.

    2002-01-01

    A modular system for containing projectiles has a sheet of material including at least a polycarbonate layer held by a metal frame having a straight frame member corresponding to each straight edge of the sheet. Each frame member has a U-shaped shield channel covering and holding a straight edge of the sheet and an adjacent U-shaped clamp channel rigidly held against the shield channel. A flexible gasket separates each sheet edge from its respective shield channel; and each frame member is fastened to each adjacent frame member only by clamps extending between adjacent clamp channels.

  11. Wing planform optimization via an adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoviriyakit, Kasidit

    This dissertation focuses on the problem of wing planform optimization for transonic aircraft based on flow simulation using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) combined with an adjoint-gradient based numerical optimization procedure. The adjoint method, traditionally used for wing section design has been extended to cover planform variations and to compute the sensitivities of the structural weight of both the wing section and planform variations. The two relevant disciplines accounted for are the aerodynamics and structural weight. A simplified structural weight model is used for the optimization. Results of a variety of long range transports indicate that significant improvement in both aerodynamics and structures can be achieved simultaneously. The proof-of-concept optimal results indicate large improvements for both drag and structural weight. The work is an "enabling step" towards a realistic automated wing designed by a computer.

  12. Adjoint of the global Eulerian-Lagrangian coupled atmospheric transport model (A-GELCA v1.0): development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Dmitry A.; Maksyutov, Shamil; Yaremchuk, Alexey; Ganshin, Alexander; Kaminski, Thomas; Blessing, Simon; Sasakawa, Motoki; Gomez-Pelaez, Angel J.; Starchenko, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We present the development of the Adjoint of the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric (A-GELCA) model that consists of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) model as an Eulerian three-dimensional transport model (TM), and FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model) as the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM). The forward tangent linear and adjoint components of the Eulerian model were constructed directly from the original NIES TM code using an automatic differentiation tool known as TAF (Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran; http://www.FastOpt.com, with additional manual pre- and post-processing aimed at improving transparency and clarity of the code and optimizing the performance of the computing, including MPI (Message Passing Interface). The Lagrangian component did not require any code modification, as LPDMs are self-adjoint and track a significant number of particles backward in time in order to calculate the sensitivity of the observations to the neighboring emission areas. The constructed Eulerian adjoint was coupled with the Lagrangian component at a time boundary in the global domain. The simulations presented in this work were performed using the A-GELCA model in forward and adjoint modes. The forward simulation shows that the coupled model improves reproduction of the seasonal cycle and short-term variability of CO2. Mean bias and standard deviation for five of the six Siberian sites considered decrease roughly by 1 ppm when using the coupled model. The adjoint of the Eulerian model was shown, through several numerical tests, to be very accurate (within machine epsilon with mismatch around to ±6 e-14) compared to direct forward sensitivity calculations. The developed adjoint of the coupled model combines the flux conservation and stability of an Eulerian discrete adjoint formulation with the flexibility, accuracy, and high resolution of a Lagrangian backward trajectory formulation. A-GELCA will be incorporated

  13. Dual of QCD with one adjoint fermion

    SciTech Connect

    Mojaza, Matin; Nardecchia, Marco; Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-03-15

    We construct the magnetic dual of QCD with one adjoint Weyl fermion. The dual is a consistent solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions, allows for flavor decoupling, and remarkably constitutes the first nonsupersymmetric dual valid for any number of colors. The dual allows to bound the anomalous dimension of the Dirac fermion mass operator to be less than one in the conformal window.

  14. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  15. Calculation of the response of cylindrical targets to collimated beams of particles using one-dimensional adjoint transport techniques. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Dupree, S. A.

    1980-06-01

    The use of adjoint techniques to determine the interaction of externally incident collimated beams of particles with cylindrical targets is a convenient means of examining a class of problems important in radiation transport studies. The theory relevant to such applications is derived, and a simple example involving a fissioning target is discussed. Results from both discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo transport-code calculations are presented, and comparisons are made with results obtained from forward calculations. The accuracy of the discrete ordinates adjoint results depends on the order of angular quadrature used in the calculation. Reasonable accuracy by using EQN quadratures can be expected from order S/sub 16/ or higher.

  16. Construction of the adjoint MIT ocean general circulation model and application to Atlantic heat transport sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marotzke, Jochem; Giering, Ralf; Zhang, Kate Q.; Stammer, Detlef; Hill, Chris; Lee, Tong

    1999-12-01

    We first describe the principles and practical considerations behind the computer generation of the adjoint to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ocean general circulation model (GCM) using R. Giering's software tool Tangent-Linear and Adjoint Model Compiler (TAMC). The TAMC's recipe for (FORTRAN-) line-by-line generation of adjoint code is explained by interpreting an adjoint model strictly as the operator that gives the sensitivity of the output of a model to its input. Then, the sensitivity of 1993 annual mean heat transport across 29°N in the Atlantic, to the hydrography on January 1, 1993, is calculated from a global solution of the GCM. The "kinematic sensitivity" to initial temperature variations is isolated, showing how the latter would influence heat transport if they did not affect the density and hence the flow. Over 1 year the heat transport at 29°N is influenced kinematically from regions up to 20° upstream in the western boundary current and up to 5° upstream in the interior. In contrast, the dynamical influences of initial temperature (and salinity) perturbations spread from as far as the rim of the Labrador Sea to the 29°N section along the western boundary. The sensitivities calculated with the adjoint compare excellently to those from a perturbation calculation with the dynamical model. Perturbations in initial interior salinity influence meridional overturning and heat transport when they have propagated to the western boundary and can thus influence the integrated east-west density difference. Our results support the notion that boundary monitoring of meridional mass and heat transports is feasible.

  17. Supersymmetric descendants of self-adjointly extended quantum mechanical Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hashimi, M. H.; Salman, M.; Shalaby, A.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2013-10-01

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant.

  18. Development of CO2 inversion system based on the adjoint of the global coupled transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Dmitry; Maksyutov, Shamil; Chevallier, Frederic; Kaminski, Thomas; Ganshin, Alexander; Blessing, Simon

    2014-05-01

    We present the development of an inverse modeling system employing an adjoint of the global coupled transport model consisting of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) Eulerian transport model (TM) and the Lagrangian plume diffusion model (LPDM) FLEXPART. NIES TM is a three-dimensional atmospheric transport model, which solves the continuity equation for a number of atmospheric tracers on a grid spanning the entire globe. Spatial discretization is based on a reduced latitude-longitude grid and a hybrid sigma-isentropic coordinate in the vertical. NIES TM uses a horizontal resolution of 2.5°×2.5°. However, to resolve synoptic-scale tracer distributions and to have the ability to optimize fluxes at resolutions of 0.5° and higher we coupled NIES TM with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART. The Lagrangian component of the forward and adjoint models uses precalculated responses of the observed concentration to the surface fluxes and 3-D concentrations field simulated with the FLEXPART model. NIES TM and FLEXPART are driven by JRA-25/JCDAS reanalysis dataset. Construction of the adjoint of the Lagrangian part is less complicated, as LPDMs calculate the sensitivity of measurements to the surrounding emissions field by tracking a large number of "particles" backwards in time. Developing of the adjoint to Eulerian part was performed with automatic differentiation tool the Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran (TAF) software (http://www.FastOpt.com). This method leads to the discrete adjoint of NIES TM. The main advantage of the discrete adjoint is that the resulting gradients of the numerical cost function are exact, even for nonlinear algorithms. The overall advantages of our method are that: 1. No code modification of Lagrangian model is required, making it applicable to combination of global NIES TM and any Lagrangian model; 2. Once run, the Lagrangian output can be applied to any chemically neutral gas; 3. High-resolution results can be obtained over

  19. Optimizing spectral wave estimates with adjoint-based sensitivity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzech, Mark; Veeramony, Jay; Flampouris, Stylianos

    2014-04-01

    A discrete numerical adjoint has recently been developed for the stochastic wave model SWAN. In the present study, this adjoint code is used to construct spectral sensitivity maps for two nearshore domains. The maps display the correlations of spectral energy levels throughout the domain with the observed energy levels at a selected location or region of interest (LOI/ROI), providing a full spectrum of values at all locations in the domain. We investigate the effectiveness of sensitivity maps based on significant wave height ( H s ) in determining alternate offshore instrument deployment sites when a chosen nearshore location or region is inaccessible. Wave and bathymetry datasets are employed from one shallower, small-scale domain (Duck, NC) and one deeper, larger-scale domain (San Diego, CA). The effects of seasonal changes in wave climate, errors in bathymetry, and multiple assimilation points on sensitivity map shapes and model performance are investigated. Model accuracy is evaluated by comparing spectral statistics as well as with an RMS skill score, which estimates a mean model-data error across all spectral bins. Results indicate that data assimilation from identified high-sensitivity alternate locations consistently improves model performance at nearshore LOIs, while assimilation from low-sensitivity locations results in lesser or no improvement. Use of sub-sampled or alongshore-averaged bathymetry has a domain-specific effect on model performance when assimilating from a high-sensitivity alternate location. When multiple alternate assimilation locations are used from areas of lower sensitivity, model performance may be worse than with a single, high-sensitivity assimilation point.

  20. Generalized uncertainty principle and self-adjoint operators

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, Venkat; Das, Saurya; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2015-09-15

    In this work we explore the self-adjointness of the GUP-modified momentum and Hamiltonian operators over different domains. In particular, we utilize the theorem by von-Neumann for symmetric operators in order to determine whether the momentum and Hamiltonian operators are self-adjoint or not, or they have self-adjoint extensions over the given domain. In addition, a simple example of the Hamiltonian operator describing a particle in a box is given. The solutions of the boundary conditions that describe the self-adjoint extensions of the specific Hamiltonian operator are obtained.

  1. On the formulation of sea-ice models. Part 2: Lessons from multi-year adjoint sea-ice export sensitivities through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbach, Patick; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Losch, Martin; Campin, Jean-Michel; Hill, Chris

    The adjoint of an ocean general circulation model is at the heart of the ocean state estimation system of the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) project. As part of an ongoing effort to extend ECCO to a coupled ocean/sea-ice estimation system, a dynamic and thermodynamic sea-ice model has been developed for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm). One key requirement is the ability to generate, by means of automatic differentiation (AD), tangent linear (TLM) and adjoint (ADM) model code for the coupled MITgcm ocean/sea-ice system. This second part of a two-part paper describes aspects of the adjoint model. The adjoint ocean and sea-ice model is used to calculate transient sensitivities of solid (ice and snow) freshwater export through Lancaster Sound in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA). The adjoint state provides a complementary view of the dynamics. In particular, the transient, multi-year sensitivity patterns reflect dominant pathways and propagation timescales through the CAA as resolved by the model, thus shedding light on causal relationships, in the model, across the Archipelago. The computational cost of inferring such causal relationships from forward model diagnostics alone would be prohibitive. The role of the exact model trajectory around which the adjoint is calculated (and therefore of the exactness of the adjoint) is exposed through calculations using free-slip vs no-slip lateral boundary conditions. Effective ice thickness, sea surface temperature, and precipitation sensitivities, are discussed in detail as examples of the coupled sea-ice/ocean and atmospheric forcing control space. To test the reliability of the adjoint, finite-difference perturbation experiments were performed for each of these elements and the cost perturbations were compared to those "predicted" by the adjoint. Overall, remarkable qualitative and quantitative agreement is found. In particular, the adjoint correctly

  2. The ORNL-SNAP shielding program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mynatt, F. R.; Clifford, C. E.; Muckenthaler, F. J.; Gritzner, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    The effort in the ORNL-SNAP shielding program is directed toward the development and verification of computer codes using numerical solutions to the transport equation for the design of optimized radiation shields for SNAP power systems. A brief discussion is given for the major areas of the SNAP shielding program, which are cross-section development, transport code development, and integral experiments. Detailed results are presented for the integral experiments utilizing the TSF-SNAP reactor. Calculated results are compared with experiments for neutron and gamma-ray spectra from the bare reactor and as transmitted through slab shields.

  3. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of an ultrawideband antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanson, M B; White, D A

    2011-07-28

    The frequency domain finite element method using H(curl)-conforming finite elements is a robust technique for full-wave analysis of antennas. As computers become more powerful, it is becoming feasible to not only predict antenna performance, but also to compute sensitivity of antenna performance with respect to multiple parameters. This sensitivity information can then be used for optimization of the design or specification of manufacturing tolerances. In this paper we review the Adjoint Method for sensitivity calculation, and apply it to the problem of optimizing a Ultrawideband antenna.

  4. Thermocouple shield

    SciTech Connect

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2009-11-24

    A thermocouple shield for use in radio frequency fields. In some embodiments the shield includes an electrically conductive tube that houses a standard thermocouple having a thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube protects the thermocouple from damage by an RF (including microwave) field and mitigates erroneous temperature readings due to the microwave or RF field. The thermocouple may be surrounded by a ceramic sheath to further protect the thermocouple. The ceramic sheath is generally formed from a material that is transparent to the wavelength of the microwave or RF energy. The microwave transparency property precludes heating of the ceramic sheath due to microwave coupling, which could affect the accuracy of temperature measurements. The ceramic sheath material is typically an electrically insulating material. The electrically insulative properties of the ceramic sheath help avert electrical arcing, which could damage the thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube is generally disposed around the thermocouple junction and disposed around at least a portion of the ceramic sheath. The concepts of the thermocouple shield may be incorporated into an integrated shielded thermocouple assembly.

  5. Improved Adjoint-Operator Learning For A Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad; Barhen, Jacob

    1995-01-01

    Improved method of adjoint-operator learning reduces amount of computation and associated computational memory needed to make electronic neural network learn temporally varying pattern (e.g., to recognize moving object in image) in real time. Method extension of method described in "Adjoint-Operator Learning for a Neural Network" (NPO-18352).

  6. Supersymmetric descendants of self-adjointly extended quantum mechanical Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hashimi, M.H.; Salman, M.; Shalaby, A.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2013-10-15

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant. -- Highlights: •Self-adjoint extension theory and contact interactions. •Application of self-adjoint extensions to supersymmetry. •Contact interactions in finite volume with Robin boundary condition.

  7. The compressible adjoint equations in geodynamics: equations and numerical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghelichkhan, Siavash; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2016-04-01

    The adjoint method is a powerful means to obtain gradient information in a mantle convection model relative to past flow structure. While the adjoint equations in geodynamics have been derived for the conservation equations of mantle flow in their incompressible form, the applicability of this approximation to Earth is limited, because density increases by almost a factor of two from the surface to the Core Mantle Boundary. Here we introduce the compressible adjoint equations for the conservation equations in the anelastic-liquid approximation. Our derivation applies an operator formulation in Hilbert spaces, to connect to recent work in seismology (Fichtner et al (2006)) and geodynamics (Horbach et al (2014)), where the approach was used to derive the adjoint equations for the wave equation and incompressible mantle flow. We present numerical tests of the newly derived equations based on twin experiments, focusing on three simulations. A first, termed Compressible, assumes the compressible forward and adjoint equations, and represents the consistent means of including compressibility effects. A second, termed Mixed, applies the compressible forward equation, but ignores compressibility effects in the adjoint equations, where the incompressible equations are used instead. A third simulation, termed Incompressible, neglects compressibility effects entirely in the forward and adjoint equations relative to the reference twin. The compressible and mixed formulations successfully restore earlier mantle flow structure, while the incompressible formulation yields noticeable artifacts. Our results suggest the use of a compressible formulation, when applying the adjoint method to seismically derived mantle heterogeneity structure.

  8. Whipple bumper shield simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, E.S.; Chhabildas, L.C. ); Hill, S.A. . George C. Marshall Space Flight Center)

    1991-01-01

    The Whipple bumper is a space shield designed to protect a space station from the most hazardous orbital space debris environment. A series of numerical simulations has been performed using the multi-dimensional hydrodynamics code CTH to estimate the effectiveness of the thin Whipple bumper design. These simulations are performed for impact velocities of {approximately}10 km/s which are now accessible by experiments using the Sandia hypervelocity launcher facility. For a {approximately}10 km/s impact by a 0.7 gm aluminum flier plate, the experimental results indicate that the debris cloud resulting upon impact of the bumper shield by the flier plate, completely penetrates the sub-structure. The CTH simulations also predict complete penetration by the subsequent debris cloud. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Sound shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Beckwith, I. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An improved test section for a supersonic or hypersonic wind tunnel is disclosed wherein the model tested is shielded from the noise normally radiated by the turbulent tunnel wall boundary layer. A vacuum plenum surrounds spaced rod elements making up the test chamber to extract some of the boundary layer as formed along the rod elements during a test to thereby delay the tendency of the rod boundary layers to become turbulent. Novel rod construction involves bending each rod slightly prior to machining the bent area to provide a flat segment on each rod for connection with the flat entrance fairing. Rods and fairing are secured to provide a test chamber incline on the order of 1 deg outward from the noise shield centerline to produce up to 65% reduction of the root mean square (rms) pressure over previously employed wind tunnel test sections at equivalent Reynolds numbers.

  10. SSC environmental radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    The environmental radiation shielding requirements of the SSC have been evaluated using currently available computational tools that incorporate the well known processes of energy loss and degradation of high energy particles into Monte Carlo computer codes. These tools permit determination of isodose contours in the matter surrounding a source point and therefore the specification of minimum thicknesses or extents of shielding in order to assure annual dose equivalents less than some specified design amount. For the general public the annual dose equivalent specified in the design is 10 millirem, small compared to the dose from naturally occurring radiation. The types of radiation fall into two classes for the purposes of shielding determinations-hadrons and muons. The sources of radiation at the SSC of concern for the surrounding environment are the interaction regions, the specially designed beam dumps into which the beams are dumped from time to time, and beam clean-up regions where stops remove the beam halo in order to reduce experimental backgrounds. A final, unlikely source of radiation considered is the accidental loss of the full beam at some point around the ring. Conservative choices of a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and a beam current three times design have been made in calculating the required shielding and boundaries of the facility. In addition to determination of minimum distances for the annual dose equivalents, the question of possible radioactivity produced in nearby wells or in municipal water supplies is addressed. The designed shielding distances and beam dumps are such that the induced radioactivity in ground water is safely smaller than the levels permitted by EPA and international agencies.

  11. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable.

  12. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions.

  13. Adjoint-based uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis for reactor depletion calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stripling, Hayes Franklin

    Depletion calculations for nuclear reactors model the dynamic coupling between the material composition and neutron flux and help predict reactor performance and safety characteristics. In order to be trusted as reliable predictive tools and inputs to licensing and operational decisions, the simulations must include an accurate and holistic quantification of errors and uncertainties in its outputs. Uncertainty quantification is a formidable challenge in large, realistic reactor models because of the large number of unknowns and myriad sources of uncertainty and error. We present a framework for performing efficient uncertainty quantification in depletion problems using an adjoint approach, with emphasis on high-fidelity calculations using advanced massively parallel computing architectures. This approach calls for a solution to two systems of equations: (a) the forward, engineering system that models the reactor, and (b) the adjoint system, which is mathematically related to but different from the forward system. We use the solutions of these systems to produce sensitivity and error estimates at a cost that does not grow rapidly with the number of uncertain inputs. We present the framework in a general fashion and apply it to both the source-driven and k-eigenvalue forms of the depletion equations. We describe the implementation and verification of solvers for the forward and ad- joint equations in the PDT code, and we test the algorithms on realistic reactor analysis problems. We demonstrate a new approach for reducing the memory and I/O demands on the host machine, which can be overwhelming for typical adjoint algorithms. Our conclusion is that adjoint depletion calculations using full transport solutions are not only computationally tractable, they are the most attractive option for performing uncertainty quantification on high-fidelity reactor analysis problems.

  14. Seismic wave-speed structure beneath the metropolitan area of Japan based on adjoint tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, T.; Obayashi, M.; Tono, Y.; Tsuboi, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have obtained a three-dimensional (3D) model of seismic wave-speed structure beneath the metropolitan area of Japan. We applied the spectral-element method (e.g. Komatitsch and Tromp 1999) and adjoint method (Liu and Tromp 2006) to the broadband seismograms in order to infer the 3D model. We used the travel-time tomography result (Matsubara and Obara 2011) as an initial 3D model and used broadband waveforms recorded at the NIED F-net stations. We selected 147 earthquakes with magnitude of larger than 4.5 from the F-net earthquake catalog and used their bandpass filtered seismograms between 5 and 20 second with a high S/N ratio. The 3D model used for the forward and adjoint simulations is represented as a region of approximately 500 by 450 km in horizontal and 120 km in depth. Minimum period of theoretical waveforms was 4.35 second. For the adjoint inversion, we picked up the windows of the body waves from the observed and theoretical seismograms. We used SPECFEM3D_Cartesian code (e.g. Peter et al. 2011) for the forward and adjoint simulations, and their simulations were implemented by K-computer in RIKEN. Each iteration required about 0.1 million CPU hours at least. The model parameters of Vp and Vs were updated by using the steepest descent method. We obtained the fourth iterative model (M04), which reproduced observed waveforms better than the initial model. The shear wave-speed of M04 was significantly smaller than the initial model at any depth. The model of compressional wave-speed was not improved by inversion because of small alpha kernel values. Acknowledgements: This research was partly supported by MEXT Strategic Program for Innovative Research. We thank to the NIED for providing seismological data.

  15. Towards Adjoint Finite Source Inversion: Application to the 2011 M9 Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somala, S.; Galvez, P.; Inbal, A.; Ampuero, J. P.; Lapusta, N.

    2011-12-01

    The recent 2011 M9 Tohoku, Japan, earthquake was recorded by thousands of sensors at near-fault distance, including broad band, strong motion and continuous GPS sensors. This event provides a unique opportunity to image the earthquake rupture process with high resolution. In order to enable the exploitation of the immense dataset available, orders of magnitude larger than in previous earthquakes, we are developing a scalable source inversion procedure based on time-reversal adjoint inversion. We adopt the linear least squares formulation of the source inversion problem, whose basic unknown is the spatio-temporal distribution of slip rate. We formulate an iterative conjugate gradient procedure to minimize the L2 norm of ground velocity residuals between data and synthetics. Each iteration involves one time-reversal (adjoint) and one forward simulation. Exploiting the time-reversal symmetry and the reciprocity principle of elastodynamics, the adjoint is computed by a wave propagation simulation in which time-reversed seismogram residuals are imposed as point forces at the stations simulated. The resulting fault tractions on a locked fault are the adjoint fields, related to the gradient of the misfit function with respect to the model. The simulations are performed with a recent extension of the SPECFEM3D spectral element code to dynamic and kinematic finite sources on unstructured meshes (Galvez et al, session S24 of this meeting). The non-planar geometry of the megathrust fault is accounted for in the spectral element mesh (generated with CUBIT). The subsurface structure is incorporated, on a coarse scale, using regional 3D velocity models, e.g. from the Japan Seismic Hazard Information Station (J-SHIS) website. We will report on the results of our initial efforts, focused on exploiting the continuous 1 Hz GPS signals recorded in Japan to understand the low frequency aspects of the rupture process of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake.

  16. A shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    Perturbation theory for fixed sources was applied to radiation shielding problems to determine changes in neutron and gamma ray doses due to changes in various shield layers. For a given source and detector position, the perturbation method enables dose derivatives due to all layer changes to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. The direct approach requires two forward calculations for the derivative due to a single layer change. Hence, the perturbation method for a obtaining dose derivatives permits an appreciable savings in computation for a multilayered shield. A comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in shield layer thickness as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  17. A shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    The perturbation theory for fixed sources was applied to radiation shielding problems to determine changes in neutron and gamma ray doses due to changes in various shield layers. For a given source and detector position the perturbation method enables dose derivatives due to all layer changes to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. The direct approach requires two forward calculations for the derivative due to a single layer change. Hence, the perturbation method for obtaining dose derivatives permits an appreciable savings in computation for a multilayered shield. For an illustrative problem, a comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in the thickness of each shield layer as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  18. Aerodynamic design optimization by using a continuous adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, JiaQi; Xiong, JunTao; Liu, Feng

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents the fundamentals of a continuous adjoint method and the applications of this method to the aerodynamic design optimization of both external and internal flows. General formulation of the continuous adjoint equations and the corresponding boundary conditions are derived. With the adjoint method, the complete gradient information needed in the design optimization can be obtained by solving the governing flow equations and the corresponding adjoint equations only once for each cost function, regardless of the number of design parameters. An inverse design of airfoil is firstly performed to study the accuracy of the adjoint gradient and the effectiveness of the adjoint method as an inverse design method. Then the method is used to perform a series of single and multiple point design optimization problems involving the drag reduction of airfoil, wing, and wing-body configuration, and the aerodynamic performance improvement of turbine and compressor blade rows. The results demonstrate that the continuous adjoint method can efficiently and significantly improve the aerodynamic performance of the design in a shape optimization problem.

  19. Adjoint active surfaces for localization and imaging.

    PubMed

    Cook, Daniel A; Mueller, Martin Fritz; Fedele, Francesco; Yezzi, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of localizing and segmenting regions embedded within a surrounding medium by characterizing their boundaries, as opposed to imaging the entirety of the volume. Active surfaces are used to directly reconstruct the shape of the region of interest. We describe the procedure for finding the optimal surface, which is computed iteratively via gradient descent that exploits the sensitivity of an error minimization functional to changes of the active surface. In doing so, we introduce the adjoint model to compute the sensitivity, and in this respect, the method shares common ground with several other disciplines, such as optimal control. Finally, we illustrate the proposed active surface technique in the framework of wave propagation governed by the scalar Helmholtz equation. Potential applications include electromagnetics, acoustics, geophysics, nondestructive testing, and medical imaging. PMID:25438311

  20. Adjoint tomography of the southern California crust.

    PubMed

    Tape, Carl; Liu, Qinya; Maggi, Alessia; Tromp, Jeroen

    2009-08-21

    Using an inversion strategy based on adjoint methods, we developed a three-dimensional seismological model of the southern California crust. The resulting model involved 16 tomographic iterations, which required 6800 wavefield simulations and a total of 0.8 million central processing unit hours. The new crustal model reveals strong heterogeneity, including local changes of +/-30% with respect to the initial three-dimensional model provided by the Southern California Earthquake Center. The model illuminates shallow features such as sedimentary basins and compositional contrasts across faults. It also reveals crustal features at depth that aid in the tectonic reconstruction of southern California, such as subduction-captured oceanic crustal fragments. The new model enables more realistic and accurate assessments of seismic hazard. PMID:19696349

  1. Adjoints and Low-rank Covariance Representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tippett, Michael K.; Cohn, Stephen E.

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative measures of the uncertainty of Earth System estimates can be as important as the estimates themselves. Second moments of estimation errors are described by the covariance matrix, whose direct calculation is impractical when the number of degrees of freedom of the system state is large. Ensemble and reduced-state approaches to prediction and data assimilation replace full estimation error covariance matrices by low-rank approximations. The appropriateness of such approximations depends on the spectrum of the full error covariance matrix, whose calculation is also often impractical. Here we examine the situation where the error covariance is a linear transformation of a forcing error covariance. We use operator norms and adjoints to relate the appropriateness of low-rank representations to the conditioning of this transformation. The analysis is used to investigate low-rank representations of the steady-state response to random forcing of an idealized discrete-time dynamical system.

  2. GPU-accelerated adjoint algorithmic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the "tape". Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography.

  3. GPU-Accelerated Adjoint Algorithmic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the “tape”. Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography

  4. Self-adjointness and conservation laws of difference equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Linyu

    2015-06-01

    A general theorem on conservation laws for arbitrary difference equations is proved. The theorem is based on an introduction of an adjoint system related with a given difference system, and it does not require the existence of a difference Lagrangian. It is proved that the system, combined by the original system and its adjoint system, is governed by a variational principle, which inherits all symmetries of the original system. Noether's theorem can then be applied. With some special techniques, e.g. self-adjointness properties, this allows us to obtain conservation laws for difference equations, which are not necessary governed by Lagrangian formalisms.

  5. High-Speed Three-Dimensional Nodal Diffusion Code System.

    2001-03-21

    Version 00 MOSRA-Light is a three-dimensional diffusion calculation code for X-Y-Z geometry. It can be used in: validation of discontinuity factor for adjoint problem; benchmark on discontinuity factor (forward & adjoint cal.); DVP BWR Benchmark (2D,2G calculation); and void reactivity effect benchmark; etc. A utility code called More-MOSRA provides many useful functions with the file produced by MOSRA-Light.

  6. Sensitivity of Lumped Constraints Using the Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akgun, Mehmet A.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Wu, K. Chauncey; Walsh, Joanne L.

    1999-01-01

    Adjoint sensitivity calculation of stress, buckling and displacement constraints may be much less expensive than direct sensitivity calculation when the number of load cases is large. Adjoint stress and displacement sensitivities are available in the literature. Expressions for local buckling sensitivity of isotropic plate elements are derived in this study. Computational efficiency of the adjoint method is sensitive to the number of constraints and, therefore, the method benefits from constraint lumping. A continuum version of the Kreisselmeier-Steinhauser (KS) function is chosen to lump constraints. The adjoint and direct methods are compared for three examples: a truss structure, a simple HSCT wing model, and a large HSCT model. These sensitivity derivatives are then used in optimization.

  7. Surface wave sensitivity: mode summation versus adjoint SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2011-12-01

    We compare finite-frequency phase and amplitude sensitivity kernels calculated based on frequency-domain surface wave mode summation and a time-domain adjoint method. The adjoint calculations involve a forward wavefield generated by an earthquake and an adjoint wavefield generated at a seismic receiver. We determine adjoint sources corresponding to frequency-dependent phase and amplitude measurements made using a multitaper technique, which may be applied to any single-taper measurement, including box car windowing. We calculate phase and amplitude sensitivity kernels using an adjoint method based on wave propagation simulations using a spectral element method (SEM). Sensitivity kernels calculated using the adjoint SEM are in good agreement with kernels calculated based on mode summation. In general, the adjoint SEM is more computationally expensive than mode summation in global studies. The advantage of the adjoint SEM lies in the calculation of sensitivity kernels in 3-D earth models. We compare surface wave sensitivity kernels computed in 1-D and 3-D reference earth models and show that (1) lateral wave speed heterogeneities may affect the geometry and amplitude of surface wave sensitivity; (2) sensitivity kernels of long-period surface waves calculated in 1-D model PREM and 3-D models S20RTS+CRUST2.0 and FFSW1+CRUST2.0 do not show significant differences, indicating that the use of a 1-D reference model is adequate in global inversions of long-period surface waves (periods of 50 s and longer); and (3) the differences become significant for short-period Love waves when mode coupling is sensitive to large differences in reference crustal structure. Finally, we show that sensitivity kernels in anelastic earth models may be calculated in purely elastic earth models provided physical dispersion is properly accounted for.

  8. Adjoint Function: Physical Basis of Variational & Perturbation Theory in Transport

    2009-07-27

    Version 00 Dr. J.D. Lewins has now released the following legacy book for free distribution: Importance: The Adjoint Function: The Physical Basis of Variational and Perturbation Theory in Transport and Diffusion Problems, North-Holland Publishing Company - Amsterdam, 582 pages, 1966 Introduction: Continuous Systems and the Variational Principle 1. The Fundamental Variational Principle 2. The Importance Function 3. Adjoint Equations 4. Variational Methods 5. Perturbation and Iterative Methods 6. Non-Linear Theory

  9. Adjoint Sensitivity Computations for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Mesh Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis,Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    . Thereafter, we focus on a shape optimization problem for an Apollo-like reentry capsule. The optimization seeks to enhance the lift-to-drag ratio of the capsule by modifyjing the shape of its heat-shield in conjunction with a center-of-gravity (c.g.) offset. This multipoint and multi-objective optimization problem is used to demonstrate the overall effectiveness of the Cartesian adjoint method for addressing the issues of complex aerodynamic design. This abstract presents only a brief outline of the numerical method and results; full details will be given in the final paper.

  10. Universal Racah matrices and adjoint knot polynomials: Arborescent knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.

    2016-04-01

    By now it is well established that the quantum dimensions of descendants of the adjoint representation can be described in a universal form, independent of a particular family of simple Lie algebras. The Rosso-Jones formula then implies a universal description of the adjoint knot polynomials for torus knots, which in particular unifies the HOMFLY (SUN) and Kauffman (SON) polynomials. For E8 the adjoint representation is also fundamental. We suggest to extend the universality from the dimensions to the Racah matrices and this immediately produces a unified description of the adjoint knot polynomials for all arborescent (double-fat) knots, including twist, 2-bridge and pretzel. Technically we develop together the universality and the "eigenvalue conjecture", which expresses the Racah and mixing matrices through the eigenvalues of the quantum R-matrix, and for dealing with the adjoint polynomials one has to extend it to the previously unknown 6 × 6 case. The adjoint polynomials do not distinguish between mutants and therefore are not very efficient in knot theory, however, universal polynomials in higher representations can probably be better in this respect.

  11. Unsteady adjoint of a gas turbine inlet guide vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talnikar, Chaitanya; Wang, Qiqi

    2015-11-01

    Unsteady fluid flow simulations like large eddy simulation have been shown to be crucial in accurately predicting heat transfer in turbomachinery applications like transonic flow over an inlet guide vane. To compute sensitivities of aerothermal objectives for a vane with respect to design parameters an unsteady adjoint is required. In this talk we present unsteady adjoint solutions for a vane from VKI using pressure loss and heat transfer over the vane surface as the objectives. The boundary layer on the suction side near the trailing edge of the vane is turbulent and this poses a challenge for an adjoint solver. The chaotic dynamics cause the adjoint solution to diverge exponentially to infinity from that region when simulated backwards in time. The prospect of adding artificial viscosity to the adjoint equations to dampen the adjoint fields is investigated. Results for the vane from simulations performed on the Titan supercomputer will be shown and the effect of the additional viscosity on the accuracy of the sensitivities will be discussed.

  12. Comparison of Evolutionary (Genetic) Algorithm and Adjoint Methods for Multi-Objective Viscous Airfoil Optimizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, T. H.; Nemec, M.; Holst, T.; Zingg, D. W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comparison between an Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) and an Adjoint-Gradient (AG) Method applied to a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for airfoil design is presented. Both approaches use a common function evaluation code, the steady-state explicit part of the code,ARC2D. The parameterization of the design space is a common B-spline approach for an airfoil surface, which together with a common griding approach, restricts the AG and EA to the same design space. Results are presented for a class of viscous transonic airfoils in which the optimization tradeoff between drag minimization as one objective and lift maximization as another, produces the multi-objective design space. Comparisons are made for efficiency, accuracy and design consistency.

  13. Corium shield

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Douglas B.; Buchholz, Carol E.

    1994-01-01

    A shield for restricting molten corium from flowing into a water sump disposed in a floor of a containment vessel includes upper and lower walls which extend vertically upwardly and downwardly from the floor for laterally bounding the sump. The upper wall includes a plurality of laterally spaced apart flow channels extending horizontally therethrough, with each channel having a bottom disposed coextensively with the floor for channeling water therefrom into the sump. Each channel has a height and a length predeterminedly selected for allowing heat from the molten corium to dissipate through the upper and lower walls as it flows therethrough for solidifying the molten corium therein to prevent accumulation thereof in the sump.

  14. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions must contend with a harsh radiation environment Impacts to crew and electronics. Need to invest in multifunctionality for spacecraft optimization. MMOD shield. Goals: Increase radiation mitigation potential. Retain overall MMOD shielding performance.

  15. Baryogenesis via leptogenesis in adjoint SU(5)

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Steve; Fileviez Perez, Pavel E-mail: fileviez@physics.wisc.edu

    2008-08-15

    The possibility of explaining the baryon asymmetry in the Universe through the leptogenesis mechanism in the context of adjoint SU(5) is investigated. In this model neutrino masses are generated through the type I and type III seesaw mechanisms, and the field responsible for the type III seesaw, called {rho}{sub 3}, generates the B-L asymmetry needed to satisfy the observed value of the baryon asymmetry in the Universe. We find that the CP asymmetry originates only from the vertex correction, since the self-energy contribution is not present. When neutrino masses have a normal hierarchy, successful leptogenesis is possible for 10{sup 11} GeV{approx}

  16. LPT. Shield test facility (TAN645 and 646). Calibration lab shield ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Shield test facility (TAN-645 and -646). Calibration lab shield door. Ralph M. Parsons 1229-17 ANP/GE-6-645-MS-1. April 1957. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 037-0645-40-693-107369 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  18. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  19. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  20. Shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    Perturbation theory formulas were derived and applied to determine changes in neutron and gamma-ray doses due to changes in various radiation shield layers for fixed sources. For a given source and detector position, the perturbation method enables dose derivatives with respect to density, or equivalently thickness, for every layer to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. A direct determination without the perturbation approach would require two forward calculations to evaluate the dose derivative due to a change in a single layer. Hence, the perturbation method for obtaining dose derivatives requires fewer computations for design studies of multilayer shields. For an illustrative problem, a comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in the thickness of each shield layer in a two-layer spherical configuration as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  1. Adjoint-based airfoil shape optimization in transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramanzini, Joe-Ray

    The primary focus of this work is efficient aerodynamic shape optimization in transonic flow. Adjoint-based optimization techniques are employed on airfoil sections and evaluated in terms of computational accuracy as well as efficiency. This study examines two test cases proposed by the AIAA Aerodynamic Design Optimization Discussion Group. The first is a two-dimensional, transonic, inviscid, non-lifting optimization of a Modified-NACA 0012 airfoil. The second is a two-dimensional, transonic, viscous optimization problem using a RAE 2822 airfoil. The FUN3D CFD code of NASA Langley Research Center is used as the ow solver for the gradient-based optimization cases. Two shape parameterization techniques are employed to study their effect and the number of design variables on the final optimized shape: Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD) and the BandAids free-form deformation technique. For the two airfoil cases, angle of attack is treated as a global design variable. The thickness and camber distributions are the local design variables for MASSOUD, and selected airfoil surface grid points are the local design variables for BandAids. Using the MASSOUD technique, a drag reduction of 72.14% is achieved for the NACA 0012 case, reducing the total number of drag counts from 473.91 to 130.59. Employing the BandAids technique yields a 78.67% drag reduction, from 473.91 to 99.98. The RAE 2822 case exhibited a drag reduction from 217.79 to 132.79 counts, a 39.05% decrease using BandAids.

  2. Reconstruction of ocean circulation from sparse data using the adjoint method: LGM and the present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurahashi-Nakamura, T.; Losch, M. J.; Paul, A.; Mulitza, S.; Schulz, M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the behavior of the Earth's climate system under different conditions in the past is the basis for more robust projections of future climate. It is thought that the ocean circulation plays a very important role in the climate system, because it can greatly affect climate by dynamic-thermodynamic (as a medium of heat transport) and biogeochemical processes (by affecting the global carbon cycle). In this context, studying the period of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is particularly promising, as it represents a climate state that is very different from today. Furthermore the LGM, compared to other paleoperiods, is characterized by a relatively good paleo-data coverage. Unfortunately, the ocean circulation during the LGM is still uncertain, with a range of climate models estimating both a stronger and a weaker formation rate of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) as compared to the present rate. Here, we present a project aiming at reducing this uncertainty by combining proxy data with a numerical ocean model using variational techniques. Our approach, the so-called adjoint method, employs a quadratic cost function of model-data differences weighted by their prior error estimates. We seek an optimal state estimate at the global minimum of the cost function by varying the independent control variables such as initial conditions (e.g. temperature), boundary conditions (e.g. surface winds, heat flux), or internal parameters (e.g. vertical diffusivity). The adjoint or dual model computes the gradient of the cost function with respect to these control variables and thus provides the information required by gradient descent algorithms. The gradients themselves provide valuable information about the sensitivity of the system to perturbations in the control variables. We use the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ocean general circulation model (MITgcm) with a cubed-sphere grid system that avoids converging grid lines and pole singularities. This model code is

  3. Adjoint tomography of the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, D. B.; Savage, B.; Rodgers, A. J.; Tromp, J.

    2010-12-01

    Improvements in nuclear explosion monitoring require refined seismic models of the target region. In our study, we focus on the Middle East, spanning a region from Turkey to the west and West India to the east. This area represents a complex geologic and tectonic setting with sparse seismic data coverage. This has lead to diverging interpretations of crustal and underlying upper-mantle structure by different research groups, complicating seismic monitoring of the Middle East at regional distances. We evaluated an initial 3D seismic model of this region by computing full waveforms for several regional earthquakes by a spectral-element method. We measure traveltime and multitaper phase shifts between observed broadband data and synthetic seismograms for distinct seismic phases within selected time windows using a recently developed automated measurement algorithm. Based on the remaining misfits, we setup an iterative inversion procedure for a fully numerical 3D seismic tomography approach. In order to improve the initial 3D seismic model, the sensitivity to seismic structure of the traveltime and multitaper phase measurements for all available seismic network recordings is computed. As this represents a computationally very intensive task, we take advantage of a fully numerical adjoint approach by using the efficient software package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE on a dedicated cluster. We show examples of such sensitivity kernels for different seismic events and use them in a steepest descent approach to update the 3D seismic model, starting at longer periods between 60 s and up to 200 s and moving towards shorter periods of 11 s. We highlight various improvements in the initial seismic structure during the iterations in order to better fit regional seismic waveforms in the Middle East.

  4. Adjoint tomography of the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, D. B.; Savage, B.; Rodgers, A.; Morency, C.; Tromp, J.

    2011-12-01

    Improvements in nuclear explosion monitoring require refined seismic models of the target region. In our study, we focus on the Middle East, spanning a region from Turkey to the west and West India to the east. This area represents a complex geologic and tectonic setting with sparse seismic data coverage. This has lead to diverging interpretations of crustal and underlying upper-mantle structure by different research groups, complicating seismic monitoring of the Middle East at regional distances. We evaluated an initial 3D seismic model of this region by computing full waveforms for several regional earthquakes based on a spectral-element method. We measure traveltime and multitaper phase differences between observed broadband data and synthetic seismograms for distinct seismic phases within selected time windows using a recently developed automated measurement algorithm. Based on the remaining misfits, we setup an iterative inversion procedure for a fully numerical 3D seismic tomography approach. In order to improve the initial 3D seismic model, sensitivity to seismic structures of traveltime and multitaper phase measurements for all available seismic network recordings is computed. As this represents a computationally very intensive task, we take advantage of a fully numerical adjoint approach by using the efficient software package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE on a dedicated cluster. We show examples of such sensitivity kernels for different seismic events. All these `event kernels' are then summed, smoothed and further used in a preconditioned conjugate-gradient approach. Thus we iteratively update the 3D seismic model, starting at longer periods between 60~s and up to 150~s and moving towards shorter periods of 11~s. We highlight various improvements in the initial seismic structure during the iterations in order to better fit regional seismic waveforms in the Middle East.

  5. Receptivity in parallel flows: An adjoint approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. Christopher

    1993-01-01

    Linear receptivity studies in parallel flows are aimed at understanding how external forcing couples to the natural unstable motions which a flow can support. The vibrating ribbon problem models the original Schubauer and Skramstad boundary layer experiment and represents the classic boundary layer receptivity problem. The process by which disturbances are initiated in convectively-unstable jets and shear layers has also received attention. Gaster was the first to handle the boundary layer analysis with the recognition that spatial modes, rather than temporal modes, were relevant when studying convectively-unstable flows that are driven by a time-harmonic source. The amplitude of the least stable spatial mode, far downstream of the source, is related to the source strength by a coupling coefficient. The determination of this coefficient is at the heart of this type of linear receptivity study. The first objective of the present study was to determine whether the various wave number derivative factors, appearing in the coupling coefficients for linear receptivity problems, could be reexpressed in a simpler form involving adjoint eigensolutions. Secondly, it was hoped that the general nature of this simplification could be shown; indeed, a rather elegant characterization of the receptivity properties of spatial instabilities does emerge. The analysis is quite distinct from the usual Fourier-inversion procedures, although a detailed knowledge of the spectrum of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation is still required. Since the cylinder wake analysis proved very useful in addressing control considerations, the final objective was to provide a foundation upon which boundary layer control theory may be developed.

  6. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). By increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate concept MLI blankets for MMOD shields. In conjunction, these MLI blankets and the subsequent MMOD shields were also evaluated for their radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. These concepts were evaluated against the ISS MLI blankets and the ISS MMOD shield, which acted as the baseline. These radiation shielding assessments were performed using the high charge and energy transport software (HZETRN). This software is based on a one-dimensional formula of the Boltzmann transport equation with a straight-ahead approximation. Each configuration was evaluated against the following environments to provide a diverse view of radiation shielding effectiveness in most space environments within the heliosphere: August 1972 solar particle event, October 1989 solar particle event, 1982 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar maximum), 1987 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar minimum), and a low earth orbit environment in 1970 that corresponded to an altitude of 400 km and inclination of 51.6 . Both the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were analyzed, but the focus of the discussion was on the dose equivalent since the data is most concerned with radiation shielding of the crew. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for

  7. Adjoint simulation of stream depletion due to aquifer pumping.

    PubMed

    Neupauer, Roseanna M; Griebling, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    If an aquifer is hydraulically connected to an adjacent stream, a pumping well operating in the aquifer will draw some water from aquifer storage and some water from the stream, causing stream depletion. Several analytical, semi-analytical, and numerical approaches have been developed to estimate stream depletion due to pumping. These approaches are effective if the well location is known. If a new well is to be installed, it may be desirable to install the well at a location where stream depletion is minimal. If several possible locations are considered for the location of a new well, stream depletion would have to be estimated for all possible well locations, which can be computationally inefficient. The adjoint approach for estimating stream depletion is a more efficient alternative because with one simulation of the adjoint model, stream depletion can be estimated for pumping at a well at any location. We derive the adjoint equations for a coupled system with a confined aquifer, an overlying unconfined aquifer, and a river that is hydraulically connected to the unconfined aquifer. We assume that the stage in the river is known, and is independent of the stream depletion, consistent with the assumptions of the MODFLOW river package. We describe how the adjoint equations can be solved using MODFLOW. In an illustrative example, we show that for this scenario, the adjoint approach is as accurate as standard forward numerical simulation methods, and requires substantially less computational effort. PMID:22182421

  8. Adjoint-Based Methodology for Time-Dependent Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a discrete adjoint method for a broad class of time-dependent optimization problems. The time-dependent adjoint equations are derived in terms of the discrete residual of an arbitrary finite volume scheme which approximates unsteady conservation law equations. Although only the 2-D unsteady Euler equations are considered in the present analysis, this time-dependent adjoint method is applicable to the 3-D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with minor modifications. The discrete adjoint operators involving the derivatives of the discrete residual and the cost functional with respect to the flow variables are computed using a complex-variable approach, which provides discrete consistency and drastically reduces the implementation and debugging cycle. The implementation of the time-dependent adjoint method is validated by comparing the sensitivity derivative with that obtained by forward mode differentiation. Our numerical results show that O(10) optimization iterations of the steepest descent method are needed to reduce the objective functional by 3-6 orders of magnitude for test problems considered.

  9. Mesh-free adjoint methods for nonlinear filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred

    2005-09-01

    We apply a new industrial strength numerical approximation, called the "mesh-free adjoint method", to solve the nonlinear filtering problem. This algorithm exploits the smoothness of the problem, unlike particle filters, and hence we expect that mesh-free adjoints are superior to particle filters for many practical applications. The nonlinear filter problem is equivalent to solving the Fokker-Planck equation in real time. The key idea is to use a good adaptive non-uniform quantization of state space to approximate the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. In particular, the adjoint method computes the location of the nodes in state space to minimize errors in the final answer. This use of an adjoint is analogous to optimal control algorithms, but it is more interesting. The adjoint method is also analogous to importance sampling in particle filters, but it is better for four reasons: (1) it exploits the smoothness of the problem; (2) it explicitly minimizes the errors in the relevant functional; (3) it explicitly models the dynamics in state space; and (4) it can be used to compute a corrected value for the desired functional using the residuals. We will attempt to make this paper accessible to normal engineers who do not have PDEs for breakfast.

  10. Space reactor shielding fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of space reactor neutron shielding by a melting and casting process utilizing lithium hydride is described. The first neutron shield fabricated is a large pancake shape 86 inches in diameter, containing about 1700 pounds of lithium hydride. This shield, fabricated by the unique melting and casting process, is the largest lithium hydride shield ever built.

  11. Imaging the slab beneath central Chile using the Spectral Elements Method and adjoint techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercerat, E. D.; Nolet, G.; Marot, M.; Deshayes, P.; Monfret, T.

    2010-12-01

    This work focuses on imaging the subducting slab beneath Central Chile using novel inversion techniques based on the adjoint method and accurate wave propagation simulations using the Spectral Elements Method. The study area comprises the flat slab portion of the Nazca plate between 29 S and 34 S subducting beneath South America. We will use a database of regional seismicity consisting of both crustal and deep slab earthquakes with magnitude 3 < Mw < 6 recorded by different temporary and permanent seismological networks. Our main goal is to determine both the kinematics and the geometry of the subducting slab in order to help the geodynamical interpretation of such particular active margin. The Spectral Elements Method (SPECFEM3D code) is used to generate the synthetic seismograms and it will be applied for the iterative minimization based on adjoint techniques. The numerical mesh is 600 km x 600 km in horizontal coordinates and 220 km depth. As a first step, we are faced to well-known issues concerning mesh generation (resolution, quality, absorbing boundary conditions). In particular, we must evaluate the influence of free surface topography, as well as the MOHO and other geological interfaces in the synthetic seismograms. The initial velocity model from a previous travel-time tomography study, is linearly interpolated to the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grid. The comparison between the first forward simulations (up to 4 seconds minimum period) validate the initial velocity model of the study area, although many features not reproduced by the initial model have already been identified. Next step will concentrate in the comparison between finite-frequency kernels calculated by travel-time methods with ones based on adjoint methods, in order to highlight advantages and disadvantages in terms of resolution, accuracy, but also computational cost.

  12. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). Increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate a concept MLI blanket for an MMOD shield. In conjunction, this MLI blanket and the subsequent MMOD shield was also evaluated for its radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. The overall MMOD shielding system using the concept MLI blanket proved to only have a marginal increase in the radiation mitigating properties. Therefore, subsequent analysis was performed on various conceptual MMOD shields to determine the combination of materials that may prove superior for radiation mitigating purposes. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for radiation shielding effectiveness.

  13. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of plasmonic structures using the FDTD method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Ahmed, Osman S; Bakr, Mohamed H

    2014-05-15

    We present an adjoint variable method for estimating the sensitivities of arbitrary responses with respect to the parameters of dispersive discontinuities in nanoplasmonic devices. Our theory is formulated in terms of the electric field components at the vicinity of perturbed discontinuities. The adjoint sensitivities are computed using at most one extra finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation regardless of the number of parameters. Our approach is illustrated through the sensitivity analysis of an add-drop coupler consisting of a square ring resonator between two parallel waveguides. The computed adjoint sensitivities of the scattering parameters are compared with those obtained using the accurate but computationally expensive central finite difference approach. PMID:24978258

  14. A Posteriori Analysis for Hydrodynamic Simulations Using Adjoint Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, C S; Estep, D; Sandelin, J; Wang, H

    2009-02-26

    This report contains results of analysis done during an FY08 feasibility study investigating the use of adjoint methodologies for a posteriori error estimation for hydrodynamics simulations. We developed an approach to adjoint analysis for these systems through use of modified equations and viscosity solutions. Targeting first the 1D Burgers equation, we include a verification of the adjoint operator for the modified equation for the Lax-Friedrichs scheme, then derivations of an a posteriori error analysis for a finite difference scheme and a discontinuous Galerkin scheme applied to this problem. We include some numerical results showing the use of the error estimate. Lastly, we develop a computable a posteriori error estimate for the MAC scheme applied to stationary Navier-Stokes.

  15. Sonic Boom Mitigation Through Aircraft Design and Adjoint Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rallabhandi, Siriam K.; Diskin, Boris; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to design of the supersonic aircraft outer mold line (OML) by optimizing the A-weighted loudness of sonic boom signature predicted on the ground. The optimization process uses the sensitivity information obtained by coupling the discrete adjoint formulations for the augmented Burgers Equation and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) equations. This coupled formulation links the loudness of the ground boom signature to the aircraft geometry thus allowing efficient shape optimization for the purpose of minimizing the impact of loudness. The accuracy of the adjoint-based sensitivities is verified against sensitivities obtained using an independent complex-variable approach. The adjoint based optimization methodology is applied to a configuration previously optimized using alternative state of the art optimization methods and produces additional loudness reduction. The results of the optimizations are reported and discussed.

  16. Learning a trajectory using adjoint functions and teacher forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad B.; Barhen, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    A new methodology for faster supervised temporal learning in nonlinear neural networks is presented which builds upon the concept of adjoint operators to allow fast computation of the gradients of an error functional with respect to all parameters of the neural architecture, and exploits the concept of teacher forcing to incorporate information on the desired output into the activation dynamics. The importance of the initial or final time conditions for the adjoint equations is discussed. A new algorithm is presented in which the adjoint equations are solved simultaneously (i.e., forward in time) with the activation dynamics of the neural network. We also indicate how teacher forcing can be modulated in time as learning proceeds. The results obtained show that the learning time is reduced by one to two orders of magnitude with respect to previously published results, while trajectory tracking is significantly improved. The proposed methodology makes hardware implementation of temporal learning attractive for real-time applications.

  17. Differential sensitivity theory applied to the MESA code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, R. J.; Maudlin, P. J.; Harstad, E. N.

    1994-07-01

    A technique called Differential Sensitivity Theory (DST) is applied to the system of equations solved by the MESA continuum mechanics code. DST uses adjoint technique to determine exact sensitivity derivatives, i.e., if R is a calculation result of interest (response R ) and αi is a calculational input (parameter αi), then αR/αi is defined as the sensitivity. The advantage of using DST is that for an n-parameter problem all n sensitivities can be obtained by integrating the solutions from only two calculations, a MESA calculation and its corresponding adjoint calculation using an Adjoint Continuum Mechanics (ACM) code. This work presents the derivation and solution of the appropriate set of adjoint equations for the purpose of computing sensitivities for high-rate two-dimensional, multi-component, high-deformation problems. As an example, results for a flyer plate impact problem are given.

  18. Shielding measurements for 230-Mev protons

    SciTech Connect

    Siebers, J.V.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W. . Dept. of Medical Physics); Coutrakon, G. . Medical Center)

    1993-09-01

    Energetic neutrons, produced as protons interact with matter, dominate the radiation shielding environment for proton accelerators. Because of the scarcity of data describing the shielding required to protect personnel from these neutrons, absorbed dose and dose-equivalent values are measured as a function of depth in a thick concrete shield at neutron emission angles of 0, 22, 45, and 90 deg for 230-MeV protons incident upon stopping-length aluminum, iron, and lead targets. Neutron attenuation lengths vary sharply with angle but are independent of the target material. Comparing results with prior shielding calculations, the High-Energy Transport Code overestimates neutron production and attenuation lengths in the forward direction. Analytical methods compare favorably in the forward direction but overestimate the production and attenuation lengths at large angles. The results presented are useful for determining the shielding requirements for proton radiotherapy facilities and as a benchmark for future calculations.

  19. A perturbation technique for shield weight minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E. )

    1993-01-01

    The radiation shield optimization code SWAN (Ref. 1) was originally developed for minimizing the thickness of a shield that will meet a given dose (or another) constraint or for extremizing a performance parameter of interest (e.g., maximizing energy multiplication or minimizing dose) while maintaining the shield volume constraint. The SWAN optimization process proved to be highly effective (e.g., see Refs. 2, 3, and 4). The purpose of this work is to investigate the applicability of the SWAN methodology to problems in which the weight rather than the volume is the relevant shield characteristic. Such problems are encountered in shield design for space nuclear power systems. The investigation is carried out using SWAN with the coupled neutron-photon cross-section library FLUNG (Ref. 5).

  20. The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function

    SciTech Connect

    Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV

  1. Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Equation for Coupled Electron-Photon Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Liscum-Powell, J.L.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Morel, J.E.; Prinja, A.K.

    1999-07-08

    Recently, Morel and McGhee described an alternate second-order form of the transport equation called the self adjoint angular flux (SAAF) equation that has the angular flux as its unknown. The SAAF formulation has all the advantages of the traditional even- and odd-parity self-adjoint equations, with the added advantages that it yields the full angular flux when it is numerically solved, it is significantly easier to implement reflective and reflective-like boundary conditions, and in the appropriate form it can be solved in void regions. The SAAF equation has the disadvantage that the angular domain is the full unit sphere and, like the even- and odd- parity form, S{sub n} source iteration cannot be implemented using the standard sweeping algorithm. Also, problems arise in pure scattering media. Morel and McGhee demonstrated the efficacy of the SAAF formulation for neutral particle transport. Here we apply the SAAF formulation to coupled electron-photon transport problems using multigroup cross-sections from the CEPXS code and S{sub n} discretization.

  2. Ocean acoustic tomography from different receiver geometries using the adjoint method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Wang, Dongxiao

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an ocean acoustic tomography inversion using the adjoint method in a shallow water environment is presented. The propagation model used is an implicit Crank-Nicolson finite difference parabolic equation solver with a non-local boundary condition. Unlike previous matched-field processing works using the complex pressure fields as the observations, here, the observed signals are the transmission losses. Based on the code tests of the tangent linear model, the adjoint model, and the gradient, the optimization problem is solved by a gradient-based minimization algorithm. The inversions are performed in numerical simulations for two geometries: one in which hydrophones are sparsely distributed in the horizontal direction, and another in which the hydrophones are distributed vertically. The spacing in both cases is well beyond the half-wavelength threshold at which beamforming could be used. To deal with the ill-posedness of the inverse problem, a linear differential regularization operator of the sound-speed profile is used to smooth the inversion results. The L-curve criterion is adopted to select the regularization parameter, and the optimal value can be easily determined at the elbow of the logarithms of the residual norm of the measured-predicted fields and the norm of the penalty function. PMID:26723329

  3. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  4. ANISORROPIA: the adjoint of the aerosol thermodynamic model ISORROPIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, S. L.; Henze, D. K.; Hakami, A.; Russell, A. G.; Nenes, A.

    2011-08-01

    We present the development of ANISORROPIA, the discrete adjoint of the ISORROPIA thermodynamic equilibrium model that treats the Na+-SO42--HSO4--NH4+-NO3--Cl--H2O aerosol system, and we demonstrate its sensitivity analysis capabilities. ANISORROPIA calculates sensitivities of an inorganic species in aerosol or gas phase with respect to the total concentrations of each species present with only a two-fold increase in computational time over the forward model execution. Due to the highly nonlinear and discontinuous solution surface of ISORROPIA, evaluation of the adjoint required a new, complex-variable version of the the model, which determines first-order sensitivities with machine precision and avoids cancellation errors arising from finite difference calculations. The adjoint is verified over an atmospherically relevant range of concentrations, temperature, and relative humidity. We apply ANISORROPIA to recent field campaign results from Atlanta, GA, USA, and Mexico City, Mexico, to characterize the inorganic aerosol sensitivities of these distinct urban air masses. The variability in the relationship between PM2.5 mass and precursor concentrations shown has important implications for air quality and climate. ANISORROPIA enables efficient elucidation of aerosol concentration dependence on aerosol precursor emissions in the context of atmospheric chemical transport model adjoints.

  5. Assimilating Remote Ammonia Observations with a Refined Aerosol Thermodynamics Adjoint"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia emissions parameters in North America can be refined in order to improve the evaluation of modeled concentrations against observations. Here, we seek to do so by developing and applying the GEOS-Chem adjoint nested over North America to conductassimilation of observations...

  6. Adjoint operator approach to shape design for internal incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabuk, H.; Sung, C.-H.; Modi, V.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of determining the profile of a channel or duct that provides the maximum static pressure rise is solved. Incompressible, laminar flow governed by the steady state Navier-Stokes equations is assumed. Recent advances in computational resources and algorithms have made it possible to solve the direct problem of determining such a flow through a body of known geometry. It is possible to obtain a set of adjoint equations, the solution to which permits the calculation of the direction and relative magnitude of change in the diffuser profile that leads to a higher pressure rise. The solution to the adjoint problem can be shown to represent an artificially constructed flow. This interpretation provides a means to construct numerical solutions to the adjoint equations that do not compromise the fully viscous nature of the problem. The algorithmic and computational aspects of solving the adjoint equations are addressed. The form of these set of equations is similar but not identical to the Navier-Stokes equations. In particular some issues related to boundary conditions and stability are discussed.

  7. Adjoint-Operator Learning For A Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhen, Jacob; Toomarian, Nikzad

    1993-01-01

    Electronic neural networks made to synthesize initially unknown mathematical models of time-dependent phenomena or to learn temporally evolving patterns by use of algorithms based on adjoint operators. Algorithms less complicated, involve less computation and solve learning equations forward in time possibly simultaneously with equations of evolution of neural network, thereby both increasing computational efficiency and making real-time applications possible.

  8. Testing the bioelectric shield.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Susan J; Rose, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    A pendant was claimed to provide numerous health benefits, including reduced stress, increased strength, and protection from electromagnetic radiation from computers and mobile phones. Three experiments tested the effectiveness of this pendant's effect as a bioelectric shield. In the first experiment, 12 subjects who work with computers wore shields (6 real, 6 sham) for several weeks and were regularly tested for hand strength and mood changes. Both types of shield increased calmness, but the real shields did not have any greater effect. In 2 further studies (in each N=40) hand strength was measured at baseline, with mobile phone, and with mobile phone and bioelectric or sham shield. The shields did not differ in their effects. Both studies showed a significant correlation between the change in strength with and without the shield and subjects'scores on a questionnaire concerning their belief in and use of alternative therapies. The shields appear to produce a measurable placebo effect but are otherwise ineffective. PMID:12233804

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.

    1957-09-24

    The reactor radiation shield material is comprised of alternate layers of iron-containing material and compressed cellulosic material, such as masonite. The shielding material may be prefabricated in the form of blocks, which can be stacked together in ary desired fashion to form an effective shield.

  10. Modeling of spacecraft proton shielding by the discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Radiation in space can be damaging to personnel and electronics in space missions. Solar flare and trapped protons are a significant component of the near-earth radiation environment. It is important to assess the effectiveness of materials (typically aluminum) for shielding protons for manned and unmanned space flights. The discrete ordinates method is a convenient and efficient method for modeling proton transport. With the adjoint capability, a set of proton environments for many different orbit trajectories can be modeled extremely efficiently. Modeling a slab geometry and a spherical shell geometry shield should provide bounds on the dose that a component inside of a satellite would be expected to receive. Neutron and other secondary particle production are neglected in this model.

  11. Adjoint-Based Methodology for Time-Dependent Optimal Control (AMTOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail; Diskin, boris; Nishikawa, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    During the five years of this project, the AMTOC team developed an adjoint-based methodology for design and optimization of complex time-dependent flows, implemented AMTOC in a testbed environment, directly assisted in implementation of this methodology in the state-of-the-art NASA's unstructured CFD code FUN3D, and successfully demonstrated applications of this methodology to large-scale optimization of several supersonic and other aerodynamic systems, such as fighter jet, subsonic aircraft, rotorcraft, high-lift, wind-turbine, and flapping-wing configurations. In the course of this project, the AMTOC team has published 13 refereed journal articles, 21 refereed conference papers, and 2 NIA reports. The AMTOC team presented the results of this research at 36 international and national conferences, meeting and seminars, including International Conference on CFD, and numerous AIAA conferences and meetings. Selected publications that include the major results of the AMTOC project are enclosed in this report.

  12. High-resolution Adjoint Tomography of the Eastern Venezuelan Crust using Empirical Green's Function Waveforms from Ambient Noise Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Masy, J.; Niu, F.; Levander, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present a high-resolution 3D crustal model of Eastern Venezuela from a full waveform inversion adjoint tomography technique, based on the spectral-element method. Empirical Green's functions (EGFs) of Rayleigh waves from ambient noise interferometry serve as the observed waveforms. Rayleigh wave signals in the period range of 10 - 50 s were extracted by cross-correlations of 48 stations from both Venezuelan national seismic network and the BOLIVAR project array. The synthetic Green's functions (SGFs) are calculated with an initial regional 3D shear wave model determined from ballistic Rayleigh wave tomography from earthquake records with periods longer than 20 s. The frequency-dependent traveltime time misfits between the SGFs and EGFs are minimized iteratively using adjoint tomography = to refine 3D crustal structure [Chen et al. 2014]. The final 3D model shows lateral shear wave velocity variations that are well correlated with the geological terranes within the continental interior. In particular, the final model reveals low velocities distributed along the axis of the Espino Graben, indicating that the graben has a substantially different crustal structure than the rest of the Eastern Venezuela Basin. We also observe high shear velocities in the lower crust beneath some of the subterranes of the Proterozoic-Archean Guayana Shield.

  13. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  14. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  15. Applications guide to the MORSE Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.

    1985-08-01

    A practical guide for the implementation of the MORESE-CG Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code system is presented. The various versions of the MORSE code are compared and contrasted, and the many references dealing explicitly with the MORSE-CG code are reviewed. The treatment of angular scattering is discussed, and procedures for obtaining increased differentiality of results in terms of reaction types and nuclides from a multigroup Monte Carlo code are explained in terms of cross-section and geometry data manipulation. Examples of standard cross-section data input and output are shown. Many other features of the code system are also reviewed, including (1) the concept of primary and secondary particles, (2) fission neutron generation, (3) albedo data capability, (4) DOMINO coupling, (5) history file use for post-processing of results, (6) adjoint mode operation, (7) variance reduction, and (8) input/output. In addition, examples of the combinatorial geometry are given, and the new array of arrays geometry feature (MARS) and its three-dimensional plotting code (JUNEBUG) are presented. Realistic examples of user routines for source, estimation, path-length stretching, and cross-section data manipulation are given. A deatiled explanation of the coupling between the random walk and estimation procedure is given in terms of both code parameters and physical analogies. The operation of the code in the adjoint mode is covered extensively. The basic concepts of adjoint theory and dimensionality are discussed and examples of adjoint source and estimator user routines are given for all common situations. Adjoint source normalization is explained, a few sample problems are given, and the concept of obtaining forward differential results from adjoint calculations is covered. Finally, the documentation of the standard MORSE-CG sample problem package is reviewed and on-going and future work is discussed.

  16. Methods and Procedures for Shielding Analyses for the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, Franz X.; Iverson, Erik B.; Remec, Igor; Lu, Wei; Popova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide radiologically safe Spallation Neutron Source operation, shielding analyses are performed according to Oak Ridge National Laboratory internal regulations and to comply with the Code of Federal Regulations. An overview of on-going shielding work for the accelerator facility and neutrons beam lines, methods, used for the analyses, and associated procedures and regulations is presented. Methods used to perform shielding analyses are described as well.

  17. Adjoint-state inversion of electric resistivity tomography data of seawater intrusion at the Argentona coastal aquifer (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-López, Sheila; Carrera, Jesús; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Luquot, Linda; Martínez, Laura; Bellmunt, Fabián

    2016-04-01

    Seawater intrusion in aquifers is a complex phenomenon that can be characterized with the help of electric resistivity tomography (ERT) because of the low resistivity of seawater, which underlies the freshwater floating on top. The problem is complex because of the need for joint inversion of electrical and hydraulic (density dependent flow) data. Here we present an adjoint-state algorithm to treat electrical data. This method is a common technique to obtain derivatives of an objective function, depending on potentials with respect to model parameters. The main advantages of it are its simplicity in stationary problems and the reduction of computational cost respect others methodologies. The relationship between the concentration of chlorides and the resistivity values of the field is well known. Also, these resistivities are related to the values of potentials measured using ERT. Taking this into account, it will be possible to define the different resistivities zones from the field data of potential distribution using the basis of inverse problem. In this case, the studied zone is situated in Argentona (Baix Maresme, Catalonia), where the values of chlorides obtained in some wells of the zone are too high. The adjoint-state method will be used to invert the measured data using a new finite element code in C ++ language developed in an open-source framework called Kratos. Finally, the information obtained numerically with our code will be checked with the information obtained with other codes.

  18. Resonance self-shielding methodology in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Collins, B.; Kochunas, B.; Martin, W.; Kim, K. S.; Williams, M.

    2013-07-01

    The resonance self-shielding methods of the neutron transport code Michigan Parallel Characteristics based Transport (MPACT) are described in this paper. Two resonance-integral table based methods are utilized to resolve the resonance self-shielding effect. The subgroup method is a mature approach used in MPACT as the basic functionality for the resonance calculation. Another new iterative method, named the embedded self-shielding method is also implemented in MPACT. Comparisons of the two methods as well as their numerical verifications are presented. The results show that MPACT is capable of modeling the resonance self-shielding in a variety of PWR benchmarking cases, including difficult fuel lattice cases with poison, control rods or mixed gadolinia fuel rods. (authors)

  19. Including the adjoint model of the moist physics in the 4D-Var in NASA's GEOS-5 Global Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdaway, D. R.; Errico, R.

    2011-12-01

    Inherent in the minimization process in the 4D-Var data assimilation system is the need for the model's adjoint. It is straightforward to obtain the exact adjoint by linearizing the code in a line by line sense; however it only provides an accurate overall representation of the physical processes if the model behaviour is linear. Moist processes in the atmosphere, and thus the models that represent them, are intrinsically highly non-linear and can contain discrete switches. The adjoint that is required in the data assimilation system needs to provide an accurate representation of the physical behaviour for perturbation sizes of the order of the analysis error, so an exact adjoint of the moist physics model is likely to be inaccurate. Instead a non-exact adjoint model, which is accurate for large enough perturbations, must be developed. The constraint on the development is that the simplified adjoint be consistent with the actual trajectory of the model. Previous attempts to include the moist physics in the 4D-Var have emphasized the need for redevelopment of the actual moist scheme to a simpler version. These schemes are designed to be linear in the limit of realistic perturbation size but also capture the essence of the physical behaviour, making the adjoint version of the scheme suitable for use in the 4D-Var. A downside to this approach is that it can result in an over simplification of the physics and represent a larger departure from the true model trajectory than necessary. The adjoint is just the transpose of the tangent linear model, which is the differential of the model operator. This differential of the operator can be constructed from Jacobian matrices. Examining the structures of the Jacobians as perturbations of varying size are added to the state vector can help determine whether the adjoint model - be it of actual or simplified physics - will be suitable for use in the assimilation algorithm. If Jacobian structures change considerably when the

  20. Accurate adjoint design sensitivities for nano metal optics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2015-09-01

    We present a method for obtaining accurate numerical design sensitivities for metal-optical nanostructures. Adjoint design sensitivity analysis, long used in fluid mechanics and mechanical engineering for both optimization and structural analysis, is beginning to be used for nano-optics design, but it fails for sharp-cornered metal structures because the numerical error in electromagnetic simulations of metal structures is highest at sharp corners. These locations feature strong field enhancement and contribute strongly to design sensitivities. By using high-accuracy FEM calculations and rounding sharp features to a finite radius of curvature we obtain highly-accurate design sensitivities for 3D metal devices. To provide a bridge to the existing literature on adjoint methods in other fields, we derive the sensitivity equations for Maxwell's equations in the PDE framework widely used in fluid mechanics. PMID:26368483

  1. Examination of Observation Impacts derived from OSEs and Adjoint Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelaro, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    With the adjoint of a data assimilation system, the impact of any or all assimilated observations on measures of forecast skill can be estimated accurately and efficiently. The approach allows aggregation of results in terms of individual data types, channels or locations, all computed simultaneously. In this study, adjoint-based estimates of observation impact are compared with results from standard observing system experiments (OSEs) in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) GEOS-5 system. The two approaches are shown to provide unique, but complimentary, information. Used together, they reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed. Understanding these dependencies poses a major challenge for optimizing the use of the current observational network and defining requirements for future observing systems.

  2. Three-Dimensional Turbulent RANS Adjoint-Based Error Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Engineering problems commonly require functional outputs of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with specified accuracy. These simulations are performed with limited computational resources. Computable error estimates offer the possibility of quantifying accuracy on a given mesh and predicting a fine grid functional on a coarser mesh. Such an estimate can be computed by solving the flow equations and the associated adjoint problem for the functional of interest. An adjoint-based error correction procedure is demonstrated for transonic inviscid and subsonic laminar and turbulent flow. A mesh adaptation procedure is formulated to target uncertainty in the corrected functional and terminate when error remaining in the calculation is less than a user-specified error tolerance. This adaptation scheme is shown to yield anisotropic meshes with corrected functionals that are more accurate for a given number of grid points then isotropic adapted and uniformly refined grids.

  3. On improving storm surge forecasting using an adjoint optimal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yineng; Peng, Shiqiu; Yan, Jing; Xie, Lian

    2013-12-01

    A three-dimensional ocean model and its adjoint model are used to simultaneously optimize the initial conditions (IC) and the wind stress drag coefficient (Cd) for improving storm surge forecasting. To demonstrate the effect of this proposed method, a number of identical twin experiments (ITEs) with a prescription of different error sources and two real data assimilation experiments are performed. Results from both the idealized and real data assimilation experiments show that adjusting IC and Cd simultaneously can achieve much more improvements in storm surge forecasting than adjusting IC or Cd only. A diagnosis on the dynamical balance indicates that adjusting IC only may introduce unrealistic oscillations out of the assimilation window, which can be suppressed by the adjustment of the wind stress when simultaneously adjusting IC and Cd. Therefore, it is recommended to simultaneously adjust IC and Cd to improve storm surge forecasting using an adjoint technique.

  4. IET. Periscope shielding and installation details. Shows range of scanning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Periscope shielding and installation details. Shows range of scanning head, removable concrete cap, concrete shielding. Ralph M. Parsons 902-4-ANP-620-A 324. Date: February 1954. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL Index code no. 035-0620-00-693-106909 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Seismic Window Selection and Misfit Measurements for Global Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, W.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M.; Podhorszki, N.; Smith, J. A.; Tromp, J.

    2013-12-01

    Global Adjoint Tomography requires fast parallel processing of large datasets. After obtaing the preprocessed observed and synthetic seismograms, we use the open source software packages FLEXWIN (Maggi et al. 2007) to select time windows and MEASURE_ADJ to make measurements. These measurements define adjoint sources for data assimilation. Previous versions of these tools work on a pair of SAC files---observed and synthetic seismic data for the same component and station, and loop over all seismic records associated with one earthquake. Given the large number of stations and earthquakes, the frequent read and write operations create severe I/O bottlenecks on modern computing platforms. We present new versions of these tools utilizing a new seismic data format, namely the Adaptive Seismic Data Format(ASDF). This new format shows superior scalability for applications on high-performance computers and accommodates various types of data, including earthquake, industry and seismic interferometry datasets. ASDF also provides user-friendly APIs, which can be easily integrated into the adjoint tomography workflow and combined with other data processing tools. In addition to solving the I/O bottleneck, we are making several improvements to these tools. For example, FLEXWIN is tuned to select windows for different types of earthquakes. To capture their distinct features, we categorize earthquakes by their depths and frequency bands. Moreover, instead of only picking phases between the first P arrival and the surface-wave arrivals, our aim is to select and assimilate many other later prominent phases in adjoint tomography. For example, in the body-wave band (17 s - 60 s), we include SKS, sSKS and their multiple, while in the surface-wave band (60 s - 120 s) we incorporate major-arc surface waves.

  6. Adjoint calculations for multiple scattering of Compton and Rayleigh effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, J. E.; Sumini, M.

    1992-08-01

    As is well known, the experimental determination of the Compton profile requires a particular geometry with a scattering angle close to π. That situation involves a narrow multiple-scattering spectrum that overlaps the Compton peak, making it difficult to analyze the different contributions to the profile. We show how the solution of the adjoint problem can help in devising more useful experimental configurations, giving, through its classical "importance" meaning, a formally clear picture of the whole problem.

  7. Forward and adjoint sensitivity computation of chaotic dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiqi

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a forward algorithm and an adjoint algorithm for computing sensitivity derivatives in chaotic dynamical systems, such as the Lorenz attractor. The algorithms compute the derivative of long time averaged “statistical” quantities to infinitesimal perturbations of the system parameters. The algorithms are demonstrated on the Lorenz attractor. We show that sensitivity derivatives of statistical quantities can be accurately estimated using a single, short trajectory (over a time interval of 20) on the Lorenz attractor.

  8. A comparison of adjoint and data-centric verification techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Wildey, Timothy Michael; Cyr, Eric Christopher; Shadid, John Nicolas; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Smith, Thomas Michael

    2013-03-01

    This document summarizes the results from a level 3 milestone study within the CASL VUQ effort. We compare the adjoint-based a posteriori error estimation approach with a recent variant of a data-centric verification technique. We provide a brief overview of each technique and then we discuss their relative advantages and disadvantages. We use Drekar::CFD to produce numerical results for steady-state Navier Stokes and SARANS approximations. 3

  9. Monopole condensation in two-flavor adjoint QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Cossu, Guido; D'Elia, Massimo; Di Giacomo, Adriano; Lacagnina, Giuseppe; Pica, Claudio

    2008-04-01

    In QCD with adjoint fermions, the deconfining transition takes place at a lower temperature than the chiral transition. We study the two transitions by use of the Polyakov loop, the monopole order parameter, and the chiral condensate. The deconfining transition is first order, the chiral is a crossover. The order parameters for confinement are not affected by the chiral transition. We conclude that the degrees of freedom relevant to confinement are different from those describing chiral symmetry.

  10. Spectral monodromy of non-self-adjoint operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Quang Sang

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, we build a combinatorial invariant, called the "spectral monodromy" from the spectrum of a single (non-self-adjoint) h-pseudodifferential operator with two degrees of freedom in the semi-classical limit. Our inspiration comes from the quantum monodromy defined for the joint spectrum of an integrable system of n commuting self-adjoint h-pseudodifferential operators, given by S. Vu Ngoc ["Quantum monodromy in integrable systems," Commun. Math. Phys. 203(2), 465-479 (1999)]. The first simple case that we treat in this work is a normal operator. In this case, the discrete spectrum can be identified with the joint spectrum of an integrable quantum system. The second more complex case we propose is a small perturbation of a self-adjoint operator with a classical integrability property. We show that the discrete spectrum (in a small band around the real axis) also has a combinatorial monodromy. The main difficulty in this case is that we do not know the description of the spectrum everywhere, but only in a Cantor type set. In addition, we also show that the corresponding monodromy can be identified with the classical monodromy, defined by J. Duistermaat ["On global action-angle coordinates," Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 33(6), 687-706 (1980)].

  11. ANISORROPIA: the adjoint of the aerosol thermodynamic model ISORROPIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, S. L.; Henze, D. K.; Hakami, A.; Russell, A. G.; Nenes, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present the development of ANISORROPIA, the discrete adjoint of the ISORROPIA thermodynamic equilibrium model that treats the Na+-SO42-- HSO4--NH4+ -NO3--Cl--H2O aerosol system, and we demonstrate its sensitivity analysis capabilities. ANISORROPIA calculates sensitivities of an inorganic species in aerosol or gas phase with respect to the total concentrations of each species present with less than a two-fold increase in computational time over the concentration calculations. Due to the highly nonlinear and discontinuous solution surface of ISORROPIA, evaluation of the adjoint required a new, complex-variable version of the model, which determines first-order sensitivities with machine precision and avoids cancellation errors arising from finite difference calculations. The adjoint is verified over an atmospherically relevant range of concentrations, temperature, and relative humidity. We apply ANISORROPIA to recent field campaign results from Atlanta, GA, USA, and Mexico City, Mexico, to characterize the inorganic aerosol sensitivities of these distinct urban air masses. The variability in the relationship between fine mode inorganic aerosol mass and precursor concentrations shown has important implications for air quality and climate.

  12. Self-adjoint time operators and invariant subspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Fernando

    2008-02-01

    The question of existence of self-adjoint time operators for unitary evolutions in classical and quantum mechanics is revisited on the basis of Halmos-Helson theory of invariant subspaces, Sz.-Nagy-Foiaş dilation theory and Misra-Prigogine-Courbage theory of irreversibility. It is shown that the existence of self-adjoint time operators is equivalent to the intertwining property of the evolution plus the existence of simply invariant subspaces or rigid operator-valued functions for its Sz.-Nagy-Foiaş functional model. Similar equivalent conditions are given in terms of intrinsic randomness in the context of statistical mechanics. The rest of the contents are mainly a unifying review of the subject scattered throughout an unconnected literature. A well-known extensive set of equivalent conditions is derived from the above results; such conditions are written in terms of Schrrdinger couples, the Weyl commutation relation, incoming and outgoing subspaces, innovation processes, Lax-Phillips scattering, translation and spectral representations, and spectral properties. Also the natural procedure dealing with symmetric time operators in standard quantum mechanics involving their self-adjoint extensions is illustrated by considering the quantum Aharonov-Bohm time-of-arrival operator.

  13. Unsteady Adjoint Approach for Design Optimization of Flapping Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Byung Joon; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the work for optimizing the propulsive efficiency of flapping airfoils, i.e., improving the thrust under constraining aerodynamic work during the flapping flights by changing their shape and trajectory of motion with the unsteady discrete adjoint approach. For unsteady problems, it is essential to properly resolving time scales of motion under consideration and it must be compatible with the objective sought after. We include both the instantaneous and time-averaged (periodic) formulations in this study. For the design optimization with shape parameters or motion parameters, the time-averaged objective function is found to be more useful, while the instantaneous one is more suitable for flow control. The instantaneous objective function is operationally straightforward. On the other hand, the time-averaged objective function requires additional steps in the adjoint approach; the unsteady discrete adjoint equations for a periodic flow must be reformulated and the corresponding system of equations solved iteratively. We compare the design results from shape and trajectory optimizations and investigate the physical relevance of design variables to the flapping motion at on- and off-design conditions.

  14. Spectral monodromy of non-self-adjoint operators

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Quang Sang

    2014-01-15

    In the present paper, we build a combinatorial invariant, called the “spectral monodromy” from the spectrum of a single (non-self-adjoint) h-pseudodifferential operator with two degrees of freedom in the semi-classical limit. Our inspiration comes from the quantum monodromy defined for the joint spectrum of an integrable system of n commuting self-adjoint h-pseudodifferential operators, given by S. Vu Ngoc [“Quantum monodromy in integrable systems,” Commun. Math. Phys. 203(2), 465–479 (1999)]. The first simple case that we treat in this work is a normal operator. In this case, the discrete spectrum can be identified with the joint spectrum of an integrable quantum system. The second more complex case we propose is a small perturbation of a self-adjoint operator with a classical integrability property. We show that the discrete spectrum (in a small band around the real axis) also has a combinatorial monodromy. The main difficulty in this case is that we do not know the description of the spectrum everywhere, but only in a Cantor type set. In addition, we also show that the corresponding monodromy can be identified with the classical monodromy, defined by J. Duistermaat [“On global action-angle coordinates,” Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 33(6), 687–706 (1980)].

  15. Application of Adjoint Method and Spectral-Element Method to Tomographic Inversion of Regional Seismological Structure Beneath Japanese Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, S.; Miyoshi, T.; Obayashi, M.; Tono, Y.; Ando, K.

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress in large scale computing by using waveform modeling technique and high performance computing facility has demonstrated possibilities to perform full-waveform inversion of three dimensional (3D) seismological structure inside the Earth. We apply the adjoint method (Liu and Tromp, 2006) to obtain 3D structure beneath Japanese Islands. First we implemented Spectral-Element Method to K-computer in Kobe, Japan. We have optimized SPECFEM3D_GLOBE (Komatitsch and Tromp, 2002) by using OpenMP so that the code fits hybrid architecture of K-computer. Now we could use 82,134 nodes of K-computer (657,072 cores) to compute synthetic waveform with about 1 sec accuracy for realistic 3D Earth model and its performance was 1.2 PFLOPS. We use this optimized SPECFEM3D_GLOBE code and take one chunk around Japanese Islands from global mesh and compute synthetic seismograms with accuracy of about 10 second. We use GAP-P2 mantle tomography model (Obayashi et al., 2009) as an initial 3D model and use as many broadband seismic stations available in this region as possible to perform inversion. We then use the time windows for body waves and surface waves to compute adjoint sources and calculate adjoint kernels for seismic structure. We have performed several iteration and obtained improved 3D structure beneath Japanese Islands. The result demonstrates that waveform misfits between observed and theoretical seismograms improves as the iteration proceeds. We now prepare to use much shorter period in our synthetic waveform computation and try to obtain seismic structure for basin scale model, such as Kanto basin, where there are dense seismic network and high seismic activity. Acknowledgements: This research was partly supported by MEXT Strategic Program for Innovative Research. We used F-net seismograms of the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention.

  16. Cable shield connecting device

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

  17. A new mathematical adjoint for the modified SAAF-SN equations

    SciTech Connect

    Schunert, Sebastian; Wang, Yaqi; Martineau, Richard; DeHart, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new adjoint FEM weak form, which can be directly used for evaluating the mathematical adjoint, suitable for perturbation calculations, of the self-adjoint angular flux SN equations (SAAF-SN) without construction and transposition of the underlying coefficient matrix. Stabilization schemes incorporated in the described SAAF-SN method make the mathematical adjoint distinct from the physical adjoint, i.e. the solution of the continuous adjoint equation with SAAF-SN . This weak form is implemented into RattleSnake, the MOOSE (Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment) based transport solver. Numerical results verify the correctness of the implementation and show its utility both for fixed source and eigenvalue problems.

  18. Nonlinear self-adjointness and conservation laws of Klein-Gordon-Fock equation with central symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulwahhab, Muhammad Alim

    2015-05-01

    The concept of nonlinear self-adjointness, introduced by Ibragimov, has significantly extends approaches to constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries since it incorporates the strict self-adjointness, the quasi self-adjointness as well as the usual linear self-adjointness. Using this concept, the nonlinear self-adjointness condition for the Klein-Gordon-Fock equation was established and subsequently used to construct simplified but infinitely many nontrivial and independent conserved vectors. The Noether's theorem was further applied to the Klein-Gordon-Fock equation to explore more distinct first integrals, result shows that conservation laws constructed through this approach are exactly the same as those obtained under strict self-adjointness of Ibragimov's method.

  19. RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-23

    ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

  20. Full waveform seismic tomography of the Vrancea region using the adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, J.; Danecek, P.; Morelli, A.; Tondi, R.

    2013-12-01

    constrained by the quantity of usable seismic data as well as a poor signal-to-noise ratio, which imposes to carry out the analysis in a frequency band of relatively high frequencies. The adjoint tomographic inversion is implemented with the SPECFEM3D solver (a community code applying the spectral element method) to generate synthetic data and traveltime misfit kernels in a fine computational mesh that satisfies the data frequency band requirements. The computation is run on a BlueGene/Q massively parallel computer available at the CINECA supercomputing centre. We show what information can be retrieved about the tomographic model applying the full-waveform inversion and adjoint methods even applied to a modest-quality, mostly high-frequency content, regional dataset.

  1. Accelerating forward and adjoint simulations of seismic wave propagation on large GPU-clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, D. B.; Rietmann, M.; Charles, J.; Messmer, P.; Komatitsch, D.; Schenk, O.; Tromp, J.

    2012-12-01

    In seismic tomography, waveform inversions require accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex media.The current versions of our spectral-element method (SEM) packages, the local-scale code SPECFEM3D and the global-scale code SPECFEM3D_GLOBE, are widely used open-source community codes which simulate seismic wave propagation for local-, regional- and global-scale applications. These numerical simulations compute highly accurate seismic wavefields, accounting for fully 3D Earth models. However, code performance often governs whether seismic inversions become feasible or remain elusive. We report here on extending these high-order finite-element packages to further exploit graphic processing units (GPUs) and perform numerical simulations of seismic wave propagation on large GPU clusters. These enhanced packages can be readily run either on multi-core CPUs only or together with many-core GPU acceleration devices. One of the challenges in parallelizing finite element codes is the potential for race conditions during the assembly phase. We therefore investigated different methods such as mesh coloring or atomic updates on the GPU. In order to achieve strong scaling, we needed to ensure good overlap of data motion at all levels, including internode and host-accelerator transfers. These new MPI/CUDA solvers exhibit excellent scalability and achieve speedup on a node-to-node basis over the carefully tuned equivalent multi-core MPI solver. We present case studies run on a Cray XK6 GPU architecture up to 896 nodes to demonstrate the performance of both the forward and adjoint functionality of the code packages. Running simulations on such dedicated GPU clusters further reduces computation times and pushes seismic inversions into a new, higher frequency realm.

  2. Performance of solar shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab I, about 63 seconds after lift-off, proved to be the harbinger of a prodigious effort to quickly develop a workable substitute for the carefully tailored passive portion of the thermal-control system. The paper describes the intensive ten-day around-the-clock effort in which numerous potential thermal-shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal-shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material 'memory' properties.

  3. RADIATION SHIELDING COMPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Dunegan, H.L.

    1963-01-29

    A light weight radiation shielding composition is described whose mechanical and radiological properties can be varied within wide limits. The composition of this shielding material consists of four basic ingredients: powder of either Pb or W, a plastic resin, a resin plasticizer, and a polymerization catalyst to promote an interaction of the plasticizer with the plastic resin. Air may be mixed into the above ingredients in order to control the density of the final composition. For equivalent gamma attenuation, the shielding composition weighs one-third to one-half as much as conventional Pb shielding. (AEC)

  4. Shielding analysis of a small compact space nuclear reactor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Woodrow, L.L.

    1987-08-01

    The SP-100 reactor concept, currently in its developmental stage, has layered tungsten - lithium hydride shield. Studies indicate that this shield configuration is the lightest weight shield. This configuration and three other shielding concepts were analyzed to determine the lightest shield and to determine the shield configuration with the smallest volume. The other three concepts were a boron carbide - beryllium layered shield, and a lithium hydride - beryllium shield. FEMP2D and FEMP1D codes were used in this analysis. These codes were developed at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), using the input from another code, RFCC, which produced energy-dependent dose conversion factors, and determined the shield's ability to attenuate the neutron and gamma radiation to permissible dose limits. The results of this analysis show that the lithium hydride - tungsten layered shield was indeed the lightest weight shield. However, a boron carbide - tungsten shield was calculably volume constrained. Therefore volume, not weight, may be the driving factor in determining the shield configuration.

  5. Shielding Analyses for VISION Beam Line at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz X

    2014-01-01

    Full-scale neutron and gamma transport analyses were performed to design shielding around the VISION beam line, instrument shielding enclosure, beam stop, secondary shutter including a temporary beam stop for the still closed neighboring beam line to meet requirement is to achieve dose rates below 0.25 mrem/h at 30 cm from the shielding surface. The beam stop and the temporary beam stop analyses were performed with the discrete ordinate code DORT additionally to Monte Carlo analyses with the MCNPX code. Comparison of the results is presented.

  6. High-resolution array imaging using teleseismic converted waves based on adjoint methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Chen, C.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic coda waves and converted phases have been used extensively to image detailed subsurface structures underneath seismic arrays, based on methods such as receiver functions, Kirchhoff migration and generalized Radon transform (GRT). Utilizing the same coda and converted waves, we propose to image both discontinuity interfaces and 3D velocity anomalies by combining full numerical simulations of wave propagation with adjoint methods recently adopted in global and regional tomography inversions. The `sensitivities' of these coda/converted waves to density, P and S velocities are calculated based on the interaction of the forward wave field that produces the main P phase, and the adjoint wave field generated by injecting the coda/converted phases at array stations as virtual sources, similar to the computation of isochrons in previous techniques. The density kernels generally highlight discontinuity interfaces and sharp velocity contrasts, while P and S velocity kernels provide hints to the update of volumetric velocity structures. The application of numerical solvers also allows the incorporation of 3D regional tomography models as background velocity models, providing better focusing of velocity anomalies. We show the feasibility of this technique on a synthetic case built based on the imaging geometry for Slave craton in the northwestern Canadian Shield by the POLARIS broadband seismic network. The main challenge of this technique lies in reproducing the forward wave field generated by tele-seismic sources in a limited simulation domain encompassing only local heterogeneous structures underneath array receivers. For simple homogeneous and layer-over-half-space background models, this can be solved by setting the incoming plane waves as initial conditions based on analytical formulae. For more sophisticated background models, a hybrid spectral-element solver is implemented by defining a fictitious boundary encompassing all local heterogeneities within the

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  8. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  9. Adjoint-based optimization for understanding and suppressing jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan B.

    2011-08-01

    Advanced simulation tools, particularly large-eddy simulation techniques, are becoming capable of making quality predictions of jet noise for realistic nozzle geometries and at engineering relevant flow conditions. Increasing computer resources will be a key factor in improving these predictions still further. Quality prediction, however, is only a necessary condition for the use of such simulations in design optimization. Predictions do not themselves lead to quieter designs. They must be interpreted or harnessed in some way that leads to design improvements. As yet, such simulations have not yielded any simplifying principals that offer general design guidance. The turbulence mechanisms leading to jet noise remain poorly described in their complexity. In this light, we have implemented and demonstrated an aeroacoustic adjoint-based optimization technique that automatically calculates gradients that point the direction in which to adjust controls in order to improve designs. This is done with only a single flow solutions and a solution of an adjoint system, which is solved at computational cost comparable to that for the flow. Optimization requires iterations, but having the gradient information provided via the adjoint accelerates convergence in a manner that is insensitive to the number of parameters to be optimized. This paper, which follows from a presentation at the 2010 IUTAM Symposium on Computational Aero-Acoustics for Aircraft Noise Prediction, reviews recent and ongoing efforts by the author and co-workers. It provides a new formulation of the basic approach and demonstrates the approach on a series of model flows, culminating with a preliminary result for a turbulent jet.

  10. Advances in Global Adjoint Tomography -- Massive Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Y.; Lei, W.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Smith, J. A.; Krischer, L.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    Azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity are key to understanding a myriad of processes in Earth's interior. Resolving these properties requires accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3-D Earth models and an iterative inversion strategy. In the wake of successes in regional studies(e.g., Chen et al., 2007; Tape et al., 2009, 2010; Fichtner et al., 2009, 2010; Chen et al.,2010; Zhu et al., 2012, 2013; Chen et al., 2015), we are employing adjoint tomography based on a spectral-element method (Komatitsch & Tromp 1999, 2002) on a global scale using the supercomputer ''Titan'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After 15 iterations, we have obtained a high-resolution transversely isotropic Earth model (M15) using traveltime data from 253 earthquakes. To obtain higher resolution images of the emerging new features and to prepare the inversion for azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity, we expanded the original dataset with approximately 4,220 additional global earthquakes (Mw5.5-7.0) --occurring between 1995 and 2014-- and downloaded 300-minute-long time series for all available data archived at the IRIS Data Management Center, ORFEUS, and F-net. Ocean Bottom Seismograph data from the last decade are also included to maximize data coverage. In order to handle the huge dataset and solve the I/O bottleneck in global adjoint tomography, we implemented a python-based parallel data processing workflow based on the newly developed Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF). With the help of the data selection tool MUSTANG developed by IRIS, we cleaned our dataset and assembled event-based ASDF files for parallel processing. We have started Centroid Moment Tensors (CMT) inversions for all 4,220 earthquakes with the latest model M15, and selected high-quality data for measurement. We will statistically investigate each channel using synthetic seismograms calculated in M15 for updated CMTs and identify problematic channels. In addition to data screening, we also modified

  11. A self-adjoint decomposition of the radial momentum operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. H.; Xiao, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    With acceptance of the Dirac's observation that the canonical quantization entails using Cartesian coordinates, we examine the operator erPr rather than Pr itself and demonstrate that there is a decomposition of erPr into a difference of two self-adjoint but noncommutative operators, in which one is the total momentum and another is the transverse one. This study renders the operator Pr indirectly measurable and physically meaningful, offering an explanation of why the mean value of Pr over a quantum mechanical state makes sense and supporting Dirac's claim that Pr "is real and is the true momentum conjugate to r".

  12. Examining Tropical Cyclone - Kelvin Wave Interactions using Adjoint Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C. A.; Doyle, J. D.; Hong, X.

    2015-12-01

    Adjoint-based tools can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms that influence the evolution and predictability of atmospheric phenomena, as they allow for the efficient and rigorous computation of forecast sensitivity to changes in the initial state. We apply adjoint-based tools from the non-hydrostatic Coupled Atmosphere/Ocean Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) to explore the initial-state sensitivity and interactions between a tropical cyclone and atmospheric equatorial waves associated with the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the Indian Ocean during the DYNAMO field campaign. The development of Tropical Cyclone 5 (TC05) coincided with the passage of an equatorial Kelvin wave and westerly wind burst associated with an MJO that developed in the Indian Ocean in late November 2011, but it was unclear if and how one affected the other. COAMPS 24-h and 36-h adjoint sensitivities are analyzed for both TC05 and the equatorial waves to understand how the evolution of each system is sensitive to the other. The sensitivity of equatorial westerlies in the western Indian Ocean on 23 November shares characteristics with the classic Gill (1980) Rossby and Kelvin wave response to symmetric heating about the equator, including symmetric cyclonic circulations to the north and south of the westerlies, and enhanced heating in the area of convergence between the equatorial westerlies and easterlies. In addition, there is sensitivity in the Bay of Bengal associated with the cyclonic circulation that eventually develops into TC05. At the same time, the developing TC05 system shows strongest sensitivity to local wind and heating perturbations, but sensitivity to the equatorial westerlies is also clear. On 24 November, when the Kelvin wave is immediately south of the developing tropical cyclone, both phenomena are sensitive to each other. On 25 November TC05 no longer shows sensitivity to the Kelvin wave, while the Kelvin Wave still exhibits some weak sensitivity to TC05. In

  13. Adjoint-based optimal control for black-box simulators enabled by model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Han; Wang, Qiqi; Klie, Hector

    2013-11-01

    Many simulations are performed using legacy code that are difficult to modify, or commercial software without available source code. Such ``black-box'' simulator often solves a partial differential equation involving some unknown parameters, functions or discretization methods. Optimal control for black-box simulators can be performed using gradient-free methods, but these methods can be computationally expensive when the controls are high dimensional. We aim at developing a more efficient optimization methodology for black-box simulations by first inferring and calibrating a ``twin model'' of the black-box simulator. The twin model is an open-box model that mirrors the behavior of the black-box simulation using data assimilation techniques. We then apply adjoint-based optimal control to the calibrated twin model. This method is applied to a 1D Buckley-Leverett equation solver, and a black-box multi-phase porous media flow solver PSIM. Special thanks to the support from the subsurface technology group of ConocoPhillips.

  14. Particle Hydrodynamics with Material Strength for Multi-Layer Orbital Debris Shield Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1999-01-01

    Three dimensional simulation of oblique hypervelocity impact on orbital debris shielding places extreme demands on computer resources. Research to date has shown that particle models provide the most accurate and efficient means for computer simulation of shield design problems. In order to employ a particle based modeling approach to the wall plate impact portion of the shield design problem, it is essential that particle codes be augmented to represent strength effects. This report describes augmentation of a Lagrangian particle hydrodynamics code developed by the principal investigator, to include strength effects, allowing for the entire shield impact problem to be represented using a single computer code.

  15. MEANS FOR SHIELDING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, W.M.; McClinton, L.T.; Burton, M.

    1959-03-10

    A reactor of the heterageneous, heavy water moderated type is described. The reactor is comprised of a plurality of vertically disposed fuel element tubes extending through a tank of heavy water moderator and adapted to accommodate a flow of coolant water in contact with the fuel elements. A tank containing outgoing coolant water is disposed above the core to function is a radiation shield. Unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon is floated on top of the water in the shield tank to reduce to a minimum the possibility of the occurrence of explosive gaseous mixtures resulting from the neutron bombardment of the water in the shield tank.

  16. Adjoint design sensitivity analysis of reduced atomic systems using generalized Langevin equation for lattice structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Geun; Jang, Hong-Lae; Cho, Seonho

    2013-05-01

    An efficient adjoint design sensitivity analysis method is developed for reduced atomic systems. A reduced atomic system and the adjoint system are constructed in a locally confined region, utilizing generalized Langevin equation (GLE) for periodic lattice structures. Due to the translational symmetry of lattice structures, the size of time history kernel function that accounts for the boundary effects of the reduced atomic systems could be reduced to a single atom’s degrees of freedom. For the problems of highly nonlinear design variables, the finite difference method is impractical for its inefficiency and inaccuracy. However, the adjoint method is very efficient regardless of the number of design variables since one additional time integration is required for the adjoint GLE. Through numerical examples, the derived adjoint sensitivity turns out to be accurate and efficient through the comparison with finite difference sensitivity.

  17. Probability density adjoint for sensitivity analysis of the Mean of Chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Blonigan, Patrick J. Wang, Qiqi

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity analysis, especially adjoint based sensitivity analysis, is a powerful tool for engineering design which allows for the efficient computation of sensitivities with respect to many parameters. However, these methods break down when used to compute sensitivities of long-time averaged quantities in chaotic dynamical systems. This paper presents a new method for sensitivity analysis of ergodic chaotic dynamical systems, the density adjoint method. The method involves solving the governing equations for the system's invariant measure and its adjoint on the system's attractor manifold rather than in phase-space. This new approach is derived for and demonstrated on one-dimensional chaotic maps and the three-dimensional Lorenz system. It is found that the density adjoint computes very finely detailed adjoint distributions and accurate sensitivities, but suffers from large computational costs.

  18. Application of the MASH v1.0 Code System to radiological warfare radiation threats

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Santoro, R.T.; Smith, M.S.

    1994-03-01

    Nuclear hardening capabilities of US and foreign ground force systems is a primary concern of the Department of Defense (DoD) and US Army. The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System -- MASH v1.0 was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to analyze these capabilities, i.e. the shielding effectiveness, for prompt radiation from a nuclear weapon detonation. Rapidly changing world events and the proliferation of nuclear weapons related technology have increased the kinds of nuclear threats to include intentionally dispersed radiation sources and fallout from tactical nuclear weapons used in the modern AirLand battlefield scenario. Consequently, a DoD area of increasing interest focuses on determining the shielding effectiveness of foreign and US armored vehicles to radiological warfare and fallout radiation threats. To demonstrate the applicability of MASH for analyzing dispersed radiation source problems, calculations have been completed for two distributed sources; a dispersed radiation environment simulated by a uniformly distributed {sup 60}Co source, and a {sup 235}U fission weapon fallout source. Fluence and dose assessments were performed for the free-field, the inside of a steel-walled two-meter box, in a phantom standing in the free-field, and in a phantom standing in the two-meter box. The results indicate substantial radiation protection factors for the {sup 60}Co dispersed radiation source and the fallout source compared to the prompt radiation protection factors. The dose protection factors ranged from 40 to 95 for the two-meter box and from 55 to 123 for the mid-gut position of the phantom standing in the box. The results further indicate that a {sup 60}Co source might be a good first order approximation for a tactical fission weapon fallout protection factor analysis.

  19. Limitations of Adjoint-Based Optimization for Separated Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, J. Javier; Sharma, Ati; Sandberg, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Cabin noise is generated by the transmission of turbulent pressure fluctuations through a vibrating panel and can lead to fatigue. In the present study, we model this problem by using DNS to simulate the flow separating off a backward facing step and interacting with a plate downstream of the step. An adjoint formulation of the full compressible Navier-Stokes equations with varying viscosity is used to calculate the optimal control required to minimize the fluid-structure-acoustic interaction with the plate. To achieve noise reduction, a cost function in wavenumber space is chosen to minimize the excitation of the lower structural modes of the structure. To ensure the validity of time-averaged cost functions, it is essential that the time horizon is long enough to be a representative sample of the statistical behaviour of the flow field. The results from the current study show how this scenario is not always feasible for separated flows, because the chaotic behaviour of turbulence surpasses the ability of adjoint-based methods to compute time-dependent sensitivities of the flow.

  20. What Is Radiation Shielding?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kerry Lee, NASA Orion radiation system manager, explains how radiation shielding is used to block harmful particles coming into the spacecraft without producing secondary particles that can cause e...

  1. ALS synchrotron radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    This note discusses the assumptions and results of synchrotron radiation shielding estimates for ALS bend magnet and wiggler beamlines. Estimates of gas bremsstrahlung production are not included and are dealt with elsewhere.

  2. SNS shielding analyses overview

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz; Iverson, Erik B; Lu, Wei; Remec, Igor

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an overview on on-going shielding analyses for Spallation Neutron Source. Presently, the most of the shielding work is concentrated on the beam lines and instrument enclosures to prepare for commissioning, save operation and adequate radiation background in the future. There is on-going work for the accelerator facility. This includes radiation-protection analyses for radiation monitors placement, designing shielding for additional facilities to test accelerator structures, redesigning some parts of the facility, and designing test facilities to the main accelerator structure for component testing. Neutronics analyses are required as well to support spent structure management, including waste characterisation analyses, choice of proper transport/storage package and shielding enhancement for the package if required.

  3. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  4. Shielded cells transfer automation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J J

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. Radiation exposure is absorbed by operators during these operations and limited only through procedural controls. Technological advances in automation using robotics have allowed a production waste removal operation to be automated to reduce radiation exposure. The robotic system bags waste containers out of glove box and transfers them to a shielded container. Operators control the system outside the system work area via television cameras. 9 figures.

  5. Space Station MMOD Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes International Space Station (ISS) shielding for micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) protection, requirements for protection, and the technical approach to meeting requirements. Current activities in MMOD protection for ISS will be described, including efforts to augment MMOD protection by adding shields on-orbit. Observed MMOD impacts on ISS elements such as radiators, modules and returned hardware will be described. Comparisons of the observed damage with predicted damage using risk assessment software will be made.

  6. Standardized Radiation Shield Design Methods: 2005 HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Badavi, Francis F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Research committed by the Langley Research Center through 1995 resulting in the HZETRN code provides the current basis for shield design methods according to NASA STD-3000 (2005). With this new prominence, the database, basic numerical procedures, and algorithms are being re-examined with new methods of verification and validation being implemented to capture a well defined algorithm for engineering design processes to be used in this early development phase of the Bush initiative. This process provides the methodology to transform the 1995 HZETRN research code into the 2005 HZETRN engineering code to be available for these early design processes. In this paper, we will review the basic derivations including new corrections to the codes to insure improved numerical stability and provide benchmarks for code verification.

  7. Forward and adjoint spectral-element simulations of seismic wave propagation using hardware accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Daniel; Videau, Brice; Pouget, Kevin; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    Improving the resolution of tomographic images is crucial to answer important questions on the nature of Earth's subsurface structure and internal processes. Seismic tomography is the most prominent approach where seismic signals from ground-motion records are used to infer physical properties of internal structures such as compressional- and shear-wave speeds, anisotropy and attenuation. Recent advances in regional- and global-scale seismic inversions move towards full-waveform inversions which require accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3D media, providing access to the full 3D seismic wavefields. However, these numerical simulations are computationally very expensive and need high-performance computing (HPC) facilities for further improving the current state of knowledge. During recent years, many-core architectures such as graphics processing units (GPUs) have been added to available large HPC systems. Such GPU-accelerated computing together with advances in multi-core central processing units (CPUs) can greatly accelerate scientific applications. There are mainly two possible choices of language support for GPU cards, the CUDA programming environment and OpenCL language standard. CUDA software development targets NVIDIA graphic cards while OpenCL was adopted mainly by AMD graphic cards. In order to employ such hardware accelerators for seismic wave propagation simulations, we incorporated a code generation tool BOAST into an existing spectral-element code package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. This allows us to use meta-programming of computational kernels and generate optimized source code for both CUDA and OpenCL languages, running simulations on either CUDA or OpenCL hardware accelerators. We show here applications of forward and adjoint seismic wave propagation on CUDA/OpenCL GPUs, validating results and comparing performances for different simulations and hardware usages.

  8. Building A New Kind of Graded-Z Shield for Swift's Burst Alert Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David W.

    2002-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift has a graded-Z Shield that closes out the volume between the coded aperture mask and the Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detector array. The purpose of the 37 kilogram shield is to attenuate gamma rays that have not penetrated the coded aperture mask of the BAT instrument and are therefore a major source of noise on the detector array. Unlike previous shields made from plates and panels, this shield consists of multiple layers of thin metal foils (lead, tantalum, tin, and copper) that are stitched together much like standard multi-layer insulation blankets. The shield sections are fastened around BAT, forming a curtain around the instrument aperture. Strength tests were performed to validate and improve the design, and the shield will be vibration tested along with BAT in late 2002. Practical aspects such as the layup design, methods of manufacture, and testing of this new kind of graded-Z Shield are presented.

  9. Energy spectra and LET spectra of protons behind shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Sari; Barak, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    With the advent of devices sensitive to SEU due to direct ionization by protons, it became important to know the flux and energies of protons behind aluminum shielding or within satellites. We present new analytically derived expressions for the energy distribution of incident protons, after passing the shielding, and of secondary protons emitted within the shielding. The results are compared with those of the MULASSIS code. In some cases, like a satellite in a GCR orbit, the contribution of the secondary protons to SEU might be the dominant one. Proton energy-distributions behind shielding are proportional, at low energy values, to inverse proton-LET in aluminum. Their calculated LET-spectra in silicon can be used for evaluating SEU-rate in space. The analytic expressions presented here can be useful in calculating the influence of shielding on other incident ions and secondary ions.

  10. Monte Carlo simulations for optimization of neutron shielding concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Tomasz; Tefelski, Dariusz; Polański, Aleksander; Skubalski, Janusz

    2012-06-01

    Concrete is one of the main materials used for gamma and neutron shielding. While in case of gamma rays an increase in density is usually efficient enough, protection against neutrons is more complex. The aim of this paper is to show the possibility of using the Monte Carlo codes for evaluation and optimization of concrete mix to reach better neutron shielding. Two codes (MCNPX and SPOT — written by authors) were used to simulate neutron transport through a wall made of different concretes. It is showed that concrete of higher compressive strength attenuates neutrons more effectively. The advantage of heavyweight concrete (with barite aggregate), usually used for gamma shielding, over the ordinary concrete was not so clear. Neutron shielding depends on many factors e.g. neutron energy, barrier thickness and atomic composition. All this makes a proper design of concrete as a very important issue for nuclear power plant safety assurance.

  11. Differential Sensitivity Theory applied to the MESA code for high pressure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maudlin, P. J.; Henninger, R. J.; Harstad, E. N.

    A technique called Differential Sensitivity Theory (DST) is applied to the system of equations solved by the MESA hydrocode. DST uses adjoint techniques to determine exact sensitivity derivatives, i.e., if R is a calculational result of interest (response R) and alpha(sub i) is a calculational input (parameter alpha(sub i)), then (partial derivative)R/(partial derivative)alpha(sub i) is defined as the sensitivity. The advantage of using DST is that for an n-parameter problem all n sensitivities can be obtained by integrating the solutions from only two calculations, a MESA calculation and its corresponding adjoint calculation using an Adjoint Continuum Mechanics code (ACM). This work describes the derivation and solution of the appropriate set of adjoint and sensitivity equations for the purpose of computing sensitivities for high-rate two-dimensional, multi-component, high deformation problems. As an example, results are presented for a flyer plate problem.

  12. Differential Sensitivity Theory applied to the MESA code for high pressure interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maudlin, P.J.; Henninger, R.J.; Harstad, E.N.

    1993-07-01

    A technique called Differential Sensitivity Theory (DST) is applied to the system of equations solved by the MESA hydrocode. DST uses adjoint techniques to determine exact sensitivity derivatives, i.e., if R is a calculational result of interest (response R) and {alpha}{sub i} is a calculational input (parameter {alpha}{sub i}), then {partial_derivative}R/{partial_derivative}{alpha}{sub i} is defined as the sensitivity. The advantage of using DST is that for an n-parameter problem all n sensitivities can be obtained by integrating the solutions from only two calculations, a MESA calculation and its corresponding adjoint calculation using an Adjoint Continuum Mechanics code (ACM). This work describes the derivation and solution of the appropriate set of adjoint and sensitivity equations for the purpose of computing sensitivities for high-rate two-dimensional, multi-component, high deformation problems. As an example, results are presented for a flyer plate problem.

  13. Mass anomalous dimension in SU(2) with two adjoint fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bursa, Francis; Del Debbio, Luigi; Keegan, Liam; Pica, Claudio; Pickup, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We study SU(2) lattice gauge theory with two flavors of Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation. We measure the running of the coupling in the Schroedinger functional scheme and find it is consistent with existing results. We discuss how systematic errors affect the evidence for an infrared fixed point (IRFP). We present the first measurement of the running of the mass in the Schroedinger functional scheme. The anomalous dimension of the chiral condensate, which is relevant for phenomenological applications, can be easily extracted from the running of the mass, under the assumption that the theory has an IRFP. At the current level of accuracy, we can estimate 0.05<{gamma}<0.56 at the IRFP.

  14. Infrared regime of SU(2) with one adjoint Dirac flavor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athenodorou, Andreas; Bennett, Ed; Bergner, Georg; Lucini, Biagio

    2015-06-01

    SU(2) gauge theory with one Dirac flavor in the adjoint representation is investigated on a lattice. Initial results for the gluonic and mesonic spectrum, static potential from Wilson and Polyakov loops, and the anomalous dimension of the fermionic condensate from the Dirac mode number are presented. The results found are not consistent with conventional confining behavior, pointing instead tentatively towards a theory lying within or very near the onset of the conformal window, with the anomalous dimension of the fermionic condensate in the range 0.9 ≲γ*≲0.95 . The implications of our work for building a viable theory of strongly interacting dynamics beyond the standard model are discussed.

  15. The refined shielding design for the cyclotron room of the Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Sheu, R D; Chen, C C; Sheu, R J; Kao, C H; Jiang, S H

    2005-01-01

    Full-scale Monte Carlo simulations of the cyclotron room of the Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital were carried out to improve the inadequate maze design. The double differential neutron source from the 18O(p,n)18F reaction was adopted for the calculation. The weight window variance reduction technique, where the weight window was set by applying the adjoint flux, has been implemented in the MCNP run to facilitate the calculation of the dose rates outside the cyclotron room. Dose rates including neutron and gamma-ray components were calculated for some maze shielding modifications. PMID:16381715

  16. New Methodologies for Generation of Multigroup Cross Sections for Shielding Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzu Alpan, F.; Haghighat, Alireza

    2003-06-01

    Coupled neutron and gamma multigroup (broad-group) libraries used for Light Water Reactor shielding and dosimetry commonly include 47-neutron and 20-gamma groups. These libraries are derived from the 199-neutron, 42-gamma fine-group VITAMIN-B6 library. In this paper, we introduce modifications to the generation procedure of the broad-group libraries. Among these modifications, we show that the fine-group structure and collapsing technique have the largest impact. We demonstrate that a more refined fine-group library and the bi-linear adjoint weighting collapsing technique can improve the accuracy of transport calculation results.

  17. Adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of fusion product activation probe experiment in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Äkäslompolo, S.; Bonheure, G.; Tardini, G.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-10-01

    The activation probe is a robust tool to measure flux of fusion products from a magnetically confined plasma. A carefully chosen solid sample is exposed to the flux, and the impinging ions transmute the material making it radioactive. Ultra-low level gamma-ray spectroscopy is used post mortem to measure the activity and, thus, the number of fusion products. This contribution presents the numerical analysis of the first measurement in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, which was also the first experiment to measure a single discharge. The ASCOT suite of codes was used to perform adjoint/reverse Monte Carlo calculations of the fusion products. The analysis facilitates, for the first time, a comparison of numerical and experimental values for absolutely calibrated flux. The results agree to within a factor of about two, which can be considered a quite good result considering the fact that all features of the plasma cannot be accounted in the simulations.Also an alternative to the present probe orientation was studied. The results suggest that a better optimized orientation could measure the flux from a significantly larger part of the plasma. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  18. Automated divertor target design by adjoint shape sensitivity analysis and a one-shot method

    SciTech Connect

    Dekeyser, W.; Reiter, D.; Baelmans, M.

    2014-12-01

    As magnetic confinement fusion progresses towards the development of first reactor-scale devices, computational tokamak divertor design is a topic of high priority. Presently, edge plasma codes are used in a forward approach, where magnetic field and divertor geometry are manually adjusted to meet design requirements. Due to the complex edge plasma flows and large number of design variables, this method is computationally very demanding. On the other hand, efficient optimization-based design strategies have been developed in computational aerodynamics and fluid mechanics. Such an optimization approach to divertor target shape design is elaborated in the present paper. A general formulation of the design problems is given, and conditions characterizing the optimal designs are formulated. Using a continuous adjoint framework, design sensitivities can be computed at a cost of only two edge plasma simulations, independent of the number of design variables. Furthermore, by using a one-shot method the entire optimization problem can be solved at an equivalent cost of only a few forward simulations. The methodology is applied to target shape design for uniform power load, in simplified edge plasma geometry.

  19. Admitting the Inadmissible: Adjoint Formulation for Incomplete Cost Functionals in Aerodynamic Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal; Salas, Manuel D.

    1997-01-01

    We derive the adjoint equations for problems in aerodynamic optimization which are improperly considered as "inadmissible." For example, a cost functional which depends on the density, rather than on the pressure, is considered "inadmissible" for an optimization problem governed by the Euler equations. We show that for such problems additional terms should be included in the Lagrangian functional when deriving the adjoint equations. These terms are obtained from the restriction of the interior PDE to the control surface. Demonstrations of the explicit derivation of the adjoint equations for "inadmissible" cost functionals are given for the potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes equations.

  20. Use of adjoint methods in the probabilistic finite element approach to fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wing Kam; Besterfield, Glen; Lawrence, Mark; Belytschko, Ted

    1988-01-01

    The adjoint method approach to probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM) is presented. When the number of objective functions is small compared to the number of random variables, the adjoint method is far superior to the direct method in evaluating the objective function derivatives with respect to the random variables. The PFEM is extended to probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) using an element which has the near crack-tip singular strain field embedded. Since only two objective functions (i.e., mode I and II stress intensity factors) are needed for PFM, the adjoint method is well suited.

  1. Trajectory Optimization Using Adjoint Method and Chebyshev Polynomial Approximation for Minimizing Fuel Consumption During Climb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Hornby, Gregory; Ishihara, Abe

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes two methods of trajectory optimization to obtain an optimal trajectory of minimum-fuel- to-climb for an aircraft. The first method is based on the adjoint method, and the second method is based on a direct trajectory optimization method using a Chebyshev polynomial approximation and cubic spine approximation. The approximate optimal trajectory will be compared with the adjoint-based optimal trajectory which is considered as the true optimal solution of the trajectory optimization problem. The adjoint-based optimization problem leads to a singular optimal control solution which results in a bang-singular-bang optimal control.

  2. Time domain adjoint sensitivity analysis of electromagnetic problems with nonlinear media.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Mohamed H; Ahmed, Osman S; El Sherif, Mohamed H; Nomura, Tsuyoshi

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a theory for wideband adjoint sensitivity analysis of problems with nonlinear media. We show that the sensitivities of the desired response with respect to all shape and material parameters are obtained through one extra adjoint simulation. Unlike linear problems, the system matrices of this adjoint simulation are time varying. Their values are determined during the original simulation. The proposed theory exploits the time-domain transmission line modeling (TLM) and provides an efficient AVM approach for sensitivity analysis of general time domain objective functions. The theory has been illustrated through a number of examples. PMID:24921783

  3. Adjoint-Based Methods for Estimating CO2 Sources and Sinks from Atmospheric Concentration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Arlyn E.

    2003-01-01

    Work to develop adjoint-based methods for estimating CO2 sources and sinks from atmospheric concentration data was initiated in preparation for last year's summer institute on Carbon Data Assimilation (CDAS) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, CO. The workshop exercises used the GSFC Parameterized Chemistry and Transport Model and its adjoint. Since the workshop, a number of simulations have been run to evaluate the performance of the model adjoint. Results from these simulations will be presented, along with an outline of challenges associated with incorporating a variety of disparate data sources, from sparse, but highly precise, surface in situ observations to less accurate, global future satellite observations.

  4. On basic conditions to generate multi-adjoint concept lattices via Galois connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Moreno, J. C.; Medina, J.; Ojeda-Aciego, M.

    2014-02-01

    This paper introduces sufficient and necessary conditions with respect to the fuzzy operators considered in a multi-adjoint frame under which the standard combinations of multi-adjoint sufficiency, possibility, and necessity operators form (antitone or isotone) Galois connections. The underlying idea is to study the minimal algebraic requirements so that the concept-forming operators (defined using the same syntactical form than the extension and intension operators of multi-adjoint concept lattices) form a Galois connection. As a consequence, given a relational database, we have much more possibilities to construct concept lattices associated with it, so that we can choose the specific version which better suits the situation.

  5. Thick Galactic Cosmic Radiation Shielding Using Atmospheric Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stanley O.; Koontz, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    NASA is concerned with protecting astronauts from the effects of galactic cosmic radiation and has expended substantial effort in the development of computer models to predict the shielding obtained from various materials. However, these models were only developed for shields up to about 120 g!cm2 in thickness and have predicted that shields of this thickness are insufficient to provide adequate protection for extended deep space flights. Consequently, effort is underway to extend the range of these models to thicker shields and experimental data is required to help confirm the resulting code. In this paper empirically obtained effective dose measurements from aircraft flights in the atmosphere are used to obtain the radiation shielding function of the earth's atmosphere, a very thick shield. Obtaining this result required solving an inverse problem and the method for solving it is presented. The results are shown to be in agreement with current code in the ranges where they overlap. These results are then checked and used to predict the radiation dosage under thick shields such as planetary regolith and the atmosphere of Venus.

  6. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  7. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2000-12-26

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  8. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  9. Magnetic shielding for a spaceborne adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Brent A.; Shirron, Peter J.; Castles, Stephen H.; Serlemitsos, Aristides T.

    1991-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center has studied magnetic shielding for an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Four types of shielding were studied: active coils, passive ferromagnetic shells, passive superconducting coils, and passive superconducting shells. The passive superconducting shells failed by allowing flux penetration. The other three methods were successful, singly or together. Experimental studies of passive ferromagnetic shielding are compared with calculations made using the Poisson Group of programs, distributed by the Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Agreement between calculation and experiment is good. The ferromagnetic material is a silicon iron alloy.

  10. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Shields CubeSat initiative is to develop a configurable platform that would allow lower cost access to Space for materials durability experiments, and to foster a pathway for both emerging and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation shielding technologies to gain spaceflight heritage in a relevant environment. The Shields-1 will be Langleys' first CubeSat platform to carry out this mission. Radiation shielding tests on Shields-1 are planned for the expected severe radiation environment in a geotransfer orbit (GTO), where advertised commercial rideshare opportunities and CubeSat missions exist, such as Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). To meet this objective, atomic number (Z) graded radiation shields (Zshields) have been developed. The Z-shield properties have been estimated, using the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) radiation shielding computational modeling, to have 30% increased shielding effectiveness of electrons, at half the thickness of a corresponding single layer of aluminum. The Shields-1 research payload will be made with the Z-graded radiation shields of varying thicknesses to create dose-depth curves to be compared with baseline materials. Additionally, Shields-1 demonstrates an engineered Z-grade radiation shielding vault protecting the systems' electronic boards. The radiation shielding materials' performances will be characterized using total ionizing dose sensors. Completion of these experiments is expected to raise the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of the tested atomic number (Z) graded materials. The most significant contribution of the Z-shields for the SmallSat community will be that it enables cost effective shielding for small satellite systems, with significant volume constraints, while increasing the operational lifetime of ionizing radiation sensitive components. These results are anticipated to increase the development of CubeSat hardware design for increased mission lifetimes, and enable

  11. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Hoenes, Glenn R.

    1981-01-01

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  12. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  13. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  14. Design of orbital debris shields for oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1994-02-01

    A new impact debris propagation code was written to link CTH simulations of space debris shield perforation to the Lagrangian finite element code DYNA3D, for space structure wall impact simulations. This software (DC3D) simulates debris cloud evolution using a nonlinear elastic-plastic deformable particle dynamics model, and renders computationally tractable the supercomputer simulation of oblique impacts on Whipple shield protected structures. Comparison of three dimensional, oblique impact simulations with experimental data shows good agreement over a range of velocities of interest in the design of orbital debris shielding. Source code developed during this research is provided on the enclosed floppy disk. An abstract based on the work described was submitted to the 1994 Hypervelocity Impact Symposium.

  15. Design of orbital debris shields for oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1994-01-01

    A new impact debris propagation code was written to link CTH simulations of space debris shield perforation to the Lagrangian finite element code DYNA3D, for space structure wall impact simulations. This software (DC3D) simulates debris cloud evolution using a nonlinear elastic-plastic deformable particle dynamics model, and renders computationally tractable the supercomputer simulation of oblique impacts on Whipple shield protected structures. Comparison of three dimensional, oblique impact simulations with experimental data shows good agreement over a range of velocities of interest in the design of orbital debris shielding. Source code developed during this research is provided on the enclosed floppy disk. An abstract based on the work described was submitted to the 1994 Hypervelocity Impact Symposium.

  16. Adjoint-Based Algorithms for Adaptation and Design Optimizations on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    Schemes based on discrete adjoint algorithms present several exciting opportunities for significantly advancing the current state of the art in computational fluid dynamics. Such methods provide an extremely efficient means for obtaining discretely consistent sensitivity information for hundreds of design variables, opening the door to rigorous, automated design optimization of complex aerospace configuration using the Navier-Stokes equation. Moreover, the discrete adjoint formulation provides a mathematically rigorous foundation for mesh adaptation and systematic reduction of spatial discretization error. Error estimates are also an inherent by-product of an adjoint-based approach, valuable information that is virtually non-existent in today's large-scale CFD simulations. An overview of the adjoint-based algorithm work at NASA Langley Research Center is presented, with examples demonstrating the potential impact on complex computational problems related to design optimization as well as mesh adaptation.

  17. Application of Adjoint Methodology in Various Aspects of Sonic Boom Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2014-01-01

    One of the advances in computational design has been the development of adjoint methods allowing efficient calculation of sensitivities in gradient-based shape optimization. This paper discusses two new applications of adjoint methodology that have been developed to aid in sonic boom mitigation exercises. In the first, equivalent area targets are generated using adjoint sensitivities of selected boom metrics. These targets may then be used to drive the vehicle shape during optimization. The second application is the computation of adjoint sensitivities of boom metrics on the ground with respect to parameters such as flight conditions, propagation sampling rate, and selected inputs to the propagation algorithms. These sensitivities enable the designer to make more informed selections of flight conditions at which the chosen cost functionals are less sensitive.

  18. MS S4.03.002 - Adjoint-Based Design for Configuration Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses a method of inverse design for low sonic boom using adjoint-based gradient computations. It outlines a method for shaping a configuration in order to match a prescribed near-field signature.

  19. A numerical adjoint parabolic equation (PE) method for tomography and geoacoustic inversion in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermand, Jean-Pierre; Berrada, Mohamed; Meyer, Matthias; Asch, Mark

    2005-09-01

    Recently, an analytic adjoint-based method of optimal nonlocal boundary control has been proposed for inversion of a waveguide acoustic field using the wide-angle parabolic equation [Meyer and Hermand, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 2937-2948 (2005)]. In this paper a numerical extension of this approach is presented that allows the direct inversion for the geoacoustic parameters which are embedded in a spectral integral representation of the nonlocal boundary condition. The adjoint model is generated numerically and the inversion is carried out jointly across multiple frequencies. The paper further discusses the application of the numerical adjoint PE method for ocean acoustic tomography. To show the effectiveness of the implemented numerical adjoint, preliminary inversion results of water sound-speed profile and bottom acoustic properties will be shown for the YELLOW SHARK '94 experimental conditions.

  20. Comparison of the adjoint and adjoint-free 4dVar assimilation of the hydrographic and velocity observations in the Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaremchuk, Max; Martin, Paul; Koch, Andrey; Beattie, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Performance of the adjoint and adjoint-free 4-dimensional variational (4dVar) data assimilation techniques is compared in application to the hydrographic surveys and velocity observations collected in the Adriatic Sea in 2006. Assimilating the data into the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) has shown that both methods deliver similar reduction of the cost function and demonstrate comparable forecast skill at approximately the same computational expense. The obtained optimal states were, however, significantly different in terms of distance from the background state: application of the adjoint method resulted in a 30-40% larger departure, mostly due to the excessive level of ageostrophic motions in the southern basin of the Sea that was not covered by observations.

  1. Lightweight blast shield

    DOEpatents

    Mixon, Larry C.; Snyder, George W.; Hill, Scott D.; Johnson, Gregory L.; Wlodarski, J. Frank; von Spakovsky, Alexis P.; Emerson, John D.; Cole, James M.; Tipton, John P.

    1991-01-01

    A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

  2. Magsat investigation. [Canadian shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A computer program was prepared for modeling segments of the Earth's crust allowing for heterogeneity in magnetization in calculating the Earth's field at Magsat heights. This permits investigation of a large number of possible models in assessing the magnetic signatures of subprovinces of the Canadian shield. The fit between the model field and observed fields is optimized in a semi-automatic procedure.

  3. Analysis of shield tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. Q.; Yue, Z. Q.; Tham, L. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Lee, C. F.; Hashimoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-dimensional finite element model for the analysis of shield tunnels by taking into account the construction process which is divided into four stages. The soil is assumed to behave as an elasto-plastic medium whereas the shield is simulated by beam-joint discontinuous model in which curved beam elements and joint elements are used to model the segments and joints, respectively. As grout is usually injected to fill the gap between the lining and the soil, the property parameters of the grout are chosen in such a way that they can reflect the state of the grout at each stage. Furthermore, the contact condition between the soil and lining will change with the construction stage, and therefore, different stress-releasing coefficients are used to account for the changes. To assess the accuracy that can be attained by the method in solving practical problems, the shield tunnelling in the No. 7 Subway Line Project in Osaka, Japan, is used as a case history for our study. The numerical results are compared with those measured in the field. The results presented in the paper show that the proposed numerical procedure can be used to effectively estimate the deformation, stresses and moments experienced by the surrounding soils and the concrete lining segments. The analysis and method presented in this paper can be considered to be useful for other subway construction projects involving shield tunnelling in soft soils. Copyright

  4. Shield against radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Grifoni, S.

    1988-02-23

    This patent describes a shield against ionizing radiations that comprises at least one layer of an aggregate-containing cement-based conglomerate or an aggregate-containing cement-based mortar wherein the aggregate consists essentially of floated galena or mixtures thereof which at least one boron mineral.

  5. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  6. Efficacy of Cosmic Ray Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    This research involved testing various types of shielding with a self-constructed Berkeley style cosmic ray detector, in order to evaluate the materials of each type of shielding's effectiveness at blocking cosmic rays and the cost- and size-efficiency of the shields as well. The detector was constructed, then tested for functionality and reliability. Following confirmation, the detector was then used at three different locations to observe it altitude or atmospheric conditions had any effect on the effectiveness of certain shields. Multiple types of shielding were tested with the detector, including combinations of several shields, primarily aluminum, high-iron steel, polyethylene plastic, water, lead, and a lead-alternative radiation shield utilized in radiology. These tests regarding both the base effectiveness and the overall efficiency of shields is designed to support future space exploratory missions where the risk of exposure to possibly lethal amounts of cosmic rays for crew and the damage caused to unshielded electronics are of serious concern.

  7. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  8. The Θ-KMS adjoint and time reversed quantum Markov semigroups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaños-Servin, Jorge R.; Quezada, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    We introduce the notion of Θ-KMS adjoint of a quantum Markov semigroup, which is identified with the time reversed semigroup. The break of Θ-KMS symmetry, or Θ-standard quantum detailed balance in the sense of Fagnola-Umanità,11 is measured by means of the von Neumann relative entropy of states associated with the semigroup and its Θ-KMS adjoint.

  9. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  10. Flexible Multi-Shock Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Flexible multi-shock shield system and method are disclosed for defending against hypervelocity particles. The flexible multi-shock shield system and method may include a number of flexible bumpers or shield layers spaced apart by one or more resilient support layers, all of which may be encapsulated in a protective cover. Fasteners associated with the protective cover allow the flexible multi-shock shield to be secured to the surface of a structure to be protected.

  11. Global adjoint tomography: Perspectives, initial results and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdag, Ebru; Zhu, Hejun; Peter, Daniel; Tromp, Jeroen

    2013-04-01

    Adjoint methods provide an efficient way for incorporating the full nonlinearity of wave propagation and 3D Fréchet kernels in iterative seismic inversions. Our goal is to take adjoint tomography forward to image the entire planet using the opportunities offered by advances in numerical wave propagation solvers and high-performance computing. Using an iterative pre-conditioned conjugate gradient scheme, we initially set the aim to obtain a global crustal and mantle model with confined transverse isotropy in the upper mantle. Our strategy is to invert crustal and mantle structure together to avoid any bias introduced into upper-mantle images due to "crustal corrections", which are commonly used in classical tomography. We have started with 255 global CMT events (5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7) and used GSN stations as well as some local networks such as USArray, European stations, etc. We have demonstrated the feasibility of global scale inversions by performing two iterations based on numerical simulations accurate down to ~27 s. To simplify the problem, we primarily focus on elastic structure, and therefore our measurements are based on multitaper traveltime differences between observed and synthetic seismograms. We compute 3D sensitivity kernels for the selected events combining long-period surface waves (initially T > 60 s), where it is easier to handle nonlinearities due to the crust, with shorter-period body waves (initially T > 27 s), which are more sensitive to deeper parts of the mantle. 3D simulations dramatically increase the usable amount of data so that, with the current earthquake-station setup, we perform each iteration with more than two million measurements. Our initial results are promising to improve images from the upper mantle all the way down to the core-mantle boundary. Recent improvements in our 3D solvers (e.g., a GPU version) and access to high-performance computational centers (e.g., ORNL's Cray XK7 "Titan" system) now enable us to perform iterations

  12. Adjoint Data Assimilative Model Study of the Gulf of Maine Coastal Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, R.; McGillicuddy, D. J.; Lynch, D. R.

    2004-12-01

    Data assimilation (DA) in the coastal ocean can be divided into category of either sequential estimation or variational adjoint. Sequential estimation techniques blend models with observations directly, using a variety of algorithms with which the relative weights of data and model are calculated. Variational adjoint techniques infer model control variables (e.g. parameters, forcing functions, boundary conditions, etc.) that minimize the misfit between observations and predictions. The advantage of the latter techniques over the former is that the resulting model solutions obey model dynamics. In this study, the Gulf of Maine coastal circulation and the material property transport are investigated with the Dartmouth variational adjoint DA modeling system, which assimilates in-situ data via inversion for the unknown sea level elevation at open boundaries. In-situ observations include ADCP currents and coastal sea levels. The adjoint DA model skill is evaluated by the inter-comparisons between modeled and observed drifter trajectories. Excellent model skill is found, demonstrating the utility and effectiveness of the adjoint DA modeling system in bridging in-situ observations with coastal ocean model simulations. Implications of the adjoint DA strategy on the emergent coastal ocean observing systems are discussed.

  13. Plumes, Hotspot & Slabs Imaged by Global Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Lei, W.; Peter, D. B.; Smith, J. A.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present the "first generation" global adjoint tomography model based on 3D wave simulations, which is the result of 15 conjugate-gradient iterations with confined transverse isotropy to the upper mantle. Our starting model is the 3D mantle and crustal models S362ANI (Kustowski et al. 2008) and Crust2.0 (Bassin et al. 2000), respectively. We take into account the full nonlinearity of wave propagation in numerical simulations including attenuation (both in forward and adjoint simulations), topography/bathymetry, etc., using the GPU version of the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package. We invert for crust and mantle together without crustal corrections to avoid any bias in mantle structure. We started with an initial selection of 253 global CMT events within the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0 with numerical simulations having resolution down to 27 s combining 30-s body and 60-s surface waves. After the 12th iteration we increased the resolution to 17 s, including higher-frequency body waves as well as going down to 45 s in surface-wave measurements. We run 180-min seismograms and assimilate all minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. Our 15th iteration model update shows a tantalisingly enhanced image of the Tahiti plume as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone, Erebus, etc. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the initial model. Point-spread function tests (Fichtner & Trampert 2011) suggest that we are close to the resolution of continental-scale studies in our global inversions and able to confidently map features, for instance, at the scale of the Yellowstone hotspot. This is a clear consequence of our multi-scale smoothing strategy, in which we define our smoothing operator as a function of the approximate Hessian kernel and smooth our gradients less wherever we have good ray coverage

  14. Big Data Challenges in Global Seismic 'Adjoint Tomography' (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, J.; Bozdag, E.; Krischer, L.; Lefebvre, M.; Lei, W.; Smith, J.

    2013-12-01

    The challenge of imaging Earth's interior on a global scale is closely linked to the challenge of handling large data sets. The related iterative workflow involves five distinct phases, namely, 1) data gathering and culling, 2) synthetic seismogram calculations, 3) pre-processing (time-series analysis and time-window selection), 4) data assimilation and adjoint calculations, 5) post-processing (pre-conditioning, regularization, model update). In order to implement this workflow on modern high-performance computing systems, a new seismic data format is being developed. The Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) is designed to replace currently used data formats with a more flexible format that allows for fast parallel I/O. The metadata is divided into abstract categories, such as "source" and "receiver", along with provenance information for complete reproducibility. The structure of ASDF is designed keeping in mind three distinct applications: earthquake seismology, seismic interferometry, and exploration seismology. Existing time-series analysis tool kits, such as SAC and ObsPy, can be easily interfaced with ASDF so that seismologists can use robust, previously developed software packages. ASDF accommodates an automated, efficient workflow for global adjoint tomography. Manually managing the large number of simulations associated with the workflow can rapidly become a burden, especially with increasing numbers of earthquakes and stations. Therefore, it is of importance to investigate the possibility of automating the entire workflow. Scientific Workflow Management Software (SWfMS) allows users to execute workflows almost routinely. SWfMS provides additional advantages. In particular, it is possible to group independent simulations in a single job to fit the available computational resources. They also give a basic level of fault resilience as the workflow can be resumed at the correct state preceding a failure. Some of the best candidates for our particular workflow

  15. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of hydrodynamic stability in cyclonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman Inigo, Juan; Juniper, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Cyclonic separators are used in a variety of industries to efficiently separate mixtures of fluid and solid phases by means of centrifugal forces and gravity. In certain circumstances, the vortex core of cyclonic flows is known to precess due to the instability of the flow, which leads to performance reductions. We aim to characterize the unsteadiness using linear stability analysis of the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations in a global framework. The system of equations, including the turbulence model, is linearised to obtain an eigenvalue problem. Unstable modes corresponding to the dynamics of the large structures of the turbulent flow are extracted. The analysis shows that the most unstable mode is a helical motion which develops around the axis of the flow. This result is in good agreement with LES and experimental analysis, suggesting the validity of the approach. Finally, an adjoint-based sensitivity analysis is performed to determine the regions of the flow that, when altered, have most influence on the frequency and growth-rate of the unstable eigenvalues.

  16. Periodic differential equations with self-adjoint monodromy operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovich, V. I.

    2001-04-01

    A linear differential equation \\dot u=A(t)u with p-periodic (generally speaking, unbounded) operator coefficient in a Euclidean or a Hilbert space \\mathbb H is considered. It is proved under natural constraints that the monodromy operator U_p is self-adjoint and strictly positive if A^*(-t)=A(t) for all t\\in\\mathbb R.It is shown that Hamiltonian systems in the class under consideration are usually unstable and, if they are stable, then the operator U_p reduces to the identity and all solutions are p-periodic.For higher frequencies averaged equations are derived. Remarkably, high-frequency modulation may double the number of critical values.General results are applied to rotational flows with cylindrical components of the velocity a_r=a_z=0, a_\\theta=\\lambda c(t)r^\\beta, \\beta<-1, c(t) is an even p-periodic function, and also to several problems of free gravitational convection of fluids in periodic fields.

  17. Determining scaling laws from geodynamic simulations using adjoint gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuber, Georg; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Whereas significant progress has been made in modelling of lithospheric and crustal scale processes in recent years, it often remains a challenge to understand which of the many model parameters is of key importance for a particular simulation. Determining this is usually done by manually changing the model input parameters and performing new simulations. For a few cases, such as for crustal-scale folding instabilities (with viscous rheologies, e.g. [1]) or for Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, one can use existing scaling laws to obtain such insights. Yet, for a more general case, it is not straightforward to do this (apart from running many simulations). Here, we test a different approach which computes gradients of the model parameters using adjoint based methods, which has the advantage that we can test the influence of an independent number of parameters on the system by computing and analysing the covariance matrix and the gradient of the parameter space. This method might give us the chance to get insights on which parameters affect for example subduction processes and how strong the system depends on their influence. [1] Fernandez, N., & Kaus, B. J. (2014). Fold interaction and wavelength selection in 3D models of multilayer detachment folding. Tectonophysics, 632, 199-217.

  18. Multigrid methods for bifurcation problems: The self adjoint case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taasan, Shlomo

    1987-01-01

    This paper deals with multigrid methods for computational problems that arise in the theory of bifurcation and is restricted to the self adjoint case. The basic problem is to solve for arcs of solutions, a task that is done successfully with an arc length continuation method. Other important issues are, for example, detecting and locating singular points as part of the continuation process, switching branches at bifurcation points, etc. Multigrid methods have been applied to continuation problems. These methods work well at regular points and at limit points, while they may encounter difficulties in the vicinity of bifurcation points. A new continuation method that is very efficient also near bifurcation points is presented here. The other issues mentioned above are also treated very efficiently with appropriate multigrid algorithms. For example, it is shown that limit points and bifurcation points can be solved for directly by a multigrid algorithm. Moreover, the algorithms presented here solve the corresponding problems in just a few work units (about 10 or less), where a work unit is the work involved in one local relaxation on the finest grid.

  19. Conformal versus confining scenario in SU(2) with adjoint fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Del Debbio, L.; Pica, C.; Lucini, B.; Patella, A.; Rago, A.

    2009-10-01

    The masses of the lowest-lying states in the meson and in the gluonic sector of an SU(2) gauge theory with two Dirac flavors in the adjoint representation are measured on the lattice at a fixed value of the lattice coupling {beta}=4/g{sub 0}{sup 2}=2.25 for values of the bare fermion mass m{sub 0} that span a range between the quenched regime and the massless limit, and for various lattice volumes. Even for light constituent fermions the lightest glueballs are found to be lighter than the lightest mesons. Moreover, the string tension between two static fundamental sources strongly depends on the mass of the dynamical fermions and becomes of the order of the inverse squared lattice linear size before the chiral limit is reached. The implications of these findings for the phase of the theory in the massless limit are discussed and a strategy for discriminating between the (near-)conformal and the confining scenario is outlined.

  20. Roof Shield for Advance and Retreat Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Shield sections change their configuration to suit mining mode. Articulation cylinders raise rear shield to advance position, and locking cylinders hold it there. To change to retreat position articulation cylinders lower shield. Locking pins at edge of outermost shield plate latch shield to chock base. Shield accommodates roof heights ranging from 36 to 60 inches (0.9 to 1.52 meters).

  1. Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Improved capacitive proximity sensors constructed by incorporating one or more additional driven shield(s). Sensitivity and range of sensor altered by adjusting driving signal(s) applied to shield(s). Includes sensing electrode and driven isolating shield that correspond to sensing electrode and driven shield.

  2. Gamma dose from activation of internal shields in IRIS reactor.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, Stefano; Cammi, Antonio; Garlati, Luisella; Lombardi, Carlo; Padovani, Enrico

    2005-01-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure is a modular pressurised water reactor with an integral design. This means that all the primary system components, such as the steam generators, pumps, pressuriser and control rod drive mechanisms, are located inside the reactor vessel, which requires a large diameter. For the sake of better reliability and safety, it is desirable to achieve the reduction of vessel embrittlement as well as the lowering of the dose beyond the vessel. The former can be easily accomplished by the presence of a wide downcomer, filled with water, which surrounds the core region, while the latter needs the presence of additional internal shields. An optimal shielding configuration is under investigation, for reducing the ex-vessel dose due to activated internals and for limiting the amount of the biological shielding. MCNP 4C calculations were performed to evaluate the neutron and the gamma dose during operation and the 60Co activation of various shields configurations. The gamma dose beyond the vessel from activation of its structural components was estimated in a shutdown condition, with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA 2002 and the MicroShield software. The results of the two codes are in agreement and show that the dose is sufficiently low, even without an additional shield. PMID:16381688

  3. Radiation shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille; Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01

    The results of radiation shielding studies for the vertical test cryostat VTS1 at Fermilab performed with the codes FISHPACT and MARS15 are presented and discussed. The analysis is focused on operations with two RF cavities in the cryostat. The vertical cavity test facility (VCTF) for superconducting RF cavities in Industrial Building 1 at Fermilab has been in operation since 2007. The facility currently consists of a single vertical test cryostat VTS1. Radiation shielding for VTS1 was designed for operations with single 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities, and the shielding calculations were performed using a simplified model of field emission as the radiation source. The operations are proposed to be extended in such a way that two RF cavities will be in VTS1 at a time, one above the other, with tests for each cavity performed sequentially. In such a case the radiation emitted during the tests from the lower cavity can, in part, bypass the initially designed shielding which can lead to a higher dose in the building. Space for additional shielding, either internal or external to VTS1, is limited. Therefore, a re-evaluation of the radiation shielding was performed. An essential part of the present analysis is in using realistic models for cavity geometry and spatial, angular and energy distributions of field-emitted electrons inside the cavities. The calculations were performed with the computer codes FISHPACT and MARS15.

  4. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  5. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  6. Multilayer radiation shield

    SciTech Connect

    Urbahn, John Arthur; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    2009-06-16

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  7. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  8. Combustor bulkhead heat shield assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Zeisser, M.H.

    1990-06-19

    This paper describes a gas turbine engine having an annular combustion chamber defined by an annular, inner liner, a concentric outer liner, and an upstream annular combustor head, wherein the head includes a radially extending bulkhead having circumferentially distributed openings for each receiving an individual fuel nozzle therethrough. It comprises: a segmented heat shield assembly, disposed between the combustion chamber interior and the bulkhead, including generally planar, sector shaped heat shields, each shield abutting circumferentially with two next adjacent shields and extending radially from proximate the inner liner to proximate the outer liner, the plurality of shields collectively defining an annular protective barrier, and wherein each sector shaped shield further includes an opening, corresponding to one of the bulkhead nozzle openings for likewise receiving the corresponding nozzle therethrough, the shield opening further including an annular lip extending toward the bulkhead and being received within the bulkhead opening, raised ridges on the shield backside, the ridges contacting the facing bulkhead surface and defining a flow path for a flow of cooling air issuing from a sized supply opening disposed in the bulkhead, the flow path running ultimately from adjacent the annular lip to the edges of each shield segment, wherein the raised edges extend fully along the lateral, circumferentially spaced edges of each shield segment and about the adjacent shield segments wherein the raised ridges further extend circumferentially between the annular lip and the abutting edge ridges.

  9. A novel shielding material prepared from solid waste containing lead for gamma ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Mehmet; Baykara, Oktay; Doğru, Mahmut; Kuluöztürk, Fatih

    2010-09-01

    Human beings are continuously exposed to cosmogenic radiation and its products in the atmosphere from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) within Earth, their bodies, houses and foods. Especially, for the radiation protection environments where high ionizing radiation levels appear should be shielded. Generally, different materials are used for the radiation shielding in different areas and for different situations. In this study, a novel shielding material produced by a metallurgical solid waste containing lead was analyzed as shielding material for gamma radiation. The photon total mass attenuation coefficients ( μ/ ρ) were measured and calculated using WinXCom computer code for the novel shielding material, concrete and lead. Theoretical and experimental values of total mass attenuation coefficient of the each studied sample were compared. Consequently, a new shielding material prepared from the solid waste containing lead could be preferred for buildings as shielding materials against gamma radiation.

  10. Skylab Solar Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A sail like sunshade for possible use as a sunscreen for the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) is shown being fabricated in the GE Building across the street from Johnson Space Center, Houston Texas. Three people help the steamstress feed the material through the sewing machine. The three-layered sunshade will be composed of a top layer of aluminized mylar, a middle layer of laminated nylon ripstop, and a bottom layer of thin nylon. Working on the sunshade are from left to right: Dale Gentry, Elizabeth Gauldin, Alyene Baker, and James H. Barnett Jr. Mrs. Baker, a GE employee, operates the double needle Singer sewing machine. Barnett is head of the Crew Equipment Development Section of JSC Crew Systems Division. Mrs. Gauldin is also with the Crew Systems Division. Gentry works for GE. The work shown here is part of the crash program underway to prepare a sunshield for Skylab to replace the orginal shield which was lost when Skylab 1 was launched on May 14, 1973. The improvised solar shield selected to be used will be carried to Earth orbit by the Skylab 2 crewman who will then deploy the reflective parasol to shade part of the OWS from the hot rays of the sun. Loss of the orginal sun shield has caused an overheating problem. in the Orbital Work Shop.

  11. Crumpled Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image of the spacecraft's crumpled heat shield on Sept. 16, 2008, the 111th Martian day of the mission.

    The 2-1/2 meter (about 8-1/2 feet) heat shield landed southeast of Phoenix, about halfway between the spacecraft and its backshell/parachute. The backshell/parachute touched ground 300 meters (1,000 ft) to the south of the lander.

    The dark area to the right of the heat shield is the 'bounce mark' it made on impact with the Red Planet. This image is the highest-resolution image that will likely be taken by the lander, and is part of the 1,500-image 'Happily Ever After' panorama.

    The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Comparison of hybrid methods for global variance reduction in shielding calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Peplow, D. E.

    2013-07-01

    For Monte Carlo shielding problems that calculate a mesh tally over the entire problem, the statistical uncertainties computed for each voxel can vary widely. This can lead to unacceptably long run times in order to reduce the uncertainties in all areas of the problem to a reasonably low level. Hybrid methods - using estimates from deterministic calculations to create importance maps for variance reduction in Monte Carlo calculations - have been successfully used to optimize the calculation of specific tallies. For the global problem, several methods have been proposed to create importance maps that distribute Monte Carlo particles in such a way as to achieve a more uniform distribution of relative uncertainty across the problem. The goal is to compute a mesh tally with nearly the same relative uncertainties in the low flux/dose areas as in the high flux/dose areas. Methods based on only forward deterministic estimates and methods using both forward and adjoint deterministic methods have been implemented in the SCALE/MAVRIC package and have been compared against each other by computing global mesh tallies on several representative shielding problems. Methods using both forward and adjoint estimates provide better performance for computing more uniform relative uncertainties across a global mesh tally. (authors)

  13. Optimization of the National Ignition Facility primary shield design

    SciTech Connect

    Annese, C.E.; Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E.; Miller, W.F.; Latkowski, J.; Lee, J.D.; Soran, P.; Tobin, M.L.

    1993-10-01

    Minimum cost design concepts of the primary shield for the National Ignition laser fusion experimental Facility (NIF) are searched with the help of the optimization code SWAN. The computational method developed for this search involves incorporating the time dependence of the delayed photon field within effective delayed photon production cross sections. This method enables one to address the time-dependent problem using relatively simple, time-independent transport calculations, thus significantly simplifying the design process. A novel approach was used for the identification of the optimal combination of constituents that will minimize the shield cost; it involves the generation, with SWAN, of effectiveness functions for replacing materials on an equal cost basis. The minimum cost shield design concept was found to consist of a mixture of polyethylene and low cost, low activation materials such as SiC, with boron added near the shield boundaries.

  14. Analysis of the Radiation Shield of HT-7U Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qunying; Chen, Yixue

    2003-06-01

    Analysis of the radiation shield of HT-7U fusion experimental device has been presented in this contribution. An inner shield and an outer shield, is used to reduce the dose rate to the device, workers and publics. Transport calculations and analyses have been done by 3D MCNP/4C models for neutron spectrum, γ spectrum, neutron and γ dose rate levels during operation and selection of detectors. Activation calculation have been done by inventory code FISPACT to estimate the decay γ dose rate level to workers after one pulse operation of the device and the permission time for workers to get into the shield building or device to make some maintenance or replace after discharge.

  15. Differential sensitivity theory applied to the MESA code

    SciTech Connect

    Henninger, R.J. ); Maudlin, P.J.; Harstad, E.N. Los Alamos, National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 )

    1994-07-10

    A technique called Differential Sensitivity Theory (DST) is applied to the system of equations solved by the MESA continuum mechanics code. DST uses adjoint technique to determine exact sensitivity derivatives, i.e., if R is a calculation result of interest (response R ) and [alpha][sub i] is a calculational input (parameter [alpha][sub i]), then [alpha]R/[alpha][sub i] is defined as the sensitivity. The advantage of using DST is that for an n-parameter problem [ital all] n sensitivities can be obtained by integrating the solutions from only [ital two] calculations, a MESA calculation and its corresponding adjoint calculation using an Adjoint Continuum Mechanics (ACM) code. This work presents the derivation and solution of the appropriate set of adjoint equations for the purpose of computing sensitivities for high-rate two-dimensional, multi-component, high-deformation problems. As an example, results for a flyer plate impact problem are given. [copyright]American Institute of Physics

  16. Shielding from space radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. Ken; Badavi, Forooz F.

    1991-01-01

    Progress during the period of 1 Jun. - 1 Dec. 1991 is presented. An analytical solution to heavy ion transport equation in terms of Green's function formalism is developed. The mathematical development is recasted into efficient computer code for space applications. The efficiency of this algorithm is accomplished by a nonperturbative technique of extending the Green's function over the solution domain. The code is also applied to accelerator boundary conditions to allow code validation in laboratory experiments.

  17. Shielding from space radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. Ken; Badavi, Forooz F.

    1991-12-01

    Progress during the period of 1 Jun. - 1 Dec. 1991 is presented. An analytical solution to heavy ion transport equation in terms of Green's function formalism is developed. The mathematical development is recasted into efficient computer code for space applications. The efficiency of this algorithm is accomplished by a nonperturbative technique of extending the Green's function over the solution domain. The code is also applied to accelerator boundary conditions to allow code validation in laboratory experiments.

  18. Material considerations in the design of a bulk shield for the Fusion Engineering Device

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, J.; Engholm, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    The FED bulk shield provides protection from high-energy neutrons and gamma rays and removes nuclear heat generated. Bulk shield optimization calculations were conducted using the Los Alamos ONEDANT discrete ordinates and the General Atomic PATH point kernel codes. Six candidate steel alloys were considered.

  19. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlemann, H.; Koch, M.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE) for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005). Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  20. Adjoint sensitivity analysis for a three-dimensional photochemical model: implementation and method comparison.

    PubMed

    Martien, Philip T; Harley, Robert A; Cacuci, Dan G

    2006-04-15

    Photochemical air pollution forms when emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) react in the atmosphere in the presence of sunlight. The goal of applying three-dimensional photochemical air quality models is usually to conduct sensitivity analysis: for example, to predict changes in an ozone response due to changes in NO(x) and VOC emissions or other model data. Forward sensitivity analysis methods are best suited to investigating sensitivities of many model responses to changes in a few inputs or parameters. Here we develop a continuous adjoint model and demonstrate an adjoint sensitivity analysis procedure that is well-suited to the complementary case of determining sensitivity of a small number of model responses to many parameters. Sensitivities generated using the adjoint method agree with those generated using other methods. Compared to the forward method, the adjoint method had large disk storage requirements but was more efficient in terms of computer processor time for receptor-based investigations focused on a single response at a specified site and time. The adjoint method also generates sensitivity apportionment fields, which reveal when and where model data are important to the target response. PMID:16683606

  1. Generalized adjoint consistent treatment of wall boundary conditions for compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Ralf; Leicht, Tobias

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we revisit the adjoint consistency analysis of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations of the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with application to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and k- ω turbulence equations. Here, particular emphasis is laid on the discretization of wall boundary conditions. While previously only one specific combination of discretizations of wall boundary conditions and of aerodynamic force coefficients has been shown to give an adjoint consistent discretization, in this article we generalize this analysis and provide a discretization of the force coefficients for any consistent discretization of wall boundary conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a related evaluation of the cp- and cf-distributions is required. The freedom gained in choosing the discretization of boundary conditions without loosing adjoint consistency is used to devise a new adjoint consistent discretization including numerical fluxes on the wall boundary which is more robust than the adjoint consistent discretization known up to now. While this work is presented in the framework of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations, the insight gained is also applicable to (and thus valuable for) other discretization schemes. In particular, the discretization of integral quantities, like the drag, lift and moment coefficients, as well as the discretization of local quantities at the wall like surface pressure and skin friction should follow as closely as possible the discretization of the flow equations and boundary conditions at the wall boundary.

  2. Self-adjoint Operators as Functions I. Lattices, Galois Connections, and the Spectral Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Andreas; Dewitt, Barry

    2014-06-01

    Observables of a quantum system, described by self-adjoint operators in a von Neumann algebra or affiliated with it in the unbounded case, form a conditionally complete lattice when equipped with the spectral order. Using this order-theoretic structure, we develop a new perspective on quantum observables. In this first paper (of two), we show that self-adjoint operators affiliated with a von Neumann algebra can equivalently be described as certain real-valued functions on the projection lattice of the algebra, which we call q-observable functions. Bounded self-adjoint operators correspond to q-observable functions with compact image on non-zero projections. These functions, originally defined in a similar form by de Groote (Observables II: quantum observables, 2005), are most naturally seen as adjoints (in the categorical sense) of spectral families. We show how they relate to the daseinisation mapping from the topos approach to quantum theory (Döring and Isham , New Structures for Physics, Springer, Heidelberg, 2011). Moreover, the q-observable functions form a conditionally complete lattice which is shown to be order-isomorphic to the lattice of self-adjoint operators with respect to the spectral order. In a subsequent paper (Döring and Dewitt, 2012, preprint), we will give an interpretation of q-observable functions in terms of quantum probability theory, and using results from the topos approach to quantum theory, we will provide a joint sample space for all quantum observables.

  3. Assessing the Impact of Observations on Numerical Weather Forecasts Using the Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelaro, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. This talk provides a general overview of the adjoint method, including the theoretical basis and practical implementation of the technique. Results are presented from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. When performed in conjunction with standard observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies may be important for optimizing the use of the current observational network and defining requirements for future observing systems

  4. Shielding from space radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. Ken; Badavi, Forooz F.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    This Progress Report covering the period of December 1, 1992 to June 1, 1993 presents the development of an analytical solution to the heavy ion transport equation in terms of Green's function formalism. The mathematical development results are recasted into a highly efficient computer code for space applications. The efficiency of this algorithm is accomplished by a nonperturbative technique of extending the Green's function over the solution domain. The code may also be applied to accelerator boundary conditions to allow code validation in laboratory experiments. Results from the isotopic version of the code with 59 isotopes present for a single layer target material, for the case of an iron beam projectile at 600 MeV/nucleon in water is presented. A listing of the single layer isotopic version of the code is included.

  5. Martian regolith as space radiation shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonsen, L. C.; Nealy, J. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Mars exploration crews will be exposed to such high radiation dosages in route from earth that as to sharply reduce the allowable dose they should receive while on the Martian surface. An account is presently given of the possibility of using Martian regolith as crew shielding to maintain very low short-term dose limits. NASA-Langley's nucleon and heavy-ion transport computer codes are used to predict the propagation and interaction of the free-space nucleons and heavy ions through the Martian atmosphere and then through various thicknesses of regolith. The largest reduction in dose occurs in the first 15-20 cm of regolith material.

  6. Radiation shielding for the Main Injector collimation system

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The results of Monte Carlo radiation shielding studies performed with the MARS15 code for the Main Injector collimation system at Fermilab are presented and discussed. MAD-to-MARS Beam Line Builder is used to generate realistic extended curvilinear geometry models.

  7. 34. DETAILS AND SECTIONS OF SHIELDING TANK FUEL ELEMENT SUPPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DETAILS AND SECTIONS OF SHIELDING TANK FUEL ELEMENT SUPPORT FRAME. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-S-4. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 60 851 151978. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. 36. DETAILS AND SECTIONS OF SHIELDING TANK, FUEL ELEMENT SUPPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. DETAILS AND SECTIONS OF SHIELDING TANK, FUEL ELEMENT SUPPORT FRAME AND SUPPORT PLATFORM, AND SAFETY MECHANISM ASSEMBLY (SPRING-LOADED HINGE). F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-S-1. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 60 851 151975. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. Radiation shielding issues for superconducting RF cavity test facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    The results of Monte Carlo radiation shielding study performed with the MARS15 code for the final design of the vertical test cryostat facility to be installed in the Industrial Building 1 at Fermilab are presented and discussed.

  10. Spacecraft ceramic protective shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larriva, Rene F. (Inventor); Nelson, Anne (M.); Czechanski, James G. (Inventor); Poff, Ray E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A low areal density protective shield apparatus, and method for making same, for protecting spacecraft structures from impact with hypervelocity objects, including a bumper member comprising a bumper ceramic layer, a bumper shock attenuator layer, and a bumper confining layer. The bumper ceramic layer can be SiC or B.sub.4 C; the bumper shock attenuator layer can be zirconia felt; and the bumper confining layer can be aluminum. A base armor member can be spaced from the bumper member and a ceramic fiber-based curtain can be positioned between the bumper and base armor members.

  11. Passive Shielding in CUORE

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, F.; Cosmelli, C.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, S.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Gargiulo, C.; Longo, E.; Morganti, S.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.; Alessandria, F.; Andreotti, E.; Foggetta, L.; Giuliani, A.; Pedretti, M.; Sangiorgio, S.; Ardito, R.; Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.

    2007-03-28

    The nature of neutrino mass is one of the friontier problems of fundamental physics. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0{nu}DBD) is a powerful tool to investigate the mass hierarchy and possible extensions of the Standard Model. CUORE is a 1-Ton next generation experiment, made of 1000 Te bolometers, aiming at reaching a background of 0.01 (possibly 0.001) counts keV-1kg-1y-1 and therefore a mass sensitivity of few tens of meV The background contribution due to environmental neutrons, muon-induced neutrons in the shieldings and external gamma is discussed.

  12. Status of MARS Code

    SciTech Connect

    N.V. Mokhov

    2003-04-09

    Status and recent developments of the MARS 14 Monte Carlo code system for simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades in shielding, accelerator and detector components in the energy range from a fraction of an electronvolt up to 100 TeV are described. these include physics models both in strong and electromagnetic interaction sectors, variance reduction techniques, residual dose, geometry, tracking, histograming. MAD-MARS Beam Line Build and Graphical-User Interface.

  13. Effects of shields on cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Aircraft wiring subjected to rapidly changing electromagnetic fields was considered. The ways in which shielded cables reduce surge voltages were studied along with the ways in which common practice regarding the use of shields may be at variance with the use required for the control of lightning effects. Courses in which this apparent conflict of use may be resolved were suggested. Noise currents flowing on shields of cables related to the noise signals coupled onto signal conductors were also investigated.

  14. Fusion neutronics-streaming, shielding, heating, activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiesleben, H.; Richter, D.; Seidel, K.; Unholzer, S.

    2001-07-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents an important step towards a fusion power plant. Controlled fusion will be realized in a d-t-plasma magnetically confined by a Tokamak configuration. The first wall of the plasma chamber, blanket and vacuum vessel of ITER form a compact assembly for converting the kinetic energy of fusion neutrons into heat while simultaneously shielding the superconducting coils efficiently against neutron and accompanying photon radiation. This shielding system can be investigated with neutrons generated by low-energy accelerators. We report on experiments concerning shielding and streaming properties of a mock-up where energy spectra of both neutrons and protons were measured. They are compared with predictions of Monte Carlo calculations (code MCNP-4A) using various data libraries. The agreement justified the use of measured spectra as basis to calculate design parameters such as neutron and photon heating, radiation damage, gas production, and activation. Some of these parameters were also directly measured. The results validate the ITER design.

  15. Stiffness characteristics of longwall shields

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Since longwall strata activity is characterized by roof-to-floor and face-to-waste displacements, a model with two degrees of freedom was used to describe the load-displacement relationship of the shield structure. The model considers the support as an elastic body and relates horizontal and vertical resultant forces acting on the support to associated displacements as a function of the stiffness of the support structure. Stiffness coefficients under full canopy and base contact configurations were determined by controlled displacement loading of longwall shields in the Bureau's Mine Roof Simulator. These two-legged longwall shields of different manufacture were investigated. The stiffness characteristics of these shields were evaluated relative to two parameters, namely, shield height and setting pressure. The tests results indicate a reduction in shield stiffness for increasing height. Setting pressure was found to have less of an effect on shield stiffness, producing only a slight increase in stiffness as setting pressure increased. Similar trends were observed for all three shields, indicating a similarity in stiffness characteristics for shields of the same basic configuration.

  16. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Cork, Christopher P.; Becker, John A.; Knapp, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  17. Efficient Calculation of Jacobian and Adjoint Vector Products in the Wave Propagational Inverse Problem Using Automatic Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Thomas F.; Santosa, Fadil; Verma, Arun

    2000-01-01

    Wave propagational inverse problems arise in several applications including medical imaging and geophysical exploration. In these problems, one is interested in obtaining the parameters describing the medium from its response to excitations. The problems are characterized by their large size, and by the hyperbolic equation which models the physical phenomena. The inverse problems are often posed as a nonlinear data-fitting where the unknown parameters are found by minimizing the misfit between the predicted data and the actual data. In order to solve the problem numerically using a gradient-type approach, one must calculate the action of the Jacobian and its adjoint on a given vector. In this paper, we explore the use of automatic differentiation (AD) to develop codes that perform these calculations. We show that by exploiting structure at 2 scales, we can arrive at a very efficient code whose main components are produced by AD. In the first scale we exploite the time-stepping nature of the hyperbolic solver by using the “Extended Jacobian” framework. In the second (finer) scale, we exploit the finite difference stencil in order to make explicit use of the sparsity in the dependence of the output variables to the input variables. The main ideas in this work are illustrated with a simpler, one-dimensional version of the problem. Numerical results are given for both one- and two- dimensional problems. We present computational templates that can be used in conjunction with optimization packages to solve the inverse problem.

  18. Hypervelocity impact shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne Lee (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact shield and method for protecting a wall structure, such as a spacecraft wall, from impact with particles of debris having densities of about 2.7 g/cu cm and impact velocities up to 16 km/s are disclosed. The shield comprises a stack of ultra thin sheets of impactor disrupting material supported and arranged by support means in spaced relationship to one another and mounted to cover the wall in a position for intercepting the particles. The sheets are of a number and spacing such that the impacting particle and the resulting particulates of the impacting particle and sheet material are successively impact-shocked to a thermal state of total melt and/or vaporization to a degree as precludes perforation of the wall. The ratio of individual sheet thickness to the theoretical diameter of particles of debris which may be of spherical form is in the range of 0.03 to 0.05. The spacing between adjacent sheets is such that the debris cloud plume of liquid and vapor resulting from an impacting particle penetrating a sheet does not puncture the next adjacent sheet prior to the arrival thereat of fragment particulates of sheet material and the debris particle produced by a previous impact.

  19. Using an Adjoint Approach to Eliminate Mesh Sensitivities in Computational Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm for efficiently incorporating the effects of mesh sensitivities in a computational design framework is introduced. The method is based on an adjoint approach and eliminates the need for explicit linearizations of the mesh movement scheme with respect to the geometric parameterization variables, an expense that has hindered practical large-scale design optimization using discrete adjoint methods. The effects of the mesh sensitivities can be accounted for through the solution of an adjoint problem equivalent in cost to a single mesh movement computation, followed by an explicit matrix-vector product scaling with the number of design variables and the resolution of the parameterized surface grid. The accuracy of the implementation is established and dramatic computational savings obtained using the new approach are demonstrated using several test cases. Sample design optimizations are also shown.

  20. Instantons and the 5D U(1) gauge theory with extra adjoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghossian, Rubik; Samsonyan, Marine

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we compute the partition function of 5D supersymmetric U(1) gauge theory with extra adjoint matter in general Ω background. It is well known that such partition functions encode very rich topological information. We show in particular that unlike the case with no extra matter, the partition function with extra adjoint at some special values of the parameters directly reproduces the generating function for the Poincare polynomial of the moduli space of instantons. We compare our results with those recently obtained by Iqbal et al (Refined topological vertex, cylindric partitions and the U(1) adjoint theory, arXiv:0803.2260), who used the so-called refined topological vertex method.

  1. Using an Adjoint Approach to Eliminate Mesh Sensitivities in Computational Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm for efficiently incorporating the effects of mesh sensitivities in a computational design framework is introduced. The method is based on an adjoint approach and eliminates the need for explicit linearizations of the mesh movement scheme with respect to the geometric parameterization variables, an expense that has hindered practical large-scale design optimization using discrete adjoint methods. The effects of the mesh sensitivities can be accounted for through the solution of an adjoint problem equivalent in cost to a single mesh movement computation, followed by an explicit matrix-vector product scaling with the number of design variables and the resolution of the parameterized surface grid. The accuracy of the implementation is established and dramatic computational savings obtained using the new approach are demonstrated using several test cases. Sample design optimizations are also shown.

  2. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le probl

  3. PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of stepped penetrations and brick layout scheme for valve stem extension sleeve. Aerojet Nuclear Company. Date: May 1976. INEEL index no. 761-0620-00-400-195280 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Tracking influential haze source areas in North China using an adjoint model, GRAPES-CUACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, X. Q.; Zhai, S. X.; Jin, M.; Gong, S. L.; Wang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Based upon the adjoint theory, the adjoint of the aerosol module in the atmospheric chemical modeling system GRAPES-CUACE (Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System coupled with the CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment) was developed and tested for its correctness. Through statistic comparison, BC (black carbon aerosol) concentrations simulated by GRAPES-CUACE were generally consistent with observations from Nanjiao (one urban observation station) and Shangdianzi (one rural observation station) stations. To track the most influential emission-sources regions and the most influential time intervals for the high BC concentration during the simulation period, the adjoint model was adopted to simulate the sensitivity of average BC concentration over Beijing at the highest concentration time point (referred to as the Objective Function) with respect to BC emission amount over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Four types of regions were selected based on administrative division and sensitivity coefficient distribution. The adjoint model was used to quantify the effects of emission-sources reduction in different time intervals over different regions by one independent simulation. Effects of different emission reduction strategies based on adjoint sensitivity information show that the more influential regions (regions with relatively larger sensitivity coefficients) do not necessarily correspond to the administrative regions, and the influence effectiveness of sensitivity-oriented regions was greater than the administrative divisions. The influence of emissions on the objective function decreases sharply approximately for the pollutants emitted 17-18 h ago in this episode. Therefore, controlling critical emission regions during critical time intervals on the basis of adjoint sensitivity analysis is much more efficient than controlling administrative specified regions during an experiential time period.

  5. Local-in-Time Adjoint-Based Method for Optimal Control/Design Optimization of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    .We study local-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of ow matching functionals subject to the 2-D unsteady compressible Euler equations. The key idea of the local-in-time method is to construct a very accurate approximation of the global-in-time adjoint equations and the corresponding sensitivity derivative by using only local information available on each time subinterval. In contrast to conventional time-dependent adjoint-based optimization methods which require backward-in-time integration of the adjoint equations over the entire time interval, the local-in-time method solves local adjoint equations sequentially over each time subinterval. Since each subinterval contains relatively few time steps, the storage cost of the local-in-time method is much lower than that of the global adjoint formulation, thus making the time-dependent optimization feasible for practical applications. The paper presents a detailed comparison of the local- and global-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of a tracking functional governed by the Euler equations describing the ow around a circular bump. Our numerical results show that the local-in-time method converges to the same optimal solution obtained with the global counterpart, while drastically reducing the memory cost as compared to the global-in-time adjoint formulation.

  6. Shielding from space radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. Ken; Badavi, Forooz F.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    This Progress Report covering the period of 1 June 1993 to 1 Dec. 1993 presents the development of an analytical solution to the heavy ion transport equation in terms of a one-layer Green's function formalism. The mathematical developments are recasted into an efficient computer code for space applications. The efficiency of this algorithm is accomplished by a nonperturbative technique of extending the Green's function over the solution domain. The code may also be applied to accelerator boundary conditions to allow code validation in laboratory experiments. Results from the isotopic version of the code with 80 isotopes present for a single layer target material, for the case of an iron beam projectile at 600 MeV/nucleon in water is presented.

  7. Shielding from space radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. Ken; Badavi, Forooz F.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    This Progress Report covering the period of 1 June 1993 to 1 Dec. 1993 presents the development of an analytical solution to the heavy ion transport equation in terms of a one-layer Green's function formalism. The mathematical developments are recasted into an efficient computer code for space applications. The efficiency of this algorithm is accomplished by a nonperturbative technique of extending the Green's function over the solution domain. The code may also be applied to accelerator boundary conditions to allow code validation in laboratory experiments. Results from the isotopic version of the code with 80 isotopes present for a single layer target material, for the case of an Iron beam projectile at 600 MeV/nucleon in water is presented.

  8. Pivotably mounted reactor shroud shield and shielding method

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, M.F.

    1987-03-31

    A method is described for shielding persons working around a nuclear reactor having a reactor head an a shroud extending upward from the reactor head, comprising: (a) mounting a plurality of swingout arms around the shroud, each swingout arm being pivotable about a respective axis that is substantially vertical and that is fixed with respect to the shroud; (b) positioning a shielding member adjacent a swingout arm with a hoist; (c) pivoting the swingout arm horizontally away from the shroud and toward the hoist; (d) transferring the shielding member from the hoist to the swingout arm so that the swingout arm supports the shielding member; (e) pivoting the swingout arm horizontally back toward the shroud; and (f) repeating steps (b) through (c) until the shroud is substantially surrounded by shielding members.

  9. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  10. Stratospheric Water Vapor and the Asian Monsoon: An Adjoint Model Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Mark A.; Andrews, Arlyn E.

    2003-01-01

    A new adjoint model of the Goddard Parameterized Chemistry and Transport Model is used to investigate the role that the Asian monsoon plays in transporting water to the stratosphere. The adjoint model provides a unique perspective compared to non-diffusive and non-mixing Lagrangian trajectory analysis. The quantity of water vapor transported from the monsoon and the pathways into the stratosphere are examined. The emphasis is on the amount of water originating from the monsoon that contributes to the tropical tape recorder signal. The cross-tropopause flux of water from the monsoon to the midlatitude lower stratosphere will also be discussed.

  11. NEMOTAM: tangent and adjoint models for the ocean modelling platform NEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidard, A.; Bouttier, P.-A.; Vigilant, F.

    2014-10-01

    The tangent linear and adjoint model (TAM) are efficient tools to analyse and to control dynamical systems such as NEMO. They can be involved in a large range of applications such as sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation or the computation of characteristics vectors. TAM is also required by the 4-D-VAR algorithm which is one of the major method in Data Assimilation. This paper describes the development and the validation of the Tangent linear and Adjoint Model for the NEMO ocean modelling platform (NEMOTAM). The diagnostic tools that are available alongside NEMOTAM are detailed and discussed and several applications are also presented.

  12. Adjoint sensitivity studies of loop current and eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2013-07-01

    Adjoint model sensitivity analyses were applied for the loop current (LC) and its eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The circulation in the GoM is mainly driven by the energetic LC and subsequent LC eddy separation. In order to understand which ocean regions and features control the evolution of the LC, including anticyclonic warm-core eddy shedding in the GoM, forward and adjoint sensitivities with respect to previous model state and atmospheric forcing were computed using the MITgcm and its adjoint. Since the validity of the adjoint model sensitivities depends on the capability of the forward model to simulate the real LC system and the eddy shedding processes, a 5 year (2004-2008) forward model simulation was performed for the GoM using realistic atmospheric forcing, initial, and boundary conditions. This forward model simulation was compared to satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and sea-surface temperature (SST), and observed transport variability. Despite realistic mean state, standard deviations, and LC eddy shedding period, the simulated LC extension shows less variability and more regularity than the observations. However, the model is suitable for studying the LC system and can be utilized for examining the ocean influences leading to a simple, and hopefully generic LC eddy separation in the GoM. The adjoint sensitivities of the LC show influences from the Yucatan Channel (YC) flow and Loop Current Frontal Eddy (LCFE) on both LC extension and eddy separation, as suggested by earlier work. Some of the processes that control LC extension after eddy separation differ from those controlling eddy shedding, but include YC through-flow. The sensitivity remains stable for more than 30 days and moves generally upstream, entering the Caribbean Sea. The sensitivities of the LC for SST generally remain closer to the surface and move at speeds consistent with advection by the high-speed core of

  13. Global Adjoint Tomography: Combining Big Data with HPC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Lei, W.; Peter, D. B.; Smith, J. A.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The steady increase in data quality and the number of global seismographic stations have substantially grown the amount of data available for construction of Earth models. Meanwhile, developments in the theory of wave propagation, numerical methods and HPC systems have enabled unprecedented simulations of seismic wave propagation in realistic 3D Earth models which lead the extraction of more information from data, ultimately culminating in the use of entire three-component seismograms.Our aim is to take adjoint tomography further to image the entire planet which is one of the extreme cases in seismology due to its intense computational requirements and vast amount of high-quality seismic data that can potentially be assimilated in inversions. We have started low resolution (T > 27 s, soon will be > 17 s) global inversions with 253 earthquakes for a transversely isotropic crust and mantle model on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system. Recent improvements in our 3D solvers, such as the GPU version of the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package, will allow us perform higher-resolution (T > 9 s) and longer-duration (~180 m) simulations to take the advantage of high-frequency body waves and major-arc surface waves to improve imbalanced ray coverage as a result of uneven distribution of sources and receivers on the globe. Our initial results after 10 iterations already indicate several prominent features reported in high-resolution continental studies, such as major slabs (Hellenic, Japan, Bismarck, Sandwich, etc.) and enhancement in plume structures (the Pacific superplume, the Hawaii hot spot, etc.). Our ultimate goal is to assimilate seismic data from more than 6,000 earthquakes within the magnitude range 5.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0. To take full advantage of this data set on ORNL's computational resources, we need a solid framework for managing big data sets during pre-processing (e.g., data requests and quality checks), gradient calculations, and post-processing (e

  14. Adaptive mesh refinement and adjoint methods in geophysics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstedde, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    required by human intervention and analysis. Specifying an objective functional that quantifies the misfit between the simulation outcome and known constraints and then minimizing it through numerical optimization can serve as an automated technique for parameter identification. As suggested by the similarity in formulation, the numerical algorithm is closely related to the one used for goal-oriented error estimation. One common point is that the so-called adjoint equation needs to be solved numerically. We will outline the derivation and implementation of these methods and discuss some of their pros and cons, supported by numerical results.

  15. Contaminant deposition building shielding factors for US residential structures.

    PubMed

    Dickson, E D; Hamby, D M; Eckerman, K F

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents validated building shielding factors designed for contemporary US housing-stock under an idealized, yet realistic, exposure scenario from contaminant deposition on the roof and surrounding surfaces. The building shielding factors are intended for use in emergency planning and level three probabilistic risk assessments for a variety of postulated radiological events in which a realistic assessment is necessary to better understand the potential risks for accident mitigation and emergency response planning. Factors are calculated from detailed computational housing-units models using the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle computational code, MCNP5, and are benchmarked from a series of narrow- and broad-beam measurements analyzing the shielding effectiveness of ten common general-purpose construction materials and ten shielding models representing the primary weather barriers (walls and roofs) of likely US housing-stock. Each model was designed to scale based on common residential construction practices and include, to the extent practical, all structurally significant components important for shielding against ionizing radiation. Calculations were performed for floor-specific locations from contaminant deposition on the roof and surrounding ground as well as for computing a weighted-average representative building shielding factor for single- and multi-story detached homes, both with and without basement as well for single-wide manufactured housing-unit. PMID:25859888

  16. Cloud immersion building shielding factors for US residential structures.

    PubMed

    Dickson, E D; Hamby, D M

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents validated building shielding factors designed for contemporary US housing-stock under an idealized, yet realistic, exposure scenario within a semi-infinite cloud of radioactive material. The building shielding factors are intended for use in emergency planning and level three probabilistic risk assessments for a variety of postulated radiological events in which a realistic assessment is necessary to better understand the potential risks for accident mitigation and emergency response planning. Factors are calculated from detailed computational housing-units models using the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle computational code, MCNP5, and are benchmarked from a series of narrow- and broad-beam measurements analyzing the shielding effectiveness of ten common general-purpose construction materials and ten shielding models representing the primary weather barriers (walls and roofs) of likely US housing-stock. Each model was designed to scale based on common residential construction practices and include, to the extent practical, all structurally significant components important for shielding against ionizing radiation. Calculations were performed for floor-specific locations as well as for computing a weighted-average representative building shielding factor for single- and multi-story detached homes, both with and without basement, as well for single-wide manufactured housing-units. PMID:25340542

  17. Galileo Heat Shield Response Experiment Data Reduction and Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Y.-K.; Henline, William D.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Galileo heat shield response experiment consists of 10 Analog Resistance Ablation Detectors (ARADs) embedded in the carbon phenolic heat shield. As the vehicle descends into the atmosphere of Jupiter, these ARADs will in effect measure the recession as a function of time at various locations on the heat shield. This recession data will be used to reconstruct the time-dependent shape of the vehicle. The shape data is of critical importance to the Atmospheric Reconstruction Experiment which must know mass and drag coefficient of the vehicle in order to determine the structure of the Jovian atmosphere. The data is also intrinsically useful as a database for evaluating the accuracy of our numerical codes and methodology for predicting highly radiating reentry flowfields and coupled heat shield material response. This paper will document the reduction of the data from the ARAD sensors, reconstruction of the heat shield shape history, and comparison of the actual heat shield response with previous calculations and experiments. If possible, we will also include results from new calculations which couple the shock layer flow with the transient material response.

  18. Shielding from the Cosmic Radiation for Interplanetary Missions: Active and Passive Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillantini, P.; Topical Team Of ESA On Radiation Shielding

    Shielding is arguably the main countermeasure for the exposure to cosmic radiation during interplanetary exploratory missions. However, shielding of cosmic rays, both of galactic or solar origin, is highly problematic, because of the high-energy of the charged particles involved and the nuclear fragmentation occurring in shielding materials. Although computer codes can predict the shield performance in space, there is a lack of biological and physical measurements to benchmark the codes. An attractive alternative to passive, bulk material shielding is the use of magnetic fields to deflect the charged particles from the spacecraft target. A shielding system based on superconducting magnetic lenses could effectively shield a spacecraft from solar particle events, at least for the portion of energetic particles roughly collinear with the direction of the solar magnetic field. To address these issues, the European Space Agency (ESA) established a Topical Team in 2003 including several European experts in the field of space radiation shielding and superconducting magnets. The Topical Team identified a number of open research questions to be addressed, including development and testing of novel shielding materials, studies on the angular distributions of energetic solar particles, and cooling systems for magnetic lenses in space. A detailed report to ESA will be published within the Fall of the 2004. A summary of the Topical Team conclusions and recommendations will be discussed in this paper. (Work supported by ESA Opportunities for Research in Life Sciences grant # ESA-RA-LS-01-PREP/TT-007).

  19. Neutron streaming through shield ducts using a discrete ordinates/Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, W.T.; Baker, R.S.

    1993-08-18

    A common problem in shield design is determining the neutron flux that streams through ducts in shields and also that penetrates the shield after having traveled partway down the duct. Obviously the determination of the neutrons that stream down the duct can be computed in a straightforward manner using Monte Carlo techniques. On the other hand those neutrons that must penetrate a significant portion of the shield are more easily handled using discrete ordinates methods. A hybrid discrete ordinates/Monte Carlo cods, TWODANT/MC, which is an extension of the existing discrete ordinates code TWODANT, has been developed at Los Alamos to allow the efficient, accurate treatment of both streaming and deep penetration problems in a single calculation. In this paper we provide examples of the application of TWODANT/MC to typical geometries that are encountered in shield design and compare the results with those obtained using the Los Alamos Monte Carlo code MCNP{sup 3}.

  20. Reflective Shields for Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Report proposes reflective shield that protects spacecraft from radiant energy. Also gives some protection against particle beams and cosmic rays. Conceptual shield essentially advanced version of decorative multifaceted mirror balls often hung over dance floors. Mirror facets disperse radiant energy in many directions.

  1. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  2. System for imaging plutonium through heavy shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Kuckertz, T.H.; Cannon, T.M.; Fenimore, E.E.; Moss, C.E.; Nixon, K.V.

    1984-04-01

    A single pinhole can be used to image strong self-luminescent gamma-ray sources such as plutonium on gamma scintillation (Anger) cameras. However, if the source is weak or heavily shielded, a poor signal to noise ratio can prevent acquisition of the image. An imaging system designed and built at Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a coded aperture to image heavily shielded sources. The paper summarizes the mathematical techniques, based on the Fast Delta Hadamard transform, used to decode raw images. Practical design considerations such as the phase of the uniformly redundant aperture and the encoded image sampling are discussed. The imaging system consists of a custom designed m-sequence coded aperture, a Picker International Corporation gamma scintillation camera, a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system, and custom imaging software. The paper considers two sources - 1.5 mCi /sup 57/Co unshielded at a distance of 27 m and 220 g of bulk plutonium (11.8% /sup 240/Pu) with 0.3 cm lead, 2.5 cm steel, and 10 cm of dense plastic material at a distance of 77.5 cm. Results show that the location and geometry of a source hidden in a large sealed package can be determined without having to open the package. 6 references, 4 figures.

  3. Manned mars rover powered by a nuclear reactor; Radiation shield analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, N.J.; El-Genk, M. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    This paper discusses a key element in the conceptual design of a nuclear reactor power system for a manned Mars rover is the analysis, design, and integration of the radiation shield. A shield analysis is carried out to characterize the thickness and spacing of shield layers to provide the minimum mass configuration that meets a dose rate requirement of 300 mSv/yr. The analysis utilizes a two-dimensional transport code to model the reactor and to provide a source term that is subsequently used to calculate dose rates as a function of reactor power level and shield layer thickness. Results show that a multilayered tungsten and lithium hydride (LiH) shield would satisfy the dose rate limit of 300 mSv/yr (30 rem/yr) to the rover crew. The position of two tungsten and LiH layers is varied to minimize secondary gamma-ray production and to optimize shield mass.

  4. Shielding Benchmark Experiments Through Concrete and Iron with High-Energy Proton and Heavy Ion Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Sasaki, M.; Nunomiya, T.; Nakao, N.; Kim, E.; Kurosawa, T.; Taniguchi, S.; Iwase, H.; Uwamino, Y.; Shibata, T.; Ito, S.; Fukumura, A.; Perry, D. R.; Wright, P.

    The deep penetration of neutrons through thick shield has become a very serious problem in the shielding design of high-energy, high-intensity accelerator facility. In the design calculation, the Monte Carlo transport calculation through thick shields has large statistical errors and the basic nuclear data and model used in the existing Monte Carlo codes are not well evaluated because of very few experimental data. It is therefore strongly needed to do the deep penetration experiment as shielding benchmark for investigating the calculation accuracy. Under this circumference, we performed the following two shielding experiments through concrete and iron, one with a 800 MeV proton accelerator of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), England and the other with a high energy heavy iron accelerator of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan. Here these two shielding benchmark experiments are outlined.

  5. Shielded Canister Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Eidem, G.G. Jr.; Fages, R.

    1993-08-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) will produce canisters filled with high-level radioactive waste immobilized in borosilicate glass. This report discusses a Shielded Canister Transporter (SCT) which will provide the means for safe transportation and handling of the canisters from the Vitrification Building to the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The stainless steel canisters are 0.61 meters in diameter, 3.0 meters tall, and weigh approximately 2,135 kilograms, with a maximum exterior surface dose rate of 90,000 R/hr. The canisters are placed into storage tubes to a maximum of three tall (two for overpack canisters) with an impact limiter placed at the tube bottom and between each canister. A floor plug seals the top of the storage tube at the operating floor level of the CSB.

  6. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1962-09-25

    A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

  7. Shielding and fragmentation studies.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, C; Guetersloh, S; Heilbronn, L; Miller, J

    2005-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry for manned spaced missions depends on the ability to adequately describe the process of high-energy ion transport through many materials. Since the types of possible nuclear interactions are many and complex, transport models are used which depend upon a reliable source of experimental data. To expand the heavy ion database used in the models we have been measuring charge-changing cross sections and fragment production cross sections from heavy-ion interactions in various elementa targets. These include materials flown on space missions such as carbon and aluminium, as well as those important in radiation dosimetry such as hydrogen, nitrogen and water. Measuring heavy-ion fragmentation through these targets also gives us the ability to determine the effectiveness of new materials proposed for shielding such as graphite composites and polyethylene hybrids. Measurement without a target present gives an indication of the level of contamination of the primary beam, which is also important in radiobiology experiments. PMID:16604611

  8. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    DOEpatents

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  9. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  10. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  11. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  12. SEU43 fuel bundle shielding analysis during spent fuel transport

    SciTech Connect

    Margeanu, C. A.; Ilie, P.; Olteanu, G.

    2006-07-01

    The basic task accomplished by the shielding calculations in a nuclear safety analysis consist in radiation doses calculation, in order to prevent any risks both for personnel protection and impact on the environment during the spent fuel manipulation, transport and storage. The paper investigates the effects induced by fuel bundle geometry modifications on the CANDU SEU spent fuel shielding analysis during transport. For this study, different CANDU-SEU43 fuel bundle projects, developed in INR Pitesti, have been considered. The spent fuel characteristics will be obtained by means of ORIGEN-S code. In order to estimate the corresponding radiation doses for different measuring points the Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code will be used. Both codes are included in ORNL's SCALE 5 programs package. A comparison between the considered SEU43 fuel bundle projects will be also provided, with CANDU standard fuel bundle taken as reference. (authors)

  13. Homogeneous versus heterogeneous shielding modeling of spent-fuel casks

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, J.J.; Lindner, C.N. )

    1992-01-01

    The design of spent-fuel casks for storage and transport requires modeling the cask for criticality, shielding, thermal, and structural analyses. While some parts of the cask are homogeneous, other regions are heterogeneous with different materials intermixed. For simplicity, some of the heterogeneous regions may be modeled as homogeneous. This paper evaluates the effect of homogenizing some regions of a cask on calculating radiation dose rates outside the cask. The dose rate calculations were performed with the one-dimensional discrete ordinates shielding XSDRNPM code coupled with the XSDOSE code and with the three-dimensional QAD-CGGP code. Dose rates were calculated radially at the midplane of the cask at two locations, cask surface and 2.3 m from the radial surface. The last location corresponds to a point 2 m from the lateral sides of a transport railroad car.

  14. Design and Analysis of the Thermal Shield of EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Han; Liao, Ziying

    2008-04-01

    EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) is a tokamak with superconducting toroidal and poloidal magnets operated at 4.5 K. In order to reduce the thermal load applied on the surfaces of all cryogenically cooled components and keep the heat load of the cryogenic system at a minimum, a continuous radiation shield system located between the magnet system and warm components is adopted. The main loads to which the thermal shield system is subjected are gravity, seismic, electromagnetic and thermal gradients. This study employed NASTRAN and ANSYS finite element codes to analyze the stress under a spectrum of loading conditions and combinations, providing a theoretical basis for an optimization design of the structure.

  15. Performance of solar shields. [Skylab 1 micrometeoroid shield difficulties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab 1 about 63 seconds after lift-off, was the catalyst for a prodigious effort to develop a substitute for the passive portion of the thermal control system. An intensive effort is described in which numerous potential thermal shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material memory properties. Specifically addressed are thermal shield materials selection criteria and the design, development, and test requirements associated with the successful development of Skylab thermal shields, and specifically the two thermal shields subsequently deployed over the exposed gold foil skin of the Orbital Workshop. Also considered are the general performance and thermal improvements provided by both the parasol design deployed by the Skylab 1 crew, and the sail design deployed by the Skylab 2 crew.

  16. Estimation of ex-core detector responses by adjoint Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogenboom, J. E.

    2006-07-01

    Ex-core detector responses can be efficiently calculated by combining an adjoint Monte Carlo calculation with the converged source distribution of a forward Monte Carlo calculation. As the fission source distribution from a Monte Carlo calculation is given only as a collection of discrete space positions, the coupling requires a point flux estimator for each collision in the adjoint calculation. To avoid the infinite variance problems of the point flux estimator, a next-event finite-variance point flux estimator has been applied, witch is an energy dependent form for heterogeneous media of a finite-variance estimator known from the literature. To test the effects of this combined adjoint-forward calculation a simple geometry of a homogeneous core with a reflector was adopted with a small detector in the reflector. To demonstrate the potential of the method the continuous-energy adjoint Monte Carlo technique with anisotropic scattering was implemented with energy dependent absorption and fission cross sections and constant scattering cross section. A gain in efficiency over a completely forward calculation of the detector response was obtained, which is strongly dependent on the specific system and especially the size and position of the ex-core detector and the energy range considered. Further improvements are possible. The method works without problems for small detectors, even for a point detector and a small or even zero energy range. (authors)

  17. Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint methods for reactive transport in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.E.; Wang, Hong

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we present Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint methods (ELLAM) to solve convection-diffusion-reaction equations governing contaminant transport in groundwater flowing through an adsorbing porous medium. These ELLAM schemes can treat various combinations of boundary conditions and conserve mass. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the strong potential of ELLAM schemes.

  18. Sensitivity analysis of a model of CO2 exchange in tundra ecosystems by the adjoint method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waelbroek, C.; Louis, J.-F.

    1995-01-01

    A model of net primary production (NPP), decomposition, and nitrogen cycling in tundra ecosystems has been developed. The adjoint technique is used to study the sensitivity of the computed annual net CO2 flux to perturbation in initial conditions, climatic inputs, and model's main parameters describing current seasonal CO2 exchange in wet sedge tundra at Barrow, Alaska. The results show that net CO2 flux is most sensitive to parameters characterizing litter chemical composition and more sensitive to decomposition parameters than to NPP parameters. This underlines the fact that in nutrient-limited ecosystems, decomposition drives net CO2 exchange by controlling mineralization of main nutrients. The results also indicate that the short-term (1 year) response of wet sedge tundra to CO2-induced warming is a significant increase in CO2 emission, creating a positive feedback to atmosphreic CO2 accumulation. However, a cloudiness increase during the same year can severely alter this response and lead to either a slight decrease or a strong increase in emitted CO2, depending on its exact timing. These results demonstrate that the adjoint method is well suited to study systems encountering regime changes, as a single run of the adjoint model provides sensitivities of the net CO2 flux to perturbations in all parameters and variables at any time of the year. Moreover, it is shown that large errors due to the presence of thresholds can be avoided by first delimiting the range of applicability of the adjoint results.

  19. Canonical quantization of lattice Higgs-Maxwell-Chern-Simons fields: Krein Self-adjointness

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Daniel A.; Challifour, John L.

    2006-10-15

    It is shown how techniques from constructive quantum field theory may be applied to indefinite metric gauge theories in Hilbert space for the case of a Higgs-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory on a lattice. The Hamiltonian operator is shown to be Krein essentially self-adjoint by means of unbounded but Krein unitary transformations relating the Hamiltonian to an essentially maximal accretive operator.

  20. Using adjoint-based optimization to study wing flexibility in flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Mingjun; Xu, Min; Dong, Haibo

    2014-11-01

    In the study of flapping-wing flight of birds and insects, it is important to understand the impact of wing flexibility/deformation on aerodynamic performance. However, the large control space from the complexity of wing deformation and kinematics makes usual parametric study very difficult or sometimes impossible. Since the adjoint-based approach for sensitivity study and optimization strategy is a process with its cost independent of the number of input parameters, it becomes an attractive approach in our study. Traditionally, adjoint equation and sensitivity are derived in a fluid domain with fixed solid boundaries. Moving boundary is only allowed when its motion is not part of control effort. Otherwise, the derivation becomes either problematic or too complex to be feasible. Using non-cylindrical calculus to deal with boundary deformation solves this problem in a very simple and still mathematically rigorous manner. Thus, it allows to apply adjoint-based optimization in the study of flapping wing flexibility. We applied the ``improved'' adjoint-based method to study the flexibility of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flapping wings, where the flapping trajectory and deformation are described by either model functions or real data from the flight of dragonflies. Supported by AFOSR.

  1. Multiple Moment Tensor Inversions For the December 26, 2004 Sumatra Earthquake Based Upon Adjoint Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Liu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    We present multiple moment-tensor solution of the December 26, 2004 Sumatra earthquake based upon adjoint methods. An objective function Φ that measures the goodness of waveform fit between data and synthetics is minimized. Synthetics are calculated by spectral-element simulations (SPECFEM3D_GLOBE) in a 3D global earth model S362ANI to reduce the effect of heterogeneous structures. The Fréchet derivatives of Φ in the form δΦ = ∫T ∫VI(ɛ †ij)(x,T-t) δ(m_dot)ij(x,t)d3xdt, where δmij is the perturbation of moment density function and I(ɛ†ij)(x,T-t) denotes the time-integrated adjoint strain tensor, are calculated based upon adjoint methods implemented in SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. Our initial source model is obtained by monitoring the time-integrated adjoint strain tensors in the vicinity of the presumed source region. Source model parameters are iteratively updated by a preconditioned conjugate-gradient method to iteratively utilizing the calculated Φ and δΦ values. Our final inversion results show both similarities to and differences from previous source inversion results based on 1D background models.

  2. Multiple Moment Tensor Inversions For the December 26, 2004 Sumatra Earthquake Based Upon Adjoint Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Liu, Q.; Hjörleifsdóttir, V.

    2010-12-01

    We present multiple moment-tensor solution of the Dec 26, 2004 Sumatra earthquake based upon the adjoint methods. An objective function Φ(m), where m is the multiple source model, measures the goodness of waveform fit between data and synthetics. The Fréchet derivatives of Φ in the form δΦ = ∫∫I(ɛ†)(x,T-t)δmij_dot(x,t)dVdt, where δmij is the source model perturbation and I(ɛ†)(x,T-t) denotes the time-integrated adjoint strain tensor, are calculated based upon adjoint methods and spectral-element simulations (SPECFEM3D_GLOBE) in a 3D global earth model S362ANI. Our initial source model is obtained independently by monitoring the time-integrated adjoint strain tensors around the presumed source region. We then utilize the Φ and δΦ calculations in a conjugate-gradient method to iteratively invert for the source model. Our final inversion results show both similarities with and differences to previous source inversion results based on 1D earth models.

  3. On the proper treatment of grid sensitivities in continuous adjoint methods for shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavvadias, I. S.; Papoutsis-Kiachagias, E. M.; Giannakoglou, K. C.

    2015-11-01

    The continuous adjoint method for shape optimization problems, in flows governed by the Navier-Stokes equations, can be formulated in two different ways, each of which leads to a different expression for the sensitivity derivatives of the objective function with respect to the control variables. The first formulation leads to an expression including only boundary integrals; it, thus, has low computational cost but, when used with coarse grids, its accuracy becomes questionable. The second formulation comprises a sum of boundary and field integrals; due to the field integrals, it has noticeably higher computational cost, obtaining though higher accuracy. In this paper, the equivalence of the two formulations is revisited from the mathematical and, particularly, the numerical point of view. Internal and external aerodynamics cases, in which the objective function is either the total pressure losses or the force exerted on a solid body, are examined and differences in the computed gradients are discussed. After identifying the reason behind these discrepancies, the adjoint formulation is enhanced by the adjoint to a (hypothetical) grid displacement model and the new approach is proved to reproduce the accuracy of the second adjoint formulation while maintaining the low cost of the first one.

  4. NEUTRON ABSORPTION AND SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-06-21

    A neutron absorption and shielding device is described which is adapted for mounting in a radiation shielding wall surrounding a radioactive area through which instrumentation leads and the like may safely pass without permitting gamma or neutron radiation to pass to the exterior. The shielding device comprises a container having at least one nonrectilinear tube or passageway means extending therethrough, which is adapted to contain instrumentation leads or the like, a layer of a substance capable of absorbing gamma rays, and a solid resinous composition adapted to attenuate fast-moving neutrons and capture slow- moving or thermal neutrons.

  5. New Materials for EMI Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite fibers intercalated with bromine or similar mixed halogen compounds have substantially lower resistivity than their pristine counterparts, and thus should exhibit higher shielding effectiveness against electromagnetic interference. The mechanical and thermal properties are nearly unaffected, and the shielding of high energy x-rays and gamma rays is substantially increased. Characterization of the resistivity of the composite materials is subtle, but it is clear that the composite resistivity is substantially lowered. Shielding effectiveness calculations utilizing a simple rule of mixtures model yields results that are consistent with available data on these materials.

  6. Two-leg longwall shield mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    This report investigates shield mechanics by describing the elastic response and interaction of shield components to applied vertical and horizontal displacements for various canopy and base contact configurations. This research provides information on generalized shield mechanics, which is applicable in describing the behavior of all two-leg shield supports. Utilizing mechanics of materials concepts and known kinematic relationships for two-leg shield supports, free-body diagrams are constructed for each shield component illustrating internal axial, shear, and bending moment responses required to maintain equilibrium for each load case evaluated. Predicted shield (component) responses are verified by controlled displacements of instrumented longwall shields in a mine roof simulator. Conclusions drawn from these analyses indicate shield structural responses are significantly dependent upon canopy and base contact configurations. Applications of shield mechanics to in situ support monitoring are discussed. An objective of this research program is to establish unique shield responses to identify in situ load conditions.

  7. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  8. Evaluation Of Shielding Efficacy Of A Ferrite Containing Ceramic Material

    SciTech Connect

    Verst, C.

    2015-10-12

    The shielding evaluation of the ferrite based Mitsuishi ceramic material has produced for several radiation sources and possible shielding sizes comparative dose attenuation measurements and simulated projections. High resolution gamma spectroscopy provided uncollided and scattered photon spectra at three energies, confirming theoretical estimates of the ceramic’s mass attenuation coefficient, μ/ρ. High level irradiation experiments were performed using Co-60, Cs-137, and Cf-252 sources to measure penetrating dose rates through steel, lead, concrete, and the provided ceramic slabs. The results were used to validate the radiation transport code MCNP6 which was then used to generate dose rate attenuation curves as a function of shielding material, thickness, and mass for photons and neutrons ranging in energy from 200 keV to 2 MeV.

  9. Optimization of Neutron Shielding for the PICASSO Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, S.; Aubin, F.; Auger, M.; Genest, M.-H.; Giroux, G.; Gornea, R.; Faust, R.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, L.; Martin, J.-P.; Kumaratunga, S.; Piro, M.-C.; Starinski, N.; Zacek, V.; Behnke, E.; Levine, I.; Shepherd, T.; Beltran, B.; Krauss, C.; MacDonald, R.

    2009-11-09

    The PICASSO experiment searches WIMPs via their spin-dependent interactions with nuclei. At their operating temperatures, PICASSO threshold detectors are not sensitive to {gamma}-rays, while it is necessary to suppress neutron and {alpha}-ray backgrounds. The different types of neutron shielding (water, polyethylene, borated water and polyethylene doped with different compounds of boron and lithium) were studied via the Monte Carlo method using MCNPX code. Efficiencies of these different types of neutron shielding were compared from the point of view of neutron suppression as well as number of newly born y-rays. The neutrons and {gamma}-rays were followed up to the PICASSO detector active material. The most suitable neutron shielding for the PICASSO experiment was determined following these simulations.

  10. Shield weight optimization using Monte Carlo transport calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.; Wohl, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines are given of the theory used in FASTER-3 Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in complex geometries. The code has the additional capability of calculating the minimum weight layered unit shield configuration which will meet a specified dose rate constraint. It includes the treatment of geometric regions bounded by quadratic and quardric surfaces with multiple radiation sources which have a specified space, angle, and energy dependence. The program calculates, using importance sampling, the resulting number and energy fluxes at specified point, surface, and volume detectors. Results are presented for sample problems involving primary neutron and both primary and secondary photon transport in a spherical reactor shield configuration. These results include the optimization of the shield configuration.

  11. International Space Station (ISS) Meteoroid/Orbital Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    1999-01-01

    Design practices to provide protection for International Space Station (ISS) crew and critical equipment from meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) Impacts have been developed. Damage modes and failure criteria are defined for each spacecraft system. Hypervolocity Impact -1 - and analyses are used to develop ballistic limit equations (BLEs) for each exposed spacecraft system. BLEs define Impact particle sizes that result in threshold failure of a particular spacecraft system as a function of Impact velocity, angles and particle density. The BUMPER computer code Is used to determine the probability of no penetration (PNP) that falls the spacecraft shielding based on NASA standard meteoroid/debris models, a spacecraft geometry model, and the BLEs. BUMPER results are used to verify spacecraft shielding requirements Low-weight, high-performance shielding alternatives have been developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HITF) to meet spacecraft protection requirements.

  12. Composite Aerogel Multifoil Protective Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies are needed to survive the temperatures, radiation, and hypervelocity particles that exploration spacecraft encounter. Multilayer insulations (MLIs) have been used on many spacecraft as thermal insulation. Other materials and composites have been used as micrometeorite shielding or radiation shielding. However, no material composite has been developed and employed as a combined thermal insulation, micrometeorite, and radiation shielding. By replacing the scrims that have been used to separate the foil layers in MLIs with various aerogels, and by using a variety of different metal foils, the overall protective performance of MLIs can be greatly expanded to act as thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and hypervelocity particle shielding. Aerogels are highly porous, low-density solids that are produced by the gelation of metal alkoxides and supercritical drying. Aerogels have been flown in NASA missions as a hypervelocity particle capture medium (Stardust) and as thermal insulation (2003 MER). Composite aerogel multifoil protective shielding would be used to provide thermal insulation, while also shielding spacecraft or components from radiation and hypervelocity particle impacts. Multiple layers of foil separated by aerogel would act as a thermal barrier by preventing the transport of heat energy through the composite. The silica aerogel would act as a convective and conductive thermal barrier, while the titania powder and metal foils would absorb and reflect the radiative heat. It would also capture small hypervelocity particles, such as micrometeorites, since it would be a stuffed, multi-shock Whipple shield. The metal foil layers would slow and break up the impacting particles, while the aerogel layers would convert the kinetic energy of the particles to thermal and mechanical energy and stop the particles.

  13. Systematic evaluation of neutron shielding effects for materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, K.; Ohashi, A.; Nariyama, N.; Nagayama, S.; Fujita, T.; Hattori, K.; Anayama, Y.

    1996-11-01

    Three types of experiments with a {sup 252}Cf neutron source are proposed to evaluate systematically the neutron shielding effects of a material. The type 1 experiment deals with each shielding material alone, the type 2 experiment combines a shielding material and a structural material, and the type 3 experiment constructs the optimization with the materials used in the type 2 experiment. In the stainless steel (SS) + polyethylene shielding system, because of the location of the SS slabs at the source side, the tenth layer of the polyethylene becomes approximately one-half the value as when the polyethylene is employed alone. This is the enhancement effect of the SS. In the type 3 experiment, the total thickness of the SS + polyethylene shielding system is 40 cm, and the total thicknesses of the SS and the polyethylene slabs are fixed at 25 and 15 cm thick, respectively. The minimum total dose-equivalent rate (neutron + secondary gamma rays) is observed when the polyethylene slabs are located at a 20-cm depth from the source side, with an arrangement of 20-cm-thick SS + 15-cm-thick polyethylene + 5-cm-thick and SS, and with a ratio of the maximum to the minimum dose-equivalent rate of 2.5. The shielding optimization can be constructed by combining the materials having different shielding characteristics. The experimental results of the three types of experiments are reproduced fairly well by using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP 4A with a next-event surface crossing estimator.

  14. Parameterizations for shielding electron accelerators based on Monte Carlo studies

    SciTech Connect

    P. Degtyarenko; G. Stapleton

    1996-10-01

    Numerous recipes for designing lateral slab neutron shielding for electron accelerators are available and each generally produces rather similar results for shield thicknesses of about 2 m of concrete and for electron beams with energy in the 1 to 10 GeV region. For thinner or much thicker shielding the results tend to diverge and the standard recipes require modification. Likewise for geometries other than lateral to the beam direction further corrections are required so that calculated results are less reliable and hence additional and costly conservatism is needed. With the adoption of Monte Carlo (MC) methods of transporting particles a much more powerful way of calculating radiation dose rates outside shielding becomes available. This method is not constrained by geometry, although deep penetration problems need special statistical treatment, and is an excellent approach to solving any radiation transport problem providing the method has been properly checked against measurements and is free from the well known errors common to such computer methods. This present paper utilizes the results of MC calculations based on a nuclear fragmentation model named DINREG using the MC transport code GEANT and models them with the normal two parameter shielding expressions. Because the parameters can change with electron beam energy, angle to the electron beam direction and target material, the parameters are expressed as functions of some of these variables to provide a universal equations for shielding electron beams which can used rather simply for deep penetration problems in simple geometry without the time consuming computations needed in the original MC programs. A particular problem with using simple parameterizations based on the uncollided flux is that approximations based on spherical geometry might not apply to the more common cylindrical cases used for accelerator shielding. This source of error has been discussed at length by Stevenson and others. To study

  15. Radiation shielding and dosimetry experiments updates in the SINBAD database.

    PubMed

    Kodeli, I; Hunter, H; Sartori, E

    2005-01-01

    The Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive Database (SINBAD) is an internationally established set of radiation shielding and dosimetry data related to experiments relevant in reactor shielding, fusion blanket neutronics and accelerator shielding. In addition to the characterisation of the radiation source, it describes shielding materials and instrumentation and the relevant detectors. The experimental results, be it dose or reaction rates, or unfolded spectra, are presented in tabular ASCII form that can easily be exported to different computer environments for further use. Most sets in SINBAD also contain the computer model used for the interpretation of the experiment and, where available, results from uncertainty analysis. This is an international effort between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (http://www.nea.fr/html/databank/) (OECD/NEA Data Bank) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (http://www-rsicc.ornl.gov/rsic.html) (ORNL/RSICC). Cooperation from many organisations, authors and benchmark analysts have helped SINBAD become a 'living database'--one which involves continuous information updates, preservation and additions of nuclear benchmarks in the areas of fusion, fission and accelerator science and engineering. This paper focuses on the increased comprehensiveness of experiments that have been carried out in recent years and the validation of computer code and cross section library using these experiments. PMID:16604698

  16. Magnetic shielding for interplanetary spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.; Merrill, B.J.

    1991-12-01

    The protection of spacecraft crews from the radiation produced by high energy electrons, protons and heavier ions in the space environment is a major health concern on long duration missions. Conventional approaches to radiation shielding in space have relied on thicker spacecraft walls to stop the high energy charged particles and to absorb the resulting gamma and bremsstrahlung photons. The shielding concept described here uses superconducting magnets to deflect charged particles before they collide with the spacecraft, thus avoiding the production of secondary particles. A number of spacecraft configurations and sizes have been analyzed, ranging from a small ``storm cellar`` for use during solar flares to continuous shielding for space stations having a crew of 15--25. The effectiveness of the magnetic shielding has been analyzed using a Monte Carlo program with incident proton energies from 0.5 to 1000 MeV. Typically the shield deflects 35--99 percent of the incident particles, depending, of course on particle energy and magnetic field strength. Further evaluation studies have been performed to assess weight comparisons between magnetic and conventional shielding; to determine magnet current distributions which minimize the magnetic field within the spacecraft itself; and to assess the potential role of ceramic superconductors. 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Magnetic shielding for interplanetary spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.; Merrill, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    The protection of spacecraft crews from the radiation produced by high energy electrons, protons and heavier ions in the space environment is a major health concern on long duration missions. Conventional approaches to radiation shielding in space have relied on thicker spacecraft walls to stop the high energy charged particles and to absorb the resulting gamma and bremsstrahlung photons. The shielding concept described here uses superconducting magnets to deflect charged particles before they collide with the spacecraft, thus avoiding the production of secondary particles. A number of spacecraft configurations and sizes have been analyzed, ranging from a small storm cellar'' for use during solar flares to continuous shielding for space stations having a crew of 15--25. The effectiveness of the magnetic shielding has been analyzed using a Monte Carlo program with incident proton energies from 0.5 to 1000 MeV. Typically the shield deflects 35--99 percent of the incident particles, depending, of course on particle energy and magnetic field strength. Further evaluation studies have been performed to assess weight comparisons between magnetic and conventional shielding; to determine magnet current distributions which minimize the magnetic field within the spacecraft itself; and to assess the potential role of ceramic superconductors. 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Integral Face Shield Concept for Firefighter's Helmet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeles, F.; Hansberry, E.; Himel, V.

    1982-01-01

    Stowable face shield could be made integral part of helmet worn by firefighters. Shield, made from same tough clear plastic as removable face shields presently used, would be pivoted at temples to slide up inside helmet when not needed. Stowable face shield, being stored in helmet, is always available, ready for use, and is protected when not being used.

  19. Magnetic Shield for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso C.; Haddad, Nicolas E.

    2013-01-01

    A new method was developed for creating a less expensive shield for ADRs using 1018 carbon steel. This shield has been designed to have similar performance to the expensive vanadium permendur shields, but the cost is 30 to 50% less. Also, these shields can be stocked in a variety of sizes, eliminating the need for special forgings, which also greatly reduces cost.

  20. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

    2014-03-04

    A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  1. Transient heat flux shielding using thermal metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana, Supradeep; Savo, Salvatore; Sato, Yuki

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a heat shield based on a metamaterial engineering approach to shield a region from transient diffusive heat flow. The shield is designed with a multilayered structure to prescribe the appropriate spatial profile for heat capacity, density, and thermal conductivity of the effective medium. The heat shield was experimentally compared to other isotropic materials.

  2. The Integrated TIGER Series Codes

    2006-01-15

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with anmore » input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and intemal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2) multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes, (4) a general purpose geometry engine for linking with CAD or other geometry formats, and (5) the Cholla facet geometry library. Moreover, the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.« less

  3. The Integrated TIGER Series Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Kensek, Ronald P.; Franke, Brian C.; Laub, Thomas W.

    2006-01-15

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and intemal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2) multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes, (4) a general purpose geometry engine for linking with CAD or other geometry formats, and (5) the Cholla facet geometry library. Moreover, the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  4. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, Paul E.

    1976-06-15

    1. The combination with a plurality of parallel horizontal members arranged in horizontal and vertical rows, the spacing of the members in all horizontal rows being equal throughout, the spacing of the members in all vertical rows being equal throughout; of a shield for a nuclear reactor comprising two layers of rectangular blocks through which the members pass generally perpendicularly to the layers, each block in each layer having for one of the members an opening equally spaced from vertical sides of the block and located closer to the top of the block than the bottom thereof, whereby gravity tends to make each block rotate about the associated member to a position in which the vertical sides of the block are truly vertical, the openings in all the blocks of one layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, the openings in all the blocks of the other layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, which spacing is different from the corresponding spacing in the said one layer, all the blocks of both layers having the same vertical dimension or length, the blocks of both layers consisting of relatively wide blocks and relatively narrow blocks, all the narrow blocks having the same horizontal dimension or width which is less than the horizontal dimension or width of the wide blocks, which is the same throughout, each layer consisting of vertical rows of narrow blocks and wide blocks alternating with one another, each vertical row of narrow blocks of each layer being covered by a vertical row of wide blocks of the other layer which wide blocks receive the same vertical row of members as the said each vertical row of narrow blocks, whereby the rectangular perimeters of each block of each layer is completely out of register with that of each block in the other layer.

  5. Analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment are presented. The experiment was performed in 1986 at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. It is the first of six experiments in this cooperative Japanese and American program in support of shielding designs for advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Six different shielding configurations and subconfigurations thereof were studied. The configurations were calculated with the DOT-IV two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport computer code using the R-Z geometry option, a symmetric S{sub 12} quadrature (96 directions), and cross sections from ENDF/B versions IV and V in either a 51- or 61-group structure. Auxiliary codes were used to compute detector responses and prepare cross sections and source input for the DOT-IV calculations. Calculated detector responses were compared with measured responses and the agreement was good to excellent in many cases. However, the agreement for configurations having thick steel or B{sub 4}C regions or for some very large configurations was fair to poor. The disagreement was attributed to cross-section data, broad-group structure, or high background in the measurements. In particular, it is shown that two cross-section sets for ``B give very different results for neutron transmission through the thick B{sub 4}C regions used in one set of experimental configurations. Implications for design calculations are given.

  6. Identification of an unknown material in a radiation shield using the schwinger inverse method.

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, J. A.; Bledsoe, K. C.

    2004-01-01

    The Schwinger method for solving inverse gamma-ray transport problems was proposed in a previous paper. The method is iterative and requires a set of uncoupled forward and adjoint transport calculations in each iteration. In this paper, the Schwinger inverse method is applied to the problem of identifying an unknown material in a radiation shield by calculating its total macroscopic photon cross sections. The gamma source is known and the total (angle-independent) gamma leakage is measured. In numerical one-dimensional spherical and slab test problems, the Schwinger inverse method successfully calculated the photon cross sections of an unknown material. Material identification was successfully achieved by comparing the calculated cross sections with those in a precomputed material cross section library, although there was some ambiguity when realistic measurements were used. The Schwinger inverse method compared very favorably with the standard single energy transmission technique (SET).

  7. X-Ray Computed Tomography Inspection of the Stardust Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Karen M.; Schneberk, Daniel J.; Empey, Daniel M.; Koshti, Ajay; Pugel, D. Elizabeth; Cozmuta, Ioana; Stackpoole, Mairead; Ruffino, Norman P.; Pompa, Eddie C.; Oliveras, Ovidio; Kontinos, Dean A.

    2010-01-01

    The "Stardust" heat shield, composed of a PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) Thermal Protection System (TPS), bonded to a composite aeroshell, contains important features which chronicle its time in space as well as re-entry. To guide the further study of the Stardust heat shield, NASA reviewed a number of techniques for inspection of the article. The goals of the inspection were: 1) to establish the material characteristics of the shield and shield components, 2) record the dimensions of shield components and assembly as compared with the pre-flight condition, 3) provide flight infonnation for validation and verification of the FIAT ablation code and PICA material property model and 4) through the evaluation of the shield material provide input to future missions which employ similar materials. Industrial X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a 3D inspection technology which can provide infonnation on material integrity, material properties (density) and dimensional measurements of the heat shield components. Computed tomographic volumetric inspections can generate a dimensionally correct, quantitatively accurate volume of the shield assembly. Because of the capabilities offered by X-ray CT, NASA chose to use this method to evaluate the Stardust heat shield. Personnel at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Lawrence Livermore National Labs (LLNL) recently performed a full scan of the Stardust heat shield using a newly installed X-ray CT system at JSC. This paper briefly discusses the technology used and then presents the following results: 1. CT scans derived dimensions and their comparisons with as-built dimensions anchored with data obtained from samples cut from the heat shield; 2. Measured density variation, char layer thickness, recession and bond line (the adhesive layer between the PICA and the aeroshell) integrity; 3. FIAT predicted recession, density and char layer profiles as well as bondline temperatures Finally suggestions are made as to future uses

  8. The continuous adjoint approach to the k-ω SST turbulence model with applications in shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavvadias, I. S.; Papoutsis-Kiachagias, E. M.; Dimitrakopoulos, G.; Giannakoglou, K. C.

    2015-11-01

    In this article, the gradient of aerodynamic objective functions with respect to design variables, in problems governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the k-ω SST turbulence model, is computed using the continuous adjoint method, for the first time. Shape optimization problems for minimizing drag, in external aerodynamics (flows around isolated airfoils), or viscous losses in internal aerodynamics (duct flows) are considered. Sensitivity derivatives computed with the proposed adjoint method are compared to those computed with finite differences or a continuous adjoint variant based on the frequently used assumption of frozen turbulence; the latter proves the need for differentiating the turbulence model. Geometries produced by optimization runs performed with sensitivities computed by the proposed method and the 'frozen turbulence' assumption are also compared to quantify the gain from formulating and solving the adjoint to the turbulence model equations.

  9. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  10. JEF-2 data check by reanalysis of the Rossendorf experiments in reactor configurations with specially designed adjoint spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Dietze, K.; Fort, E.; Rahlfs, S.; Rimpault, G.; Salvatores, M.

    1994-12-31

    The Rossendorf RRRJSEG configurations characterized by, energy-independent or continuously rising adjoint spectra have been recalculated using the full European scheme JEF2/ECCO/ERANOS. C/E-values are given for structural materials and fission product nuclides using the results of sample reactivity measurements at the central position of these configurations. Due to the specially designed adjoint spectra, capture or scattering cross- sections can be checked separately. Recommendations for data corrections are given based on perturbation theory calculations.

  11. Preliminary shielding assessment for the 100 MeV proton linac (KOMAC).

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Ouk; Cho, Y S; Chang, J

    2005-01-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project is building the Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex facilities from 2002 to 2012, which consists of a high-current 100 MeV proton linear accelerator and various beam-lines. This paper provides a preliminary estimate of the shielding required for the 20 mA proton linac and the beam-dump. For an accurate information on secondary neutron production from the guiding magnet and primary heat sink of the beam dump, proton-induced 63Cu and 65Cu cross section data were evaluated and applied to shielding calculations. The required thickness of the concrete was assessed by a simple line-of-sight model for the lateral shielding of the beam-line and the full shielding of the beam dump. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed using the MCNPX code to obtain the source term and attenuation coefficients for the three-dimensional lateral shielding model of the beam-line. PMID:16381787

  12. Radiation protection effectiveness of a proposed magnetic shielding concept for manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, J. L.; Nealy, John E.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness of a proposed concept for shielding a manned Mars vehicle using a confined magnetic field configuration is evaluated by computing estimated crew radiation exposures resulting from galactic cosmic rays and a large solar flare event. In the study the incident radiation spectra are transported through the spacecraft structure/magnetic shield using the deterministic space radiation transport computer codes developed at Langley Research Center. The calculated exposures unequivocally demonstrate that magnetic shielding could provide an effective barrier against solar flare protons but is virtually transparent to the more energetic galactic cosmic rays. It is then demonstrated that through proper selection of materials and shield configuration, adequate and reliable bulk material shielding can be provided for the same total mass as needed to generate and support the more risky magnetic field configuration.

  13. N-SAP and G-SAP neutron and gamma ray albedo model scatter shield analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapovchak, B. J.; Stephenson, L. D.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program calculates neutron or gamma ray first order scattering from a plane or cylindrical surface to a detector point. The SAP Codes, G-SAP and N-SAP, constitute a multiple scatter albedo model shield analysis.

  14. Active adjoint modeling method in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography for breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaozhang; Zhao, Zhiqin; Wang, Jinguo; Chen, Guoping; Liu, Qing Huo

    2014-07-01

    To improve the model-based inversion performance of microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography for breast tumor imaging, an active adjoint modeling (AAM) method is proposed. It aims to provide a more realistic breast acoustic model used for tumor inversion as the background by actively measuring and reconstructing the structural heterogeneity of human breast environment. It utilizes the reciprocity of acoustic sensors, and adapts the adjoint tomography method from seismic exploration. With the reconstructed acoustic model of breast environment, the performance of model-based inversion method such as time reversal mirror is improved significantly both in contrast and accuracy. To prove the advantage of AAM, a checkerboard pattern model and anatomical realistic breast models have been used in full wave numerical simulations. PMID:24956614

  15. Adjoint Airfoil Optimization of Darrieus-Type Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Roman; Nordborg, Henrik

    2012-11-01

    We present the feasibility of using an adjoint solver to optimize the torque of a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). We start with a 2D cross section of a symmetrical airfoil and restrict us to low solidity ratios to minimize blade vortex interactions. The adjoint solver of the ANSYS FLUENT software package computes the sensitivities of airfoil surface forces based on a steady flow field. Hence, we find the torque of a full revolution using a weighted average of the sensitivities at different wind speeds and angles of attack. The weights are computed analytically, and the range of angles of attack is given by the tip speed ratio. Then the airfoil geometry is evolved, and the proposed methodology is evaluated by transient simulations.

  16. Efficient Construction of Discrete Adjoint Operators on Unstructured Grids Using Complex Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Kleb, William L.

    2005-01-01

    A methodology is developed and implemented to mitigate the lengthy software development cycle typically associated with constructing a discrete adjoint solver for aerodynamic simulations. The approach is based on a complex-variable formulation that enables straightforward differentiation of complicated real-valued functions. An automated scripting process is used to create the complex-variable form of the set of discrete equations. An efficient method for assembling the residual and cost function linearizations is developed. The accuracy of the implementation is verified through comparisons with a discrete direct method as well as a previously developed handcoded discrete adjoint approach. Comparisons are also shown for a large-scale configuration to establish the computational efficiency of the present scheme. To ultimately demonstrate the power of the approach, the implementation is extended to high temperature gas flows in chemical nonequilibrium. Finally, several fruitful research and development avenues enabled by the current work are suggested.

  17. Efficient Construction of Discrete Adjoint Operators on Unstructured Grids by Using Complex Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Kleb, William L.

    2005-01-01

    A methodology is developed and implemented to mitigate the lengthy software development cycle typically associated with constructing a discrete adjoint solver for aerodynamic simulations. The approach is based on a complex-variable formulation that enables straightforward differentiation of complicated real-valued functions. An automated scripting process is used to create the complex-variable form of the set of discrete equations. An efficient method for assembling the residual and cost function linearizations is developed. The accuracy of the implementation is verified through comparisons with a discrete direct method as well as a previously developed handcoded discrete adjoint approach. Comparisons are also shown for a large-scale configuration to establish the computational efficiency of the present scheme. To ultimately demonstrate the power of the approach, the implementation is extended to high temperature gas flows in chemical nonequilibrium. Finally, several fruitful research and development avenues enabled by the current work are suggested.

  18. Adjoint-based optimal control of an airfoil in gusting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeesoon; Colonius, Tim; California Institute of Technology Team

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we apply optimal control to an airfoil in gusting flow to investigate the possibility of extracting energy. The gradients of an objective function are obtained via the adjoint method and used to minimize the cost. The immersed boundary projection method is used for our forward solver, and the relevant adjoint equations are derived by the discrete-then-differentiate approach. Translational gusts are generated by a body force in the computational domain upstream to the body, and the method finds the optimal angles of the airfoil that exploits the greatest amount of energy. The influence of a vortex traversing an airfoil is also investigated and optimized to reduce the fluctuating lift.

  19. An Exact Dual Adjoint Solution Method for Turbulent Flows on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Lu, James; Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm for solving the discrete adjoint system based on an unstructured-grid discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The method is constructed such that an adjoint solution exactly dual to a direct differentiation approach is recovered at each time step, yielding a convergence rate which is asymptotically equivalent to that of the primal system. The new approach is implemented within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid framework and results are presented for inviscid, laminar, and turbulent flows. Improvements to the baseline solution algorithm, such as line-implicit relaxation and a tight coupling of the turbulence model, are also presented. By storing nearest-neighbor terms in the residual computation, the dual scheme is computationally efficient, while requiring twice the memory of the flow solution. The scheme is expected to have a broad impact on computational problems related to design optimization as well as error estimation and grid adaptation efforts.

  20. Application of Adjoint Methodology to Supersonic Aircraft Design Using Reversed Equivalent Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to shape an aircraft to equivalent area based objectives using the discrete adjoint approach. Equivalent areas can be obtained either using reversed augmented Burgers equation or direct conversion of off-body pressures into equivalent area. Formal coupling with CFD allows computation of sensitivities of equivalent area objectives with respect to aircraft shape parameters. The exactness of the adjoint sensitivities is verified against derivatives obtained using the complex step approach. This methodology has the benefit of using designer-friendly equivalent areas in the shape design of low-boom aircraft. Shape optimization results with equivalent area cost functionals are discussed and further refined using ground loudness based objectives.

  1. Theoretical analysis and numerical experiments of variational adjoint approach for refractivity estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Si-Xun; Du, Hua-Dong

    2011-02-01

    This paper puts forward possibilities of refractive index profile retrieval using field measurements at an array of radio receivers in terms of variational adjoint approach. The derivation of the adjoint model begins with the parabolic wave equation for a smooth, perfectly conducting surface and horizontal polarization conditions. To deal with the ill-posed difficulties of the inversion, the regularization ideas are introduced into the establishment of the cost function. Based on steepest descent iterations, the optimal value of refractivity could be retrieved quickly at each point over height. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the method works well for low-distance signals, while it is not accurate enough for long-distance propagations. Through curve fitting processing, however, giving a good initial refractivity profile could generally improve the inversions.

  2. Self-adjoint elliptic operators with boundary conditions on not closed hypersurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantile, Andrea; Posilicano, Andrea; Sini, Mourad

    2016-07-01

    The theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators is used to construct self-adjoint realizations of a second-order elliptic differential operator on Rn with linear boundary conditions on (a relatively open part of) a compact hypersurface. Our approach allows to obtain Kreĭn-like resolvent formulae where the reference operator coincides with the "free" operator with domain H2 (Rn); this provides an useful tool for the scattering problem from a hypersurface. Concrete examples of this construction are developed in connection with the standard boundary conditions, Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, δ and δ‧-type, assigned either on a (n - 1) dimensional compact boundary Γ = ∂ Ω or on a relatively open part Σ ⊂ Γ. Schatten-von Neumann estimates for the difference of the powers of resolvents of the free and the perturbed operators are also proven; these give existence and completeness of the wave operators of the associated scattering systems.

  3. Realization of Center Symmetry in Two Adjoint Flavor Large-N Yang-Mills

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, Simon; Galvez, Richard; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-08-26

    We report on the results of numerical simulations of SU(N) lattice Yang Mills with two flavors of (light) Wilson fermion in the adjoint representation. We analytically and numerically address the question of center symmetry realization on lattices with {Lambda} sites in each direction in the large-N limit. We show, by a weak coupling calculation that, for massless fermions, center symmetry realization is independent of {Lambda}, and is unbroken. Then, we extend our result by conducting simulations at non zero mass and finite gauge coupling. Our results indicate that center symmetry is intact for a range of fermion mass in the vicinity of the critical line on lattices of volume 2{sup 4}. This observation makes it possible to compute infinite volume physical observables using small volume simulations in the limit N {yields} {infinity}, with possible applications to the determination of the conformal window in gauge theories with adjoint fermions.

  4. Adjoint equations and analysis of complex systems: Application to virus infection modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchuk, G. I.; Shutyaev, V.; Bocharov, G.

    2005-12-01

    Recent development of applied mathematics is characterized by ever increasing attempts to apply the modelling and computational approaches across various areas of the life sciences. The need for a rigorous analysis of the complex system dynamics in immunology has been recognized since more than three decades ago. The aim of the present paper is to draw attention to the method of adjoint equations. The methodology enables to obtain information about physical processes and examine the sensitivity of complex dynamical systems. This provides a basis for a better understanding of the causal relationships between the immune system's performance and its parameters and helps to improve the experimental design in the solution of applied problems. We show how the adjoint equations can be used to explain the changes in hepatitis B virus infection dynamics between individual patients.

  5. Radiation shielding design of the PAL-XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Nam-Suk; Lee, Hee-Seock; Oh, Joo-Hee; Kim, Bum-Jong

    2015-02-01

    The construction of the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL) started in 2011. The PAL-XFEL is designed to generate X-rays using 10 GeV, 0.2 nC electron beams. For the radiation shielding design, a beam-loss scenario suitable for the PAL-XFEL should be established. The beam-loss scenario was determined and categorized as normal or accidental. The electron beam will be shut down automatically when accidental beam-loss occurs. Using this scenario, the thickness of the accelerator and undulator tunnel of the PAL-XFEL was calculated by using the SHIELD11 code, and complicated tunnel structures such as maze entrances, sliding doors, trenches, sleeves, and ducts, were determined under the assumption of a thick iron target by using the FLUKA code. A detailed design of the main beam dump was established, and shielding structures at the front end for suppression of the radiation dose at the experimental area under the accidental beam-loss scenario were considered. The muon production was estimated by using the FLUKA code.

  6. Clinical coding. Code breakers.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Steve

    2005-02-24

    --The advent of payment by results has seen the role of the clinical coder pushed to the fore in England. --Examinations for a clinical coding qualification began in 1999. In 2004, approximately 200 people took the qualification. --Trusts are attracting people to the role by offering training from scratch or through modern apprenticeships. PMID:15768716

  7. Airfoil design using a coupled euler and integral boundary layer method with adjoint based sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, S.; Reuther, J.; Chattot, J. J.

    The objective of this paper is to present a control theory approach for the design of airfoils in the presence of viscous compressible flows. A coupled system of the integral boundary layer and the Euler equations is solved to provide rapid flow simulations. An adjoint approach consistent with the complete coupled state equations is employed to obtain the sensitivities needed to drive a numerical optimization algorithm. Design to a target pressure distribution is demonstrated on an RAE 2822 airfoil at transonic speeds.

  8. Some results on the dynamics and transition probabilities for non self-adjoint hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Bagarello, F.

    2015-05-15

    We discuss systematically several possible inequivalent ways to describe the dynamics and the transition probabilities of a quantum system when its hamiltonian is not self-adjoint. In order to simplify the treatment, we mainly restrict our analysis to finite dimensional Hilbert spaces. In particular, we propose some experiments which could discriminate between the various possibilities considered in the paper. An example taken from the literature is discussed in detail.

  9. Nonlinear self adjointness, conservation laws and exact solutions of ill-posed Boussinesq equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaşar, Emrullah; San, Sait; Özkan, Yeşim Sağlam

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the ill-posed Boussinesq equation which arises in shallow water waves and non-linear lattices. We prove that the ill-posed Boussinesq equation is nonlinearly self-adjoint. Using this property and Lie point symmetries, we construct conservation laws for the underlying equation. In addition, the generalized solitonary, periodic and compact-like solutions are constructed by the exp-function method.

  10. Inequivalence of unitarity and self-adjointness: An example in quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, N.A. )

    1990-02-15

    An example of a quantum cosmological model is presented whose dynamics is unitary although the time-dependent Hamiltonian operator fails to be self-adjoint (because it is not defined) for a particular value of {ital t}. The model is shown to be singular, and this disproves a conjecture put forward by Gotay and Demaret to the effect that unitary quantum dynamics in a slow-time'' gauge is always nonsingular.

  11. Trailer shield assembly for a welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates generally to trailer shields for gas shielded arc welding torches, and more particularly to a trailer shield assembly provided with a shield gas manifold for providing an even dispersion of shield gas to the interior of the shield assembly, which generally encloses a joint being welded and a welding trailing portion of hot welded metal. The novelty of the invention lies in providing trailer shield with a manifold tube having a plurality of openings from which shield gas is distributed. A gas manifold region ahead of the torch is also provided with shield gas from a tube to protect metal preheated by the torch. Further novelty lies in constructing portions of sides and housing and portions of side walls of the guide of stainless steel screen having a tight mesh.

  12. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  13. Carbon microfiber material for electromagnetic (shielding) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Nadeem

    Electromagnetic shielding is becoming more and more important with the abundance of wireless devices. Therefore a need has arisen for more versatile, flexible and low-cost solutions for shielding. For these requirements, carbon microfiber material has been proposed for electromagnetic shielding applications. For this purpose its shielding effectiveness has been measured and modeled in a simulation environment. A parametric simulation was conducted for the material property 'conductivity' and the results were compared to measured ones. These simulation results were also verified by the analytical solution for the shielding effectiveness and the agreement between the simulated values and analytical results demonstrated that the carbon microfiber material, though having less conductivity than the traditional metallic shields is a good candidate for electromagnetic shielding applications. Carbon microfiber not only provides comparable shielding effectiveness to a metallic shield but it can be advantageous because of its light weight, corrosion resistance and flexibility. Also, its porous nature can help with cooling of enclosed electronic circuits.

  14. Radiation shielding materials and containers incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound ("PYRUC") shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  15. MORSE Monte Carlo shielding calculations for the zirconium hydride reference reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgart, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    Verification of DOT-SPACETRAN transport calculations of a lithium hydride and tungsten shield for a SNAP reactor was performed using the MORSE (Monte Carlo) code. Transport of both neutrons and gamma rays was considered. Importance sampling was utilized in the MORSE calculations. Several quantities internal to the shield, as well as dose at several points outside of the configuration, were in satisfactory agreement with the DOT calculations of the same.

  16. Calculation of self-shielding factor for neutron activation experiments using GEANT4 and MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Barrientos, Jaime; Molina, F.; Aguilera, Pablo; Arellano, H. F.

    2016-07-01

    The neutron self-shielding factor G as a function of the neutron energy was obtained for 14 pure metallic samples in 1000 isolethargic energy bins from 1.10-5eV to 2.107eV using Monte Carlo simulations in GEANT4 and MCNP6. The comparison of these two Monte Carlo codes shows small differences in the final self-shielding factor mostly due to the different cross section databases that each program uses.

  17. Magnetic shield for turbomolecular pump of the Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Subir; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Pal, Rabindranath

    2011-01-01

    The turbo molecular pump of the Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental device is protected from damage by a magnetic shield. As the pump runs continuously in a magnetic field environment during a plasma physics experiment, it may get damaged owing to eddy current effect. For design and testing of the shield, first we simulate in details various aspects of magnetic shield layouts using a readily available field design code. The performance of the shield made from two half cylinders of soft iron material, is experimentally observed to agree very well with the simulation results. PMID:21280830

  18. Radiation shielding for future space exploration missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWitt, Joel Michael

    Scope and Method of Study. The risk to space crew health and safety posed by exposure to space radiation is regarded as a significant obstacle to future human space exploration. To countermand this risk, engineers and designers in today's aerospace community will require detailed knowledge of a broad range of possible materials suitable for the construction of future spacecraft or planetary surface habitats that provide adequate protection from a harmful space radiation environment. This knowledge base can be supplied by developing an experimental method that provides quantitative information about a candidate material's space radiation shielding efficacy with the understanding that (1) shielding is currently the only practical countermeasure to mitigate the effects of space radiation on human interplanetary missions, (2) any mass of a spacecraft or planetary surface habitat necessarily alters the incident flux of ionizing radiation on it, and (3) the delivery of mass into LEO and beyond is expensive and therefore may benefit from the possible use of novel multifunctional materials that could in principle reduce cost as well as ionizing radiation exposure. The developed method has an experimental component using CR-39 PNTD and Al2O3:C OSLD that exposes candidate space radiation shielding materials of varying composition and depth to a representative sample of the GCR spectrum that includes 1 GeV 1H and 1 GeV/n 16O, 28Si, and 56Fe heavy ion beams at the BNL NSRL. The computer modeling component of the method used the Monte Carlo radiation transport code FLUKA to account for secondary neutrons that were not easily measured in the laboratory. Findings and Conclusions. This study developed a method that quantifies the efficacy of a candidate space radiation shielding material relative to the standard of polyethylene using a combination of experimental and computer modeling techniques. The study used established radiation dosimetry techniques to present an empirical

  19. Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1995-12-31

    A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are compatible with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages of using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g. immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and man-made radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electronphoton transport problems.

  20. Toward a Comprehensive Carbon Budget for North America: Potential Applications of Adjoint Methods with Diverse Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, A.

    2002-01-01

    A detailed mechanistic understanding of the sources and sinks of CO2 will be required to reliably predict future COS levels and climate. A commonly used technique for deriving information about CO2 exchange with surface reservoirs is to solve an "inverse problem," where CO2 observations are used with an atmospheric transport model to find the optimal distribution of sources and sinks. Synthesis inversion methods are powerful tools for addressing this question, but the results are disturbingly sensitive to the details of the calculation. Studies done using different atmospheric transport models and combinations of surface station data have produced substantially different distributions of surface fluxes. Adjoint methods are now being developed that will more effectively incorporate diverse datasets in estimates of surface fluxes of CO2. In an adjoint framework, it will be possible to combine CO2 concentration data from long-term surface monitoring stations with data from intensive field campaigns and with proposed future satellite observations. A major advantage of the adjoint approach is that meteorological and surface data, as well as data for other atmospheric constituents and pollutants can be efficiently included in addition to observations of CO2 mixing ratios. This presentation will provide an overview of potentially useful datasets for carbon cycle research in general with an emphasis on planning for the North American Carbon Project. Areas of overlap with ongoing and proposed work on air quality/air pollution issues will be highlighted.

  1. Source attribution of particulate matter pollution over North China with the adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Liu, Licheng; Zhao, Yuanhong; Gong, Sunling; Zhang, Xiaoye; Henze, Daven K.; Capps, Shannon L.; Fu, Tzung-May; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Yuxuan

    2015-08-01

    We quantify the source contributions to surface PM2.5 (fine particulate matter) pollution over North China from January 2013 to 2015 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint with improved model horizontal resolution (1/4° × 5/16°) and aqueous-phase chemistry for sulfate production. The adjoint method attributes the PM2.5 pollution to emissions from different source sectors and chemical species at the model resolution. Wintertime surface PM2.5 over Beijing is contributed by emissions of organic carbon (27% of the total source contribution), anthropogenic fine dust (27%), and SO2 (14%), which are mainly from residential and industrial sources, followed by NH3 (13%) primarily from agricultural activities. About half of the Beijing pollution originates from sources outside of the city municipality. Adjoint analyses for other cities in North China all show significant regional pollution transport, supporting a joint regional control policy for effectively mitigating the PM2.5 air pollution.

  2. Towards efficient backward-in-time adjoint computations using data compression techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cyr, E. C.; Shadid, J. N.; Wildey, T.

    2014-12-16

    In the context of a posteriori error estimation for nonlinear time-dependent partial differential equations, the state-of-the-practice is to use adjoint approaches which require the solution of a backward-in-time problem defined by a linearization of the forward problem. One of the major obstacles in the practical application of these approaches, we found, is the need to store, or recompute, the forward solution to define the adjoint problem and to evaluate the error representation. Our study considers the use of data compression techniques to approximate forward solutions employed in the backward-in-time integration. The development derives an error representation that accounts for themore » difference between the standard-approach and the compressed approximation of the forward solution. This representation is algorithmically similar to the standard representation and only requires the computation of the quantity of interest for the forward solution and the data-compressed reconstructed solution (i.e. scalar quantities that can be evaluated as the forward problem is integrated). This approach is then compared with existing techniques, such as checkpointing and time-averaged adjoints. Lastly, we provide numerical results indicating the potential efficiency of our approach on a transient diffusion–reaction equation and on the Navier–Stokes equations. These results demonstrate memory compression ratios up to 450×450× while maintaining reasonable accuracy in the error-estimates.« less

  3. Towards efficient backward-in-time adjoint computations using data compression techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, E. C.; Shadid, J. N.; Wildey, T.

    2014-12-16

    In the context of a posteriori error estimation for nonlinear time-dependent partial differential equations, the state-of-the-practice is to use adjoint approaches which require the solution of a backward-in-time problem defined by a linearization of the forward problem. One of the major obstacles in the practical application of these approaches, we found, is the need to store, or recompute, the forward solution to define the adjoint problem and to evaluate the error representation. Our study considers the use of data compression techniques to approximate forward solutions employed in the backward-in-time integration. The development derives an error representation that accounts for the difference between the standard-approach and the compressed approximation of the forward solution. This representation is algorithmically similar to the standard representation and only requires the computation of the quantity of interest for the forward solution and the data-compressed reconstructed solution (i.e. scalar quantities that can be evaluated as the forward problem is integrated). This approach is then compared with existing techniques, such as checkpointing and time-averaged adjoints. Lastly, we provide numerical results indicating the potential efficiency of our approach on a transient diffusion–reaction equation and on the Navier–Stokes equations. These results demonstrate memory compression ratios up to 450×450× while maintaining reasonable accuracy in the error-estimates.

  4. Adjoint-based deviational Monte Carlo methods for phonon transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe M.; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.

    2015-06-01

    In the field of linear transport, adjoint formulations exploit linearity to derive powerful reciprocity relations between a variety of quantities of interest. In this paper, we develop an adjoint formulation of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation for phonon transport. We use this formulation for accelerating deviational Monte Carlo simulations of complex, multiscale problems. Benefits include significant computational savings via direct variance reduction, or by enabling formulations which allow more efficient use of computational resources, such as formulations which provide high resolution in a particular phase-space dimension (e.g., spectral). We show that the proposed adjoint-based methods are particularly well suited to problems involving a wide range of length scales (e.g., nanometers to hundreds of microns) and lead to computational methods that can calculate quantities of interest with a cost that is independent of the system characteristic length scale, thus removing the traditional stiffness of kinetic descriptions. Applications to problems of current interest, such as simulation of transient thermoreflectance experiments or spectrally resolved calculation of the effective thermal conductivity of nanostructured materials, are presented and discussed in detail.

  5. Adjoint-based error estimation and mesh adaptation for the correction procedure via reconstruction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Z. J.

    2015-08-01

    Adjoint-based mesh adaptive methods are capable of distributing computational resources to areas which are important for predicting an engineering output. In this paper, we develop an adjoint-based h-adaptation approach based on the high-order correction procedure via reconstruction formulation (CPR) to minimize the output or functional error. A dual-consistent CPR formulation of hyperbolic conservation laws is developed and its dual consistency is analyzed. Super-convergent functional and error estimate for the output with the CPR method are obtained. Factors affecting the dual consistency, such as the solution point distribution, correction functions, boundary conditions and the discretization approach for the non-linear flux divergence term, are studied. The presented method is then used to perform simulations for the 2D Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with mesh adaptation driven by the adjoint-based error estimate. Several numerical examples demonstrate the ability of the presented method to dramatically reduce the computational cost comparing with uniform grid refinement.

  6. Self-adjointness of the Fourier expansion of quantized interaction field Lagrangians

    PubMed Central

    Paneitz, S. M.; Segal, I. E.

    1983-01-01

    Regularity properties significantly stronger than were previously known are developed for four-dimensional non-linear conformally invariant quantized fields. The Fourier coefficients of the interaction Lagrangian in the interaction representation—i.e., evaluated after substitution of the associated quantized free field—is a densely defined operator on the associated free field Hilbert space K. These Fourier coefficients are with respect to a natural basis in the universal cosmos ˜M, to which such fields canonically and maximally extend from Minkowski space-time M0, which is covariantly a submanifold of ˜M. However, conformally invariant free fields over M0 and ˜M are canonically identifiable. The kth Fourier coefficient of the interaction Lagrangian has domain inclusive of all vectors in K to which arbitrary powers of the free hamiltonian in ˜M are applicable. Its adjoint in the rigorous Hilbert space sense is a-k in the case of a hermitian Lagrangian. In particular (k = 0) the leading term in the perturbative expansion of the S-matrix for a conformally invariant quantized field in M0 is a self-adjoint operator. Thus, e.g., if ϕ(x) denotes the free massless neutral scalar field in M0, then ∫M0:ϕ(x)4:d4x is a self-adjoint operator. No coupling constant renormalization is involved here. PMID:16593346

  7. Neural network training by integration of adjoint systems of equations forward in time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically, it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved, but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. The trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  8. Neural Network Training by Integration of Adjoint Systems of Equations Forward in Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically. it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved. but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. Tbc trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  9. Strong Adjoint Sensitivities in Tropical Eddy-Permitting Variational Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornuelle, B.; Hoteit, I.; Koehl, A.; Stammer, D.

    2007-05-01

    A variational data assimilation system has been implemented for the tropical Pacific Ocean for an eddy-permitting regional implementation of the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The model uses realistic topography with parameterizations for the surface boundary layer (KPP) and open boundaries at the south and north, as well as in the Indonesian throughflow. The adjoint method is used to adjust the model to observations in the tropical Pacific region using control parameters which include initial temperature and salinity, temperature, salinity and horizontal velocities at the open boundaries, and twice-daily surface fluxes of momentum, heat and freshwater. The model is constrained with most of the available datasets in the tropical Pacific, including climatologies, TAO, ARGO, XBT, and satellite SST and SSH data. The forward model runs exhibit strongly growing flow instabilities in the regions of high kinetic energy and low planetary potential vorticity gradient. The growth of these perturbations is limited by nonlinearities once they reach finite size, meaning that the high linear growth rates do not apply for long time periods. This poses a technical problem for adjoint-based assimilation, which depends on the linearized sensitivities to adjust the controls. Relative to the forward model runs, increased viscosity and diffusivity terms are used in the adjoint model runs to avoid large sensitivities related to the flow instabilities present in the high-resolution model. This talk will discuss some of the technical aspects and show results for 1 year assimilation period.

  10. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  11. Gamma self-shielding correction factors calculation for aqueous bulk sample analysis by PGNAA technique.

    PubMed

    Nasrabadi, M N; Mohammadi, A; Jalali, M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) was applied to aqueous sample analysis using a relative method. For elemental analysis of an unknown bulk sample, gamma self-shielding coefficient was required. Gamma self-shielding coefficient of unknown samples was estimated by an experimental method and also by MCNP code calculation. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the gamma self-shielding within the sample volume is required. PMID:19328700

  12. Solar-flare shielding with Regolith at a lunar-base site

    SciTech Connect

    Nealy, J.E.; Wilson, J.W.; Townsend, L.W.

    1988-12-01

    The Langley high energy nucleon transport computer code BRYNTRN is used to predict time-integrated radiation dose levels at the lunar surface due to high proton flux from solar flares. The study addresses the shielding requirements for candidate lunar habitat configurations necessary to protect crew members from these large and unpredictable radiation fluxes. Three solar proton events have been analyzed, and variations in radiation intensity in a shield medium due to the various primary particle energy distributions are predicted. Radiation dose predictions are made for various slab thicknesses of a lunar soil model. Results are also presented in the form of dose patterns within specific habitat configurations shielded with lunar material.

  13. Development of the Next Generation of Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, S.J.; Christiansen, E.L.; Lear, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    The novel structure of metallic foams is of interest in the design of next-generation debris shields as it introduces physical mechanisms that are advantageous to hypervelocity impact shielding (e.g. increased fragmentation/melt/vaporization, energy dissipation, etc.). Preliminary investigations have shown improved shielding capability over traditional spacecraft primary structures. In this paper, the results of a current hypervelocity impact test program on metallic open-cell foam core sandwich panels are reported. A preliminary ballistic limit equation has been derived from the experimental results, and is presented in a form suitable for implementation in risk assessment software codes.

  14. Solar-flare shielding with Regolith at a lunar-base site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, John E.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    The Langley high energy nucleon transport computer code BRYNTRN is used to predict time-integrated radiation dose levels at the lunar surface due to high proton flux from solar flares. The study addresses the shielding requirements for candidate lunar habitat configurations necessary to protect crew members from these large and unpredictable radiation fluxes. Three solar proton events have been analyzed, and variations in radiation intensity in a shield medium due to the various primary particle energy distributions are predicted. Radiation dose predictions are made for various slab thicknesses of a lunar soil model. Results are also presented in the form of dose patterns within specific habitat configurations shielded with lunar material.

  15. Large solar flare radiation shielding requirements for manned interplanetary missions.

    PubMed

    Townsend, L W; Nealy, J E; Wilson, J W; Atwell, W

    1989-01-01

    As the 21st century approaches, there is an ever-increasing interest in launching manned missions to Mars. A major concern to mission planners is exposure of the flight crews to highly penetrating and damaging space radiations. Beyond the protective covering of the Earth's magnetosphere, the two main sources of these radiations are galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. Preliminary analyses of potential exposures from galactic cosmic rays (GCR's) were presented elsewhere. In this Note, estimates of shielding thicknesses required to protect astronauts on interplanetary missions from the effects of large solar flare events are presented. The calculations use integral proton fluences for the February 1956, November 1960, and August 1972 solar particle events as inputs into the NASA Langley Research Center nucleon transport code BRYNTRN. This deterministic computer code transports primary protons and secondary protons and neutrons through any number of layers of target material of arbitrary thickness and composition. Contributions from target nucleus breakup (fragmentation) and recoil are also included. The results for each flare are presented as estimates of dose equivalent [in units of roentgen equivalent man (rem)] to the skin, eye, and bloodforming organs (BFO) behind various thicknesses of aluminum shielding. These results indicate that the February 1956 event was the most penetrating; however, the August 1972 event, the largest ever recorded, could have been mission- or life-threatening for thinly shielded (< or = 5 g/cm2) spacecraft. Also presented are estimates of the thicknesses of water shielding required to reduce the BFO dose equivalent to currently recommended astronaut exposure limits. These latter results suggest that organic polymers, similar to water, appear to be a much more desirable shielding material than aluminum. PMID:11537157

  16. Stiffness characteristics of longwall shields

    SciTech Connect

    Bayczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The stiffness characteristics of longwall shields have been investigated the this study. Since longwall strata activity is characterized by roof-to-floor and face-to-waste displacements, a model with two degrees of freedom is used to describe the load-displacement relationship of the shield structure. The model considers the support as an elastic body and relates horizontal and vertical resultant forces acting on the support to associated displacements as a function of the stiffness of the support structure. Stiffness coefficients under full canopy and base contact configurations have been determined.

  17. Investigating Sensitivity to Saharan Dust in Tropical Cyclone Formation Using Nasa's Adjoint Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdaway, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As tropical cyclones develop from easterly waves coming of the coast of Africa they interact with dust from the Sahara desert. There is a long standing debate over whether this dust inhibits or advances the developing storm and how much influence it has. Dust can surround the storm and absorb incoming solar radiation, cooling the air below. As a result an energy source for the system is potentially diminished, inhibiting growth of the storm. Alternatively dust may interact with clouds through micro-physical processes, for example by causing more moisture to condense, potentially increasing the strength. As a result of climate change, concentrations and amount of dust in the atmosphere will likely change. It it is important to properly understand its effect on tropical storm formation. The adjoint of an atmospheric general circulation model provides a very powerful tool for investigating sensitivity to initial conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently developed an adjoint version of the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) dynamical core, convection scheme, cloud model and radiation schemes. This is extended so that the interaction between dust and radiation is also accounted for in the adjoint model. This provides a framework for examining the sensitivity to dust in the initial conditions. Specifically the set up allows for an investigation into the extent to which dust affects cyclone strength through absorption of radiation. In this work we investigate the validity of using an adjoint model for examining sensitivity to dust in hurricane formation. We present sensitivity results for a number of systems that developed during the Atlantic hurricane season of 2006. During this period there was a significant outbreak of Saharan dust and it is has been argued that this outbreak was responsible for the relatively calm season. This period was also covered by an extensive observation campaign. It is shown that the

  18. Mass optimization studies of gamma shield materials for space nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Banjac, V.; Heger, A.S. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-10-01

    A mass optimization study of the total shield mass requirements for gamma attenuation for a space nuclear power system is carried out. The reference system is a nuclear electric power-generating reactor with a 10[sup 16] [gamma]/s source term and reference dimensions based on the Russian TOPAZ-II. Seven potential shield materials are analyzed, and the total gamma shield masses are presented for a desired dose equivalent of 5.0 mrem/h at the end of the shield. A three-dimensional shielding code, QAD-CGGP, is used to model the reactor and the truncated cone shield. Gamma energies of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 MeV are analyzed, and the required shield masses are normalized to the lowest value, giving a mass index.'' Comparison of the required masses and mass indices for both direct radiation and buildup dose is presented. For all three gamma energies, depleted uranium has a mass index of 1.0 and provides the required shielding with the lowest mass requirement. Mass indices between 1.2 and 1.7 are characteristic of tungsten and lead, making them potential substitutes for depleted uranium in the case of smaller reactor power levels.

  19. Analytical-HZETRN model for rapid assessment of active magnetic radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, S. A.; Blattnig, S. R.; Singleterry, R. C.; Westover, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of active radiation shielding designs has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on deep-space missions at a significantly lower mass penalty than designs utilizing only passive shielding. Unfortunately, the determination of the radiation exposure inside these shielded environments often involves lengthy and computationally intensive Monte Carlo analysis. In order to evaluate the large trade space of design parameters associated with a magnetic radiation shield design, an analytical model was developed for the determination of flux inside a solenoid magnetic field due to the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) radiation environment. This analytical model was then coupled with NASA's radiation transport code, HZETRN, to account for the effects of passive/structural shielding mass. The resulting model can rapidly obtain results for a given configuration and can therefore be used to analyze an entire trade space of potential variables in less time than is required for even a single Monte Carlo run. Analyzing this trade space for a solenoid magnetic shield design indicates that active shield bending powers greater than ˜15 Tm and passive/structural shielding thicknesses greater than 40 g/cm2 have a limited impact on reducing dose equivalent values. Also, it is shown that higher magnetic field strengths are more effective than thicker magnetic fields at reducing dose equivalent.

  20. Analytical-HZETRN Model for Rapid Assessment of Active Magnetic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, S. A.; Blattnig, S. R.; Singleterry, R. C.; Westover, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of active radiation shielding designs has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on deep-space missions at a significantly lower mass penalty than designs utilizing only passive shielding. Unfortunately, the determination of the radiation exposure inside these shielded environments often involves lengthy and computationally intensive Monte Carlo analysis. In order to evaluate the large trade space of design parameters associated with a magnetic radiation shield design, an analytical model was developed for the determination of flux inside a solenoid magnetic field due to the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) radiation environment. This analytical model was then coupled with NASA's radiation transport code, HZETRN, to account for the effects of passive/structural shielding mass. The resulting model can rapidly obtain results for a given configuration and can therefore be used to analyze an entire trade space of potential variables in less time than is required for even a single Monte Carlo run. Analyzing this trade space for a solenoid magnetic shield design indicates that active shield bending powers greater than 15 Tm and passive/structural shielding thicknesses greater than 40 g/cm2 have a limited impact on reducing dose equivalent values. Also, it is shown that higher magnetic field strengths are more effective than thicker magnetic fields at reducing dose equivalent.

  1. Coupled radiation transport/thermal analysis of the radiation shield for a space nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barattino, W. J.

    1985-07-01

    A coupled radiation transport-heat transfer-stress analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 reactor was performed using a numerical code developed at the University of New Mexico and Sandia National Laboratory. For a fast reactor operating at 1.66 MW sub th, the energy deposited and resulting temperature distribution was determined for a shield consisting of tungsten and lithium hydride pressed into a stainless steel honeycomb matrix. While temperature feedback was shown to have a minor effect on energy deposition, the shielding configuration was found to have a major influence in meeting thermal requirements of the lithium hydride. It was shown that a shield optimized for radiation protection will fail because of melting. However, with minor modifications in the shield layering and material selection, the thermal integrity of the shield can be preserved. A shield design of graphite, depleted lithium hydride, tungsten, and natural lithium hydride was shown to satisfy neutron and gamma fluence requirements, maximum temperature limits, and minimize cracking in the LiH portion of the shield.

  2. 3D unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.

    1997-12-31

    Three unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes are currently being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first code is ATTILA, which uses an unstructured tetrahedral mesh in conjunction with standard Sn (discrete-ordinates) angular discretization, standard multigroup energy discretization, and linear-discontinuous spatial differencing. ATTILA solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation using source iteration in conjunction with diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. DANTE is designed to run primarily on workstations. The second code is DANTE, which uses a hybrid finite-element mesh consisting of arbitrary combinations of hexahedra, wedges, pyramids, and tetrahedra. DANTE solves several second-order self-adjoint forms of the transport equation including the even-parity equation, the odd-parity equation, and a new equation called the self-adjoint angular flux equation. DANTE also offers three angular discretization options: $S{_}n$ (discrete-ordinates), $P{_}n$ (spherical harmonics), and $SP{_}n$ (simplified spherical harmonics). DANTE is designed to run primarily on massively parallel message-passing machines, such as the ASCI-Blue machines at LANL and LLNL. The third code is PERICLES, which uses the same hybrid finite-element mesh as DANTE, but solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation rather than a second-order self-adjoint form. DANTE uses a standard $S{_}n$ discretization in angle in conjunction with trilinear-discontinuous spatial differencing, and diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. PERICLES was initially designed to run on workstations, but a version for massively parallel message-passing machines will be built. The three codes will be described in detail and computational results will be presented.

  3. 3D High-Resolution Seismic Tomography in the Upper Mantle of Gulf of California Region by SEM Seismogram Simulation and Adjoint Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Forsyth, D. W.; Savage, B.

    2010-12-01

    In our previous surface wave study in Gulf of California area, we developed a moderate-resolution 3D shear velocity model by employing two-plane wave field representation array technique and 2D finite frequency kernels based on Born’s approximation. Using both amplitude and phase information of 22-111s teleseismic Rayleigh wave, we were able to constrain a lateral resolution on the order of 100 km in the upper 160 km depth. In order to enhance resolution beneath the highly heterogeneous Gulf region, we carry on further study using Spectral element method (SEM) for forward wave propagation simulation and adjoint method for tomographic inversion. The code we are using is SPECFEM3D_GLOBE by Komatitsch and Tromp et al. To enhance the resolution in the Gulf, we will minimize the waveform difference between the regional earthquake seismograms, recorded by NARS-Baja seismic array and stations in southern California, and synthetic seismograms simulated by SEM, to iteratively update the current model based on an adjoint inversion. Taking our current 3D moderate-resolution model as starting point and a recently developed crustal structure of Gulf region should help to reduce the number of iterations. There are two reasons that resolution should be enhanced compared to surface wave tomography: first, regional events contain more high frequency signals than teleseismic events; second, SEM is a full waveform synthesis method avoiding many of the usual approximations in tomographic studies. Improved tomographic images of 3D velocity heterogeneities in the upper mantle of Gulf of California will help to identify compositional and temperature variations, leading to a better understanding of mantle dynamics in the region.

  4. Material Effectiveness for Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Materials with a smaller mean atomic mass, such as lithium (Li) hydride and polyethylene, make the best radiation shields for astronauts. The materials have a higher density of nuclei and are better able to block incoming radiation. Also, they tend to produce fewer and less dangerous secondary particles after impact with incoming radiation.

  5. Isotopic Dependence of GCR Fluence behind Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross-sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple-scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (+/-100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (approx.170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past, however less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  6. Predictions for Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) is a serious hazard to humans and electronic instruments during space travel, particularly on prolonged missions outside the Earth s magnetic fields. Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is composed of approx. 98% nucleons and approx. 2% electrons and positrons. Although cosmic ray heavy ions are 1-2% of the fluence, these energetic heavy nuclei (HZE) contribute 50% of the long-term dose. These unusually high specific ionizations pose a significant health hazard acting as carcinogens and also causing microelectronics damage inside spacecraft and high-flying aircraft. These HZE ions are of concern for radiation protection and radiation shielding technology, because gross rearrangements and mutations and deletions in DNA are expected. Calculations have shown that HZE particles have a strong preference for interaction with light nuclei. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is totally impractical. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Shielding is required during missions in Earth orbit and possibly for frequent flying at high altitude because of the broad GCR spectrum and during a passage into deep space and LunarMars habitation because of the protracted exposure encountered on a long space mission. An additional hazard comes from solar particle events (SPEs) which are mostly energetic protons that can produce heavy ion secondaries as well as neutrons in materials. These events occur at unpredictable times and can deliver a potentially lethal dose within several hours to an unshielded human. Radiation protection for humans requires safety in short-term missions and maintaining career exposure limits within acceptable levels on future long-term exploration missions. The selection of shield materials can alter the protection of humans by an order of magnitude. If improperly selected, shielding materials can actually

  7. Heat shield erosion in a dusty Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, Periklis; Tauber, Michael; Chang, I-Dee

    1992-01-01

    The study calculates the effects of dust particle impacts on the erosion of the forebody heat shield for a 26-m diameter aerobraking vehicle entering the Martian atmosphere at 8.6 km/s. An explicit thin-layer Navier-Stokes code is used to compute the dustless flowfield about the vehicle for the actual Martian atmospheric composition. The deceleration and melting of the dust particles within the forebody shock layer was computed for dust spherules having initial diameters from 1 to 19 microns. All the particles began vaporizing shortly after entering the shock layer, but most survived to hit the heat shield surface. The two different heat shield materials considered were Shuttle ceramic tiles with glassy surfaces and a moderate-density ablator. For a vehicle with a ballistic coefficient of 200 kg/sq m, a glassy heat shield surface experienced an average of 7 mm of surface erosion, or 20 times the thickness of the glassy layer on ceramic tiles.

  8. Reliability-Based Electronics Shielding Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; O'Neill, P. J.; Zang, T. A.; Pandolf, J. E.; Tripathi, R. K.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2007-01-01

    Shielding design on large human-rated systems allows minimization of radiation impact on electronic systems. Shielding design tools require adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and adequate follow-up on final design evaluation.

  9. Improved Connector Shell for Cable Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, A. L.; Rotta, J. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Cable connector shell improves electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding by electrically connecting cable braid around entire circumference. Connector cable braid is slipped over ferrule and sleeve is slipped over braid, clamping it tightly to shell. Connector shell completely shields cable conductors.

  10. A Deterministic Transport Code for Space Environment Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, John E.; Chang, C. K.; Norman, Ryan B.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Badavi, Francis F.; Adamczyk, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    A deterministic computational procedure has been developed to describe transport of space environment electrons in various shield media. This code is an upgrade and extension of an earlier electron code. Whereas the former code was formulated on the basis of parametric functions derived from limited laboratory data, the present code utilizes well established theoretical representations to describe the relevant interactions and transport processes. The shield material specification has been made more general, as have the pertinent cross sections. A combined mean free path and average trajectory approach has been used in the transport formalism. Comparisons with Monte Carlo calculations are presented.

  11. Debris shield survivability and lifetimes for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S; Duewer, T; Eder, D; Ertel, J; Horton, R; Latkowski, Brereton, S; MacGowan, B; Thomas, I; Tobin, M; Zaka, F

    1999-09-01

    The survivability and performance of the NIF debris shields on the National Ignition Facility are a key factor for the successful conduct and affordable operation of the facility. Estimates of debris shield lifetime in the presence of target emissions indicate severely shortened lifetimes. We have tested a new coating design that improves debris shield cleaning. A combination of modeling and continuous data collection on NIF is described/recommended to allow cost effective debris shield operation.

  12. Towards a 3D Space Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Tripathl, R. K.; Cicomptta, F. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Tweed, J.

    2002-01-01

    High-speed computational procedures for space radiation shielding have relied on asymptotic expansions in terms of the off-axis scatter and replacement of the general geometry problem by a collection of flat plates. This type of solution was derived for application to human rated systems in which the radius of the shielded volume is large compared to the off-axis diffusion limiting leakage at lateral boundaries. Over the decades these computational codes are relatively complete and lateral diffusion effects are now being added. The analysis for developing a practical full 3D space shielding code is presented.

  13. GCFR shielding design and supporting experimental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.G.; Hamilton, C.J.; Bartine, D.

    1980-05-01

    The shielding for the conceptual design of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) is described, and the component exposure design criteria which determine the shield design are presented. The experimental programs for validating the GCFR shielding design methods and data (which have been in existence since 1976) are also discussed.

  14. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  15. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  16. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  17. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  18. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  19. Estimates of galactic cosmic ray shielding requirements during solar minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Wilson, John W.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates of radiation risk from galactic cosmic rays are presented for manned interplanetary missions. The calculations use the Naval Research Laboratory cosmic ray spectrum model as input into the Langley Research Center galactic cosmic ray transport code. This transport code, which transports both heavy ions and nucleons, can be used with any number of layers of target material, consisting of up to five different arbitrary constituents per layer. Calculated galactic cosmic ray fluxes, dose and dose equivalents behind various thicknesses of aluminum, water and liquid hydrogen shielding are presented for the solar minimum period. Estimates of risk to the skin and the blood-forming organs (BFO) are made using 0-cm and 5-cm depth dose/dose equivalent values, respectively, for water. These results indicate that at least 3.5 g/sq cm (3.5 cm) of water, or 6.5 g/sq cm (2.4 cm) of aluminum, or 1.0 g/sq cm (14 cm) of liquid hydrogen shielding is required to reduce the annual exposure below the currently recommended BFO limit of 0.5 Sv. Because of large uncertainties in fragmentation parameters and the input cosmic ray spectrum, these exposure estimates may be uncertain by as much as a factor of 2 or more. The effects of these potential exposure uncertainties or shield thickness requirements are analyzed.

  20. Comparison of radiation shielding properties of materials for space exploration initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Divadeenam, M.; Snead, C.L. Jr.; Ward, T.E. ); Nealy, J.E. . Langley Research Center)

    1992-01-01

    Radiation transport calculations were performed using the Montecarlo Intranuclear Cascade Code LAHET in order to evaluate the shielding effectiveness of CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 2} materials compared with, Water, Aluminum, Iron and Lead. In addition, calculations were performed using the deterministic straight-ahead approximation code BRYNTRN for CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 2}, B,C, Al, Fe Ta, and Pb. The use of hydrogenous material is shown to be superior in its shielding properties of particle and energy spectra of SPE and for the GCR spectra.

  1. Comparison of radiation shielding properties of materials for space exploration initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Divadeenam, M.; Snead, C.L. Jr.; Ward, T.E.; Nealy, J.E.

    1992-08-01

    Radiation transport calculations were performed using the Montecarlo Intranuclear Cascade Code LAHET in order to evaluate the shielding effectiveness of CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 2} materials compared with, Water, Aluminum, Iron and Lead. In addition, calculations were performed using the deterministic straight-ahead approximation code BRYNTRN for CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 2}, B,C, Al, Fe Ta, and Pb. The use of hydrogenous material is shown to be superior in its shielding properties of particle and energy spectra of SPE and for the GCR spectra.

  2. An adjoint view on flux consistency and strong wall boundary conditions to the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stück, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Inconsistent discrete expressions in the boundary treatment of Navier-Stokes solvers and in the definition of force objective functionals can lead to discrete-adjoint boundary treatments that are not a valid representation of the boundary conditions to the corresponding adjoint partial differential equations. The underlying problem is studied for an elementary 1D advection-diffusion problem first using a node-centred finite-volume discretisation. The defect of the boundary operators in the inconsistently defined discrete-adjoint problem leads to oscillations and becomes evident with the additional insight of the continuous-adjoint approach. A homogenisation of the discretisations for the primal boundary treatment and the force objective functional yields second-order functional accuracy and eliminates the defect in the discrete-adjoint boundary treatment. Subsequently, the issue is studied for aerodynamic Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes problems in conjunction with a standard finite-volume discretisation on median-dual grids and a strong implementation of noslip walls, found in many unstructured general-purpose flow solvers. Going out from a base-line discretisation of force objective functionals which is independent of the boundary treatment in the flow solver, two improved flux-consistent schemes are presented; based on either body wall-defined or farfield-defined control-volumes they resolve the dual inconsistency. The behaviour of the schemes is investigated on a sequence of grids in 2D and 3D.

  3. Development and application of the WRFPLUS-Chem online chemistry adjoint and WRFDA-Chem assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrette, J. J.; Henze, D. K.

    2015-02-01

    Here we present the online meteorology and chemistry adjoint and tangent linear model, WRFPLUS-Chem, which incorporates modules to treat boundary layer mixing, emission, aging, dry deposition, and advection of black carbon aerosol. We also develop land surface and surface layer adjoints to account for coupling between radiation and vertical mixing. Model performance is verified against finite difference derivative approximations. A second order checkpointing scheme is created to reduce computational costs and enable simulations longer than six hours. The adjoint is coupled to WRFDA-Chem, in order to conduct a sensitivity study of anthropogenic and biomass burning sources throughout California during the 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) field campaign. A cost function weighting scheme was devised to increase adjoint sensitivity robustness in future inverse modeling studies. Results of the sensitivity study show that, for this domain and time period, anthropogenic emissions are over predicted, while wildfire emissions are under predicted. We consider the diurnal variation in emission sensitivities to determine at what time sources should be scaled up or down. Also, adjoint sensitivities for two choices of land surface model indicate that emission inversion results would be sensitive to forward model configuration. The tools described here are the first step in conducting four-dimensional variational data assimilation in a coupled meteorology-chemistry model, which will potentially provide new constraints on aerosol precursor emissions and their distributions. Such analyses will be invaluable to assessments of particulate matter health and climate impacts.

  4. Application of variational principles and adjoint integrating factors for constructing numerical GFD models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penenko, Vladimir; Tsvetova, Elena; Penenko, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    The proposed method is considered on an example of hydrothermodynamics and atmospheric chemistry models [1,2]. In the development of the existing methods for constructing numerical schemes possessing the properties of total approximation for operators of multiscale process models, we have developed a new variational technique, which uses the concept of adjoint integrating factors. The technique is as follows. First, a basic functional of the variational principle (the integral identity that unites the model equations, initial and boundary conditions) is transformed using Lagrange's identity and the second Green's formula. As a result, the action of the operators of main problem in the space of state functions is transferred to the adjoint operators defined in the space of sufficiently smooth adjoint functions. By the choice of adjoint functions the order of the derivatives becomes lower by one than those in the original equations. We obtain a set of new balance relationships that take into account the sources and boundary conditions. Next, we introduce the decomposition of the model domain into a set of finite volumes. For multi-dimensional non-stationary problems, this technique is applied in the framework of the variational principle and schemes of decomposition and splitting on the set of physical processes for each coordinate directions successively at each time step. For each direction within the finite volume, the analytical solutions of one-dimensional homogeneous adjoint equations are constructed. In this case, the solutions of adjoint equations serve as integrating factors. The results are the hybrid discrete-analytical schemes. They have the properties of stability, approximation and unconditional monotony for convection-diffusion operators. These schemes are discrete in time and analytic in the spatial variables. They are exact in case of piecewise-constant coefficients within the finite volume and along the coordinate lines of the grid area in each

  5. Constrained Multipoint Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using an Adjoint Formulation and Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Saunders, David

    1997-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method that treats the design of complex aircraft configurations subject to high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD), geometric constraints and multiple design points is described. The design process will be greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and distributed memory computer architectures. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods. The resulting problem is implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on a higher order CFD method. In order to facilitate the integration of these high fidelity CFD approaches into future multi-disciplinary optimization (NW) applications, new methods must be developed which are capable of simultaneously addressing complex geometries, multiple objective functions, and geometric design constraints. In our earlier studies, we coupled the adjoint based design formulations with unconstrained optimization algorithms and showed that the approach was effective for the aerodynamic design of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations. In many of the results presented in these earlier works, geometric constraints were satisfied either by a projection into feasible space or by posing the design space parameterization such that it automatically satisfied constraints. Furthermore, with the exception of reference 9 where the second author initially explored the use of multipoint design in conjunction with adjoint formulations, our earlier works have focused on single point design efforts. Here we demonstrate that the same methodology may be extended to treat

  6. Mapping Emissions that Contribute to Air Pollution Using Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, L. A. J.; Mcdonald, B. C.; Brown, N. J.; Harley, R.

    2014-12-01

    The adjoint of the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) is used to map emissions that contribute to air pollution at receptors of interest. Adjoint tools provide an efficient way to calculate the sensitivity of a model response to a large number of model inputs, a task that would require thousands of simulations using a more traditional forward sensitivity approach. Initial applications of this technique, demonstrated here, are to benzene and directly-emitted diesel particulate matter, for which atmospheric reactions are neglected. Emissions of these pollutants are strongly influenced by light-duty gasoline vehicles and heavy-duty diesel trucks, respectively. We study air quality responses in three receptor areas where populations have been identified as especially susceptible to, and adversely affected by air pollution. Population-weighted air basin-wide responses for each pollutant are also evaluated for the entire San Francisco Bay area. High-resolution (1 km horizontal grid) emission inventories have been developed for on-road motor vehicle emission sources, based on observed traffic count data. Emission estimates represent diurnal, day of week, and seasonal variations of on-road vehicle activity, with separate descriptions for gasoline and diesel sources. Emissions that contribute to air pollution at each receptor have been mapped in space and time using the adjoint method. Effects on air quality of both relative (multiplicative) and absolute (additive) perturbations to underlying emission inventories are analyzed. The contributions of local versus upwind sources to air quality in each receptor area are quantified, and weekday/weekend and seasonal variations in the influence of emissions from upwind areas are investigated. The contribution of local sources to the total air pollution burden within the receptor areas increases from about 40% in the summer to about 50% in the winter due to increased atmospheric stagnation. The effectiveness of control

  7. CAD-based radiation protection and shielding in space

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    In the not-too-distant future, astronauts will begin living and working on space station Freedom (SSF), eventually establishing a permanent presence in space. Beyond Freedom, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has set its sights on returning to and eventually establishing outposts on the moon and Mars. Without appropriate methods of identifying protection deficiencies, spacecraft designers often overestimate or defer shielding solutions in both cases burdening the program. To avoid possible penalties such as increased mass, complexity, and cost, radiation analysis should be conducted as part of the preliminary design process. An innovative radiation assessment system combining computer-aided design (CAD) capabilities with established NASA transport codes has been developed permitting fast, accurate analysis of spacecraft. The use of this automated analytical tool the Boeing Radiation Exposure Model (Brem) is discussed in this paper, relative to spacecraft design and the optimization of radiation shielding. Results obtained from recently completed radiation analysis of space station Freedom are also discussed.

  8. Optimum Structure of Whipple Shield against Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minhyung

    2013-06-01

    It has been known that the spacecraft protection issues against space debris or meteoroid impact damage are of great importance. Whipple shield structures (double spaced plates) have been investigated and empirical ballistic limit curve (BLCs) are developed. In this paper, we like to investigate an optimum Whipple Shield structure of fixed areal density and space. To do this, a new in-house SPH code has been used. Last 20 years SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) numerical scheme has been widely applied to the hypervelocity impact problems because of the limited velocity range and cost of test. We first examined the extent of debris spreading which seems to be a key factor to the back plate impact. The debris cloud expansion angle shows a maximum value. Then, a series of hypervelocity impact simulations were conducted to predict the critical impacting sphere diameter. It has been found that there is an optimum thickness ratio of front bumper to real wall.

  9. Multileaf shielding design against neutrons produced by medical linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Rebello, W F; Silva, A X; Facure, A

    2008-01-01

    This work aims at presenting a study using Monte Carlo simulation of a Multileaf Shielding (MLS) System designed to be used for the protection of patients who undergo radiotherapy treatment, against undesired exposure to neutrons produced in the components of the medical linear accelerator heads. The choice of radiotherapy equipment as the subject of study fell on the Varian Clinac 2,100/2,300 with MLC-120 operating at 18 MeV. The general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP5, was used in the computer simulation in order to determine the ambient dose equivalent, H (10), on several points on the patient's plane, with the equipment operation with and without the MLS. The results of the simulations showed a significant neutron dose reduction after the inclusion of the proposed shielding. PMID:17569690

  10. Shielding calculations for a production target for secondary beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Back, B.B.; Jiang, C.L.

    1995-08-01

    In order to estimate the amount of shielding required for a radioactive beam facility dose rate were performed. The calculations for production targets with different geometries were performed. The calculations were performed with the MSU shielding code assuming a 500-p{mu}A 200-MeV deuteron beam stopped in a thick Al target. The target and the ion-optical elements for beam extraction are located in a 2 m{sup 3} large volume at the center of the production cell. These dose rate calculations show that with a combination of Fe and concrete it is possible to reduce the dose rate expected at the surface of a 7-m-wide cube housing the production target to less than 2 mrem/hr.

  11. New facility shield design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the criteria presented here is to provide standard guidance for the design of nuclear radiation shields thoughout new facilities. These criteria are required to assure a consistent and integrated design that can be operated safely and economically within the DOE standards. The scope of this report is confined to the consideration of radiation shielding for contained sources. The whole body dose limit established by the DOE applies to all doses which are generally distributed throughout the trunk of the body. Therefore, where the whole body is the critical organ for an internally deposited radionuclide, the whole body dose limit applies to the sum of doses received must assure control of the concentration of radionuclides in the building atmosphere and thereby limit the dose from internal sources.

  12. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  13. Radiation shielding for diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Colin J

    2015-07-01

    Scattered radiation makes up the majority of the stray radiation field around an X-ray unit. The scatter is linked to the amount of radiation incident on the patient. It can be estimated from quantities used to assess patient dose such as the kerma-area product, and factors have been established linking this to levels of scattered radiation for radiography and fluoroscopy. In radiography shielding against primary radiation is also needed, but in other modalities this is negligible, as the beam is intercepted by the image receptor. In the same way scatter from CT can be quantified in terms of dose-length product, but because of higher radiation levels, exposure to tertiary scatter from ceilings needs to be considered. Transmission requirements are determined from comparisons between calculated radiation levels and agreed dose criteria, taking into account the occupancy of adjacent areas. Thicknesses of shielding material required can then be calculated from simple equations. PMID:25813477

  14. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  15. Approximations of Strongly Continuous Families of Unbounded Self-Adjoint Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Artzi, Jonathan; Holding, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The problem of approximating the discrete spectra of families of self-adjoint operators that are merely strongly continuous is addressed. It is well-known that the spectrum need not vary continuously (as a set) under strong perturbations. However, it is shown that under an additional compactness assumption the spectrum does vary continuously, and a family of symmetric finite-dimensional approximations is constructed. An important feature of these approximations is that they are valid for the entire family uniformly. An application of this result to the study of plasma instabilities is illustrated.

  16. Self-adjointness and the Casimir effect with confined quantized spinor matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitenko, Yurii A.

    2016-01-01

    A generalization of the MIT bag boundary condition for spinor matter is proposed basing on the requirement that the Dirac hamiltonian operator be self-adjoint. An influence of a background magnetic field on the vacuum of charged spinor matter confined between two parallel material plates is studied. Employing the most general set of boundary conditions at the plates in the case of the uniform magnetic field directed orthogonally to the plates, we find the pressure from the vacuum onto the plates. In physically plausible situations, the Casimir effect is shown to be repulsive, independently of a choice of boundary conditions and of a distance between the plates.

  17. Diffusion Acceleration Schemes for Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Formulation with a Void Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqi Wang; Hongbin Zhang; Richard C. Martineau

    2014-02-01

    A Galerkin weak form for the monoenergetic neutron transport equation with a continuous finite element method and discrete ordinate method is developed based on self-adjoint angular flux formulation. This weak form is modified for treating void regions. A consistent diffusion scheme is developed with projection. Correction terms of the diffusion scheme are derived to reproduce the transport scalar flux. A source iteration that decouples the solution of all directions with both linear and nonlinear diffusion accelerations is developed and demonstrated. One-dimensional Fourier analysis is conducted to demonstrate the stability of the linear and nonlinear diffusion accelerations. Numerical results of these schemes are presented.

  18. Approximations of Strongly Continuous Families of Unbounded Self-Adjoint Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Artzi, Jonathan; Holding, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The problem of approximating the discrete spectra of families of self-adjoint operators that are merely strongly continuous is addressed. It is well-known that the spectrum need not vary continuously (as a set) under strong perturbations. However, it is shown that under an additional compactness assumption the spectrum does vary continuously, and a family of symmetric finite-dimensional approximations is constructed. An important feature of these approximations is that they are valid for the entire family uniformly. An application of this result to the study of plasma instabilities is illustrated.

  19. Pricing of American style options with an adjoint process correction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaekel, Uwe

    2005-07-01

    Pricing of American options is a more complicated problem than pricing of European options. In this work a formula is derived that allows the computation of the early exercise premium, i.e. the price difference between these two option types in terms of an adjoint process evolving in the reversed time direction of the original process determining the evolution of the European price. We show how this equation can be utilised to improve option price estimates from numerical schemes like finite difference or Monte Carlo methods.

  20. Ginsparg-Wilson relation on a fuzzy 2-sphere for adjoint matter

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Hajime

    2010-10-15

    We formulate a Ginsparg-Wilson relation on a fuzzy 2-sphere for matter in the adjoint representation of the gauge group. Because of the Ginsparg-Wilson relation, an index theorem is satisfied. Our formulation is applicable to topologically nontrivial configurations as monopoles. It gives a solid basis for obtaining chiral fermions, which are an important ingredient of the standard model, from matrix model formulations of the superstring theory, such as the IIB matrix model, by considering topological configurations in the extra dimensions. We finally discuss whether this mechanism really works.