Science.gov

Sample records for adjoint transport capability

  1. MCNP: Multigroup/adjoint capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Redmond, E.L. II; Palmtag, S.P.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-04-01

    This report discusses various aspects related to the use and validity of the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP for multigroup/adjoint calculations. The increased desire to perform comparisons between Monte Carlo and deterministic codes, along with the ever-present desire to increase the efficiency of large MCNP calculations has produced a greater user demand for the multigroup/adjoint capabilities. To more fully utilize these capabilities, we review the applications of the Monte Carlo multigroup/adjoint method, describe how to generate multigroup cross sections for MCNP with the auxiliary CRSRD code, describe how to use the multigroup/adjoint capability in MCNP, and provide examples and results indicating the effectiveness and validity of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint treatment. This information should assist users in taking advantage of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint capabilities.

  2. Self-adjoint integral operator for bounded nonlocal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, J. E.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-11-01

    An integral operator is developed to describe nonlocal transport in a one-dimensional system bounded on both ends by material walls. The "jump" distributions associated with nonlocal transport are taken to be Lévy α -stable distributions, which become naturally truncated by the bounding walls. The truncation process results in the operator containing a self-consistent, convective inward transport term (pinch). The properties of the integral operator as functions of the Lévy distribution parameter set [α ,γ ] and the wall conductivity are presented. The integral operator continuously recovers the features of local transport when α =2 . The self-adjoint formulation allows for an accurate description of spatial variation in the Lévy parameters in the nonlocal system. Spatial variation in the Lévy parameters is shown to result in internally generated flows. Examples of cold-pulse propagation in nonlocal systems illustrate the capabilities of the methodology.

  3. Self-adjoint integral operator for bounded nonlocal transport.

    PubMed

    Maggs, J E; Morales, G J

    2016-11-01

    An integral operator is developed to describe nonlocal transport in a one-dimensional system bounded on both ends by material walls. The "jump" distributions associated with nonlocal transport are taken to be Lévy α-stable distributions, which become naturally truncated by the bounding walls. The truncation process results in the operator containing a self-consistent, convective inward transport term (pinch). The properties of the integral operator as functions of the Lévy distribution parameter set [α,γ] and the wall conductivity are presented. The integral operator continuously recovers the features of local transport when α=2. The self-adjoint formulation allows for an accurate description of spatial variation in the Lévy parameters in the nonlocal system. Spatial variation in the Lévy parameters is shown to result in internally generated flows. Examples of cold-pulse propagation in nonlocal systems illustrate the capabilities of the methodology.

  4. National transportable telecommunications capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boheim, Kenneth B.; Bach, Beverly

    1991-01-01

    The chance to integrate two emerging telecommunications technologies together, the Ku-band satellite communication (SATCOM) and cellular, offered the unique opportunity to package a truly stand-alone capability to reconstitute telecommuications service. Terrestrial cellular telephone services have proven to be an essential tool for dealing with local emergencies to the extent that they survive and remain operable, as in the San Francisco earthquake. Cellular telephones can provide emergency coordinators the flexibility of wireless mobility in the field via the Public Switched Network (PSN) to coordinate emergency services. However, not all areas are covered by cellular service; existing cellular and PSN service availability could be limited by the congestion and competition for the dial tone that occurs in emergencies. It was realized that a critical need exists for a rapidly deployable stand-alone cellular capability coupled with alternate connectivity to bypass congested or damaged PSN links. Existing commercial Ku-band satellite communications have provided alternate routing links in some cases to support emergency communications. An emergency operational capability was conceived that integrates these technologies into a rapidly deployable and transportable package that provides both local and long distance telephone services to an area that has suffered widespread telecommunications outages or has been totally isolated from the world.

  5. The adjoint neutron transport equation and the statistical approach for its solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracco, P.; Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.

    2016-11-01

    The adjoint equation was introduced in the early days of neutron transport and its solution, the neutron importance, has been used for several applications in neutronics. The work presents at first a critical review of the adjoint neutron transport equation. Afterwards, the adjont model is constructed for a reference physical situation, for which an analytical approach is viable, i.e. an infinite homogeneous scattering medium. This problem leads to an equation that is the adjoint of the slowing-down equation, which is well known in nuclear reactor physics. A general closed-form analytical solution to such adjoint equation is obtained by a procedure that can be used also to derive the classical Placzek functions. This solution constitutes a benchmark for any statistical or numerical approach to the adjoint equation. A sampling technique to evaluate the adjoint flux for the transport equation is then proposed and physically interpreted as a transport model for pseudo-particles. This can be done by introducing appropriate kernels describing the transfer of the pseudo-particles in the phase space. This technique allows estimating the importance function by a standard Monte Carlo approach. The sampling scheme is validated by comparison with the analytical results previously obtained.

  6. Stabilized FE simulation of prototype thermal-hydraulics problems with integrated adjoint-based capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadid, J. N.; Smith, T. M.; Cyr, E. C.; Wildey, T. M.; Pawlowski, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    A critical aspect of applying modern computational solution methods to complex multiphysics systems of relevance to nuclear reactor modeling, is the assessment of the predictive capability of specific proposed mathematical models. In this respect the understanding of numerical error, the sensitivity of the solution to parameters associated with input data, boundary condition uncertainty, and mathematical models is critical. Additionally, the ability to evaluate and or approximate the model efficiently, to allow development of a reasonable level of statistical diagnostics of the mathematical model and the physical system, is of central importance. In this study we report on initial efforts to apply integrated adjoint-based computational analysis and automatic differentiation tools to begin to address these issues. The study is carried out in the context of a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes approximation to turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer using a particular spatial discretization based on implicit fully-coupled stabilized FE methods. Initial results are presented that show the promise of these computational techniques in the context of nuclear reactor relevant prototype thermal-hydraulics problems.

  7. Stabilized FE simulation of prototype thermal-hydraulics problems with integrated adjoint-based capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Smith, T.M.; Cyr, E.C.; Wildey, T.M.; Pawlowski, R.P.

    2016-09-15

    A critical aspect of applying modern computational solution methods to complex multiphysics systems of relevance to nuclear reactor modeling, is the assessment of the predictive capability of specific proposed mathematical models. In this respect the understanding of numerical error, the sensitivity of the solution to parameters associated with input data, boundary condition uncertainty, and mathematical models is critical. Additionally, the ability to evaluate and or approximate the model efficiently, to allow development of a reasonable level of statistical diagnostics of the mathematical model and the physical system, is of central importance. In this study we report on initial efforts to apply integrated adjoint-based computational analysis and automatic differentiation tools to begin to address these issues. The study is carried out in the context of a Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes approximation to turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer using a particular spatial discretization based on implicit fully-coupled stabilized FE methods. Initial results are presented that show the promise of these computational techniques in the context of nuclear reactor relevant prototype thermal-hydraulics problems.

  8. Stabilized FE simulation of prototype thermal-hydraulics problems with integrated adjoint-based capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J. N.; Smith, T. M.; Cyr, E. C.; Wildey, T. M.; Pawlowski, R. P.

    2016-05-20

    A critical aspect of applying modern computational solution methods to complex multiphysics systems of relevance to nuclear reactor modeling, is the assessment of the predictive capability of specific proposed mathematical models. The understanding of numerical error, the sensitivity of the solution to parameters associated with input data, boundary condition uncertainty, and mathematical models is critical. Additionally, the ability to evaluate and or approximate the model efficiently, to allow development of a reasonable level of statistical diagnostics of the mathematical model and the physical system, is of central importance. In our study we report on initial efforts to apply integrated adjoint-based computational analysis and automatic differentiation tools to begin to address these issues. The study is carried out in the context of a Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes approximation to turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer using a particular spatial discretization based on implicit fully-coupled stabilized FE methods. We present the initial results that show the promise of these computational techniques in the context of nuclear reactor relevant prototype thermal-hydraulics problems.

  9. Stabilized FE simulation of prototype thermal-hydraulics problems with integrated adjoint-based capabilities

    DOE PAGES

    Shadid, J. N.; Smith, T. M.; Cyr, E. C.; ...

    2016-05-20

    A critical aspect of applying modern computational solution methods to complex multiphysics systems of relevance to nuclear reactor modeling, is the assessment of the predictive capability of specific proposed mathematical models. The understanding of numerical error, the sensitivity of the solution to parameters associated with input data, boundary condition uncertainty, and mathematical models is critical. Additionally, the ability to evaluate and or approximate the model efficiently, to allow development of a reasonable level of statistical diagnostics of the mathematical model and the physical system, is of central importance. In our study we report on initial efforts to apply integrated adjoint-basedmore » computational analysis and automatic differentiation tools to begin to address these issues. The study is carried out in the context of a Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes approximation to turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer using a particular spatial discretization based on implicit fully-coupled stabilized FE methods. We present the initial results that show the promise of these computational techniques in the context of nuclear reactor relevant prototype thermal-hydraulics problems.« less

  10. Adjoint transport calculations for sensitivity analysis of the Hiroshima air-over-ground environment

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.; Cacuci, D.G.; Pace, J.V. III

    1984-01-01

    A major effort within the US Dose Reassessment Program is aimed at recalculating the transport of initial nuclear radiation in an air-over-ground environment. This paper is the first report of results from adjoint calculations in the Hiroshima air-over-ground environment. The calculations use a Hiroshima/Nagasaki multi-element ground, ENDF/B-V nuclear data, one-dimensional ANISN flux weighting for neutron and gamma cross sections, a source obtained by two-dimensional hydrodynamic and three-dimensional transport calculations, and best-estimate atmospheric conditions from Japanese sources. 7 references, 2 figures.

  11. Calculation of the response of cylindrical targets to collimated beams of particles using one-dimensional adjoint transport techniques. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Dupree, S. A.

    1980-06-01

    The use of adjoint techniques to determine the interaction of externally incident collimated beams of particles with cylindrical targets is a convenient means of examining a class of problems important in radiation transport studies. The theory relevant to such applications is derived, and a simple example involving a fissioning target is discussed. Results from both discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo transport-code calculations are presented, and comparisons are made with results obtained from forward calculations. The accuracy of the discrete ordinates adjoint results depends on the order of angular quadrature used in the calculation. Reasonable accuracy by using EQN quadratures can be expected from order S/sub 16/ or higher.

  12. Transportation capabilities of the existing cask fleet

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S.; Wankerl, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a number of scenarios estimating the amount of spent nuclear fuel that could be transported to a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility by various combinations of existing cask fleets. To develop the scenarios, the data provided by the Transportation System Data Base (TSDB) were modified to reflect the additional time for cask turnaround resulting from various startup and transportation issues. With these more realistic speed and cask-handling assumptions, the annual transportation capability of a fleet consisting of all of the existing casks is approximately 46 metric tons of uranium (MTU). The most likely fleet of existing casks that would be made available to the Department of Energy (DOE) consists of two rail, three overweight truck, and six legal weight truck casks. Under the same transportation assumptions, this cask fleet is capable of approximately transporting 270 MTU/year. These ranges of capability is a result of the assumptions pertaining to the number of casks assumed to be available. It should be noted that this assessment assumes additional casks based on existing certifications are not fabricated. 5 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Adjoint of the global Eulerian-Lagrangian coupled atmospheric transport model (A-GELCA v1.0): development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Dmitry A.; Maksyutov, Shamil; Yaremchuk, Alexey; Ganshin, Alexander; Kaminski, Thomas; Blessing, Simon; Sasakawa, Motoki; Gomez-Pelaez, Angel J.; Starchenko, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We present the development of the Adjoint of the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric (A-GELCA) model that consists of the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) model as an Eulerian three-dimensional transport model (TM), and FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model) as the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM). The forward tangent linear and adjoint components of the Eulerian model were constructed directly from the original NIES TM code using an automatic differentiation tool known as TAF (Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran; http://www.FastOpt.com, with additional manual pre- and post-processing aimed at improving transparency and clarity of the code and optimizing the performance of the computing, including MPI (Message Passing Interface). The Lagrangian component did not require any code modification, as LPDMs are self-adjoint and track a significant number of particles backward in time in order to calculate the sensitivity of the observations to the neighboring emission areas. The constructed Eulerian adjoint was coupled with the Lagrangian component at a time boundary in the global domain. The simulations presented in this work were performed using the A-GELCA model in forward and adjoint modes. The forward simulation shows that the coupled model improves reproduction of the seasonal cycle and short-term variability of CO2. Mean bias and standard deviation for five of the six Siberian sites considered decrease roughly by 1 ppm when using the coupled model. The adjoint of the Eulerian model was shown, through several numerical tests, to be very accurate (within machine epsilon with mismatch around to ±6 e-14) compared to direct forward sensitivity calculations. The developed adjoint of the coupled model combines the flux conservation and stability of an Eulerian discrete adjoint formulation with the flexibility, accuracy, and high resolution of a Lagrangian backward trajectory formulation. A-GELCA will be incorporated

  14. A 4D-Var inversion system based on the icosahedral grid model (NICAM-TM 4D-Var v1.0) - Part 1: Offline forward and adjoint transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Yosuke; Tomita, Hirofumi; Satoh, Masaki; Imasu, Ryoichi; Sawa, Yousuke; Tsuboi, Kazuhiro; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Machida, Toshinobu; Sasakawa, Motoki; Belan, Boris; Saigusa, Nobuko

    2017-03-01

    A four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) method is a popular algorithm for inverting atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements. In order to meet the computationally intense 4D-Var iterative calculation, offline forward and adjoint transport models are developed based on the Nonhydrostatic ICosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM). By introducing flexibility into the temporal resolution of the input meteorological data, the forward model developed in this study is not only computationally efficient, it is also found to nearly match the transport performance of the online model. In a transport simulation of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), the data-thinning error (error resulting from reduction in the time resolution of the meteorological data used to drive the offline transport model) is minimized by employing high temporal resolution data of the vertical diffusion coefficient; with a low 6-hourly temporal resolution, significant concentration biases near the surface are introduced. The new adjoint model can be run in discrete or continuous adjoint mode for the advection process. The discrete adjoint is characterized by perfect adjoint relationship with the forward model that switches off the flux limiter, while the continuous adjoint is characterized by an imperfect but reasonable adjoint relationship with its corresponding forward model. In the latter case, both the forward and adjoint models use the flux limiter to ensure the monotonicity of tracer concentrations and sensitivities. Trajectory analysis for high CO2 concentration events are performed to test adjoint sensitivities. We also demonstrate the potential usefulness of our adjoint model for diagnosing tracer transport. Both the offline forward and adjoint models have computational efficiency about 10 times higher than the online model. A description of our new 4D-Var system that includes an optimization method, along with its application in an atmospheric CO2 inversion and the effects of using either the

  15. Least-Squares PN Formulation of the Transport Equation Using Self-Adjoint-Angular-Flux Consistent Boundary Conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent M. Laboure; Yaqi Wang; Mark D. DeHart

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study the Least-Squares (LS) PN form of the transport equation compatible with voids in the context of Continuous Finite Element Methods (CFEM).We first deriveweakly imposed boundary conditions which make the LS weak formulation equivalent to the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux (SAAF) variational formulation with a void treatment, in the particular case of constant cross-sections and a uniform mesh. We then implement this method in Rattlesnake with the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework using a spherical harmonics (PN) expansion to discretize in angle. We test our implementation using the Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) and find the expected convergence behavior both in angle and space. Lastly, we investigate the impact of the global non-conservation of LS by comparing the method with SAAF on a heterogeneous test problem.

  16. A three-dimensional finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method (ELLAM) for solute-transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heberton, C.I.; Russell, T.F.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the U.S. Geological Survey Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method (ELLAM) algorithm that solves an integral form of the solute-transport equation, incorporating an implicit-in-time difference approximation for the dispersive and sink terms. Like the algorithm in the original version of the U.S. Geological Survey MOC3D transport model, ELLAM uses a method of characteristics approach to solve the transport equation on the basis of the velocity field. The ELLAM algorithm, however, is based on an integral formulation of conservation of mass and uses appropriate numerical techniques to obtain global conservation of mass. The implicit procedure eliminates several stability criteria required for an explicit formulation. Consequently, ELLAM allows large transport time increments to be used. ELLAM can produce qualitatively good results using a small number of transport time steps. A description of the ELLAM numerical method, the data-input requirements and output options, and the results of simulator testing and evaluation are presented. The ELLAM algorithm was evaluated for the same set of problems used to test and evaluate Version 1 and Version 2 of MOC3D. These test results indicate that ELLAM offers a viable alternative to the explicit and implicit solvers in MOC3D. Its use is desirable when mass balance is imperative or a fast, qualitative model result is needed. Although accurate solutions can be generated using ELLAM, its efficiency relative to the two previously documented solution algorithms is problem dependent.

  17. Top-Down Inversion of Aerosol Emissions through Adjoint Integration of Satellite Radiance and GEOS-Chem Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Wang, J.; Henze, D. K.; Qu, W.; Kopacz, M.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of aerosol emissions from both natural and anthropogenic sources are needed to study the impacts of tropospheric aerosol on atmospheric composition, climate, and human health, but large uncertainties persist in quantifying the aerosol sources with the current bottom-up methods. This study presents a new top-down approach that spatially constrains the amount of aerosol emissions from satellite (MODIS) observed reflectance with the adjoint of a chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem). We apply this technique with a one-month case study (April 2008) over the East Asia. The bottom-up estimated sulfate-nitrate-ammonium precursors, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2), ammonia (NH3), and nitrogen oxides (NOx), all from INTEX-B 2006 inventory, emissions of black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC) from Bond-2007 inventory, and mineral dust simulated from DEAD dust mobilization scheme, are spatially optimized from the GEOS-Chem model and its adjoint constrained by the aerosol optical depth (AOD) that are derived from MODIS reflectance with the GEOS-Chem aerosol single scattering properties. The adjoint inverse modeling for the study period yields notable decreases in anthropogenic aerosol emissions over China: 436 Gg (33.5%) for SO2, 378 Gg (34.5%) for NH3, 319 (18.8%) for NOx, 10 Gg (9.1%) for BC, and 30 Gg (15.0%) for OC. The total amount of the mineral dust emission is reduced by 56.4% from the DEAD mobilization module which simulates dust production of 19020 Gg. Sub-regional adjustments are significant and directions of changes are spatially different. The model simulation with optimized aerosol emissions shows much better agreement with independent observations from sun-spectrophotometer observed AOD from AERONET, MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) AOD, OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) NO2 and SO2 columns, and surface aerosol concentrations measured over both anthropogenic pollution and dust source regions. Assuming the used bottom-up anthropogenic

  18. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2016-03-01

    This work discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package authored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Shift has been developed to scale well from laptops to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers and includes features such as support for multiple geometry and physics engines, hybrid capabilities for variance reduction methods such as the Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling methodology, advanced parallel decompositions, and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. The scaling studies presented in this paper demonstrate good weak and strong scaling behavior for the implemented algorithms. Shift has also been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks, including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors' Virtual Environment for Reactor Analysis criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems presented in this paper. These benchmark results compare well to those from other contemporary Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP5 and KENO.

  19. Introduction to Adjoint Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Errico, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, some fundamentals of adjoint models will be described. This includes a basic derivation of tangent linear and corresponding adjoint models from a parent nonlinear model, the interpretation of adjoint-derived sensitivity fields, a description of methods of automatic differentiation, and the use of adjoint models to solve various optimization problems, including singular vectors. Concluding remarks will attempt to correct common misconceptions about adjoint models and their utilization.

  20. Capabilities of the Large-Scale Sediment Transport Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    instrument reliability and accuracy while reducing maintenance and to expand facility capabilities for cohesive sediment erosion and transport...crested wave. Twenty variable speed pumps are used to minimize the boundary effects of a finite-length beach by supplementing the wave-driven... pump flow meters, sediment trap weigh tanks, and beach profiling lidar. A detailed discussion of the original LSTF features and capabilities can be

  1. Mars Missions Using Emerging Commercial Space Transportation Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    New Discoveries regarding the Martian Environment may impact Mars mission planning. Transportation of investigation payloads can be facilitated by Commercial Space Transportation options. The development of Commercial Space Transportation. Capabilities anticipated from various commercial entities are examined objectively. The potential for one of these options, in the form of a Mars Sample Return mission, described in the results of previous work, is presented to demonstrate a high capability potential. The transportation needs of the Mars Environment Team Project at ISU 2016 may fit within the payload capabilities of a Mars Sample Return mission, but the payload elements may or may not differ. Resource Modules will help you develop a component of a strategy to address the Implications of New Discoveries in the Martian Environment using the possibility of efficient, commercial space transportation options. Opportunities for open discussions as appropriate during the team project formulation period at the end of each Resource Module. The objective is to provide information that can be incorporated into your work in the Team Project including brainstorming.

  2. Development of an analysis capability for the National Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Anson, D.; Nelson, R.

    1997-10-24

    The purpose of this report is to examine the Department of Transportation`s (DOT) National Transportation System (NTS) initiative, to document what has been learned, and to outline a National Transportation Network Analysis Capability (NTNAC) based on a ``TRANSIMS-like`` approach. This study was conducted over a two month period at the end of FY1997. The scope of the effort was carefully defined to accommodate the short time horizon and to provide focus to a very large analytical problem. The objectives were to: (1) define the NTS and the NTS problem; (2) identify problem characteristics; (3) describe an analytical solution based on the TRANSIMS approach; (4) identify data requirements and availability; (5) develop criteria for a scenario to be used in a prototype demonstration; and (6) select a scenario for the prototype demonstration.

  3. Transportation capabilities study of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.L.; Johnson, R.A.; Smith, R.W.; Abbott, D.G.; Tyacke, M.J.

    1994-10-01

    This study evaluates current capabilities for transporting spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy. Currently licensed irradiated fuel shipping packages that have the potential for shipping the spent nuclear fuel are identified and then matched against the various spent nuclear fuel types. Also included are the results of a limited investigation into other certified packages and new packages currently under development. This study is intended to support top-level planning for the disposition of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel inventory.

  4. Validation of Heavy Ion Transport Capabilities in PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronningen, Reginald M.

    2007-03-01

    The performance of the Monte Carlo code system PHITS is validated for heavy ion transport capabilities by performing simulations and comparing results against experimental data from heavy ion reactions of benchmark quality. These data are from measurements of secondary neutron production cross sections in reactions of Xe at 400 MeV/u with lithium and lead targets, measurements of neutrons outside of thick concrete and iron shields, and measurements of isotope yields produced in the fragmentation of a 140 MeV/u 48Ca beam on a beryllium target and on a tantalum target. A practical example that tests magnetic field capabilities is shown for a simulated 48Ca beam at 500 MeV/u striking a lithium target to produce the rare isotope 44Si, with ion transport through a fragmentation-reaction magnetic pre-separator. The results of this study show that PHITS performs reliably for the simulation of radiation fields that is necessary for designing safe, reliable and cost effective future high-powered heavy-ion accelerators in rare isotope beam facilities.

  5. Realtime capable first principle based modelling of tokamak turbulent transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citrin, Jonathan; Breton, Sarah; Felici, Federico; Imbeaux, Frederic; Redondo, Juan; Aniel, Thierry; Artaud, Jean-Francois; Baiocchi, Benedetta; Bourdelle, Clarisse; Camenen, Yann; Garcia, Jeronimo

    2015-11-01

    Transport in the tokamak core is dominated by turbulence driven by plasma microinstabilities. When calculating turbulent fluxes, maintaining both a first-principle-based model and computational tractability is a strong constraint. We present a pathway to circumvent this constraint by emulating quasilinear gyrokinetic transport code output through a nonlinear regression using multilayer perceptron neural networks. This recovers the original code output, while accelerating the computing time by five orders of magnitude, allowing realtime applications. A proof-of-principle is presented based on the QuaLiKiz quasilinear transport model, using a training set of five input dimensions, relevant for ITG turbulence. The model is implemented in the RAPTOR real-time capable tokamak simulator, and simulates a 300s ITER discharge in 10s. Progress in generalizing the emulation to include 12 input dimensions is presented. This opens up new possibilities for interpretation of present-day experiments, scenario preparation and open-loop optimization, realtime controller design, realtime discharge supervision, and closed-loop trajectory optimization.

  6. Transport capabilities of environmental Pseudomonads for sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Korajczyk, Peter J; Noirot, Philippe H; Collart, Frank R

    2017-04-01

    Sulfur is an essential element in plant rhizospheres and microbial activity plays a key role in increasing the biological availability of sulfur in soil environments. To better understand the mechanisms facilitating the exchange of sulfur-containing molecules in soil, we profiled the binding specificities of eight previously uncharacterized ABC transporter solute-binding proteins from plant-associated Pseudomonads. A high-throughput screening procedure indicated eighteen significant organosulfur binding ligands, with at least one high-quality screening hit for each protein target. Calorimetric and spectroscopic methods were used to validate the best ligand assignments and catalog the thermodynamic properties of the protein-ligand interactions. Two novel high-affinity ligand-binding activities were identified and quantified in this set of solute-binding proteins. Bacteria were cultured in minimal media with screening library components supplied as the sole sulfur sources, demonstrating that these organosulfur compounds can be metabolized and confirming the relevance of ligand assignments. These results expand the set of experimentally validated ligands amenable to transport by this ABC transporter family and demonstrate the complex range of protein-ligand interactions that can be accomplished by solute-binding proteins. Characterizing new nutrient import pathways provides insight into Pseudomonad metabolic capabilities which can be used to further interrogate bacterial survival and participation in soil and rhizosphere communities.

  7. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Seifried, Jeffrey E.

    2011-09-01

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  8. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, Jeffrey Edwin

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  9. Adjoint sensitivity studies of loop current and eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2013-07-01

    Adjoint model sensitivity analyses were applied for the loop current (LC) and its eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The circulation in the GoM is mainly driven by the energetic LC and subsequent LC eddy separation. In order to understand which ocean regions and features control the evolution of the LC, including anticyclonic warm-core eddy shedding in the GoM, forward and adjoint sensitivities with respect to previous model state and atmospheric forcing were computed using the MITgcm and its adjoint. Since the validity of the adjoint model sensitivities depends on the capability of the forward model to simulate the real LC system and the eddy shedding processes, a 5 year (2004-2008) forward model simulation was performed for the GoM using realistic atmospheric forcing, initial, and boundary conditions. This forward model simulation was compared to satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and sea-surface temperature (SST), and observed transport variability. Despite realistic mean state, standard deviations, and LC eddy shedding period, the simulated LC extension shows less variability and more regularity than the observations. However, the model is suitable for studying the LC system and can be utilized for examining the ocean influences leading to a simple, and hopefully generic LC eddy separation in the GoM. The adjoint sensitivities of the LC show influences from the Yucatan Channel (YC) flow and Loop Current Frontal Eddy (LCFE) on both LC extension and eddy separation, as suggested by earlier work. Some of the processes that control LC extension after eddy separation differ from those controlling eddy shedding, but include YC through-flow. The sensitivity remains stable for more than 30 days and moves generally upstream, entering the Caribbean Sea. The sensitivities of the LC for SST generally remain closer to the surface and move at speeds consistent with advection by the high-speed core of

  10. TAKEOFF AND LANDING PERFORMANCE CAPABILITIES OF TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRCRAFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, W. E.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most important considerations in the design of a commercial transport aircraft is the aircraft's performance during takeoff and landing operations. The aircraft must be designed to meet field length constraints in accordance with airworthiness standards specified in the Federal Aviation Regulations. In addition, the noise levels generated during these operations must be within acceptable limits. This computer program provides for the detailed analysis of the takeoff and landing performance capabilities of transport category aircraft. The program calculates aircraft performance in accordance with the airworthiness standards of the Federal Aviation Regulations. The aircraft and flight constraints are represented in sufficient detail to permit realistic sensitivity studies in terms of either configuration modifications or changes in operational procedures. This program provides for the detailed performance analysis of the takeoff and landing capabilities of specific aircraft designs and allows for sensitivity studies. The program is not designed to synthesize configurations or to generate aerodynamic, propulsion, or structural characteristics. This type of information must be generated externally to the program and then input as data. The program's representation of the aircraft data is extensive and includes realistic limits on engine and aircraft operational boundaries and maximum attainable lift coefficients. The takeoff and climbout flight-path is generated by a stepwise integration of the equation of motion. Special features include options for nonstandard-day operation, for balanced field length, for derated throttle to meet a given field length for off-loaded aircraft, and for throttle cutback during climbout for community noise alleviation. Advanced takeoff procedures for noise alleviation such as programmed throttle and control flaps may be investigated with the program. Approach profiles may incorporate advanced procedures such as two segment

  11. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  12. A new mathematical adjoint for the modified SAAF-SN equations

    SciTech Connect

    Schunert, Sebastian; Wang, Yaqi; Martineau, Richard; DeHart, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new adjoint FEM weak form, which can be directly used for evaluating the mathematical adjoint, suitable for perturbation calculations, of the self-adjoint angular flux SN equations (SAAF-SN) without construction and transposition of the underlying coefficient matrix. Stabilization schemes incorporated in the described SAAF-SN method make the mathematical adjoint distinct from the physical adjoint, i.e. the solution of the continuous adjoint equation with SAAF-SN . This weak form is implemented into RattleSnake, the MOOSE (Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment) based transport solver. Numerical results verify the correctness of the implementation and show its utility both for fixed source and eigenvalue problems.

  13. Global Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdag, Ebru; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Lei, Wenjie; Peter, Daniel; Smith, James; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    We will present our initial results of global adjoint tomography based on 3D seismic wave simulations which is one of the most challenging examples in seismology in terms of intense computational requirements and vast amount of high-quality seismic data that can potentially be assimilated in inversions. Using a spectral-element method, we incorporate full 3D wave propagation in seismic tomography by running synthetic seismograms and adjoint simulations to compute exact sensitivity kernels in realistic 3D background models. We run our global simulations on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system taking advantage of the GPU version of the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package. We have started iterations with initially selected 253 earthquakes within the magnitude range of 5.5 < Mw < 7.0 and numerical simulations having resolution down to ~27 s to invert for a transversely isotropic crust and mantle model using a non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm. The measurements are currently based on frequency-dependent traveltime misfits. We use both minor- and major-arc body and surface waves by running 200 min simulations where inversions are performed with more than 2.6 million measurements. Our initial results after 12 iterations already indicate several prominent features such as enhanced slab (e.g., Hellenic, Japan, Bismarck, Sandwich), plume/hotspot (e.g., the Pacific superplume, Caroline, Yellowstone, Hawaii) images, etc. To improve the resolution and ray coverage, particularly in the lower mantle, our aim is to increase the resolution of numerical simulations first going down to ~17 s and then to ~9 s to incorporate high-frequency body waves in inversions. While keeping track of the progress and illumination of features in our models with a limited data set, we work towards to assimilate all available data in inversions from all seismic networks and earthquakes in the global CMT catalogue.

  14. COUPLED FREE AND DISSOLVED PHASE TRANSPORT: NEW SIMULATION CAPABILITIES AND PARAMETER INVERSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vadose zone free-phase simulation capabilities of the US EPA Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM)have been linked with the 3-D multi-species dissolved-phase contaminant transport simulator MT3DMS.

  15. Stiff DAE integrator with sensitivity analysis capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Serban, R.

    2007-11-26

    IDAS is a general purpose (serial and parallel) solver for differential equation (ODE) systems with senstivity analysis capabilities. It provides both forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis options.

  16. Real-time capable first principle based modelling of tokamak turbulent transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citrin, J.; Breton, S.; Felici, F.; Imbeaux, F.; Aniel, T.; Artaud, J. F.; Baiocchi, B.; Bourdelle, C.; Camenen, Y.; Garcia, J.

    2015-09-01

    A real-time capable core turbulence tokamak transport model is developed. This model is constructed from the regularized nonlinear regression of quasilinear gyrokinetic transport code output. The regression is performed with a multilayer perceptron neural network. The transport code input for the neural network training set consists of five dimensions, and is limited to adiabatic electrons. The neural network model successfully reproduces transport fluxes predicted by the original quasilinear model, while gaining five orders of magnitude in computation time. The model is implemented in a real-time capable tokamak simulator, and simulates a 300 s ITER discharge in 10 s. This proof-of-principle for regression based transport models anticipates a significant widening of input space dimensionality and physics realism for future training sets. This aims to provide unprecedented computational speed coupled with first-principle based physics for real-time control and integrated modelling applications.

  17. Demonstration of Four Operating Capabilities to Enable a Small Aircraft Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Sally A.; Brooks, Frederick M.

    2005-01-01

    The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) project has been a five-year effort fostering research and development that could lead to the transformation of our country s air transportation system. It has become evident that our commercial air transportation system is reaching its peak in terms of capacity, with numerous delays in the system and the demand keeps steadily increasing. The SATS vision is to increase mobility in our nation s transportation system by expanding access to more than 3400 small community airports that are currently under-utilized. The SATS project has focused its efforts on four key operating capabilities that have addressed new emerging technologies and procedures to pave the way for a new way of air travel. The four key operating capabilities are: Higher Volume Operations at Non-Towered/Non-Radar Airports, En Route Procedures and Systems for Integrated Fleet Operations, Lower Landing Minimums at Minimally Equipped Landing Facilities, and Increased Single Pilot Performance. These four capabilities are key to enabling low-cost, on-demand, point-to-point transportation of goods and passengers utilizing small aircraft operating from small airports. The focus of this paper is to discuss the technical and operational feasibility of the four operating capabilities and demonstrate how they can enable a small aircraft transportation system.

  18. Attribution of primary formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide at Texas City during SHARP/formaldehyde and olefins from large industrial releases (FLAIR) using an adjoint chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaguer, Eduardo P.; Herndon, Scott C.; Buzcu-Guven, Birnur; Kolb, Charles E.; Brown, Michael J.; Cuclis, Alex E.

    2013-10-01

    adjoint version of the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) neighborhood air quality model with 200 m horizontal resolution, coupled offline to the Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC-URB) fast response urban wind model, was used to perform 4-D variational (4Dvar) inverse modeling of an industrial release of formaldehyde (HCHO) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in Texas City, Texas during the 2009 Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors (SHARP). The source attribution was based on real-time observations by the Aerodyne mobile laboratory and a high resolution 3-D digital model of the emitting petrochemical complex and surrounding urban canopy. The inverse model estimate of total primary HCHO emitted during the incident agrees very closely with independent remote sensing estimates based on both Imaging and Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Whereas a previous analysis of Imaging DOAS data attributed the HCHO release to a Fluidized Catalytic Cracking Unit (FCCU), the HARC model attributed most of the HCHO event emissions to both the FCCU and desulfurization processes. Fugitives contributed significantly to primary HCHO, as did combustion processes, whereas the latter accounted for most SO2 event emissions. The inferred HCHO-to-SO2 molar emission ratio was similar to that computed directly from ambient air measurements during the release. The model-estimated HCHO-to-CO molar emission ratio for combustion units with significant inferred emissions ranged from 2% to somewhat less than 7%, consistent with other observationally-based estimates obtained during SHARP. A model sensitivity study demonstrated that the inclusion of urban morphology has a significant, but not critical, impact on the source attribution.

  19. Application of an adjoint neighborhood-scale chemistry transport model to the attribution of primary formaldehyde at Lynchburg Ferry during TexAQS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaguer, Eduardo P.

    2013-05-01

    During the 2006 Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS II) field study, ambient mixing ratios of formaldehyde (HCHO) up to 52 ppbv were observed at Lynchburg Ferry in the Houston Ship Channel on the morning of 27 September 2006. These elevated mixing ratios coincided with a flare event during a sequential planned shutdown of a petrochemical facility ~8 km from the monitoring site. An adjoint version of the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) neighborhood air quality model was used to perform 4-D variational inverse modeling of industrial emissions of HCHO and other ozone precursors based on Lynchburg Ferry observations. The simulation employed a horizontal domain size and grid resolution of 8 km × 8 km and 400 m, and was conducted for a 1.5 h period (8-9:30 A.M.) during which the highest HCHO concentrations were recorded. The event emissions of ethene and propene computed by the inverse model are consistent with the largest estimated emissions for the facility in question derived from the Solar Occultation Flux technique during TexAQS II. Moreover, the computed peak flare emissions of HCHO during the shutdown event were around 282 kg/h, which is less than but comparable in magnitude to the largest area-wide total (primary plus secondary) formaldehyde flux from the Houston Ship Channel measured by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy during TexAQS II. The estimated flare event emissions of primary formaldehyde are roughly 50 times larger than HCHO emissions from flares used in routine operations, as inferred from remote sensing and/or real-time in situ measurements during the 2009 SHARP campaign.

  20. Data adjoint assimilation into the adjoint inverse coastal circulation model that conforms to topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Pain, C. C.; Gaddard, A. J. H.; de Oliveira, C. R. E.; Piggott, M. D.; Umpleby, A. P.; Copeland, G. J. M.

    2003-04-01

    There are often uncertain factors in ocean numerical models, e.g. the initial and boundary conditions, parameters. With the introduction of advanced observational techniques, more attention has been given to data assimilation to improve the predictive capabilities of ocean models. The question is how and where best to assimilate the observations for reducing the dependence of solutions on the initial and boundary data and getting a better representation of non-stratified water flows around and over coastal topography. In this investigation, we aim to introduce an adjoint model into the Imperial College Ocean Model (ICOM), which is a 3D nonlinear non-hydrostatic model with mesh adaptivity and optimal Domain Decomposition Method (DDM) parallel solver. By using an unstructured mesh, ICOM can automatically conform to the complicated coastal topography and with mesh adaptivity the resolution can be designed to meet physics demands such as flows in region of high shear and flow separation at coastlines. In the initial stage of this investigation, we discuss various adjoint methods and their consistence. To accelerate the convergence of the gradient calculation and reduce the memory requirement, the numerical techniques: Nonlinear Conjugate Gradient and Check Pointing are introduced. We then apply the adjoint method to 1D nonlinear shallow water and 2D coastal flow past a headland with the inversion of both boundary and initial conditions. We give an initial insight to (1) Effect of data information to be inverted; (2) Role of the nonlinear terms in the inversion; (3) Possibility of adopting non-consistent discretization schemes in the forward and backward adjoint models; (4) Effect of various boundary conditions, e.g. uniform flow and wave/tidal flow.

  1. New Capabilities in Mercury: A Modern, Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Cullen, D E; Greenman, G M; Hagmann, C A; Kramer, K J; McKinley, M S; O'Brien, M J; Taylor, J M

    2007-03-08

    The new physics, algorithmic and computer science capabilities of the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code are discussed. The new physics and algorithmic features include in-line energy deposition and isotopic depletion, significant enhancements to the tally and source capabilities, diagnostic ray-traced particles, support for multi-region hybrid (mesh and combinatorial geometry) systems, and a probability of initiation method. Computer science enhancements include a second method of dynamically load-balancing parallel calculations, improved methods for visualizing 3-D combinatorial geometries and initial implementation of an in-line visualization capabilities.

  2. COUPLED FREE AND DISSOLVED PHASE TRANSPORT: NEW SIMULATION CAPABILITIES AND PARAMETER INVERSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vadose zone free-phase simulation capabilities of the US EPA Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM) (Weaver et al., 1994) have been linked with the 3-D multi-species dissolved-phase contaminant transport simulator MT3DMS (Zheng and Wang, 1999; Zheng, 2005). The linkage pro...

  3. Discrete Adjoint-Based Design Optimization of Unsteady Turbulent Flows on Dynamic Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris; Yamaleev, Nail K.

    2009-01-01

    An adjoint-based methodology for design optimization of unsteady turbulent flows on dynamic unstructured grids is described. The implementation relies on an existing unsteady three-dimensional unstructured grid solver capable of dynamic mesh simulations and discrete adjoint capabilities previously developed for steady flows. The discrete equations for the primal and adjoint systems are presented for the backward-difference family of time-integration schemes on both static and dynamic grids. The consistency of sensitivity derivatives is established via comparisons with complex-variable computations. The current work is believed to be the first verified implementation of an adjoint-based optimization methodology for the true time-dependent formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations in a practical computational code. Large-scale shape optimizations are demonstrated for turbulent flows over a tiltrotor geometry and a simulated aeroelastic motion of a fighter jet.

  4. Adjoint-Based Methods for Estimating CO2 Sources and Sinks from Atmospheric Concentration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Arlyn E.

    2003-01-01

    Work to develop adjoint-based methods for estimating CO2 sources and sinks from atmospheric concentration data was initiated in preparation for last year's summer institute on Carbon Data Assimilation (CDAS) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, CO. The workshop exercises used the GSFC Parameterized Chemistry and Transport Model and its adjoint. Since the workshop, a number of simulations have been run to evaluate the performance of the model adjoint. Results from these simulations will be presented, along with an outline of challenges associated with incorporating a variety of disparate data sources, from sparse, but highly precise, surface in situ observations to less accurate, global future satellite observations.

  5. Definition of display/control requirements for assault transport night/adverse weather capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milelli, R. J.; Mowery, G. W.; Pontelandolfo, C.

    1982-01-01

    A Helicopter Night Vision System was developed to improve low-altitude night and/or adverse weather assult transport capabilities. Man-in-the-loop simulation experiments were performed to define the minimum display and control requirements for the assult transport mission and investigate forward looking infrared sensor requirements, along with alternative displays such as panel mounted displays (PMD) helmet mounted displays (HMD), and integrated control display units. Also explored were navigation requirements, pilot/copilot interaction, and overall cockpit arrangement. Pilot use of an HMD and copilot use of a PMD appear as both the preferred and most effective night navigation combination.

  6. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    DOE PAGES

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; ...

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Somemore » specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.« less

  7. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Some specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.

  8. Overview of the Small Aircraft Transportation System Project Four Enabling Operating Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Sally A.; Brooks, Frederick M.; Johnson, Sally C.

    2005-01-01

    It has become evident that our commercial air transportation system is reaching its peak in terms of capacity, with numerous delays in the system and the demand still steadily increasing. NASA, FAA, and the National Consortium for Aviation Mobility (NCAM) have partnered to aid in increasing the mobility throughout the United States through the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) project. The SATS project has been a five-year effort to provide the technical and economic basis for further national investment and policy decisions to support a small aircraft transportation system. The SATS vision is to enable people and goods to have the convenience of on-demand point-to-point travel, anywhere, anytime for both personal and business travel. This vision can be obtained by expanding near all-weather access to more than 3,400 small community airports that are currently under-utilized throughout the United States. SATS has focused its efforts on four key operating capabilities that have addressed new emerging technologies, procedures, and concepts to pave the way for small aircraft to operate in nearly all weather conditions at virtually any runway in the United States. These four key operating capabilities are: Higher Volume Operations at Non-Towered/Non-Radar Airports, En Route Procedures and Systems for Integrated Fleet Operations, Lower Landing Minimums at Minimally Equipped Landing Facilities, and Increased Single Pilot Performance. The SATS project culminated with the 2005 SATS Public Demonstration in Danville, Virginia on June 5th-7th, by showcasing the accomplishments achieved throughout the project and demonstrating that a small aircraft transportation system could be viable. The technologies, procedures, and concepts were successfully demonstrated to show that they were safe, effective, and affordable for small aircraft in near all weather conditions. The focus of this paper is to provide an overview of the technical and operational feasibility of the

  9. Self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators

    SciTech Connect

    Much, Albert

    2015-09-15

    We consider deformations of unbounded operators by using the novel construction tool of warped convolutions. By using the Kato-Rellich theorem, we show that unbounded self-adjoint deformed operators are self-adjoint if they satisfy a certain condition. This condition proves itself to be necessary for the oscillatory integral to be well-defined. Moreover, different proofs are given for self-adjointness of deformed unbounded operators in the context of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory.

  10. Advanced multi-dimensional deterministic transport computational capability for safety analysis of pebble-bed reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyobeka, Bismark Mzubanzi

    A coupled neutron transport thermal-hydraulics code system with both diffusion and transport theory capabilities is presented. At the heart of the coupled code is a powerful neutronics solver, based on a neutron transport theory approach, powered by the time-dependent extension of the well known DORT code, DORT-TD. DORT-TD uses a fully implicit time integration scheme and is coupled via a general interface to the thermal-hydraulics code THERMIX-DIREKT, an HTR-specific two dimensional core thermal-hydraulics code. Feedback is accounted for by interpolating multigroup cross sections from pre-generated libraries which are structured for user specified discrete sets of thermal-hydraulic parameters e.g. fuel and moderator temperatures. The coupled code system is applied to two HTGR designs, the PBMR 400MW and the PBMR 268MW. Steady-state and several design basis transients are modeled in an effort to discern with the adequacy of using neutron diffusion theory as against the more accurate but yet computationally expensive neutron transport theory. It turns out that there are small but significant differences in the results from using either of the two theories. It is concluded that diffusion theory can be used with a higher degree of confidence in the PBMR as long as more than two energy groups are used and that the result must be checked against lower order transport solution, especially for safety analysis purposes. The end product of this thesis is a high fidelity, state-of-the-art computer code system, with multiple capabilities to analyze all PBMR safety related transients in an accurate and efficient manner.

  11. Numerical Computation of Sensitivities and the Adjoint Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the numerical computation of sensitivities via the adjoint approach in optimization problems governed by differential equations. We focus on the adjoint problem in its weak form. We show how one can avoid some of the problems with the adjoint approach, such as deriving suitable boundary conditions for the adjoint equation. We discuss the convergence of numerical approximations of the costate computed via the weak form of the adjoint problem and show the significance for the discrete adjoint problem.

  12. Adjoint sensitivity study on idealized explosive cyclogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Kekuan; Zhang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    The adjoint sensitivity related to explosive cyclogenesis in a conditionally unstable atmosphere is investigated in this study. The PSU/NCAR limited-area, nonhydrostatic primitive equation numerical model MM5 and its adjoint system are employed for numerical simulation and adjoint computation, respectively. To ensure the explosive development of a baroclinic wave, the forecast model is initialized with an idealized condition including an idealized two-dimensional baroclinic jet with a balanced three-dimensional moderate-amplitude disturbance, derived from a potential vorticity inversion technique. Firstly, the validity period of the tangent linear model for this idealized baroclinic wave case is discussed, considering different initial moisture distributions and a dry condition. Secondly, the 48-h forecast surface pressure center and the vertical component of the relative vorticity of the cyclone are selected as the response functions for adjoint computation in a dry and moist environment, respectively. The preliminary results show that the validity of the tangent linear assumption for this idealized baroclinic wave case can extend to 48 h with intense moist convection, and the validity period can last even longer in the dry adjoint integration. Adjoint sensitivity analysis indicates that the rapid development of the idealized baroclinic wave is sensitive to the initial wind and temperature perturbations around the steering level in the upstream. Moreover, the moist adjoint sensitivity can capture a secondary high sensitivity center in the upper troposphere, which cannot be depicted in the dry adjoint run.

  13. Adjoint Error Estimation for Linear Advection

    SciTech Connect

    Connors, J M; Banks, J W; Hittinger, J A; Woodward, C S

    2011-03-30

    An a posteriori error formula is described when a statistical measurement of the solution to a hyperbolic conservation law in 1D is estimated by finite volume approximations. This is accomplished using adjoint error estimation. In contrast to previously studied methods, the adjoint problem is divorced from the finite volume method used to approximate the forward solution variables. An exact error formula and computable error estimate are derived based on an abstractly defined approximation of the adjoint solution. This framework allows the error to be computed to an arbitrary accuracy given a sufficiently well resolved approximation of the adjoint solution. The accuracy of the computable error estimate provably satisfies an a priori error bound for sufficiently smooth solutions of the forward and adjoint problems. The theory does not currently account for discontinuities. Computational examples are provided that show support of the theory for smooth solutions. The application to problems with discontinuities is also investigated computationally.

  14. Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling using Space, Energy and Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Peplow, Douglas E.; Mosher, Scott W; Evans, Thomas M

    2012-08-01

    For challenging radiation transport problems, hybrid methods combine the accuracy of Monte Carlo methods with the global information present in deterministic methods. One of the most successful hybrid methods is CADIS Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling. This method uses a deterministic adjoint solution to construct a biased source distribution and consistent weight windows to optimize a specific tally in a Monte Carlo calculation. The method has been implemented into transport codes using just the spatial and energy information from the deterministic adjoint and has been used in many applications to compute tallies with much higher figures-of-merit than analog calculations. CADIS also outperforms user-supplied importance values, which usually take long periods of user time to develop. This work extends CADIS to develop weight windows that are a function of the position, energy, and direction of the Monte Carlo particle. Two types of consistent source biasing are presented: one method that biases the source in space and energy while preserving the original directional distribution and one method that biases the source in space, energy, and direction. Seven simple example problems are presented which compare the use of the standard space/energy CADIS with the new space/energy/angle treatments.

  15. Dose Rate Analysis Capability for Actual Spent Fuel Transportation Cask Contents

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Lefebvre, Robert A; Peplow, Douglas E.; Williams, Mark L; Scaglione, John M

    2014-01-01

    The approved contents for a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensed spent nuclear fuel casks are typically based on bounding used nuclear fuel (UNF) characteristics. However, the contents of the UNF canisters currently in storage at independent spent fuel storage installations are considerably heterogeneous in terms of fuel assembly burnup, initial enrichment, decay time, cladding integrity, etc. Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation & Disposal Analysis Resource and Data System (UNF ST&DARDS) is an integrated data and analysis system that facilitates automated cask-specific safety analyses based on actual characteristics of the as-loaded UNF. The UNF-ST&DARDS analysis capabilities have been recently expanded to include dose rate analysis of as-loaded transportation packages. Realistic dose rate values based on actual canister contents may be used in place of bounding dose rate values to support development of repackaging operations procedures, evaluation of radiation-related transportation risks, and communication with stakeholders. This paper describes the UNF-ST&DARDS dose rate analysis methodology based on actual UNF canister contents and presents sample dose rate calculation results.

  16. A Generalized Adjoint Approach for Quantifying Reflector Assembly Discontinuity Factor Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Yankov, Artem; Collins, Benjamin; Jessee, Matthew Anderson; Downar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Sensitivity-based uncertainty analysis of assembly discontinuity factors (ADFs) can be readily performed using adjoint methods for infinite lattice models. However, there is currently no adjoint-based methodology to obtain uncertainties for ADFs along an interface between a fuel and reflector region. To accommodate leakage effects in a reflector region, a 1D approximation is usually made in order to obtain the homogeneous interface flux required to calculate the ADF. Within this 1D framework an adjoint-based method is proposed that is capable of efficiently calculating ADF uncertainties. In the proposed method the sandwich rule is utilized to relate the covariance of the input parameters of 1D diffusion theory in the reflector region to the covariance of the interface ADFs. The input parameters covariance matrix can be readily obtained using sampling-based codes such as XSUSA or adjoint-based codes such as TSUNAMI. The sensitivity matrix is constructed using a fixed-source adjoint approach for inputs characterizing the reflector region. An analytic approach is then used to determine the sensitivity of the ADFs to fuel parameters using the neutron balance equation. A stochastic approach is used to validate the proposed adjoint-based method.

  17. Adjoint Algorithm for CAD-Based Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    an effective optimization framework that incorporates a direct-CAD interface. In this work, we enhance the capabilities of this framework with efficient gradient computations using the discrete adjoint method. We present details of the adjoint numerical implementation, which reuses the domain decomposition, multigrid, and time-marching schemes of the flow solver. Furthermore, we explain and demonstrate the use of CAD in conjunction with the Cartesian adjoint approach. The final paper will contain a number of complex geometry, industrially relevant examples with many design variables to demonstrate the effectiveness of the adjoint method on Cartesian meshes.

  18. Adjoint method and runaway electron avalanche

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Brennan, Dylan P.; Boozer, Allen H.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-02-01

    The adjoint method for the study of runaway electron dynamics in momentum space Liu et al (2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 010702) is rederived using the Green’s function method, for both the runaway probability function (RPF) and the expected loss time (ELT). The RPF and ELT obtained using the adjoint method are presented, both with and without the synchrotron radiation reaction force. The adjoint method is then applied to study the runaway electron avalanche. Both the critical electric field and the growth rate for the avalanche are calculated using this fast and novel approach.

  19. Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, Laurent

    2003-09-01

    During the summer 1998, a strong pollution event was documented over Paris as part of the Etude et Simulation de la Qualité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF) project (second intensive observation period (IOP2)). From 7 to 9 August 1998 the pollution event changes from a well-marked ozone plume issued from Paris to a more general pollution over the whole Ile-de-France region. Using a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model and its adjoint part, the sensitivity of ozone, Ox, and NOx peaks to model parameters is investigated. For two locations, Paris and a suburban site, the influence of both meteorological and chemical model parameters on the simulated field concentrations is hourly quantified for each day. Processes leading to a urban polluted event are compared. It is shown that the pollutant concentrations are mainly driven by traffic and solvent surface emissions and meteorological parameters such as temperature. Since the adjoint approach is limited to infinitesimal model perturbation, some scenario simulations are carried out to evaluate the linearity of the impact of the most sensitive parameters within the uncertainty range. It is shown that the sensitivities determined from the adjoint approach can be extrapolated until their uncertainty ranges except for the wind speed.

  20. Survey of state and tribal emergency response capabilities for radiological transportation incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Vilardo, F J; Mitter, E L; Palmer, J A; Briggs, H C; Fesenmaier, J

    1990-05-01

    This publication is the final report of a project to survey the fifty states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and selected Indian Tribal jurisdictions to ascertain their emergency-preparedness planning and capabilities for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. The survey was conducted to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and other federal agencies with information concerning the current level of emergency-response preparedness of the states and selected tribes and an assessment of the changes that have occurred since 1980. There have been no major changes in the states' emergency-response planning strategies and field tactics. The changes noted included an increased availability of dedicated emergency-response vehicles, wider availability of specialized radiation-detection instruments, and higher proportions of police and fire personnel with training in the handling of suspected radiation threats. Most Indian tribes have no capability to evaluate suspected radiation threats and have no formal relations with emergency-response personnel in adjacent states. For the nation as a whole, the incidence of suspected radiation threats declined substantially from 1980 to 1988. 58 tabs.

  1. New Lidar Capabilities in Space: An Overview of the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, M. J.; Yorks, J. E.; Hlavka, D. L.; Selmer, P. A.; Hart, W. D.; Palm, S. P.; Nowottnick, E. P.; Vaughan, M.; Rodier, S. D.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Buchard, V.

    2014-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), built at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a payload for the International Space Station (ISS), is set to launch in the late 2014. CATS is an elastic backscatter lidar operating in one of three science modes with three wavelengths (1064, 532, 355 nm) and HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at the 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths. The CATS science modes are described in Figure 1. The ISS orbit is a 51 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of about 405 km. This orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three day repeat cycle. Thus, science applications of CATS include cloud and aerosol climate studies, air quality monitoring, and smoke/volcanic plume tracking. Current uncertainties in cloud and aerosol properties limit our ability to accurately model the Earth's climate system and predict climate change. These limitations are due primarily to difficulties in adequately measuring aerosols and clouds on a global scale. A primary science objectives of CATS is to provide global aerosol and cloud vertical profile data in near real time to for assimilation in aerosol transport models such as the NASA GEOS-5 model. Furthermore, the vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties provided by CATS will complement current and future passive satellite sensors. Another important science objective of CATS is to advance technology in support of future mission development. CATS will employ 355 nm and HSRL capabilities, as well as depolarization at multiple wavelengths. These expanded measurement capabilities will provide the science community with new and improved global data products that have yet to be retrieved from space-based lidar. In preparation for launch, simulations of the CATS lidar signal are produced using GEOS5 model data to develop and test future data products. An example of the simulated CATS attenuated

  2. Adjoint estimation of ozone climate penalties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shunliu; Pappin, Amanda J.; Morteza Mesbah, S.; Joyce Zhang, J. Y.; MacDonald, Nicole L.; Hakami, Amir

    2013-10-01

    adjoint of a regional chemical transport model is used to calculate location-specific temperature influences (climate penalties) on two policy-relevant ozone metrics: concentrations in polluted regions (>65 ppb) and short-term mortality in Canada and the U.S. Temperature influences through changes in chemical reaction rates, atmospheric moisture content, and biogenic emissions exhibit significant spatial variability. In particular, high-NOx, polluted regions are prominently distinguished by substantial climate penalties (up to 6.2 ppb/K in major urban areas) as a result of large temperature influences through increased biogenic emissions and nonnegative water vapor sensitivities. Temperature influences on ozone mortality, when integrated across the domain, result in 369 excess deaths/K in Canada and the U.S. over a summer season—an impact comparable to a 5% change in anthropogenic NOx emissions. As such, we suggest that NOx control can be also regarded as a climate change adaptation strategy with regard to ozone air quality.

  3. Application of the adjoint approach to optimise the initial conditions of a turbidity current with the AdjointTurbidity 1.0 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Samuel D.; Funke, Simon W.; Hill, Jon; Piggott, Matthew D.; Allison, Peter A.

    2017-03-01

    Turbidity currents are one of the main drivers of sediment transport from the continental shelf to the deep ocean. The resulting sediment deposits can reach hundreds of kilometres into the ocean. Computer models that simulate turbidity currents and the resulting sediment deposit can help us to understand their general behaviour. However, in order to recreate real-world scenarios, the challenge is to find the turbidity current parameters that reproduce the observations of sediment deposits. This paper demonstrates a solution to the inverse sediment transportation problem: for a known sedimentary deposit, the developed model reconstructs details about the turbidity current that produced the deposit. The reconstruction is constrained here by a shallow water sediment-laden density current model, which is discretised by the finite-element method and an adaptive time-stepping scheme. The model is differentiated using the adjoint approach, and an efficient gradient-based optimisation method is applied to identify the turbidity parameters which minimise the misfit between the modelled and the observed field sediment deposits. The capabilities of this approach are demonstrated using measurements taken in the Miocene Marnoso-arenacea Formation (Italy). We find that whilst the model cannot match the deposit exactly due to limitations in the physical processes simulated, it provides valuable insights into the depositional processes and represents a significant advance in our toolset for interpreting turbidity current deposits.

  4. On the adjoint operator in photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, Simon R.; Betcke, Marta M.; Cox, Ben T.; Lucka, Felix; Treeby, Brad E.

    2016-11-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging biomedical imaging from coupled physics technique, in which the image contrast is due to optical absorption, but the information is carried to the surface of the tissue as ultrasound pulses. Many algorithms and formulae for PAT image reconstruction have been proposed for the case when a complete data set is available. In many practical imaging scenarios, however, it is not possible to obtain the full data, or the data may be sub-sampled for faster data acquisition. In such cases, image reconstruction algorithms that can incorporate prior knowledge to ameliorate the loss of data are required. Hence, recently there has been an increased interest in using variational image reconstruction. A crucial ingredient for the application of these techniques is the adjoint of the PAT forward operator, which is described in this article from physical, theoretical and numerical perspectives. First, a simple mathematical derivation of the adjoint of the PAT forward operator in the continuous framework is presented. Then, an efficient numerical implementation of the adjoint using a k-space time domain wave propagation model is described and illustrated in the context of variational PAT image reconstruction, on both 2D and 3D examples including inhomogeneous sound speed. The principal advantage of this analytical adjoint over an algebraic adjoint (obtained by taking the direct adjoint of the particular numerical forward scheme used) is that it can be implemented using currently available fast wave propagation solvers.

  5. Session on High Speed Civil Transport Design Capability Using MDO and High Performance Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehder, Joe

    2000-01-01

    Since the inception of CAS in 1992, NASA Langley has been conducting research into applying multidisciplinary optimization (MDO) and high performance computing toward reducing aircraft design cycle time. The focus of this research has been the development of a series of computational frameworks and associated applications that increased in capability, complexity, and performance over time. The culmination of this effort is an automated high-fidelity analysis capability for a high speed civil transport (HSCT) vehicle installed on a network of heterogeneous computers with a computational framework built using Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) and Java. The main focus of the research in the early years was the development of the Framework for Interdisciplinary Design Optimization (FIDO) and associated HSCT applications. While the FIDO effort was eventually halted, work continued on HSCT applications of ever increasing complexity. The current application, HSCT4.0, employs high fidelity CFD and FEM analysis codes. For each analysis cycle, the vehicle geometry and computational grids are updated using new values for design variables. Processes for aeroelastic trim, loads convergence, displacement transfer, stress and buckling, and performance have been developed. In all, a total of 70 processes are integrated in the analysis framework. Many of the key processes include automatic differentiation capabilities to provide sensitivity information that can be used in optimization. A software engineering process was developed to manage this large project. Defining the interactions among 70 processes turned out to be an enormous, but essential, task. A formal requirements document was prepared that defined data flow among processes and subprocesses. A design document was then developed that translated the requirements into actual software design. A validation program was defined and implemented to ensure that codes integrated into the framework produced the same

  6. The Design of Transportation Equipment in Terms of Human Capabilities. The Role of Engineering Psychology in Transport Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Ross A.

    Human factors engineering is considered with regard to the design of safety factors for aviation and highway transportation equipment. Current trends and problem areas are identified for jet air transportation and for highway transportation. Suggested solutions to transportation safety problems are developed by applying the techniques of human…

  7. Enhanced Transport Capabilities via Nanotechnologies: Impacting Bioefficacy, Controlled Release Strategies, and Novel Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotou, Thomai; Fisher, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging nanotechnologies have, and will continue to have, a major impact on the pharmaceutical industry. Their influence on a drug's life cycle, inception to delivery, is rapidly expanding. As the industry moves more aggressively toward continuous manufacturing modes, utilizing Process Analytical Technology (PAT) and Process Intensification (PI) concepts, the critical role of transport phenomena becomes elucidated. The ability to transfer energy, mass, and momentum with directed purposeful outcomes is a worthwhile endeavor in establishing higher production rates more economically. Furthermore, the ability to obtain desired drug properties, such as size, habit, and morphology, through novel manufacturing strategies permits unique formulation control for optimum delivery methodologies. Bottom-up processing to obtain nano-sized crystals is an excellent example. Formulation and delivery are intimately coupled in improving bio-efficacy at reduced loading and/or better controlled release capabilities, minimizing side affects and providing improved therapeutic interventions. Innovative nanotechnology applications, such as simultaneous targeting, imaging and delivery to tumors, are now possible through use of novel chaperones. Other examples include nanoparticles attachment to T-cells, release from novel hydrogel implants, and functionalized encapsulants. Difficult tasks such as drug delivery to the brain via the blood brain barrier and/or the cerebrospinal fluid are now easier to accomplish. PMID:21603220

  8. Transporter protein and drug-conjugated gold nanoparticles capable of bypassing the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanhua; Walker, Janelle Buttry; Minic, Zeljka; Liu, Fangchao; Goshgarian, Harry; Mao, Guangzhao

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is challenging due to the inability of many drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we show that wheat germ agglutinin horse radish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) chemically conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be transported to the spinal cord and brainstem following intramuscular injection into the diaphragm of rats. We synthesized and determined the size and chemical composition of a three-part nanoconjugate consisting of WGA-HRP, AuNPs, and drugs for the treatment of diaphragm paralysis associated with high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Upon injection into the diaphragm muscle of rats, we show that the nanoconjugate is capable of delivering the drug at a much lower dose than the unconjugated drug injected systemically to effectively induce respiratory recovery in rats following SCI. This study not only demonstrates a promising strategy to deliver drugs to the CNS bypassing the BBB but also contributes a potential nanotherapy for the treatment of respiratory muscle paralysis resulted from cervical SCI. PMID:27180729

  9. Transporter protein and drug-conjugated gold nanoparticles capable of bypassing the blood-brain barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanhua; Walker, Janelle Buttry; Minic, Zeljka; Liu, Fangchao; Goshgarian, Harry; Mao, Guangzhao

    2016-05-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is challenging due to the inability of many drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we show that wheat germ agglutinin horse radish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) chemically conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be transported to the spinal cord and brainstem following intramuscular injection into the diaphragm of rats. We synthesized and determined the size and chemical composition of a three-part nanoconjugate consisting of WGA-HRP, AuNPs, and drugs for the treatment of diaphragm paralysis associated with high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Upon injection into the diaphragm muscle of rats, we show that the nanoconjugate is capable of delivering the drug at a much lower dose than the unconjugated drug injected systemically to effectively induce respiratory recovery in rats following SCI. This study not only demonstrates a promising strategy to deliver drugs to the CNS bypassing the BBB but also contributes a potential nanotherapy for the treatment of respiratory muscle paralysis resulted from cervical SCI.

  10. Enhanced Transport Capabilities via Nanotechnologies: Impacting Bioefficacy, Controlled Release Strategies, and Novel Chaperones.

    PubMed

    Panagiotou, Thomai; Fisher, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Emerging nanotechnologies have, and will continue to have, a major impact on the pharmaceutical industry. Their influence on a drug's life cycle, inception to delivery, is rapidly expanding. As the industry moves more aggressively toward continuous manufacturing modes, utilizing Process Analytical Technology (PAT) and Process Intensification (PI) concepts, the critical role of transport phenomena becomes elucidated. The ability to transfer energy, mass, and momentum with directed purposeful outcomes is a worthwhile endeavor in establishing higher production rates more economically. Furthermore, the ability to obtain desired drug properties, such as size, habit, and morphology, through novel manufacturing strategies permits unique formulation control for optimum delivery methodologies. Bottom-up processing to obtain nano-sized crystals is an excellent example. Formulation and delivery are intimately coupled in improving bio-efficacy at reduced loading and/or better controlled release capabilities, minimizing side affects and providing improved therapeutic interventions. Innovative nanotechnology applications, such as simultaneous targeting, imaging and delivery to tumors, are now possible through use of novel chaperones. Other examples include nanoparticles attachment to T-cells, release from novel hydrogel implants, and functionalized encapsulants. Difficult tasks such as drug delivery to the brain via the blood brain barrier and/or the cerebrospinal fluid are now easier to accomplish.

  11. Aerodynamic Optimization Design of Multi-stage Turbine Using the Continuous Adjoint Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Chen, Jiang

    2015-05-01

    This paper develops a continuous adjoint formulation for the aerodynamic shape design of a turbine in a multi-stage environment based on S2 surface governed by the Euler equations with source terms. First, given the general expression of the objective function, the adjoint equations and their boundary conditions are derived by introducing the adjoint variable vectors. Then, the final expression of the objective function gradient only includes the terms pertinent to the physical shape variations. The adjoint system is solved numerically by a finite-difference method with the Jameson spatial scheme employing first and third order dissipative flux and the time-marching is conducted by Runge-Kutta time method. Integrating the blade stagger angles, stacking lines and passage perturbation parameterization with the Quasi-Newton method of BFGS, a gradient-based aerodynamic optimization design system is constructed. Finally, the application of the adjoint method is validated through the blade and passage optimization of a 2-stage turbine with an objective function of entropy generation. The efficiency increased by 0.37% with the deviations of the mass flow rate and the pressure ratio within 1% via the optimization, which demonstrates the capability of the gradient-based system for turbine aerodynamic design.

  12. How to characterize thermal transport capability of 2D materials fairly? - Sheet thermal conductance and the choice of thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xufei; Varshney, Vikas; Lee, Jonghoon; Pang, Yunsong; Roy, Ajit K.; Luo, Tengfei

    2017-02-01

    Thermal transport capability of monolayer 2D materials has been under constant spotlight. However, different definitions of thickness in literature have led to ambiguity towards predicting thermal conductivity values and thus in understanding the heat transfer capability of different monolayer 2D materials. We argue that the same thickness should be used and a 'sheet thermal conductance' should be defined as an intensive 2D material property when characterizing the heat transfer capability of 2D materials. When converting literature thermal conductivity values of monolayer materials to this new property, some new features that were not displayed when using different thicknesses show up.

  13. Adjoint Optimization of Wind Plant Layouts

    DOE PAGES

    King, Ryan N.; Dykes, Katherine; Graf, Peter; ...

    2016-08-31

    Using adjoint optimization and three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) simulations, we present a new gradient-based approach for optimally siting wind turbines within utility-scale wind plants. By solving the adjoint equations of the flow model, the gradients needed for optimization are found at a cost that is independent of the number of control variables, thereby permitting optimization of large wind plants with many turbine locations. Moreover, compared to the common approach of superimposing prescribed wake deficits onto linearized flow models, the computational efficiency of the adjoint approach allows the use of higher-fidelity RANS flow models which can capture nonlinear turbulent flowmore » physics within a wind plant. The RANS flow model is implemented in the Python finite element package FEniCS and the derivation of the adjoint equations is automated within the dolfin-adjoint framework. Gradient-based optimization of wind turbine locations is demonstrated on idealized test cases that reveal new optimization heuristics such as rotational symmetry, local speedups, and nonlinear wake curvature effects. Layout optimization is also demonstrated on more complex wind rose shapes, including a full annual energy production (AEP) layout optimization over 36 inflow directions and 5 windspeed bins.« less

  14. Adjoint Optimization of Wind Plant Layouts

    SciTech Connect

    King, Ryan N.; Dykes, Katherine; Graf, Peter; Hamlington, Peter E.

    2016-08-31

    Using adjoint optimization and three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) simulations, we present a new gradient-based approach for optimally siting wind turbines within utility-scale wind plants. By solving the adjoint equations of the flow model, the gradients needed for optimization are found at a cost that is independent of the number of control variables, thereby permitting optimization of large wind plants with many turbine locations. Moreover, compared to the common approach of superimposing prescribed wake deficits onto linearized flow models, the computational efficiency of the adjoint approach allows the use of higher-fidelity RANS flow models which can capture nonlinear turbulent flow physics within a wind plant. The RANS flow model is implemented in the Python finite element package FEniCS and the derivation of the adjoint equations is automated within the dolfin-adjoint framework. Gradient-based optimization of wind turbine locations is demonstrated on idealized test cases that reveal new optimization heuristics such as rotational symmetry, local speedups, and nonlinear wake curvature effects. Layout optimization is also demonstrated on more complex wind rose shapes, including a full annual energy production (AEP) layout optimization over 36 inflow directions and 5 windspeed bins.

  15. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yanhua O.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wave speed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding non-uniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and practically. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relative (and thus higher resolution) structural variations in areas close to the stations. Whereas in conventional tomography a measurement made on a single earthquake-station pair provides very limited structural information, in double-difference tomography one earthquake can actually resolve significant details of the structure. The double-difference methodology can be incorporated into the usual adjoint tomography workflow by simply pairing up all conventional measurements; the computational cost of the necessary adjoint simulations is largely unaffected. Rather than adding to the computational burden, the inversion of double-difference measurements merely modifies the construction of the adjoint sources for data assimilation.

  16. New capabilities of the Liège intranuclear-cascade model for particle-transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancusi, D.; Boudard, A.; Cugnon, J.; David, J.-C.; Hagiwara, M.; Leprince, A.; Leray, S.

    2014-06-01

    We review and discuss the latest developments of the Liège Intranuclear Cascade model. The new capabilities are illustrated by comparisons with selected experimental data. We also present examples of thick-target calculations performed using particle-transport codes.

  17. New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

    2010-01-01

    Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 °C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20°C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned

  18. Adjoint variational methods in nonconservative stability problems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. N.; Herrmann, G.

    1972-01-01

    A general nonself-adjoint eigenvalue problem is examined and it is shown that the commonly employed approximate methods, such as the Galerkin procedure, the method of weighted residuals and the least square technique lack variational descriptions. When used in their previously known forms they do not yield stationary eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. With the help of an adjoint system, however, several analogous variational descriptions may be developed and it is shown in the present study that by properly restating the method of least squares, stationary eigenvalues may be obtained. Several properties of the adjoint eigenvalue problem, known only for a restricted group, are shown to exist for the more general class selected for study.

  19. Rebalancing to the Pacific: Re-Examining Army Transportation Expeditionary Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Anonymous, The Economist, April 7, 2012, 3. 14 Thomas G. Mahnken, Thomas Donnely, Dan Blumenthal, Gary J . Schmitt, Michael Mazza, Andrew Searer...The Army Times, July 26, 2012. 49 Douglas Workman , “APS Watercraft Status,” briefing slides, Rock Island, Illinois, Army Sustainment Command...March 25, 2010 50 U.S. Combined Arms Support Command, Transportation Corps Update” briefing to the Chief of Transportation. 26 51 Workman , APS

  20. Fully automatic adjoints: a robust and efficient mechanism for generating adjoint ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Funke, S. W.; Rognes, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    The problem of generating and maintaining adjoint models is sufficiently difficult that typically only the most advanced and well-resourced community ocean models achieve it. There are two current technologies which each suffer from their own limitations. Algorithmic differentiation, also called automatic differentiation, is employed by models such as the MITGCM [2] and the Alfred Wegener Institute model FESOM [3]. This technique is very difficult to apply to existing code, and requires a major initial investment to prepare the code for automatic adjoint generation. AD tools may also have difficulty with code employing modern software constructs such as derived data types. An alternative is to formulate the adjoint differential equation and to discretise this separately. This approach, known as the continuous adjoint and employed in ROMS [4], has the disadvantage that two different model code bases must be maintained and manually kept synchronised as the model develops. The discretisation of the continuous adjoint is not automatically consistent with that of the forward model, producing an additional source of error. The alternative presented here is to formulate the flow model in the high level language UFL (Unified Form Language) and to automatically generate the model using the software of the FEniCS project. In this approach it is the high level code specification which is differentiated, a task very similar to the formulation of the continuous adjoint [5]. However since the forward and adjoint models are generated automatically, the difficulty of maintaining them vanishes and the software engineering process is therefore robust. The scheduling and execution of the adjoint model, including the application of an appropriate checkpointing strategy is managed by libadjoint [1]. In contrast to the conventional algorithmic differentiation description of a model as a series of primitive mathematical operations, libadjoint employs a new abstraction of the simulation

  1. Improvements in Thermal Protection Sizing Capabilities for TCAT: Conceptual Design for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John R.; Izon, Stephen James

    2002-01-01

    The Thermal Calculation Analysis Tool (TCAT), originally developed for the Space Systems Design Lab at the Georgia Institute of Technology, is a conceptual design tool capable of integrating aeroheating analysis into conceptual reusable launch vehicle design. It provides Thermal Protection System (TPS) unit thicknesses and acreage percentages based on the geometry of the vehicle and a reference trajectory to be used in calculation of the total cost and weight of the vehicle design. TCAT has proven to be reasonably accurate at calculating the TPS unit weights for in-flight trajectories; however, it does not have the capability of sizing TPS materials above cryogenic fuel tanks for ground hold operations. During ground hold operations, the vehicle is held for a brief period (generally about two hours) during which heat transfer from the TPS materials to the cryogenic fuel occurs. If too much heat is extracted from the TPS material, the surface temperature may fall below the freezing point of water, thereby freezing any condensation that may be present at the surface of the TPS. Condensation or ice on the surface of the vehicle is potentially hazardous to the mission and can also damage the TPS. It is questionable whether or not the TPS thicknesses provided by the aeroheating analysis would be sufficiently thick to insulate the surface of the TPS from the heat transfer to the fuel. Therefore, a design tool has been developed that is capable of sizing TPS materials at these cryogenic fuel tank locations to augment TCAT's TPS sizing capabilities.

  2. Supersonic biplane design via adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rui

    In developing the next generation supersonic transport airplane, two major challenges must be resolved. The fuel efficiency must be significantly improved, and the sonic boom propagating to the ground must be dramatically reduced. Both of these objectives can be achieved by reducing the shockwaves formed in supersonic flight. The Busemann biplane is famous for using favorable shockwave interaction to achieve nearly shock-free supersonic flight at its design Mach number. Its performance at off-design Mach numbers, however, can be very poor. This dissertation studies the performance of supersonic biplane airfoils at design and off-design conditions. The choked flow and flow-hysteresis phenomena of these biplanes are studied. These effects are due to finite thickness of the airfoils and non-uniqueness of the solution to the Euler equations, creating over an order of magnitude more wave drag than that predicted by supersonic thin airfoil theory. As a result, the off-design performance is the major barrier to the practical use of supersonic biplanes. The main contribution of this work is to drastically improve the off-design performance of supersonic biplanes by using an adjoint based aerodynamic optimization technique. The Busemann biplane is used as the baseline design, and its shape is altered to achieve optimal wave drags in series of Mach numbers ranging from 1.1 to 1.7, during both acceleration and deceleration conditions. The optimized biplane airfoils dramatically reduces the effects of the choked flow and flow-hysteresis phenomena, while maintaining a certain degree of favorable shockwave interaction effects at the design Mach number. Compared to a diamond shaped single airfoil of the same total thickness, the wave drag of our optimized biplane is lower at almost all Mach numbers, and is significantly lower at the design Mach number. In addition, by performing a Navier-Stokes solution for the optimized airfoil, it is verified that the optimized biplane improves

  3. Towards a heavy-ion transport capability in the MARS15 code

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov et al.

    2004-05-12

    In order to meet the challenges of new accelerator and space projects and further improve modeling of radiation effects in microscopic objects, heavy-ion interaction and transport physics have been recently incorporated into the MARS15 Monte Carlo code. A brief description of new modules is given in comparison with experimental data.

  4. Transport capabilities of eleven gram-positive bacteria: comparative genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Lorca, Graciela L; Barabote, Ravi D; Zlotopolski, Vladimir; Tran, Can; Winnen, Brit; Hvorup, Rikki N; Stonestrom, Aaron J; Nguyen, Elizabeth; Huang, Li-Wen; Kim, David S; Saier, Milton H

    2007-06-01

    The genomes of eleven Gram-positive bacteria that are important for human health and the food industry, nine low G+C lactic acid bacteria and two high G+C Gram-positive organisms, were analyzed for their complement of genes encoding transport proteins. Thirteen to 18% of their genes encode transport proteins, larger percentages than observed for most other bacteria. All of these bacteria possess channel proteins, some of which probably function to relieve osmotic stress. Amino acid uptake systems predominate over sugar and peptide cation symporters, and of the sugar uptake porters, those specific for oligosaccharides and glycosides often outnumber those for free sugars. About 10% of the total transport proteins are constituents of putative multidrug efflux pumps with Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS)-type pumps (55%) being more prevalent than ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type pumps (33%), which, however, usually greatly outnumber all other types. An exception to this generalization is Streptococcus thermophilus with 54% of its drug efflux pumps belonging to the ABC superfamily and 23% belonging each to the Multidrug/Oligosaccharide/Polysaccharide (MOP) superfamily and the MFS. These bacteria also display peptide efflux pumps that may function in intercellular signalling, and macromolecular efflux pumps, many of predictable specificities. Most of the bacteria analyzed have no pmf-coupled or transmembrane flow electron carriers. The one exception is Brevibacterium linens, which in addition to these carriers, also has transporters of several families not represented in the other ten bacteria examined. Comparisons with the genomes of organisms from other bacterial kingdoms revealed that lactic acid bacteria possess distinctive proportions of recognized transporter types (e.g., more porters specific for glycosides than reducing sugars). Some homologues of transporters identified had previously been identified only in Gram-negative bacteria or in eukaryotes. Our studies

  5. Transport Capabilities of Eleven Gram-positive Bacteria: Comparative Genomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lorca, Graciela L.; Barabote, Ravi D.; Zlotopolski, Vladimir; Tran, Can; Winnen, Brit; Hvorup, Rikki N.; Stonestrom, Aaron J.; Nguyen, Elizabeth; Huang, Li-Wen; Kim, David S.; Saier, Milton H.

    2007-01-01

    The genomes of eleven Gram-positive bacteria that are important for human health and the food industry, nine low G+C lactic acid bacteria and two high G+C Gram-positive organisms, were analyzed for their complement of genes encoding transport proteins. Thirteen to eighteen percent of their genes encode transport proteins, larger percentages than observed for most other bacteria. All of these bacteria possess channel proteins, some of which probably function to relieve osmotic stress. Amino acid uptake systems predominate over sugar and peptide cation symporters, and of the sugar uptake porters, those specific for oligosaccharides and glycosides often outnumber those for free sugars. About 10% of the total transport proteins are constituents of putative multidrug efflux pumps with Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS)-type pumps (55%) being more prevalent than ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type pumps (33%), which, however, usually greatly outnumber all other types. An exception to this generalization is Streptococcus thermophilus with 54% of its drug efflux pumps belonging to the ABC superfamily and 23% belonging each to the Multidrug/Oligosaccharide/Polysaccharide (MOP) superfamily and the MFS. These bacteria also display peptide efflux pumps that may function in intercellular signalling, and macromolecular efflux pumps, many of predictable specificities. Most of the bacteria analyzed have no pmf-coupled or transmembrane flow electron carriers. The one exception is Brevibacterium linens, which in addition to these carriers, also has transporters of several families not represented in the other ten bacteria examined. Comparisons with the genomes of organisms from other bacterial kingdoms revealed that lactic acid bacteria possess distinctive proportions of recognized transporter types (e.g., more porters specific for glycosides than reducing sugars). Some homologues of transporters identified had previously been identified only in Gram-negative bacteria or in eukaryotes

  6. Optimal Multistage Algorithm for Adjoint Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Aupy, Guillaume; Herrmann, Julien; Hovland, Paul; Robert, Yves

    2016-01-01

    We reexamine the work of Stumm and Walther on multistage algorithms for adjoint computation. We provide an optimal algorithm for this problem when there are two levels of checkpoints, in memory and on disk. Previously, optimal algorithms for adjoint computations were known only for a single level of checkpoints with no writing and reading costs; a well-known example is the binomial checkpointing algorithm of Griewank and Walther. Stumm and Walther extended that binomial checkpointing algorithm to the case of two levels of checkpoints, but they did not provide any optimality results. We bridge the gap by designing the first optimal algorithm in this context. We experimentally compare our optimal algorithm with that of Stumm and Walther to assess the difference in performance.

  7. Expanded serial communication capability for the transport systems research vehicle laptop computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easley, Wesley C.

    1991-01-01

    A recent upgrade of the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) operated by the Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program Office at the NASA Langley Research Center included installation of a number of Grid 1500 series laptop computers. Each unit is a 80386-based IBM PC clone. RS-232 data busses are needed for TSRV flight research programs, and it has been advantageous to extend the application of the Grids in this area. Use was made of the expansion features of the Grid internal bus to add a user programmable serial communication channel. Software to allow use of the Grid bus expansion has been written and placed in a Turbo C library for incorporation into applications programs in a transparent manner via function calls. Port setup; interrupt-driven, two-way data transfer; and software flow control are built into the library functions.

  8. Towards a heavy-ion transport capability in the MARS15 Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N. V.; Gudima, K. K.; Mashnik, S. G.; Rakhno, I. L.; Striganov, S.

    2004-04-01

    In order to meet the challenges of new accelerator and space projects and further improve modelling of radiation effects in microscopic objects, heavy-ion interaction and transport physics have been recently incorporated into the MARS15 Monte Carlo code. A brief description of new modules is given in comparison with experimental data. The MARS Monte Carlo code is widely used in numerous accelerator, detector, shielding and cosmic ray applications. The needs of the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, Large Hadron Collider, Rare Isotope Accelerator and NASA projects have recently induced adding heavy-ion interaction and transport physics to the MARS15 code. The key modules of the new implementation are described below along with their comparisons to experimental data.

  9. Chiral phases of fundamental and adjoint quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Natale, A. A.

    2016-01-22

    We consider a QCD chiral symmetry breaking model where the gap equation contains an effective confining propagator and a dressed gluon propagator with a dynamically generated mass. This model is able to explain the ratios between the chiral transition and deconfinement temperatures in the case of fundamental and adjoint quarks. It also predicts the recovery of the chiral symmetry for a large number of quarks (n{sub f} ≈ 11 – 13) in agreement with lattice data.

  10. Chiral phases of fundamental and adjoint quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natale, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    We consider a QCD chiral symmetry breaking model where the gap equation contains an effective confining propagator and a dressed gluon propagator with a dynamically generated mass. This model is able to explain the ratios between the chiral transition and deconfinement temperatures in the case of fundamental and adjoint quarks. It also predicts the recovery of the chiral symmetry for a large number of quarks (nf ≈ 11 - 13) in agreement with lattice data.

  11. Optimal ignition placement using nonlinear adjoint looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadri, Ubaid; Schmid, Peter; Magri, Luca; Ihme, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    Spark ignition of a turbulent mixture of fuel and oxidizer is a highly sensitive process. Traditionally, a large number of parametric studies are used to determine the effects of different factors on ignition and this can be quite tedious. In contrast, we treat ignition as an initial value problem and seek to find the initial condition that maximizes a given cost function. We use direct numerical simulation of the low Mach number equations with finite rate one-step chemistry, and of the corresponding adjoint equations, to study an axisymmetric jet diffusion flame. We find the L - 2 norm of the temperature field integrated over a short time to be a suitable cost function. We find that the adjoint fields localize around the flame front, identifying the most sensitive region of the flow. The adjoint fields provide gradient information that we use as part of an optimization loop to converge to a local optimal ignition location. We find that the optimal locations correspond with the stoichiometric surface downstream of the jet inlet plane. The methods and results of this study can be easily applied to more complex flow geometries.

  12. Supersymmetric descendants of self-adjointly extended quantum mechanical Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hashimi, M. H.; Salman, M.; Shalaby, A.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2013-10-01

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant.

  13. Coupled electron-photon radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lorence, L.; Kensek, R.P.; Valdez, G.D.; Drumm, C.R.; Fan, W.C.; Powell, J.L.

    2000-01-17

    Massively-parallel computers allow detailed 3D radiation transport simulations to be performed to analyze the response of complex systems to radiation. This has been recently been demonstrated with the coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code, ITS. To enable such calculations, the combinatorial geometry capability of ITS was improved. For greater geometrical flexibility, a version of ITS is under development that can track particles in CAD geometries. Deterministic radiation transport codes that utilize an unstructured spatial mesh are also being devised. For electron transport, the authors are investigating second-order forms of the transport equations which, when discretized, yield symmetric positive definite matrices. A novel parallelization strategy, simultaneously solving for spatial and angular unknowns, has been applied to the even- and odd-parity forms of the transport equation on a 2D unstructured spatial mesh. Another second-order form, the self-adjoint angular flux transport equation, also shows promise for electron transport.

  14. Urinary Exosomes Contain MicroRNAs Capable of Paracrine Modulation of Tubular Transporters in Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Gracia, Tannia; Wang, Xiaonan; Su, Ya; Norgett, Elizabeth E.; Williams, Timothy L.; Moreno, Pablo; Micklem, Gos; Frankl, Fiona E. Karet

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes derived from all nephron segments are present in human urine, where their functionality is incompletely understood. Most studies have focused on biomarker discovery rather than exosome function. Through sequencing we identified the miRNA repertoire of urinary exosomes from healthy volunteers; 276 mature miRNAs and 345 pre-miRNAs were identified (43%/7% of reads). Among the most abundant were members of the miR-10, miR-30 and let-7 families. Targets for the identified miRNAs were predicted using five different databases; genes encoding membrane transporters and their regulators were enriched, highlighting the possibility that these miRNAs could modulate key renal tubular functions in a paracrine manner. As proof of concept, cultured renal epithelial cells were exposed to urinary exosomes and cellular exosomal uptake was confirmed; thereafter, reduced levels of the potassium channel ROMK and kinases SGK1 and WNK1 were observed in a human collecting duct cell line, while SPAK was unaltered. In proximal tubular cells, mRNA levels of the amino acid transporter gene SLC38A2 were diminished and reflected in a significant decrement of its encoded protein SNAT2. Protein levels of the kinase SGK1 did not change. Thus we demonstrated a novel potential function for miRNA in urinary exosomes. PMID:28094285

  15. Generalized uncertainty principle and self-adjoint operators

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, Venkat; Das, Saurya; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2015-09-15

    In this work we explore the self-adjointness of the GUP-modified momentum and Hamiltonian operators over different domains. In particular, we utilize the theorem by von-Neumann for symmetric operators in order to determine whether the momentum and Hamiltonian operators are self-adjoint or not, or they have self-adjoint extensions over the given domain. In addition, a simple example of the Hamiltonian operator describing a particle in a box is given. The solutions of the boundary conditions that describe the self-adjoint extensions of the specific Hamiltonian operator are obtained.

  16. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): A New Earth Science Capability for ISS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, M. J.; Yorks, J. E.; Scott, S.; Kupchock, A.; Selmer, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a lidar remote sensing instrument developed for deployment to the International Space Station (ISS). The CATS lidar will provide range-resolved profile measurements of atmospheric aerosol and cloud distributions and properties. The CATS instrument uses a high repetition rate laser operating at three wavelengths (1064, 532, and 355 nm) to derive properties of cloud/aerosol layers including: layer height, layer thickness, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization-based discrimination of particle type. The CATS mission was designed to capitalize on the Space Station's unique orbit and facilities to continue existing Earth Science data records, to provide observational data for use in forecast models, and to demonstrate new technologies for use in future missions. The CATS payload will be installed on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF). The payload is designed to operate on-orbit for at least six months, and up to three years. The payload is completed and currently scheduled for a mid-2014 launch. The ISS and, in particular, the JEM-EF, is an exciting new platform for spaceborne Earth observations. The ability to leverage existing aircraft instrument designs coupled with the lower cost possible for ISS external attached payloads permits rapid and cost effective development of spaceborne sensors. The CATS payload is based on existing instrumentation built and operated on the high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft. The payload is housed in a 1.5 m x 1 m x 0.8 m volume that attaches to the JEM-EF. The allowed volume limits the maximum size for the collecting telescope to 60 cm diameter. Figure 1 shows a schematic layout of the CATS payload, with the primary instrument components identified. Figure 2 is a photo of the completed payload. CATS payload cut-away view. Completed CATS payload assembly.

  17. Elementary operators on self-adjoint operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Lajos; Semrl, Peter

    2007-03-01

    Let H be a Hilbert space and let and be standard *-operator algebras on H. Denote by and the set of all self-adjoint operators in and , respectively. Assume that and are surjective maps such that M(AM*(B)A)=M(A)BM(A) and M*(BM(A)B)=M*(B)AM*(B) for every pair , . Then there exist an invertible bounded linear or conjugate-linear operator and a constant c[set membership, variant]{-1,1} such that M(A)=cTAT*, , and M*(B)=cT*BT, .

  18. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of an ultrawideband antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanson, M B; White, D A

    2011-07-28

    The frequency domain finite element method using H(curl)-conforming finite elements is a robust technique for full-wave analysis of antennas. As computers become more powerful, it is becoming feasible to not only predict antenna performance, but also to compute sensitivity of antenna performance with respect to multiple parameters. This sensitivity information can then be used for optimization of the design or specification of manufacturing tolerances. In this paper we review the Adjoint Method for sensitivity calculation, and apply it to the problem of optimizing a Ultrawideband antenna.

  19. Imaging Earth's Interior Based Upon Adjoint Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, J.; Komatitsch, D.; Liu, Q.; Tape, C.; Maggi, A.

    2008-12-01

    Modern numerical methods in combination with rapid advances in parallel computing have enabled the simulation of seismic wave propagation in 3D Earth models at unpredcented resolution and accuracy. On a modest PC cluster one can now simulate global seismic wave propagation at periods of 20~s longer accounting for heterogeneity in the crust and mantle, topography, anisotropy, attenuation, fluid-solid interactions, self-gravitation, rotation, and the oceans. On the 'Ranger' system at the Texas Advanced Computing Center one can break the 2~s barrier. By drawing connections between seismic tomography, adjoint methods popular in climate and ocean dynamics, time-reversal imaging, and finite-frequency 'banana-doughnut' kernels, it has been demonstrated that Fréchet derivatives for tomographic and (finite) source inversions in complex 3D Earth models may be obtained based upon just two numerical simulations for each earthquake: one calculation for the current model and a second, 'adjoint', calculation that uses time-reversed signals at the receivers as simultaneous, fictitious sources. The adjoint wavefield is calculated while the regular wavefield is reconstructed on the fly by propagating the last frame of the wavefield saved by a previous forward simulation backward in time. This aproach has been used to calculate sensitivity kernels in regional and global Earth models for various body- and surface-wave arrivals. These kernels illustrate the sensitivity of the observations to the structural parameters and form the basis of 'adjoint tomography'. We use a non-linear conjugate gradient method in combination with a source subspace projection preconditioning technique to iterative minimize the misfit function. Using an automated time window selection algorithm, our emphasis is on matching targeted, frequency-dependent body-wave traveltimes and surface-wave phase anomalies, rather than entire waveforms. To avoid reaching a local minimum in the optimization procedure, we

  20. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients.

  1. Supersymmetric descendants of self-adjointly extended quantum mechanical Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hashimi, M.H.; Salman, M.; Shalaby, A.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2013-10-15

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant. -- Highlights: •Self-adjoint extension theory and contact interactions. •Application of self-adjoint extensions to supersymmetry. •Contact interactions in finite volume with Robin boundary condition.

  2. Tsunami waveform inversion by adjoint methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Carlos; Miranda, Pedro M. A.

    2001-09-01

    An adjoint method for tsunami waveform inversion is proposed, as an alternative to the technique based on Green's functions of the linear long wave model. The method has the advantage of being able to use the nonlinear shallow water equations, or other appropriate equation sets, and to optimize an initial state given as a linear or nonlinear function of any set of free parameters. This last facility is used to perform explicit optimization of the focal fault parameters, characterizing the initial sea surface displacement of tsunamigenic earthquakes. The proposed methodology is validated with experiments using synthetic data, showing the possibility of recovering all relevant details of a tsunami source from tide gauge observations, providing that the adjoint method is constrained in an appropriate manner. It is found, as in other methods, that the inversion skill of tsunami sources increases with the azimuthal and temporal coverage of assimilated tide gauge stations; furthermore, it is shown that the eigenvalue analysis of the Hessian matrix of the cost function provides a consistent and useful methodology to choose the subset of independent parameters that can be inverted with a given dataset of observations and to evaluate the error of the inversion process. The method is also applied to real tide gauge series, from the tsunami of the February 28, 1969, Gorringe Bank earthquake, suggesting some reasonable changes to the assumed focal parameters of that event. It is suggested that the method proposed may be able to deal with transient tsunami sources such as those generated by submarine landslides.

  3. Incorporation of an explosive cloud rise code into ARAC's (Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability) ADPIC transport and diffusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.T.; Freis, R.P. ); Nasstrom, J.S. )

    1990-04-01

    The US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) supports various government agencies by modeling the transport and diffusion of radiological material released into the atmosphere. ARAC provides this support principally in the form of computer-generated isopleths of radionuclide concentrations. In order to supply these concentration estimates in a timely manner, a suite of operational computer models is maintained by the ARAC staff. One primary tools used by ARAC is the ADPIC transport and diffusion computer model. This three-dimensional, particle-in-cell code simulates the release of a pollutant into the atmosphere, by injecting marker particles into a gridded, mass-consistent modeled wind field. The particles are then moved through the gridded domain by applying the appropriate advection, diffusion, and gravitational fall velocities. A cloud rise module has been incorporated into ARAC's ADPIC dispersion model to allow better simulation of particle distribution early after an explosive release of source material. The module is based on the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, which are solved for the cloud radius, height, temperature, and velocity as a function of time. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Development of an adjoint model of GRAPES-CUACE and its application in tracking influential haze source areas in north China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Xing Qin; Xian Zhai, Shi; Jin, Min; Gong, Sunling; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The aerosol adjoint module of the atmospheric chemical modeling system GRAPES-CUACE (Global-Regional Assimilation and Prediction System coupled with the CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment) is constructed based on the adjoint theory. This includes the development and validation of the tangent linear and the adjoint models of the three parts involved in the GRAPES-CUACE aerosol module: CAM (Canadian Aerosol Module), interface programs that connect GRAPES and CUACE, and the aerosol transport processes that are embedded in GRAPES. Meanwhile, strict mathematical validation schemes for the tangent linear and the adjoint models are implemented for all input variables. After each part of the module and the assembled tangent linear and adjoint models is verified, the adjoint model of the GRAPES-CUACE aerosol is developed and used in a black carbon (BC) receptor-source sensitivity analysis to track influential haze source areas in north China. The sensitivity of the average BC concentration over Beijing at the highest concentration time point (referred to as the Objective Function) is calculated with respect to the BC amount emitted over the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Four types of regions are selected based on the administrative division or the sensitivity coefficient distribution. The adjoint sensitivity results are then used to quantify the effect of reducing the emission sources at different time intervals over different regions. It is indicated that the more influential regions (with relatively larger sensitivity coefficients) do not necessarily correspond to the administrative regions. Instead, the influence per unit area of the sensitivity selected regions is greater. Therefore, controlling the most influential regions during critical time intervals based on the results of the adjoint sensitivity analysis is much more efficient than controlling administrative regions during an experimental time period.

  5. Adjoints and Low-rank Covariance Representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tippett, Michael K.; Cohn, Stephen E.

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative measures of the uncertainty of Earth System estimates can be as important as the estimates themselves. Second moments of estimation errors are described by the covariance matrix, whose direct calculation is impractical when the number of degrees of freedom of the system state is large. Ensemble and reduced-state approaches to prediction and data assimilation replace full estimation error covariance matrices by low-rank approximations. The appropriateness of such approximations depends on the spectrum of the full error covariance matrix, whose calculation is also often impractical. Here we examine the situation where the error covariance is a linear transformation of a forcing error covariance. We use operator norms and adjoints to relate the appropriateness of low-rank representations to the conditioning of this transformation. The analysis is used to investigate low-rank representations of the steady-state response to random forcing of an idealized discrete-time dynamical system.

  6. Gauge mediation models with adjoint messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Mustafayev, Azar; Shafi, Qaisar; Ün, Cem Salih

    2016-10-01

    We present a class of models in the framework of gauge mediation supersymmetry breaking where the messenger fields transform in the adjoint representation of the standard model gauge symmetry. To avoid unacceptably light right-handed sleptons in the spectrum we introduce a nonzero U (1 )B-L D-term. This leads to an additional contribution to the soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms which makes the right-handed slepton masses compatible with the current experimental bounds. We show that in this framework the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson mass can be accommodated with the sleptons accessible at the LHC, while the squarks and gluinos lie in the multi-TeV range. We also discuss the issue of the fine-tuning and show that the desired relic dark matter abundance can also be accommodated.

  7. GPU-Accelerated Adjoint Algorithmic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the "tape". Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography.

  8. GPU-accelerated adjoint algorithmic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the "tape". Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography.

  9. GPU-Accelerated Adjoint Algorithmic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gremse, Felix; Höfter, Andreas; Razik, Lukas; Kiessling, Fabian; Naumann, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Many scientific problems such as classifier training or medical image reconstruction can be expressed as minimization of differentiable real-valued cost functions and solved with iterative gradient-based methods. Adjoint algorithmic differentiation (AAD) enables automated computation of gradients of such cost functions implemented as computer programs. To backpropagate adjoint derivatives, excessive memory is potentially required to store the intermediate partial derivatives on a dedicated data structure, referred to as the “tape”. Parallelization is difficult because threads need to synchronize their accesses during taping and backpropagation. This situation is aggravated for many-core architectures, such as Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), because of the large number of light-weight threads and the limited memory size in general as well as per thread. We show how these limitations can be mediated if the cost function is expressed using GPU-accelerated vector and matrix operations which are recognized as intrinsic functions by our AAD software. We compare this approach with naive and vectorized implementations for CPUs. We use four increasingly complex cost functions to evaluate the performance with respect to memory consumption and gradient computation times. Using vectorization, CPU and GPU memory consumption could be substantially reduced compared to the naive reference implementation, in some cases even by an order of complexity. The vectorization allowed usage of optimized parallel libraries during forward and reverse passes which resulted in high speedups for the vectorized CPU version compared to the naive reference implementation. The GPU version achieved an additional speedup of 7.5 ± 4.4, showing that the processing power of GPUs can be utilized for AAD using this concept. Furthermore, we show how this software can be systematically extended for more complex problems such as nonlinear absorption reconstruction for fluorescence-mediated tomography

  10. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of plasmonic structures using the FDTD method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Ahmed, Osman S; Bakr, Mohamed H

    2014-05-15

    We present an adjoint variable method for estimating the sensitivities of arbitrary responses with respect to the parameters of dispersive discontinuities in nanoplasmonic devices. Our theory is formulated in terms of the electric field components at the vicinity of perturbed discontinuities. The adjoint sensitivities are computed using at most one extra finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation regardless of the number of parameters. Our approach is illustrated through the sensitivity analysis of an add-drop coupler consisting of a square ring resonator between two parallel waveguides. The computed adjoint sensitivities of the scattering parameters are compared with those obtained using the accurate but computationally expensive central finite difference approach.

  11. Gradient-based optimum aerodynamic design using adjoint methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lei

    2002-09-01

    Continuous adjoint methods and optimal control theory are applied to a pressure-matching inverse design problem of quasi 1-D nozzle flows. Pontryagin's Minimum Principle is used to derive the adjoint system and the reduced gradient of the cost functional. The properties of adjoint variables at the sonic throat and the shock location are studied, revealing a log-arithmic singularity at the sonic throat and continuity at the shock location. A numerical method, based on the Steger-Warming flux-vector-splitting scheme, is proposed to solve the adjoint equations. This scheme can finely resolve the singularity at the sonic throat. A non-uniform grid, with points clustered near the throat region, can resolve it even better. The analytical solutions to the adjoint equations are also constructed via Green's function approach for the purpose of comparing the numerical results. The pressure-matching inverse design is then conducted for a nozzle parameterized by a single geometric parameter. In the second part, the adjoint methods are applied to the problem of minimizing drag coefficient, at fixed lift coefficient, for 2-D transonic airfoil flows. Reduced gradients of several functionals are derived through application of a Lagrange Multiplier Theorem. The adjoint system is carefully studied including the adjoint characteristic boundary conditions at the far-field boundary. A super-reduced design formulation is also explored by treating the angle of attack as an additional state; super-reduced gradients can be constructed either by solving adjoint equations with non-local boundary conditions or by a direct Lagrange multiplier method. In this way, the constrained optimization reduces to an unconstrained design problem. Numerical methods based on Jameson's finite volume scheme are employed to solve the adjoint equations. The same grid system generated from an efficient hyperbolic grid generator are adopted in both the Euler flow solver and the adjoint solver. Several

  12. Self-adjointness and conservation laws of difference equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Linyu

    2015-06-01

    A general theorem on conservation laws for arbitrary difference equations is proved. The theorem is based on an introduction of an adjoint system related with a given difference system, and it does not require the existence of a difference Lagrangian. It is proved that the system, combined by the original system and its adjoint system, is governed by a variational principle, which inherits all symmetries of the original system. Noether's theorem can then be applied. With some special techniques, e.g. self-adjointness properties, this allows us to obtain conservation laws for difference equations, which are not necessary governed by Lagrangian formalisms.

  13. Advances in Sensitivity Analysis Capabilities with SCALE 6.0 and 6.1

    SciTech Connect

    Rearden, Bradley T; Petrie Jr, Lester M; Williams, Mark L

    2010-01-01

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis sequences of SCALE compute the sensitivity of k{sub eff} to each constituent multigroup cross section using perturbation theory based on forward and adjoint transport computations with several available codes. Versions 6.0 and 6.1 of SCALE, released in 2009 and 2010, respectively, include important additions to the TSUNAMI-3D sequence, which computes forward and adjoint solutions in multigroup with the KENO Monte Carlo codes. Previously, sensitivity calculations were performed with the simple and efficient geometry capabilities of KENO V.a, but now calculations can also be performed with the generalized geometry code KENO-VI. TSUNAMI-3D requires spatial refinement of the angular flux moment solutions for the forward and adjoint calculations. These refinements are most efficiently achieved with the use of a mesh accumulator. For SCALE 6.0, a more flexible mesh accumulator capability has been added to the KENO codes, enabling varying granularity of the spatial refinement to optimize the calculation for different regions of the system model. The new mesh capabilities allow the efficient calculation of larger models than were previously possible. Additional improvements in the TSUNAMI calculations were realized in the computation of implicit effects of resonance self-shielding on the final sensitivity coefficients. Multigroup resonance self-shielded cross sections are accurately computed with SCALE's robust deterministic continuous-energy treatment for the resolved and thermal energy range and with Bondarenko shielding factors elsewhere, including the unresolved resonance range. However, the sensitivities of the self-shielded cross sections to the parameters input to the calculation are quantified using only full-range Bondarenko factors.

  14. Adjoint-based uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis for reactor depletion calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stripling, Hayes Franklin

    Depletion calculations for nuclear reactors model the dynamic coupling between the material composition and neutron flux and help predict reactor performance and safety characteristics. In order to be trusted as reliable predictive tools and inputs to licensing and operational decisions, the simulations must include an accurate and holistic quantification of errors and uncertainties in its outputs. Uncertainty quantification is a formidable challenge in large, realistic reactor models because of the large number of unknowns and myriad sources of uncertainty and error. We present a framework for performing efficient uncertainty quantification in depletion problems using an adjoint approach, with emphasis on high-fidelity calculations using advanced massively parallel computing architectures. This approach calls for a solution to two systems of equations: (a) the forward, engineering system that models the reactor, and (b) the adjoint system, which is mathematically related to but different from the forward system. We use the solutions of these systems to produce sensitivity and error estimates at a cost that does not grow rapidly with the number of uncertain inputs. We present the framework in a general fashion and apply it to both the source-driven and k-eigenvalue forms of the depletion equations. We describe the implementation and verification of solvers for the forward and ad- joint equations in the PDT code, and we test the algorithms on realistic reactor analysis problems. We demonstrate a new approach for reducing the memory and I/O demands on the host machine, which can be overwhelming for typical adjoint algorithms. Our conclusion is that adjoint depletion calculations using full transport solutions are not only computationally tractable, they are the most attractive option for performing uncertainty quantification on high-fidelity reactor analysis problems.

  15. Sensitivity of Lumped Constraints Using the Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akgun, Mehmet A.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Wu, K. Chauncey; Walsh, Joanne L.

    1999-01-01

    Adjoint sensitivity calculation of stress, buckling and displacement constraints may be much less expensive than direct sensitivity calculation when the number of load cases is large. Adjoint stress and displacement sensitivities are available in the literature. Expressions for local buckling sensitivity of isotropic plate elements are derived in this study. Computational efficiency of the adjoint method is sensitive to the number of constraints and, therefore, the method benefits from constraint lumping. A continuum version of the Kreisselmeier-Steinhauser (KS) function is chosen to lump constraints. The adjoint and direct methods are compared for three examples: a truss structure, a simple HSCT wing model, and a large HSCT model. These sensitivity derivatives are then used in optimization.

  16. Optimizing Spectral Wave Estimates with Adjoint-Based Sensitivity Maps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-18

    forecasts of nearshore wave conditions are important to a diverse constituency, including vacation destinations such as Miami Beach or San Diego, coastal...a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 18 FEB 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES...Sensitivity maps for wave spectra For any type of adjoint, sensitivity maps may be constructed from adjoint output to track the response of system properties

  17. Unsteady adjoint of a gas turbine inlet guide vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talnikar, Chaitanya; Wang, Qiqi

    2015-11-01

    Unsteady fluid flow simulations like large eddy simulation have been shown to be crucial in accurately predicting heat transfer in turbomachinery applications like transonic flow over an inlet guide vane. To compute sensitivities of aerothermal objectives for a vane with respect to design parameters an unsteady adjoint is required. In this talk we present unsteady adjoint solutions for a vane from VKI using pressure loss and heat transfer over the vane surface as the objectives. The boundary layer on the suction side near the trailing edge of the vane is turbulent and this poses a challenge for an adjoint solver. The chaotic dynamics cause the adjoint solution to diverge exponentially to infinity from that region when simulated backwards in time. The prospect of adding artificial viscosity to the adjoint equations to dampen the adjoint fields is investigated. Results for the vane from simulations performed on the Titan supercomputer will be shown and the effect of the additional viscosity on the accuracy of the sensitivities will be discussed.

  18. Global adjoint tomography: First-generation model

    SciTech Connect

    Bozdag, Ebru; Peter, Daniel; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen; Hill, Judith C.; Podhorszki, Norbert; Pugmire, David

    2016-09-22

    We present the first-generation global tomographic model constructed based on adjoint tomography, an iterative full-waveform inversion technique. Synthetic seismograms were calculated using GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of global seismic wave propagation, accommodating effects due to 3-D anelastic crust & mantle structure, topography & bathymetry, the ocean load, ellipticity, rotation, and self-gravitation. Fréchet derivatives were calculated in 3-D anelastic models based on an adjoint-state method. The simulations were performed on the Cray XK7 named ‘Titan’, a computer with 18 688 GPU accelerators housed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The transversely isotropic global model is the result of 15 tomographic iterations, which systematically reduced differences between observed and simulated three-component seismograms. Our starting model combined 3-D mantle model S362ANI with 3-D crustal model Crust2.0. We simultaneously inverted for structure in the crust and mantle, thereby eliminating the need for widely used ‘crustal corrections’. We used data from 253 earthquakes in the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0. We started inversions by combining ~30 s body-wave data with ~60 s surface-wave data. The shortest period of the surface waves was gradually decreased, and in the last three iterations we combined ~17 s body waves with ~45 s surface waves. We started using 180 min long seismograms after the 12th iteration and assimilated minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. The 15th iteration model features enhancements of well-known slabs, an enhanced image of the Samoa/Tahiti plume, as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone and Erebus. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the starting model. Point-spread function tests demonstrate that we are approaching

  19. Global adjoint tomography: First-generation model

    DOE PAGES

    Bozdag, Ebru; Peter, Daniel; Lefebvre, Matthieu; ...

    2016-09-22

    We present the first-generation global tomographic model constructed based on adjoint tomography, an iterative full-waveform inversion technique. Synthetic seismograms were calculated using GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of global seismic wave propagation, accommodating effects due to 3-D anelastic crust & mantle structure, topography & bathymetry, the ocean load, ellipticity, rotation, and self-gravitation. Fréchet derivatives were calculated in 3-D anelastic models based on an adjoint-state method. The simulations were performed on the Cray XK7 named ‘Titan’, a computer with 18 688 GPU accelerators housed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The transversely isotropic global model is the result of 15 tomographic iterations, which systematicallymore » reduced differences between observed and simulated three-component seismograms. Our starting model combined 3-D mantle model S362ANI with 3-D crustal model Crust2.0. We simultaneously inverted for structure in the crust and mantle, thereby eliminating the need for widely used ‘crustal corrections’. We used data from 253 earthquakes in the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0. We started inversions by combining ~30 s body-wave data with ~60 s surface-wave data. The shortest period of the surface waves was gradually decreased, and in the last three iterations we combined ~17 s body waves with ~45 s surface waves. We started using 180 min long seismograms after the 12th iteration and assimilated minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. The 15th iteration model features enhancements of well-known slabs, an enhanced image of the Samoa/Tahiti plume, as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone and Erebus. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the starting model. Point-spread function tests demonstrate that we are approaching

  20. Global adjoint tomography: first-generation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdağ, Ebru; Peter, Daniel; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen; Hill, Judith; Podhorszki, Norbert; Pugmire, David

    2016-12-01

    We present the first-generation global tomographic model constructed based on adjoint tomography, an iterative full-waveform inversion technique. Synthetic seismograms were calculated using GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of global seismic wave propagation, accommodating effects due to 3-D anelastic crust & mantle structure, topography & bathymetry, the ocean load, ellipticity, rotation, and self-gravitation. Fréchet derivatives were calculated in 3-D anelastic models based on an adjoint-state method. The simulations were performed on the Cray XK7 named `Titan', a computer with 18 688 GPU accelerators housed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The transversely isotropic global model is the result of 15 tomographic iterations, which systematically reduced differences between observed and simulated three-component seismograms. Our starting model combined 3-D mantle model S362ANI with 3-D crustal model Crust2.0. We simultaneously inverted for structure in the crust and mantle, thereby eliminating the need for widely used `crustal corrections'. We used data from 253 earthquakes in the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0. We started inversions by combining ˜30 s body-wave data with ˜60 s surface-wave data. The shortest period of the surface waves was gradually decreased, and in the last three iterations we combined ˜17 s body waves with ˜45 s surface waves. We started using 180 min long seismograms after the 12th iteration and assimilated minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. The 15th iteration model features enhancements of well-known slabs, an enhanced image of the Samoa/Tahiti plume, as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone and Erebus. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the starting model. Point-spread function tests demonstrate that we are approaching the resolution

  1. Adjoint operator approach in marginal separation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Stefan; Scheichl, Stefan; Kluwick, Alfred

    2013-10-01

    Thin airfoils are prone to localized flow separation at their leading edge if subjected to moderate angles of attack α. Although 'laminar separation bubbles' at first do not significantly alter the airfoil performance, they tend to 'burst' if a is increased further or perturbations acting upon the flow reach a certain intensity. This then leads either to global flow separation (stall) or triggers the laminar-turbulent transition process within the boundary layer flow. The present paper addresses the asymptotic analysis of the early stages of the latter phenomenon in the limit as the characteristic Reynolds number Re → ∞, commonly referred to as marginal separation theory (MST). A new approach based on the adjoint operator method is presented to derive the fundamental similarity laws of MST and to extend the analysis to higher order. Special emphasis is placed on the breakdown of the flow description, i.e. the formation of finite time singularities (a manifestation of the bursting process), and its resolution based on asymptotic reasoning. The computation of the spatio-temporal evolution of the flow in the subsequent triple deck stage is performed by means of a Chebyshev spectral method. The associated numerical treatment of fractional integrals characteristic of MST is based on barycentric Lagrange interpolation, which is described in detail.

  2. Baryogenesis via leptogenesis in adjoint SU(5)

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Steve; Fileviez Perez, Pavel E-mail: fileviez@physics.wisc.edu

    2008-08-15

    The possibility of explaining the baryon asymmetry in the Universe through the leptogenesis mechanism in the context of adjoint SU(5) is investigated. In this model neutrino masses are generated through the type I and type III seesaw mechanisms, and the field responsible for the type III seesaw, called {rho}{sub 3}, generates the B-L asymmetry needed to satisfy the observed value of the baryon asymmetry in the Universe. We find that the CP asymmetry originates only from the vertex correction, since the self-energy contribution is not present. When neutrino masses have a normal hierarchy, successful leptogenesis is possible for 10{sup 11} GeV{approx}

  3. Adjoint methods for aerodynamic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    A model inverse design problem is used to investigate the effect of flow discontinuities on the optimization process. The optimization involves finding the cross-sectional area distribution of a duct that produces velocities that closely match a targeted velocity distribution. Quasi-one-dimensional flow theory is used, and the target is chosen to have a shock wave in its distribution. The objective function which quantifies the difference between the targeted and calculated velocity distributions may become non-smooth due to the interaction between the shock and the discretization of the flowfield. This paper offers two techniques to resolve the resulting problems for the optimization algorithms. The first, shock-fitting, involves careful integration of the objective function through the shock wave. The second, coordinate straining with shock penalty, uses a coordinate transformation to align the calculated shock with the target and then adds a penalty proportional to the square of the distance between the shocks. The techniques are tested using several popular sensitivity and optimization methods, including finite-differences, and direct and adjoint discrete sensitivity methods. Two optimization strategies, Gauss-Newton and sequential quadratic programming (SQP), are used to drive the objective function to a minimum.

  4. The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function

    SciTech Connect

    Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV

  5. A user's manual for MASH 1. 0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the dose importance'' of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  6. New capabilities for space-based cloud and aerosols measurements: The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Palm, S. P.; Hart, W. D.; Nowottnick, E. P.; Vaughan, M.; Rodier, S. D.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Buchard-Marchant, V.

    2013-12-01

    Current uncertainties in cloud and aerosol properties limit our ability to accurately model the Earth's climate system and predict climate change. These limitations are due primarily to difficulties in adequately measuring aerosols and clouds on a global scale. NASA's A-Train satellites provide an unprecedented opportunity to address these uncertainties. In particular, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO) satellite provides vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties. The CALIOP lidar onboard CALIPSO has reached its seventh year of operation, well past its expected lifetime. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2016 or later. If the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational, there will be a gap in global lidar measurements. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), built at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a payload for the International Space Station (ISS), is set to launch in the summer of 2014. CATS is an elastic backscatter lidar with three wavelengths (1064, 532, 355 nm) and HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all three wavelengths. The ISS orbit is a 51 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of about 405 km. This orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three day repeat cycle. Thus, science applications of CATS include cloud and aerosol climate studies, air quality monitoring, and smoke/volcanic plume tracking. The primary science objectives of CATS include: continuing the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud vertical profile data record, providing near real time data to support operational applications such as air quality modeling, and advancing technology in support of future mission development using the HSRL channel. Furthermore, the vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties provided by CATS will complement current and future passive satellite

  7. Adjoint-Based Methodology for Time-Dependent Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a discrete adjoint method for a broad class of time-dependent optimization problems. The time-dependent adjoint equations are derived in terms of the discrete residual of an arbitrary finite volume scheme which approximates unsteady conservation law equations. Although only the 2-D unsteady Euler equations are considered in the present analysis, this time-dependent adjoint method is applicable to the 3-D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with minor modifications. The discrete adjoint operators involving the derivatives of the discrete residual and the cost functional with respect to the flow variables are computed using a complex-variable approach, which provides discrete consistency and drastically reduces the implementation and debugging cycle. The implementation of the time-dependent adjoint method is validated by comparing the sensitivity derivative with that obtained by forward mode differentiation. Our numerical results show that O(10) optimization iterations of the steepest descent method are needed to reduce the objective functional by 3-6 orders of magnitude for test problems considered.

  8. Optimization of wind plant layouts using an adjoint approach

    DOE PAGES

    King, Ryan N.; Dykes, Katherine; Graf, Peter; ...

    2017-03-10

    Using adjoint optimization and three-dimensional steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) simulations, we present a new gradient-based approach for optimally siting wind turbines within utility-scale wind plants. By solving the adjoint equations of the flow model, the gradients needed for optimization are found at a cost that is independent of the number of control variables, thereby permitting optimization of large wind plants with many turbine locations. Moreover, compared to the common approach of superimposing prescribed wake deficits onto linearized flow models, the computational efficiency of the adjoint approach allows the use of higher-fidelity RANS flow models which can capture nonlinear turbulent flowmore » physics within a wind plant. The steady-state RANS flow model is implemented in the Python finite-element package FEniCS and the derivation and solution of the discrete adjoint equations are automated within the dolfin-adjoint framework. Gradient-based optimization of wind turbine locations is demonstrated for idealized test cases that reveal new optimization heuristics such as rotational symmetry, local speedups, and nonlinear wake curvature effects. Layout optimization is also demonstrated on more complex wind rose shapes, including a full annual energy production (AEP) layout optimization over 36 inflow directions and 5 wind speed bins.« less

  9. Mesh-free adjoint methods for nonlinear filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred

    2005-09-01

    We apply a new industrial strength numerical approximation, called the "mesh-free adjoint method", to solve the nonlinear filtering problem. This algorithm exploits the smoothness of the problem, unlike particle filters, and hence we expect that mesh-free adjoints are superior to particle filters for many practical applications. The nonlinear filter problem is equivalent to solving the Fokker-Planck equation in real time. The key idea is to use a good adaptive non-uniform quantization of state space to approximate the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. In particular, the adjoint method computes the location of the nodes in state space to minimize errors in the final answer. This use of an adjoint is analogous to optimal control algorithms, but it is more interesting. The adjoint method is also analogous to importance sampling in particle filters, but it is better for four reasons: (1) it exploits the smoothness of the problem; (2) it explicitly minimizes the errors in the relevant functional; (3) it explicitly models the dynamics in state space; and (4) it can be used to compute a corrected value for the desired functional using the residuals. We will attempt to make this paper accessible to normal engineers who do not have PDEs for breakfast.

  10. Adjoint simulation of stream depletion due to aquifer pumping.

    PubMed

    Neupauer, Roseanna M; Griebling, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    If an aquifer is hydraulically connected to an adjacent stream, a pumping well operating in the aquifer will draw some water from aquifer storage and some water from the stream, causing stream depletion. Several analytical, semi-analytical, and numerical approaches have been developed to estimate stream depletion due to pumping. These approaches are effective if the well location is known. If a new well is to be installed, it may be desirable to install the well at a location where stream depletion is minimal. If several possible locations are considered for the location of a new well, stream depletion would have to be estimated for all possible well locations, which can be computationally inefficient. The adjoint approach for estimating stream depletion is a more efficient alternative because with one simulation of the adjoint model, stream depletion can be estimated for pumping at a well at any location. We derive the adjoint equations for a coupled system with a confined aquifer, an overlying unconfined aquifer, and a river that is hydraulically connected to the unconfined aquifer. We assume that the stage in the river is known, and is independent of the stream depletion, consistent with the assumptions of the MODFLOW river package. We describe how the adjoint equations can be solved using MODFLOW. In an illustrative example, we show that for this scenario, the adjoint approach is as accurate as standard forward numerical simulation methods, and requires substantially less computational effort.

  11. Sonic Boom Mitigation Through Aircraft Design and Adjoint Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rallabhandi, Siriam K.; Diskin, Boris; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to design of the supersonic aircraft outer mold line (OML) by optimizing the A-weighted loudness of sonic boom signature predicted on the ground. The optimization process uses the sensitivity information obtained by coupling the discrete adjoint formulations for the augmented Burgers Equation and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) equations. This coupled formulation links the loudness of the ground boom signature to the aircraft geometry thus allowing efficient shape optimization for the purpose of minimizing the impact of loudness. The accuracy of the adjoint-based sensitivities is verified against sensitivities obtained using an independent complex-variable approach. The adjoint based optimization methodology is applied to a configuration previously optimized using alternative state of the art optimization methods and produces additional loudness reduction. The results of the optimizations are reported and discussed.

  12. A Posteriori Analysis for Hydrodynamic Simulations Using Adjoint Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, C S; Estep, D; Sandelin, J; Wang, H

    2009-02-26

    This report contains results of analysis done during an FY08 feasibility study investigating the use of adjoint methodologies for a posteriori error estimation for hydrodynamics simulations. We developed an approach to adjoint analysis for these systems through use of modified equations and viscosity solutions. Targeting first the 1D Burgers equation, we include a verification of the adjoint operator for the modified equation for the Lax-Friedrichs scheme, then derivations of an a posteriori error analysis for a finite difference scheme and a discontinuous Galerkin scheme applied to this problem. We include some numerical results showing the use of the error estimate. Lastly, we develop a computable a posteriori error estimate for the MAC scheme applied to stationary Navier-Stokes.

  13. The adjoint-state method for the downward continuation of the geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedoorn, J. M.; Martinec, Z.

    2015-05-01

    The downward continuation of the observed geomagnetic field from the Earth's surface to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) is complicated due to induction and diffusion processes in the electrically conducting Earth mantle, which modify the amplitudes and morphology of the geomagnetic field. Various methods have been developed to solve this problem, for example, the perturbation approach by Benton & Whaler, or the non-harmonic downward continuation by Ballani et al. In this paper, we present a new approach for determining the geomagnetic field at the CMB by reformulating the ill-posed, one-sided boundary-value problem with time-variable boundary-value function on the Earth's surface into an optimization problem for the boundary condition at the CMB. The reformulated well-posed problem is solved by a conjugate gradient technique using the adjoint gradient of a misfit. For this purpose, we formulate the geomagnetic adjoint-state equations for efficient computations of the misfit gradient. Beside the theoretical description of the new adjoint-state method (ASM), the first applications to a global geomagnetic field model are presented. The comparison with other methods demonstrates the capability of the new method to determine the geomagnetic field at the CMB and allows us to investigate the variability of the determined field with respect to the applied methods. This shows that it is necessary to apply the ASM when investigating the effect of the Earth's mantle conductivity because the difference between the results of approximate methods (harmonic downward continuation, perturbation approach) and the rigorous ASM are of the same order as the difference between the results of the ASM applied for different mantle conductivities.

  14. Constrained Multipoint Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using an Adjoint Formulation and Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Saunders, David

    1997-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method that treats the design of complex aircraft configurations subject to high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD), geometric constraints and multiple design points is described. The design process will be greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and distributed memory computer architectures. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods. The resulting problem is implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on a higher order CFD method. In order to facilitate the integration of these high fidelity CFD approaches into future multi-disciplinary optimization (NW) applications, new methods must be developed which are capable of simultaneously addressing complex geometries, multiple objective functions, and geometric design constraints. In our earlier studies, we coupled the adjoint based design formulations with unconstrained optimization algorithms and showed that the approach was effective for the aerodynamic design of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations. In many of the results presented in these earlier works, geometric constraints were satisfied either by a projection into feasible space or by posing the design space parameterization such that it automatically satisfied constraints. Furthermore, with the exception of reference 9 where the second author initially explored the use of multipoint design in conjunction with adjoint formulations, our earlier works have focused on single point design efforts. Here we demonstrate that the same methodology may be extended to treat

  15. Fission Matrix Capability for MCNP Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Forrest; Carney, Sean; Kiedrowski, Brian; Martin, William

    2014-06-01

    We describe recent experience and results from implementing a fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The fission matrix can be used to provide estimates of the fundamental mode fission distribution, the dominance ratio, the eigenvalue spectrum, and higher mode forward and adjoint eigenfunctions of the fission neutron source distribution. It can also be used to accelerate the convergence of the power method iterations and to provide basis functions for higher-order perturbation theory. The higher-mode fission sources can be used in MCNP to determine higher-mode forward fluxes and tallies, and work is underway to provide higher-mode adjoint-weighted fluxes and tallies. Past difficulties and limitations of the fission matrix approach are overcome with a new sparse representation of the matrix, permitting much larger and more accurate fission matrix representations. The new fission matrix capabilities provide a significant advance in the state-of-the-art for Monte Carlo criticality calculations.

  16. An Adjoint-Based Analysis of the Sampling Footprints of Tall Tower, Aircraft and Potential Future Lidar Observations of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Arlyn; Kawa, Randy; Zhu, Zhengxin; Burris, John; Abshire, Jim

    2004-01-01

    A detailed mechanistic understanding of the sources and sinks of CO2 will be required to reliably predict future CO2 levels and climate. A commonly used technique for deriving information about CO2 exchange with surface reservoirs is to solve an 'inverse problem', where CO2 observations are used with an atmospheric transport model to find the optimal distribution of sources and sinks. Synthesis inversion methods are powerful tools for addressing this question, but the results are disturbingly sensitive to the details of the calculation. Studies done using different atmospheric transport models and combinations of surface station data have produced substantially different distributions of surface fluxes. Adjoint methods are now being developed that will more effectively incorporate diverse datasets in estimates of surface fluxes of CO2. In an adjoint framework, it will be possible to combine CO2 concentration data from longterm surface and aircraft monitoring stations with data from intensive field campaigns and with proposed future satellite observations. We have recently developed an adjoint for the GSFC 3-D Parameterized Chemistry and Transport Model (PCTM). Here, we will present results from a PCTM Adjoint study comparing the sampling footprints of tall tower, aircraft and potential future lidar observations of CO2. The vertical resolution and extent of the profiles and the observation frequency will be considered for several sites in North America.

  17. Adjoint-based optimization of fish swimming gaits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floryan, Daniel; Rowley, Clarence W.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2016-11-01

    We study a simplified model of fish swimming, namely a flat plate periodically pitching about its leading edge. Using gradient-based optimization, we seek periodic gaits that are optimal in regards to a particular objective (e.g. maximal thrust). The two-dimensional immersed boundary projection method is used to investigate the flow states, and its adjoint formulation is used to efficiently calculate the gradient of the objective function needed for optimization. The adjoint method also provides sensitivity information, which may be used to elucidate the physics responsible for optimality. Supported under ONR MURI Grants N00014-14-1-0533, Program Manager Bob Brizzolara.

  18. Adjoint Sensitivity Computations for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Mesh Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis,Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Cartesian-mesh methods are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools. Our goal is to combine the automation capabilities of Cartesian methods with an eficient computation of design sensitivities. We address this issue using the adjoint method, where the computational cost of the design sensitivities, or objective function gradients, is esseutially indepeudent of the number of design variables. In previous work, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm included the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The objective of the present work is to extend our adjoint formulation to problems involving general shape changes. Central to this development is the computation of volume-mesh sensitivities to obtain a reliable approximation of the objective finction gradient. Motivated by the success of mesh-perturbation schemes commonly used in body-fitted unstructured formulations, we propose an approach based on a local linearization of a mesh-perturbation scheme similar to the spring analogy. This approach circumvents most of the difficulties that arise due to non-smooth changes in the cut-cell layer as the boundary shape evolves and provides a consistent approximation tot he exact gradient of the discretized abjective function. A detailed gradient accurace study is presented to verify our approach

  19. Mantle-driven uplift of Hangai Dome: New seismic constraints from adjoint tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Niu, Fenglin; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2015-09-01

    The origin of Hangai Dome, an unusual large-scale, high-elevation low-relief landform in central Mongolia, remains enigmatic partly due to lack of constraints on its underlying seismic structure. Using adjoint tomography—a full waveform tomographic technique—and a large seismic waveform data set in East Asia, we discover beneath the dome a deep low shear wave speed (low-V) conduit indicating a slightly warmer (54 K to 127 K) upwelling from the transition zone. This upwelling is spatially linked to a broader uppermost mantle low-V region underlying the dome. Further observations of high compressional to shear wave speed ratios and positive radial anisotropy in the low-V region suggest partial melting and horizontal melt transport. We propose that the mantle upwelling induced decompression melting in the uppermost mantle and that excess heat associated with melt transport modified the lithosphere that isostatically compensates the surface uplift at upper mantle depths (>80 km).

  20. Adjoint-optimization algorithm for spatial reconstruction of a scalar source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Hasegawa, Yosuke; Meneveau, Charles; Zaki, Tamer

    2016-11-01

    Identifying the location of the source of passive scalar transported in a turbulent environment based on remote measurements is an ill-posed problem. A conjugate-gradient algorithm is proposed, and relies on eddy-resolving simulations of both the forward and adjoint scalar transport equations to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the source. The formulation can naturally accommodate measurements from multiple sensors. The algorithm is evaluated for scalar dispersion in turbulent channel flow (Reτ = 180). As the distance between the source and sensor increases, the accuracy of the source recovery deteriorates due to diffusive effects. Improvement in performance is demonstrated for higher Prantl numbers and also with increasing number of sensors. This study is supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant CNS 1461870).

  1. Adjoint Methods for Guiding Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Tsunami Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, B. N.; LeVeque, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    One difficulty in developing numerical methods for tsunami modeling is the fact that solutions contain time-varying regions where much higher resolution is required than elsewhere in the domain, particularly when tracking a tsunami propagating across the ocean. The open source GeoClaw software deals with this issue by using block-structured adaptive mesh refinement to selectively refine around propagating waves. For problems where only a target area of the total solution is of interest (e.g., one coastal community), a method that allows identifying and refining the grid only in regions that influence this target area would significantly reduce the computational cost of finding a solution. In this work, we show that solving the time-dependent adjoint equation and using a suitable inner product with the forward solution allows more precise refinement of the relevant waves. We present the adjoint methodology first in one space dimension for illustration and in a broad context since it could also be used in other adaptive software, and potentially for other tsunami applications beyond adaptive refinement. We then show how this adjoint method has been integrated into the adaptive mesh refinement strategy of the open source GeoClaw software and present tsunami modeling results showing that the accuracy of the solution is maintained and the computational time required is significantly reduced through the integration of the adjoint method into adaptive mesh refinement.

  2. Assimilating Remote Ammonia Observations with a Refined Aerosol Thermodynamics Adjoint"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia emissions parameters in North America can be refined in order to improve the evaluation of modeled concentrations against observations. Here, we seek to do so by developing and applying the GEOS-Chem adjoint nested over North America to conductassimilation of observations...

  3. Self-adjoint commuting differential operators of rank two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A. E.

    2016-08-01

    This is a survey of results on self-adjoint commuting ordinary differential operators of rank two. In particular, the action of automorphisms of the first Weyl algebra on the set of commuting differential operators with polynomial coefficients is discussed, as well as the problem of constructing algebro-geometric solutions of rank l>1 of soliton equations. Bibliography: 59 titles.

  4. Seeking Energy System Pathways to Reduce Ozone Damage to Ecosystems through Adjoint-based Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, S. L.; Pinder, R. W.; Loughlin, D. H.; Bash, J. O.; Turner, M. D.; Henze, D. K.; Percell, P.; Zhao, S.; Russell, M. G.; Hakami, A.

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) affects the productivity of ecosystems in addition to degrading human health. Concentrations of this pollutant are significantly influenced by precursor gas emissions, many of which emanate from energy production and use processes. Energy system optimization models could inform policy decisions that are intended to reduce these harmful effects if the contribution of precursor gas emissions to human health and ecosystem degradation could be elucidated. Nevertheless, determining the degree to which precursor gas emissions harm ecosystems and human health is challenging because of the photochemical production of ozone and the distinct mechanisms by which ozone causes harm to different crops, tree species, and humans. Here, the adjoint of a regional chemical transport model is employed to efficiently calculate the relative influences of ozone precursor gas emissions on ecosystem and human health degradation, which informs an energy system optimization. Specifically, for the summer of 2007 the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model adjoint is used to calculate the location- and sector-specific influences of precursor gas emissions on potential productivity losses for the major crops and sensitive tree species as well as human mortality attributable to chronic ozone exposure in the continental U.S. The atmospheric concentrations are evaluated with 12-km horizontal resolution with crop production and timber biomass data gridded similarly. These location-specific factors inform the energy production and use technologies selected in the MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) model.

  5. Sources and processes contributing to nitrogen deposition: an adjoint model analysis applied to biodiversity hotspots worldwide.

    PubMed

    Paulot, Fabien; Jacob, Daniel J; Henze, Daven K

    2013-04-02

    Anthropogenic enrichment of reactive nitrogen (Nr) deposition is an ecological concern. We use the adjoint of a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to identify the sources and processes that control Nr deposition to an ensemble of biodiversity hotspots worldwide and two U.S. national parks (Cuyahoga and Rocky Mountain). We find that anthropogenic sources dominate deposition at all continental sites and are mainly regional (less than 1000 km) in origin. In Hawaii, Nr supply is controlled by oceanic emissions of ammonia (50%) and anthropogenic sources (50%), with important contributions from Asia and North America. Nr deposition is also sensitive in complicated ways to emissions of SO2, which affect Nr gas-aerosol partitioning, and of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which affect oxidant concentrations and produce organic nitrate reservoirs. For example, VOC emissions generally inhibit deposition of locally emitted NOx but significantly increase Nr deposition downwind. However, in polluted boreal regions, anthropogenic VOC emissions can promote Nr deposition in winter. Uncertainties in chemical rate constants for OH + NO2 and NO2 hydrolysis also complicate the determination of source-receptor relationships for polluted sites in winter. Application of our adjoint sensitivities to the representative concentration pathways (RCPs) scenarios for 2010-2050 indicates that future decreases in Nr deposition due to NOx emission controls will be offset by concurrent increases in ammonia emissions from agriculture.

  6. Development of Parallel Computing Framework to Enhance Radiation Transport Code Capabilities for Rare Isotope Beam Facility Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kostin, Mikhail; Mokhov, Nikolai; Niita, Koji

    2013-09-25

    A parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. It is intended to be used with older radiation transport codes implemented in Fortran77, Fortran 90 or C. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was developed and tested in conjunction with the MARS15 code. It is possible to use it with other codes such as PHITS, FLUKA and MCNP after certain adjustments. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. The framework corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

  7. An approach to computing discrete adjoints for MPI-parallelized models applied to Ice Sheet System Model 4.11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larour, Eric; Utke, Jean; Bovin, Anton; Morlighem, Mathieu; Perez, Gilberto

    2016-11-01

    Within the framework of sea-level rise projections, there is a strong need for hindcast validation of the evolution of polar ice sheets in a way that tightly matches observational records (from radar, gravity, and altimetry observations mainly). However, the computational requirements for making hindcast reconstructions possible are severe and rely mainly on the evaluation of the adjoint state of transient ice-flow models. Here, we look at the computation of adjoints in the context of the NASA/JPL/UCI Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), written in C++ and designed for parallel execution with MPI. We present the adaptations required in the way the software is designed and written, but also generic adaptations in the tools facilitating the adjoint computations. We concentrate on the use of operator overloading coupled with the AdjoinableMPI library to achieve the adjoint computation of the ISSM. We present a comprehensive approach to (1) carry out type changing through the ISSM, hence facilitating operator overloading, (2) bind to external solvers such as MUMPS and GSL-LU, and (3) handle MPI-based parallelism to scale the capability. We demonstrate the success of the approach by computing sensitivities of hindcast metrics such as the misfit to observed records of surface altimetry on the northeastern Greenland Ice Stream, or the misfit to observed records of surface velocities on Upernavik Glacier, central West Greenland. We also provide metrics for the scalability of the approach, and the expected performance. This approach has the potential to enable a new generation of hindcast-validated projections that make full use of the wealth of datasets currently being collected, or already collected, in Greenland and Antarctica.

  8. Calculating Air Quality and Climate Co-Benefits Metrics from Adjoint Elasticities in Chemistry-Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spak, S.; Henze, D. K.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    The science and policy communities both need common metrics that clearly, comprehensively, and intuitively communicate the relative sensitivities of air quality and climate to emissions control strategies, include emissions and process uncertainties, and minimize the range of error that is transferred to the metric. This is particularly important because most emissions control policies impact multiple short-lived climate forcing agents, and non-linear climate and health responses in space and time limit the accuracy and policy value of simple emissions-based calculations. Here we describe and apply new second-order elasticity metrics to support the direct comparison of emissions control policies for air quality and health co-benefits analyses using adjoint chemical transport and chemistry-climate models. Borrowing an econometric concept, the simplest elasticities in the atmospheric system are the percentage changes in concentrations due to a percentage change in the emissions. We propose a second-order elasticity metric, the Emissions Reduction Efficiency, which supports comparison across compounds, to long-lived climate forcing agents like CO2, and to other air quality impacts, at any temporal or spatial scale. These adjoint-based metrics (1) possess a single uncertainty range; (2) allow for the inclusion of related health and other impacts effects within the same framework; (3) take advantage of adjoint and forward sensitivity models; and (4) are easily understood. Using global simulations with the adjoint of GEOS-Chem, we apply these metrics to identify spatial and sectoral variability in the climate and health co-benefits of sectoral emissions controls on black carbon, sulfur dioxide, and PM2.5. We find spatial gradients in optimal control strategies on every continent, along with differences among megacities.

  9. Subsurface flow and transport of organic chemicals: an assessment of current modeling capability and priority directions for future research (1987-1995)

    SciTech Connect

    Streile, G.P.; Simmons, C.S.

    1986-09-01

    Theoretical and computer modeling capability for assessing the subsurface movement and fate of organic contaminants in groundwater was examined. Hence, this study is particularly concerned with energy-related, organic compounds that could enter a subsurface environment and move as components of a liquid phase separate from groundwater. The migration of organic chemicals that exist in an aqueous dissolved state is certainly a part of this more general scenario. However, modeling of the transport of chemicals in aqueous solution has already been the subject of several reviews. Hence, this study emphasizes the multiphase scenario. This study was initiated to focus on the important physicochemical processes that control the behavior of organic substances in groundwater systems, to evaluate the theory describing these processes, and to search for and evaluate computer codes that implement models that correctly conceptualize the problem situation. This study is not a code inventory, and no effort was made to identify every available code capable of representing a particular process.

  10. Adjoint Formulation for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Murman, Scott M.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Many problems in aerodynamic design can be characterized by smooth and convex objective functions. This motivates the use of gradient-based algorithms, particularly for problems with a large number of design variables, to efficiently determine optimal shapes and configurations that maximize aerodynamic performance. Accurate and efficient computation of the gradient, however, remains a challenging task. In optimization problems where the number of design variables dominates the number of objectives and flow- dependent constraints, the cost of gradient computations can be significantly reduced by the use of the adjoint method. The problem of aerodynamic optimization using the adjoint method has been analyzed and validated for both structured and unstructured grids. The method has been applied to design problems governed by the potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes equations and can be subdivided into the continuous and discrete formulations. Giles and Pierce provide a detailed review of both approaches. Most implementations rely on grid-perturbation or mapping procedures during the gradient computation that explicitly couple changes in the surface shape to the volume grid. The solution of the adjoint equation is usually accomplished using the same scheme that solves the governing flow equations. Examples of such code reuse include multistage Runge-Kutta schemes coupled with multigrid, approximate-factorization, line-implicit Gauss-Seidel, and also preconditioned GMRES. The development of the adjoint method for aerodynamic optimization problems on Cartesian grids has been limited. In contrast to implementations on structured and unstructured grids, Cartesian grid methods decouple the surface discretization from the volume grid. This feature makes Cartesian methods well suited for the automated analysis of complex geometry problems, and consequently a promising approach to aerodynamic optimization. Melvin e t al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code

  11. Development of a coupled dynamics code with transport theory capability and application to accelerator driven systems transients

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalan, J. E.; Ama, T.; Palmiotti, G.; Taiwo, T. A.; Yang, W. S.

    2000-03-09

    The VARIANT-K and DIF3D-K nodal spatial kinetics computer codes have been coupled to the SAS4A and SASSYS-1 liquid metal reactor accident and systems analysis codes. SAS4A and SASSYS-1 have been extended with the addition of heavy liquid metal (Pb and Pb-Bi) thermophysical properties, heat transfer correlations, and fluid dynamics correlations. The coupling methodology and heavy liquid metal modeling additions are described. The new computer code suite has been applied to analysis of neutron source and thermal-hydraulics transients in a model of an accelerator-driven minor actinide burner design proposed in an OECD/NEA/NSC benchmark specification. Modeling assumptions and input data generation procedures are described. Results of transient analyses are reported, with emphasis on comparison of P1 and P3 variational nodal transport theory results with nodal diffusion theory results, and on significance of spatial kinetics effects.

  12. Seismic imaging and inversion based on spectral-element and adjoint methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yang

    One of the most important topics in seismology is to construct detailed tomographic images beneath the surface, which can be interpreted geologically and geochemically to understand geodynamic processes happening in the interior of the Earth. Classically, these images are usually produced based upon linearized traveltime anomalies involving several particular seismic phases, whereas nonlinear inversion fitting synthetic seismograms and recorded signals based upon the adjoint method becomes more and more favorable. The adjoint tomography, also referred to as waveform inversion, is advantageous over classical techniques in several aspects, such as better resolution, while it also has several drawbacks, e.g., slow convergence and lack of quantitative resolution analysis. In this dissertation, we focus on solving these remaining issues in adjoint tomography, from a theoretical perspective and based upon synthetic examples. To make the thesis complete by itself and easy to follow, we start from development of the spectral-element method, a wave equation solver that enables access to accurate synthetic seismograms for an arbitrary Earth model, and the adjoint method, which provides Frechet derivatives, also named as sensitivity kernels, of a given misfit function. Then, the sensitivity kernels for waveform misfit functions are illustrated, using examples from exploration seismology, in other words, for migration purposes. Next, we show step by step how these gradient derivatives may be utilized in minimizing the misfit function, which leads to iterative refinements on the Earth model. Strategies needed to speed up the inversion, ensure convergence and improve resolution, e.g., preconditioning, quasi-Newton methods, multi-scale measurements and combination of traveltime and waveform misfit functions, are discussed. Through comparisons between the adjoint tomography and classical tomography, we address the resolution issue by calculating the point-spread function, the

  13. Adjoint optimal control problems for the RANS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attavino, A.; Cerroni, D.; Da Vià, R.; Manservisi, S.; Menghini, F.

    2017-01-01

    Adjoint optimal control in computational fluid dynamics has become increasingly popular recently because of its use in several engineering and research studies. However the optimal control of turbulent flows without the use of Direct Numerical Simulation is still an open problem and various methods have been proposed based on different approaches. In this work we study optimal control problems for a turbulent flow modeled with a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes system. The adjoint system is obtained through the use of a Lagrangian multiplier method by setting as objective of the control a velocity matching profile or an increase or decrease in the turbulent kinetic energy. The optimality system is solved with an in-house finite element code and numerical results are reported in order to show the validity of this approach.

  14. Accurate adjoint design sensitivities for nano metal optics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2015-09-07

    We present a method for obtaining accurate numerical design sensitivities for metal-optical nanostructures. Adjoint design sensitivity analysis, long used in fluid mechanics and mechanical engineering for both optimization and structural analysis, is beginning to be used for nano-optics design, but it fails for sharp-cornered metal structures because the numerical error in electromagnetic simulations of metal structures is highest at sharp corners. These locations feature strong field enhancement and contribute strongly to design sensitivities. By using high-accuracy FEM calculations and rounding sharp features to a finite radius of curvature we obtain highly-accurate design sensitivities for 3D metal devices. To provide a bridge to the existing literature on adjoint methods in other fields, we derive the sensitivity equations for Maxwell's equations in the PDE framework widely used in fluid mechanics.

  15. Adjoint Fokker-Planck equation and runaway electron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chang; Brennan, Dylan P.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-01-15

    The adjoint Fokker-Planck equation method is applied to study the runaway probability function and the expected slowing-down time for highly relativistic runaway electrons, including the loss of energy due to synchrotron radiation. In direct correspondence to Monte Carlo simulation methods, the runaway probability function has a smooth transition across the runaway separatrix, which can be attributed to effect of the pitch angle scattering term in the kinetic equation. However, for the same numerical accuracy, the adjoint method is more efficient than the Monte Carlo method. The expected slowing-down time gives a novel method to estimate the runaway current decay time in experiments. A new result from this work is that the decay rate of high energy electrons is very slow when E is close to the critical electric field. This effect contributes further to a hysteresis previously found in the runaway electron population.

  16. Adjoint Fokker-Planck equation and runaway electron dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Brennan, Dylan P.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-01-01

    The adjoint Fokker-Planck equation method is applied to study the runaway probability function and the expected slowing-down time for highly relativistic runaway electrons, including the loss of energy due to synchrotron radiation. In direct correspondence to Monte Carlo simulation methods, the runaway probability function has a smooth transition across the runaway separatrix, which can be attributed to effect of the pitch angle scattering term in the kinetic equation. However, for the same numerical accuracy, the adjoint method is more efficient than the Monte Carlo method. The expected slowing-down time gives a novel method to estimate the runaway current decay time in experiments. A new result from this work is that the decay rate of high energy electrons is very slow when E is close to the critical electric field. This effect contributes further to a hysteresis previously found in the runaway electron population.

  17. Three-Dimensional Turbulent RANS Adjoint-Based Error Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Engineering problems commonly require functional outputs of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with specified accuracy. These simulations are performed with limited computational resources. Computable error estimates offer the possibility of quantifying accuracy on a given mesh and predicting a fine grid functional on a coarser mesh. Such an estimate can be computed by solving the flow equations and the associated adjoint problem for the functional of interest. An adjoint-based error correction procedure is demonstrated for transonic inviscid and subsonic laminar and turbulent flow. A mesh adaptation procedure is formulated to target uncertainty in the corrected functional and terminate when error remaining in the calculation is less than a user-specified error tolerance. This adaptation scheme is shown to yield anisotropic meshes with corrected functionals that are more accurate for a given number of grid points then isotropic adapted and uniformly refined grids.

  18. A comparison of adjoint and data-centric verification techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Wildey, Timothy Michael; Cyr, Eric C; Shadid, John N; Pawlowski, Roger P; Smith, Thomas Michael

    2013-03-01

    This document summarizes the results from a level 3 milestone study within the CASL VUQ effort. We compare the adjoint-based a posteriori error estimation approach with a recent variant of a data-centric verification technique. We provide a brief overview of each technique and then we discuss their relative advantages and disadvantages. We use Drekar::CFD to produce numerical results for steady-state Navier Stokes and SARANS approximations. 3

  19. Seismic Window Selection and Misfit Measurements for Global Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, W.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M.; Podhorszki, N.; Smith, J. A.; Tromp, J.

    2013-12-01

    Global Adjoint Tomography requires fast parallel processing of large datasets. After obtaing the preprocessed observed and synthetic seismograms, we use the open source software packages FLEXWIN (Maggi et al. 2007) to select time windows and MEASURE_ADJ to make measurements. These measurements define adjoint sources for data assimilation. Previous versions of these tools work on a pair of SAC files---observed and synthetic seismic data for the same component and station, and loop over all seismic records associated with one earthquake. Given the large number of stations and earthquakes, the frequent read and write operations create severe I/O bottlenecks on modern computing platforms. We present new versions of these tools utilizing a new seismic data format, namely the Adaptive Seismic Data Format(ASDF). This new format shows superior scalability for applications on high-performance computers and accommodates various types of data, including earthquake, industry and seismic interferometry datasets. ASDF also provides user-friendly APIs, which can be easily integrated into the adjoint tomography workflow and combined with other data processing tools. In addition to solving the I/O bottleneck, we are making several improvements to these tools. For example, FLEXWIN is tuned to select windows for different types of earthquakes. To capture their distinct features, we categorize earthquakes by their depths and frequency bands. Moreover, instead of only picking phases between the first P arrival and the surface-wave arrivals, our aim is to select and assimilate many other later prominent phases in adjoint tomography. For example, in the body-wave band (17 s - 60 s), we include SKS, sSKS and their multiple, while in the surface-wave band (60 s - 120 s) we incorporate major-arc surface waves.

  20. Adjoint based sensitivity analysis of a reacting jet in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sashittal, Palash; Sayadi, Taraneh; Schmid, Peter

    2016-11-01

    With current advances in computational resources, high fidelity simulations of reactive flows are increasingly being used as predictive tools in various industrial applications. In order to capture the combustion process accurately, detailed/reduced chemical mechanisms are employed, which in turn rely on various model parameters. Therefore, it would be of great interest to quantify the sensitivities of the predictions with respect to the introduced models. Due to the high dimensionality of the parameter space, methods such as finite differences which rely on multiple forward simulations prove to be very costly and adjoint based techniques are a suitable alternative. The complex nature of the governing equations, however, renders an efficient strategy in finding the adjoint equations a challenging task. In this study, we employ the modular approach of Fosas de Pando et al. (2012), to build a discrete adjoint framework applied to a reacting jet in crossflow. The developed framework is then used to extract the sensitivity of the integrated heat release with respect to the existing combustion parameters. Analyzing the sensitivities in the three-dimensional domain provides insight towards the specific regions of the flow that are more susceptible to the choice of the model.

  1. Unsteady Adjoint Approach for Design Optimization of Flapping Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Byung Joon; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the work for optimizing the propulsive efficiency of flapping airfoils, i.e., improving the thrust under constraining aerodynamic work during the flapping flights by changing their shape and trajectory of motion with the unsteady discrete adjoint approach. For unsteady problems, it is essential to properly resolving time scales of motion under consideration and it must be compatible with the objective sought after. We include both the instantaneous and time-averaged (periodic) formulations in this study. For the design optimization with shape parameters or motion parameters, the time-averaged objective function is found to be more useful, while the instantaneous one is more suitable for flow control. The instantaneous objective function is operationally straightforward. On the other hand, the time-averaged objective function requires additional steps in the adjoint approach; the unsteady discrete adjoint equations for a periodic flow must be reformulated and the corresponding system of equations solved iteratively. We compare the design results from shape and trajectory optimizations and investigate the physical relevance of design variables to the flapping motion at on- and off-design conditions.

  2. A User's Manual for MASH V1.5 - A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    SciTech Connect

    C. O. Slater; J. M. Barnes; J. O. Johnson; J.D. Drischler

    1998-10-01

    The Monte Carlo ~djoint ~ielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma- ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air- over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system includes the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. The current version, MASH v 1.5, is the successor to the original MASH v 1.0 code system initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the "dose importance" of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response as a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem.

  3. Utilisation de sources et d'adjoints dragon pour les calculs TRIPOLI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camand, Corentin

    Numerical simulation is an essential part of reactor physics in order to understand the behaviour of neutrons inside and outside nuclear reactors. The objective is to solve the neutron transport equation in order to know the neutron flux and the interactions between neutrons and materials. We use neutronic simulation codes in order to solve this equation for criticallity problem, where we have a neutron multiplying environment, and shielding problems. There are two different types of numerical simulation techniques. Deterministic methods solve directly the transport equation using some approximations. The energy domain is divided in regions called groups, we use a spatial mesh for the geometry treatment, transport operator may also be simplified. Those approximations invole an inherent error. However these methods provide high computation time performances. Monte Carlo or stochastic methods follow explicitly a large number of neutrons as they travel through materials minimizing approximations. Continuous-energy and multigroup treatment are both available. Quantities calculated are random variables to which are associated statistical error called standard deviations. We have to simulate a very large number of neutrons if we want the calculation to converge and the results to be precise enough. As a matter of fact, computation time of these methods can be excessively large and represent their main weakness. The objective of this study is to set up a chaining method from a deterministic code to a Monte Carlo code, in order to improve the convergence of Monte Carlo calculations performed by the code TRIPOLI. We want to use datas calculated by the deterministic code DRAGON and use them in TRIPOLI. We will develop two methods. The first one will calculate source distribution in DRAGON and implement them in TRIPOLI as initial sources of a criticallity calculation. The objective is to accelerate the convergence of the neutrons sources, and save the first batches that are

  4. Nonlinear self-adjointness and conservation laws of Klein-Gordon-Fock equation with central symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulwahhab, Muhammad Alim

    2015-05-01

    The concept of nonlinear self-adjointness, introduced by Ibragimov, has significantly extends approaches to constructing conservation laws associated with symmetries since it incorporates the strict self-adjointness, the quasi self-adjointness as well as the usual linear self-adjointness. Using this concept, the nonlinear self-adjointness condition for the Klein-Gordon-Fock equation was established and subsequently used to construct simplified but infinitely many nontrivial and independent conserved vectors. The Noether's theorem was further applied to the Klein-Gordon-Fock equation to explore more distinct first integrals, result shows that conservation laws constructed through this approach are exactly the same as those obtained under strict self-adjointness of Ibragimov's method.

  5. Continuous adjoint sensitivity analysis for aerodynamic and acoustic optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayour, Kaveh

    1999-11-01

    A gradient-based shape optimization methodology based on continuous adjoint sensitivities has been developed for two-dimensional steady Euler equations on unstructured meshes and the unsteady transonic small disturbance equation. The continuous adjoint sensitivities of the Helmholtz equation for acoustic applications have also been derived and discussed. The highlights of the developments for the steady two-dimensional Euler equations are the generalization of the airfoil surface boundary condition of the adjoint system to allow a proper closure of the Lagrangian functional associated with a general cost functional and the results for an inverse problem with density as the prescribed target. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that a transformation to the natural coordinate system, in conjunction with the reduction of the governing state equations to the control surface, results in sensitivity integrals that are only a function of the tangential derivatives of the state variables. This approach alleviates the need for directional derivative computations with components along the normal to the control surface, which can render erroneous results. With regard to the unsteady transonic small disturbance equation (UTSD), the continuous adjoint methodology has been successfully extended to unsteady flows. It has been demonstrated that for periodic airfoil oscillations leading to limit-cycle behavior, the Lagrangian functional can be only closed if the time interval of interest spans one or more periods of the flow oscillations after the limit-cycle has been attained. The steady state and limit-cycle sensitivities are then validated by comparing with the brute-force derivatives. The importance of accounting for the flow circulation sensitivity, appearing in the form of a Dirac delta in the wall boundary condition at the trailing edge, has been stressed and demonstrated. Remarkably, the cost of an unsteady adjoint solution is about 0.2 times that of a UTSD solution

  6. Adjoint-Based Sensitivity Maps for the Nearshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzech, Mark; Veeramony, Jay; Ngodock, Hans

    2013-04-01

    The wave model SWAN (Booij et al., 1999) solves the spectral action balance equation to produce nearshore wave forecasts and climatologies. It is widely used by the coastal modeling community and is part of a variety of coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere model systems. A variational data assimilation system (Orzech et al., 2013) has recently been developed for SWAN and is presently being transitioned to operational use by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office. This system is built around a numerical adjoint to the fully nonlinear, nonstationary SWAN code. When provided with measured or artificial "observed" spectral wave data at a location of interest on a given nearshore bathymetry, the adjoint can compute the degree to which spectral energy levels at other locations are correlated with - or "sensitive" to - variations in the observed spectrum. Adjoint output may be used to construct a sensitivity map for the entire domain, tracking correlations of spectral energy throughout the grid. When access is denied to the actual locations of interest, sensitivity maps can be used to determine optimal alternate locations for data collection by identifying regions of greatest sensitivity in the mapped domain. The present study investigates the properties of adjoint-generated sensitivity maps for nearshore wave spectra. The adjoint and forward SWAN models are first used in an idealized test case at Duck, NC, USA, to demonstrate the system's effectiveness at optimizing forecasts of shallow water wave spectra for an inaccessible surf-zone location. Then a series of simulations is conducted for a variety of different initializing conditions, to examine the effects of seasonal changes in wave climate, errors in bathymetry, and variations in size and shape of the inaccessible region of interest. Model skill is quantified using two methods: (1) a more traditional correlation of observed and modeled spectral statistics such as significant wave height, and (2) a recently developed RMS

  7. Testing prediction capabilities of an 131I terrestrial transport model by using measurements collected at the Hanford nuclear facility.

    PubMed

    Apostoaei, A Iulian

    2005-05-01

    A model describing transport of 131I in the environment was developed by SENES Oak Ridge, Inc., for assessment of radiation doses and excess lifetime risk from 131I atmospheric releases from Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in southeast Idaho. This paper describes the results of an exercise designed to test the reliability of this model and to identify the main sources of uncertainty in doses and risks estimated by this model. The testing of the model was based on materials published by the International Atomic Energy Agency BIOMASS program, specifically environmental data collected after the release into atmosphere of 63 curies of 131I during 2-5 September 1963, after an accident at the Hanford PUREX Chemical Separations Plant, in Hanford, Washington. Measurements of activity in air, vegetation, and milk were collected in nine counties around Hanford during the first couple of months after the accident. The activity of 131I in the thyroid glands of two children was measured 47 d after the accident. The model developed by SENES Oak Ridge, Inc., was used to estimate concentrations of 131I in environmental media, thyroid doses for the general population, and the activity of 131I in thyroid glands of the two children. Predicted concentrations of 131I in pasture grass and milk and thyroid doses were compared with similar estimates produced by other modelers. The SENES model was also used to estimate excess lifetime risk of thyroid cancer due to the September 1963 releases of 131I from Hanford. The SENES model was first calibrated and then applied to all locations of interest around Hanford without fitting the model parameters to a given location. Predictions showed that the SENES model reproduces satisfactorily the time-dependent and the time-integrated measured concentrations in vegetation and milk, and provides reliable estimates of 131I activity in thyroids of children. SENES model

  8. Modeling Finite Faults Using the Adjoint Wave Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjörleifsdóttir, V.; Liu, Q.; Tromp, J.

    2004-12-01

    Time-reversal acoustics, a technique in which an acoustic signal is recorded by an array of transducers, time-reversed, and retransmitted, is used, e.g., in medical therapy to locate and destroy gallstones (for a review see Fink, 1997). As discussed by Tromp et al. (2004), time-reversal techniques for locating sources are closely linked to so-called `adjoint methods' (Talagrand and Courtier, 1987), which may be used to evaluate the gradient of a misfit function. Tromp et al. (2004) illustrate how a (finite) source inversion may be implemented based upon the adjoint wave field by writing the change in the misfit function, δ χ, due to a change in the moment-density tensor, δ m, as an integral of the adjoint strain field ɛ x,t) over the fault plane Σ : δ χ = ∫ 0T∫_Σ ɛ x,T-t) :δ m(x,t) d2xdt. We find that if the real fault plane is located at a distance δ h in the direction of the fault normal hat n, then to first order an additional factor of ∫ 0T∫_Σ δ h (x) ∂ n ɛ x,T-t):m(x,t) d2xdt is added to the change in the misfit function. The adjoint strain is computed by using the time-reversed difference between data and synthetics recorded at all receivers as simultaneous sources and recording the resulting strain on the fault plane. In accordance with time-reversal acoustics, all the resulting waves will constructively interfere at the position of the original source in space and time. The level of convergence will be deterimined by factors such as the source-receiver geometry, the frequency of the recorded data and synthetics, and the accuracy of the velocity structure used when back propagating the wave field. The terms ɛ x,T-t) and ∂ n ɛ x,T-t):m(x,t) can be viewed as sensitivity kernels for the moment density and the faultplane location respectively. By looking at these quantities we can make an educated choice of fault parametrization given the data in hand. The process can then be repeated to invert for the best source model, as

  9. Effect of the acoustic environment on adjoint sound speed inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Edward

    The recent prevalence of low cost robotic platforms such as oceanographic gliders has increased the availability of long-term measurements of the ocean environment. Gliders can take direct measurements of the ocean sound speed environment, which is of interest in many ocean acoustic problems, including source localization and tomography. These measurements, however, have a low spatial-temporal resolution that makes them difficult to use directly. These measurements have the potential to provide an accurate environmental parameterization for acoustic inversions, which could in turn be used to measure the sound speed field at a much higher spatial-temporal resolution. This study uses glider measurements to provide the environmental parameterization used in the adjoint inversion method. The adjoint method calculates the gradient of a cost function describing the mismatch between observed data and acoustic model predictions with respect to the ocean sound speed. This gradient is a measure of how changing the sound speed at any point in the acoustic environment would affect this misfit. This cost function and its gradient information is then used as inputs to a numerical optimization routine, which efficiently finds a local minimum. There are two challenges of this method addressed in this study; the first is restricting the search space of this inversion. Proper parameterization of the inversion will ensure that the local minimum found in the numerical optimization routine is the correct result of the inversion. This parameterization allows for the combination of the relative strengths of both methods of measuring the sound speed field, the robust direct measurement of the glider and the near instantaneous result of an acoustic inversion. A covariance matrix is created from glider measurements of the range dependent sound speed field, which is then decomposed into an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) base. The mean profile and the significant EOF bases then form the

  10. Using Adjoint Methods to Improve 3-D Velocity Models of Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Tape, C.; Maggi, A.; Tromp, J.

    2006-12-01

    We use adjoint methods popular in climate and ocean dynamics to calculate Fréchet derivatives for tomographic inversions in southern California. The Fréchet derivative of an objective function χ(m), where m denotes the Earth model, may be written in the generic form δχ=int Km(x) δln m(x) d3x, where δln m=δ m/m denotes the relative model perturbation. For illustrative purposes, we construct the 3-D finite-frequency banana-doughnut kernel Km, corresponding to the misfit of a single traveltime measurement, by simultaneously computing the 'adjoint' wave field s† forward in time and reconstructing the regular wave field s backward in time. The adjoint wave field is produced by using the time-reversed velocity at the receiver as a fictitious source, while the regular wave field is reconstructed on the fly by propagating the last frame of the wave field saved by a previous forward simulation backward in time. The approach is based upon the spectral-element method, and only two simulations are needed to produce density, shear-wave, and compressional-wave sensitivity kernels. This method is applied to the SCEC southern California velocity model. Various density, shear-wave, and compressional-wave sensitivity kernels are presented for different phases in the seismograms. We also generate 'event' kernels for Pnl, S and surface waves, which are the Fréchet kernels of misfit functions that measure the P, S or surface wave traveltime residuals at all the receivers simultaneously for one particular event. Effectively, an event kernel is a sum of weighted Fréchet kernels, with weights determined by the associated traveltime anomalies. By the nature of the 3-D simulation, every event kernel is also computed based upon just two simulations, i.e., its construction costs the same amount of computation time as an individual banana-doughnut kernel. One can think of the sum of the event kernels for all available earthquakes, called the 'misfit' kernel, as a graphical

  11. Extension of the ADjoint Approach to a Laminar Navier-Stokes Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, Cody

    The use of adjoint methods is common in computational fluid dynamics to reduce the cost of the sensitivity analysis in an optimization cycle. The forward mode ADjoint is a combination of an adjoint sensitivity analysis method with a forward mode automatic differentiation (AD) and is a modification of the reverse mode ADjoint method proposed by Mader et al.[1]. A colouring acceleration technique is presented to reduce the computational cost increase associated with forward mode AD. The forward mode AD facilitates the implementation of the laminar Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The forward mode ADjoint method is applied to a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics solver. The resulting Euler and viscous ADjoint sensitivities are compared to the reverse mode Euler ADjoint derivatives and a complex-step method to demonstrate the reduced computational cost and accuracy. Both comparisons demonstrate the benefits of the colouring method and the practicality of using a forward mode AD. [1] Mader, C.A., Martins, J.R.R.A., Alonso, J.J., and van der Weide, E. (2008) ADjoint: An approach for the rapid development of discrete adjoint solvers. AIAA Journal, 46(4):863-873. doi:10.2514/1.29123.

  12. A user`s manual for MASH 1.0: A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    1992-03-01

    The Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma-ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air-over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system include the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. MASH is the successor to the Vehicle Code System (VCS) initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the ``dose importance`` of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response a a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user`s manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem (input data and selected output edits) for each code.

  13. The efficiency of geophysical adjoint codes generated by automatic differentiation tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasenko, A. V.; Köhl, A.; Stammer, D.

    2016-02-01

    The accuracy of numerical models that describe complex physical or chemical processes depends on the choice of model parameters. Estimating an optimal set of parameters by optimization algorithms requires knowledge of the sensitivity of the process of interest to model parameters. Typically the sensitivity computation involves differentiation of the model, which can be performed by applying algorithmic differentiation (AD) tools to the underlying numerical code. However, existing AD tools differ substantially in design, legibility and computational efficiency. In this study we show that, for geophysical data assimilation problems of varying complexity, the performance of adjoint codes generated by the existing AD tools (i) Open_AD, (ii) Tapenade, (iii) NAGWare and (iv) Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran (TAF) can be vastly different. Based on simple test problems, we evaluate the efficiency of each AD tool with respect to computational speed, accuracy of the adjoint, the efficiency of memory usage, and the capability of each AD tool to handle modern FORTRAN 90-95 elements such as structures and pointers, which are new elements that either combine groups of variables or provide aliases to memory addresses, respectively. We show that, while operator overloading tools are the only ones suitable for modern codes written in object-oriented programming languages, their computational efficiency lags behind source transformation by orders of magnitude, rendering the application of these modern tools to practical assimilation problems prohibitive. In contrast, the application of source transformation tools appears to be the most efficient choice, allowing handling even large geophysical data assimilation problems. However, they can only be applied to numerical models written in earlier generations of programming languages. Our study indicates that applying existing AD tools to realistic geophysical problems faces limitations that urgently need to be solved to allow the

  14. Towards Multi-resolution Adjoint Tomography of the European Crust and Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basini, P.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Boschi, L.; Schenk, O.; Verbeke, J.; Hanasoge, S.; Giardini, D.

    2010-12-01

    Thanks to continuously improved instrument coverage, and the growth of high-performance computational infrastructure, it is now possible to enhance the resolution at which seismologists image the Earth's interior. While most algorithms in global seismic tomography today are grounded on the ray-theory approximation, however, resolution and model complexity can effectively be enhanced only through the application of more advanced techniques accounting for the many complexities of the partial derivatives relating seismic data and Earth structure. These include full-wave forward modelling methods and adjoint algorithms, which together set a framework for iterative, nonlinear inversion upon complex 3D structures. We take advantage of these methodological improvements using a newly developed, flexible spectral-element method (SPECFEM3D) with embedded adjoint capabilities to devise new tomographic models of the European crust and upper mantle. We chose a two-scale strategy, in which we use global surface wave data to first constrain the large-scale structures, and simultaneously invert for high-resolution, regional structures based on measurements of ambient noise in central and southern Europe. By its very nature, and as a result of the dense station coverage over the continent, the ambient-noise method affords us a particularly uniform seismic coverage. To define surface-wave sensitivity kernels, we construct a flexible, global mesh of the upper mantle only (i.e., a spherical shell) honoring all global discontinuities, and include 3D starting models down to periods of 30 seconds. The noise data are cross-correlated to obtain station-to-station Green's functions. We will present examples of sensitivity kernels computed for these noise-based Green's functions and discuss the data-specific validity of the underlying assumptions to extract Green's functions. The local setup, which is constructed using the same software as in the global case, needs to honor internal and

  15. Adjoint Techniques for Topology Optimization of Structures Under Damage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akgun, Mehmet A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this cooperative agreement was to seek computationally efficient ways to optimize aerospace structures subject to damage tolerance criteria. Optimization was to involve sizing as well as topology optimization. The work was done in collaboration with Steve Scotti, Chauncey Wu and Joanne Walsh at the NASA Langley Research Center. Computation of constraint sensitivity is normally the most time-consuming step of an optimization procedure. The cooperative work first focused on this issue and implemented the adjoint method of sensitivity computation (Haftka and Gurdal, 1992) in an optimization code (runstream) written in Engineering Analysis Language (EAL). The method was implemented both for bar and plate elements including buckling sensitivity for the latter. Lumping of constraints was investigated as a means to reduce the computational cost. Adjoint sensitivity computation was developed and implemented for lumped stress and buckling constraints. Cost of the direct method and the adjoint method was compared for various structures with and without lumping. The results were reported in two papers (Akgun et al., 1998a and 1999). It is desirable to optimize topology of an aerospace structure subject to a large number of damage scenarios so that a damage tolerant structure is obtained. Including damage scenarios in the design procedure is critical in order to avoid large mass penalties at later stages (Haftka et al., 1983). A common method for topology optimization is that of compliance minimization (Bendsoe, 1995) which has not been used for damage tolerant design. In the present work, topology optimization is treated as a conventional problem aiming to minimize the weight subject to stress constraints. Multiple damage configurations (scenarios) are considered. Each configuration has its own structural stiffness matrix and, normally, requires factoring of the matrix and solution of the system of equations. Damage that is expected to be tolerated is local

  16. Examining Tropical Cyclone - Kelvin Wave Interactions using Adjoint Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C. A.; Doyle, J. D.; Hong, X.

    2015-12-01

    Adjoint-based tools can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms that influence the evolution and predictability of atmospheric phenomena, as they allow for the efficient and rigorous computation of forecast sensitivity to changes in the initial state. We apply adjoint-based tools from the non-hydrostatic Coupled Atmosphere/Ocean Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) to explore the initial-state sensitivity and interactions between a tropical cyclone and atmospheric equatorial waves associated with the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the Indian Ocean during the DYNAMO field campaign. The development of Tropical Cyclone 5 (TC05) coincided with the passage of an equatorial Kelvin wave and westerly wind burst associated with an MJO that developed in the Indian Ocean in late November 2011, but it was unclear if and how one affected the other. COAMPS 24-h and 36-h adjoint sensitivities are analyzed for both TC05 and the equatorial waves to understand how the evolution of each system is sensitive to the other. The sensitivity of equatorial westerlies in the western Indian Ocean on 23 November shares characteristics with the classic Gill (1980) Rossby and Kelvin wave response to symmetric heating about the equator, including symmetric cyclonic circulations to the north and south of the westerlies, and enhanced heating in the area of convergence between the equatorial westerlies and easterlies. In addition, there is sensitivity in the Bay of Bengal associated with the cyclonic circulation that eventually develops into TC05. At the same time, the developing TC05 system shows strongest sensitivity to local wind and heating perturbations, but sensitivity to the equatorial westerlies is also clear. On 24 November, when the Kelvin wave is immediately south of the developing tropical cyclone, both phenomena are sensitive to each other. On 25 November TC05 no longer shows sensitivity to the Kelvin wave, while the Kelvin Wave still exhibits some weak sensitivity to TC05. In

  17. Advances in Global Adjoint Tomography -- Massive Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Y.; Lei, W.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Smith, J. A.; Krischer, L.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    Azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity are key to understanding a myriad of processes in Earth's interior. Resolving these properties requires accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3-D Earth models and an iterative inversion strategy. In the wake of successes in regional studies(e.g., Chen et al., 2007; Tape et al., 2009, 2010; Fichtner et al., 2009, 2010; Chen et al.,2010; Zhu et al., 2012, 2013; Chen et al., 2015), we are employing adjoint tomography based on a spectral-element method (Komatitsch & Tromp 1999, 2002) on a global scale using the supercomputer ''Titan'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After 15 iterations, we have obtained a high-resolution transversely isotropic Earth model (M15) using traveltime data from 253 earthquakes. To obtain higher resolution images of the emerging new features and to prepare the inversion for azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity, we expanded the original dataset with approximately 4,220 additional global earthquakes (Mw5.5-7.0) --occurring between 1995 and 2014-- and downloaded 300-minute-long time series for all available data archived at the IRIS Data Management Center, ORFEUS, and F-net. Ocean Bottom Seismograph data from the last decade are also included to maximize data coverage. In order to handle the huge dataset and solve the I/O bottleneck in global adjoint tomography, we implemented a python-based parallel data processing workflow based on the newly developed Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF). With the help of the data selection tool MUSTANG developed by IRIS, we cleaned our dataset and assembled event-based ASDF files for parallel processing. We have started Centroid Moment Tensors (CMT) inversions for all 4,220 earthquakes with the latest model M15, and selected high-quality data for measurement. We will statistically investigate each channel using synthetic seismograms calculated in M15 for updated CMTs and identify problematic channels. In addition to data screening, we also modified

  18. A self-adjoint decomposition of the radial momentum operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. H.; Xiao, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    With acceptance of the Dirac's observation that the canonical quantization entails using Cartesian coordinates, we examine the operator erPr rather than Pr itself and demonstrate that there is a decomposition of erPr into a difference of two self-adjoint but noncommutative operators, in which one is the total momentum and another is the transverse one. This study renders the operator Pr indirectly measurable and physically meaningful, offering an explanation of why the mean value of Pr over a quantum mechanical state makes sense and supporting Dirac's claim that Pr "is real and is the true momentum conjugate to r".

  19. Tangent Adjoint Methods In a Higher-Order Space-Time Discontinuous-Galerkin Solver For Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diosady, Laslo; Murman, Scott; Blonigan, Patrick; Garai, Anirban

    2017-01-01

    Presented space-time adjoint solver for turbulent compressible flows. Confirmed failure of traditional sensitivity methods for chaotic flows. Assessed rate of exponential growth of adjoint for practical 3D turbulent simulation. Demonstrated failure of short-window sensitivity approximations.

  20. Adjoint-based approach to Enhancing Mixing in Rayleigh-Taylor Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kord, Ali; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    A recently developed adjoint method for multi-component compressible flow is used to measure sensitivity of the mixing rate to initial perturbations in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) turbulence. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of RT instabilities are performed at moderate Reynolds numbers. The DNS are used to provide an initial prediction, and the corresponding space-time discrete-exact adjoint provides a sensitivity gradient for a specific quantity of interest (QoI). In this work, a QoI is defined based on the time-integrated scalar field to quantify the mixing rate. Therefore, the adjoint solution is used to measure sensitivity of this QoI to a set of initial perturbations, and inform a gradient-based line search to optimize mixing. We first demonstrate the adjoint approach in the linear regime and compare the optimized initial conditions to the expected values from linear stability analysis. The adjoint method is then used in the high Reynolds number limit where theory is no longer valid. Finally, chaos is known to contaminate the accuracy of the adjoint gradient in turbulent flows when integrated over long time horizons. We assess the influence of chaos on the accuracy of the adjoint gradient to guide the work of future studies on adjoint-based sensitivity of turbulent mixing. PhD Student, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

  1. Study on adjoint-based optimization method for multi-stage turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiwei; Tian, Yong; Yi, Weilin; Ji, Lucheng; Shao, Weiwei; Xiao, Yunhan

    2011-10-01

    Adjoint-based optimization method is a hotspot in turbomachinery. First, this paper presents principles of adjoint method from Lagrange multiplier viewpoint. Second, combining a continuous route with thin layer RANS equations, we formulate adjoint equations and anti-physical boundary conditions. Due to the multi-stage environment in turbomachinery, an adjoint interrow mixing method is introduced. Numerical techniques of solving flow equations and adjoint equations are almost the same, and once they are converged respectively, the gradients of an objective function to design variables can be calculated using complex method efficiently. Third, integrating a shape perturbation parameterization and a simple steepest descent method, a frame of adjoint-based aerodynamic shape optimization for multi-stage turbomachinery is constructed. At last, an inverse design of an annular cascade is employed to validate the above approach, and adjoint field of an Aachen 1.5 stage turbine demonstrates the conservation and areflexia of the adjoint interrow mixing method. Then a direct redesign of a 1+1 counter-rotating turbine aiming to increase efficiency and apply constraints to mass flow rate and pressure ratio is taken.

  2. Comparison of the Adjoint and Adjoint-Free 4dVar Assimilation of the Hydrographic and Velocity Observations in the Adriatic Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-10

    Accepted 12 October 2015 Available online 10 November 2015 Keywords: Data assimilation Ajoint analysis Regional modeling a b s t r a c t Performance of...the adjoint and adjoint-free 4-dimensional variational (4dVar) data assimilation techniques is compared in application to the hydrographic surveys...and velocity observations collected in the Adriatic Sea in 2006. Assimilating the data into the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) has shown that both

  3. Adjoint design sensitivity analysis of reduced atomic systems using generalized Langevin equation for lattice structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Geun; Jang, Hong-Lae; Cho, Seonho

    2013-05-01

    An efficient adjoint design sensitivity analysis method is developed for reduced atomic systems. A reduced atomic system and the adjoint system are constructed in a locally confined region, utilizing generalized Langevin equation (GLE) for periodic lattice structures. Due to the translational symmetry of lattice structures, the size of time history kernel function that accounts for the boundary effects of the reduced atomic systems could be reduced to a single atom’s degrees of freedom. For the problems of highly nonlinear design variables, the finite difference method is impractical for its inefficiency and inaccuracy. However, the adjoint method is very efficient regardless of the number of design variables since one additional time integration is required for the adjoint GLE. Through numerical examples, the derived adjoint sensitivity turns out to be accurate and efficient through the comparison with finite difference sensitivity.

  4. Spectral functions of non-essentially self-adjoint operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falomir, H. A.; Pisani, P. A. G.

    2012-09-01

    One of the many problems to which Dowker devoted his attention is the effect of a conical singularity in the base manifold on the behavior of the quantum fields. In particular, he studied the small-t asymptotic expansion of the heat-kernel trace on a cone and its effects on physical quantities as the Casimir energy. In this paper, we review some peculiar results found in the last decade, regarding the appearance of non-standard powers of t, and even negative integer powers of log t, in this asymptotic expansion for the self-adjoint extensions of some symmetric operators with singular coefficients. Similarly, we show that the ζ-function associated with these self-adjoint extensions presents an unusual analytic structure. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker’s 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’.

  5. Investigations on the heat transport capability of a cryogenic oscillating heat pipe and its application in achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell vitrification cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Ma, Hongbin; Jiao, Anjun; Critser, John K

    2008-06-01

    Theoretically, direct vitrification of cell suspensions with relatively low concentrations ( approximately 1 M) of permeating cryoprotective agents (CPA) is suitable for cryopreservation of almost all cell types and can be accomplished by ultra-fast cooling rates that are on the order of 10(6-7) K/min. However, the methods and devices currently available for cell cryopreservation cannot achieve such high cooling rates. In this study, we constructed a novel cryogenic oscillating heat pipe (COHP) using liquid nitrogen as its working fluid and investigated its heat transport capability to assess its application for achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell cryopreservation. The experimental results showed that the apparent heat transfer coefficient of the COHP can reach 2 x 10(5) W/m(2).K, which is two orders of the magnitude higher than traditional heat pipes. Theoretical analyzes showed that the average local heat transfer coefficient in the thin film evaporation region of the COHP can reach 1.2 x 10(6) W/m(2).K, which is approximately 10(3) times higher than that achievable with standard pool-boiling approaches. Based on these results, a novel device design applying the COHP and microfabrication techniques is proposed and its efficiency for cell vitrification is demonstrated through numerical simulation. The estimated average cooling rates achieved through this approach is 10(6-7)K/min, which is much faster than the currently available methods and sufficient for achieving vitrification with relatively low concentrations of CPA.

  6. Unsteady adjoint for large eddy simulation of a coupled turbine stator-rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talnikar, Chaitanya; Wang, Qiqi; Laskowski, Gregory

    2016-11-01

    Unsteady fluid flow simulations like large eddy simulation are crucial in capturing key physics in turbomachinery applications like separation and wake formation in flow over a turbine vane with a downstream blade. To determine how sensitive the design objectives of the coupled system are to control parameters, an unsteady adjoint is needed. It enables the computation of the gradient of an objective with respect to a large number of inputs in a computationally efficient manner. In this paper we present unsteady adjoint solutions for a coupled turbine stator-rotor system. As the transonic fluid flows over the stator vane, the boundary layer transitions to turbulence. The turbulent wake then impinges on the rotor blades, causing early separation. This coupled system exhibits chaotic dynamics which causes conventional adjoint solutions to diverge exponentially, resulting in the corruption of the sensitivities obtained from the adjoint solutions for long-time simulations. In this presentation, adjoint solutions for aerothermal objectives are obtained through a localized adjoint viscosity injection method which aims to stabilize the adjoint solution and maintain accurate sensitivities. Preliminary results obtained from the supercomputer Mira will be shown in the presentation.

  7. Capability Disillusionment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Defense AT&L: July–August 2011 22 Capability Disillusionment Cochrane is an operations research analyst and has worked for the past 6 years at the... Disillusionment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...unsup- ported by either academic investigation or practical utility. The definition of “capability” in the literature suggests that capabilities are

  8. Haydock's recursive solution of self-adjoint problems. Discrete spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    Haydock's recursive solution is shown to underline a number of different concepts such as (i) quasi-exactly solvable models, (ii) exactly solvable models, (iii) three-term recurrence solutions based on Schweber's quantization criterion in Hilbert spaces of entire analytic functions, and (iv) a discrete quantum mechanics of Odake and Sasaki. A recurrent theme of Haydock's recursive solution is that the spectral properties of any self-adjoint problem can be mapped onto a corresponding sequence of polynomials {pn(E) } in energy variable E. The polynomials {pn(E) } are orthonormal with respect to the density of states n0(E) and energy eigenstate | E > is the generating function of {pn(E) } . The generality of Haydock's recursive solution enables one to see the different concepts from a unified perspective and mutually benefiting from each other. Some results obtained within the particular framework of any of (i) to (iv) may have much broader significance.

  9. Sensitivity kernels for viscoelastic loading based on adjoint methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Attar, David; Tromp, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Observations of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) allow for inferences to be made about mantle viscosity, ice sheet history and other related parameters. Typically, this inverse problem can be formulated as minimizing the misfit between the given observations and a corresponding set of synthetic data. When the number of parameters is large, solution of such optimization problems can be computationally challenging. A practical, albeit non-ideal, solution is to use gradient-based optimization. Although the gradient of the misfit required in such methods could be calculated approximately using finite differences, the necessary computation time grows linearly with the number of model parameters, and so this is often infeasible. A far better approach is to apply the `adjoint method', which allows the exact gradient to be calculated from a single solution of the forward problem, along with one solution of the associated adjoint problem. As a first step towards applying the adjoint method to the GIA inverse problem, we consider its application to a simpler viscoelastic loading problem in which gravitationally self-consistent ocean loading is neglected. The earth model considered is non-rotating, self-gravitating, compressible, hydrostatically pre-stressed, laterally heterogeneous and possesses a Maxwell solid rheology. We determine adjoint equations and Fréchet kernels for this problem based on a Lagrange multiplier method. Given an objective functional J defined in terms of the surface deformation fields, we show that its first-order perturbation can be written δ J = int _{MS}K_{η }δ ln η dV +int _{t0}^{t1}int _{partial M}K_{dot{σ }} δ dot{σ } dS dt, where δ ln η = δη/η denotes relative viscosity variations in solid regions MS, dV is the volume element, δ dot{σ } is the perturbation to the time derivative of the surface load which is defined on the earth model's surface ∂M and for times [t0, t1] and dS is the surface element on ∂M. The `viscosity

  10. Optimizing spectral wave estimates with adjoint-based sensitivity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzech, Mark; Veeramony, Jay; Flampouris, Stylianos

    2014-04-01

    A discrete numerical adjoint has recently been developed for the stochastic wave model SWAN. In the present study, this adjoint code is used to construct spectral sensitivity maps for two nearshore domains. The maps display the correlations of spectral energy levels throughout the domain with the observed energy levels at a selected location or region of interest (LOI/ROI), providing a full spectrum of values at all locations in the domain. We investigate the effectiveness of sensitivity maps based on significant wave height ( H s ) in determining alternate offshore instrument deployment sites when a chosen nearshore location or region is inaccessible. Wave and bathymetry datasets are employed from one shallower, small-scale domain (Duck, NC) and one deeper, larger-scale domain (San Diego, CA). The effects of seasonal changes in wave climate, errors in bathymetry, and multiple assimilation points on sensitivity map shapes and model performance are investigated. Model accuracy is evaluated by comparing spectral statistics as well as with an RMS skill score, which estimates a mean model-data error across all spectral bins. Results indicate that data assimilation from identified high-sensitivity alternate locations consistently improves model performance at nearshore LOIs, while assimilation from low-sensitivity locations results in lesser or no improvement. Use of sub-sampled or alongshore-averaged bathymetry has a domain-specific effect on model performance when assimilating from a high-sensitivity alternate location. When multiple alternate assimilation locations are used from areas of lower sensitivity, model performance may be worse than with a single, high-sensitivity assimilation point.

  11. Admitting the Inadmissible: Adjoint Formulation for Incomplete Cost Functionals in Aerodynamic Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal; Salas, Manuel D.

    1997-01-01

    We derive the adjoint equations for problems in aerodynamic optimization which are improperly considered as "inadmissible." For example, a cost functional which depends on the density, rather than on the pressure, is considered "inadmissible" for an optimization problem governed by the Euler equations. We show that for such problems additional terms should be included in the Lagrangian functional when deriving the adjoint equations. These terms are obtained from the restriction of the interior PDE to the control surface. Demonstrations of the explicit derivation of the adjoint equations for "inadmissible" cost functionals are given for the potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes equations.

  12. Trajectory Optimization Using Adjoint Method and Chebyshev Polynomial Approximation for Minimizing Fuel Consumption During Climb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Hornby, Gregory; Ishihara, Abe

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes two methods of trajectory optimization to obtain an optimal trajectory of minimum-fuel- to-climb for an aircraft. The first method is based on the adjoint method, and the second method is based on a direct trajectory optimization method using a Chebyshev polynomial approximation and cubic spine approximation. The approximate optimal trajectory will be compared with the adjoint-based optimal trajectory which is considered as the true optimal solution of the trajectory optimization problem. The adjoint-based optimization problem leads to a singular optimal control solution which results in a bang-singular-bang optimal control.

  13. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  14. Adjoint based data assimilation for phase field model using second order information of a posterior distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Shin-Ichi; Nagao, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Akinori; Tsukada, Yuhki; Koyama, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Junya

    Phase field (PF) method, which phenomenologically describes dynamics of microstructure evolutions during solidification and phase transformation, has progressed in the fields of hydromechanics and materials engineering. How to determine, based on observation data, an initial state and model parameters involved in a PF model is one of important issues since previous estimation methods require too much computational cost. We propose data assimilation (DA), which enables us to estimate the parameters and states by integrating the PF model and observation data on the basis of the Bayesian statistics. The adjoint method implemented on DA not only finds an optimum solution by maximizing a posterior distribution but also evaluates the uncertainty in the estimations by utilizing the second order information of the posterior distribution. We carried out an estimation test using synthetic data generated by the two-dimensional Kobayashi's PF model. The proposed method is confirmed to reproduce the true initial state and model parameters we assume in advance, and simultaneously estimate their uncertainties due to quality and quantity of the data. This result indicates that the proposed method is capable of suggesting the experimental design to achieve the required accuracy.

  15. Inversion of tsunami sources by the adjoint method in the presence of observational and model errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, C.; Miranda, P. M. A.

    2003-04-01

    The adjoint method is applied to the inversion of tsumani sources from tide-gauge observations in both idealized and realistic setups, with emphasis on the effects of observational, bathymetric and other model errors in the quality of the inversion. The method is developed in a way that allows for the direct optimization of seismic focal parameters, in the case of seismic tsunamis, through a 4-step inversion procedure that can be fully automated, consisting in (i) source area delimitation, by adjoint backward ray-tracing, (ii) adjoint optimization of the initial sea state, from a vanishing first-guess, (iii) non-linear adjustment of the fault model and (iv) final adjoint optimization in the fault parameter space. The methodology is systematically tested with synthetic data, showing its flexibility and robustness in the presence of significant amounts of error.

  16. Adjoint-Based Algorithms for Adaptation and Design Optimizations on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    Schemes based on discrete adjoint algorithms present several exciting opportunities for significantly advancing the current state of the art in computational fluid dynamics. Such methods provide an extremely efficient means for obtaining discretely consistent sensitivity information for hundreds of design variables, opening the door to rigorous, automated design optimization of complex aerospace configuration using the Navier-Stokes equation. Moreover, the discrete adjoint formulation provides a mathematically rigorous foundation for mesh adaptation and systematic reduction of spatial discretization error. Error estimates are also an inherent by-product of an adjoint-based approach, valuable information that is virtually non-existent in today's large-scale CFD simulations. An overview of the adjoint-based algorithm work at NASA Langley Research Center is presented, with examples demonstrating the potential impact on complex computational problems related to design optimization as well as mesh adaptation.

  17. MS S4.03.002 - Adjoint-Based Design for Configuration Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses a method of inverse design for low sonic boom using adjoint-based gradient computations. It outlines a method for shaping a configuration in order to match a prescribed near-field signature.

  18. Application of Adjoint Methodology in Various Aspects of Sonic Boom Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2014-01-01

    One of the advances in computational design has been the development of adjoint methods allowing efficient calculation of sensitivities in gradient-based shape optimization. This paper discusses two new applications of adjoint methodology that have been developed to aid in sonic boom mitigation exercises. In the first, equivalent area targets are generated using adjoint sensitivities of selected boom metrics. These targets may then be used to drive the vehicle shape during optimization. The second application is the computation of adjoint sensitivities of boom metrics on the ground with respect to parameters such as flight conditions, propagation sampling rate, and selected inputs to the propagation algorithms. These sensitivities enable the designer to make more informed selections of flight conditions at which the chosen cost functionals are less sensitive.

  19. Almost commuting self-adjoint matrices: The real and self-dual cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loring, Terry A.; Sørensen, Adam P. W.

    2016-08-01

    We show that a pair of almost commuting self-adjoint, symmetric matrices is close to a pair of commuting self-adjoint, symmetric matrices (in a uniform way). Moreover, we prove that the same holds with self-dual in place of symmetric and also for paths of self-adjoint matrices. Since a symmetric, self-adjoint matrix is real, we get a real version of Huaxin Lin’s famous theorem on almost commuting matrices. Similarly, the self-dual case gives a version for matrices over the quaternions. To prove these results, we develop a theory of semiprojectivity for real C*-algebras and also examine various definitions of low-rank for real C*-algebras.

  20. On the role of self-adjointness in the continuum formulation of topological quantum phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanhayi Ahari, Mostafa; Ortiz, Gerardo; Seradjeh, Babak

    2016-11-01

    Topological quantum phases of matter are characterized by an intimate relationship between the Hamiltonian dynamics away from the edges and the appearance of bound states localized at the edges of the system. Elucidating this correspondence in the continuum formulation of topological phases, even in the simplest case of a one-dimensional system, touches upon fundamental concepts and methods in quantum mechanics that are not commonly discussed in textbooks, in particular the self-adjoint extensions of a Hermitian operator. We show how such topological bound states can be derived in a prototypical one-dimensional system. Along the way, we provide a pedagogical exposition of the self-adjoint extension method as well as the role of symmetries in correctly formulating the continuum, field-theory description of topological matter with boundaries. Moreover, we show that self-adjoint extensions can be characterized generally in terms of a conserved local current associated with the self-adjoint operator.

  1. Comparison of Ensemble and Adjoint Approaches to Variational Optimization of Observational Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechaev, D.; Panteleev, G.; Yaremchuk, M.

    2015-12-01

    Comprehensive monitoring of the circulation in the Chukchi Sea and Bering Strait is one of the key prerequisites of the successful long-term forecast of the Arctic Ocean state. Since the number of continuously maintained observational platforms is restricted by logistical and political constraints, the configuration of such an observing system should be guided by an objective strategy that optimizes the observing system coverage, design, and the expenses of monitoring. The presented study addresses optimization of system consisting of a limited number of observational platforms with respect to reduction of the uncertainties in monitoring the volume/freshwater/heat transports through a set of key sections in the Chukchi Sea and Bering Strait. Variational algorithms for optimization of observational arrays are verified in the test bed of the set of 4Dvar optimized summer-fall circulations in the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean. The results of an optimization approach based on low-dimensional ensemble of model solutions is compared against a more conventional algorithm involving application of the tangent linear and adjoint models. Special attention is paid to the computational efficiency and portability of the optimization procedure.

  2. Preliminary Results from the Application of Automated Adjoint Code Generation to CFL3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, Alan; Fagan, Mike; Green, Lawrence L.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes preliminary results obtained using an automated adjoint code generator for Fortran to augment a widely-used computational fluid dynamics flow solver to compute derivatives. These preliminary results with this augmented code suggest that, even in its infancy, the automated adjoint code generator can accurately and efficiently deliver derivatives for use in transonic Euler-based aerodynamic shape optimization problems with hundreds to thousands of independent design variables.

  3. Important literature on the use of adjoint, variational methods and the Kalman filter in meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtier, Philippe; Derber, John; Errico, Ron; Louis, Jean-Francois; Vukićević, Tomislava

    1993-10-01

    The use of adjoint equations is proving to be invaluable in many areas of meteorological research. Unlike a forecast model which describes the evolution of meteorological fields forward in time, the adjoint equations describe the evolution of sensitivity (to initial, boundary and parametric conditions) backward in time. Essentially, by utilizing this sensitivity information, many types of problems can be solved more efficiently than in the past, including variational data assimilation, parameter fitting, optimal instability and sensitivity analysis in general. For this reason, the adjoints of various models and their applications have been appearing more and more frequently in meteorological research. This paper is a bibliography in chronological order of published works in meteorology dealing with adjoints which have appeared prior to this issue of Tellus. Also included are meteorological works regarding variational methods (even without adjoints) and Kalman filtering in data assimilation, plus some references outside meteorology. These additional works are included here because the main thrust for adjoint application within meteorology is currently concentrated in the development of next-generation data assimilation systems.

  4. Adjoint-field errors in high fidelity compressible turbulence simulations for sound control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan; Bodony, Daniel; Freund, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    A consistent discrete adjoint for high-fidelity discretization of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations is used to quantify the error in the sensitivity gradient predicted by the continuous adjoint method, and examine the aeroacoustic flow-control problem for free-shear-flow turbulence. A particular quadrature scheme for approximating the cost functional makes our discrete adjoint formulation for a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme with high-order finite differences practical and efficient. The continuous adjoint-based sensitivity gradient is shown to to be inconsistent due to discretization truncation errors, grid stretching and filtering near boundaries. These errors cannot be eliminated by increasing the spatial or temporal resolution since chaotic interactions lead them to become O (1) at the time of control actuation. Although this is a known behavior for chaotic systems, its effect on noise control is much harder to anticipate, especially given the different resolution needs of different parts of the turbulence and acoustic spectra. A comparison of energy spectra of the adjoint pressure fields shows significant error in the continuous adjoint at all wavenumbers, even though they are well-resolved. The effect of this error on the noise control mechanism is analyzed.

  5. A finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method for solution of the advection-dispersion equation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; Russell, T.F.

    1993-01-01

    Test results demonstrate that the finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint method (FVELLAM) outperforms standard finite-difference methods for solute transport problems that are dominated by advection. FVELLAM systematically conserves mass globally with all types of boundary conditions. Integrated finite differences, instead of finite elements, are used to approximate the governing equation. This approach, in conjunction with a forward tracking scheme, greatly facilitates mass conservation. The mass storage integral is numerically evaluated at the current time level, and quadrature points are then tracked forward in time to the next level. Forward tracking permits straightforward treatment of inflow boundaries, thus avoiding the inherent problem in backtracking of characteristic lines intersecting inflow boundaries. FVELLAM extends previous results by obtaining mass conservation locally on Lagrangian space-time elements. -from Authors

  6. Space applications of the MITS electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kensek, R.P.; Lorence, L.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Morel, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    The MITS multigroup/continuous-energy electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system has matured to the point that it is capable of addressing more realistic three-dimensional adjoint applications. It is first employed to efficiently predict point doses as a function of source energy for simple three-dimensional experimental geometries exposed to simulated uniform isotropic planar sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 4.0 MeV. Results are in very good agreement with experimental data. It is then used to efficiently simulate dose to a detector in a subsystem of a GPS satellite due to its natural electron environment, employing a relatively complex model of the satellite. The capability for survivability analysis of space systems is demonstrated, and results are obtained with and without variance reduction.

  7. Big Data Challenges in Global Seismic 'Adjoint Tomography' (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, J.; Bozdag, E.; Krischer, L.; Lefebvre, M.; Lei, W.; Smith, J.

    2013-12-01

    The challenge of imaging Earth's interior on a global scale is closely linked to the challenge of handling large data sets. The related iterative workflow involves five distinct phases, namely, 1) data gathering and culling, 2) synthetic seismogram calculations, 3) pre-processing (time-series analysis and time-window selection), 4) data assimilation and adjoint calculations, 5) post-processing (pre-conditioning, regularization, model update). In order to implement this workflow on modern high-performance computing systems, a new seismic data format is being developed. The Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) is designed to replace currently used data formats with a more flexible format that allows for fast parallel I/O. The metadata is divided into abstract categories, such as "source" and "receiver", along with provenance information for complete reproducibility. The structure of ASDF is designed keeping in mind three distinct applications: earthquake seismology, seismic interferometry, and exploration seismology. Existing time-series analysis tool kits, such as SAC and ObsPy, can be easily interfaced with ASDF so that seismologists can use robust, previously developed software packages. ASDF accommodates an automated, efficient workflow for global adjoint tomography. Manually managing the large number of simulations associated with the workflow can rapidly become a burden, especially with increasing numbers of earthquakes and stations. Therefore, it is of importance to investigate the possibility of automating the entire workflow. Scientific Workflow Management Software (SWfMS) allows users to execute workflows almost routinely. SWfMS provides additional advantages. In particular, it is possible to group independent simulations in a single job to fit the available computational resources. They also give a basic level of fault resilience as the workflow can be resumed at the correct state preceding a failure. Some of the best candidates for our particular workflow

  8. Plumes, Hotspot & Slabs Imaged by Global Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Lei, W.; Peter, D. B.; Smith, J. A.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present the "first generation" global adjoint tomography model based on 3D wave simulations, which is the result of 15 conjugate-gradient iterations with confined transverse isotropy to the upper mantle. Our starting model is the 3D mantle and crustal models S362ANI (Kustowski et al. 2008) and Crust2.0 (Bassin et al. 2000), respectively. We take into account the full nonlinearity of wave propagation in numerical simulations including attenuation (both in forward and adjoint simulations), topography/bathymetry, etc., using the GPU version of the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package. We invert for crust and mantle together without crustal corrections to avoid any bias in mantle structure. We started with an initial selection of 253 global CMT events within the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0 with numerical simulations having resolution down to 27 s combining 30-s body and 60-s surface waves. After the 12th iteration we increased the resolution to 17 s, including higher-frequency body waves as well as going down to 45 s in surface-wave measurements. We run 180-min seismograms and assimilate all minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. Our 15th iteration model update shows a tantalisingly enhanced image of the Tahiti plume as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone, Erebus, etc. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the initial model. Point-spread function tests (Fichtner & Trampert 2011) suggest that we are close to the resolution of continental-scale studies in our global inversions and able to confidently map features, for instance, at the scale of the Yellowstone hotspot. This is a clear consequence of our multi-scale smoothing strategy, in which we define our smoothing operator as a function of the approximate Hessian kernel and smooth our gradients less wherever we have good ray coverage

  9. A practical discrete-adjoint method for high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan; Bodony, Daniel J.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-03-15

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvements. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs, though this is predicated on the availability of a sufficiently accurate solution of the forward and adjoint systems. These are challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. Here, we analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space–time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge–Kutta-like scheme, though it would be just first-order accurate if used outside the adjoint formulation for time integration, with finite-difference spatial operators for the adjoint system. Its computational cost only modestly exceeds that of the flow equations. We confirm that

  10. A practical discrete-adjoint method for high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan; Bodony, Daniel J.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-03-01

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvements. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs, though this is predicated on the availability of a sufficiently accurate solution of the forward and adjoint systems. These are challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. Here, we analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space-time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge-Kutta-like scheme, though it would be just first-order accurate if used outside the adjoint formulation for time integration, with finite-difference spatial operators for the adjoint system. Its computational cost only modestly exceeds that of the flow equations. We confirm that its

  11. Multigrid methods for bifurcation problems: The self adjoint case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taasan, Shlomo

    1987-01-01

    This paper deals with multigrid methods for computational problems that arise in the theory of bifurcation and is restricted to the self adjoint case. The basic problem is to solve for arcs of solutions, a task that is done successfully with an arc length continuation method. Other important issues are, for example, detecting and locating singular points as part of the continuation process, switching branches at bifurcation points, etc. Multigrid methods have been applied to continuation problems. These methods work well at regular points and at limit points, while they may encounter difficulties in the vicinity of bifurcation points. A new continuation method that is very efficient also near bifurcation points is presented here. The other issues mentioned above are also treated very efficiently with appropriate multigrid algorithms. For example, it is shown that limit points and bifurcation points can be solved for directly by a multigrid algorithm. Moreover, the algorithms presented here solve the corresponding problems in just a few work units (about 10 or less), where a work unit is the work involved in one local relaxation on the finest grid.

  12. On the nonlinear self-adjointness and local conservation laws for a class of evolution equations unifying many models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Igor Leite; Santos Sampaio, Júlio Cesar

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we consider a class of evolution equations up to fifth-order containing many arbitrary smooth functions from the point of view of nonlinear self-adjointness. The studied class includes many important equations modeling different phenomena. In particular, some of the considered equations were studied previously by other researchers from the point of view of quasi self-adjointness or strictly self-adjointness. Therefore we find new local conservation laws for these equations invoking the obtained results on nonlinearly self-adjointness and the conservation theorem proposed by Nail Ibragimov.

  13. Capability 9.2 Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrasjek, June

    2005-01-01

    Modern operational concepts require significant bandwidths and multipoint communication capabilities. Provide voice, video and data communications among vehicles moving along the surface, vehicles in suborbital transport or reconnaissance, surface elements, and home planet facilities.

  14. MT3D-USGS version 1: A U.S. Geological Survey release of MT3DMS updated with new and expanded transport capabilities for use with MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedekar, Vivek; Morway, Eric D.; Langevin, Christian D.; Tonkin, Matthew J.

    2016-09-30

    MT3D-USGS, a U.S. Geological Survey updated release of the groundwater solute transport code MT3DMS, includes new transport modeling capabilities to accommodate flow terms calculated by MODFLOW packages that were previously unsupported by MT3DMS and to provide greater flexibility in the simulation of solute transport and reactive solute transport. Unsaturated-zone transport and transport within streams and lakes, including solute exchange with connected groundwater, are among the new capabilities included in the MT3D-USGS code. MT3D-USGS also includes the capability to route a solute through dry cells that may occur in the Newton-Raphson formulation of MODFLOW (that is, MODFLOW-NWT). New chemical reaction Package options include the ability to simulate inter-species reactions and parent-daughter chain reactions. A new pump-and-treat recirculation package enables the simulation of dynamic recirculation with or without treatment for combinations of wells that are represented in the flow model, mimicking the above-ground treatment of extracted water. A reformulation of the treatment of transient mass storage improves conservation of mass and yields solutions for better agreement with analytical benchmarks. Several additional features of MT3D-USGS are (1) the separate specification of the partitioning coefficient (Kd) within mobile and immobile domains; (2) the capability to assign prescribed concentrations to the top-most active layer; (3) the change in mass storage owing to the change in water volume now appears as its own budget item in the global mass balance summary; (4) the ability to ignore cross-dispersion terms; (5) the definition of Hydrocarbon Spill-Source Package (HSS) mass loading zones using regular and irregular polygons, in addition to the currently supported circular zones; and (6) the ability to specify an absolute minimum thickness rather than the default percent minimum thickness in dry-cell circumstances.Benchmark problems that implement the new

  15. Molecular cloning of a putative divalent-cation transporter gene as a new genetic marker for the identification of Lactobacillus brevis strains capable of growing in beer.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, N; Ito, M; Horiike, S; Taguchi, H

    2001-05-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR analysis of Lactobacillus brevis isolates from breweries revealed that one of the random primers could distinguish beer-spoilage strains of L. brevis from nonspoilage strains. The 1.1-kb DNA fragment amplified from all beer-spoilers included one open reading frame, termed hitA (hop-inducible cation transporter), which encodes an integral membrane protein with 11 putative trans-membrane domains and a binding protein-dependent transport signature of a non-ATP binding membrane transporter common to several prokaryotic and eukaryotic transporters. The hitA polypeptide is homologous to the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (Nramp) family characterized as divalent-cation transport proteins in many prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Northern blot analysis indicated that the hitA transcripts are expressed in cells cultivated in MRS broth supplemented with hop bitter compounds, which act as mobile-carrier ionophores, dissipating the trans-membrane pH gradient in bacteria sensitive to the hop bitter compounds by exchanging H+ for cellular divalent cations such as Mn2+. This suggests that the hitA gene products may play an important role in making the bacteria resistant to hop bitter compounds in beer by transporting metal ions such as Mn2+ into cells that no longer maintain the proton gradient.

  16. Advanced Mesh-Enabled Monte carlo capability for Multi-Physics Reactor Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Paul; Evans, Thomas; Tautges, Tim

    2012-12-24

    This project will accumulate high-precision fluxes throughout reactor geometry on a non- orthogonal grid of cells to support multi-physics coupling, in order to more accurately calculate parameters such as reactivity coefficients and to generate multi-group cross sections. This work will be based upon recent developments to incorporate advanced geometry and mesh capability in a modular Monte Carlo toolkit with computational science technology that is in use in related reactor simulation software development. Coupling this capability with production-scale Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can provide advanced and extensible test-beds for these developments. Continuous energy Monte Carlo methods are generally considered to be the most accurate computational tool for simulating radiation transport in complex geometries, particularly neutron transport in reactors. Nevertheless, there are several limitations for their use in reactor analysis. Most significantly, there is a trade-off between the fidelity of results in phase space, statistical accuracy, and the amount of computer time required for simulation. Consequently, to achieve an acceptable level of statistical convergence in high-fidelity results required for modern coupled multi-physics analysis, the required computer time makes Monte Carlo methods prohibitive for design iterations and detailed whole-core analysis. More subtly, the statistical uncertainty is typically not uniform throughout the domain, and the simulation quality is limited by the regions with the largest statistical uncertainty. In addition, the formulation of neutron scattering laws in continuous energy Monte Carlo methods makes it difficult to calculate adjoint neutron fluxes required to properly determine important reactivity parameters. Finally, most Monte Carlo codes available for reactor analysis have relied on orthogonal hexahedral grids for tallies that do not conform to the geometric boundaries and are thus generally not well

  17. Adjoint-based airfoil shape optimization in transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramanzini, Joe-Ray

    The primary focus of this work is efficient aerodynamic shape optimization in transonic flow. Adjoint-based optimization techniques are employed on airfoil sections and evaluated in terms of computational accuracy as well as efficiency. This study examines two test cases proposed by the AIAA Aerodynamic Design Optimization Discussion Group. The first is a two-dimensional, transonic, inviscid, non-lifting optimization of a Modified-NACA 0012 airfoil. The second is a two-dimensional, transonic, viscous optimization problem using a RAE 2822 airfoil. The FUN3D CFD code of NASA Langley Research Center is used as the ow solver for the gradient-based optimization cases. Two shape parameterization techniques are employed to study their effect and the number of design variables on the final optimized shape: Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD) and the BandAids free-form deformation technique. For the two airfoil cases, angle of attack is treated as a global design variable. The thickness and camber distributions are the local design variables for MASSOUD, and selected airfoil surface grid points are the local design variables for BandAids. Using the MASSOUD technique, a drag reduction of 72.14% is achieved for the NACA 0012 case, reducing the total number of drag counts from 473.91 to 130.59. Employing the BandAids technique yields a 78.67% drag reduction, from 473.91 to 99.98. The RAE 2822 case exhibited a drag reduction from 217.79 to 132.79 counts, a 39.05% decrease using BandAids.

  18. An Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of the South Portion of the California Current and Ecosystem Using ROMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A. M.; Dilorenzo, E.; Arango, H. G.; Lewis, C. V.; Powell, T. M.; Miller, A. J.; Cornuelle, B. D.

    2005-12-01

    The adjoint of the tangent linear version of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) coupled to a four component nitrogen-based trophic model (NPZD) has been used to explore the sensitivity of various physical and biological aspects of the southern arm of the California Current system to linear variations in the physical and biological attributes of the system. The aspects of the system of interest are characterized by suitably defined indices of variability that include measures of coastal upwelling, eddy kinetic energy, and biological tracer concentrations. The adjoint approach is particularly well suited to this kind of analysis because all of the model linear sensitivities can be computed from a single integration of the adjoint model for each index. The adjoint model provides two- and three-dimensional, time-dependent fields of sensitivity from which clear signatures of processes such as advection and instability can be identified. By comparing the sensitivities that arise from perturbing different physical variables in an appropriate way, the relative importance of different physical and biological processes and their potential to control a chosen index can be determined. We will show examples of such adjoint sensitivity analyses for the coupled physical-biological model computed in this way, and discuss their implications.

  19. Reconstruction of Mantle Convection in the Geological Past Using the Adjoint Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Gurnis, M.

    2006-12-01

    In mantle convection, earlier work has demonstrated the effectiveness of the adjoint method, widely applied in models of atmospheric circulation. With CitComS.py, the spherical finite element model of mantle convection, and the Pyre framework, we developed an adjoint of the energy equation which, together with the forward modeling, solves for temperature conditions in the past. Our model is applied to several problems, including plume heads impacting and eroding the lithosphere. The assumed true initial condition is a hot spherical blob in the lower mantle, and the final state of the forward model qualitatively shows little information on initial conditions. The adjoint method allows us to retrieve this unknown initial condition iteratively with a first guess. We tested different kinds of first guess initials, and found that a better knowledge of the true initial leads to a better converged solution, both in the sense of mismatch pattern and its RMS norm. Since we have limited knowledge of past mantle structures, earlier adjoint models in mantle convection used arbitrary first guesses which caused large errors in the retrieved initial condition. Our experiments show that a simple backward integration of the energy equation while neglecting thermal diffusion can be used as a first guess and leads to a smaller error. This is potentially important because the overall effectiveness of the adjoint methods is almost doubled using this optimal first guess. We are now experimenting with partial data assimilation with dynamic topography and plate kinematics in conjunction with seismic tomography models.

  20. Generalized adjoint consistent treatment of wall boundary conditions for compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Ralf; Leicht, Tobias

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we revisit the adjoint consistency analysis of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations of the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with application to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and k- ω turbulence equations. Here, particular emphasis is laid on the discretization of wall boundary conditions. While previously only one specific combination of discretizations of wall boundary conditions and of aerodynamic force coefficients has been shown to give an adjoint consistent discretization, in this article we generalize this analysis and provide a discretization of the force coefficients for any consistent discretization of wall boundary conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a related evaluation of the cp- and cf-distributions is required. The freedom gained in choosing the discretization of boundary conditions without loosing adjoint consistency is used to devise a new adjoint consistent discretization including numerical fluxes on the wall boundary which is more robust than the adjoint consistent discretization known up to now. While this work is presented in the framework of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations, the insight gained is also applicable to (and thus valuable for) other discretization schemes. In particular, the discretization of integral quantities, like the drag, lift and moment coefficients, as well as the discretization of local quantities at the wall like surface pressure and skin friction should follow as closely as possible the discretization of the flow equations and boundary conditions at the wall boundary.

  1. Assessing the Impact of Observations on Numerical Weather Forecasts Using the Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelaro, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. This talk provides a general overview of the adjoint method, including the theoretical basis and practical implementation of the technique. Results are presented from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. When performed in conjunction with standard observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies may be important for optimizing the use of the current observational network and defining requirements for future observing systems

  2. Transport Code for Regular Triangular Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    1993-06-09

    DIAMANT2 solves the two-dimensional static multigroup neutron transport equation in planar regular triangular geometry. Both regular and adjoint, inhomogeneous and homogeneous problems subject to vacuum, reflective or input specified boundary flux conditions are solved. Anisotropy is allowed for the scattering source. Volume and surface sources are allowed for inhomogeneous problems.

  3. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Supersonic Aircraft Configurations via an Adjoint Formulation on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Jameson, Antony

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the application of a control theory-based aerodynamic shape optimization method to the problem of supersonic aircraft design. The design process is greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and a parallel implementation on distributed memory computers. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods. The resulting problem is then implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) Standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on higher order computational fluid dynamics methods (CFD). In our earlier studies, the serial implementation of this design method was shown to be effective for the optimization of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations using both the potential equation and the Euler equations. In our most recent paper, the Euler method was extended to treat complete aircraft configurations via a new multiblock implementation. Furthermore, during the same conference, we also presented preliminary results demonstrating that this basic methodology could be ported to distributed memory parallel computing architectures. In this paper, our concern will be to demonstrate that the combined power of these new technologies can be used routinely in an industrial design environment by applying it to the case study of the design of typical supersonic transport configurations. A particular difficulty of this test case is posed by the propulsion/airframe integration.

  4. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Supersonic Aircraft Configurations via an Adjoint Formulation on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Jameson, Antony

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the application of a control theory-based aerodynamic shape optimization method to the problem of supersonic aircraft design. The design process is greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and a parallel implementation on distributed memory computers. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods (13, 12, 44, 38). The resulting problem is then implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) Standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on higher order computational fluid dynamics methods (CFD). In our earlier studies, the serial implementation of this design method (19, 20, 21, 23, 39, 25, 40, 41, 42, 43, 9) was shown to be effective for the optimization of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations using both the potential equation and the Euler equations (39, 25). In our most recent paper, the Euler method was extended to treat complete aircraft configurations via a new multiblock implementation. Furthermore, during the same conference, we also presented preliminary results demonstrating that the basic methodology could be ported to distributed memory parallel computing architectures [241. In this paper, our concem will be to demonstrate that the combined power of these new technologies can be used routinely in an industrial design environment by applying it to the case study of the design of typical supersonic transport configurations. A particular difficulty of this test case is posed by the propulsion/airframe integration.

  5. Inversion of Gravity Fields From the Spacecraft Orbital Data Using an Adjoint Operator Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustinov, E. A.

    1999-01-01

    In perturbation approximation, the forward problem of orbital dynamics (equations with initial conditions) is linear with respect to variations of coordinates and/or velocities of the spacecraft and to corresponding variations of the gravity field in the models used. The linear operator adjoint to the linear operator of such forward problem turns out to be instrumental in inversion of differences between observed and predicted coordinates/velocities in terms of the updates of harmonics in the initial gravity field model. Based on this approach, the solution of resulting adjoint problem of orbital dynamics can be used to directly evaluate the matrix of partial derivatives of observable differences with respect to the gravity field harmonics. General discussion of the adjoint problem of orbital dynamics is given and an example of a mathematical formalism for the practical retrieval algorithm is presented.

  6. Time dependent adjoint-based optimization for coupled fluid-structure problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Asitav; Mani, Karthik; Mavriplis, Dimitri; Sitaraman, Jay

    2015-07-01

    A formulation for sensitivity analysis of fully coupled time-dependent aeroelastic problems is given in this paper. Both forward sensitivity and adjoint sensitivity formulations are derived that correspond to analogues of the fully coupled non-linear aeroelastic analysis problem. Both sensitivity analysis formulations make use of the same iterative disciplinary solution techniques used for analysis, and make use of an analogous coupling strategy. The information passed between fluid and structural solvers is dimensionally equivalent in all cases, enabling the use of the same data structures for analysis, forward and adjoint problems. The fully coupled adjoint formulation is then used to perform rotor blade design optimization for a four bladed HART2 rotor in hover conditions started impulsively from rest. The effect of time step size and mesh resolution on optimization results is investigated.

  7. Adjoint-based constrained topology optimization for viscous flows, including heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontoleontos, E. A.; Papoutsis-Kiachagias, E. M.; Zymaris, A. S.; Papadimitriou, D. I.; Giannakoglou, K. C.

    2013-08-01

    In fluid mechanics, topology optimization is used for designing flow passages, connecting predefined inlets and outlets, with optimal performance based on selected criteria. In this article, the continuous adjoint approach to topology optimization in incompressible ducted flows with heat transfer is presented. A variable porosity field, to be determined during the optimization, is the means to define the optimal topology. The objective functions take into account viscous losses and the amount of heat transfer. Turbulent flows are handled using the Spalart-Allmaras model and the proposed adjoint is exact, i.e. the adjoint to the turbulence model equation is formulated and solved, too. This is an important novelty in this article which extends the porosity-based method to account for heat transfer flow problems in turbulent flows. In problems such as the design of manifolds, constraints on the outlet flow direction, rates and mean outlet temperatures are imposed.

  8. An exact and consistent adjoint method for high-fidelity discretization of the compressible flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Ramanathan Vishnampet Ganapathi

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvement. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs. Such methods have enabled sensitivity analysis and active control of turbulence at engineering flow conditions by providing gradient information at computational cost comparable to that of simulating the flow. They accelerate convergence of numerical design optimization algorithms, though this is predicated on the availability of an accurate gradient of the discretized flow equations. This is challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. We analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space--time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge--Kutta-like scheme

  9. Local-in-Time Adjoint-Based Method for Optimal Control/Design Optimization of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    .We study local-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of ow matching functionals subject to the 2-D unsteady compressible Euler equations. The key idea of the local-in-time method is to construct a very accurate approximation of the global-in-time adjoint equations and the corresponding sensitivity derivative by using only local information available on each time subinterval. In contrast to conventional time-dependent adjoint-based optimization methods which require backward-in-time integration of the adjoint equations over the entire time interval, the local-in-time method solves local adjoint equations sequentially over each time subinterval. Since each subinterval contains relatively few time steps, the storage cost of the local-in-time method is much lower than that of the global adjoint formulation, thus making the time-dependent optimization feasible for practical applications. The paper presents a detailed comparison of the local- and global-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of a tracking functional governed by the Euler equations describing the ow around a circular bump. Our numerical results show that the local-in-time method converges to the same optimal solution obtained with the global counterpart, while drastically reducing the memory cost as compared to the global-in-time adjoint formulation.

  10. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of a Coupled Groundwater-Surface Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    Derivation of the exact equations of Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis for a coupled Groundwater-Surface water model is presented here, with reference to the Stream package in MODFLOW-2005. MODFLOW-2005 offers two distinct packages to simulate river boundary conditions in an aquifer model. They are the RIV (RIVer) Package and the STR (STReam) Package. The STR package simulates a coupled Groundwater and Surface Water flow model. As a result of coupling between the Groundwater and the Surface Water flows, the flows to/from the aquifer depend not just on the river stage and aquifer head at that location (as would happen in the RIV package); but on the river stages and aquifer heads at all upstream locations, in the complex network of streams with all its distributaries and diversions. This requires a substantial modification of the adjoint state equations (not required in RIV Package). The necessary equations for the STR Package have now been developed and implemented the MODFLOW-ADJOINT Code. The exact STR Adjoint code has been validated by comparing with the results from the parameter perturbation method, for the case of San Pedro Model (USGS) and Northern Arizona Regional Aquifer Model (USGS). When the RIV package is used for the same models, the sensitivity analysis results are incorrect for some nodes, indicating the advantage of using the exact methods of the STR Package in MODFLOW-Adjoint code. This exact analysis has been used for deriving the capture functions in the management of groundwater, subject to the constraints on the depletion of surface water supplies. Capture maps are used for optimal location of the pumping wells, their rates of withdrawals, and their timing. Because of the immense savings in computational times, with this Adjoint strategy, it is feasible to embed the groundwater management problem in a stochastic framework (probabilistic approach) to address the uncertainties in the groundwater model.

  11. General formalism for the efficient calculation of the Hessian matrix of EM data misfit and Hessian-vector products based upon adjoint sources approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, Oleg; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-03-01

    3-D electromagnetic (EM) studies of the Earth have advanced significantly over the past decade. Despite a certain success of the 3-D EM inversions of real data sets, the quantitative assessment of the recovered models is still a challenging problem. It is known that one can gain valuable information about model uncertainties from the analysis of Hessian matrix. However, even with modern computational capabilities the calculation of the Hessian matrix based on numerical differentiation is extremely time consuming. Much more efficient way to compute the Hessian matrix is provided by an `adjoint sources' methodology. The computation of Hessian matrix (and Hessian-vector products) using adjoint formulation is now well-established approach, especially in seismic inverse modelling. As for EM inverse modelling we did not find in the literature a description of the approach, which would allow EM researchers to apply this methodology in a straightforward manner to their scenario of interest. In the paper, we present formalism for the efficient calculation of the Hessian matrix using adjoint sources approach. We also show how this technique can be implemented to calculate multiple Hessian-vector products very efficiently. The formalism is general in the sense that it allows to work with responses that arise in EM problem set-ups either with natural- or controlled-source excitations. The formalism allows for various types of parametrization of the 3-D conductivity distribution. Using this methodology one can readily obtain appropriate formulae for the specific sounding methods. To illustrate the concept we provide such formulae for two EM techniques: magnetotellurics and controlled-source sounding with vertical magnetic dipole as a source.

  12. Finite-frequency sensitivity kernels for global seismic wave propagation based upon adjoint methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2008-07-01

    We determine adjoint equations and Fréchet kernels for global seismic wave propagation based upon a Lagrange multiplier method. We start from the equations of motion for a rotating, self-gravitating earth model initially in hydrostatic equilibrium, and derive the corresponding adjoint equations that involve motions on an earth model that rotates in the opposite direction. Variations in the misfit function χ then may be expressed as , where δlnm = δm/m denotes relative model perturbations in the volume V, δlnd denotes relative topographic variations on solid-solid or fluid-solid boundaries Σ, and ∇Σδlnd denotes surface gradients in relative topographic variations on fluid-solid boundaries ΣFS. The 3-D Fréchet kernel Km determines the sensitivity to model perturbations δlnm, and the 2-D kernels Kd and Kd determine the sensitivity to topographic variations δlnd. We demonstrate also how anelasticity may be incorporated within the framework of adjoint methods. Finite-frequency sensitivity kernels are calculated by simultaneously computing the adjoint wavefield forward in time and reconstructing the regular wavefield backward in time. Both the forward and adjoint simulations are based upon a spectral-element method. We apply the adjoint technique to generate finite-frequency traveltime kernels for global seismic phases (P, Pdiff, PKP, S, SKS, depth phases, surface-reflected phases, surface waves, etc.) in both 1-D and 3-D earth models. For 1-D models these adjoint-generated kernels generally agree well with results obtained from ray-based methods. However, adjoint methods do not have the same theoretical limitations as ray-based methods, and can produce sensitivity kernels for any given phase in any 3-D earth model. The Fréchet kernels presented in this paper illustrate the sensitivity of seismic observations to structural parameters and topography on internal discontinuities. These kernels form the basis of future 3-D tomographic inversions.

  13. Global Adjoint Tomography: Combining Big Data with HPC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Lei, W.; Peter, D. B.; Smith, J. A.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The steady increase in data quality and the number of global seismographic stations have substantially grown the amount of data available for construction of Earth models. Meanwhile, developments in the theory of wave propagation, numerical methods and HPC systems have enabled unprecedented simulations of seismic wave propagation in realistic 3D Earth models which lead the extraction of more information from data, ultimately culminating in the use of entire three-component seismograms.Our aim is to take adjoint tomography further to image the entire planet which is one of the extreme cases in seismology due to its intense computational requirements and vast amount of high-quality seismic data that can potentially be assimilated in inversions. We have started low resolution (T > 27 s, soon will be > 17 s) global inversions with 253 earthquakes for a transversely isotropic crust and mantle model on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system. Recent improvements in our 3D solvers, such as the GPU version of the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package, will allow us perform higher-resolution (T > 9 s) and longer-duration (~180 m) simulations to take the advantage of high-frequency body waves and major-arc surface waves to improve imbalanced ray coverage as a result of uneven distribution of sources and receivers on the globe. Our initial results after 10 iterations already indicate several prominent features reported in high-resolution continental studies, such as major slabs (Hellenic, Japan, Bismarck, Sandwich, etc.) and enhancement in plume structures (the Pacific superplume, the Hawaii hot spot, etc.). Our ultimate goal is to assimilate seismic data from more than 6,000 earthquakes within the magnitude range 5.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0. To take full advantage of this data set on ORNL's computational resources, we need a solid framework for managing big data sets during pre-processing (e.g., data requests and quality checks), gradient calculations, and post-processing (e

  14. Adaptive mesh refinement and adjoint methods in geophysics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstedde, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    required by human intervention and analysis. Specifying an objective functional that quantifies the misfit between the simulation outcome and known constraints and then minimizing it through numerical optimization can serve as an automated technique for parameter identification. As suggested by the similarity in formulation, the numerical algorithm is closely related to the one used for goal-oriented error estimation. One common point is that the so-called adjoint equation needs to be solved numerically. We will outline the derivation and implementation of these methods and discuss some of their pros and cons, supported by numerical results.

  15. RCPO1 - A Monte Carlo program for solving neutron and photon transport problems in three dimensional geometry with detailed energy description and depletion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Ondis, L.A., II; Tyburski, L.J.; Moskowitz, B.S.

    2000-03-01

    The RCP01 Monte Carlo program is used to analyze many geometries of interest in nuclear design and analysis of light water moderated reactors such as the core in its pressure vessel with complex piping arrangement, fuel storage arrays, shipping and container arrangements, and neutron detector configurations. Written in FORTRAN and in use on a variety of computers, it is capable of estimating steady state neutron or photon reaction rates and neutron multiplication factors. The energy range covered in neutron calculations is that relevant to the fission process and subsequent slowing-down and thermalization, i.e., 20 MeV to 0 eV. The same energy range is covered for photon calculations.

  16. Assimilation of seasonal chlorophyll and nutrient data into an adjoint three-dimensional ocean carbon cycle model: Sensitivity analysis and ecosystem parameter optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjiputra, Jerry F.; Polzin, Dierk; Winguth, Arne M. E.

    2007-03-01

    An adjoint method is applied to a three-dimensional global ocean biogeochemical cycle model to optimize the ecosystem parameters on the basis of SeaWiFS surface chlorophyll observation. We showed with identical twin experiments that the model simulated chlorophyll concentration is sensitive to perturbation of phytoplankton and zooplankton exudation, herbivore egestion as fecal pellets, zooplankton grazing, and the assimilation efficiency parameters. The assimilation of SeaWiFS chlorophyll data significantly improved the prediction of chlorophyll concentration, especially in the high-latitude regions. Experiments that considered regional variations of parameters yielded a high seasonal variance of ecosystem parameters in the high latitudes, but a low variance in the tropical regions. These experiments indicate that the adjoint model is, despite the many uncertainties, generally capable to optimize sensitive parameters and carbon fluxes in the euphotic zone. The best fit regional parameters predict a global net primary production of 36 Pg C yr-1, which lies within the range suggested by Antoine et al. (1996). Additional constraints of nutrient data from the World Ocean Atlas showed further reduction in the model-data misfit and that assimilation with extensive data sets is necessary.

  17. Using a global aerosol model adjoint to unravel the footprint of spatially-distributed emissions on cloud droplet number and cloud albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karydis, V. A.; Capps, S. L.; Moore, R. H.; Russell, A. G.; Henze, D. K.; Nenes, A.

    2012-12-01

    The adjoints of the GEOS-Chem Chemical Transport Model and a comprehensive cloud droplet parameterization are coupled to study the sensitivity of cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) over US regions and Central Europe to global emissions of anthropogenic fine mode aerosol precursors. Simulations reveal that the Nd over the midwestern and southeastern US is mostly sensitive to SO2 emissions during August, and to NH3 emissions during February. Over the western US, Nd is mostly sensitivity to SO2 and primary organic aerosol emissions. In Central Europe, Nd is most sensitive to NH3 and NOx emissions. As expected, local emissions strongly affect Nd; long-range transport, however, is also important for the western US and Europe. Emissions changes projected for the year 2050 are estimated to have the largest impacts on cloud albedo and Nd over Central Europe during August (42% and 82% change, respectively) and western US during February (12% and 36.5% change, respectively).

  18. Analysis of Correlated Coupling of Monte Carlo Forward and Adjoint Histories

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, Taro; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Kloosterman, J. L.

    2001-02-15

    In Monte Carlo correlated coupling, forward and adjoint particle histories are initiated in exactly opposite directions at an arbitrarily placed surface between a physical source and a physical detector. It is shown that this coupling calculation can become more efficient than standard forward calculations. In many cases, the basic form of correlated coupling is less efficient than standard forward calculations. This inherent inefficiency can be overcome by applying a black absorber perturbation to either the forward or the adjoint problem and by processing the product of batch averages as one statistical entity. The usage of the black absorber is based on the invariance of the response flow integral with a material perturbation in either the physical detector side volume in the forward problem or the physical source side volume in the adjoint problem. The batch-average product processing makes use of a quadratic increase of the nonzero coupled-score probability. All the developments have been done in such a way that improved efficiency schemes available in widely distributed Monte Carlo codes can be applied to both the forward and adjoint simulations. Also, the physical meaning of the black absorber perturbation is interpreted based on surface crossing and is numerically validated. In addition, the immediate reflection at the intermediate surface with a controlled direction change is investigated within the invariance framework. This approach can be advantageous for a void streaming problem.

  19. Application of non-self-adjoint operators for description of electronic excitations in metallic lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A. V.

    2016-01-15

    Metallic lithium is used to demonstrate the possibilities of applying non-self-adjoint operators for quantitative description of orbital excitations of electrons in crystals. It is shown that, the nonequilibrium distribution function can be calculated when solving the spectral problem; therefore, the kinetic properties of a material can also be described with the unified band theory.

  20. Adjoint-operators and non-adiabatic learning algorithms in neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, N.; Barhen, J.

    1991-01-01

    Adjoint sensitivity equations are presented, which can be solved simultaneously (i.e., forward in time) with the dynamics of a nonlinear neural network. These equations provide the foundations for a new methodology which enables the implementation of temporal learning algorithms in a highly efficient manner.

  1. Sensitivity analysis of a model of CO2 exchange in tundra ecosystems by the adjoint method

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroek, C.; Louis, J.F. |

    1995-02-01

    A model of net primary production (NPP), decomposition, and nitrogen cycling in tundra ecosystems has been developed. The adjoint technique is used to study the sensitivity of the computed annual net CO2 flux to perturbation in initial conditions, climatic inputs, and model`s main parameters describing current seasonal CO2 exchange in wet sedge tundra at Barrow, Alaska. The results show that net CO2 flux is most sensitive to parameters characterizing litter chemical composition and more sensitive to decomposition parameters than to NPP parameters. This underlines the fact that in nutrient-limited ecosystems, decomposition drives net CO2 exchange by controlling mineralization of main nutrients. The results also indicate that the short-term (1 year) response of wet sedge tundra to CO2-induced warming is a significant increase in CO2 emission, creating a positive feedback to atmosphreic CO2 accumulation. However, a cloudiness increase during the same year can severely alter this response and lead to either a slight decrease or a strong increase in emitted CO2, depending on its exact timing. These results demonstrate that the adjoint method is well suited to study systems encountering regime changes, as a single run of the adjoint model provides sensitivities of the net CO2 flux to perturbations in all parameters and variables at any time of the year. Moreover, it is shown that large errors due to the presence of thresholds can be avoided by first delimiting the range of applicability of the adjoint results.

  2. Two-Point Boundary Value Problems and the Method of Adjoints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.; Miller, H. Vincent

    1990-01-01

    Discusses a numerical technique called the method of adjoints, turning a linear two-point boundary value problem into an initial value problem. Described are steps for using the method in linear or nonlinear systems. Applies the technique to solve a simple pendulum problem. Lists 15 references. (YP)

  3. 3-D crustal and uppermost mantle structure beneath NE China revealed by ambient noise adjoint tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaning; Niu, Fenglin; Chen, Min; Yang, Wencai

    2017-03-01

    We construct a new 3-D shear wave speed model of the crust and the uppermost mantle beneath Northeast China using the ambient noise adjoint tomography method. Without intermediate steps of measuring phase dispersion, the adjoint tomography inverts for shear wave speeds of the crust and uppermost mantle directly from 6-40 s waveforms of Empirical Green's functions (EGFs) of Rayleigh waves, which are derived from interferometry of two years of ambient noise data recorded by the 127 Northeast China Extended Seismic Array stations. With an initial 3-D model derived from traditional asymptotic surface wave tomography method, adjoint tomography refines the 3-D model by iteratively minimizing the frequency-dependent traveltime misfits between EGFs and synthetic Green's functions measured in four period bands: 6-15 s, 10-20 s, 15-30 s, and 20-40 s. Our new model shows shear wave speed anomalies that are spatially correlated with known tectonic units such as the Great Xing'an range and the Changbaishan mountain range. The new model also reveals low wave speed conduits in the mid-lower crust and the uppermost mantle with a wave speed reduction indicative of partial melting beneath the Halaha, Xilinhot-Abaga, and Jingpohu volcanic complexes, suggesting that the Cenozoic volcanism in the area has a deep origin. Overall, the adjoint tomographic images show more vertically continuous velocity anomalies with larger amplitudes due to the consideration of the finite frequency and 3-D effects.

  4. Use of an adjoint model for finding triggers for Alpine lee cyclogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukicevic, Tomislava; Raeder, Kevin

    1995-01-01

    The authors propose a new procedure, designated the adjoint-based genesis diagnostic (AGD) procedure, for studying triggering mechanisms and the subsequent genesis of the synoptic phenomena of interest. This procedure makes use of a numerical model sensitivity to initial conditions and the nonlinear evolution of the initial perturbations that are designed using this sensitivity. The model sensitivity is evaluated using the associated adjoint model. This study uses the dry version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Adjoint Modeling System (MAMS) for the numerical experiments. The authors apply the AGD procedure to two cases of Alpine lee cyclogenesis that were observed during the Alpine Experiment special observations period. The results show that the sensitivity fields that are produced by the adjoint model and the associated initial perturbations are readily related to the probable triggering mechanisms for these cyclones. Additionally, the nonlinear evolution of these initial perturbations points toward the physical processes involved in the lee cyclone formation. The AGD experiments for a weak cyclone case indicate that the MAMS forecast model has an underrepresented topographic forcing due to the sigma vertical coordinate and that this model error can be compensated by adjustments in the initial conditions that are related to the triggering mechanisms, which is not associated with the topographic blocking mechanism.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of a model of CO2 exchange in tundra ecosystems by the adjoint method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waelbroek, C.; Louis, J.-F.

    1995-01-01

    A model of net primary production (NPP), decomposition, and nitrogen cycling in tundra ecosystems has been developed. The adjoint technique is used to study the sensitivity of the computed annual net CO2 flux to perturbation in initial conditions, climatic inputs, and model's main parameters describing current seasonal CO2 exchange in wet sedge tundra at Barrow, Alaska. The results show that net CO2 flux is most sensitive to parameters characterizing litter chemical composition and more sensitive to decomposition parameters than to NPP parameters. This underlines the fact that in nutrient-limited ecosystems, decomposition drives net CO2 exchange by controlling mineralization of main nutrients. The results also indicate that the short-term (1 year) response of wet sedge tundra to CO2-induced warming is a significant increase in CO2 emission, creating a positive feedback to atmosphreic CO2 accumulation. However, a cloudiness increase during the same year can severely alter this response and lead to either a slight decrease or a strong increase in emitted CO2, depending on its exact timing. These results demonstrate that the adjoint method is well suited to study systems encountering regime changes, as a single run of the adjoint model provides sensitivities of the net CO2 flux to perturbations in all parameters and variables at any time of the year. Moreover, it is shown that large errors due to the presence of thresholds can be avoided by first delimiting the range of applicability of the adjoint results.

  6. A coupled-adjoint method for high-fidelity aero-structural optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Joaquim Rafael Rost A.

    A new integrated aero-structural design method for aerospace vehicles is presented. The approach combines an aero-structural analysis solver, a coupled aero-structural adjoint solver, a geometry engine, and an efficient gradient-based optimization algorithm. The aero-structural solver ensures accurate solutions by using high-fidelity models for the aerodynamics, structures, and coupling procedure. The coupled aero-structural adjoint solver is used to calculate the sensitivities of aerodynamic and structural cost functions with respect to both aerodynamic shape and structural variables. The aero-structural adjoint sensitivities are compared with those given by the complex-step derivative approximation and finite differences. The proposed method is shown to be both accurate and efficient, exhibiting a significant cost advantage when the gradient of a small number of functions with respect to a large number of design variables is needed. The optimization of a supersonic business jet configuration demonstrates the usefulness and importance of computing aero-structural sensitivities using the coupled-adjoint method.

  7. Using adjoint-based optimization to study wing flexibility in flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Mingjun; Xu, Min; Dong, Haibo

    2014-11-01

    In the study of flapping-wing flight of birds and insects, it is important to understand the impact of wing flexibility/deformation on aerodynamic performance. However, the large control space from the complexity of wing deformation and kinematics makes usual parametric study very difficult or sometimes impossible. Since the adjoint-based approach for sensitivity study and optimization strategy is a process with its cost independent of the number of input parameters, it becomes an attractive approach in our study. Traditionally, adjoint equation and sensitivity are derived in a fluid domain with fixed solid boundaries. Moving boundary is only allowed when its motion is not part of control effort. Otherwise, the derivation becomes either problematic or too complex to be feasible. Using non-cylindrical calculus to deal with boundary deformation solves this problem in a very simple and still mathematically rigorous manner. Thus, it allows to apply adjoint-based optimization in the study of flapping wing flexibility. We applied the ``improved'' adjoint-based method to study the flexibility of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flapping wings, where the flapping trajectory and deformation are described by either model functions or real data from the flight of dragonflies. Supported by AFOSR.

  8. Full Waveform Inversion Using the Adjoint Method for Earthquake Kinematics Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tago Pacheco, J.; Metivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.

    2014-12-01

    Extracting the information contained in seismograms for better description of the Earth structure and evolution is often based on only selected attributes of these signals. Exploiting the entire seismogram, Full Wave Inversion based on an adjoint estimation of the gradient and Hessian operators, has been recognized as a high-resolution imaging technique. Most of earthquake kinematics inversion are still based on the estimation of the Frechet derivatives for the gradient operator computation in linearized optimization. One may wonder the benefit of the adjoint formulation which avoids the estimation of these derivatives for the gradient estimation. Recently, Somala et al. (submitted) have detailed the adjoint method for earthquake kinematics inversion starting from the second-order wave equation in 3D media. They have used a conjugate gradient method for the optimization procedure. We explore a similar adjoint formulation based on the first-order wave equations while using different optimization schemes. Indeed, for earthquake kinematics inversion, the model space is the slip-rate spatio-temporal history over the fault. Seismograms obtained from a dislocation rupture simulation are linearly linked to this slip-rate distribution. Therefore, we introduce a simple systematic procedure based on Lagrangian formulation of the adjoint method in the linear problem of earthquake kinematics. We have developed both the gradient estimation using the adjoint formulation and the Hessian influence using the second-order adjoint formulation (Metivier et al, 2013, 2014). Since the earthquake kinematics is a linear problem, the minimization problem is quadratic, henceforth, only one solution of the Newton equations is needed with the Hessian impact. Moreover, the formal uncertainty estimation over slip-rate distribution could be deduced from this Hessian analysis. On simple synthetic examples for antiplane kinematic rupture configuration in 2D medium, we illustrate the properties of

  9. Diphenylamino-substituted bicarbazole derivative: Hole-transporting material with high glass-transition temperature, good electron and triplet exciton blocking capabilities and efficient hole injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shanyong; Jiang, Shan; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    A diphenylamino-substituted bicarbazole derivative (BCZDA) with high glass-transition temperature (170 °C) has been developed. The introduction of the strongly electron-donating diphenylamino group endows this compound with high HOMO (-4.94 eV), LUMO (-1.94 eV) and triplet energy (2.65 eV) levels which are beneficial for hole injection and electron/triplet exciton blocking. By adopting this compound as the hole-transporting layer, both fluorescent and phosphorescent devices with good performance have been realized. Through the device study, the performance of this compound is proved to be comparable to that of NPB. The utility of this compound as a host has also been evaluated.

  10. Finite-frequency tomography using adjoint methods-Methodology and examples using membrane surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, Carl; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2007-03-01

    We employ adjoint methods in a series of synthetic seismic tomography experiments to recover surface wave phase-speed models of southern California. Our approach involves computing the Fréchet derivative for tomographic inversions via the interaction between a forward wavefield, propagating from the source to the receivers, and an `adjoint' wavefield, propagating from the receivers back to the source. The forward wavefield is computed using a 2-D spectral-element method (SEM) and a phase-speed model for southern California. A `target' phase-speed model is used to generate the `data' at the receivers. We specify an objective or misfit function that defines a measure of misfit between data and synthetics. For a given receiver, the remaining differences between data and synthetics are time-reversed and used as the source of the adjoint wavefield. For each earthquake, the interaction between the regular and adjoint wavefields is used to construct finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, which we call event kernels. An event kernel may be thought of as a weighted sum of phase-specific (e.g. P) banana-doughnut kernels, with weights determined by the measurements. The overall sensitivity is simply the sum of event kernels, which defines the misfit kernel. The misfit kernel is multiplied by convenient orthonormal basis functions that are embedded in the SEM code, resulting in the gradient of the misfit function, that is, the Fréchet derivative. A non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm is used to iteratively improve the model while reducing the misfit function. We illustrate the construction of the gradient and the minimization algorithm, and consider various tomographic experiments, including source inversions, structural inversions and joint source-structure inversions. Finally, we draw connections between classical Hessian-based tomography and gradient-based adjoint tomography.

  11. Top-down Estimate of Dust Emissions Through Integration of MODIS and MISR Aerosol Retrievals With the Geos-chem Adjoint Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang; Henze, Daven K.; Zeng, Jing; Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee; Huang, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the influences of dust on atmospheric composition, climate, and human health requires accurate knowledge of dust emissions, but large uncertainties persist in quantifying mineral sources. This study presents a new method for combined use of satellite-measured radiances and inverse modeling to spatially constrain the amount and location of dust emissions. The technique is illustrated with a case study in May 2008; the dust emissions in Taklimakan and Gobi deserts are spatially optimized using the GEOSChem chemical transport model and its adjoint constrained by aerosol optical depth (AOD) that are derived over the downwind dark-surface region in China from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) reflectance with the aerosol single scattering properties consistent with GEOS-chem. The adjoint inverse modeling yields an overall 51% decrease in prior dust emissions estimated by GEOS-Chem over the Taklimakan-Gobi area, with more significant reductions south of the Gobi Desert. The model simulation with optimized dust emissions shows much better agreement with independent observations from MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) AOD and MODIS Deep Blue AOD over the dust source region and surface PM10 concentrations. The technique of this study can be applied to global multi-sensor remote sensing data for constraining dust emissions at various temporal and spatial scales, and hence improving the quantification of dust effects on climate, air quality, and human health.

  12. New Multi-group Transport Neutronics (PHISICS) Capabilities for RELAP5-3D and its Application to Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi

    2012-10-01

    PHISICS is a neutronics code system currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. The different modules for PHISICS currently under development are a nodal and semi-structured transport core solver (INSTANT), a depletion module (MRTAU) and a cross section interpolation (MIXER) module. The INSTANT module is the most developed of the mentioned above. Basic functionalities are ready to use, but the code is still in continuous development to extend its capabilities. This paper reports on the effort of coupling the nodal kinetics code package PHISICS (INSTANT/MRTAU/MIXER) to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D, to enable full core and system modeling. This will enable the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5-3D (NESTLE). In the second part of the paper, an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark is given. This benchmark has been approved by the OECD, and is based on the General Atomics 350 MW Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) design. The benchmark includes coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics exercises that require more capabilities than RELAP5-3D with NESTLE offers. Therefore, the MHTGR benchmark makes extensive use of the new PHISICS/RELAP5-3D coupling capabilities. The paper presents the preliminary results of the three steady state exercises specified in Phase I of the benchmark using PHISICS/RELAP5-3D.

  13. Practical Aerodynamic Design Optimization Based on the Navier-Stokes Equations and a Discrete Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    The technical details are summarized below: Compressible and incompressible versions of a three-dimensional unstructured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver have been differentiated and resulting derivatives have been verified by comparisons with finite differences and a complex-variable approach. In this implementation, the turbulence model is fully coupled with the flow equations in order to achieve this consistency. The accuracy demonstrated in the current work represents the first time that such an approach has been successfully implemented. The accuracy of a number of simplifying approximations to the linearizations of the residual have been examined. A first-order approximation to the dependent variables in both the adjoint and design equations has been investigated. The effects of a "frozen" eddy viscosity and the ramifications of neglecting some mesh sensitivity terms were also examined. It has been found that none of the approximations yielded derivatives of acceptable accuracy and were often of incorrect sign. However, numerical experiments indicate that an incomplete convergence of the adjoint system often yield sufficiently accurate derivatives, thereby significantly lowering the time required for computing sensitivity information. The convergence rate of the adjoint solver relative to the flow solver has been examined. Inviscid adjoint solutions typically require one to four times the cost of a flow solution, while for turbulent adjoint computations, this ratio can reach as high as eight to ten. Numerical experiments have shown that the adjoint solver can stall before converging the solution to machine accuracy, particularly for viscous cases. A possible remedy for this phenomenon would be to include the complete higher-order linearization in the preconditioning step, or to employ a simple form of mesh sequencing to obtain better approximations to the solution through the use of coarser meshes. . An efficient surface parameterization based

  14. Practical Aerodynamic Design Optimization Based on the Navier-Stokes Equations and a Discrete Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Compressible and incompressible versions of a three-dimensional unstructured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver have been differentiated and resulting derivatives have been verified by comparisons with finite differences and a complex-variable approach. In this implementation, the turbulence model is fully coupled with the flow equations in order to achieve this consistency. The accuracy demonstrated in the current work represents the first time that such an approach has been successfully implemented. The accuracy of a number of simplifying approximations to the linearizations of the residual have been examined. A first-order approximation to the dependent variables in both the adjoint and design equations has been investigated. The effects of a "frozen" eddy viscosity and the ramifications of neglecting some mesh sensitivity terms were also examined. It has been found that none of the approximations yielded derivatives of acceptable accuracy and were often of incorrect sign. However, numerical experiments indicate that an incomplete convergence of the adjoint system often yield sufficiently accurate derivatives, thereby significantly lowering the time required for computing sensitivity information. The convergence rate of the adjoint solver relative to the flow solver has been examined. Inviscid adjoint solutions typically require one to four times the cost of a flow solution, while for turbulent adjoint computations, this ratio can reach as high as eight to ten. Numerical experiments have shown that the adjoint solver can stall before converging the solution to machine accuracy, particularly for viscous cases. A possible remedy for this phenomenon would be to include the complete higher-order linearization in the preconditioning step, or to employ a simple form of mesh sequencing to obtain better approximations to the solution through the use of coarser meshes. An efficient surface parameterization based on a free-form deformation technique has been

  15. IrLaW an OGC compliant infrared thermography measurement system developed on mini PC with real time computing capabilities for long term monitoring of transport infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, J.; Averty, R.

    2012-04-01

    One of the objectives of ISTIMES project is to evaluate the potentialities offered by the integration of different electromagnetic techniques able to perform non-invasive diagnostics for surveillance and monitoring of transport infrastructures. Among the EM methods investigated, uncooled infrared camera is a promising technique due to its dissemination potential according to its relative low cost on the market. Infrared thermography, when it is used in quantitative mode (not in laboratory conditions) and not in qualitative mode (vision applied to survey), requires to process in real time thermal radiative corrections on raw data acquired to take into account influences of natural environment evolution with time. But, camera sensor has to be enough smart to apply in real time calibration law and radiometric corrections in a varying atmosphere. So, a complete measurement system was studied and developed with low cost infrared cameras available on the market. In the system developed, infrared camera is coupled with other sensors to feed simplified radiative models running, in real time, on GPU available on small PC. The system studied and developed uses a fast Ethernet camera FLIR A320 [1] coupled with a VAISALA WXT520 [2] weather station and a light GPS unit [3] for positioning and dating. It can be used with other Ethernet infrared cameras (i.e. visible ones) but requires to be able to access measured data at raw level. In the present study, it has been made possible thanks to a specific agreement signed with FLIR Company. The prototype system studied and developed is implemented on low cost small computer that integrates a GPU card to allow real time parallel computing [4] of simplified radiometric [5] heat balance using information measured with the weather station. An HMI was developed under Linux using OpenSource and complementary pieces of software developed at IFSTTAR. This new HMI called "IrLaW" has various functionalities that let it compliant to be use in

  16. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis for high-energy density radiative transfer using flux-limited diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humbird, Kelli D.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2017-03-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited radiative diffusion using the adjoint approach. The sensitivities computed are shown to agree with standard perturbation theory and require significantly less computational time. The adjoint approach saves the computational cost of one forward solve per sensitivity, making the method attractive when multiple sensitivities are of interest.

  17. Evaluating Observational Constraints on N2O Emissions via Information Content Analysis Using GEOS-Chem and its Adjoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Bousserez, N.; Henze, D. K.; Chaliyakunnel, S.; Griffis, T. J.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Prinn, R. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Weiss, R. F.; Dutton, G. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Steele, P.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a long-lived greenhouse gas with a global warming potential approximately 300 times that of CO2, and plays a key role in stratospheric ozone depletion. Human perturbation of the nitrogen cycle has led to a rise in atmospheric N2O, but large uncertainties exist in the spatial and temporal distribution of its emissions. Here we employ a 4D-Var inversion framework for N2O based on the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint to derive new constraints on the space-time distribution of global land and ocean N2O fluxes. Based on an ensemble of global surface measurements, we find that emissions are overestimated over Northern Hemisphere land areas and underestimated in the Southern Hemisphere. Assigning these biases to particular land or ocean regions is more difficult given the long lifetime of N2O. To quantitatively evaluate where the current N2O observing network provides local and regional emission constraints, we apply a new, efficient information content analysis technique involving radial basis functions. The technique yields optimal state vector dimensions for N2O source inversions, with model grid cells grouped in space and time according to the resolution that can actually be provided by the network of global observations. We then use these optimal state vectors in an analytical inversion to refine current top-down emission estimates.

  18. Projecting Future Changes in Seasonal Vegetative Exposure to Ozone in the Western US Using GEOS-Chem Adjoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapina, K.; Henze, D. K.; Milford, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Frequent exposure to elevated levels of ozone leads to negative impacts on ecosystems including the loss of ozone-sensitive tree species and agricultural crops in many regions of the United States. Information on emission sources contributing to these losses is crucial for developing a successful strategy to mitigate the negative effects of ozone on vegetation. A cumulative ozone exposure metric, W126, has been considered by the US EPA for use as secondary ozone standard. The rural West of the US has been demonstrated to have an especially great potential for disconnect between attaining primary versus W126-based ozone standards. In this work we separate the relative impact of emissions sources for the W126 in the Western US using forward and adjoint simulations with the global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem. The obtained source contributions are separated by different locations, species, and sectors and are combined with representative concentration pathway (RCP) anthropogenic emission scenarios to project future changes in W126 through 2050. Focusing on the foreign influences we find that the change in Chinese emissions alone is projected to lead to up to 20% increase in the W126 levels in the West and is strongly dependent on the RCP scenario. We further use concentration-response functions based on the W126 index to estimate the loss of four ozone-sensitive species in the West - ponderosa pine, Douglas Fir, red alder and quacking aspen.

  19. Finite Element Solution of a Self-Adjoint Transport Equation in One Dimension.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    8217STREAM’/ DATA BUGEI (6) /’ABSORB’/ DATA BUGEM(7) /’SCATI ’/ DATA BUGEM(8) /’SCAT2 𔃻 DATA BUGEM(9) /’SCAT3 ’/ DATA BUGEN(10) /’CASEDT’/ DATA BUGEM

  20. Efficient Construction of Discrete Adjoint Operators on Unstructured Grids by Using Complex Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Kleb, William L.

    2005-01-01

    A methodology is developed and implemented to mitigate the lengthy software development cycle typically associated with constructing a discrete adjoint solver for aerodynamic simulations. The approach is based on a complex-variable formulation that enables straightforward differentiation of complicated real-valued functions. An automated scripting process is used to create the complex-variable form of the set of discrete equations. An efficient method for assembling the residual and cost function linearizations is developed. The accuracy of the implementation is verified through comparisons with a discrete direct method as well as a previously developed handcoded discrete adjoint approach. Comparisons are also shown for a large-scale configuration to establish the computational efficiency of the present scheme. To ultimately demonstrate the power of the approach, the implementation is extended to high temperature gas flows in chemical nonequilibrium. Finally, several fruitful research and development avenues enabled by the current work are suggested.

  1. Efficient Construction of Discrete Adjoint Operators on Unstructured Grids Using Complex Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Kleb, William L.

    2005-01-01

    A methodology is developed and implemented to mitigate the lengthy software development cycle typically associated with constructing a discrete adjoint solver for aerodynamic simulations. The approach is based on a complex-variable formulation that enables straightforward differentiation of complicated real-valued functions. An automated scripting process is used to create the complex-variable form of the set of discrete equations. An efficient method for assembling the residual and cost function linearizations is developed. The accuracy of the implementation is verified through comparisons with a discrete direct method as well as a previously developed handcoded discrete adjoint approach. Comparisons are also shown for a large-scale configuration to establish the computational efficiency of the present scheme. To ultimately demonstrate the power of the approach, the implementation is extended to high temperature gas flows in chemical nonequilibrium. Finally, several fruitful research and development avenues enabled by the current work are suggested.

  2. Adjoint equations and analysis of complex systems: Application to virus infection modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchuk, G. I.; Shutyaev, V.; Bocharov, G.

    2005-12-01

    Recent development of applied mathematics is characterized by ever increasing attempts to apply the modelling and computational approaches across various areas of the life sciences. The need for a rigorous analysis of the complex system dynamics in immunology has been recognized since more than three decades ago. The aim of the present paper is to draw attention to the method of adjoint equations. The methodology enables to obtain information about physical processes and examine the sensitivity of complex dynamical systems. This provides a basis for a better understanding of the causal relationships between the immune system's performance and its parameters and helps to improve the experimental design in the solution of applied problems. We show how the adjoint equations can be used to explain the changes in hepatitis B virus infection dynamics between individual patients.

  3. An Exact Dual Adjoint Solution Method for Turbulent Flows on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Lu, James; Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm for solving the discrete adjoint system based on an unstructured-grid discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The method is constructed such that an adjoint solution exactly dual to a direct differentiation approach is recovered at each time step, yielding a convergence rate which is asymptotically equivalent to that of the primal system. The new approach is implemented within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid framework and results are presented for inviscid, laminar, and turbulent flows. Improvements to the baseline solution algorithm, such as line-implicit relaxation and a tight coupling of the turbulence model, are also presented. By storing nearest-neighbor terms in the residual computation, the dual scheme is computationally efficient, while requiring twice the memory of the flow solution. The scheme is expected to have a broad impact on computational problems related to design optimization as well as error estimation and grid adaptation efforts.

  4. Application of Adjoint Methodology to Supersonic Aircraft Design Using Reversed Equivalent Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to shape an aircraft to equivalent area based objectives using the discrete adjoint approach. Equivalent areas can be obtained either using reversed augmented Burgers equation or direct conversion of off-body pressures into equivalent area. Formal coupling with CFD allows computation of sensitivities of equivalent area objectives with respect to aircraft shape parameters. The exactness of the adjoint sensitivities is verified against derivatives obtained using the complex step approach. This methodology has the benefit of using designer-friendly equivalent areas in the shape design of low-boom aircraft. Shape optimization results with equivalent area cost functionals are discussed and further refined using ground loudness based objectives.

  5. Parameter identification of multi-body railway vehicle models - Application of the adjoint state approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, S.; Puel, G.; Aubry, D.; Funfschilling, C.

    2016-12-01

    For the calibration of multi-body models of railway vehicles, the identification of the model parameters from on-track measurement is required. This involves the solution of an inverse problem by minimising the misfit function which describes the distance between model and measurement using optimisation methods. The application of gradient-based optimisation methods is advantageous but necessitates an efficient approach for the computation of the gradients considering the large number of model parameters and the costly evaluation of the forward model. This work shows that the application of the adjoint state approach to the nonlinear vehicle-track multi-body system is suitable, reducing on the one hand the computational cost and increasing on the other hand the precision of the gradients. Gradients from the adjoint state method are computed for vehicle models and validated taking into account measurement noise.

  6. A Low-Order Galerkin Model Based on DMD and Adjoint-DMD modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Wei, Mingjun

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) has emerged as a new tool for the understanding of flow dynamics associated with frequencies. The DMD modes computed by this process have been considered as an alternative of base functions for model order reduction. However, DMD modes are not orthogonal bases which are usually desired for the simplicity of Galerkin models. Therefore, we used the bi-orthogonal pair of DMD modes and adjoint DMD modes to solve this problem, and introduced an easy approach to derive a simple DMD-Galerkin projection model. The introduction of adjoint DMD modes also provides an easy way to rank DMD modes for order reduction. The approach is applied on a flow-passing-cylinder case in both transition and periodic stages. For the periodic case, DMD-Galerkin model is similar to POD-Galerkin model; and for the transition case, DMD-Galerkin model carries more clear frequency features. Supported by ARL.

  7. Adjoint eigenfunctions of temporally recurrent single-spiral solutions in a simple model of atrial fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotte, Christopher D.; Grigoriev, Roman O.

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a numerical method for computing the spectrum of adjoint (left) eigenfunctions of spiral wave solutions to reaction-diffusion systems in arbitrary geometries. The method is illustrated by computing over a hundred eigenfunctions associated with an unstable time-periodic single-spiral solution of the Karma model on a square domain. We show that all leading adjoint eigenfunctions are exponentially localized in the vicinity of the spiral tip, although the marginal modes (response functions) demonstrate the strongest localization. We also discuss the implications of the localization for the dynamics and control of unstable spiral waves. In particular, the interaction with no-flux boundaries leads to a drift of spiral waves which can be understood with the help of the response functions.

  8. Adjoint-Free Variational Data Assimilation into a Regional Wave Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    algorithm assimilating HFR data was ex- ecuted in 74 s on a single processor . A series of OI and a4DVAR experiments were con- ducted, involving assimilation...Adjoint-Free Variational Data Assimilation into a Regional Wave Model GLEB PANTELEEV University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, and National...Manuscript received 12 September 2014, in final form 23 December 2014) ABSTRACT A variational data assimilation algorithm is developed for the ocean

  9. Seismic wave-speed structure beneath the metropolitan area of Japan based on adjoint tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, T.; Obayashi, M.; Tono, Y.; Tsuboi, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have obtained a three-dimensional (3D) model of seismic wave-speed structure beneath the metropolitan area of Japan. We applied the spectral-element method (e.g. Komatitsch and Tromp 1999) and adjoint method (Liu and Tromp 2006) to the broadband seismograms in order to infer the 3D model. We used the travel-time tomography result (Matsubara and Obara 2011) as an initial 3D model and used broadband waveforms recorded at the NIED F-net stations. We selected 147 earthquakes with magnitude of larger than 4.5 from the F-net earthquake catalog and used their bandpass filtered seismograms between 5 and 20 second with a high S/N ratio. The 3D model used for the forward and adjoint simulations is represented as a region of approximately 500 by 450 km in horizontal and 120 km in depth. Minimum period of theoretical waveforms was 4.35 second. For the adjoint inversion, we picked up the windows of the body waves from the observed and theoretical seismograms. We used SPECFEM3D_Cartesian code (e.g. Peter et al. 2011) for the forward and adjoint simulations, and their simulations were implemented by K-computer in RIKEN. Each iteration required about 0.1 million CPU hours at least. The model parameters of Vp and Vs were updated by using the steepest descent method. We obtained the fourth iterative model (M04), which reproduced observed waveforms better than the initial model. The shear wave-speed of M04 was significantly smaller than the initial model at any depth. The model of compressional wave-speed was not improved by inversion because of small alpha kernel values. Acknowledgements: This research was partly supported by MEXT Strategic Program for Innovative Research. We thank to the NIED for providing seismological data.

  10. Neural network training by integration of adjoint systems of equations forward in time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically, it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved, but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. The trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  11. Towards efficient backward-in-time adjoint computations using data compression techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Cyr, E. C.; Shadid, J. N.; Wildey, T.

    2014-12-16

    In the context of a posteriori error estimation for nonlinear time-dependent partial differential equations, the state-of-the-practice is to use adjoint approaches which require the solution of a backward-in-time problem defined by a linearization of the forward problem. One of the major obstacles in the practical application of these approaches, we found, is the need to store, or recompute, the forward solution to define the adjoint problem and to evaluate the error representation. Our study considers the use of data compression techniques to approximate forward solutions employed in the backward-in-time integration. The development derives an error representation that accounts for themore » difference between the standard-approach and the compressed approximation of the forward solution. This representation is algorithmically similar to the standard representation and only requires the computation of the quantity of interest for the forward solution and the data-compressed reconstructed solution (i.e. scalar quantities that can be evaluated as the forward problem is integrated). This approach is then compared with existing techniques, such as checkpointing and time-averaged adjoints. Lastly, we provide numerical results indicating the potential efficiency of our approach on a transient diffusion–reaction equation and on the Navier–Stokes equations. These results demonstrate memory compression ratios up to 450×450× while maintaining reasonable accuracy in the error-estimates.« less

  12. Self-adjointness of the Fourier expansion of quantized interaction field Lagrangians

    PubMed Central

    Paneitz, S. M.; Segal, I. E.

    1983-01-01

    Regularity properties significantly stronger than were previously known are developed for four-dimensional non-linear conformally invariant quantized fields. The Fourier coefficients of the interaction Lagrangian in the interaction representation—i.e., evaluated after substitution of the associated quantized free field—is a densely defined operator on the associated free field Hilbert space K. These Fourier coefficients are with respect to a natural basis in the universal cosmos ˜M, to which such fields canonically and maximally extend from Minkowski space-time M0, which is covariantly a submanifold of ˜M. However, conformally invariant free fields over M0 and ˜M are canonically identifiable. The kth Fourier coefficient of the interaction Lagrangian has domain inclusive of all vectors in K to which arbitrary powers of the free hamiltonian in ˜M are applicable. Its adjoint in the rigorous Hilbert space sense is a-k in the case of a hermitian Lagrangian. In particular (k = 0) the leading term in the perturbative expansion of the S-matrix for a conformally invariant quantized field in M0 is a self-adjoint operator. Thus, e.g., if ϕ(x) denotes the free massless neutral scalar field in M0, then ∫M0:ϕ(x)4:d4x is a self-adjoint operator. No coupling constant renormalization is involved here. PMID:16593346

  13. Neural Network Training by Integration of Adjoint Systems of Equations Forward in Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories exploits the concepts of adjoint operators to enable computation of the gradient of an objective functional with respect to the various parameters of the network architecture in a highly efficient manner. Specifically. it combines the advantage of dramatic reductions in computational complexity inherent in adjoint methods with the ability to solve two adjoint systems of equations together forward in time. Not only is a large amount of computation and storage saved. but the handling of real-time applications becomes also possible. The invention has been applied it to two examples of representative complexity which have recently been analyzed in the open literature and demonstrated that a circular trajectory can be learned in approximately 200 iterations compared to the 12000 reported in the literature. A figure eight trajectory was achieved in under 500 iterations compared to 20000 previously required. Tbc trajectories computed using our new method are much closer to the target trajectories than was reported in previous studies.

  14. ITS version 5.0 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2004-06-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state of the art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent couple electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2)multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, and (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes. Moreover the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  15. California Earthquake Residual Transportation Capability Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    through vi 0 Gardenia, Signal Hill and Huntington Beach to Newport Beach. The damaged area would extend from the San Fernando Valley to Oceanside. 0...Bernardino. Ocean service could come from San Diego via highway. Survivors in the San Fernando Valley would be supplied by distri- bution trucks that...1971 San Fernando earthquake, then fire, police and other emer- gency services can cope with the major problems. However, a massive earthquake that

  16. Investigating Sensitivity to Saharan Dust in Tropical Cyclone Formation Using Nasa's Adjoint Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdaway, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As tropical cyclones develop from easterly waves coming of the coast of Africa they interact with dust from the Sahara desert. There is a long standing debate over whether this dust inhibits or advances the developing storm and how much influence it has. Dust can surround the storm and absorb incoming solar radiation, cooling the air below. As a result an energy source for the system is potentially diminished, inhibiting growth of the storm. Alternatively dust may interact with clouds through micro-physical processes, for example by causing more moisture to condense, potentially increasing the strength. As a result of climate change, concentrations and amount of dust in the atmosphere will likely change. It it is important to properly understand its effect on tropical storm formation. The adjoint of an atmospheric general circulation model provides a very powerful tool for investigating sensitivity to initial conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently developed an adjoint version of the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) dynamical core, convection scheme, cloud model and radiation schemes. This is extended so that the interaction between dust and radiation is also accounted for in the adjoint model. This provides a framework for examining the sensitivity to dust in the initial conditions. Specifically the set up allows for an investigation into the extent to which dust affects cyclone strength through absorption of radiation. In this work we investigate the validity of using an adjoint model for examining sensitivity to dust in hurricane formation. We present sensitivity results for a number of systems that developed during the Atlantic hurricane season of 2006. During this period there was a significant outbreak of Saharan dust and it is has been argued that this outbreak was responsible for the relatively calm season. This period was also covered by an extensive observation campaign. It is shown that the

  17. Investigating sensitivity to Saharan dust in tropical cyclone formation using NASA's adjoint model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdaway, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    As tropical cyclones develop from easterly waves coming off the coast of Africa they interact with dust from the Sahara desert. There is a long standing debate over whether this dust inhibits or advances the developing storm and how much influence it has. Dust can surround the storm and absorb incoming solar radiation, cooling the air below. As a result an energy source for the system is potentially diminished, inhibiting growth of the storm. Alternatively dust may interact with clouds through micro-physical processes, for example by causing more moisture to condense, potentially increasing the strength. As a result of climate change, concentrations and amount of dust in the atmosphere will likely change. It it is important to properly understand its effect on tropical storm formation. The adjoint of an atmospheric general circulation model provides a very powerful tool for investigating sensitivity to initial conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently developed an adjoint version of the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) dynamical core, convection scheme, cloud model and radiation schemes. This is extended so that the interaction between dust and radiation is also accounted for in the adjoint model. This provides a framework for examining the sensitivity to dust in the initial conditions. Specifically the set up allows for an investigation into the extent to which dust affects cyclone strength through absorption of radiation. In this work we investigate the validity of using an adjoint model for examining sensitivity to dust in hurricane formation. We present sensitivity results for a number of systems that developed during the Atlantic hurricane season of 2006. During this period there was a significant outbreak of Saharan dust and it is has been argued that this outbreak was responsible for the relatively calm season. This period was also covered by an extensive observation campaign. It is shown that the

  18. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of Push-Pull Partitioning Tracer Test Data for DNAPL Saturation Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, T.; Boroumand, A.; Abriola, L. M.; Miller, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Characterization of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones is a critical component for successful remediation of sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Although Push-Pull Tracer Tests (PPTTs) offer a promising approach for local in situ source zone characterization, non-equilibrium mass transfer effects and the spatial variability of saturation make their interpretation difficult. To better understand the dependence of well test data on these factors and as the basis for the estimation of the spatial DNAPL distribution, here we develop numerical methods based on the use of adjoint sensitivity mehtods to explore the sensitivity of PPTT observations to the distribution of DNAPL saturation. We examine the utility of the developed approach using three-dimensional hypothetical source zones containing heterogeneous DNAPL distributions. For model applications the flow fields are generated with MODFLOW and non-equilibrium tracer mass transfer is described by a linear driving force expression. Comprehensive modeling of partitioning tracer tests requires the solution of tracer mass balance equations in the aqueous and DNAPL phases. Consistent with this process coupling, the developed adjoint method introduces a vector of adjoint variables to formulate the coupled adjoint states equations for tracer concentrations in both the aqueous and NAPL phases. For the sensitivity analysis, we investigate how the tracer concentration in the well changes with perturbations of the saturation within the interrogated zone. Using the calculated sensitivity functions, coupled with the observed tracer breakthrough curve, we develop a nonlinear least-squares inverse method to determine three metrics related to the spatial distribution of DNAPL in the source zone: average DNAPL saturation, total mass of DNAPL and distance of the DNAPL from the test well. These results have utility for local source zone characterization and can provide an initial quantitative understanding of

  19. Reentry-Vehicle Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Adjoint Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A DJOINT solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (e.g., geometric parameters that control the shape). Classic aerodynamic applications of gradient-based optimization include the design of cruise configurations for transonic and supersonic flow, as well as the design of high-lift systems. are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric computer-aided design (CAD). In previous work on Cartesian adjoint solvers, Melvin et al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the two-dimensional Euler equations using a ghost-cell method to enforce the wall boundary conditions. In Refs. 18 and 19, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm were the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The accuracy of the gradient computation was verified using several three-dimensional test cases, which included design

  20. Lunar Capabilities Roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. Y.; Lawrence, D. J.; Neal, C. R.; Clark, P. E.; Green, R. O.; Horanyi, M.; Johnson, M. D.; Kelso, R. M.; Sultana, M.; Thompson, D. R.

    2016-11-01

    A Lunar Capabilities Roadmap (LCR) is required to highlight capabilities critical for science and exploration of the Moon as well as beyond. The LCR will focus mainly on capabilities with examples of specific technologies to satisfy those needs.

  1. Mobile systems capability plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

  2. Imaging the slab beneath central Chile using the Spectral Elements Method and adjoint techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercerat, E. D.; Nolet, G.; Marot, M.; Deshayes, P.; Monfret, T.

    2010-12-01

    This work focuses on imaging the subducting slab beneath Central Chile using novel inversion techniques based on the adjoint method and accurate wave propagation simulations using the Spectral Elements Method. The study area comprises the flat slab portion of the Nazca plate between 29 S and 34 S subducting beneath South America. We will use a database of regional seismicity consisting of both crustal and deep slab earthquakes with magnitude 3 < Mw < 6 recorded by different temporary and permanent seismological networks. Our main goal is to determine both the kinematics and the geometry of the subducting slab in order to help the geodynamical interpretation of such particular active margin. The Spectral Elements Method (SPECFEM3D code) is used to generate the synthetic seismograms and it will be applied for the iterative minimization based on adjoint techniques. The numerical mesh is 600 km x 600 km in horizontal coordinates and 220 km depth. As a first step, we are faced to well-known issues concerning mesh generation (resolution, quality, absorbing boundary conditions). In particular, we must evaluate the influence of free surface topography, as well as the MOHO and other geological interfaces in the synthetic seismograms. The initial velocity model from a previous travel-time tomography study, is linearly interpolated to the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grid. The comparison between the first forward simulations (up to 4 seconds minimum period) validate the initial velocity model of the study area, although many features not reproduced by the initial model have already been identified. Next step will concentrate in the comparison between finite-frequency kernels calculated by travel-time methods with ones based on adjoint methods, in order to highlight advantages and disadvantages in terms of resolution, accuracy, but also computational cost.

  3. Tomography, Adjoint Methods, Time-Reversal, and Banana-Doughnut Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, C.; Tromp, J.; Liu, Q.

    2004-12-01

    We demonstrate that Fréchet derivatives for tomographic inversions may be obtained based upon just two calculations for each earthquake: one calculation for the current model and a second, `adjoint', calculation that uses time-reversed signals at the receivers as simultaneous, fictitious sources. For a given model~m, we consider objective functions χ(m) that minimize differences between waveforms, traveltimes, or amplitudes. We show that the Fréchet derivatives of such objective functions may be written in the generic form δ χ=∫ VK_m( {x}) δ ln m( {x}) d3 {x}, where δ ln m=δ m/m denotes the relative model perturbation. The volumetric kernel Km is defined throughout the model volume V and is determined by time-integrated products between spatial and temporal derivatives of the regular displacement field {s} and the adjoint displacement field {s} obtained by using time-reversed signals at the receivers as simultaneous sources. In waveform tomography the time-reversed signal consists of differences between the data and the synthetics, in traveltime tomography it is determined by synthetic velocities, and in amplitude tomography it is controlled by synthetic displacements. For each event, the construction of the kernel Km requires one forward calculation for the regular field {s} and one adjoint calculation involving the fields {s} and {s}. For multiple events the kernels are simply summed. The final summed kernel is controlled by the distribution of events and stations and thus determines image resolution. In the case of traveltime tomography, the kernels Km are weighted combinations of banana-doughnut kernels. We demonstrate also how amplitude anomalies may be inverted for lateral variations in elastic and anelastic structure. The theory is illustrated based upon 2D spectral-element simulations.

  4. 14 CFR 145.215 - Capability list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Capability list. 145.215 Section 145.215 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Operating Rules § 145.215 Capability list. (a)...

  5. Simultaneous inversion of mantle properties and initial conditions using an adjoint of mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijun; Gurnis, Michael

    2008-08-01

    Through the assimilation of present-day mantle seismic structure, adjoint methods can be used to constrain the structure of the mantle at earlier times, i.e., mantle initial conditions. However, the application to geophysical problems is restricted through both the high computational expense from repeated iteration between forward and adjoint models and the need to know mantle properties (such as viscosity and the absolute magnitude of temperature or density) a priori. We propose that an optimal first guess to the initial condition can be obtained through a simple backward integration (SBI) of the governing equations, thus lessening the computational expense. Given a model with known mantle properties, we show that a solution based on an SBI-generated first guess has smaller residuals than arbitrary guesses. Mantle viscosity and the effective Rayleigh number are crucial for mantle convection models, neither of which is exactly known. We place additional constraints on these basic mantle properties when the convection-induced dynamic topography on Earth's surface is considered within an adjoint inverse method. Besides assimilating present-day seismic structure as a constraint, we use dynamic topography and its rate of change in an inverse method that allows simultaneous inversion of the absolute upper and lower mantle viscosities, scaling between seismic velocity and thermal anomalies, and initial condition. The theory is derived from the governing equations of mantle convection and validated by synthetic experiments for both one-layer viscosity and two-layer viscosity regionally bounded spherical shells. For the one-layer model, at any instant of time, the magnitude of dynamic topography is controlled by the temperature scaling while the rate of change of topography is controlled by the absolute value of viscosity. For the two-layer case, the rate of change of topography constrains upper mantle viscosity while the magnitude of dynamic topography determines the

  6. Solving Large-Scale Inverse Magnetostatic Problems using the Adjoint Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Wautischer, Gregor; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Hinze, Michael; Suess, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for the reconstruction of the magnetization state within magnetic components is presented. The occurring inverse magnetostatic problem is solved by means of an adjoint approach, based on the Fredkin-Koehler method for the solution of the forward problem. Due to the use of hybrid FEM-BEM coupling combined with matrix compression techniques the resulting algorithm is well suited for large-scale problems. Furthermore the reconstruction of the magnetization state within a permanent magnet as well as an optimal design application are demonstrated.

  7. Solving Large-Scale Inverse Magnetostatic Problems using the Adjoint Method

    PubMed Central

    Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Wautischer, Gregor; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Hinze, Michael; Suess, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for the reconstruction of the magnetization state within magnetic components is presented. The occurring inverse magnetostatic problem is solved by means of an adjoint approach, based on the Fredkin-Koehler method for the solution of the forward problem. Due to the use of hybrid FEM-BEM coupling combined with matrix compression techniques the resulting algorithm is well suited for large-scale problems. Furthermore the reconstruction of the magnetization state within a permanent magnet as well as an optimal design application are demonstrated. PMID:28098851

  8. Generation of perturbations by means of decoupled equations and their adjoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Del Castillo, G. F.

    1990-10-01

    It is shown that the procedure introduced by Wald for constructing solutions of a coupled system of linear partial differential equations from the solution of a single equation, based on the concept of the adjoint of a linear partial differential operator, can be extended to equations involving spinor fields, matrix fields and two or more fields. Some results concerning massless spinor fields are presented and the application of the method to linear perturbations of Yang-Mills fields and of Einstein-Maxwell fields is indicated.

  9. An inverse problem strategy based on forward model evaluations: Gradient-based optimization without adjoint solves

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilo Valentin, Miguel Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a new nonlinear programming formulation for the solution of inverse problems. First, a general inverse problem formulation based on the compliance error functional is presented. The proposed error functional enables the computation of the Lagrange multipliers, and thus the first order derivative information, at the expense of just one model evaluation. Therefore, the calculation of the Lagrange multipliers does not require the solution of the computationally intensive adjoint problem. This leads to significant speedups for large-scale, gradient-based inverse problems.

  10. Ginsparg-Wilson relation on a fuzzy 2-sphere for adjoint matter

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Hajime

    2010-10-15

    We formulate a Ginsparg-Wilson relation on a fuzzy 2-sphere for matter in the adjoint representation of the gauge group. Because of the Ginsparg-Wilson relation, an index theorem is satisfied. Our formulation is applicable to topologically nontrivial configurations as monopoles. It gives a solid basis for obtaining chiral fermions, which are an important ingredient of the standard model, from matrix model formulations of the superstring theory, such as the IIB matrix model, by considering topological configurations in the extra dimensions. We finally discuss whether this mechanism really works.

  11. A forward operator and its adjoint for GPS slant total delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zus, Florian; Dick, Galina; Heise, Stefan; Wickert, Jens

    2015-05-01

    In a recent study we developed a fast and accurate algorithm to compute Global Positioning System (GPS) Slant Total Delay (STDs) utilizing numerical weather model data. Having developed a forward operator we construct in this study the tangent linear (adjoint) operator by application of the chain rule of differential calculus in forward (reverse) mode. Armed with these operators we show in a simulation study the potential benefit of GPS STDs in inverse modeling. We conclude that the developed operators are tailored for three (four)-dimensional variational data assimilation and/or travel time tomography.

  12. Direct and adjoint sensitivity analysis of chemical kinetic systems with KPP: Part I—theory and software tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandu, Adrian; Daescu, Dacian N.; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    The analysis of comprehensive chemical reactions mechanisms, parameter estimation techniques, and variational chemical data assimilation applications require the development of efficient sensitivity methods for chemical kinetics systems. The new release (KPP-1.2) of the kinetic preprocessor (KPP) contains software tools that facilitate direct and adjoint sensitivity analysis. The direct-decoupled method, built using BDF formulas, has been the method of choice for direct sensitivity studies. In this work, we extend the direct-decoupled approach to Rosenbrock stiff integration methods. The need for Jacobian derivatives prevented Rosenbrock methods to be used extensively in direct sensitivity calculations; however, the new automatic and symbolic differentiation technologies make the computation of these derivatives feasible. The direct-decoupled method is known to be efficient for computing the sensitivities of a large number of output parameters with respect to a small number of input parameters. The adjoint modeling is presented as an efficient tool to evaluate the sensitivity of a scalar response function with respect to the initial conditions and model parameters. In addition, sensitivity with respect to time-dependent model parameters may be obtained through a single backward integration of the adjoint model. KPP software may be used to completely generate the continuous and discrete adjoint models taking full advantage of the sparsity of the chemical mechanism. Flexible direct-decoupled and adjoint sensitivity code implementations are achieved with minimal user intervention. In a companion paper, we present an extensive set of numerical experiments that validate the KPP software tools for several direct/adjoint sensitivity applications, and demonstrate the efficiency of KPP-generated sensitivity code implementations.

  13. A Least-Squares Transport Equation Compatible with Voids

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Jon; Peterson, Jacob; Morel, Jim; Ragusa, Jean; Wang, Yaqi

    2014-12-01

    Standard second-order self-adjoint forms of the transport equation, such as the even-parity, odd-parity, and self-adjoint angular flux equation, cannot be used in voids. Perhaps more important, they experience numerical convergence difficulties in near-voids. Here we present a new form of a second-order self-adjoint transport equation that has an advantage relative to standard forms in that it can be used in voids or near-voids. Our equation is closely related to the standard least-squares form of the transport equation with both equations being applicable in a void and having a nonconservative analytic form. However, unlike the standard least-squares form of the transport equation, our least-squares equation is compatible with source iteration. It has been found that the standard least-squares form of the transport equation with a linear-continuous finite-element spatial discretization has difficulty in the thick diffusion limit. Here we extensively test the 1D slab-geometry version of our scheme with respect to void solutions, spatial convergence rate, and the intermediate and thick diffusion limits. We also define an effective diffusion synthetic acceleration scheme for our discretization. Our conclusion is that our least-squares Sn formulation represents an excellent alternative to existing second-order Sn transport formulations

  14. Sensitivity analysis of numerically-simulated convective storms using direct and adjoint methods

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.K.; Droegemeier, K.K.; Bischof, C.; Knauff, T.

    1994-06-01

    The goal of this project is to evaluate the sensitivity of numerically modeled convective storms to control parameters such as the initial conditions, boundary conditions, environment, and various physical and computational parameters. In other words, the authors seek the gradient of the solution vector with respect to specified parameters. One can use two approaches to accomplish this task. In the first or so-called brute force method, one uses a fully nonlinear model to generate a control forecast starting from a specified initial state. Then, a number of other forecasts are made in which chosen parameters (e.g., initial conditions) are systematically varied. The obvious drawback is that a large number of full model predictions are needed to examine the effects of only a single parameter. The authors describe herein an alternative, essentially automated method (ADIFOR, or Automatic DIfferentiation of FORtran) for obtaining the solution gradient that bypasses the adjoint altogether yet provides even more information about the gradient. (ADIFOR, like the adjoint technique, is constrained by the linearity assumption.) Applied to a 1-D moist cloud model, the authors assess the utility of ADIFOR relative to the brute force approach and evaluate the validity of the tangent linear approximation in the context of deep convection.

  15. Improving the Fit of a Land-Surface Model to Data Using its Adjoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoult, N.; Jupp, T. E.; Cox, P. M.; Luke, C.

    2015-12-01

    Land-surface models (LSMs) are of growing importance in the world of climate prediction. They are crucial components of larger Earth system models that are aimed at understanding the effects of land surface processes on the global carbon cycle. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is the land-surface model used by the UK Met Office. It has been automatically differentiated using commercial software from FastOpt, resulting in an analytical gradient, or 'adjoint', of the model. Using this adjoint, the adJULES parameter estimation system has been developed, to search for locally optimum parameter sets by calibrating against observations. adJULES presents an opportunity to confront JULES with many different observations, and make improvements to the model parameterisation. In the newest version of adJULES, multiple sites can be used in the calibration, to giving a generic set of parameters that can be generalised over plant functional types. We present an introduction to the adJULES system and its applications to data from a variety of flux tower sites. We show that calculation of the 2nd derivative of JULES allows us to produce posterior probability density functions of the parameters and how knowledge of parameter values is constrained by observations.

  16. Efficient Adjoint Computation of Hybrid Systems of Differential Algebraic Equations with Applications in Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Abhyankar, Shrirang; Anitescu, Mihai; Constantinescu, Emil; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-31

    Sensitivity analysis is an important tool to describe power system dynamic behavior in response to parameter variations. It is a central component in preventive and corrective control applications. The existing approaches for sensitivity calculations, namely, finite-difference and forward sensitivity analysis, require a computational effort that increases linearly with the number of sensitivity parameters. In this work, we investigate, implement, and test a discrete adjoint sensitivity approach whose computational effort is effectively independent of the number of sensitivity parameters. The proposed approach is highly efficient for calculating trajectory sensitivities of larger systems and is consistent, within machine precision, with the function whose sensitivity we are seeking. This is an essential feature for use in optimization applications. Moreover, our approach includes a consistent treatment of systems with switching, such as DC exciters, by deriving and implementing the adjoint jump conditions that arise from state and time-dependent discontinuities. The accuracy and the computational efficiency of the proposed approach are demonstrated in comparison with the forward sensitivity analysis approach.

  17. Eguchi-Kawai reduction with one flavor of adjoint Möbius fermion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, William; Giedt, Joel

    2016-02-01

    We study the single site lattice gauge theory of S U (N ) coupled to one Dirac flavor of fermion in the adjoint representation. We utilize Möbius fermions for this study, and accelerate the calculation with graphics processing units. Our Monte Carlo simulations indicate that for sufficiently large inverse 't Hooft coupling b =1 /g2N , and for N ≤10 the distribution of traced Polyakov loops has "fingers" that extend from the origin. However, in the massless case the distribution of eigenvalues of the untraced Polyakov loop becomes uniform at large N , indicating preservation of center symmetry in the thermodynamic limit. By contrast, for a large mass and large b , the distribution is highly nonuniform in the same limit, indicating spontaneous center symmetry breaking. These conclusions are confirmed by comparing to the quenched case, as well as by examining another observable based on the average value of the modulus of the traced Polyakov loop. The result of this investigation is that with massless adjoint fermions center symmetry is stabilized and the Eguchi-Kawai reduction should be successful; this is in agreement with most other studies.

  18. Adjoint Optimization of Multistage Axial Compressor Blades with Static Pressure Constraint at Blade Row Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia; Ji, Lucheng; Li, Weiwei; Yi, Weilin

    2016-06-01

    Adjoint method is an important tool for design refinement of multistage compressors. However, the radial static pressure distribution deviates during the optimization procedure and deteriorates the overall performance, producing final designs that are not well suited for realistic engineering applications. In previous development work on multistage turbomachinery blade optimization using adjoint method and thin shear-layer N-S equations, the entropy production is selected as the objective function with given mass flow rate and total pressure ratio as imposed constraints. The radial static pressure distribution at the interfaces between rows is introduced as a new constraint in the present paper. The approach is applied to the redesign of a five-stage axial compressor, and the results obtained with and without the constraint on the radial static pressure distribution at the interfaces between rows are discussed in detail. The results show that the redesign without the radial static pressure distribution constraint (RSPDC) gives an optimal solution that shows deviations on radial static pressure distribution, especially at rotor exit tip region. On the other hand, the redesign with the RSPDC successfully keeps the radial static pressure distribution at the interfaces between rows and make sure that the optimization results are applicable in a practical engineering design.

  19. Tide-surge adjoint modeling: A new technique to understand forecast uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Chris; Horsburgh, Kevin J.; Williams, Jane; Flowerdew, Jonathan; Zanna, Laure

    2013-10-01

    For a simple dynamical system, such as a pendulum, it is easy to deduce where and when applied forcing might produce a particular response. However, for a complex nonlinear dynamical system such as the ocean or atmosphere, this is not as obvious. Knowing when or where the system is most sensitive, to observational uncertainty or otherwise, is key to understanding the physical processes, improving and providing reliable forecasts. We describe the application of adjoint modeling to determine the sensitivity of sea level at a UK coastal location, Sheerness, to perturbations in wind stress preceding an extreme North Sea storm surge event on 9 November 2007. Sea level at Sheerness is one of the most important factors used to decide whether to close the Thames Flood Barrier, which protects London. Adjoint modeling has been used by meteorologists since the 1990s, but is a relatively new technique for ocean modeling. It may be used to determine system sensitivity beyond the scope of ensemble modeling and in a computationally efficient way. Using estimates of wind stress error from Met Office forecasts, we find that for this event total sea level at Sheerness is most sensitive in the 3 h preceding the time of its unperturbed maximum level and over a radius of approximately 300 km. We also find that the pattern of sensitivity follows a simple sequence when considered in the reverse-time direction.

  20. Optimization of computations for adjoint field and Jacobian needed in 3D CSEM inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehiya, Rahul; Singh, Arun; Gupta, Pravin K.; Israil, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present the features and results of a newly developed code, based on Gauss-Newton optimization technique, for solving three-dimensional Controlled-Source Electromagnetic inverse problem. In this code a special emphasis has been put on representing the operations by block matrices for conjugate gradient iteration. We show how in the computation of Jacobian, the matrix formed by differentiation of system matrix can be made independent of frequency to optimize the operations at conjugate gradient step. The coarse level parallel computing, using OpenMP framework, is used primarily due to its simplicity in implementation and accessibility of shared memory multi-core computing machine to almost anyone. We demonstrate how the coarseness of modeling grid in comparison to source (comp`utational receivers) spacing can be exploited for efficient computing, without compromising the quality of the inverted model, by reducing the number of adjoint calls. It is also demonstrated that the adjoint field can even be computed on a grid coarser than the modeling grid without affecting the inversion outcome. These observations were reconfirmed using an experiment design where the deviation of source from straight tow line is considered. Finally, a real field data inversion experiment is presented to demonstrate robustness of the code.

  1. Adjoint-based minimization of the sound radiated by a Mach 1.3 turbulent jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeonglae; Bodony, Daniel; Freund, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    A control optimization using the adjoint of the perturbed and linearized Navier--Stokes equations is applied to a simulation of a Mach 1.3 turbulent jet to reduce its radiated sound. The solution of the adjoint system provides gradient information for a minimization algorithm to circumvent the flow complexity and reduce the sound directly. Comparisons between the loud and the perturbed-but-quiet versions of the same jet are examined to identify sound mechanisms. The overall algorithm is designed such that the control can be optimized with degrees of freedom comparable to that of the numerical discretization or with constraints on its spatial or temporal profiles to reflect hardware limitations. The large-eddy simulation of the uncontrolled, baseline jet is carried out in curvilinear coordinates using a non-dissipative high-order finite-difference. The far-field sound is computed using a Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings surface. Turbulence and far-field sound statistics agree with experimental data. An unconstrained optimal control reduces the sound cost functional by 17%. The far-field sound is reduced at all angles with a maximum reduction of 2.7dB in the peak radiation direction. Constraining the control in actuator-like zones shows a similar result. Optimizations are ongoing.

  2. Forward and adjoint simulations of seismic wave propagation on fully unstructured hexahedral meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Daniel; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Luo, Yang; Martin, Roland; Le Goff, Nicolas; Casarotti, Emanuele; Le Loher, Pieyre; Magnoni, Federica; Liu, Qinya; Blitz, Céline; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; Basini, Piero; Tromp, Jeroen

    2011-08-01

    We present forward and adjoint spectral-element simulations of coupled acoustic and (an)elastic seismic wave propagation on fully unstructured hexahedral meshes. Simulations benefit from recent advances in hexahedral meshing, load balancing and software optimization. Meshing may be accomplished using a mesh generation tool kit such as CUBIT, and load balancing is facilitated by graph partitioning based on the SCOTCH library. Coupling between fluid and solid regions is incorporated in a straightforward fashion using domain decomposition. Topography, bathymetry and Moho undulations may be readily included in the mesh, and physical dispersion and attenuation associated with anelasticity are accounted for using a series of standard linear solids. Finite-frequency Fréchet derivatives are calculated using adjoint methods in both fluid and solid domains. The software is benchmarked for a layercake model. We present various examples of fully unstructured meshes, snapshots of wavefields and finite-frequency kernels generated by Version 2.0 'Sesame' of our widely used open source spectral-element package SPECFEM3D.

  3. Adjoint Tomography of Taiwan Region: From Travel-Time Toward Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. H.; Lee, S. J.; Tromp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The complicated tectonic environment such as Taiwan region can modulate the seismic waveform severely and hamper the discrimination and the utilization of later phases. Restricted to the use of only first arrivals of P- and S-wave, the travel-time tomographic models of Taiwan can simulate the seismic waveform barely to a frequency of 0.2 Hz to date. While it has been sufficient for long-period studies, e.g. source inversion, this frequency band is still far from the applications to the community and high-resolution studies. To achieve a higher-frequency simulation, more data and the considerations of off-path and finite-frequency effects are necessary. Based on the spectral-element and the adjoint method recently developed, we prepared 94 MW 3.5-6.0 earthquakes with well-defined location and focal mechanism solutions from Real-Time Moment Tensor Monitoring System (RMT), and preformed an iterative gradient-based inversion employing waveform modeling and finite-frequency measurements of adjoint method. By which the 3-D sensitivity kernels are taken into account realistically and the full waveform information are naturally sought, without a need of any phase pick. A preliminary model m003 using 10-50 sec data was demonstrated and compared with previous travel-time models. The primary difference appears in the mountainous area, where the previous travel-time model may underestimate the S-wave speed in the upper crust, but overestimates in the lower crust.

  4. Dynamical sensitivity analysis of tropical cyclone steering and genesis using an adjoint model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Brett T.

    The adjoint of a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model is a powerful tool for efficiently calculating the "sensitivity" of some function of the model forecast state with respect to small but otherwise arbitrary perturbations to the model state at earlier times. Physical interpretation of these sensitivity gradients for functions describing some phenomenon of dynamical interest allows the user to approach a variety of dynamical problems in atmospheric science from the perspective of the potential impact of small perturbations on the future development of that phenomenon; the integration of adjoint-derived sensitivity gradients as a dynamical tool for approaching these problems can be called dynamical sensitivity analysis. A methodology for dynamical sensitivity analysis is developed and applied to problems related to the steering and genesis of modeled tropical cyclones. Functions defining the steering and genesis of tropical cyclones are developed and tested, and sensitivity gradients of those functions with respect to model initial conditions are interpreted physically. Results indicate that regions of strong sensitivity tend to localize where small vorticity perturbations have the capacity to grow quickly and impact the future state of the model, such as regions of strong ascent and subsidence surrounding midlatitude troughs, or near zonal jets where upshear-tilted perturbations can grow barotropically. Consequences for dynamics and predictability of these events are discussed.

  5. Numerical study of tidal dynamics in the South China Sea with adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiumin; Wei, Zexun; Lv, Xianqing; Wang, Yonggang; Fang, Guohong

    2015-08-01

    We adopt a parameterized internal tide dissipation term to the two-dimensional (2-D) shallow water equations, and develop the corresponding adjoint model to investigate tidal dynamics in the South China Sea (SCS). The harmonic constants derived from 63 tidal gauge stations and 24 TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) satellite altimeter crossover points are assimilated into the adjoint model to minimize the deviations of the simulated results and observations by optimizing the bottom friction coefficient and the internal tide dissipation coefficient. Tidal constituents M2, S2, K1 and O1 are simulated simultaneously. The numerical results (assimilating only tidal gauge data) agree well with T/P data showing that the model results are reliable. The co-tidal charts of M2, S2, K1 and O1 are obtained, which reflect the characteristics of tides in the SCS. The tidal energy flux is analyzed based on numerical results. The strongest tidal energy flux appears in the Luzon Strait (LS) for both semi-diurnal and diurnal tidal constituents. The analysis of tidal energy dissipation indicates that the bottom friction dissipation occurs mainly in shallow water area, meanwhile the internal tide dissipation is mainly concentrated in the LS and the deep basin of the SCS. The tidal energetics in the LS is examined showing that the tidal energy input closely balances the tidal energy dissipation.

  6. Imaging Earth's Interior based on Spectral-Element and Adjoint Methods (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, J.; Zhu, H.; Bozdag, E.

    2013-12-01

    We use spectral-element and adjoint methods to iteratively improve 3D tomographic images of Earth's interior, ranging from global to continental to exploration scales. The spectral-element method, a high-order finite-element method with the advantage of a diagonal mass matrix, is used to accurately calculate three-component synthetic seismograms in a complex 3D Earth model. An adjoint method is used to numerically compute Frechét derivatives of a misfit function based on the interaction between the wavefield for a reference Earth model and a wavefield obtained by using time-reversed differences between data and synthetics at all receivers as simultaneous sources. In combination with gradient-based optimization methods, such as a preconditioned conjugate gradient or L-BSGF method, we are able to iteratively improve 3D images of Earth's interior and gradually minimize discrepancies between observed and simulated seismograms. Various misfit functions may be chosen to quantify these discrepancies, such as cross-correlation traveltime differences, frequency-dependent phase and amplitude anomalies as well as full-waveform differences. Various physical properties of the Earth are constrained based on this method, such as elastic wavespeeds, radial anisotropy, shear attenuation and impedance contrasts. We apply this method to study seismic inverse problems at various scales, from global- and continental-scale seismic tomography to exploration-scale full-waveform inversion.

  7. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Complex Aircraft Configurations via an Adjoint Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony; Farmer, James; Martinelli, Luigi; Saunders, David

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for complex aircraft configurations. Here control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which allows for a drastic reduction in computational costs over previous design methods (13, 12, 43, 38). In our earlier studies (19, 20, 22, 23, 39, 25, 40, 41, 42) it was shown that this method could be used to devise effective optimization procedures for airfoils, wings and wing-bodies subject to either analytic or arbitrary meshes. Design formulations for both potential flows and flows governed by the Euler equations have been demonstrated, showing that such methods can be devised for various governing equations (39, 25). In our most recent works (40, 42) the method was extended to treat wing-body configurations with a large number of mesh points, verifying that significant computational savings can be gained for practical design problems. In this paper the method is extended for the Euler equations to treat complete aircraft configurations via a new multiblock implementation. New elements include a multiblock-multigrid flow solver, a multiblock-multigrid adjoint solver, and a multiblock mesh perturbation scheme. Two design examples are presented in which the new method is used for the wing redesign of a transonic business jet.

  8. Magnetic Field Separation Around Planets Using an Adjoint-Method Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabert, Christian; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Heyner, Daniel; Othmer, Carsten

    The two spacecraft of the BepiColombo mission will reach planet Mercury in 2022. The magnetometers on-board these polar orbiting spacecraft will provide a detailed map of the magnetic field in Mercury's environment. Unfortunately, a separation of the magnetic field into internal and external parts using the classical Gauss-algorithm is not possible due to strong electric currents in the orbit region of the spacecraft. These currents are due to the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury's planetary magnetic field. We use an MHD code to simulate this interaction process. This requires a first choice of Mercury's planetary field which is used and modified until the simulation results fit to the actual measurements. This optimization process is carried out most efficiently using an adjoint-method. The adjoint-method is well known for its low computational cost in order to determine sensitivities required for the minimization. In a first step, the validity of our approach to separate magnetic field contributions into internal and external parts is demonstrated using synthetic generated data. Furthermore, we apply our approach to satellite measurements of the Earth's magnetic field. We can compare the results with the well known planetary field of the Earth to prove practical suitability.

  9. Analytical solution for the advection-dispersion transport equation in layered media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advection-dispersion transport equation with first-order decay was solved analytically for multi-layered media using the classic integral transform technique (CITT). The solution procedure used an associated non-self-adjoint advection-diffusion eigenvalue problem that had the same form and coef...

  10. Resolution of group velocity models obtained by adjoint inversion in the Czech Republic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentova, Lubica; Gallovic, Frantisek; Ruzek, Bohuslav; de la Puente, Josep

    2013-04-01

    We performed tomographic inversion of crosscorrelation traveltimes of group waves in the Bohemian massif. The traveltimes used for inversion come from ambient seismic noise measurements between pairs of stations filtered for several period ranges between 2-20s. The inverse problem was solved by the conjugate gradients, which were calculated using efficient adjoint method. Assuming that the propagation of group waves can be approximated by membrane waves for each period separately, the computations are reduced to 2D domain. The numerical calculations were carried out using adjoint version of SeisSol, which solves elastodynamic system using Discontinuous Galerkin method with arbitrary high order time derivatives (ADER-DG). The adjoint inversion is based on computation of so called sensitivity kernels for each data, which are then combined into Fréchet kernel of misfit gradient. Therefore, if using only the longest wavelength data i.e. the traveltimes of 20s and 16s group waves, structures of even shorter wavelengths can be obtained by the inversion. However, these smaller-scale structures are possibly more affected by data noise and thus require careful treatment. Note that in the classical tomography based on ray method, such structures are subdued by regularization. This leads to question on the influence of data noise on the obtained models. Several synthetic tests were carried out to reveal the effect of data errors on the resulting model. Firstly, we tested the level of data noise required to obtain artificial small scale structures. As a target model we constructed simple heterogenous model consisting of one very long wavelength structure. The synthetic traveltime data were modified using random shifts for several distributions with different variances. The method appears to be extremely sensitive even for relatively small level of noise. The other set of tests concentrated on the main feature of models obtained from the real data. All models inverted using

  11. Test Laboratory Facilities and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, located inside the boundaries of 40,000 acre Redstone Arsenal military reservation, has over 50 test facilities across 400+ acres, many inside an additional secure, fenced area. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate test facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength/dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

  12. An adjoint method for a high-order discretization of deforming domain conservation laws for optimization of flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahr, M. J.; Persson, P.-O.

    2016-12-01

    The fully discrete adjoint equations and the corresponding adjoint method are derived for a globally high-order accurate discretization of conservation laws on parametrized, deforming domains. The conservation law on the deforming domain is transformed into one on a fixed reference domain by the introduction of a time-dependent mapping that encapsulates the domain deformation and parametrization, resulting in an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian form of the governing equations. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method is used to discretize the transformed equation in space and a high-order diagonally implicit Runge-Kutta scheme is used for the temporal discretization. Quantities of interest that take the form of space-time integrals are discretized in a solver-consistent manner. The corresponding fully discrete adjoint method is used to compute exact gradients of quantities of interest along the manifold of solutions of the fully discrete conservation law. These quantities of interest and their gradients are used in the context of gradient-based PDE-constrained optimization. The adjoint method is used to solve two optimal shape and control problems governed by the isentropic, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The first optimization problem seeks the energetically optimal trajectory of a 2D airfoil given a required initial and final spatial position. The optimization solver, driven by gradients computed via the adjoint method, reduced the total energy required to complete the specified mission nearly an order of magnitude. The second optimization problem seeks the energetically optimal flapping motion and time-morphed geometry of a 2D airfoil given an equality constraint on the x-directed impulse generated on the airfoil. The optimization solver satisfied the impulse constraint to greater than 8 digits of accuracy and reduced the required energy between a factor of 2 and 10, depending on the value of the impulse constraint, as compared to the nominal configuration.

  13. Comparison of adjoint and nudging methods to initialise ice sheet model basal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosbeux, Cyrille; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Gagliardini, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Ice flow models are now routinely used to forecast the ice sheets' contribution to 21st century sea-level rise. For such short term simulations, the model response is greatly affected by the initial conditions. Data assimilation algorithms have been developed to invert for the friction of the ice on its bedrock using observed surface velocities. A drawback of these methods is that remaining uncertainties, especially in the bedrock elevation, lead to non-physical ice flux divergence anomalies resulting in undesirable transient effects. In this study, we compare two different assimilation algorithms based on adjoints and nudging to constrain both bedrock friction and elevation. Using synthetic twin experiments with realistic observation errors, we show that the two algorithms lead to similar performances in reconstructing both variables and allow the flux divergence anomalies to be significantly reduced.

  14. Self-adjoint Lyapunov variables, temporal ordering, and irreversible representations of Schroedinger evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Y.

    2010-02-15

    In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics time enters as a parameter in the Schroedinger equation. However, there are various situations where the need arises to view time as a dynamical variable. In this paper we consider the dynamical role of time through the construction of a Lyapunov variable - i.e., a self-adjoint quantum observable whose expectation value varies monotonically as time increases. It is shown, in a constructive way, that a certain class of models admits a Lyapunov variable and that the existence of a Lyapunov variable implies the existence of a transformation mapping the original quantum mechanical problem to an equivalent irreversible representation. In addition, it is proven that in the irreversible representation there exists a natural time ordering observable splitting the Hilbert space at each t>0 into past and future subspaces.

  15. Adjoint-Based Methodology for Time-Dependent Optimal Control (AMTOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail; Diskin, boris; Nishikawa, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    During the five years of this project, the AMTOC team developed an adjoint-based methodology for design and optimization of complex time-dependent flows, implemented AMTOC in a testbed environment, directly assisted in implementation of this methodology in the state-of-the-art NASA's unstructured CFD code FUN3D, and successfully demonstrated applications of this methodology to large-scale optimization of several supersonic and other aerodynamic systems, such as fighter jet, subsonic aircraft, rotorcraft, high-lift, wind-turbine, and flapping-wing configurations. In the course of this project, the AMTOC team has published 13 refereed journal articles, 21 refereed conference papers, and 2 NIA reports. The AMTOC team presented the results of this research at 36 international and national conferences, meeting and seminars, including International Conference on CFD, and numerous AIAA conferences and meetings. Selected publications that include the major results of the AMTOC project are enclosed in this report.

  16. Supersonic wing and wing-body shape optimization using an adjoint formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for wing and wing-body design of supersonic configurations. The work represents an extension of our earlier research in which control theory is used to devise a design procedure that significantly reduces the computational cost by employing an adjoint equation. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used toeviseransonic design methods for airfoils and wings in which the shape and the surrounding body-fitted mesh are both generated analytically, and the control is the mapping function. The method has also been implemented for both transonic potential flows and transonic flows governed by the Euler equations using an alternative formulation which employs numerically generated grids, so that it can treat more general configurations. Here results are presented for three-dimensional design cases subject to supersonic flows governed by the Euler equation.

  17. Comparison of Evolutionary (Genetic) Algorithm and Adjoint Methods for Multi-Objective Viscous Airfoil Optimizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, T. H.; Nemec, M.; Holst, T.; Zingg, D. W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comparison between an Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) and an Adjoint-Gradient (AG) Method applied to a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for airfoil design is presented. Both approaches use a common function evaluation code, the steady-state explicit part of the code,ARC2D. The parameterization of the design space is a common B-spline approach for an airfoil surface, which together with a common griding approach, restricts the AG and EA to the same design space. Results are presented for a class of viscous transonic airfoils in which the optimization tradeoff between drag minimization as one objective and lift maximization as another, produces the multi-objective design space. Comparisons are made for efficiency, accuracy and design consistency.

  18. Discrete Adjoint-Based Design for Unsteady Turbulent Flows On Dynamic Overset Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris

    2012-01-01

    A discrete adjoint-based design methodology for unsteady turbulent flows on three-dimensional dynamic overset unstructured grids is formulated, implemented, and verified. The methodology supports both compressible and incompressible flows and is amenable to massively parallel computing environments. The approach provides a general framework for performing highly efficient and discretely consistent sensitivity analysis for problems involving arbitrary combinations of overset unstructured grids which may be static, undergoing rigid or deforming motions, or any combination thereof. General parent-child motions are also accommodated, and the accuracy of the implementation is established using an independent verification based on a complex-variable approach. The methodology is used to demonstrate aerodynamic optimizations of a wind turbine geometry, a biologically-inspired flapping wing, and a complex helicopter configuration subject to trimming constraints. The objective function for each problem is successfully reduced and all specified constraints are satisfied.

  19. Transition probabilities for non self-adjoint Hamiltonians in infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bagarello, F.

    2015-11-15

    In a recent paper we have introduced several possible inequivalent descriptions of the dynamics and of the transition probabilities of a quantum system when its Hamiltonian is not self-adjoint. Our analysis was carried out in finite dimensional Hilbert spaces. This is useful, but quite restrictive since many physically relevant quantum systems live in infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces. In this paper we consider this situation, and we discuss some applications to well known models, introduced in the literature in recent years: the extended harmonic oscillator, the Swanson model and a generalized version of the Landau levels Hamiltonian. Not surprisingly we will find new interesting features not previously found in finite dimensional Hilbert spaces, useful for a deeper comprehension of this kind of physical systems.

  20. Widening Participation; Widening Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes that widening participation in higher education might distinctively be conceptualised beyond economically driven human capital outcomes, as a matter of widening capability. Specifically, the paper proposes forming the capability of students to become and to be "strong evaluators", able to make reflexive and informed…

  1. Testing and technical capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, R.W.; Dill, M.S.

    1984-05-01

    Capabilities of the following are outlined: state-of-the-art-services, measurement control and capabilities coordination, sampling and standard section, analytical technology section, environmental-industrial hygiene section, spectrochemical section, inorganic and production control section, instrumentation and control section, instrument technology, and mass spectrometry-isotopic section.

  2. XRCF Testing Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reily, Cary; Kegely, Jeff; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center's X-ray Calibration Facility has been recently modified to test Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) developmental mirrors at cryogenic temperatures (35 degrees Kelvin) while maintaining capability for performance testing of x-ray optics and detectors. The facility's current cryo-optical testing capability and potential modifications for future support of NGST will be presented.

  3. Metrology measurement capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Shroyer, K.

    1997-02-01

    Since 1958, the AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) mechanical; (2) environmental, gas, liquid; (3) electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (4) optical and radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of the suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the report.

  4. Towards adjoint-based inversion of time-dependent mantle convection with non-linear viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dunzhu; Gurnis, Michael; Stadler, Georg

    2017-01-01

    We develop and study an adjoint-based inversion method for the simultaneous recovery of initial temperature conditions and viscosity parameters in time-dependent mantle convection from the current mantle temperature and historic plate motion. Based on a realistic rheological model with temperature- and strain rate-dependent viscosity, we formulate the inversion as a PDE-constrained optimization problem. The objective functional includes the misfit of surface velocity (plate motion) history, the misfit of the current mantle temperature, and a regularization for the uncertain initial condition. The gradient of this functional with respect to the initial temperature and the uncertain viscosity parameters is computed by solving the adjoint of the mantle convection equations. This gradient is used in a preconditioned quasi-Newton minimization algorithm. We study the prospects and limitations of the inversion, as well as the computational performance of the method using two synthetic problems, a sinking cylinder and a realistic subduction model. The subduction model is characterized by the migration of a ridge toward a trench whereby both plate motions and subduction evolve. The results demonstrate: (1) for known viscosity parameters, the initial temperature can be well recovered, as in previous initial condition-only inversions where the effective viscosity was given; (2) for known initial temperature, viscosity parameters can be recovered accurately, despite the existence of trade-offs due to ill-conditioning; (3) for the joint inversion of initial condition and viscosity parameters, initial condition and effective viscosity can be reasonably recovered, but the high dimension of the parameter space and the resulting ill-posedness may limit recovery of viscosity parameters.

  5. Data assimilation for massive autonomous systems based on a second-order adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Shin-ichi; Nagao, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Akinori; Tsukada, Yuhki; Koyama, Toshiyuki; Kano, Masayuki; Inoue, Junya

    2016-10-01

    Data assimilation (DA) is a fundamental computational technique that integrates numerical simulation models and observation data on the basis of Bayesian statistics. Originally developed for meteorology, especially weather forecasting, DA is now an accepted technique in various scientific fields. One key issue that remains controversial is the implementation of DA in massive simulation models under the constraints of limited computation time and resources. In this paper, we propose an adjoint-based DA method for massive autonomous models that produces optimum estimates and their uncertainties within reasonable computation time and resource constraints. The uncertainties are given as several diagonal elements of an inverse Hessian matrix, which is the covariance matrix of a normal distribution that approximates the target posterior probability density function in the neighborhood of the optimum. Conventional algorithms for deriving the inverse Hessian matrix require O (C N2+N3) computations and O (N2) memory, where N is the number of degrees of freedom of a given autonomous system and C is the number of computations needed to simulate time series of suitable length. The proposed method using a second-order adjoint method allows us to directly evaluate the diagonal elements of the inverse Hessian matrix without computing all of its elements. This drastically reduces the number of computations to O (C ) and the amount of memory to O (N ) for each diagonal element. The proposed method is validated through numerical tests using a massive two-dimensional Kobayashi phase-field model. We confirm that the proposed method correctly reproduces the parameter and initial state assumed in advance, and successfully evaluates the uncertainty of the parameter. Such information regarding uncertainty is valuable, as it can be used to optimize the design of experiments.

  6. A New Method for Computing Three-Dimensional Capture Fraction in Heterogeneous Regional Systems using the MODFLOW Adjoint Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemo, T. M.; Ramarao, B.; Kelly, V. A.; Lavenue, M.

    2011-12-01

    Capture is a measure of the impact of groundwater pumping upon groundwater and surface water systems. The computation of capture through analytical or numerical methods has been the subject of articles in the literature for several decades (Bredehoeft et al., 1982). Most recently Leake et al. (2010) described a systematic way to produce capture maps in three-dimensional systems using a numerical perturbation approach in which capture from streams was computed using unit rate pumping at many locations within a MODFLOW model. The Leake et al. (2010) method advances the current state of computing capture. A limitation stems from the computational demand required by the perturbation approach wherein days or weeks of computational time might be required to obtain a robust measure of capture. In this paper, we present an efficient method to compute capture in three-dimensional systems based upon adjoint states. The efficiency of the adjoint method will enable uncertainty analysis to be conducted on capture calculations. The USGS and INTERA have collaborated to extend the MODFLOW Adjoint code (Clemo, 2007) to include stream-aquifer interaction and have applied it to one of the examples used in Leake et al. (2010), the San Pedro Basin MODFLOW model. With five layers and 140,800 grid blocks per layer, the San Pedro Basin model, provided an ideal example data set to compare the capture computed from the perturbation and the adjoint methods. The capture fraction map produced from the perturbation method for the San Pedro Basin model required significant computational time to compute and therefore the locations for the pumping wells were limited to 1530 locations in layer 4. The 1530 direct simulations of capture require approximately 76 CPU hours. Had capture been simulated in each grid block in each layer, as is done in the adjoint method, the CPU time would have been on the order of 4 years. The MODFLOW-Adjoint produced the capture fraction map of the San Pedro Basin model

  7. What can adjoint modelling tell about the response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to changes in basal sliding?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Jonathan; Rutt, Ian; Murray, Tavi; Utke, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Studying the future behaviour of the Greenland Ice Sheet is important considering the ice sheet has a sea-level equivalent of 7 metres and the rate of mass loss from it is increasing (Velicogna, 2009). Examining the modelled response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to changes in forcing parameters can give insight into how it will behave in the future. The response of the ice sheet to specific changes in forcing parameters is referred to as the sensitivity. Being able to obtain model sensitivities in as little computation time as possible would be useful for examining the future response of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Adjoint models allow sensitivities to be obtained more efficiently than the conventional way, when considering spatially varying parameters. Conventionally, such sensitivities are obtained by perturbing a parameter at every grid point in turn and calculating the sensitivity at every grid point. Adjoint sensitivities, though, are calculated in a single step. This reduces the computational cost when obtaining sensitivities over large model domains. The adjoint method also has the advantage that it gives the exact value of the model sensitivity, rather than a finite difference approximation to it. We present the adjoint of a finite difference, shallow ice, thermomechanical ice sheet model with basal sliding, applied to the Greenland Ice Sheet. This adjoint model is obtained using the OpenAD automatic differentiation tool (Utke, 2006), which is open source. The adjoint model is validated by comparing adjoint and forward model sensitivities over 100 years. This work builds on the work of Heimbach (2009). We use the adjoint model to examine the sensitivity of the model to changes in basal sliding. About half the mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet occurs from surface runoff and half from dynamic mass loss (Broeke, 2009). Melt-water from Greenland Ice Sheet supra-glacial lakes can percolate to the bed through moulins. The melt-water that reaches the bed can then

  8. ACCELERATING FUSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS MODELING BY AUTOMATIC COUPLING OF HYBRID MONTE CARLO/DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT ON CAD GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, Elliott D; Ibrahim, Ahmad M; Mosher, Scott W; Grove, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Detailed radiation transport calculations are necessary for many aspects of the design of fusion energy systems (FES) such as ensuring occupational safety, assessing the activation of system components for waste disposal, and maintaining cryogenic temperatures within superconducting magnets. Hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic techniques are necessary for this analysis because FES are large, heavily shielded, and contain streaming paths that can only be resolved with MC. The tremendous complexity of FES necessitates the use of CAD geometry for design and analysis. Previous ITER analysis has required the translation of CAD geometry to MCNP5 form in order to use the AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) for hybrid MC/deterministic transport. In this work, ADVANTG was modified to support CAD geometry, allowing hybrid (MC)/deterministic transport to be done automatically and eliminating the need for this translation step. This was done by adding a new ray tracing routine to ADVANTG for CAD geometries using the Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library. This new capability is demonstrated with a prompt dose rate calculation for an ITER computational benchmark problem using both the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method an the Forward Weighted (FW)-CADIS method. The variance reduction parameters produced by ADVANTG are shown to be the same using CAD geometry and standard MCNP5 geometry. Significant speedups were observed for both neutrons (as high as a factor of 7.1) and photons (as high as a factor of 59.6).

  9. KSC Technical Capabilities Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nufer, Brian; Bursian, Henry; Brown, Laurette L.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the website pages that review the technical capabilities that the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has for partnership opportunities. The purpose of this information is to make prospective customers aware of the capabilities and provide an opportunity to form relationships with the experts at KSC. The technical capabilities fall into these areas: (1) Ground Operations and Processing Services, (2) Design and Analysis Solutions, (3) Command and Control Systems / Services, (4) Materials and Processes, (5) Research and Technology Development and (6) Laboratories, Shops and Test Facilities.

  10. NESTLE: Few-group neutron diffusion equation solver utilizing the nodal expansion method for eigenvalue, adjoint, fixed-source steady-state and transient problems

    SciTech Connect

    Turinsky, P.J.; Al-Chalabi, R.M.K.; Engrand, P.; Sarsour, H.N.; Faure, F.X.; Guo, W.

    1994-06-01

    NESTLE is a FORTRAN77 code that solves the few-group neutron diffusion equation utilizing the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM). NESTLE can solve the eigenvalue (criticality); eigenvalue adjoint; external fixed-source steady-state; or external fixed-source. or eigenvalue initiated transient problems. The code name NESTLE originates from the multi-problem solution capability, abbreviating Nodal Eigenvalue, Steady-state, Transient, Le core Evaluator. The eigenvalue problem allows criticality searches to be completed, and the external fixed-source steady-state problem can search to achieve a specified power level. Transient problems model delayed neutrons via precursor groups. Several core properties can be input as time dependent. Two or four energy groups can be utilized, with all energy groups being thermal groups (i.e. upscatter exits) if desired. Core geometries modelled include Cartesian and Hexagonal. Three, two and one dimensional models can be utilized with various symmetries. The non-linear iterative strategy associated with the NEM method is employed. An advantage of the non-linear iterative strategy is that NSTLE can be utilized to solve either the nodal or Finite Difference Method representation of the few-group neutron diffusion equation.

  11. Engineering Capabilities and Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulos, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the engineering capabilities at Johnson Space Center, The presentation also reviews the partnerships that have resulted in successfully designed and developed projects that involved commercial and educational institutions.

  12. Remote Controlled Orbiter Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garske, Michael; delaTorre, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The Remote Control Orbiter (RCO) capability allows a Space Shuttle Orbiter to perform an unmanned re-entry and landing. This low-cost capability employs existing and newly added functions to perform key activities typically performed by flight crews and controllers during manned re-entries. During an RCO landing attempt, these functions are triggered by automation resident in the on-board computers or uplinked commands from flight controllers on the ground. In order to properly route certain commands to the appropriate hardware, an In-Flight Maintenance (IFM) cable was developed. Currently, the RCO capability is reserved for the scenario where a safe return of the crew from orbit may not be possible. The flight crew would remain in orbit and await a rescue mission. After the crew is rescued, the RCO capability would be used on the unmanned Orbiter in an attempt to salvage this national asset.

  13. Metrology measurement capability

    SciTech Connect

    Shroyer, K.

    1995-01-01

    During the past 36 years, the Kansas City Division`s (KCD) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; Electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (3) Optical and Radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. KCD Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 19 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the following pages.

  14. Metrology measurement capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shroyer, K.

    1995-01-01

    During the past 36 years, the Kansas City Division's (KCD) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; Electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (3) Optical and Radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. KCD Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 19 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the following pages.

  15. Metrology measurement capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, L.M.

    1997-06-01

    Since 1958, the AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: mechanical; environmental, gas, liquid; electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/microwave); and optical and radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. FM and T Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Department of energy`s Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 16 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of the suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in this report.

  16. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of Orbital Mechanics: Application to Computations of Observables' Partials with Respect to Harmonics of the Planetary Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustinov, Eugene A.; Sunseri, Richard F.

    2005-01-01

    An approach is presented to the inversion of gravity fields based on evaluation of partials of observables with respect to gravity harmonics using the solution of adjoint problem of orbital dynamics of the spacecraft. Corresponding adjoint operator is derived directly from the linear operator of the linearized forward problem of orbital dynamics. The resulting adjoint problem is similar to the forward problem and can be solved by the same methods. For given highest degree N of gravity harmonics desired, this method involves integration of N adjoint solutions as compared to integration of N2 partials of the forward solution with respect to gravity harmonics in the conventional approach. Thus, for higher resolution gravity models, this approach becomes increasingly more effective in terms of computer resources as compared to the approach based on the solution of the forward problem of orbital dynamics.

  17. A new least-squares transport equation compatible with voids

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J. B.; Morel, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    We define a new least-squares transport equation that is applicable in voids, can be solved using source iteration with diffusion-synthetic acceleration, and requires only the solution of an independent set of second-order self-adjoint equations for each direction during each source iteration. We derive the equation, discretize it using the S{sub n} method in conjunction with a linear-continuous finite-element method in space, and computationally demonstrate various of its properties. (authors)

  18. Pathways of the North Pacific Intermediate Water identified through the tangent linear and adjoint models of an ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Y.; Nakano, T.; Usui, N.; Matsumoto, S.; Tsujino, H.; Kamachi, M.

    2014-12-01

    This study develops a strategy for tracing a target water mass, and applies it to analyzing the pathway of the North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) from the subarctic gyre to the northwestern part of the subtropical gyre south of Japan in a simulation of an ocean general circulation model. This strategy estimates the pathway of the water mass that travels from an origin to a destination area during a specific period using a conservation property concerning tangent linear and adjoint models. In our analysis, a large fraction of the low salinity origin water mass of NPIW initially comes from the Okhotsk or Bering Sea, flows through the southeastern side of the Kuril Islands, and is advected to the Mixed Water Region (MWR) by the Oyashio current. It then enters the Kuroshio Extension (KE) at the first KE ridge, and is advected eastward by the KE current. However, it deviates southward from the KE axis around 158°E over the Shatsky Rise, or around 170ºE on the western side of the Emperor Seamount Chain, and enters the subtropical gyre. It is finally transported westward by the recirculation flow. This pathway corresponds well to the shortcut route of NPIW from MWR to the region south of Japan inferred from analysis of the long-term freshening trend of NPIW observation.

  19. Pathways of the North Pacific Intermediate Water identified through the tangent linear and adjoint models of an ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yosuke; Nakano, Toshiya; Usui, Norihisa; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Kamachi, Masafumi

    2013-04-01

    This study develops a strategy for tracing a target water mass, and applies it to analyzing the pathway of the North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) from the subarctic gyre to the northwestern part of the subtropical gyre south of Japan in a simulation of an ocean general circulation model. This strategy estimates the pathway of the water mass that travels from an origin to a destination area during a specific period using a conservation property concerning tangent linear and adjoint models. In our analysis, a large fraction of the low salinity origin water mass of NPIW initially comes from the Okhotsk or Bering Sea, flows through the southeastern side of the Kuril Islands, and is advected to the Mixed Water Region (MWR) by the Oyashio current. It then enters the Kuroshio Extension (KE) at the first KE ridge, and is advected eastward by the KE current. However, it deviates southward from the KE axis around 158°E over the Shatsky Rise, or around 170°E on the western side of the Emperor Seamount Chain, and enters the subtropical gyre. It is finally transported westward by the recirculation flow. This pathway corresponds well to the shortcut route of NPIW from MWR to the region south of Japan inferred from analysis of the long-term freshening trend of NPIW observation. Copyright 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Space Logistics: Launch Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furnas, Randall B.

    1989-01-01

    The current maximum launch capability for the United States are shown. The predicted Earth-to-orbit requirements for the United States are presented. Contrasting the two indicates the strong National need for a major increase in Earth-to-orbit lift capability. Approximate weights for planned payloads are shown. NASA is studying the following options to meet the need for a new heavy-lift capability by mid to late 1990's: (1) Shuttle-C for near term (include growth versions); and (2) the Advanced Lauching System (ALS) for the long term. The current baseline two-engine Shuttle-C has a 15 x 82 ft payload bay and an expected lift capability of 82,000 lb to Low Earth Orbit. Several options are being considered which have expanded diameter payload bays. A three-engine Shuttle-C with an expected lift of 145,000 lb to LEO is being evaluated as well. The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a potential joint development between the Air Force and NASA. This program is focused toward long-term launch requirements, specifically beyond the year 2000. The basic approach is to develop a family of vehicles with the same high reliability as the Shuttle system, yet offering a much greater lift capability at a greatly reduced cost (per pound of payload). The ALS unmanned family of vehicles will provide a low end lift capability equivalent to Titan IV, and a high end lift capability greater than the Soviet Energia if requirements for such a high-end vehicle are defined.In conclusion, the planning of the next generation space telescope should not be constrained to the current launch vehicles. New vehicle designs will be driven by the needs of anticipated heavy users.

  1. Variational data assimilation with a semi-Lagrangian semi-implicit global shallow-water equation model and its adjoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y.; Navon, I. M.; Courtier, P.; Gauthier, P.

    1993-01-01

    An adjoint model is developed for variational data assimilation using the 2D semi-Lagrangian semi-implicit (SLSI) shallow-water equation global model of Bates et al. with special attention being paid to the linearization of the interpolation routines. It is demonstrated that with larger time steps the limit of the validity of the tangent linear model will be curtailed due to the interpolations, especially in regions where sharp gradients in the interpolated variables coupled with strong advective wind occur, a synoptic situation common in the high latitudes. This effect is particularly evident near the pole in the Northern Hemisphere during the winter season. Variational data assimilation experiments of 'identical twin' type with observations available only at the end of the assimilation period perform well with this adjoint model. It is confirmed that the computational efficiency of the semi-Lagrangian scheme is preserved during the minimization process, related to the variational data assimilation procedure.

  2. Coupled forward-adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of spatial-angular light fields to determine optical sensitivity in turbid media

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Adam R.; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We present a coupled forward-adjoint Monte Carlo (cFAMC) method to determine the spatially resolved sensitivity distributions produced by optical interrogation of three-dimensional (3-D) tissue volumes. We develop a general computational framework that computes the spatial and angular distributions of the forward-adjoint light fields to provide accurate computations in mesoscopic tissue volumes. We provide full computational details of the cFAMC method and provide results for low- and high-scattering tissues probed using a single pair of optical fibers. We examine the effects of source-detector separation and orientation on the sensitivity distributions and consider how the degree of angular discretization used in the 3-D tissue model impacts the accuracy of the resulting absorption sensitivity profiles. We discuss the value of such computations for optical imaging and the design of optical measurements. PMID:24972356

  3. Adjoint-Based Design of Rotors using the Navier-Stokes Equations in a Noninertial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Jones, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Optimization of rotorcraft flowfields using an adjoint method generally requires a time-dependent implementation of the equations. The current study examines an intermediate approach in which a subset of rotor flowfields are cast as steady problems in a noninertial reference frame. This technique permits the use of an existing steady-state adjoint formulation with minor modifications to perform sensitivity analyses. The formulation is valid for isolated rigid rotors in hover or where the freestream velocity is aligned with the axis of rotation. Discrete consistency of the implementation is demonstrated using comparisons with a complex-variable technique, and a number of single- and multi-point optimizations for the rotorcraft figure of merit function are shown for varying blade collective angles. Design trends are shown to remain consistent as the grid is refined.

  4. Adjoint-Based Design of Rotors Using the Navier-Stokes Equations in a Noninertial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Jones, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Optimization of rotorcraft flowfields using an adjoint method generally requires a time-dependent implementation of the equations. The current study examines an intermediate approach in which a subset of rotor flowfields are cast as steady problems in a noninertial reference frame. This technique permits the use of an existing steady-state adjoint formulation with minor modifications to perform sensitivity analyses. The formulation is valid for isolated rigid rotors in hover or where the freestream velocity is aligned with the axis of rotation. Discrete consistency of the implementation is demonstrated by using comparisons with a complex-variable technique, and a number of single- and multipoint optimizations for the rotorcraft figure of merit function are shown for varying blade collective angles. Design trends are shown to remain consistent as the grid is refined.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of a model of CO{sub 2} exchange in tundra ecosystems by the adjoint method

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroeck, C.; Louis, J.F.

    1995-02-20

    A model of net primary production (NPP), decomposition, and nitrogen cycling in tundra ecosystems has been developed. The adjoint technique is used to study the sensitivity of the computed annual net CO{sub 2} flux to perturbations in initial conditions, climatic inputs, and model`s main parameters describing current seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange in wet sedge tundra at Barrow, Alaska. The results show that net CO{sub 2} flux is more sensitive to decomposition parameters than to NPP parameters. This underlines the fact that in nutrient-limited ecosystems, decomposition drives net CO{sub 2} exchange by controlling mineralization of main nutrients. The results also indicate that the short-term (1 year) response of wet sedge tundra to CO{sub 2}-induced warming is a significant increase in CO{sub 2} emission, creating a positive feedback to atmospheric CO{sub 2} accumulation. However, a cloudiness increase during the same year can severely alter this response and lead to either a slight decrease or a strong increase in emitted CO{sub 2}, depending on its exact timing. These results demonstrate that the adjoint method is well suited to study systems encountering regime changes, as a single run of the adjoint model provides sensitivities of the net CO{sub 2} flux to perturbations in all parameters and variables at any time of the year. Moreover, it is shown that large errors due to the presence of thresholds can be avoided by first delimiting the range of applicability of the adjoint results. 38 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Assessing the Impact of Advanced Satellite Observations in the NASA GEOS-5 Forecast System Using the Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelaro, Ron; Liu, Emily; Sienkiewicz, Meta

    2011-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. In this talk, we present results from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. The tool has been running in various off-line configurations for some time, and is scheduled to run as a regular part of the real-time forecast suite beginning in autumn 20 I O. We focus on the impacts of the newest components of the satellite observing system, including AIRS, IASI and GPS. For AIRS and IASI, it is shown that the vast majority of the channels assimilated have systematic positive impacts (of varying magnitudes), although some channels degrade the forecast. Of the latter, most are moisture-sensitive or near-surface channels. The impact of GPS observations in the southern hemisphere is found to be a considerable overall benefit to the system. In addition, the spatial variability of observation impacts reveals coherent patterns of positive and negative impacts that may point to deficiencies in the use of certain observations over, for example, specific surface types. When performed in conjunction with selected observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies appears to pose a major challenge for optimizing the use of the current observational network and

  7. Slope tomography based on eikonal solvers and the adjoint-state method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, B.; Operto, S.; Ribodetti, A.; Virieux, J.

    2017-03-01

    Velocity macro-model building is a crucial step in the seismic imaging workflow as it provides the necessary background model for migration or full waveform inversion. In this study, we present a new formulation of stereotomography that can handle more efficiently long-offset acquisition, complex geological structures and large-scale datasets. Stereotomography is a slope tomographic method based upon a semi-automatic picking of local coherent events. Each local coherent event, characterised by its two-way traveltime and two slopes in common-shot and common-receiver gathers, is tied to a scatterer or a reflector segment in the subsurface. Ray tracing provides a natural forward engine to compute traveltime and slopes but can suffer from non-uniform ray sampling in presence of complex media and long-offset acquisitions. Moreover, most implementations of stereotomography explicitly build a sensitivity matrix, leading to the resolution of large systems of linear equations, which can be cumbersome when large-scale datasets are considered. Overcoming these issues comes with a new matrix-free formulation of stereotomography: a factored eikonal solver based on the fast sweeping method to compute first-arrival traveltimes and an adjoint-state formulation to compute the gradient of the misfit function. By solving eikonal equation from sources and receivers, we make the computational cost proportional to the number of sources and receivers while it is independent of picked events density in each shot and receiver gather. The model space involves the subsurface velocities and the scatterer coordinates, while the dip of the reflector segments are implicitly represented by the spatial support of the adjoint sources and are updated through the joint localization of nearby scatterers. We present an application on the complex Marmousi model for a towed-streamer acquisition and a realistic distribution of local events. We show that the estimated model, built without any prior

  8. Adjoint tomography of crust and upper-mantle structure beneath Continental China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Niu, F.; Liu, Q.; Tromp, J.

    2013-12-01

    Four years of regional earthquake recordings from 1,869 seismic stations are used for high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging of the crust and upper-mantle structure beneath Continental China. This unprecedented high-density dataset is comprised of seismograms recorded by the China Earthquake Administration Array (CEArray), NorthEast China Extended SeiSmic Array (NECESSArray), INDEPTH-IV Array, F-net and other global and regional seismic networks, and involves 1,326,384 frequency-dependent phase measurements. Adjoint tomography is applied to this unprecedented dataset, aiming to resolve detailed 3D maps of compressional and shear wavespeeds, and radial anisotropy. Contrary to traditional ray-theory based tomography, adjoint tomography takes into account full 3D wave propagation effects and off-ray-path sensitivity. In our implementation, it utilizes a spectral-element method for precise wave propagation simulations. The tomographic method starts with a 3D initial model that combines smooth radially anisotropic mantle model S362ANI and 3D crustal model Crust2.0. Traveltime and amplitude misfits are minimized iteratively based on a conjugate gradient method, harnessing 3D finite-frequency kernels computed for each updated 3D model. After 17 iterations, our inversion reveals strong correlations of 3D wavespeed heterogeneities in the crust and upper mantle with surface tectonic units, such as the Himalaya Block, the Tibetan Plateau, the Tarim Basin, the Ordos Block, and the South China Block. Narrow slab features emerge from the smooth initial model above the transition zone beneath the Japan, Ryukyu, Philippine, Izu-Bonin, Mariana and Andaman arcs. 3D wavespeed variations appear comparable to or much sharper than in high-frequency P-and S-wave models from previous studies. Moreover our results include new information, such as 3D variations of radial anisotropy and the Vp/Vs ratio, which are expected to shed new light to the composition, thermal state, flow

  9. Adjoint-based computation of U.S. nationwide ozone exposure isopleths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, Akshay; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2016-05-01

    Population exposure to daily maximum ozone is associated with an increased risk of premature mortality, and efforts to mitigate these impacts involve reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We quantify the dependence of U.S. national exposure to annually averaged daily maximum ozone on ambient VOC and NOx concentrations through ozone exposure isopleths, developed using emissions sensitivities from the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem air quality model for 2006. We develop exposure isopleths for all locations within the contiguous US and derive metrics based on the isopleths that quantify the impact of emissions on national ozone exposure. This work is the first to create ozone exposure isopleths using adjoint sensitivities and at a large scale. We find that across the US, 29% of locations experience VOC-limited conditions (where increased NOx emissions lower ozone) during 51% of the year on average. VOC-limited conditions are approximately evenly distributed diurnally and occur more frequently during the fall and winter months (67% of the time) than in the spring and summer (37% of the time). The VOC/NOx ratio of the ridge line on the isopleth diagram (denoting a local maximum in ozone exposure with respect to NOx concentrations) is 9.2 ppbC/ppb on average across grid cells that experience VOC-limited conditions and 7.9, 10.1 and 6.7 ppbC/ppb at the three most populous US cities of New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, respectively. Emissions that are ozone exposure-neutral during VOC-limited exposure conditions result in VOC/NOx concentration ratios of 0.63, 1.61 and 0.72 ppbC/ppb at each of the three US cities respectively, and between 0.01 and 1.91 ppbC/ppb at other locations. The sensitivity of national ozone exposure to NOx and VOC emissions is found to be highest near major cities in the US. Together, this information can be used to assess the effectiveness of NOx and VOC emission reductions on mitigating ozone exposure in the

  10. Space Launch Initiative: New Capabilities - New Horizons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel; Smith, Dennis E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) with new capabilities and new horizons. The topics include: 1) Integrated Space Transportation Plan; 2) SLI: The Work of a Nation; 3) SLI Goals and Status; 4) Composites and Materials; and 5) SLI and DOD/USAF Collaboration. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  11. Curvature theory for point-path and plane-envelope in spherical kinematics by new adjoint approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Delun

    2014-11-01

    Planar kinematics has been studied systematically based on centrodes, however axodes are underutilized to set up the curvature theories in spherical and spatial kinematics. Through a spherical adjoint approach, an axode-based theoretical system of spherical kinematics is established. The spherical motion is re-described by the adjoint approach and vector equation of spherical instant center is concisely derived. The moving and fixed axodes for spherical motion are mapped onto a unit sphere to obtain spherical centrodes, whose kinematic invariants totally reflect the intrinsic property of spherical motion. Based on the spherical centrodes, the curvature theories for a point and a plane of a rigid body in spherical motion are revealed by spherical fixed point and plane conditions. The Euler-Savary analogue for point-path is presented. Tracing points with higher order curvature features are located in the moving body by means of algebraic equations. For plane-envelope, the construction parameters are obtained. The osculating conditions for plane-envelope and circular cylindrical surface or circular conical surface are given. A spherical four-bar linkage is taken as an example to demonstrate the spherical adjoint approach and the curvature theories. The research proposes systematic spherical curvature theories with the axode as logical starting-point, and sets up a bridge from the centrode-based planar kinematics to the axode-based spatial kinematics.

  12. Development of a four-dimensional variational analysis system using the adjoint method at GLA. I - Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.; Chang, Lang-Ping

    1992-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of data assimilation have pointed to variational analysis (essentially least-squares fitting of a model solution to observed data) using the adjoint method as a new direction that holds the potential of major improvements over the current optimal interpolation method. This paper describes the initial effort in the development of a 4D variational analysis system. Although the development is based on the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres General Circulation Model (GCM), the methods and procedures described in this paper can be applied to any model. The adjoint code that computes the gradients needed in the analysis can be written directly from the GCM code. An easy error-detection technique was devised in the construction of the adjoint model. Also, a method of determining the weights and the preconditioning scales for the cases where model-generated data, which are error free, are used as observation is proposed. Two test experiments show that the dynamics part of the system has been successfully completed.

  13. Goal-oriented space-time adaptivity for transient dynamics using a modal description of the adjoint solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdugo, Francesc; Parés, Núria; Díez, Pedro

    2014-08-01

    This article presents a space-time adaptive strategy for transient elastodynamics. The method aims at computing an optimal space-time discretization such that the computed solution has an error in the quantity of interest below a user-defined tolerance. The methodology is based on a goal-oriented error estimate that requires accounting for an auxiliary adjoint problem. The major novelty of this paper is using modal analysis to obtain a proper approximation of the adjoint solution. The idea of using a modal-based description was introduced in a previous work for error estimation purposes. Here this approach is used for the first time in the context of adaptivity. With respect to the standard direct time-integration methods, the modal solution of the adjoint problem is highly competitive in terms of computational effort and memory requirements. The performance of the proposed strategy is tested in two numerical examples. The two examples are selected to be representative of different wave propagation phenomena, one being a 2D bulky continuum and the second a 2D domain representing a structural frame.

  14. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Glen E. Gronniger

    2007-10-02

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 13.2, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1. FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/Standards/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized. The Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major fields of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; (3) Electrical (DC, AC, RF/Microwave); and (4) Optical and Radiation. Metrology Engineering provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement in the fields listed above. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. Evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys.

  15. Exploration Medical Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David; Wu, Jimmy; Barsten, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember. This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this goal and our current areas of interest. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to identify medical conditions of concern during exploration missions. The list was derived from space flight medical incidents, the shuttle medical checklist, the International Space Station medical checklist, and expert opinion. The conditions on the list were prioritized according to mission type by a panel comprised of flight surgeons, physician astronauts, engineers, and scientists. From the prioritized list, the ExMC element determined the capabilities needed to address the medical conditions of concern. Where such capabilities were not currently available, a gap was identified. The element s research plan outlines these gaps and the tasks identified to achieve the desired capabilities for exploration missions. This poster is being presented to inform the audience of the gaps and tasks being investigated by ExMC and to encourage discussions of shared interests and possible future collaborations.

  16. Capitalizing on capabilities.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Dave; Smallwood, Norm

    2004-06-01

    By making the most of organizational capabilities--employees' collective skills and fields of expertise--you can dramatically improve your company's market value. Although there is no magic list of proficiencies that every organization needs in order to succeed, the authors identify 11 intangible assets that well-managed companies tend to have: talent, speed, shared mind-set and coherent brand identity, accountability, collaboration, learning, leadership, customer connectivity, strategic unity, innovation, and efficiency. Such companies typically excel in only three of these capabilities while maintaining industry parity in the other areas. Organizations that fall below the norm in any of the 11 are likely candidates for dysfunction and competitive disadvantage. So you can determine how your company fares in these categories (or others, if the generic list doesn't suit your needs), the authors explain how to conduct a "capabilities audit," describing in particular the experiences and findings of two companies that recently performed such audits. In addition to highlighting which intangible assets are most important given the organization's history and strategy, this exercise will gauge how well your company delivers on its capabilities and will guide you in developing an action plan for improvement. A capabilities audit can work for an entire organization, a business unit, or a region--indeed, for any part of a company that has a strategy to generate financial or customer-related results. It enables executives to assess overall company strengths and weaknesses, senior leaders to define strategy, midlevel managers to execute strategy, and frontline leaders to achieve tactical results. In short, it helps turn intangible assets into concrete strengths.

  17. The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; James, Michael R.; Hendricks, John S.; Goorley, John T.

    2012-06-19

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

  18. The new MCNP6 depletion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, M. L.; James, M. R.; Hendricks, J. S.; Goorley, J. T.

    2012-07-01

    The first MCNP based in-line Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology. (authors)

  19. Simulation of atmospheric N2O with GEOS-Chem and its adjoint: evaluation of observational constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Bousserez, N.; Henze, D. K.; Chaliyakunnel, S.; Griffis, T. J.; Luan, Y.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Prinn, R. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Weiss, R. F.; Dutton, G. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R.; Steele, L. P.; Kort, E. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Umezawa, T.

    2015-10-01

    We describe a new 4D-Var inversion framework for nitrous oxide (N2O) based on the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint, and apply it in a series of observing system simulation experiments to assess how well N2O sources and sinks can be constrained by the current global observing network. The employed measurement ensemble includes approximately weekly and quasi-continuous N2O measurements (hourly averages used) from several long-term monitoring networks, N2O measurements collected from discrete air samples onboard a commercial aircraft (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container; CARIBIC), and quasi-continuous measurements from the airborne HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) campaigns. For a 2-year inversion, we find that the surface and HIPPO observations can accurately resolve a uniform bias in emissions during the first year; CARIBIC data provide a somewhat weaker constraint. Variable emission errors are much more difficult to resolve given the long lifetime of N2O, and major parts of the world lack significant constraints on the seasonal cycle of fluxes. Current observations can largely correct a global bias in the stratospheric sink of N2O if emissions are known, but do not provide information on the temporal and spatial distribution of the sink. However, for the more realistic scenario where source and sink are both uncertain, we find that simultaneously optimizing both would require unrealistically small errors in model transport. Regardless, a bias in the magnitude of the N2O sink would not affect the a posteriori N2O emissions for the 2-year timescale used here, given realistic initial conditions, due to the timescale required for stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE). The same does not apply to model errors in the rate of STE itself, which we show exerts a larger influence on the tropospheric burden of N2O than does the chemical loss rate over short (< 3 year) timescales. We use a

  20. Simulation of atmospheric N2O with GEOS-Chem and its adjoint: evaluation of observational constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Bousserez, N.; Henze, D. K.; Chaliyakunnel, S.; Griffis, T. J.; Luan, Y.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Prinn, R. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Weiss, R. F.; Dutton, G. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R.; Steele, L. P.; Kort, E. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Umezawa, T.

    2015-07-01

    We describe a new 4D-Var inversion framework for N2O based on the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint, and apply this framework in a series of observing system simulation experiments to assess how well N2O sources and sinks can be constrained by the current global observing network. The employed measurement ensemble includes approximately weekly and quasi-continuous N2O measurements (hourly averages used) from several long-term monitoring networks, N2O measurements collected from discrete air samples aboard a commercial aircraft (CARIBIC), and quasi-continuous measurements from an airborne pole-to-pole sampling campaign (HIPPO). For a two-year inversion, we find that the surface and HIPPO observations can accurately resolve a uniform bias in emissions during the first year; CARIBIC data provide a somewhat weaker constraint. Variable emission errors are much more difficult to resolve given the long lifetime of N2O, and major parts of the world lack significant constraints on the seasonal cycle of fluxes. Current observations can largely correct a global bias in the stratospheric sink of N2O if emissions are known, but do not provide information on the temporal and spatial distribution of the sink. However, for the more realistic scenario where source and sink are both uncertain, we find that simultaneously optimizing both would require unrealistically small errors in model transport. Regardless, a bias in the magnitude of the N2O sink would not affect the a posteriori N2O emissions for the two-year timescale used here, given realistic initial conditions, due to the timescale required for stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE). The same does not apply to model errors in the rate of STE itself, which we show exerts a larger influence on the tropospheric burden of N2O than does the chemical loss rate over short (< 3 year) timescales. We use a stochastic estimate of the inverse Hessian for the inversion to evaluate the spatial resolution of emission

  1. Adjoint-Based, Three-Dimensional Error Prediction and Grid Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    Engineering computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and design applications focus on output functions (e.g., lift, drag). Errors in these output functions are generally unknown and conservatively accurate solutions may be computed. Computable error estimates can offer the possibility to minimize computational work for a prescribed error tolerance. Such an estimate can be computed by solving the flow equations and the linear adjoint problem for the functional of interest. The computational mesh can be modified to minimize the uncertainty of a computed error estimate. This robust mesh-adaptation procedure automatically terminates when the simulation is within a user specified error tolerance. This procedure for estimating and adapting to error in a functional is demonstrated for three-dimensional Euler problems. An adaptive mesh procedure that links to a Computer Aided Design (CAD) surface representation is demonstrated for wing, wing-body, and extruded high lift airfoil configurations. The error estimation and adaptation procedure yielded corrected functions that are as accurate as functions calculated on uniformly refined grids with ten times as many grid points.

  2. Geothermal reservoir monitoring based upon spectral-element and adjoint methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, C.; Templeton, D. C.; Harris, D.; Mellors, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Induced seismicity associated with CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and enhanced geothermal systems is triggered by fracturing during fluid injection. These events range from magnitude -1 (microseismicity) up to 3.5, for induced seismicity on pre-existing faults. In our approach, we are using seismic data collected at the Salton Sea geothermal field, to improve the current structural model (SCEC CVM4.0 including a 10m resolution topography) and to invert for the moment tensor and source location of the microseismic events. The key here is to refine the velocity model to then precisely invert for the location and mechanism (tensile or shear) of fracture openings. This information is crucial for geothermal reservoir assessment, especially in an unconventional setting where hydrofracturing is used to enhance productivity. The location of pre-existing and formed fractures as well as their type of openings are important elements for strategic decisions. Numerical simulations are performed using a spectral-element method, which contrary to finite-element methods (FEM), uses high degree Lagrange polynomials, allowing the technique to not only handle complex geometries, like the FEM, but also to retain the strength of exponential convergence and accuracy due to the use of high degree polynomials. Finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, used in the non-linear iterative inversions, are calculated based on an adjoint method.

  3. Adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of fusion product activation probe experiment in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Äkäslompolo, S.; Bonheure, G.; Tardini, G.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-10-01

    The activation probe is a robust tool to measure flux of fusion products from a magnetically confined plasma. A carefully chosen solid sample is exposed to the flux, and the impinging ions transmute the material making it radioactive. Ultra-low level gamma-ray spectroscopy is used post mortem to measure the activity and, thus, the number of fusion products. This contribution presents the numerical analysis of the first measurement in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, which was also the first experiment to measure a single discharge. The ASCOT suite of codes was used to perform adjoint/reverse Monte Carlo calculations of the fusion products. The analysis facilitates, for the first time, a comparison of numerical and experimental values for absolutely calibrated flux. The results agree to within a factor of about two, which can be considered a quite good result considering the fact that all features of the plasma cannot be accounted in the simulations.Also an alternative to the present probe orientation was studied. The results suggest that a better optimized orientation could measure the flux from a significantly larger part of the plasma. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  4. Automated divertor target design by adjoint shape sensitivity analysis and a one-shot method

    SciTech Connect

    Dekeyser, W.; Reiter, D.; Baelmans, M.

    2014-12-01

    As magnetic confinement fusion progresses towards the development of first reactor-scale devices, computational tokamak divertor design is a topic of high priority. Presently, edge plasma codes are used in a forward approach, where magnetic field and divertor geometry are manually adjusted to meet design requirements. Due to the complex edge plasma flows and large number of design variables, this method is computationally very demanding. On the other hand, efficient optimization-based design strategies have been developed in computational aerodynamics and fluid mechanics. Such an optimization approach to divertor target shape design is elaborated in the present paper. A general formulation of the design problems is given, and conditions characterizing the optimal designs are formulated. Using a continuous adjoint framework, design sensitivities can be computed at a cost of only two edge plasma simulations, independent of the number of design variables. Furthermore, by using a one-shot method the entire optimization problem can be solved at an equivalent cost of only a few forward simulations. The methodology is applied to target shape design for uniform power load, in simplified edge plasma geometry.

  5. Improving NO(x) cap-and-trade system with adjoint-based emission exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, S Morteza; Hakami, Amir; Schott, Stephan

    2012-11-06

    Cap-and-trade programs have proven to be effective instruments for achieving environmental goals while incurring minimum cost. The nature of the pollutant, however, affects the design of these programs. NO(x), an ozone precursor, is a nonuniformly mixed pollutant with a short atmospheric lifetime. NO(x) cap-and-trade programs in the U.S. are successful in reducing total NO(x) emissions but may result in suboptimal environmental performance because location-specific ozone formation potentials are neglected. In this paper, the current NO(x) cap-and-trade system is contrasted to a hypothetical NO(x) trading policy with sensitivity-based exchange rates. Location-specific exchange rates, calculated through adjoint sensitivity analysis, are combined with constrained optimization for prediction of NO(x) emissions trading behavior and post-trade ozone concentrations. The current and proposed policies are examined in a case study for 218 coal-fired power plants that participated in the NO(x) Budget Trading Program in 2007. We find that better environmental performance at negligibly higher system-wide abatement cost can be achieved through inclusion of emission exchange rates. Exposure-based exchange rates result in better environmental performance than those based on concentrations.

  6. Multi-point Adjoint-Based Design of Tilt-Rotors in a Noninertial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William T.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Acree, Cecil W.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of tilt-rotor systems requires the consideration of performance at multiple design points. In the current study, an adjoint-based optimization of a tilt-rotor blade is considered. The optimization seeks to simultaneously maximize the rotorcraft figure of merit in hover and the propulsive efficiency in airplane-mode for a tilt-rotor system. The design is subject to minimum thrust constraints imposed at each design point. The rotor flowfields at each design point are cast as steady-state problems in a noninertial reference frame. Geometric design variables used in the study to control blade shape include: thickness, camber, twist, and taper represented by as many as 123 separate design variables. Performance weighting of each operational mode is considered in the formulation of the composite objective function, and a build up of increasing geometric degrees of freedom is used to isolate the impact of selected design variables. In all cases considered, the resulting designs successfully increase both the hover figure of merit and the airplane-mode propulsive efficiency for a rotor designed with classical techniques.

  7. Muon g -2 in gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking models with adjoint messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Ün, Cem Salih

    2017-02-01

    We explored the sparticle mass spectrum in light of the muon g -2 anomaly and the little hierarchy problem in a class of the gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking model. Here, the messenger fields transform in the adjoint representation of the Standard Model gauge symmetry. To avoid unacceptably light right-handed slepton masses, the Standard Model is supplemented by the additional U (1 )B-L gauge symmetry. A nonzero U (1 )B-L D term makes the right-handed slepton masses compatible with the current experimental bounds. We show that in the framework of Λ3<0 and μ <0 the muon g -2 anomaly and the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson mass can be simultaneously accommodated. The slepton masses in this case are predicted to lie in the few hundred GeV range, which can be tested at the LHC. Despite the heavy colored sparticle spectrum, the little hierarchy problem in this model can be ameliorated, and the electroweak fine-tuning parameter can be as low as 10 or so.

  8. An Efficient Radial Basis Function Mesh Deformation Scheme within an Adjoint-Based Aerodynamic Optimization Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Vincent

    Mesh deformation schemes play an important role in numerical aerodynamic optimization. As the aerodynamic shape changes, the computational mesh must adapt to conform to the deformed geometry. In this work, an extension to an existing fast and robust Radial Basis Function (RBF) mesh movement scheme is presented. Using a reduced set of surface points to define the mesh deformation increases the efficiency of the RBF method; however, at the cost of introducing errors into the parameterization by not recovering the exact displacement of all surface points. A secondary mesh movement is implemented, within an adjoint-based optimization framework, to eliminate these errors. The proposed scheme is tested within a 3D Euler flow by reducing the pressure drag while maintaining lift of a wing-body configured Boeing-747 and an Onera-M6 wing. As well, an inverse pressure design is executed on the Onera-M6 wing and an inverse span loading case is presented for a wing-body configured DLR-F6 aircraft.

  9. Parameter estimates of a zero-dimensional ecosystem model applying the adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartau, Markus; Oschlies, Andreas; Willebrand, Jürgen

    Assimilation experiments with data from the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS, 1989-1993) were performed with a simple mixed-layer ecosystem model of dissolved inorganic nitrogen ( N), phytoplankton ( P) and herbivorous zooplankton ( H). Our aim is to optimize the biological model parameters, such that the misfits between model results and observations are minimized. The utilized assimilation method is the variational adjoint technique, starting from a wide range of first-parameter guesses. A twin experiment displayed two kinds of solutions, when Gaussian noise was added to the model-generated data. The expected solution refers to the global minimum of the misfit model-data function, whereas the other solution is biologically implausible and is associated with a local minimum. Experiments with real data showed either bottom-up or top-down controlled ecosystem dynamics, depending on the deep nutrient availability. To confine the solutions, an additional constraint on zooplankton biomass was added to the optimization procedure. This inclusion did not produce optimal model results that were consistent with observations. The modelled zooplankton biomass still exceeded the observations. From the model-data discrepancies systematic model errors could be determined, in particular when the chlorophyll concentration started to decline before primary production reached its maximum. A direct comparision of measured 14C-production data with modelled phytoplankton production rates is inadequate at BATS, at least when a constant carbon to nitrogen C : N ratio is assumed for data assimilation.

  10. Level density and level-spacing distributions of random, self-adjoint, non-Hermitian matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Yogesh N.; Karr, William A.

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the level density σ(x) and the level-spacing distribution p(s) of random matrices M=AF≠M†, where F is a (diagonal) inner product and A is a random, real, symmetric or complex, Hermitian matrix with independent entries drawn from a probability distribution q(x) with zero mean and finite higher moments. Although not Hermitian, the matrix M is self-adjoint with respect to F and thus has purely real eigenvalues. We find that the level density σF(x) is independent of the underlying distribution q(x) and solely characterized by F, and therefore generalizes the Wigner semicircle distribution σW(x). We find that the level-spacing distributions p(s) are independent of q(x), and are dependent upon both the inner product F and whether A is real or complex, and therefore generalize the Wigner surmise for level spacing. Our results suggest F-dependent generalizations of the well-known Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble and Gaussian Unitary Ensemble classes.

  11. Seismic structure of the European crust and upper mantle based on adjoint tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Bozdag, E.; Peter, D.; Tromp, J.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new crustal and upper mantle model for the European continent and the North Atlantic Ocean, named EU60. It is constructed based on adjoint tomography and involves 3D variations in elastic wavespeeds, anelastic attenuation, and radial/azimuthal anisotropy. Long-wavelength elastic wavespeed structure of EU60 agree with previous body- and surface-wave tomographic models. Some hitherto unidentified features, such as the Adria microplate, naturally emerge from smoothed starting model. Subducting slabs, slab detachment, ancient suture zones, continental rifts and back-arc basins are well resolved in EU60. For anelastic structure, we find an anti-correlation between shear wavespeeds and anelastic attenuation at shallow depths. At greater depths, this anti-correlation becomes relatively weak, in agreement with previous attenuation studies at global scales. Consistent with radial anisotropy in 1D reference models, the European continent is dominated by features with radially anisotropic parameter xi>1, indicating the presence of horizontal flow within the upper mantle. In addition, subduction zones, such as the Apennines and Hellenic arcs, are characterized as vertical flow with xi<1 at depths greater than 150~km. For azimuthal anisotropy, we find that the direction of fast anisotropic axis is well correlated with complicated tectonic evolution in this region, such as extension along the North Atlantic Ridge, trench retreat in the Mediterranean and counter-clockwise rotation of the Anatolian Plate. The ``point spread function'' is used to assess image quality and analyze tradeoff between different model parameters.

  12. Adjoint analyses of enhanced solidification for shape optimization in conjugate heat transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Kenichi; Kinoshita, Hidenori; Suzuki, Yuji

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, an adjoint-based shape-optimization method has been developed for designing extended heat transfer surfaces in conjugate heat transfer problems. Here we specifically consider heat conduction-dominated solidification problem under different thermal boundary conditions: (i) the isothermal condition, and (ii) the conjugate condition with thermal coupling between the solidified liquid and the solid wall inside the domain bounded by the extended heat transfer surface. In the present shape-optimization scheme, extended heat transfer surfaces are successively refined in a local way based on the variational information of a cost functional with respect to the shape modification. In the computation of the developed scheme, a meshless method is employed for dealing with the complex boundary shape. For high-resolution analyses with boundary-fitted node arrangement, we have introduced a bubble-mesh method combined with a high-efficiency algorithm for searching neighboring bubbles within a cut-off distance. The present technique can be easily applied to convection problems including high Reynolds number flow. We demonstrate, for the isothermal boundary condition, that the present optimization leads to tree-like fin shapes, which achieve the temperature field with global similarity for different initial fin shapes. We will also show the computational results for the conjugate condition, which would regularize the present optimization due to the fin-efficiency effect.

  13. Transporting particulate material

    DOEpatents

    Aldred, Derek Leslie; Rader, Jeffrey A.; Saunders, Timothy W.

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  14. A physically-based channel-modeling framework integrating HEC-RAS sediment transport capabilities and the USDA-ARS bank-stability and toe-erosion model (BSTEM)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical, one-dimensional, mobile bed, sediment-transport models simulate vertical channel adjustment, raising or lowering cross-section node elevations to simulate erosion or deposition. This approach does not account for bank erosion processes including toe scour and mass failure. In many systems...

  15. The development of three-dimensional adjoint method for flow control with blowing in convergent-divergent nozzle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikarwar, Nidhi

    multiple experiments or numerical simulations. Alternatively an inverse design method can be used. An adjoint optimization method can be used to achieve the optimum blowing rate. It is shown that the method works for both geometry optimization and active control of the flow in order to deflect the flow in desirable ways. An adjoint optimization method is described. It is used to determine the blowing distribution in the diverging section of a convergent-divergent nozzle that gives a desired pressure distribution in the nozzle. Both the direct and adjoint problems and their associated boundary conditions are developed. The adjoint method is used to determine the blowing distribution required to minimize the shock strength in the nozzle to achieve a known target pressure and to achieve close to an ideally expanded flow pressure. A multi-block structured solver is developed to calculate the flow solution and associated adjoint variables. Two and three-dimensional calculations are performed for internal and external of the nozzle domains. A two step MacCormack scheme based on predictor- corrector technique is was used for some calculations. The four and five stage Runge-Kutta schemes are also used to artificially march in time. A modified Runge-Kutta scheme is used to accelerate the convergence to a steady state. Second order artificial dissipation has been added to stabilize the calculations. The steepest decent method has been used for the optimization of the blowing velocity after the gradients of the cost function with respect to the blowing velocity are calculated using adjoint method. Several examples are given of the optimization of blowing using the adjoint method.

  16. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, L.M.

    2003-11-12

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 8.4, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2000, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1 (equivalent to ISO Guide 25). FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/ts/htdocs/210/214/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized in the table at the bottom of this introduction.

  17. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, L.M.

    2000-03-23

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties in laboratories that conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 8.4, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1 (equivalent to ISO Guide 25). FM and T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. These parameters are summarized.

  18. Layered Composite Analysis Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.; Cole, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Laminated composite material construction is gaining popularity within industry as an attractive alternative to metallic designs where high strength at reduced weights is of prime consideration. This has necessitated the development of an effective analysis capability for the static, dynamic and buckling analyses of structural components constructed of layered composites. Theoretical and user aspects of layered composite analysis and its incorporation into CSA/NASTRAN are discussed. The availability of stress and strain based failure criteria is described which aids the user in reviewing the voluminous output normally produced in such analyses. Simple strategies to obtain minimum weight designs of composite structures are discussed. Several example problems are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and user convenient features of the capability.

  19. Group Capability Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  20. Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-582 Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined TY - Then...JLENS), and select coalition partners into a single fire control quality air track picture. Radar measurement data from individual CUs within a CEC

  1. Current Range Safety Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    mission objectives, to prevent personnel injury , to minimize property damage, and to preclude incidents having the potential for international... high -speed film cameras in 16 mm, 35 mm, and 70 mm formats. These cameras can operate at frame rates from 6 to 40,000 frames per second. * Bowen ribbon...90, 180, and 360 frames per second. * Ultra- high -speed cameras capable of rates up to 4,500,000 frames per second in the framing mode or write records

  2. Enhanced Rescue Lift Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolving and ever-increasing demands of emergency response and disaster relief support provided by rotorcraft dictate, among other things, the development of enhanced rescue lift capability for these platforms. This preliminary analysis is first-order in nature but provides considerable insight into some of the challenges inherent in trying to effect rescue using a unique form of robotic rescue device deployed and operated from rotary-wing aerial platforms.

  3. Ada Compiler Evaluation Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    library functions may be available (and necessary) to exploit the vector processing capabilities. * Very Long Instruction Word (VLIW) machine...interested in how well the target machine instructions are utilized: Are available idioms exploited ? To answer this question, specific test problems...different pages) will also be referenced every fourth operation. This pattern can be exploited by locking the root and perhaps the first level directory

  4. Joint Forces Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    for countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in space. The Space Operations Center ( SPOC ), USSPACECOM is the single point...of contact for assessing space capabilities. Combatant commanders, subordinate JFCs, and Services can access this information from the SPOC via the...special operations forces SPOC Space Operations Center SSBN fleet ballistic missile submarine SST space support team UJTL Universal Joint Task List UN

  5. Review of CFD Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    growth in wind tunnel testing requirements – Increasingly sensitive/complex designs require more testing/analysis for success … – But, for fixed- wing ...been used to maintain an essentially constant number of wind tunnel test hours for the last 30 years. Also, while the number of different wing designs...not addressed directly • This study did not evaluate wind tunnel facilities or their capabilities – Comparisons between CFD and wind tunnel testing

  6. IAC - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. With the goal of supporting the unique needs of engineering analysis groups concerned with interdisciplinary problems, IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a data base, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automatic data transfer among analysis programs. IAC 2.5, designed to be compatible as far as possible with Level 1.5, contains a major upgrade in executive and database management system capabilities, and includes interfaces to enable thermal, structures, optics, and control interaction dynamics analysis. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation interfaces are supplied for building and viewing models. Advanced graphics capabilities are provided within particular analysis modules such as INCA and NASTRAN. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model

  7. Quantifying Capability Vectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    at night. The components that enable this capability are a 12-V dry cell battery, a lightbulb , cables, and an on/off switch. The battery is hooked...to the lightbulb by conducting cables. The cables electrically connect the battery to the lightbulb , with the on/off switch connected in-between to...Finally, each succeeding cell that is drained Switch + 1 + -T vT v Ti -T i-T / -T k Lightbulb Dry Cells Figure 2. Components Which Enable the

  8. Aerosol Health Impact Source Attribution Studies with the CMAQ Adjoint Air Quality Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M. D.

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is an air pollutant consisting of a mixture of solid and liquid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Knowledge of the sources and distributions of PM2.5 is important for many reasons, two of which are that PM2.5 has an adverse effect on human health and also an effect on climate change. Recent studies have suggested that health benefits resulting from a unit decrease in black carbon (BC) are four to nine times larger than benefits resulting from an equivalent change in PM2.5 mass. The goal of this thesis is to quantify the role of emissions from different sectors and different locations in governing the total health impacts, risk, and maximum individual risk of exposure to BC both nationally and regionally in the US. We develop and use the CMAQ adjoint model to quantify the role of emissions from all modeled sectors, times, and locations on premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC. From a national analysis, we find that damages resulting from anthropogenic emissions of BC are strongly correlated with population and premature death. However, we find little correlation between damages and emission magnitude, suggesting that controls on the largest emissions may not be the most efficient means of reducing damages resulting from BC emissions. Rather, the best proxy for locations with damaging BC emissions is locations where premature deaths occur. Onroad diesel and nonroad vehicle emissions are the largest contributors to premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC, while onroad gasoline emissions cause the highest deaths per amount emitted. Additionally, emissions in fall and winter contribute to more premature deaths (and more per amount emitted) than emissions in spring and summer. From a regional analysis, we find that emissions from outside each of six urban areas account for 7% to 27% of the premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC within the region. Within the region encompassing New York City and Philadelphia

  9. Towards magnetic sounding of the Earth's core by an adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Jackson, A.; Livermore, P. W.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's magnetic field is generated and sustained by the so called geodynamo system in the core. Measurements of the geomagnetic field taken at the surface, downwards continued through the electrically insulating mantle to the core-mantle boundary (CMB), provide important constraints on the time evolution of the velocity, magnetic field and temperature anomaly in the fluid outer core. The aim of any study in data assimilation applied to the Earth's core is to produce a time-dependent model consistent with these observations [1]. Snapshots of these ``tuned" models provide a window through which the inner workings of the Earth's core, usually hidden from view, can be probed. We apply a variational data assimilation framework to an inertia-free magnetohydrodynamic system (MHD) [2]. Such a model is close to magnetostrophic balance [3], to which we have added viscosity to the dominant forces of Coriolis, pressure, Lorentz and buoyancy, believed to be a good approximation of the Earth's dynamo in the convective time scale. We chose to study the MHD system driven by a static temperature anomaly to mimic the actual inner working of Earth's dynamo system, avoiding at this stage the further complication of solving for the time dependent temperature field. At the heart of the models is a time-dependent magnetic field to which the core-flow is enslaved. In previous work we laid the foundation of the adjoint methodology, applied to a subset of the full equations [4]. As an intermediate step towards our ultimate vision of applying the techniques to a fully dynamic mode of the Earth's core tuned to geomagnetic observations, we present the intermediate step of applying the adjoint technique to the inertia-free Navier-Stokes equation in continuous form. We use synthetic observations derived from evolving a geophysically-reasonable magnetic field profile as the initial condition of our MHD system. Based on our study, we also propose several different strategies for accurately

  10. NPSS Overview to TAFW Multidisciplinary Simulation Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Karl

    2002-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a concerted effort by NASA Glenn Research Center, the aerospace industry, and academia to develop an advanced engineering environment or integrated collection of software programs for the analysis and design of aircraft engines and, eventually, space transportation components. NPSS is now being applied by GE ground power to ground power generation with the view of expanding the capability to nontraditional power plant applications (example: fuel cells) and NPSS has an interest in in-space power and will be developing those simulation capabilities.

  11. Application of Exactly Linearized Error Transport Equations to AIAA CFD Prediction Workshops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derlaga, Joseph M.; Park, Michael A.; Rallabhandi, Sriram

    2017-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) prediction workshops sponsored by the AIAA have created invaluable opportunities in which to discuss the predictive capabilities of CFD in areas in which it has struggled, e.g., cruise drag, high-lift, and sonic boom pre diction. While there are many factors that contribute to disagreement between simulated and experimental results, such as modeling or discretization error, quantifying the errors contained in a simulation is important for those who make decisions based on the computational results. The linearized error transport equations (ETE) combined with a truncation error estimate is a method to quantify one source of errors. The ETE are implemented with a complex-step method to provide an exact linearization with minimal source code modifications to CFD and multidisciplinary analysis methods. The equivalency of adjoint and linearized ETE functional error correction is demonstrated. Uniformly refined grids from a series of AIAA prediction workshops demonstrate the utility of ETE for multidisciplinary analysis with a connection between estimated discretization error and (resolved or under-resolved) flow features.

  12. Comparison of Observation Impacts in Two Forecast Systems using Adjoint Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelaro, Ronald; Langland, Rolf; Todling, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    An experiment is being conducted to compare directly the impact of all assimilated observations on short-range forecast errors in different operational forecast systems. We use the adjoint-based method developed by Langland and Baker (2004), which allows these impacts to be efficiently calculated. This presentation describes preliminary results for a "baseline" set of observations, including both satellite radiances and conventional observations, used by the Navy/NOGAPS and NASA/GEOS-5 forecast systems for the month of January 2007. In each system, about 65% of the total reduction in 24-h forecast error is provided by satellite observations, although the impact of rawinsonde, aircraft, land, and ship-based observations remains significant. Only a small majority (50- 55%) of all observations assimilated improves the forecast, while the rest degrade it. It is found that most of the total forecast error reduction comes from observations with moderate-size innovations providing small to moderate impacts, not from outliers with very large positive or negative innovations. In a global context, the relative impacts of the major observation types are fairly similar in each system, although regional differences in observation impact can be significant. Of particular interest is the fact that while satellite radiances have a large positive impact overall, they degrade the forecast in certain locations common to both systems, especially over land and ice surfaces. Ongoing comparisons of this type, with results expected from other operational centers, should lead to more robust conclusions about the impacts of the various components of the observing system as well as about the strengths and weaknesses of the methodologies used to assimilate them.

  13. Aerodynamic shape optimization via discrete adjoint formulation using Euler equations on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Bijoyendra

    A methodology for aerodynamic shape optimization on two-dimensional unstructured grids using Euler equations is presented. The sensitivity derivatives are obtained using the discrete adjoint formulation. The Euler equations are solved using a fully implicit, upwind, cell-vertex, median-dual finite volume scheme. Roe's upwind flux-difference-splitting scheme is used to determine the inviscid fluxes. To enable discontinuities to be captured without oscillations, limiters are used at the reconstruction stage. The derivation of the accurate discretization of the flux Jacobians due to the conserved variables and the entire mesh required for the costate equation is developed and its efficient accumulation algorithm on an edge-based loop is implemented and documented. Exact linearization of Roe's approximate Riemann solver is incorporated into the aerodynamic analysis as well as the sensitivity analysis. Higher-order discretization is achieved by including all distance-one and -two terms due to the reconstruction and the limiter, although the limiter is not linearized. Two-dimensional body conforming grid movement strategy and grid sensitivity are obtained by considering the grid to be a system of interconnected springs. Arbitrary airfoil geometries are obtained using an algorithm for generalized von Mises airfoils with finite trailing edges. An incremental iterative formulation is used to solve the large sparse linear systems of equations obtained from the sensitivity analysis. The discrete linear systems obtained from the equations governing the flow and those from the sensitivity analysis are solved iteratively using the preconditioned GMRES (Generalized Minimum Residual) algorithm. For the optimization process, a constrained nonlinear programming package which uses a sequential quadratic programming algorithm is used. This study presents the process of analytically obtaining the exact discrete sensitivity derivatives and computationally cost-effective algorithms to

  14. Forward and adjoint spectral-element simulations of seismic wave propagation using hardware accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Daniel; Videau, Brice; Pouget, Kevin; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    Improving the resolution of tomographic images is crucial to answer important questions on the nature of Earth's subsurface structure and internal processes. Seismic tomography is the most prominent approach where seismic signals from ground-motion records are used to infer physical properties of internal structures such as compressional- and shear-wave speeds, anisotropy and attenuation. Recent advances in regional- and global-scale seismic inversions move towards full-waveform inversions which require accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3D media, providing access to the full 3D seismic wavefields. However, these numerical simulations are computationally very expensive and need high-performance computing (HPC) facilities for further improving the current state of knowledge. During recent years, many-core architectures such as graphics processing units (GPUs) have been added to available large HPC systems. Such GPU-accelerated computing together with advances in multi-core central processing units (CPUs) can greatly accelerate scientific applications. There are mainly two possible choices of language support for GPU cards, the CUDA programming environment and OpenCL language standard. CUDA software development targets NVIDIA graphic cards while OpenCL was adopted mainly by AMD graphic cards. In order to employ such hardware accelerators for seismic wave propagation simulations, we incorporated a code generation tool BOAST into an existing spectral-element code package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. This allows us to use meta-programming of computational kernels and generate optimized source code for both CUDA and OpenCL languages, running simulations on either CUDA or OpenCL hardware accelerators. We show here applications of forward and adjoint seismic wave propagation on CUDA/OpenCL GPUs, validating results and comparing performances for different simulations and hardware usages.

  15. Adjoint methods for adjusting three-dimensional atmosphere and surface properties to fit multi-angle/multi-pixel polarimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, William; Cairns, Brian; Bal, Guillaume

    2014-09-01

    This paper derives an efficient procedure for using the three-dimensional (3D) vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) to adjust atmosphere and surface properties and improve their fit with multi-angle/multi-pixel radiometric and polarimetric measurements of scattered sunlight. The proposed adjoint method uses the 3D VRTE to compute the measurement misfit function and the adjoint 3D VRTE to compute its gradient with respect to all unknown parameters. In the remote sensing problems of interest, the scalar-valued misfit function quantifies agreement with data as a function of atmosphere and surface properties, and its gradient guides the search through this parameter space. Remote sensing of the atmosphere and surface in a three-dimensional region may require thousands of unknown parameters and millions of data points. Many approaches would require calls to the 3D VRTE solver in proportion to the number of unknown parameters or measurements. To avoid this issue of scale, we focus on computing the gradient of the misfit function as an alternative to the Jacobian of the measurement operator. The resulting adjoint method provides a way to adjust 3D atmosphere and surface properties with only two calls to the 3D VRTE solver for each spectral channel, regardless of the number of retrieval parameters, measurement view angles or pixels. This gives a procedure for adjusting atmosphere and surface parameters that will scale to the large problems of 3D remote sensing. For certain types of multi-angle/multi-pixel polarimetric measurements, this encourages the development of a new class of three-dimensional retrieval algorithms with more flexible parametrizations of spatial heterogeneity, less reliance on data screening procedures, and improved coverage in terms of the resolved physical processes in the Earth's atmosphere.

  16. Facility capability assessment.

    PubMed

    McCandless, J

    1994-06-01

    An inspection and evaluation procedure has been developed to assess the capabilities of contract toxicology laboratories. This procedure has been used for the inspection of 18 different contract toxicology laboratories. There are 10 areas inspected: 1. Facility 2. Personnel 3. Operations 4. Animals/Animal Care 5. Standard Operating Procedures 6. Quality Assurance 7. Equipment 8. Test Article 9. Data 10. Archives. Each of these areas is divided into categories with each category divided further into specific topics. Points are assigned to each topic. The points earned by the laboratory reflect the inspector's assessment of the laboratory's quality in each area. Area scores are added and a percentage score for the facility is calculated. This approach provides a clear distinction among the laboratories evaluated. The facility inspection and rating system played an important role in screening laboratories when the author worked for the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) corporate toxicology department. It highlighted strengths and weaknesses of individual laboratories.

  17. PHOBOS physics capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.D.

    1995-07-15

    PHOBOS is the name of a detector and of a research program to study systematically the physics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions over a large range of impact parameters and nuclear species. Collisions with a center mass energy of 200 A GeV at RHIC are expected to produce the highest energy densities ever accessible in the laboratory. In this writeup, the authors outline the physics capabilities of the PHOBOS detector and describe the detector design in terms of the general philosophy behind the PHOBOS research program. In order to make the discussion concrete, they then focus on two specific examples of physics measurements that they plan to make at RHIC: dN/d{eta} for charged particles and the mass spectrum from {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decays.

  18. PHOBICS physics capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.D.

    1995-12-31

    PHOBOS is the name of a detector and of a research program to study systematically the physics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions over a large range of impact parameters and nuclear species. Collisions with a center of mass energy of 200 A GeV at RHIC are expected to produce the highest energy densities ever accessible in the laboratory. In this writeup, we outline the physics capabilities of the PHOBOS detector and describe the detector design in terms of the general philosophy behind the PHOBOS research program. In order to make the discussion concrete, we then focus on two specific examples of physics measurements that we plan to make at RHIC: dN/d{zeta} for charged particles and the mass spectrum from {phi}{r_arrow} K{sup +}K{sup -} decays.

  19. Nonintrusive subsurface surveying capability

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, T.W.; Cave, S.P.

    1994-06-01

    This presentation describes the capabilities of a ground-pentrating radar (GPR) system developed by EG&G Energy Measurements (EM), a prime contractor to the Department of Energy (DOE). The focus of the presentation will be on the subsurface survey of DOE site TA-21 in Los Alamos, New Mexico. EG&G EM developed the system for the Department of Defense. The system is owned by the Department of the Army and currently resides at KO in Albuquerque. EM is pursuing efforts to transfer this technology to environmental applications such as waste-site characterization with DOE encouragement. The Army has already granted permission to use the system for the waste-site characterization activities.

  20. General shape optimization capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  1. Capability 9.4 Servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Rud

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on capability structure 9.4 servicing. The topics include: 1) Servicing Description; 2) Benefits of Servicing; 3) Drivers & Assumptions for Servicing; 4) Capability Breakdown Structure 9.4 Servicing; 5) Roadmap for Servicing; 6) 9.4 Servicing Critical Gaps; 7) Capability 9.4 Servicing; 8) Capability 9.4.1 Inspection; 9) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.1 Inspection; 10) Capability 9.4.2 Diagnostics; 11) State-of-the-Art/Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.2 Diagnostics; 12) Capability 9.4.3 Perform Planned Maintenance; 13) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.3 Perform Planned Maintenance; 14) Capability 9.4.4 Perform Unplanned Repair; 15) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.4 Perform Unplanned Repair; 16) Capability 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 17) Capability 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 18) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 19) Capability 9.4.6 Planning, Logistics, Training; and 20) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.6 Planning, Logistics, & Training;

  2. A weighted adjoint-source for weight-window generation by means of a linear tally combination

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, Avneet; Booth, Thomas E; Solomon, Clell J

    2009-01-01

    A new importance estimation technique has been developed that allows weight-window optimization for a linear combination of tallies. This technique has been implemented in a local version of MCNP and effectively weights the adjoint source term for each tally in the combination. Optimizing weight window parameters for the linear tally combination allows the user to optimize weight windows for multiple regions at once. In this work, we present our results of solutions to an analytic three-tally-region test problem and a flux calculation on a 100,000 voxel oil-well logging tool problem.

  3. Self-adjoint extensions of the Dirac Hamiltonian in the magnetic-solenoid field and related exact solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, S.P.; Gitman, D.M.; Smirnov, A.A.

    2003-02-01

    We study solutions of Dirac equation in the field of Aharonov-Bohm solenoid and a collinear uniform magnetic field. On this base we construct self-adjoint extensions of the Dirac Hamiltonian using von Neumann's theory of deficiency indices. We reduce (3+1)-dimensional problem to (2+1)-dimensional one by a proper choice of spin operator. Then we study the problem doing a finite radius regularization of the solenoid field. We exploit solutions of the latter problem to specify boundary conditions in the singular case.

  4. Application of Parallel Adjoint-Based Error Estimation and Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Three-Dimensional Aerospace Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Park, M. A.; Jones, W. T.; Hammond, D. P.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the extension of error estimation and adaptation methods to parallel computations enabling larger, more realistic aerospace applications and the quantification of discretization errors for complex 3-D solutions. Results were shown for an inviscid sonic-boom prediction about a double-cone configuration and a wing/body segmented leading edge (SLE) configuration where the output function of the adjoint was pressure integrated over a part of the cylinder in the near field. After multiple cycles of error estimation and surface/field adaptation, a significant improvement in the inviscid solution for the sonic boom signature of the double cone was observed. Although the double-cone adaptation was initiated from a very coarse mesh, the near-field pressure signature from the final adapted mesh compared very well with the wind-tunnel data which illustrates that the adjoint-based error estimation and adaptation process requires no a priori refinement of the mesh. Similarly, the near-field pressure signature for the SLE wing/body sonic boom configuration showed a significant improvement from the initial coarse mesh to the final adapted mesh in comparison with the wind tunnel results. Error estimation and field adaptation results were also presented for the viscous transonic drag prediction of the DLR-F6 wing/body configuration, and results were compared to a series of globally refined meshes. Two of these globally refined meshes were used as a starting point for the error estimation and field-adaptation process where the output function for the adjoint was the total drag. The field-adapted results showed an improvement in the prediction of the drag in comparison with the finest globally refined mesh and a reduction in the estimate of the remaining drag error. The adjoint-based adaptation parameter showed a need for increased resolution in the surface of the wing/body as well as a need for wake resolution downstream of the fuselage and wing trailing edge

  5. ITS version 5.0 :the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/Photon monte carlo transport codes with CAD geometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2005-09-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2) multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes, (4) a general purpose geometry engine for linking with CAD or other geometry formats, and (5) the Cholla facet geometry library. Moreover, the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  6. Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 11; Documentation of the Tangent Linear and Adjoint Models of the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert Moisture Parameterization of the NASA GEOS-1 GCM; 5.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Max J. (Editor); Yang, Wei-Yu; Todling, Ricardo; Navon, I. Michael

    1997-01-01

    A detailed description of the development of the tangent linear model (TLM) and its adjoint model of the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert moisture parameterization package used in the NASA GEOS-1 C-Grid GCM (Version 5.2) is presented. The notational conventions used in the TLM and its adjoint codes are described in detail.

  7. Effect of present technology on airship capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    The effect is presented of updating past airship designs using current materials and propulsion systems to determine new airship performance and productivity capabilities. New materials and power plants permit reductions in the empty weights and increases in the useful load capabilities of past airship designs. The increased useful load capability results in increased productivity for a given range, i.e., either increased payload at the same operating speed or increased operating speed for the same payload weight or combinations of both. Estimated investment costs and operating costs are presented to indicate the significant cost parameters in estimating transportation costs of payloads in cents per ton mile. Investment costs are presented considering production lots of 1, 10 and 100 units. Operating costs are presented considering flight speeds and ranges.

  8. Enhanced ocean observational capability

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, A M; Esser, B K

    2000-01-10

    Coastal oceans are vital to world health and sustenance. Technology that enables new observations has always been the driver of discovery in ocean sciences. In this context, we describe the first at sea deployment and operation of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS) for continuous measurement of trace elements in seawater. The purpose of these experiments was to demonstrate that an ICPMS could be operated in a corrosive and high vibration environment with no degradation in performance. Significant advances occurred this past year due to ship time provided by Scripps Institution of Oceanography (UCSD), as well as that funded through this project. Evaluation at sea involved performance testing and characterization of several real-time seawater analysis modes. We show that mass spectrometers can rapidly, precisely and accurately determine ultratrace metal concentrations in seawater, thus allowing high-resolution mapping of large areas of surface seawater. This analytical capability represents a significant advance toward real-time observation and understanding of water mass chemistry in dynamic coastal environments. In addition, a joint LLNL-SIO workshop was convened to define and design new technologies for ocean observation. Finally, collaborative efforts were initiated with atmospheric scientists at LLNL to identify realistic coastal ocean and river simulation models to support real-time analysis and modeling of hazardous material releases in coastal waterways.

  9. Advanced CLIPS capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Gary

    1991-01-01

    The C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) is a forward chaining rule based language developed by NASA. CLIPS was designed specifically to provide high portability, low cost, and easy integration with external systems. The current release of CLIPS, version 4.3, is being used by over 2500 users throughout the public and private community. The primary addition to the next release of CLIPS, version 5.0, will be the CLIPS Object Oriented Language (COOL). The major capabilities of COOL are: class definition with multiple inheritance and no restrictions on the number, types, or cardinality of slots; message passing which allows procedural code bundled with an object to be executed; and query functions which allow groups of instances to be examined and manipulated. In addition to COOL, numerous other enhancements were added to CLIPS including: generic functions (which allow different pieces of procedural code to be executed depending upon the types or classes of the arguments); integer and double precision data type support; multiple conflict resolution strategies; global variables; logical dependencies; type checking on facts; full ANSI compiler support; and incremental reset for rules.

  10. CMT Source Inversions for Massive Data Assimilation in Global Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Smith, J. A.; Modrak, R. T.; Komatitsch, D.; Song, X.; Liu, Q.; Tromp, J.; Peter, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is a vital tool for probing the Earth's interior and enhancing our knowledge of the underlying dynamical processes [e.g., Liu et al., 2012]. Using the adjoint tomography method, we have successfully obtained a first-generation global FWI model named M15 [Bozdag et al., 2015]. To achieve higher resolution of the emerging new structural features and to accommodate azimuthal anisotropy and anelasticity in the next-generation model, we expanded our database from 256 to 4,224 earthquakes. Previous studies have shown that ray-theory-based Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) inversion algorithms can produce systematic biases in earthquake source parameters due to tradeoffs with 3D crustal and mantle heterogeneity [e.g., Hjorleifsdottir et al., 2010]. To reduce these well-known tradeoffs, we performed CMT inversions in our current 3D global model before resuming the structural inversion with the expanded database. Initial source parameters are selected from the global CMT database [Ekstrom et al., 2012], with moment magnitudes ranging from 5.5 to 7.0 and occurring between 1994 and 2015. Data from global and regional networks were retrieved from the IRIS DMC. Synthetic seismograms were generated based on the spectral-element-based seismic wave propagation solver (SPECFEM3D GLOBE) in model M15. We used a source inversion algorithm based on a waveform misfit function while allowing time shifts between data and synthetics to accommodate additional unmodeled 3D heterogeneity [Liu et al., 2004]. To accommodate the large number of earthquakes and time series (more than 10,000,000 records), we implemented a source inversion workflow based on the newly developed Adaptive Seismic Data Format (ASDF) [Krischer, Smith, et al., 2015] and ObsPy [Krischer et al., 2015]. In ASDF, each earthquake is associated with a single file, thereby eliminating I/O bottlenecks in the workflow and facilitating fast parallel processing. Our preliminary results indicate that errors

  11. Parallelized Three-Dimensional Resistivity Inversion Using Finite Elements And Adjoint State Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, Ralf; Gross, Lutz; Du Plessis, Jaco

    2015-04-01

    The resistivity method is one of the oldest geophysical exploration methods, which employs one pair of electrodes to inject current into the ground and one or more pairs of electrodes to measure the electrical potential difference. The potential difference is a non-linear function of the subsurface resistivity distribution described by an elliptic partial differential equation (PDE) of the Poisson type. Inversion of measured potentials solves for the subsurface resistivity represented by PDE coefficients. With increasing advances in multichannel resistivity acquisition systems (systems with more than 60 channels and full waveform recording are now emerging), inversion software require efficient storage and solver algorithms. We developed the finite element solver Escript, which provides a user-friendly programming environment in Python to solve large-scale PDE-based problems (see https://launchpad.net/escript-finley). Using finite elements, highly irregular shaped geology and topography can readily be taken into account. For the 3D resistivity problem, we have implemented the secondary potential approach, where the PDE is decomposed into a primary potential caused by the source current and the secondary potential caused by changes in subsurface resistivity. The primary potential is calculated analytically, and the boundary value problem for the secondary potential is solved using nodal finite elements. This approach removes the singularity caused by the source currents and provides more accurate 3D resistivity models. To solve the inversion problem we apply a 'first optimize then discretize' approach using the quasi-Newton scheme in form of the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) method (see Gross & Kemp 2013). The evaluation of the cost function requires the solution of the secondary potential PDE for each source current and the solution of the corresponding adjoint-state PDE for the cost function gradients with respect to the subsurface

  12. Adjoint-state inversion of electric resistivity tomography data of seawater intrusion at the Argentona coastal aquifer (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-López, Sheila; Carrera, Jesús; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Luquot, Linda; Martínez, Laura; Bellmunt, Fabián

    2016-04-01

    Seawater intrusion in aquifers is a complex phenomenon that can be characterized with the help of electric resistivity tomography (ERT) because of the low resistivity of seawater, which underlies the freshwater floating on top. The problem is complex because of the need for joint inversion of electrical and hydraulic (density dependent flow) data. Here we present an adjoint-state algorithm to treat electrical data. This method is a common technique to obtain derivatives of an objective function, depending on potentials with respect to model parameters. The main advantages of it are its simplicity in stationary problems and the reduction of computational cost respect others methodologies. The relationship between the concentration of chlorides and the resistivity values of the field is well known. Also, these resistivities are related to the values of potentials measured using ERT. Taking this into account, it will be possible to define the different resistivities zones from the field data of potential distribution using the basis of inverse problem. In this case, the studied zone is situated in Argentona (Baix Maresme, Catalonia), where the values of chlorides obtained in some wells of the zone are too high. The adjoint-state method will be used to invert the measured data using a new finite element code in C ++ language developed in an open-source framework called Kratos. Finally, the information obtained numerically with our code will be checked with the information obtained with other codes.

  13. Spectral-Element Seismic Wave Propagation Codes for both Forward Modeling in Complex Media and Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Peter, D. B.; Tromp, J.; Komatitsch, D.; Lefebvre, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    We present both SPECFEM3D_Cartesian and SPECFEM3D_GLOBE open-source codes, representing high-performance numerical wave solvers simulating seismic wave propagation for local-, regional-, and global-scale application. These codes are suitable for both forward propagation in complex media and tomographic imaging. Both solvers compute highly accurate seismic wave fields using the continuous Galerkin spectral-element method on unstructured meshes. Lateral variations in compressional- and shear-wave speeds, density, as well as 3D attenuation Q models, topography and fluid-solid coupling are all readily included in both codes. For global simulations, effects due to rotation, ellipticity, the oceans, 3D crustal models, and self-gravitation are additionally included. Both packages provide forward and adjoint functionality suitable for adjoint tomography on high-performance computing architectures. We highlight the most recent release of the global version which includes improved performance, simultaneous MPI runs, OpenCL and CUDA support via an automatic source-to-source transformation library (BOAST), parallel I/O readers and writers for databases using ADIOS and seismograms using the recently developed Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) with built-in provenance. This makes our spectral-element solvers current state-of-the-art, open-source community codes for high-performance seismic wave propagation on arbitrarily complex 3D models. Together with these solvers, we provide full-waveform inversion tools to image the Earth's interior at unprecedented resolution.

  14. High-resolution Adjoint Tomography of the Eastern Venezuelan Crust using Empirical Green's Function Waveforms from Ambient Noise Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Masy, J.; Niu, F.; Levander, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present a high-resolution 3D crustal model of Eastern Venezuela from a full waveform inversion adjoint tomography technique, based on the spectral-element method. Empirical Green's functions (EGFs) of Rayleigh waves from ambient noise interferometry serve as the observed waveforms. Rayleigh wave signals in the period range of 10 - 50 s were extracted by cross-correlations of 48 stations from both Venezuelan national seismic network and the BOLIVAR project array. The synthetic Green's functions (SGFs) are calculated with an initial regional 3D shear wave model determined from ballistic Rayleigh wave tomography from earthquake records with periods longer than 20 s. The frequency-dependent traveltime time misfits between the SGFs and EGFs are minimized iteratively using adjoint tomography = to refine 3D crustal structure [Chen et al. 2014]. The final 3D model shows lateral shear wave velocity variations that are well correlated with the geological terranes within the continental interior. In particular, the final model reveals low velocities distributed along the axis of the Espino Graben, indicating that the graben has a substantially different crustal structure than the rest of the Eastern Venezuela Basin. We also observe high shear velocities in the lower crust beneath some of the subterranes of the Proterozoic-Archean Guayana Shield.

  15. Advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disher, J. H.; Hethcoat, J. P.; Page, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Projected growth in space transportation capabilities beyond the initial Space Shuttle is discussed in terms of earth-to-low-orbit launch vehicles as well as transportation beyond low orbit (orbit transfer vehicles). Growth versions of the Shuttle and heavy-lift derivatives of the Shuttle are shown conceptually. More advanced launch vehicle concepts are also shown, based on rocket propulsion or combinations of rocket and air-breathing propulsion. Orbit transfer vehicle concepts for personnel transport and for cargo transport are discussed, including chemical rocket as well as electric propulsion. Finally, target levels of capability and efficiencies for later time periods are discussed and compared with the prospective vehicle concepts mentioned earlier.

  16. LANL Analytical and Radiochemistry Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; Lamont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-07-27

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities.

  17. Barotropic Mechanisms of Derivative-based Uncertainty Propagation in Drake Passage Transport Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmikov, A.; Heimbach, P.

    2013-12-01

    We apply derivative-based uncertainty quantification (UQ) and sensitivity methods to the estimation of Drake Passage transport in a global barotropic configuration of the MIT ocean general circulation model (MITgcm). Sensitivity and uncertainty fields are evaluated via first and second derivative codes of the MITgcm, generated via algorithmic differentiation (AD). Observation uncertainties are projected to uncertainties in the control variables by inversion of the Hessian of the nonlinear least-squares misfit function. Only data-supported components of Hessian information are retained through elimination of the unconstrained uncertainty nullspace. The assimilated observation uncertainty is combined with prior control variable uncertainties to reduce their posterior uncertainty. The spatial patterns of posterior uncertainty reduction and their temporal evolution are explained in terms of barotropic dynamics. Global uncertainty teleconnection mechanisms are identified as barotropic uncertainty waves. Uncertainty coupling across different control fields is demonstrated by assimilation of sea surface height uncertainty. A second step in our UQ scheme consists in propagating prior and posterior uncertainties of the model controls onto model output variables of interest, here Drake Passage transport. Forward uncertainty propagation amounts to matrix transformation of the uncertainty covariances via the model Jacobian and its adjoint. Sources of uncertainties of the transport are revealed through analysis of the adjoint wave dynamics in the model. These adjoint (reversed) mechanisms are associated with the evolution of sensitivity fields and our method formally extends sensitivity analysis to uncertainty quantification. Inverse uncertainty propagation mechanisms can be linked to adjoint dynamics in a similar manner. The posterior correlations of controls are found to dominate the reduction of the transport uncertainty compared to the marginal uncertainty reduction of the

  18. Small rover exploration capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salotti, Jean-Marc; Laithier, Corentin; Machut, Benoit; Marie, Aurélien; Bruneau, Audrey; Grömer, Gernot; Foing, Bernard H.

    2015-05-01

    For a human mission to the Moon or Mars, an important question is to determine the best strategy for the choice of surface vehicles. Recent studies suggest that the first missions to Mars will be strongly constrained and that only small unpressurized vehicles will be available. We analyze the exploration capabilities and limitations of small surface vehicles from the user perspective. Following the “human centered design” paradigm, the team focused on human systems interactions and conducted the following experiments: - Another member of our team participated in the ILEWG EuroMoonMars 2013 simulation at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah during the same period of time. Although the possible traverses were restricted, a similar study with analog space suits and quads has been carried out. - Other experiments have been conducted in an old rock quarry close to Bordeaux, France. An expert in the use of quads for all types of terrains performed a demonstration and helped us to characterize the difficulties, the risks and advantages and drawbacks of different vehicles and tools. The vehicles that will be used on the surface of Mars have not been defined yet. Nevertheless, the results of our project already show that using a light and unpressurized vehicle (in the order of 150 kg) for the mobility on the Martian surface can be a true advantage. Part of the study was dedicated to the search for appropriate tools that could be used to make

  19. 3D unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.

    1997-12-31

    Three unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes are currently being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first code is ATTILA, which uses an unstructured tetrahedral mesh in conjunction with standard Sn (discrete-ordinates) angular discretization, standard multigroup energy discretization, and linear-discontinuous spatial differencing. ATTILA solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation using source iteration in conjunction with diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. DANTE is designed to run primarily on workstations. The second code is DANTE, which uses a hybrid finite-element mesh consisting of arbitrary combinations of hexahedra, wedges, pyramids, and tetrahedra. DANTE solves several second-order self-adjoint forms of the transport equation including the even-parity equation, the odd-parity equation, and a new equation called the self-adjoint angular flux equation. DANTE also offers three angular discretization options: $S{_}n$ (discrete-ordinates), $P{_}n$ (spherical harmonics), and $SP{_}n$ (simplified spherical harmonics). DANTE is designed to run primarily on massively parallel message-passing machines, such as the ASCI-Blue machines at LANL and LLNL. The third code is PERICLES, which uses the same hybrid finite-element mesh as DANTE, but solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation rather than a second-order self-adjoint form. DANTE uses a standard $S{_}n$ discretization in angle in conjunction with trilinear-discontinuous spatial differencing, and diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. PERICLES was initially designed to run on workstations, but a version for massively parallel message-passing machines will be built. The three codes will be described in detail and computational results will be presented.

  20. SCALE 6.2 Continuous-Energy TSUNAMI-3D Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Rearden, Bradley T

    2015-01-01

    The TSUNAMI (Tools for Sensitivity and UNcertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation) capabilities within the SCALE code system make use of sensitivity coefficients for an extensive number of criticality safety applications, such as quantifying the data-induced uncertainty in the eigenvalue of critical systems, assessing the neutronic similarity between different systems, quantifying computational biases, and guiding nuclear data adjustment studies. The need to model geometrically complex systems with improved ease of use and fidelity and the desire to extend TSUNAMI analysis to advanced applications have motivated the development of a SCALE 6.2 module for calculating sensitivity coefficients using three-dimensional (3D) continuous-energy (CE) Monte Carlo methods: CE TSUNAMI-3D. This paper provides an overview of the theory, implementation, and capabilities of the CE TSUNAMI-3D sensitivity analysis methods. CE TSUNAMI contains two methods for calculating sensitivity coefficients in eigenvalue sensitivity applications: (1) the Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) method and (2) the Contributon-Linked eigenvalue sensitivity/Uncertainty estimation via Track length importance CHaracterization (CLUTCH) method. This work also presents the GEneralized Adjoint Response in Monte Carlo method (GEAR-MC), a first-of-its-kind approach for calculating adjoint-weighted, generalized response sensitivity coefficients—such as flux responses or reaction rate ratios—in CE Monte Carlo applications. The accuracy and efficiency of the CE TSUNAMI-3D eigenvalue sensitivity methods are assessed from a user perspective in a companion publication, and the accuracy and features of the CE TSUNAMI-3D GEAR-MC methods are detailed in this paper.

  1. The forward sensitivity and adjoint-state methods of glacial isostatic adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinec, Zdeněk; Sasgen, Ingo; Velímský, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new method for computing the sensitivity of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) forward solution with respect to the Earth's mantle viscosity, the so-called the forward sensitivity method (FSM), and a method for computing the gradient of data misfit with respect to viscosity parameters, the so-called adjoint-state method (ASM), are presented. These advanced formal methods complement each other in the inverse modelling of GIA-related observations. When solving this inverse problem, the first step is to calculate the forward sensitivities by the FSM and use them to fix the model parameters that do not affect the forward model solution, as well as identifying and removing redundant parts of the inferred viscosity structure. Once the viscosity model is optimized in view of the forward sensitivities, the minimization of the data misfit with respect to the viscosity parameters can be carried out by a gradient technique which makes use of the ASM. The aim is this paper is to derive the FSM and ASM in the forms that are closely associated with the forward solver of GIA developed by Martinec. Since this method is based on a continuous form of the forward model equations, which are then discretized by spectral and finite elements, we first derive the continuous forms of the FSM and ASM and then discretize them by the spectral and finite elements used in the discretization of the forward model equations. The advantage of this approach is that all three methods (forward, FSM and ASM) have the same matrix of equations and use the same methodology for the implementation of the time evolution of stresses. The only difference between the forward method and the FSM and ASM is that the different numerical differencing schemes for the time evolution of the Maxwell and generalized Maxwell viscous stresses are applied in the respective methods. However, it requires only a little extra computational time for carrying out the FSM and ASM numerically. An

  2. AN EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN LOCALIZED ADJOINT METHOD FOR THE ADVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many numerical methods use characteristic analysis to accommodate the advective component of transport. Such characteristic methods include Eulerian-Lagrangian methods (ELM), modified method of characteristics (MMOC), and operator splitting methods. A generalization of characteri...

  3. Capabilities and Incapabilities of the Capabilities Approach to Health Justice.

    PubMed

    Selgelid, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    This first part of this article critiques Sridhar Venkatapuram's conception of health as a capability. It argues that Venkatapuram relies on the problematic concept of dignity, implies that those who are unhealthy lack lives worthy of dignity (which seems politically incorrect), sets a low bar for health, appeals to metaphysically problematic thresholds, fails to draw clear connections between appealed-to capabilities and health, and downplays the importance/relevance of health functioning. It concludes by questioning whether justice entitlements should pertain to the capability for health versus health achievements, challenging Venkatapuram's claims about the strength of health entitlements, and demonstrating that the capabilities approach is unnecessary to address social determinants of health.

  4. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    DOE PAGES

    Jakeman, J. D.; Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity. We show that utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this papermore » we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.« less

  5. Adjoint Method and Predictive Control for 1-D Flow in NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ardema, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a modeling method and a new optimal control approach to investigate a Mach number control problem for the NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. The flow in the wind tunnel is modeled by the 1-D unsteady Euler equations whose boundary conditions prescribe a controlling action by a compressor. The boundary control inputs to the compressor are in turn controlled by a drive motor system and an inlet guide vane system whose dynamics are modeled by ordinary differential equations. The resulting Euler equations are thus coupled to the ordinary differential equations via the boundary conditions. Optimality conditions are established by an adjoint method and are used to develop a model predictive linear-quadratic optimal control for regulating the Mach number due to a test model disturbance during a continuous pitch

  6. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Jakeman, J. D.; Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity. We show that utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this paper we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.

  7. INVERSE ESTIMATION OF BED ROUGHNESS COEFFICIENTS IN OPEN-CHANNELS WITH FLOOD PLAINS BY USING ADJOINT SHALLOW-WATER MODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Keisuke

    This study describes the methodology on an inverse estimation of the bed roughness coefficients in open-channels with flood plains. The coefficients are identified by an adjoint shallow-water model and an optimal control theory. Several twin experiments were carried out with the synthetic data in order to validate the method. The data assimilated consists of values of the water level and depth-averaged velocity. The results showed that the coefficients can be accurately predicted with the velocity data, while the estimation fails with the water level data. This is because the cross-sectionally distributed bed roughness does not always influence the lateral profile of the water level, but the local velocity field. Namely, the relation between the lateral profile of the water level and the bed roughness turns out to be non-unique in open-channels with flood plains.

  8. Joint Inversion of Mantle Viscosity and Thermal Structure: Applications of the Adjoint of Mantle Convection with Observational Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Gurnis, M.

    2007-12-01

    The adjoint method widely used in meteorology and oceanography was introduced into mantle convection by Bunge et al (2003) and Ismail et al (2004). We implemented the adjoint method in CitcomS, a finite-element code that solves for thermal convection within a spherical shell. This method constrains the initial condition by minimizing the mismatch of prediction to observation. Since the present day mantle thermal structure is inferred from seismic tomography, we converted seismic velocity to temperature, an uncertain conversion. Moreover, since mantle viscosity is also uncertain, the inference of mantle initial conditions from tomography is not unique. We have developed a method that incorporates dynamic topography as an additional constraint and are able to jointly invert for mantle viscosity and the seismic to thermal scaling. We assume the thermal structure of present day mantle has the same ¡°pattern¡± as inferred from tomography, but leave the scaling to temperature as an unknown. The other constraint is the evolving dynamic topography recorded at specific points on earth's surface. From the governing equations of mantle convection, we derive the relations between dynamic topography, thermal anomaly and mantle viscosities. These relations allow a two- layer looping algorithm that inverts for viscosity and thermal anomaly: the inner loop takes the tomographic image as a constraint and the outer loop takes dynamic topography and its rate of change. Starting with incorrect values of thermal anomaly and viscosities, we show with synthetic experiments that all variables converge to their correct values after a finite number of iterations. Our method is examined both in a uniformly viscous mantle and a mantle with depth- and temperature-dependent viscosity. The method has been applied to the descent of the Farallon slab beneath North America.

  9. Waveform Inversion of OBS Data and Illumination/Resolution Analyses on Marine Seismic Data Acquisitions by the Adjoint Wavefield Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Li, K.

    2012-12-01

    We applied a wave-equation based adjoint wavefield method for seismic illumination/resolution analyses and full waveform inversion. A two-way wave-equation is used to calculate directional and diffracted energy fluxes for waves propagating between sources and receivers to the subsurface target. The first-order staggered-grid pressure-velocity formulation, which lacks the characteristic of being self-adjoint is further validated and corrected to render the modeling operator before its practical application. Despite most published papers on synthetic kernel research, realistic applications to two field experiments are demonstrated and emphasize its practical needs. The Fréchet sensitivity kernels are used to quantify the target illumination conditions. For realistic illumination measurements and resolution analyses, two completely different survey geometries and nontrivial pre-conditioning strategies based on seismic data type are demonstrated and compared. From illumination studies, particle velocity responses are more sensitive to lateral velocity variations than pressure records. For waveform inversion, the more accurately estimated velocity model obtained the deeper the depth of investigation would be reached. To achieve better resolution and illumination, closely spaced OBS receiver interval is preferred. Based on the results, waveform inversion is applied for a gas hydrate site in Taiwan for shallow structure and BSR detection. Full waveform approach potentially provides better depth resolution than ray approach. The quantitative analyses, a by-product of full waveform inversion, are useful for quantifying seismic processing and depth migration strategies.llumination/resolution analysis for a 3D MCS/OBS survey in 2008. Analysis of OBS data shows that pressure (top), horizontal (middle) and vertical (bottom) velocity records produce different resolving power for gas hydrate exploration. ull waveform inversion of 8 OBS data along Yuan-An Ridge in SW Taiwan

  10. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.

  11. Transit satellite system timing capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finsod, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    Current time transfer capabilities of the Transit Satellite System are reviewed. Potential improvements in the changes in equipment and operational procedures using operational satellites are discussed.

  12. Molecular Contamination Investigation Facility (MCIF) Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soules, David M.

    2013-01-01

    This facility was used to guide the development of ASTM E 1559 center dot Multiple Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs), large sample and spectral effects capability center dot Several instrumented, high vacuum chamber systems are used to evaluate the molecular outgassing characteristics of materials, flight components and other sensitive surfaces. Test materials for spacecraft/instrument selection center.Test flight components for acceptable molecular outgas levels center dot Determine time/temperature vacuum bake-out requirements center. Data used to set limits for use of materials and specific components center. Provide Input Data to Contamination Transport Models -Applied to numerous flight projects over the past 20 years.

  13. Marshall Space Flight Center Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Jeffrey T.

    2005-01-01

    The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has over 50 facilities across 400+ acres inside a secure, fenced facility. The entire Center is located inside the boundaries of Redstone Arsenal, a 40,000 acre military reservation. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength, structural dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

  14. Final Report for Project "Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations (FACETS)"

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, Donald

    2014-01-17

    This is the final report for the Colorado State University Component of the FACETS Project. FACETS was focused on the development of a multiphysics, parallel framework application that could provide the capability to enable whole-device fusion reactor modeling and, in the process, the development of the modeling infrastructure and computational understanding needed for ITER. It was intended that FACETS be highly flexible, through the use of modern computational methods, including component technology and object oriented design, to facilitate switching from one model to another for a given aspect of the physics, and making it possible to use simplified models for rapid turnaround or high-fidelity models that will take advantage of the largest supercomputer hardware. FACETS was designed in a heterogeneous parallel context, where different parts of the application can take advantage through parallelism based on task farming, domain decomposition, and/or pipelining as needed and applicable. As with all fusion simulations, an integral part of the FACETS project was treatment of the coupling of different physical processes at different scales interacting closely. A primary example for the FACETS project is the coupling of existing core and edge simulations, with the transport and wall interactions described by reduced models. However, core and edge simulations themselves involve significant coupling of different processes with large scale differences. Numerical treatment of coupling is impacted by a number of factors including, scale differences, form of information transferred between processes, implementation of solvers for different codes, and high performance computing concerns. Operator decomposition involving the computation of the individual processes individually using appropriate simulation codes and then linking/synchronizing the component simulations at regular points in space and time, is the defacto approach to high performance simulation of multiphysics

  15. Real data assimilation for optimization of frictional parameters and prediction of afterslip in the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake inferred from slip velocity by an adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Shin'ichi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Hiyoshi, Yoshihisa; Ito, Kosuke; Hirahara, Kazuro

    2015-10-01

    Data assimilation is a technique that optimizes the parameters used in a numerical model with a constraint of model dynamics achieving the better fit to observations. Optimized parameters can be utilized for the subsequent prediction with a numerical model and predicted physical variables are presumably closer to observations that will be available in the future, at least, comparing to those obtained without the optimization through data assimilation. In this work, an adjoint data assimilation system is developed for optimizing a relatively large number of spatially inhomogeneous frictional parameters during the afterslip period in which the physical constraints are a quasi-dynamic equation of motion and a laboratory derived rate and state dependent friction law that describe the temporal evolution of slip velocity at subduction zones. The observed variable is estimated slip velocity on the plate interface. Before applying this method to the real data assimilation for the afterslip of the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, a synthetic data assimilation experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of optimizing the frictional parameters in the afterslip area. It is confirmed that the current system is capable of optimizing the frictional parameters A-B, A and L by adopting the physical constraint based on a numerical model if observations capture the acceleration and decaying phases of slip on the plate interface. On the other hand, it is unlikely to constrain the frictional parameters in the region where the amplitude of afterslip is less than 1.0 cm d-1. Next, real data assimilation for the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake is conducted to incorporate slip velocity data inferred from time dependent inversion of Global Navigation Satellite System time-series. The optimized values of A-B, A and L are O(10 kPa), O(102 kPa) and O(10 mm), respectively. The optimized frictional parameters yield the better fit to the observations and the better prediction skill of slip

  16. Indigenous Research Capability in Aotearoa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormond, Adreanne; Williams, Les R. Tumoana

    2013-01-01

    This article begins by considering the general nature of capability, from some dictionary meanings, then extends to theoretical perspectives related to the capability approach. As a consequence, we arrive at an operational definition that emphasises the ability to solve problems in a systematic way that brings transformation. In these terms,…

  17. Connecting Curriculum, Capabilities and Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ian; Depasquale, James

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The reported research aims to examine the extent to which sustainability capabilities have been delivered by a specific example of Education for Sustainability (EfS) and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), and how important the capabilities have been in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach Students who participated in an…

  18. EARA2014 (East Asia Radially Anisotropic Model Based on Adjoint Tomography) and its Interpretations: Insights to the Formation of the Hangai Dome and the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Niu, F.; Liu, Q.; Tromp, J.

    2015-12-01

    EARA2014 -a 3-D radially anisotropic model of the crust and mantle beneath East Asia down to 900 km depth- is developed by adjoint tomography based on a spectral element method. The data set used for the inversion comprises 1.7 million frequency-dependent traveltime measurements from waveforms of 227 earthquakes recorded by 1869 stations. After 20 iterations, the new model (named EARA2014) exhibits sharp and detailed wave speed anomalies with improved correlations with surface tectonic units compared to previous models. As part of tectonic interpretations of EARA2014, we investigated the seismic wavespeed anomalies beneath two prominent uplifted regions in East Asia: (1) Hangai Dome, an intra-continental low-relief surface with more than 2 km elevation in central Mongolia, and (2) Tibetan Plateau, a vast continental-margin surface with an average elevation of 4.5 km in west China. We discover beneath Hangai Dome a deep low shear wavespeed (low-V) conduit indicating a slightly warmer (54 K-127 K) upwelling from the transition zone. We propose that the mantle upwelling induced decompression melting in the uppermost mantle and that excess heat associated with melt transport modified the lithosphere that isostatically compensates the surface uplift of Hangai Dome at upper mantle depths (> 80 km). On the other hand, we observe no discernable focused deep mantle upwelling directly beneath Tibetan Plateau, which is instead dominated by a strong high-V structure, appearing below 100 km depth and extending to the bottom of the mantle transition zone. However, we find a very strong and localized low-V anomaly beneath the Tibetan Plateau in the crust and uppermost mantle (at depths of ~50 km and 100 km) mainly confined within the Songpan Ganzi Fold Belt and the northern Qiangtang Block. This low-V anomaly is spatially linked to a low-V anomaly beneath the Chuandian Block in the same depth range, which is fed by a deep mantle upwelling directly beneath Hainan Volcano in south

  19. NASA Capability Roadmaps Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willcoxon, Rita; Thronson, Harley; Varsi, Guilio; Mueller, Robert; Regenie, Victoria; Inman, Tom; Crooke, Julie; Coulter, Dan

    2005-01-01

    This document is the result of eight months of hard work and dedication from NASA, industry, other government agencies, and academic experts from across the nation. It provides a summary of the capabilities necessary to execute the Vision for Space Exploration and the key architecture decisions that drive the direction for those capabilities. This report is being provided to the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) team for consideration in development of an architecture approach and investment strategy to support NASA future mission, programs and budget requests. In addition, it will be an excellent reference for NASA's strategic planning. A more detailed set of roadmaps at the technology and sub-capability levels are available on CD. These detailed products include key driving assumptions, capability maturation assessments, and technology and capability development roadmaps.

  20. Combined assimilation of hydrography and TOPEX data into an Indian Ocean GCM using the adjoint method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marotzke, T. L. J.

    1997-01-01

    To study seasonal circulation and meridional heat transport of the Indian Ocean by synthesizing dynamics with data, climatological monthly temperatures and salinities, surface heat and freshewater fluxes, and wind stresses, together with monthly ensembles of three years (93-95) of TOPEX-derived surface geostrophic velocity anomalies, are assimilated into an Indian Ocean GCM.

  1. Soviet Naval War Fighting Capabilities,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    This paper attempts to determine the levels of major Soviet combat forces in each of the ocean areas of the world and assess the capability of those forces to conduct warfighting operations from a standing, walking, or running start.

  2. Capability Test Design and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-13

    UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Joint Test and Evaluation Methodology (JTEM),Washington,DC,20301 8. PERFORMING...refinement process for testing in a joint environment (TIJE) 2. Review the methods and processes for an evaluation strategy refinement process 3...Environment System Design Document (SDD) JTEM Capability Test Methodology (CTM) v2.0 Event Management Plan Test Plan Joint Capability Evaluation (JCE

  3. Earth Science Capability Demonstration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation reviewing the Earth Science Capability Demonstration Project is shown. The contents include: 1) ESCD Project; 2) Available Flight Assets; 3) Ikhana Procurement; 4) GCS Layout; 5) Baseline Predator B Architecture; 6) Ikhana Architecture; 7) UAV Capability Assessment; 8) The Big Picture; 9) NASA/NOAA UAV Demo (5/05 to 9/05); 10) NASA/USFS Western States Fire Mission (8/06); and 11) Suborbital Telepresence.

  4. Direct Linearization and Adjoint Approaches to Evaluation of Atmospheric Weighting Functions and Surface Partial Derivatives: General Principles, Synergy and Areas of Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustino, Eugene A.

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the observable radiances as functions of atmospheric parameters and of surface parameters; the mathematics of atmospheric weighting functions (WFs) and surface partial derivatives (PDs) are presented; and the equation of the forward radiative transfer (RT) problem is presented. For non-scattering atmospheres this can be done analytically, and all WFs and PDs can be computed analytically using the direct linearization approach. For scattering atmospheres, in general case, the solution of the forward RT problem can be obtained only numerically, but we need only two numerical solutions: one of the forward RT problem and one of the adjoint RT problem to compute all WFs and PDs we can think of. In this presentation we discuss applications of both the linearization and adjoint approaches

  5. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a "special divergence-free" (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  6. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    DOE PAGES

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. Wemore » also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.« less

  7. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  8. Solving the transport equation with quadratic finite elements: Theory and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    At the 4th Joint Conference on Computational Mathematics, the author presented a paper introducing a new quadratic finite element scheme (QFEM) for solving the transport equation. In the ensuing year the author has obtained considerable experience in the application of this method, including solution of eigenvalue problems, transmission problems, and solution of the adjoint form of the equation as well as the usual forward solution. He will present detailed results, and will also discuss other refinements of his transport codes, particularly for 3-dimensional problems on rectilinear and non-rectilinear grids.

  9. Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin W

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

  10. Towards expanding megasonic cleaning capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhenxing; Ferstl, Berthold; Oetter, Günter; Dietze, Uwe; Samayoa, Martin; Dattilo, Davide

    2016-10-01

    Megasonic cleaning remains the industry's workhorse technology for particle removal on advanced 193i and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photomasks. Several megasonic cleaning technologies and chemistries have been proposed and implemented over the years in diverse production environments. The operational range of these process technologies, over a wide array of applications, is ultimately defined by measurable capability limits. As geometries continue to scale-down and new materials are introduced, existing cleaning technologies will naturally fade out of range and new capability is ultimately required. This paper presents a novel fundamental approach for expanding cleaning capability by use of high-frequency megasonics and tenside-based additives (BASF SELECTIPUR C-series). To this end, a sonoluminescence-based experimental test bench was configured to characterize and study the effects of various process parameters on cleaning performance, with a particular emphasis on cavitation-induced damage and enhancement of particle removal capabilities. The results from the fundamental studies provide a path forward towards delivering new cleaning capability by enabling high-frequency megasonic systems and tenside-based additives.

  11. Uncertain Representations of Sub-Grid Pollutant Transport in Chemistry-Transport Models and Impacts on Long-Range Transport and Global Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Zhu, Z.; Ott, L. E.; Molod, A.; Duncan, B. N.; Nielsen, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Sub-grid transport, by convection and turbulence, is known to play an important role in lofting pollutants from their source regions. Consequently, the long-range transport and climatology of simulated atmospheric composition are impacted. This study uses the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric model to study pollutant transport. The baseline model uses a Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert (RAS) scheme that represents convection through a sequence of linearly entraining cloud plumes characterized by unique detrainment levels. Thermodynamics, moisture and trace gases are transported in the same manner. Various approximate forms of trace-gas transport are implemented, in which the box-averaged cloud mass fluxes from RAS are used with different numerical approaches. Substantial impacts on forward-model simulations of CO (using a linearized chemistry) are evident. In particular, some aspects of simulations using a diffusive form of sub-grid transport bear more resemblance to space-biased CO observations than do the baseline simulations with RAS transport. Implications for transport in the real atmosphere will be discussed. Another issue of importance is that many adjoint/inversion computations use simplified representations of sub-grid transport that may be inconsistent with the forward models: implications will be discussed. Finally, simulations using a complex chemistry model in GEOS-5 (in place of the linearized CO model) are underway: noteworthy results from this simulation will be mentioned.

  12. Physical capability scale: psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara; Boltz, Marie; Galik, Elizabeth; Wells, Chris

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the psychometric testing of the Basic Physical Capability Scale. The study was a secondary data analysis of combined data sets from three studies. Study participants included 93 older adults, recruited from 2 acute-care settings and 110 older adults living in long-term care facilities. Rasch analysis was used for the testing of the measurement model. There was some support for construct validity based on the fit of the items to the scale across both samples. In addition, there was support for hypothesis testing as physical function was significantly associated with physical capability. There was evidence for internal consistency (Alpha coefficients of .77-.83) and interrater reliability based on an intraclass correlation of .81. This study provided preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the Basic Physical Capability Scale, and guidance for scale revisions and continued use.

  13. Estimating the time evolution of the geoid: An application of the adjoint method in global mantle circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horbach, A.; Bunge, H.-P.

    2012-04-01

    Forward simulations of mantle circulation processes in the Earth's interior suffer from the problem of an unknown initial condition, that is the temperature distribution of the past is not known a-priori. With the help of the adjoint method (Bunge (2003)), we are able to determine an optimal initial condition iteratively, given a temperature model of the present time. Here we use an s-wave tomography (Grand (1997)) as the estimator for present-day Earth structure. The seismic model is converted into temperature using a published self-consistent mineralogical model (Piazzoni (2007)), allowing us to constrain a time series of mantle flow consistent with the present-day estimator for the past 40 Myrs. Temperature fluctuations initiate density anomalies, which in turn influence the Earth's external gravitational field. Gravity provides an important constraint for geodynamic modelling. We find a very high correlation of our model geoid for the present time to current satellite derived geoid solutions. Furthermore, our models of paleo circulation allow us to determine time-series of the geoid for the past 40 Ma. Some remarkable geodynamic features can be recognized from our proof-of-concept models, especially the sinking of the Farallon and the Tethys slab through the Earth's mantle, and their associated effects on past topography and geoid.

  14. Second Order of Accuracy Stable Difference Schemes for Hyperbolic Problems Subject to Nonlocal Conditions with Self-Adjoint Operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Yildirim, Ozgur

    2011-09-01

    In the present paper, two new second order of accuracy absolutely stable difference schemes are presented for the nonlocal boundary value problem {d2u(t)/dt2+Au(t) = f(t) (0≤t≤1),u(0) = ∑ j = 1nαju(λj)+φ,ut(0) = ∑ j = 1nβjut(λj)+ψ,0<λ1<λ2<…<λn≤1 for differential equations in a Hilbert space H with the self-adjoint positive definite operator A. The stability estimates for the solutions of these difference schemes are established. In practice, one-dimensional hyperbolic equation with nonlocal boundary conditions and multidimensional hyperbolic equation with Dirichlet conditions are considered. The stability estimates for the solutions of difference schemes for the nonlocal boundary value hyperbolic problems are obtained and the numerical results are presented to support our theoretical statements.

  15. The Adjoint Method for The Optimization of Brachytherapy and Radiotherapy Patient Treatment Planning Procedures Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    D.L. Henderson; S. Yoo; M. Kowalok; T.R. Mackie; B.R. Thomadsen

    2001-10-30

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of the adjoint method, commonly used in the reactor physics community, for the optimization of radiation therapy patient treatment plans. Two different types of radiation therapy are being examined, interstitial brachytherapy and radiotherapy. In brachytherapy radioactive sources are surgically implanted within the diseased organ such as the prostate to treat the cancerous tissue. With radiotherapy, the x-ray source is usually located at a distance of about 1-metere from the patient and focused on the treatment area. For brachytherapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal placement of the radioactive sources, which delivers the prescribed dose to the disease tissue while simultaneously sparing (reducing) the dose to sensitive tissue and organs. For external beam radiation therapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal direction and intensity of beam, which provides complete coverage of the tumor region with the prescribed dose while simultaneously avoiding sensitive tissue areas. For both therapy methods, the optimal treatment plan is one in which the diseased tissue has been treated with the prescribed dose and dose to the sensitive tissue and organs has been kept to a minimum.

  16. Continuous-Energy Adjoint Flux and Perturbation Calculation using the Iterated Fission Probability Method in Monte Carlo Code TRIPOLI-4® and Underlying Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truchet, G.; Leconte, P.; Peneliau, Y.; Santamarina, A.; Malvagi, F.

    2014-06-01

    Pile-oscillation experiments are performed in the MINERVE reactor at the CEA Cadarache to improve nuclear data accuracy. In order to precisely calculate small reactivity variations (<10 pcm) obtained in these experiments, a reference calculation need to be achieved. This calculation may be accomplished using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® by using the eigenvalue difference method. This "direct" method has shown limitations in the evaluation of very small reactivity effects because it needs to reach a very small variance associated to the reactivity in both states. To answer this problem, it has been decided to implement the exact perturbation theory in TRIPOLI-4® and, consequently, to calculate a continuous-energy adjoint flux. The Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) method was chosen because it has shown great results in some other Monte Carlo codes. The IFP method uses a forward calculation to compute the adjoint flux, and consequently, it does not rely on complex code modifications but on the physical definition of the adjoint flux as a phase-space neutron importance. In the first part of this paper, the IFP method implemented in TRIPOLI-4® is described. To illustrate the effciency of the method, several adjoint fluxes are calculated and compared with their equivalent obtained by the deterministic code APOLLO-2. The new implementation can calculate angular adjoint flux. In the second part, a procedure to carry out an exact perturbation calculation is described. A single cell benchmark has been used to test the accuracy of the method, compared with the "direct" estimation of the perturbation. Once again the method based on the IFP shows good agreement for a calculation time far more inferior to the "direct" method. The main advantage of the method is that the relative accuracy of the reactivity variation does not depend on the magnitude of the variation itself, which allows us to calculate very small reactivity perturbations with high

  17. Experimental Validation: Subscale Aircraft Ground Facilities and Integrated Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Roger M.; Hostetler, Robert W., Jr.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Belcastro, Celeste M.; Belcastro, Christine M.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental testing is an important aspect of validating complex integrated safety critical aircraft technologies. The Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) Testbed is being developed at NASA Langley to validate technologies under conditions that cannot be flight validated with full-scale vehicles. The AirSTAR capability comprises a series of flying sub-scale models, associated ground-support equipment, and a base research station at NASA Langley. The subscale model capability utilizes a generic 5.5% scaled transport class vehicle known as the Generic Transport Model (GTM). The AirSTAR Ground Facilities encompass the hardware and software infrastructure necessary to provide comprehensive support services for the GTM testbed. The ground facilities support remote piloting of the GTM aircraft, and include all subsystems required for data/video telemetry, experimental flight control algorithm implementation and evaluation, GTM simulation, data recording/archiving, and audio communications. The ground facilities include a self-contained, motorized vehicle serving as a mobile research command/operations center, capable of deployment to remote sites when conducting GTM flight experiments. The ground facilities also include a laboratory based at NASA LaRC providing near identical capabilities as the mobile command/operations center, as well as the capability to receive data/video/audio from, and send data/audio to the mobile command/operations center during GTM flight experiments.

  18. Space Station Freedom capabilities for users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William W. L.; Snyder, Robert S.; Willenberg, Harvey J.

    1991-01-01

    Space Station Freedom's major objectives are to prepare for human space exploration by providing a long-duration, continuously habitable spacecraft in low earth orbit for physiology studies and for development of systems to support human presence in space and to enable laboratory and observational research in space. As a result of restructuring and the preliminary design review, designs of Space Station Freedom architecture and systems have progressed to the point where the accommodations for users can be well described. These capabilities are enumerated, covering such important resources as power and cooling, rack volume and external accommodations, crew time, data and command rates, and acceleration environment. Related items such as total energy, data management systems, and interfaces, station attitude, payload transportation, and on board and ground facilities are considered.

  19. Medical vest broadens treatment capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. S.

    1970-01-01

    Universal sized vest, with specially tailored pockets designed to hold medical supplies, provides first aid/first care medical teams with broadened on-site capability. Vest is made of nylon, tough fibrous materials, and polyvinyl chloride. Design facilitates rapid donning, doffing, and adjustment.

  20. Research for new UAV capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.; Leadabrand, R.

    1996-07-01

    This paper discusses research for new Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) capabilities. Findings indicate that UAV performance could be greatly enhanced by modest research. Improved sensors and communications enhance near term cost effectiveness. Improved engines, platforms, and stealth improve long term effectiveness.

  1. A Generalized Framework for Constrained Design Optimization of General Supersonic Configurations Using Adjoint Based Sensitivity Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karman, Steve L., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) sent out an NASA Research Announcement (NRA) for proposals soliciting research and technical development. The proposed research program was aimed at addressing the desired milestones and outcomes of ROA (ROA-2006) Subtopic A.4.1.1 Advanced Computational Methods. The second milestone, SUP.1.06.02 Robust, validated mesh adaptation and error quantification for near field Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), was addressed by the proposed research. Additional research utilizing the direct links to geometry through a CAD interface enabled by this work will allow for geometric constraints to be applied and address the final milestone, SUP2.07.06 Constrained low-drag supersonic aerodynamic design capability. The original product of the proposed research program was an integrated system of tools that can be used for the mesh mechanics required for rapid high fidelity analysis and for design of supersonic cruise vehicles. These Euler and Navier-Stokes volume grid manipulation tools were proposed to efficiently use parallel processing. The mesh adaptation provides a systematic approach for achieving demonstrated levels of accuracy in the solutions. NASA chose to fund only the mesh generation/adaptation portion of the proposal. So this report describes the completion of the proposed tasks for mesh creation, manipulation and adaptation as it pertains to sonic boom prediction of supersonic configurations.

  2. Aerothermodynamic Flight Simulation Capabilities for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles G.

    1998-01-01

    Aerothermodynamics, encompassing aerodynamics, aeroheating, and fluid dynamics and physical processes, is the genesis for the design and development of advanced space transportation vehicles and provides crucial information to other disciplines such as structures, materials, propulsion, avionics, and guidance, navigation and control. Sources of aerothermodynamic information are ground-based facilities, Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) and engineering computer codes, and flight experiments. Utilization of this aerothermodynamic triad provides the optimum aerothermodynamic design to safely satisfy mission requirements while reducing design conservatism, risk and cost. The iterative aerothermodynamic process for initial screening/assessment of aerospace vehicle concepts, optimization of aerolines to achieve/exceed mission requirements, and benchmark studies for final design and establishment of the flight data book are reviewed. Aerothermodynamic methodology centered on synergism between ground-based testing and CFD predictions is discussed for various flow regimes encountered by a vehicle entering the Earth s atmosphere from low Earth orbit. An overview of the resources/infrastructure required to provide accurate/creditable aerothermodynamic information in a timely manner is presented. Impacts on Langley s aerothermodynamic capabilities due to recent programmatic changes such as Center reorganization, downsizing, outsourcing, industry (as opposed to NASA) led programs, and so forth are discussed. Sample applications of these capabilities to high Agency priority, fast-paced programs such as Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV)/X-33 Phases I and 11, X-34, Hyper-X and X-38 are presented and lessons learned discussed. Lastly, enhancements in ground-based testing/CFD capabilities necessary to partially/fully satisfy future requirements are addressed.

  3. LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbeck, D.A.; Krantz, E.A.; Hunt, G.L.; Meyer, O.R.

    1980-01-01

    The outline of the LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program is presented. This program utilizes the LOFT (Loss-of-Fluid Test) reactor facility which is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the LOFT operational transient experiment series as a test bed for methods of enhancing the reactor operator's capability for safer operation. The design of an Operational Diagnotics and Display System is presented which was backfit to the existing data acquisition computers. Basic color-graphic displays of the process schematic and trend type are presented. In addition, displays were developed and are presented which represent safety state vector information. A task analysis method was applied to LOFT reactor operating procedures to test its usefulness in defining the operator's information needs and workload.

  4. Human-Centered Design Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Howard, Robert

    2009-01-01

    For NASA, human-centered design (HCD) seeks opportunities to mitigate the challenges of living and working in space in order to enhance human productivity and well-being. Direct design participation during the development stage is difficult, however, during project formulation, a HCD approach can lead to better more cost-effective products. HCD can also help a program enter the development stage with a clear vision for product acquisition. HCD tools for clarifying design intent are listed. To infuse HCD into the spaceflight lifecycle the Space and Life Sciences Directorate developed the Habitability Design Center. The Center has collaborated successfully with program and project design teams and with JSC's Engineering Directorate. This presentation discusses HCD capabilities and depicts the Center's design examples and capabilities.

  5. Determining your organization's 'risk capability'.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Bill; Hancock, Melinda

    2014-05-01

    An assessment of a provider's level of risk capability should focus on three key elements: Business intelligence, including sophisticated analytical models that can offer insight into the expected cost and quality of care for a given population. Clinical enterprise maturity, marked by the ability to improve health outcomes and to manage utilization and costs to drive change. Revenue transformation, emphasizing the need for a revenue cycle platform that allows for risk acceptance and management and that provides incentives for performance against defined objectives.

  6. Exploration Medical Capability - Technology Watch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, Michael; Watkins, Sharmila; Barr, Yael; Barsten, Kristina; Fung, Paul; Baumann, David

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the Technology Watch process are to identify emerging, high-impact technologies that augment current ExMC development efforts, and to work with academia, industry, and other government agencies to accelerate the development of medical care and research capabilities for the mitigation of potential health issues that could occur during space exploration missions. The establishment of collaborations with these entities is beneficial to technology development, assessment and/or insertion. Such collaborations also further NASA s goal to provide a safe and healthy environment for human exploration. The Tech Watch project addresses requirements and capabilities identified by knowledge and technology gaps that are derived from a discrete set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur on exploration missions. These gaps are addressed through technology readiness level assessments, market surveys, collaborations and distributed innovation opportunities. Ultimately, these gaps need to be closed with respect to exploration missions, and may be achieved through technology development projects. Information management is a key aspect to this process where Tech Watch related meetings, research articles, collaborations and partnerships are tracked by the HRP s Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element. In 2011, ExMC will be introducing the Tech Watch external website and evidence wiki that will provide access to ExMC technology and knowledge gaps, technology needs and requirements documents.

  7. The forward and adjoint sensitivity methods of glacial isostatic adjustment: Existence, uniqueness and time-differencing scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinec, Zdenek; Sasgen, Ingo; Velimsky, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    In this study, two new methods for computing the sensitivity of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) forward solution with respect to the Earth's mantle viscosity are presented: the forward sensitivity method (FSM) and the adjoint sensitivity method (ASM). These advanced formal methods are based on the time-domain,spectral-finite element method for modelling the GIA response of laterally heterogeneous earth models developed by Martinec (2000). There are many similarities between the forward method and the FSM and ASM for a general physical system. However, in the case of GIA, there are also important differences between the forward and sensitivity methods. The analysis carried out in this study results in the following findings. First, the forward method of GIA is unconditionally solvable, regardless of whether or not a combined ice and ocean-water load contains the first-degree spherical harmonics. This is also the case for the FSM, however, the ASM must in addition be supplemented by nine conditions on the misfit between the given GIA-related data and the forward model predictions to guarantee the existence of a solution. This constrains the definition of data least-squares misfit. Second, the forward method of GIA implements an ocean load as a free boundary-value function over an ocean area with a free geometry. That is, an ocean load and the shape of ocean, the so-called ocean function, are being sought, in addition to deformation and gravity-increment fields, by solving the forward method. The FSM and ASM also apply the adjoint ocean load as a free boundary-value function, but instead over an ocean area with the fixed geometry given by the ocean function determined by the forward method. In other words, a boundary-value problem for the forward method of GIA is free with respect to determining (i) the boundary-value data over an ocean area and (ii) the ocean function itself, while the boundary-value problems for the FSM and ASM are free only with respect to

  8. AN ADJOINT-BASED METHOD FOR THE INVERSION OF THE JUNO AND CASSINI GRAVITY MEASUREMENTS INTO WIND FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2016-04-01

    During 2016–17, the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close eccentric orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, obtaining high-precision gravity measurements for these planets. These data will be used to estimate the depth of the observed surface flows on these planets. All models to date, relating the winds to the gravity field, have been in the forward direction, thus only allowing the calculation of the gravity field from given wind models. However, there is a need to do the inverse problem since the new observations will be of the gravity field. Here, an inverse dynamical model is developed to relate the expected measurable gravity field, to perturbations of the density and wind fields, and therefore to the observed cloud-level winds. In order to invert the gravity field into the 3D circulation, an adjoint model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration. This tool is used for the examination of various scenarios, simulating cases in which the depth of the wind depends on latitude. We show that it is possible to use the gravity measurements to derive the depth of the winds, both on Jupiter and Saturn, also taking into account measurement errors. Calculating the solution uncertainties, we show that the wind depth can be determined more precisely in the low-to-mid-latitudes. In addition, the gravitational moments are found to be particularly sensitive to flows at the equatorial intermediate depths. Therefore, we expect that if deep winds exist on these planets they will have a measurable signature by Juno and Cassini.

  9. An Overview of Power Capability Requirements for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jose M.; Cataldo, Robert L.; Soeder, James F.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Hakimzadeh, Roshanak

    2005-01-01

    Advanced power is one of the key capabilities that will be needed to achieve NASA's missions of exploration and scientific advancement. Significant gaps exist in advanced power capabilities that are on the critical path to enabling human exploration beyond Earth orbit and advanced robotic exploration of the solar system. Focused studies and investment are needed to answer key development issues for all candidate technologies before down-selection. The viability of candidate power technology alternatives will be a major factor in determining what exploration mission architectures are possible. Achieving the capabilities needed to enable the CEV, Moon, and Mars missions is dependent on adequate funding. Focused investment in advanced power technologies for human and robotic exploration missions is imperative now to reduce risk and to make informed decisions on potential exploration mission decisions beginning in 2008. This investment would begin the long lead-time needed to develop capabilities for human exploration missions in the 2015 to 2030 timeframe. This paper identifies some of the key technologies that will be needed to fill these power capability gaps. Recommendations are offered to address capability gaps in advanced power for Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) power, surface nuclear power systems, surface mobile power systems, high efficiency power systems, and space transportation power systems. These capabilities fill gaps that are on the critical path to enabling robotic and human exploration missions. The recommendations address the following critical technology areas: Energy Conversion, Energy Storage, and Power Management and Distribution.

  10. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOEpatents

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  11. The Capabilities of Space Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Over the past two years the U.S. space station program has evolved to a three-phased international program, with the first phase consisting of the use of the U.S. Space Shuttle and the upgrading and use of the Russian Mir Space Station, and the second and third phases consisting of the assembly and use of the new International Space Station. Projected capabilities for research, and plans for utilization, have also evolved and it has been difficult for those not directly involved in the design and engineering of these space stations to learn and understand their technical details. The Committee on the Space Station of the National Research Council, with the concurrence of NASA, undertook to write this short report in order to provide concise and objective information on space stations and platforms -- with emphasis on the Mir Space Station and International Space Station -- and to supply a summary of the capabilities of previous, existing, and planned space stations. In keeping with the committee charter and with the task statement for this report, the committee has summarized the research capabilities of five major space platforms: the International Space Station, the Mir Space Station, the Space Shuttle (with a Spacelab or Spacehab module in its cargo bay), the Space Station Freedom (which was redesigned to become the International Space Station in 1993 and 1994), and Skylab. By providing the summary, together with brief descriptions of the platforms, the committee hopes to assist interested readers, including scientists and engineers, government officials, and the general public, in evaluating the utility of each system to meet perceived user needs.

  12. Relating health and climate impacts to grid-scale emissions using adjoint sensitivity modeling for the Climate and Clean Air Coalition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henze, D. K.; Lacey, F.; Seltzer, M.; Vallack, H.; Kuylenstierna, J.; Bowman, K. W.; Anenberg, S.; Sasser, E.; Lee, C. J.; Martin, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) was initiated in 2012 to develop, understand and promote measures to reduce short lived climate forcers such as aerosol, ozone and methane. The Coalition now includes over 30 nations, and as a service to these nations is committed to providing a decision support toolkit that allows member nations to explore the benefits of a range of emissions mitigation measures in terms of the combined impacts on air quality and climate and so help in the development of their National Action Plans. Here we will present recent modeling work to support the development of the CCAC National Action Plans toolkit. Adjoint sensitivity analysis is presented as a means of efficiently relating air quality, climate and crop impacts back to changes in emissions from each species, sector and location at the grid-scale resolution of typical global air quality model applications. The GEOS-Chem adjoint model is used to estimate the damages per ton of emissions of PM2.5 related mortality, the impacts of ozone precursors on crops and ozone-related health effects, and the combined impacts of these species on regional surface temperature changes. We show how the benefits-per-emission vary spatially as a function of the surrounding environment, and how this impacts the overall benefit of sector-specific control strategies. We present initial findings for Bangladesh, as well as Mexico, Ghana and Colombia, some of the first countries to join the CCAC, and discuss general issues related to adjoint-based metrics for quantifying air quality and climate co-benefits.

  13. Adjoint Methods for Adjusting Three-Dimensional Atmosphere and Surface Properties to Fit Multi-Angle Multi-Pixel Polarimetric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, William G.; Cairns, Brian; Bal, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    This paper derives an efficient procedure for using the three-dimensional (3D) vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) to adjust atmosphere and surface properties and improve their fit with multi-angle/multi-pixel radiometric and polarimetric measurements of scattered sunlight. The proposed adjoint method uses the 3D VRTE to compute the measurement misfit function and the adjoint 3D VRTE to compute its gradient with respect to all unknown parameters. In the remote sensing problems of interest, the scalar-valued misfit function quantifies agreement with data as a function of atmosphere and surface properties, and its gradient guides the search through this parameter space. Remote sensing of the atmosphere and surface in a three-dimensional region may require thousands of unknown parameters and millions of data points. Many approaches would require calls to the 3D VRTE solver in proportion to the number of unknown parameters or measurements. To avoid this issue of scale, we focus on computing the gradient of the misfit function as an alternative to the Jacobian of the measurement operator. The resulting adjoint method provides a way to adjust 3D atmosphere and surface properties with only two calls to the 3D VRTE solver for each spectral channel, regardless of the number of retrieval parameters, measurement view angles or pixels. This gives a procedure for adjusting atmosphere and surface parameters that will scale to the large problems of 3D remote sensing. For certain types of multi-angle/multi-pixel polarimetric measurements, this encourages the development of a new class of three-dimensional retrieval algorithms with more flexible parametrizations of spatial heterogeneity, less reliance on data screening procedures, and improved coverage in terms of the resolved physical processes in the Earth?s atmosphere.

  14. Green's formula and variational principles for cosmic-ray transport with application to rotating and shearing flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Jokipii, J. R.; Morfill, G. E.

    1994-01-01

    Green's theorem and Green's formula for the diffusive cosmic-ray transport equation in relativistic flows are derived. Green's formula gives the solution of the transport equation in terms of the Green's function of the adjoint transport equation, and in terms of distributed sources throughout the region R of interest, plus terms involving the particle intensity and streaming on the boundary. The adjoint transport equation describes the time-reversed particle transport. An Euler-Lagrange variational principle is then obtained for both the mean scattering frame distribution function f, and its adjoint f(dagger). Variations of the variational functional with respect to f(dagger) yield the transport equation, whereas variations of f yield the adjoint transport equation. The variational principle, when combined with Noether's theorem, yields the conservation law associated with Green's theorem. An investigation of the transport equation for steady, azimuthal, rotating flows suggests the introduction of a new independent variable H to replace the comoving frame momentum variable p'. For the case of rigid rotating flows, H is conserved and is shown to be analogous to the Hamiltonian for a bead on a rigidly rotating wire. The variable H corresponds to a balance between the centrifugal force and the particle inertia in the rotating frame. The physical interpretation of H includes a discussion of nonrelativistic and special relativistic rotating flows as well as the cases of aziuthal, differentially rotating flows about Schwarzs-child and Kerr black holes. Green's formula is then applied to the problem of the acceleration of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays by galactic rotation. The model for galactic rotation assumes an angular velocity law Omega = Omega(sub 0)(omega(sub 0)/omega), where omega denotes radial distance from the axis of rotation. Green's functions for the galactic rotation problem are used to investigate the spectrum of accelerated particles arising from

  15. Drop Tower and Aircraft Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation is a brief introduction to existing capabilities in drop towers and low-gravity aircraft that will be presented as part of a Symposium: Microgravity Platforms Other Than the ISS, From Users to Suppliers which will be a half day program to bring together the international community of gravity-dependent scientists, program officials and technologists with the suppliers of low gravity platforms (current and future) to focus on the future requirements and use of platforms other than the International Space Station (ISS).

  16. Space Shuttle mission extension capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, W. M., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Space Shuttle missions are currently limited to 11 days, primarily due to depletion of the power reactants (hydrogen and oxygen). A power system Mission Extension Kit (MEK) is described which could provide the capability to stay on orbit 10 additional days. These extra days would benefit Space Station construction and missions such as materials processing, earth and celestial observation, and life science studies (Spacelab). Other constraints to longer missions which may dictate minor Orbiter modifications will be discussed. The power system MEK is particularly desirable because of its existing flight qualified hardware which can be delivered within 3 to 4 years.

  17. Mobile Munitions Assessment System Field Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Snyder; D. A. Verrill; K. D. Watts

    1999-05-27

    The US has developed, stored, tested, and conducted disposal operations on various forms of chemical munitions for several decades. The remnants of these activities have resulted in the presence of suspect CWM at more than 200 sites in the US, the District of Columbia, and the US Virgin Islands. An advanced Mobile Munitions Assessment System (Phase II MMAS) has been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory under contract to the US Army's Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel for use in the assessment and characterization of ''non-stockpile'' chemical warfare materiel (CWM). The Phase II MMAS meets the immediate need to augment response equipment currently used by the US Army with a system that includes state-of-the-art assessment equipment and advanced sensors. The Phase II MMAS will be used for response to known storage and remediation sites. This system is designed to identify the munition type; evaluate the condition of the CWM; evaluate the environmental conditions in the vicinity of the CWM; determine if fuzes, bursters, or safety and arming devices are in place; identify the chemical fill; provide other data (e.g., meteorological data) necessary for assessing the risk associated with handling, transporting, and disposing of CWM; and record the data on a dedicated computer system. The Phase II MMAS is capable of over-the-road travel and air transport to any site for conducting rigorous assessments of suspect CWM. The Phase II MMAS utilizes a specially-designed commercial motor home to provide a means to transport an interactive network of non-intrusive characterization and assessment equipment. The assessment equipment includes radiography systems, a gamma densitometer system, a Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) system, a Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) system, air monitoring equipment (i.e., M-90s and a field ion spectroscopy system), and a phase determination

  18. Lunar material transport vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Charles D.; Lyons, Douglas; Wilkins, W. Allen, Jr.; Whitehead, Harry C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The proposed vehicle, the Lunar Material Transport Vehicle (LMTV), has a mission objective of efficient lunar soil material transport. The LMTV was designed to meet a required set of performance specifications while operating under a given set of constraints. The LMTV is essentially an articulated steering, double-ended dump truck. The vehicle moves on four wheels and has two identical chassis halves. Each half consists of a chassis frame, a material bucket, two wheels with integral curvilinear synchronous motors, a fuel cell and battery arrangement, an electromechanically actuated dumping mechanism, and a powerful microprocessor. The vehicle, as designed, is capable of transporting up to 200 cu ft of material over a one mile round trip per hour. The LMTV is capable of being operated from a variety of sources. The vehicle has been designed as simply as possible with attention also given to secondary usage of components.

  19. The polarimetric capabilities of NICMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, D. C.; Schmidt, G. D.; Lytle, Dyer

    1997-01-01

    The polarimetric capabilities of Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) are demonstrated from data obtained during the Early Release Observations of IRC+10216 and CRL 2688 (the Egg Nebula). Preflight Thermal Vacuum tests revealed that each polarizer has a unique polarizing efficiency, and that the position angle offsets differ from the nominal positions of O deg, 120 deg and 240 deg. Therefore an algorithm different from that of an ideal polarizer is required for proper reduction of astronomical polarimetry data. We discuss this new algorithm and the results of its application to NICMOS data. We also present preliminary estimates of the Instrumental Polarization, the sensitivity of the grisms to polarized light, and the accuracy of NICMOS imaging polarimetry for faint and low polarization objects. Finally, we suggest strategies for maximizing the success of NICMOS polarimetry observations.

  20. Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Sean

    2015-01-01

    While at the KSC, I was given the opportunity of assisting the Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office (SSCO) specifically the Propellant Transfer System (PTS) lead by my mentor, Brian Nufer. While waiting to test different components in the PTS, I was able to assist with testing for the Hose Management Assembly (HMA) and was able to work on a simulation in Labview. For the HMA, I was able to help with testing of a coating as well as to help test the durability of the pinch rollers in space. In Labview, I experimented with building a simulation for the PTS, to show where fluids and gases were flowing depending on which valves in the PTS were opened. Not all of the integrated parts required assembly level testing, which allowed me to test these parts individually by myself and document the results. I was also able to volunteer to assist project NEO, allowing me to gain some knowledge of cryogenic fluid systems.

  1. Titan II secondary payload capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butts, Aubrey J.; Nance, Milo; Odle, Roger C.

    Small satellite programs are often faced with the prospect of flying as a secondary payload because of size or funding considerations. This paper discusses a concept for flying such payloads on flights already scheduled on the Titan II SLV program over the next decade. The Titan II has the capability of inserting over 4200 lbs into LEO and larger payloads on ballistic trajectories from which higher orbits can be achieved when kick motors are used. Orbit changes are possible depending on the specific altitudes and payloads involved. Of the existing 13 remaining missions currently scheduled to fly on the Titan II SLV, excess performance is available on several missions that could be used to insert secondary payloads of up to 3000 lbs into their final orbit. This paper outlines an approach that would implement a secondary payload mission and allow small satellites to schedule a launch at a predetermined date through the year 2000.

  2. Integrated Urban Dispersion Modeling Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Kosovic, B; Chan, S T

    2003-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for developing a detailed understanding of three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). The accurate and timely prediction of the atmospheric dispersion of hazardous materials in densely populated urban areas is a critical homeland and national security need for emergency preparedness, risk assessment, and vulnerability studies. The main challenges in high-fidelity numerical modeling of urban dispersion are the accurate prediction of peak concentrations, spatial extent and temporal evolution of harmful levels of hazardous materials, and the incorporation of detailed structural geometries. Current computational tools do not include all the necessary elements to accurately represent hazardous release events in complex urban settings embedded in high-resolution terrain. Nor do they possess the computational efficiency required for many emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We are developing a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability, able to efficiently predict dispersion in diverse urban environments for a wide range of atmospheric conditions, temporal and spatial scales, and release event scenarios. This new computational fluid dynamics capability includes adaptive mesh refinement and it can simultaneously resolve individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features), treat complex building and structural geometries (e.g., stadiums, arenas, subways, airplane interiors), and cope with the full range of atmospheric conditions (e.g. stability). We are developing approaches for seamless coupling with mesoscale numerical weather prediction models to provide realistic forcing of the urban-scale model, which is critical to its performance in real-world conditions.

  3. Chemical Modeling for Studies of GeoTRACE Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Geostationary measurements of tropospheric pollutants with high spatial and temporal resolution will revolutionize the understanding and predictions of the chemically linked global pollutants aerosols and ozone. However, the capabilities of proposed geostationary instruments, particularly GeoTRACE, have not been thoroughly studied with model simulations. Such model simulations are important to answer the questions and allay the concerns that have been expressed in the atmospheric sciences community about the feasibility of such measurements. We proposed a suite of chemical transport model simulations using the EPA Models 3 chemical transport model, which obtains its meteorology from the MM-5 mesoscale model. The model output consists of gridded abundances of chemical pollutants and meteorological parameters every 30-60 minutes for cases that have occurred in the Eastern United States. This output was intended to be used to test the GeoTRACE capability to retrieve the tropospheric columns of these pollutants.

  4. Constraining Black Carbon Aerosol over Asia using OMI Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth and the Adjoint of GEOS-Chem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Li; Henze, David K.; Grell, Georg A.; Carmichael. Gregory R.; Bousserez, Nicolas; Zhang, Qiang; Torres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo; Lu, Zifeng; Cao, Junji; Mao, Yuhao

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the emissions and distribution of black carbon (BC) in the region referred to here as Southeastern Asia (70degE-l50degE, 11degS-55degN) are critical to studies of the atmospheric environment and climate change. Analysis of modeled BC concentrations compared to in situ observations indicates levels are underestimated over most of Southeast Asia when using any of four different emission inventories. We thus attempt to reduce uncertainties in BC emissions and improve BC model simulations by developing top-down, spatially resolved, estimates of BC emissions through assimilation of OMI observations of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) with the GEOS-Chem model and its adjoint for April and October of 2006. Overwhelming enhancements, up to 500%, in anthropogenic BC emissions are shown after optimization over broad areas of Southeast Asia in April. In October, the optimization of anthropogenic emissions yields a slight reduction (1-5%) over India and parts of southern China, while emissions increase by 10-50% over eastern China. Observational data from in situ measurements and AERONET observations are used to evaluate the BC inversions and assess the bias between OMI and AERONET AAOD. Low biases in BC concentrations are improved or corrected in most eastern and central sites over China after optimization, while the constrained model still underestimates concentrations in Indian sites in both April and October, possibly as a. consequence of low prior emissions. Model resolution errors may contribute up to a factor of 2.5 to the underestimate of surface BC concentrations over northern India. We also compare the optimized results using different anthropogenic emission inventories and discuss the sensitivity of top-down constraints on anthropogenic emissions with respect to biomass burning emissions. In addition, the impacts of brown carbon, the formulation of the observation operator, and different a priori constraints on the optimization are

  5. Generalized perturbation theory using two-dimensional, discrete ordinates transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, R.L.

    1980-06-01

    Perturbation theory for changes in linear and bilinear functionals of the forward and adjoint fluxes in a critical reactor has been implemented using two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport theory. The computer program DOT IV was modified to calculate the generalized functions GAMMA and GAMMA*. Demonstration calculations were performed for changes in a reaction-rate ratio and a reactivity worth caused by system perturbations. The perturbation theory predictions agreed with direct calculations to within about 2%. A method has been developed for calculating higher lambda eigenvalues and eigenfunctions using techniques similar to those developed for generalized functions. Demonstration calculations have been performed to obtain these eigenfunctions.

  6. Assessing the Tangent Linear Behaviour of Common Tracer Transport Schemes and Their Use in a Linearised Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdaway, Daniel; Kent, James

    2015-01-01

    The linearity of a selection of common advection schemes is tested and examined with a view to their use in the tangent linear and adjoint versions of an atmospheric general circulation model. The schemes are tested within a simple offline one-dimensional periodic domain as well as using a simplified and complete configuration of the linearised version of NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5). All schemes which prevent the development of negative values and preserve the shape of the solution are confirmed to have nonlinear behaviour. The piecewise parabolic method (PPM) with certain flux limiters, including that used by default in GEOS-5, is found to support linear growth near the shocks. This property can cause the rapid development of unrealistically large perturbations within the tangent linear and adjoint models. It is shown that these schemes with flux limiters should not be used within the linearised version of a transport scheme. The results from tests using GEOS-5 show that the current default scheme (a version of PPM) is not suitable for the tangent linear and adjoint model, and that using a linear third-order scheme for the linearised model produces better behaviour. Using the third-order scheme for the linearised model improves the correlations between the linear and non-linear perturbation trajectories for cloud liquid water and cloud liquid ice in GEOS-5.

  7. A Capabilities-Based Strategy for Army Security Cooperation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    practicability , and dual-utility. Criterion 1: Complementarity The first and most important criterion is the degree to which a candi- date niche capability...This document and trademark(s) contained herein are protected by law as indicated in a notice appearing later in this work . This electronic...SECURITY TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKFORCE AND WORKPLACE The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit research organization providing objective

  8. IT capabilities for the realization of the laboratory without walls.

    PubMed Central

    Covvey, H. D.

    1996-01-01

    This article presents the factors that are driving the restructuring of laboratory services and the information technology capabilities that are necessary to support the regionalized laboratory services organization. The overall need is for a trans-entity laboratory information system with point of care ordering and results reporting and enterprise-wide specimen transportation and tracking, that is interfaced with other information resources required for clinical decision-making, and patient care, operational, and financial management. PMID:8947739

  9. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  10. The application of the gradient-based adjoint multi-point optimization of single and double shock control bumps for transonic airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, K.; Nejati, A.; Chaharlang Kiani, K.; Taheri, R.

    2016-07-01

    A shock control bump (SCB) is a flow control method that uses local small deformations in a flexible wing surface to considerably reduce the strength of shock waves and the resulting wave drag in transonic flows. Most of the reported research is devoted to optimization in a single flow condition. Here, we have used a multi-point adjoint optimization scheme to optimize shape and location of the SCB. Practically, this introduces transonic airfoils equipped with the SCB that are simultaneously optimized for different off-design transonic flight conditions. Here, we use this optimization algorithm to enhance and optimize the performance of SCBs in two benchmark airfoils, i.e., RAE-2822 and NACA-64-A010, over a wide range of off-design Mach numbers. All results are compared with the usual single-point optimization. We use numerical simulation of the turbulent viscous flow and a gradient-based adjoint algorithm to find the optimum location and shape of the SCB. We show that the application of SCBs may increase the aerodynamic performance of an RAE-2822 airfoil by 21.9 and by 22.8 % for a NACA-64-A010 airfoil compared to the no-bump design in a particular flight condition. We have also investigated the simultaneous usage of two bumps for the upper and the lower surfaces of the airfoil. This has resulted in a 26.1 % improvement for the RAE-2822 compared to the clean airfoil in one flight condition.

  11. The truncated Newton using 1st and 2nd order adjoint-state method: a new approach for traveltime tomography without rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretaudeau, F.; Metivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Virieux, J.

    2013-12-01

    Traveltime tomography algorithms generally use ray tracing. The use of rays in tomography may not be suitable for handling very large datasets and perform tomography in very complex media. Traveltime maps can be computed through finite-difference approach (FD) and avoid complex ray-tracing algorithm for the forward modeling (Vidale 1998, Zhao 2004). However, rays back-traced from receiver to source following the gradient of traveltime are still used to compute the Fréchet derivatives. As a consequence, the sensitivity information computed using back-traced rays is not numerically consistent with the FD modeling used (the derivatives are only a rough approximation of the true derivatives of the forward modeling). Leung & Quian (2006) proposed a new approach that avoid ray tracing where the gradient of the misfit function is computed using the adjoint-state method. An adjoint-state variable is thus computed simultaneously for all receivers using a numerical method consistent with the forward modeling, and for the computational cost of one forward modeling. However, in their formulation, the receivers have to be located at the boundary of the investigated model, and the optimization approach is limited to simple gradient-based method (i.e. steepest descent, conjugate gradient) as only the gradient is computed. However, the Hessian operator has an important role in gradient-based reconstruction methods, providing the necessary information to rescale the gradient, correct for illumination deficit and remove artifacts. Leung & Quian (2006) uses LBFGS, a quasi-Newton method that provides an improved estimation of the influence of the inverse Hessian. Lelievre et al. (2011) also proposed a tomography approach in which the Fréchet derivatives are computed directly during the forward modeling using explicit symbolic differentiation of the modeling equations, resulting in a consistent Gauss-Newton inversion. We are interested here in the use of a new optimization approach

  12. Global Search Capabilities of Indirect Methods for Impulsive Transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hong-Xin; Casalino, Lorenzo; Luo, Ya-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    An optimization method which combines an indirect method with homotopic approach is proposed and applied to impulsive trajectories. Minimum-fuel, multiple-impulse solutions, with either fixed or open time are obtained. The homotopic approach at hand is relatively straightforward to implement and does not require an initial guess of adjoints, unlike previous adjoints estimation methods. A multiple-revolution Lambert solver is used to find multiple starting solutions for the homotopic procedure; this approach can guarantee to obtain multiple local solutions without relying on the user's intuition, thus efficiently exploring the solution space to find the global optimum. The indirect/homotopic approach proves to be quite effective and efficient in finding optimal solutions, and outperforms the joint use of evolutionary algorithms and deterministic methods in the test cases.

  13. Monte Carlo capabilities of the SCALE code system

    DOE PAGES

    Rearden, Bradley T.; Petrie, Jr., Lester M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; ...

    2014-09-12

    SCALE is a broadly used suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a “plug-and-play” framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that can be selected based on the desired solution, including hybrid deterministic/Monte Carlo simulations. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport asmore » well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE’s graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2 will provide several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded continuous-energy Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Finally, an overview of the Monte Carlo capabilities of SCALE is provided here, with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2.« less

  14. Monte Carlo capabilities of the SCALE code system

    SciTech Connect

    Rearden, Bradley T.; Petrie, Jr., Lester M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Bekar, Kursat B.; Wiarda, Dorothea; Celik, Cihangir; Perfetti, Christopher M.; Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Hart, S. W. D.; Dunn, Michael E.; Marshall, William J.

    2014-09-12

    SCALE is a broadly used suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a “plug-and-play” framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that can be selected based on the desired solution, including hybrid deterministic/Monte Carlo simulations. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport as well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE’s graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2 will provide several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded continuous-energy Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Finally, an overview of the Monte Carlo capabilities of SCALE is provided here, with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2.

  15. Core capabilities and technical enhancement, FY-98 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L.

    1999-04-01

    The Core Capability and Technical Enhancement (CCTE) Program, a part of the Verification, Validation, and Engineering Assessment Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening the technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). An analysis of EM's science and technology needs as well as the technology investments currently being made by EM across the complex was used to formulate a portfolio of research activities designed to address EM's needs without overlapping work being done elsewhere. An additional purpose is to enhance and maintain the technical capabilities and research infrastructure at the INEEL. This is a progress report for fiscal year 1998 for the five CCTE research investment areas: (a) transport aspects of selective mass transport agents, (b) chemistry of environmental surfaces, (c) materials dynamics, (d) characterization science, and (e) computational simulation of mechanical and chemical systems. In addition to the five purely technical research areas, this report deals with the science and technology foundations element of the CCTE from the standpoint of program management and complex-wide issues. This report also provides details of ongoing and future work in all six areas.

  16. Core Capabilities and Technical Enhancement -- FY-98 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David Lynn

    1999-04-01

    The Core Capability and Technical Enhancement (CC&TE) Program, a part of the Verification, Validation, and Engineering Assessment Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening the technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Office of Environmental Management (EM). An analysis of EM's science and technology needs as well as the technology investments currently being made by EM across the complex was used to formulate a portfolio of research activities designed to address EM's needs without overlapping work being done elsewhere. An additional purpose is to enhance and maintain the technical capabilities and research infrastructure at the INEEL. This is a progress report for fiscal year 1998 for the five CC&TE research investment areas: (a) transport aspects of selective mass transport agents, (b) chemistry of environmental surfaces, (c) materials dynamics, (d) characterization science, and (e) computational simulation of mechanical and chemical systems. In addition to the five purely technical research areas, this report deals with the science and technology foundations element of the CC&TE from the standpoint of program management and complex-wide issues. This report also provides details of ongoing and future work in all six areas.

  17. Monte Carlo Capabilities of the SCALE Code System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rearden, B. T.; Petrie, L. M.; Peplow, D. E.; Bekar, K. B.; Wiarda, D.; Celik, C.; Perfetti, C. M.; Ibrahim, A. M.; Hart, S. W. D.; Dunn, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    SCALE is a widely used suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a "plug-and-play" framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that can be selected based on the desired solution, including hybrid deterministic/Monte Carlo simulations. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport as well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE's graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2, to be released in 2014, will provide several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded continuous-energy Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. An overview of the Monte Carlo capabilities of SCALE is provided here, with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2.

  18. Transportation: Destination Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eoff, Bill

    1998-01-01

    As the agency space transportation lead center, Marshall Space Flight Center has been conducting transportation assessments for future robotic and human Mars missions to identify critical technologies. Five human Mars options are currently under assessment with each option including all transportation requirements from Earth to Mars and return. The primary difference for each option is the propulsion source from Earth to Mars. In case any of the options require heavy launch capability that is not currently projected as available, an in-house study has been initiated to determine the most cost effective means of providing such launch capability. This assessment is only considering launch architectures that support the overall human Mars mission cost goal of $25B. The guidelines for the launch capability study included delivery of 80 metric ton (176 KLB) payloads, 25 feet diameter x 92 feet long, to 220 nmi orbits at 28.5 degrees. The launch vehicle concept of the study was designated "Magnum" to differentiate from prior heavy launch vehicle assessments. This assessment along with the assessment of options for all transportation phases of a Mars mission are on-going.

  19. Transportation: Destination Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eoff, Bill

    1998-01-01

    As the agency space transportation lead center, Marshall Space Flight Center has been conducting transportation assessments for future robotic and human Mars missions to identify critical technologies. Five human Mars options are currently under assessment with each option including all transportation requirements from Earth to Mars and return. The primary difference for each option is the propulsion source from Earth to Mars. In case any of the options require heavy launch capability that is not currently projected as available, an in-house study has been initiated to determine the most cost effective means of providing such launch capability. This assessment is only considering launch architectures that support the overall human Mars mission cost goal of 25B. The guidelines for the launch capability study included delivery of 80 metric ton (176 KLB) payloads, 25 feet diameter x 92 feet long, to 220 nmi orbits at 28.5 degrees. The launch vehicle concept of the study was designated "Magnum" to differentiate from prior heavy launch vehicle assessments. This assessment along with the assessment of options for all transportation phases of a Mars mission are on-going.

  20. An AMR capable finite element diffusion solver for ALE hydrocodes [An AMR capable diffusion solver for ALE-AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A. C.; Bailey, D. S.; Kaiser, T. B.; Eder, D. C.; Gunney, B. T. N.; Masters, N. D.; Koniges, A. E.; Anderson, R. W.

    2015-02-01

    Here, we present a novel method for the solution of the diffusion equation on a composite AMR mesh. This approach is suitable for including diffusion based physics modules to hydrocodes that support ALE and AMR capabilities. To illustrate, we proffer our implementations of diffusion based radiation transport and heat conduction in a hydrocode called ALE-AMR. Numerical experiments conducted with the diffusion solver and associated physics packages yield 2nd order convergence in the L2 norm.