Science.gov

Sample records for adjunct assistant professor

  1. Effective Use of Adjunct Professors in Educational Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonson, Stacey; Fisher, Alice

    The limited resources of most colleges and universities and the efforts of most higher education programs, including those in educational leadership, to comply with state and national standards mean that adjunct professors play a vital role in the success of an educational leadership program. This paper offers suggestions for maintaining the…

  2. Colorado Commission on Higher Education Adjunct Professor Benefits Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Commission on Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE) to determine the impact of providing health and dental benefits to adjunct professors who are employed by one or more public institution of higher education and teach an aggregate of 15 or more credit hours in a twelve month period. In order…

  3. To Many Adjunct Professors, Academic Freedom Is a Myth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Alison

    1999-01-01

    Reports that adjunct faculty, which accounts for half the professoriate, does not have academic freedom and can lose jobs for such usually protected activities as teaching controversial material, fighting grade changes, or organizing unions. Accounts of such activities are offered from Jefferson Community College (Kentucky), Chestnut Hill College…

  4. Student Attitudes toward Professors and Teaching Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, R. J.; Helsel, Diana G.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are the results of a survey of several classes in a college of agriculture to determine whether students had different attitudes about being taught by professors vs. teaching assistants. Data indicated that professionalism and course content are the most important variables to students. (CW)

  5. Academic Labor Markets and Assistant Professors' Employment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargens, Lowell L.

    2012-01-01

    Using data for 638 assistant professors who joined graduate sociology departments between 1975 and 1992, I examine the claim that when the labor market for new doctorates is weak, assistant professors experience less favorable employment outcomes than when that labor market is strong. Surprisingly, I find that those hired during the weak…

  6. Adjunct Accounting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesesne, Cherise

    2012-01-01

    With colleges and universities recruiting more adjunct professors, schools have been able to reduce the costly expenses of large salary and benefit packages that are typically associated with full-time employees. Yet, schools have started to re-evaluate their use of adjunct professors in order to comply with the Affordable Care Act (ACA), dubbed…

  7. An Examination of Assistant Professors' Project Management Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpert, Shannon Atkinson; Hartshorne, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to identify factors that influence the use of project management in higher education research projects by investigating the project management practices of assistant professors. Design/methodology/approach: Using a grounded theory approach that included in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 22…

  8. Improving College Instruction: A Strategy for Assisting Professors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightwell, D. Shelby

    This paper proposes a strategy for analyzing and improving a college professor's approach to teaching. The strategy uses volunteer observers and a simple checklist, the Teacher Observation Checklist, of positive teaching behaviors drawn from the literature. Since college professors' sensitivity to examination and evaluation is high, this strategy…

  9. How Entry-Level Assistant Professors Master the Art and Science of Successful Scholarship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Sandy; Davis, Keith M.; Christensen, Teresa M.; Duys, David K.; Glass, J. Scott; Portman, Tarrell; Schmidt, Eric A.; Veach, Laura J.

    2003-01-01

    This article features results of a participatory study focused on strategies used by 7 entry-level assistant professors to negotiate the challenges of writing and submitting successful scholarly research during their 1st year as counselor education faculty members. (Contains 20 references and 1 table.) (Author)

  10. The Academic Marketplace in the 1980s: Appointment and Termination of Assistant Professors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Dolores L.

    1987-01-01

    The 1958 Caplow and McGee study of patterns and problems of employment of assistant professors was replicated in the same universities, and the results are compared. It is concluded that human resource management in the academy could be improved, and that the onus for improvement is on the departments. (Author/MSE)

  11. Disposable Goods or Valued Resource: Appointment and Termination of Assistant Professors. ASHE 1987 Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Dolores L.

    The question of whether assistant professors are valued resources at colleges was investigated and compared to findings of a 1957 study by Caplow and McGee. Based on actual personnel actions, interviews were conducted with 306 department heads, nonterminated faculty colleagues, and new appointees. The interviews were concerned with the appointment…

  12. Does Instructor Type Matter? Undergraduate Student Perception of Graduate Teaching Assistants and Professors

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, K. Denise; Schussler, Elisabeth E.

    2012-01-01

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) are used extensively as instructors in higher education, yet their status and authority as teachers may be unclear to undergraduates, to administrators, and even to the GTAs themselves. This study explored undergraduate perception of classroom instruction by GTAs and professors to identify factors unique to each type of instructor versus the type of classes they teach. Data collection was via an online survey composed of subscales from two validated instruments, as well as one open-ended question asking students to compare the same class taught by a professor versus a GTA. Quantitative and qualitative results indicated that some student instructional perceptions are specific to instructor type, and not class type. For example, regardless of type of class, professors are perceived as being confident, in control, organized, experienced, knowledgeable, distant, formal, strict, hard, boring, and respected. Conversely, GTAs are perceived as uncertain, hesitant, nervous, relaxed, laid-back, engaging, interactive, relatable, understanding, and able to personalize teaching. Overall, undergraduates seem to perceive professors as having more knowledge and authority over the curriculum, but enjoy the instructional style of GTAs. The results of this study will be used to make recommendations for GTA professional development programs. PMID:22665591

  13. Does instructor type matter? Undergraduate student perception of graduate teaching assistants and professors.

    PubMed

    Kendall, K Denise; Schussler, Elisabeth E

    2012-01-01

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) are used extensively as instructors in higher education, yet their status and authority as teachers may be unclear to undergraduates, to administrators, and even to the GTAs themselves. This study explored undergraduate perception of classroom instruction by GTAs and professors to identify factors unique to each type of instructor versus the type of classes they teach. Data collection was via an online survey composed of subscales from two validated instruments, as well as one open-ended question asking students to compare the same class taught by a professor versus a GTA. Quantitative and qualitative results indicated that some student instructional perceptions are specific to instructor type, and not class type. For example, regardless of type of class, professors are perceived as being confident, in control, organized, experienced, knowledgeable, distant, formal, strict, hard, boring, and respected. Conversely, GTAs are perceived as uncertain, hesitant, nervous, relaxed, laid-back, engaging, interactive, relatable, understanding, and able to personalize teaching. Overall, undergraduates seem to perceive professors as having more knowledge and authority over the curriculum, but enjoy the instructional style of GTAs. The results of this study will be used to make recommendations for GTA professional development programs.

  14. Professor Age and Research Assistant Ratings of Passive-Avoidant and Proactive Leadership: The Role of Age-Related Work Concerns and Age Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacher, Hannes; Bal, P. Matthijs

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has shown that, in general, older professors are rated to have more passive-avoidant leadership styles than younger professors by their research assistants. The current study investigated professors' age-related work concerns and research assistants' favorable age stereotypes as possible explanations for this finding. Data came…

  15. Diode laser-assisted endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy: a comparison of three different combinations of adjunctive procedures.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Remzi; Meric, Aysenur; Ozsütcü, Mustafa; Yenigun, Alper

    2013-08-01

    Chronic dacryocystitis is a frequently encountered condition which can be corrected by dacryocystorhinostomy. Today, the diode laser is increasingly put to use in such corrective operations. This study aims to answer the questions of which adjunctive procedures and which combinations of such procedures are necessary and effective in securing more successful outcomes in diode laser dacryocystorhinostomy. This prospective randomized study included eighty patients (13 male, 67 female) who underwent dacryocystorhinostomy in our hospital during the 2 year period of January 2009-January 2011. The patients were selected consecutively and were randomly allocated to three groups. Group 1 (30): diode laser + mitomycin C + silicone intubation; Group 2 (27): diode laser + silicone intubation; Group 3 (23): diode laser + mitomycin C. All patients were evaluated postoperatively on day 1, week 1, and on the 1st, 3rd, 6th, 12th, 18th, and 24th months. The postoperative evaluation consisted of preoperative and postoperative ostium measurements, recording postoperative complications, and calculating and comparing success rates and operative times. The mean ages of the patients were 63.4 for Group 1, 60.7 for Group 2, and 61.8 for Group 3. No statistically significant difference was found among the groups regarding pre- and postoperative ostium measurements. The success rates were 84.3, 80, and 76.9 % for Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Complications noted in Group 1 were restenosis (3), premature silicone tube loss (1), development of granulation tissue (3), synechia (2), infection (2), and hemorrhage (3). Those for Group 2 were restenosis (5), premature tube loss (2), granulation (8), synechia (6), infection (3), and hemorrhage (4). Group 3 had 6 cases with stenosis, 5 with granulation, 3 with infection, 6 with synechia, and 5 with hemorrhage. The operative times of the groups were 25.5, 15.3, and 18.1 min, respectively, for Group 1, 2, and 3. All three groups had statistically

  16. Adjuncts Build Strength in Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2012-01-01

    When professors in positions that offer no chance of earning tenure begin to stack the faculty, campus dynamics start to change. Growing numbers of adjuncts make themselves more visible. They push for roles in governance, better pay and working conditions, and recognition for work well done. And they do so at institutions where tenured faculty,…

  17. Help! My Students Can't Write and I Can't Edit: An Analysis of Editing Training for Wilmington University Adjunct Professors to Address Inadequacies in Student Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This executive position paper proposes recommendations for the development of editing workshops and editing training for adjunct faculty of Wilmington University. An editing workshop was developed and taught to two groups of adjunct instructors at Wilmington University. Surveys distributed to the adjuncts after the workshops provide relevant data…

  18. Adjunct Professorships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2011-01-01

    Colleges of education have come to rely heavily on superintendents to teach graduate-level classes in educational administration. While no national organization tracks this phenomenon, anecdotal evidence points to widespread and perhaps growing involvement in the adjunct ranks. While the majority reported being assigned to teach semester-long…

  19. A Philosopher Stirs up the World of Adjuncts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2008-01-01

    Keith Hoeller is an adjunct professor. He teaches philosophy for a living at Green River Community College, just outside Seattle. He has also spent much of the last two decades ruminating about the bigger picture for those at his level of the professorial pecking order. Over the years, Hoeller has lobbied relentlessly for adjunct-friendly…

  20. Adjuncts Fight Back over Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Steven Bitterman was fired by his school after he offended his students for telling them that they could easily appreciate the biblical story of Adam and Eve if they considered it a myth. Several adjunct and full-time professors who work off the tenure track have been fired after saying something, as Mr. Bitterman did, that offended students or…

  1. Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) Program As a Useful Adjunct to Conventional Psychosocial Rehabilitation for Patients with Schizophrenia: Results of a Small-scale Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Paula; Fortuny, Joan R.; Guzmán, Sergio; Macías, Cristina; Bowen, Jonathan; García, María L.; Orejas, Olivia; Molins, Ferran; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J.; Bulbena, Antoni; Fatjó, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Currently, one of the main objectives of human–animal interaction research is to demonstrate the benefits of animal assisted therapy (AAT) for specific profiles of patients or participants. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of an AAT program as an adjunct to a conventional 6–month psychosocial rehabilitation program for people with schizophrenia. Our hypothesis is that the inclusion of AAT into psychosocial rehabilitation would contribute positively to the impact of the overall program on symptomology and quality of life, and that AAT would be a positive experience for patients. To test these hypotheses, we compared pre–program with post–program scores for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the EuroQoL-5 dimensions questionnaire (EuroQol-5D), pre–session with post–session salivary cortisol and alpha–amylase for the last four AAT sessions, and adherence rates between different elements of the program. We conducted a randomized, controlled study in a psychiatric care center in Spain. Twenty–two institutionalized patients with chronic schizophrenia completed the 6–month rehabilitation program, which included individual psychotherapy, group therapy, a functional program (intended to improve daily functioning), a community program (intended to facilitate community reintegration) and a family program. Each member of the control group (n = 8) participated in one activity from a range of therapeutic activities that were part of the functional program. In place of this functional program activity, the AAT–treatment group (n = 14) participated in twice–weekly 1–h sessions of AAT. All participants received the same weekly total number of hours of rehabilitation. At the end of the program, both groups (control and AAT–treatment) showed significant improvements in positive and overall symptomatology, as measured with PANSS, but only the AAT–treatment group showed a significant improvement in negative symptomatology

  2. Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) Program As a Useful Adjunct to Conventional Psychosocial Rehabilitation for Patients with Schizophrenia: Results of a Small-scale Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Paula; Fortuny, Joan R; Guzmán, Sergio; Macías, Cristina; Bowen, Jonathan; García, María L; Orejas, Olivia; Molins, Ferran; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J; Bulbena, Antoni; Fatjó, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Currently, one of the main objectives of human-animal interaction research is to demonstrate the benefits of animal assisted therapy (AAT) for specific profiles of patients or participants. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of an AAT program as an adjunct to a conventional 6-month psychosocial rehabilitation program for people with schizophrenia. Our hypothesis is that the inclusion of AAT into psychosocial rehabilitation would contribute positively to the impact of the overall program on symptomology and quality of life, and that AAT would be a positive experience for patients. To test these hypotheses, we compared pre-program with post-program scores for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the EuroQoL-5 dimensions questionnaire (EuroQol-5D), pre-session with post-session salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase for the last four AAT sessions, and adherence rates between different elements of the program. We conducted a randomized, controlled study in a psychiatric care center in Spain. Twenty-two institutionalized patients with chronic schizophrenia completed the 6-month rehabilitation program, which included individual psychotherapy, group therapy, a functional program (intended to improve daily functioning), a community program (intended to facilitate community reintegration) and a family program. Each member of the control group (n = 8) participated in one activity from a range of therapeutic activities that were part of the functional program. In place of this functional program activity, the AAT-treatment group (n = 14) participated in twice-weekly 1-h sessions of AAT. All participants received the same weekly total number of hours of rehabilitation. At the end of the program, both groups (control and AAT-treatment) showed significant improvements in positive and overall symptomatology, as measured with PANSS, but only the AAT-treatment group showed a significant improvement in negative symptomatology. Adherence to the AAT

  3. Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) Program As a Useful Adjunct to Conventional Psychosocial Rehabilitation for Patients with Schizophrenia: Results of a Small-scale Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Paula; Fortuny, Joan R; Guzmán, Sergio; Macías, Cristina; Bowen, Jonathan; García, María L; Orejas, Olivia; Molins, Ferran; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J; Bulbena, Antoni; Fatjó, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Currently, one of the main objectives of human-animal interaction research is to demonstrate the benefits of animal assisted therapy (AAT) for specific profiles of patients or participants. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of an AAT program as an adjunct to a conventional 6-month psychosocial rehabilitation program for people with schizophrenia. Our hypothesis is that the inclusion of AAT into psychosocial rehabilitation would contribute positively to the impact of the overall program on symptomology and quality of life, and that AAT would be a positive experience for patients. To test these hypotheses, we compared pre-program with post-program scores for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the EuroQoL-5 dimensions questionnaire (EuroQol-5D), pre-session with post-session salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase for the last four AAT sessions, and adherence rates between different elements of the program. We conducted a randomized, controlled study in a psychiatric care center in Spain. Twenty-two institutionalized patients with chronic schizophrenia completed the 6-month rehabilitation program, which included individual psychotherapy, group therapy, a functional program (intended to improve daily functioning), a community program (intended to facilitate community reintegration) and a family program. Each member of the control group (n = 8) participated in one activity from a range of therapeutic activities that were part of the functional program. In place of this functional program activity, the AAT-treatment group (n = 14) participated in twice-weekly 1-h sessions of AAT. All participants received the same weekly total number of hours of rehabilitation. At the end of the program, both groups (control and AAT-treatment) showed significant improvements in positive and overall symptomatology, as measured with PANSS, but only the AAT-treatment group showed a significant improvement in negative symptomatology. Adherence to the AAT

  4. Alloplastic adjuncts in breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cabalag, Miguel S.; Rostek, Marie; Miller, George S.; Chae, Michael P.; Quinn, Tam; Rozen, Warren M.

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been an increasing role of acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) and synthetic meshes in both single- and two-stage implant/expander breast reconstruction. Numerous alloplastic adjuncts exist, and these vary in material type, processing, storage, surgical preparation, level of sterility, available sizes and cost. However, there is little published data on most, posing a significant challenge to the reconstructive surgeon trying to compare and select the most suitable product. The aims of this systematic review were to identify, summarize and evaluate the outcomes of studies describing the use of alloplastic adjuncts for post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. The secondary aims were to determine their cost-effectiveness and analyze outcomes in patients who also underwent radiotherapy. Methods Using the PRSIMA 2009 statement, a systematic review was conducted to find articles reporting on the outcomes on the use of alloplastic adjuncts in post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. Multiple databases were searched independently by three authors (Cabalag MS, Miller GS and Chae MP), including: Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to present), Embase (1980 to 2015), PubMed and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Results Current published literature on available alloplastic adjuncts are predominantly centered on ADMs, both allogeneic and xenogeneic, with few outcome studies available for synthetic meshes. Outcomes on the 89 articles, which met the inclusion criteria, were summarized and analyzed. The reported outcomes on alloplastic adjunct-assisted breast reconstruction were varied, with most data available on the use of ADMs, particularly AlloDerm® (LifeCell, Branchburg, New Jersey, USA). The use of ADMs in single-stage direct-to-implant breast reconstruction resulted in lower complication rates (infection, seroma, implant loss and late revision), and was more cost effective when compared to non-ADM, two-stage reconstruction. The majority of studies demonstrated

  5. Professors Cede Grading Power to Outsiders--Even Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    The best way to eliminate grade inflation is to take professors out of the grading process: Replace them with professional evaluators who never meet students and don't worry that students will punish harsh grades with poor reviews. That's the argument made by leaders of Western Governors University, which has hired 300 adjunct professors who do…

  6. Why Are Associate Professors so Unhappy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Life as an associate professor with tenure can be even more isolating and overwhelming than being an assistant professor on the tenure track. The path to achieving what amounts to higher education's golden ring is well marked and includes guidance from more-experienced peers. But once a professor earns tenure, that guidance disappears, the amount…

  7. A Simple Spreadsheet Strikes a Nerve among Adjuncts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stratford, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Energized by his fellow adjunct professors who had gathered for a national meeting last month in Washington, District of Columbia, Joshua A. Boldt flew home to Athens, Georgia, opened his laptop, and created a Google document. On his personal blog, the writing instructor implored colleagues to contribute to the publicly editable spreadsheet,…

  8. Professor Avatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Andrea L.

    2008-01-01

    Despite its image as an all-American city, downtown Peoria, Illinois, home of Bradley University, is also a place of strip clubs and violent crime. For undergraduates, it's a risky environment in which to conduct field research. Edward Lamoureux, an associate professor in Bradley's multimedia program, saw a better place in the virtual world Second…

  9. Graduate Student Attitudes toward Professor Pedagogical Content Knowledge, Transformational Teaching Practices, Student-Professor Engagement in Learning, and Student Deep Learning in Worldwide Business and Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economos, Jennifer Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Some professors are expected to remain competitive research scholars, as well as teach, particularly in research-intensive universities. It has been argued that some professors spend too much time on research to obtain institutional incentives or promotion, and not enough time on teaching. Consequently, some adjuncts assume the responsibility for…

  10. The Entrepreneurial Adjunct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, John

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly, the higher education community is witnessing what the author calls the "entrepreneurial adjunct phenomenon": a kind of merchandising of the needs, concerns, and activities of faculty with short-term, often part-time, appointments that depend on factors like enrollment, budget, and program changes. These faculty members are called any…

  11. Professor Igor Yevseyev: In Memoriam Professor Igor Yevseyev: In Memoriam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-06-01

    Dear readers and authors, June 3, 2012 will mark five months since Professor Igor Yevseyev, Deputy Editor-in-Chief of both journals Laser Physics and Laser Physics Letters passed away, suddenly and unexpectedly. He was 67. Born in Moscow, he entered one of the world's best schools of physics, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI). With this renowned educational and research institution he bonded an alliance for his entire life, starting as an undergraduate student in the Department of Theoretical Physics and later continued as graduate student, assistant professor, associated professor, and full professor in the same department, a rare accomplishment of a person. All those years he retained the love of his life—the love for physics. He worked tirelessly as a teacher and scholar in this captivating field of knowledge. Professor Yevseyev was one of the founders of the international journal of Laser Physics in 1990, the first academic English language journal published in the former USSR. Later, in 2004, the second journal, Laser Physics Letters was brought to the forum of global laser physics community. The idea behind this new title was Professor Yevseyev's initiative to reach the readers and participants with new pioneering and break-through research results more rapidly. His leadership and indefatigable dedication to the quality of published materials made it possible that this journal reached international recognition in a few short years. Still, in order to attract even more attention of potential contributors and readers, Professor Yevseyev originally proposed to conduct the International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS) on the annual basis. Since 1992 the Workshop has been conducted every year, each year in a different country. As in all previous years, Professor Yevseyev was the key organizer of this year's workshop in Calgary, Canada. Sadly, this workshop will take place without him. Editorial Board

  12. Adjunctive behaviors are operants.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Peter R; Pellón, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    Adjunctive behaviors such as schedule-induced polydipsia are said to be induced by periodic delivery of incentives, but not reinforced by them. That standard treatment assumes that contingency is necessary for conditioning and that delay of reinforcement gradients are very steep. The arguments and evidence for this position are reviewed and rejected. In their place, data are presented that imply different gradients for different classes of responses. Proximity between response and reinforcer, rather than contingency or contiguity, is offered as a key principle of association. These conceptions organize a wide variety of observations and provide the rudiments for a more general theory of conditioning.

  13. Adjunctive behaviors are operants.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Peter R; Pellón, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    Adjunctive behaviors such as schedule-induced polydipsia are said to be induced by periodic delivery of incentives, but not reinforced by them. That standard treatment assumes that contingency is necessary for conditioning and that delay of reinforcement gradients are very steep. The arguments and evidence for this position are reviewed and rejected. In their place, data are presented that imply different gradients for different classes of responses. Proximity between response and reinforcer, rather than contingency or contiguity, is offered as a key principle of association. These conceptions organize a wide variety of observations and provide the rudiments for a more general theory of conditioning. PMID:23359373

  14. Adjuncts Matter: A Qualitative Study of Adjuncts' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Telvis M.

    2016-01-01

    The extrinsic factors that influence the workplace experiences of 27 adjuncts teaching online were explored. In this qualitative research study, the adjuncts' lived experiences were examined through in-depth interviews. The results indicated three emergent factors which influenced the participants' workplace experiences, and the alternative…

  15. Adjuncts Disjunct? Your Institution's Defunct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Laurel V.; Mulholland, Kevin

    At Valencia Community College's Osceola Campus, adjunct instructors make up over 75% of the teaching force. Adjunct faculty are given several challenges: to contribute to every aspect of campus life; to affect major instructional instruction; and to be aware of the constraints created by college policy and a regard for instructional excellence.…

  16. Caught in the Adjunct Trap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hose, Linda; Ford, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Based on personal experiences garnered through years of adjunct instruction, the authors explore the challenges associated with working in academia without the guarantees of a long-term contract or tenure. Further, adjuncts are desperate to accept any position that is remunerative and this willingness undermines contract negotiation leverage of…

  17. Career Technical Education Adjunct Faculty Teacher Readiness: An Investigation of Teacher Excellence and Variables of Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerra, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between teaching readiness and teaching excellence with three variables of preparedness of adjunct professors teaching career technical education courses through student surveys using a correlational design of two statistical techniques; least-squares regression and one-way analysis of…

  18. [Professor Ivan Tarchanoff].

    PubMed

    Widacki, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Napoleon Cybulski, generally recognised the father of Polish physiology, was first a student and later an assistant of Tarchanoff at the Chair of Medical and Surgical Physiology of the Imperial Medical-Surgical Academy in St Petersburg. A Professor of the Jagiellonian University himself (whose nomination, by the way, was supported among others on the recommendations from Tarchanoff), Cybulski was a co-discoverer of adrenaline, and one of the first researchers in the world to make an EEG recording. Tarchanoff's ties with Poland are far greater than his biographers would admit. He was more than just a teacher and a friend of Cybulski: after being dismissed from the Academy in St Petersburg , the scientist not only used to visit Kraków but published his scientific works here, built a house in the vicinity of the city, and here he died on 24th August 1908. His wife, Helena Antokolska-Tarchanoff was active in Kraków's artistic circles. Hints suggesting that Tarchanoff planned to spend the rest of his life in what at the time was Galicia are plenty. PMID:26076579

  19. [Professor Ivan Tarchanoff].

    PubMed

    Widacki, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Napoleon Cybulski, generally recognised the father of Polish physiology, was first a student and later an assistant of Tarchanoff at the Chair of Medical and Surgical Physiology of the Imperial Medical-Surgical Academy in St Petersburg. A Professor of the Jagiellonian University himself (whose nomination, by the way, was supported among others on the recommendations from Tarchanoff), Cybulski was a co-discoverer of adrenaline, and one of the first researchers in the world to make an EEG recording. Tarchanoff's ties with Poland are far greater than his biographers would admit. He was more than just a teacher and a friend of Cybulski: after being dismissed from the Academy in St Petersburg , the scientist not only used to visit Kraków but published his scientific works here, built a house in the vicinity of the city, and here he died on 24th August 1908. His wife, Helena Antokolska-Tarchanoff was active in Kraków's artistic circles. Hints suggesting that Tarchanoff planned to spend the rest of his life in what at the time was Galicia are plenty.

  20. Politicos Turned Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jamal E.

    2008-01-01

    While White politicians have long retreated to the academy in pursuit of highprofile jobs as professors and university presidents, the trend is relatively new for Black politicians who come to the academic setting after having served long political stints as state legislators, mayors and congressional leaders. Dr. Ronald Walters, a professor of…

  1. A Professor's Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melko, Matthew

    This book describes a year-long participant-observer case study of the professorship as a profession. Following an introductory chapter, each chapter examines one aspect of the professor's occupation by recounting the specific experiences of the author, a sociology professor at Wright State University (Ohio). Chapter 2 looks at the department as…

  2. University Curriculum Project--Professors Reflect on Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babbitt, Beatrice C.

    This paper describes the reflections of the university professors in eight colleges at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, who were pioneers in integrating assistive technology and related content into their courses and who continue to provide leadership in curricular change. Professors from the colleges of fine and performing arts, business,…

  3. Understanding Asperger Syndrome: A Professor's Guide [DVD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organization for Autism Research (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    College can be a trying time in any individual's life. For adults with Asperger Syndrome this experience can be overwhelming. This title in the new DVD series Asperger Syndrome and Adulthood focuses on educating professors, teaching assistants, and others on what it means to be a college student on the spectrum and how they might best be able to…

  4. Turning Practitioners into Professors: Exploring Effective Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Steven R.; Gustafson, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Presents results of focus interviews with 25 "practitioners turned professors" regarding their transition from industry to academia. Finds a general consensus that all advertising and public relations programs should implement a formal mentoring process to include teacher training and inservice, greater explanation of and assistance with promotion…

  5. Aesthetic adjuncts with orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Waheed V; Perenack, Jon D

    2014-11-01

    Traditional orthognathic surgery aligns the patient's bony jaws into a desired, more appropriate position but may leave other cosmetic issues unaddressed. Soft tissue deformities may be treated concomitantly with orthognathic surgery, including soft tissue augmentation (fillers), reduction (liposuction), hard tissue augmentation, cosmetic lip procedures, and rhinoplasty. Some cosmetic adjunctive procedures may be performed at a later date after soft tissue edema from orthognathic surgery has resolved to achieve a more predictable outcome. Undesired cosmetic changes may occur months to years after orthognathic surgery and may be addressed by adjunctive cosmetic procedures.

  6. Adjunctive alcohol drinking in humans.

    PubMed

    Doyle, T F; Samson, H H

    1988-01-01

    In an attempt to validate the animal model of adjunctive ethanol drinking in people, human subjects were allowed access to ad lib beer while playing a game that delivered monetary reinforcements on a FI schedule. Subjects exposed to a longer FI schedule drank significantly more than those exposed to a shorter schedule, confirming the prediction made by the animal model. A pattern of ingestion characteristic of adjunctive drinking was also observed in the longer FI condition, providing evidence that ethanol drinking in humans can be schedule-induced. PMID:3249751

  7. Qualifying Adjuncts Academic Worth and the Justification of Adjunct Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagnucco, Nicholas D.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation studies the organization of adjunct instruction within Departments of English and Mathematics at three colleges--a public research university, a private masters granting teaching college, and a public community college. Four questions lie at the core of this project. First, what higher principles and standards of evaluation (i.e.…

  8. Using an Online Curriculum Design and a Cooperative Instructional Approach to Orientate Adjunct Faculty to the Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Emily; Wang, Chihhsuan

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this study was to develop an orientation program that would assist adjunct faculty to gain specific competencies to facilitate an online course. The orientation curriculum employed a set of guiding questions that focused on the intellectual, cognitive, and applicable skills adjunct faculty would need to facilitate an online course. To…

  9. Adjunctive therapies for Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anita J; Burns, Jane C

    2016-07-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in developed countries.(1,2) The primary goal of treatment is to prevent coronary artery aneurysms (CAA). Between 10 and 20% of KD patients are resistant to treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and have an almost nine-fold increased risk of developing CAA.(3) In addition, approximately 80-90% of patients who go on to develop CAA have abnormal coronary artery dimensions on their first echocardiogram and can therefore be identified as high-risk patients. These two subsets of KD patients are candidates for adjunctive therapy, in addition to IVIG. Understanding the mechanism of action of IVIG may provide insight into IVIG resistance and guidance for choosing adjunctive therapies in KD. Therapeutic options in the treatment of refractory KD and patients with early CAA include additional IVIG, glucocorticoids, tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, calcineurin inhibitors and interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockers.(3-10) Animal studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of statins may also be beneficial in blocking CAA progression.(6) It is unlikely that these therapies will be studied in large, randomized controlled trials in the future due to required sample size and funding constraints. Thus, data from the research laboratory may be helpful in guiding selection of the most promising adjunctive therapies. PMID:27241708

  10. Professor Camillo Negro's Neuropathological Films.

    PubMed

    Chiò, Adriano; Gianetto, Claudia; Dagna, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Camillo Negro, Professor in Neurology at the University of Torino, was a pioneer of scientific film. From 1906 to 1908, with the help of his assistant Giuseppe Roasenda and in collaboration with Roberto Omegna, one of the most experienced cinematographers in Italy, he filmed some of his patients for scientific and educational purposes. During the war years, he continued his scientific film project at the Military Hospital in Torino, filming shell-shocked soldiers. In autumn 2011, the Museo Nazionale del Cinema, in partnership with the Faculty of Neurosciences of the University of Torino, presented a new critical edition of the neuropathological films directed by Negro. The Museum's collection also includes 16 mm footage probably filmed in 1930 by Doctor Fedele Negro, Camillo's son. One of these films is devoted to celebrating the effects of the so-called "Bulgarian cure" on Parkinson's disease. PMID:26684422

  11. Professor Camillo Negro's Neuropathological Films.

    PubMed

    Chiò, Adriano; Gianetto, Claudia; Dagna, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Camillo Negro, Professor in Neurology at the University of Torino, was a pioneer of scientific film. From 1906 to 1908, with the help of his assistant Giuseppe Roasenda and in collaboration with Roberto Omegna, one of the most experienced cinematographers in Italy, he filmed some of his patients for scientific and educational purposes. During the war years, he continued his scientific film project at the Military Hospital in Torino, filming shell-shocked soldiers. In autumn 2011, the Museo Nazionale del Cinema, in partnership with the Faculty of Neurosciences of the University of Torino, presented a new critical edition of the neuropathological films directed by Negro. The Museum's collection also includes 16 mm footage probably filmed in 1930 by Doctor Fedele Negro, Camillo's son. One of these films is devoted to celebrating the effects of the so-called "Bulgarian cure" on Parkinson's disease.

  12. Games Professors Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, James A.; Herzing, Thomas W.

    1969-01-01

    The games are Build a Reputation (REP), Confuse the Student (CON), Blame the Opposition (BOP), and Pass the Buck (BUCK). Professors play these games because they "want to show off on occasion, . . . want to get off the hook and avoid responsibility, . . . are prone to blame others, or simply because they are lazy. (WM)

  13. Profile: Professor Philippa Garety

    PubMed Central

    Bland, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Healthy professional one-upmanship is exemplified in Philippa Garety's position as a professor of clinical psychology, a clinical director and a joint leader of a psychosis clinical academic group. Julia Bland sought to discover whether psychiatrists have anything substantial to offer that psychologists cannot. PMID:27087997

  14. Adjunctive drug use among opiate addicts.

    PubMed

    Navaratnam, V; Foong, K

    1990-01-01

    In a study of 249 opiate (mainly heroin) addicts special attention was paid to adjunctive drug use. Generally, nicotine (cigarette smoking), alcohol and cannabis preceded the use of heroin, and continued to be used as adjunctive drugs after the establishment of heroin addiction. Nicotine was the most common substance used together with opiates. Alcohol and cannabis were used as adjunctive drugs in about two-thirds of the cases. In the late stages of heroin addiction, benzodiazepines were also used concomitantly with opiates. The most frequently reported reason for the use of adjunctive drugs was to intensify the effect of the opiate. Three-quarters or more of the addicts had used different adjunctive drugs to boost the euphoric feeling derived from the primary drug, i.e. heroin. Attempt at self-treatment of withdrawal symptoms was a less frequently reported reason for adjunctive drug use. The findings show that heroin addiction is the major problem. The use of adjunctive drugs, especially benzodiazepines, can be partly explained on economic grounds. They must be clearly distinguished from the primary drug of abuse, heroin. For policy-making decisions, it is important that the elimination of heroin abuse through effective prevention measures would ultimately wipe out the problem of adjunctive drug use, while reduction of the overall supply of heroin without reduction in actual demand might result in an increasing trend to adjunctive drug use.

  15. Adjunct Mentoring, a Vital Responsibility in a Changing Educational Climate: The Lesley University Adjunct Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Carol A.; Reiff, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    Lesley University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, has established an adjunct mentoring process in response to its growing number of adjunct faculty. Lesley's adjunct corps serves in Lesley programs offered both on and off campus. The primary goals of the mentoring program are to support excellence in teaching, and to engage in mentoring that…

  16. Adjunct Info: A Journal for Managers of Adjunct and Part-Time Faculty, 1994-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greive, Donald, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This document consists of the twelve issues of the quarterly journal "Adjunct Info" during the three-year period 1994-1997. Individual issues contain articles, editorials, columns, teaching tips, and suggested resources related to management of adjunct and part-time faculty. Major articles include: "A Message to Managers: From an Adjunct" (June…

  17. Athletic Trainers' Knowledge Regarding Airway Adjuncts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edler, Jessica R.; Eberman, Lindsey E.; Kahanov, Leamor; Roman, Christopher; Mata, Heather Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Context: Research suggests that knowledge gaps regarding the appropriate use of airway adjuncts exist among various health care practitioners, and that knowledge is especially limited within athletic training. Objective: To determine the relationship between perceived knowledge (PK) and actual knowledge (AK) of airway adjunct use and the…

  18. Teaching Strategies & Techniques for Adjunct Faculty. Third Edition. Higher Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greive, Donald

    This booklet presents teaching strategies and techniques in a quick reference format. It was designed specifically to assist adjunct and part-time faculty, who have careers outside of education, to efficiently grasp many of the concepts necessary for effective teaching. Included are a checklist of points to review prior to beginning a teaching…

  19. An Orientation Program for Clinical Adjunct Faculty.

    PubMed

    Rice, Gwendolyn

    2016-01-01

    Having highly competent clinical faculty in an institution of higher learning is a prerequisite for graduating safe nurses in the future. The purpose of this project was to increase each clinical nurse's knowledge and skills for the new role of clinical adjunct nursing faculty. Successful implementation of this program will help promote consistency in effective job performance of clinical adjunct faculty and facilitate achievement of the projected goals and outcomes. This orientation program was presented in a one day face-to-face encounter with twelve (12) adjunct faculty members, tenured and others on the tenured track. These faculty members were hired by City Colleges of Chicago (CCC) School of Nursing Program at the Malcolm X College. Presentations were given by attendees with a lesson plan. Pre-test, post-test and evaluation forms were presented and it was agreed that an orientation program should be developed and presented to all newly hired clinical adjunct nursing faculty at CCC.

  20. An Orientation Program for Clinical Adjunct Faculty.

    PubMed

    Rice, Gwendolyn

    2016-01-01

    Having highly competent clinical faculty in an institution of higher learning is a prerequisite for graduating safe nurses in the future. The purpose of this project was to increase each clinical nurse's knowledge and skills for the new role of clinical adjunct nursing faculty. Successful implementation of this program will help promote consistency in effective job performance of clinical adjunct faculty and facilitate achievement of the projected goals and outcomes. This orientation program was presented in a one day face-to-face encounter with twelve (12) adjunct faculty members, tenured and others on the tenured track. These faculty members were hired by City Colleges of Chicago (CCC) School of Nursing Program at the Malcolm X College. Presentations were given by attendees with a lesson plan. Pre-test, post-test and evaluation forms were presented and it was agreed that an orientation program should be developed and presented to all newly hired clinical adjunct nursing faculty at CCC. PMID:26930766

  1. Professor of Teaching: The Quest for Equity and Parity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragoonaden, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Emerging from the contested site of a new university campus, this article reflects on the transformative process of reconceptualizing and rebuilding a professional and an academic stream in a 21st-century Faculty of Education. In order to maximize her own capital, an assistant professor sought tenure in an innovative new stream introduced to her…

  2. Can Virtual Patients Help Real Professors Teach Medicine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debolt, David

    2008-01-01

    This article reports MyCaseSpace, a Web-based program used to present clinical cases to students in health-related professions to test their critical thinking skills. The creator of MyCaseSpace, David Segal, an assistant professor in the College of Health and Public Affairs at the University of Central Florida, has created various characters to…

  3. Professors Are People Too: The Impact of Informal Evaluations of Professors on Students and Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowai-Bell, Neneh; Guadagno, Rosanna E.; Little, Tannah E.; Ballew, Jamie L.

    2012-01-01

    There are websites where individuals anonymously provide informal reviews of professors. What impact do such sites have on student and professor motivational factors? Research suggests that undergraduate students are affected (e.g. Edwards et al. in "J Comput Mediat Commun" 14:368-392, 2009; Kowai-Bell et al. in "Comput Hum Behav" 27(5):1862-1867,…

  4. Management by Professors: A Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasser, Henry

    1977-01-01

    Mass higher education calls for new management style and structure: administration should not be separate from faculty and students. Professors with administrative qualities should perform administrative tasks in the contemporary university. (Author/LBH)

  5. Pediatric sepsis: challenges and adjunctive therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, William; Wong, Hector R.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Sepsis remains an important challenge in pediatric critical care medicine. The current review intends to provide an appraisal of adjunctive therapies for sepsis and to highlight opportunities for meeting selected challenges in the field. Future clinical studies should address long-term and functional outcomes, as well as acute outcomes. Potential adjunctive therapies such as corticosteroids, hemofiltration, hemoadsorption, and plasmapheresis may have important roles, but still require formal and more rigorous testing by way of clinical trials. Finally, the design of future clinical trials should consider novel approaches for stratifying outcome risks as a means of improving the risk to benefit ratio of experimental therapies. PMID:23537672

  6. Adjuncts: Solutions for a Mistreated Majority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louis, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    According to best estimates, some 800,000 faculty members, close to two-thirds of the total nationwide, are adjunct, "contingent," or "lecturer." The severity of their plight, rapidly worsening in today's economic crisis, intersects the interrelated domains of human rights, fair employment, and the future of higher education. In those areas where…

  7. Effective Leadership of Online Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipple, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Post secondary education leaders and administrators are currently facing two separate but inter-related trends: the growth in online education, and the significant increase in adjunct (part-time) faculty. In order to maximize the educational quality and institutional effectiveness, education leaders must develop an approach that levers the…

  8. Adjunct Faculty QUEST Survey: Fall 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard Community Coll., Columbia, MD. Office of Planning and Evaluation.

    This report presents the highlights from the 2001 QUEST (Quality Education for Students and Teachers) Survey for Adjunct Faculty, administered in November 2001 at Howard Community College (HCC) (Maryland). The survey listed 64 service areas to be rated on a 5-point scale ranging from poor (1) to excellent (5), or to indicate if they were…

  9. Observations of an Adjunct Faculty Member.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beman, Richard R.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the rewards and frustrations of part-time teaching from the viewpoint of an adjunct faculty member. Includes an examination of the forces which separate full- and part-time instructors and a description of the personal rewards which motivate career persons to teach on the side. (JP)

  10. Outward Bound as an Adjunct to Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Nelson K.

    The Colorado Outward Bound School (COBS) provides successful adjunct programs for special populations undergoing therapy at the Adventure Home (Boulder, CO), the Juvenile Justice Program and the St. Luke's Hospital Alcoholism Recovery Unit (Denver, CO), and the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Department of Psychiatry (Hanover, NH). The goals of…

  11. Interview: Professor Andrew Feinberg speaks to Epigenomics.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    Andrew Feinberg studied mathematics and humanities at Yale University (CT, USA) in the Directed Studies honors program, and he received his BA (1973) and MD (1976) from the accelerated medical program at Johns Hopkins University (MD, USA), as well as an MPH from Johns Hopkins (1981). He performed a postdoctoral fellowship in developmental biology at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD, CA, USA), clinical training in medicine and medical genetics at the University of Pennsylvania (PA, USA) and genetics research with Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins, discovering altered DNA methylation in human cancer. Dr Feinberg continued to perform seminal work in cancer epigenetics as a Howard Hughes investigator at the University of Michigan (MI, USA), discovering human imprinted genes and loss of imprinting in cancer, and the molecular basis of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. He returned to John Hopkins in 1994 as King Fahd Professor of Medicine, Molecular Biology & Genetics and Oncology, and he holds an Adjunct Professorship at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. Dr Feinberg is Director of the Center for Epigenetics, a National Human Genome Research Institute-designated Center of Excellence in Genome Sciences. The Center is pioneering genome-scale tools in molecular, statistical and epidemiological epigenetics, and is applying them to the study of cancer, neuropsychiatric disease and aging. As part of the center, Dr Feinberg has organized a highly innovative program to bring gifted minority high-school students into genetics and genomics. Dr Feinberg has also invented a number of widely used molecular tools, including random priming. His honors include election to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as membership on the ISI most-cited authors list, a MERIT Award of the National Cancer Institute, a

  12. Desire for Professional Development among Adjunct Business Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backhaus, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    This study provides a foundation for further work about motivation for training and the world of contingent employment in higher education and beyond for adjunct faculty. This sample of adjunct business faculty shows there is much to be learned about why adjunct faculty choose to work in higher education and how they view their own professional…

  13. Adjunct Faculty Organizational Sense of Belonging and Affective Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, Constance L.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years all public higher education institutions have increased their reliance on adjunct faculty. Adjuncts provide expertise in key areas, are available at times that meet the needs of the changing student demographic, and cover an increasing number of introductory courses. It has been suggested that adjunct faculty may be more weakly…

  14. Adjuncts in Social Work Programs: Good Practice or Unethical?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearlman, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Social work education programs rely heavily on adjunct instructors, as do most academic institutions. This article adds to existing literature on adjuncts by focusing on the unique issues in social work education, using social work values and ethics as a focus. The benefits and detriments for adjuncts, programs, and students in schools of social…

  15. The utilization of the seven principles for good practices of full-time and adjunct faculty in teaching health & science in community colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musaitif, Linda M.

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which undergraduate full-time and adjunct faculty members in the health and science programs at community colleges in Southern California utilize the seven principles of good practice as measured by the Faculty Inventory of the Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education. A second purpose was to compare degree of utilization for gender and class size. Methodology. This is a quantitative study wherein there exists a systematic and mathematical assessment of data gathered through the use of a Likert scale survey to process and determine the mathematical model of the use of the principles by the target population of both full-time and adjunct faculty of health/science programs of community colleges in Southern California. Findings. Examination of the data revealed that both full-time and adjunct faculty members of Southern California community colleges perceive themselves a high degree of utilization of the seven principles of good practice. There was no statistically significant data to suggest a discrepancy between full-time and adjunct professors' perceptions among the utilization of the seven principles. Overall, male faculty members perceived themselves as utilizing the principles to a greater degree than female faculty. Data suggest that faculty with class size 60 or larger showed to utilize the seven principles more frequently than the professors with smaller class sizes. Conclusions. Full-time and adjunct professors of the health and sciences in Southern California community colleges perceive themselves as utilizing the seven principles of good practice to a high degree. Recommendations. This study suggests many recommendations for future research, including the degree to which negative economic factors such as budget cuts and demands affect the utilization of the seven principles. Also recommended is a study comparing students' perceptions of faculty's utilization of the seven

  16. Professors of the New Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2000-01-01

    Profiles four professors who epitomize the increasing influence of academe on new technology-driven Internet business: a start-up maven, Steven Kaplan; a social psychologist, Michael Ray; a cyberlawyer, David Post; and an e-commerce expert, Andrew B. Whinston. (DB)

  17. WORK LOAD OF UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FRENCH, JOHN R. P., JR.; AND OTHERS

    WORK PRESSURES AMONG UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS INVOLVING QUANTITATIVE OVERLOAD AND QUALITATIVE OVERLOAD WERE STUDIED. MORE SPECIFICALLY, THE STUDY INVESTIGATED (1) THE EFFECTS OF OVERLOAD AND WORKLOAD ON JOB SATISFACTION, TENSION, AND SELF-ESTEEM, (2) THE EFFECTS OF THESE STATES ON CERTAIN INDICATORS OF HEALTH, AND (3) HOW THESE EFFECTS VARY WITH…

  18. "Tired" Professors Can Be Rejuvenated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seldin, Peter

    2008-01-01

    At a recent national conference, colleagues from different academic disciplines but all worked in college or university teaching-improvement programs found that the subject most frequently discussed was how to improve the teaching of "tired" faculty members. Tired faculty members are most often senior professors who have worked at their…

  19. Does a Professor's Reputation Affect Course Selection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoag, John H.; And Others

    To examine whether a professor's reputation affects course selection, a survey was conducted of about 280 students in a junior level marketing class required of all business students at Bowling Green State University (Ohio). The questionnaire listed 25 economics professors and asked what the students had heard about the professors in five…

  20. ICT Use by Journalism Professors in Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Elias Said

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses how journalism professors at Colombian universities use information and communications technologies (ICT) in their teaching. Survey data was obtained during the first trimester of 2009 from 63 professors in journalism departments and from a total of 865 professors who are affiliated with journalism departments at 29…

  1. Professor Jerzy Kaulbersz, pioneer of Polish gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J

    2011-04-01

    Jerzy Kaulbersz was undoubtedly the father of experimental gastroenterological physiology in Poland. He pioneered the neural and endocrine aspects of the mechanisms controlling gastric and pancreatic secretion by assessing the influence on this secretion of vagal nerves and endocrine factors such as gastrin, enterogastrone, urogastrone, pituitary, adrenal, thyroid and sex hormones as well as bile, hypoxia and X-ray irradiation. He introduced various models of peptic ulcerations such as induced by pylorus-ligation (Shay ulcers) or Mann-Williamson ulcers to test the influence of neuroendocrine factors on the formation and healing of these ulcerations. This review is designed to commemorate the outstanding contribution to experimental gastroenterology of Professor Kaulbersz, who first studied biology in German universities to obtain the title of Doctor of Natural Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Freiburg in 1913 and then completed medical studies at the Medical Faculty of the Jagiellonian University in Cracow receiving the title of Doctor of Universal Medicine (MD) in 1920. He then joined Department of Physiology of Jagiellonian University in Krakow as its assistant and gradually was appointed docent and finally promoted to professor in this Department, working here as chairman from 1934 to 1964 with only 7 years interruption when he spent the time of World War II in USA, working at various departments of experimental gastroenterology and publishing his outstanding papers in most prestigious physiology ournals such as American Journal of Physiology. He possessed comprehensive knowledge of physiology and was gifted to create and organize Cracow Department of Physiology. Moreover he became co-founder of the of Polish Physiological Society, the honorary member of American Physiological Association, honorary member of Polish Society of Gastroenterology and Physiology and received the diploma of Doctor Honoris Causa of Medical Academy in Cracow. This ad memoriam note commemorates his

  2. Novel adjunctive treatments of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Michael Rahbek; Pryds, Kasper; Bøtker, Hans Erik

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is a major cause of death and disability worldwide and myocardial infarct size is a major determinant of prognosis. Early and successful restoration of myocardial reperfusion following an ischemic event is the most effective strategy to reduce final infarct size and improve clinical outcome, but reperfusion may induce further myocardial damage itself. Development of adjunctive therapies to limit myocardial reperfusion injury beyond opening of the coronary artery gains increasing attention. A vast number of experimental studies have shown cardioprotective effects of ischemic and pharmacological conditioning, but despite decades of research, the translation into clinical effects has been challenging. Recently published clinical studies, however, prompt optimism as novel techniques allow for improved clinical applicability. Cyclosporine A, the GLP-1 analogue exenatide and rapid cooling by endovascular infusion of cold saline all reduce infarct size and may confer clinical benefit for patients admitted with acute myocardial infarcts. Equally promising, three follow-up studies of the effect of remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) show clinical prognostic benefit in patients undergoing coronary surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention. The discovery that RIC can be performed noninvasively using a blood pressure cuff on the upper arm to induce brief episodes of limb ischemia and reperfusion has facilitated the translation of RIC into the clinical arena. This review focus on novel advances in adjunctive therapies in relation to acute and elective coronary procedures. PMID:24976915

  3. 32 CFR 728.93 - Chart of adjuncts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Adjuncts to Medical Care § 728.93 Chart of... the several categories of beneficiaries eligible for medical care at naval MTFs. Adjuncts Active...

  4. Psychotherapeutic and Adjunctive Pharmacologic Approaches to Treating Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nisenoff, Carolina D.

    2008-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a potentially disabling illness that affects millions of people worldwide and can be very difficult to treat, especially the sleep disturbances often associated with this disorder. Successful treatment focuses on psychotherapy, and medications may be useful adjuncts. This article gives examples of successful therapeutic approaches and adjunctive medication use in PTSD. PMID:19727267

  5. Adjuncts used to enhance the results of guided tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Domagala, P

    1999-01-01

    Guided Tissue Regeneration involves procedures designed to regenerate lost periodontal structures. There are several adjunctive procedures used in conjunction with barrier membranes. This review article discusses the most commonly used adjuncts and the benefits and limitations of each. A brief synopsis of possible future directions is also discussed.

  6. Managing Adjunct & Part-Time Faculty for the New Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greive, Donald E., Ed.; Worden, Catherine A., Ed.

    The contributions in this book address issues related to the management of part-time and adjunct college faculty members, including the impact of new technology, and provide information necessary for effective management in the future. The chapters are: (1) "A Vision of the Future--From the CEO" (Roy A. Church); (2) "Managing Adjunct and Part-Time…

  7. Selenium sulfide: adjunctive therapy for tinea capitis.

    PubMed

    Allen, H B; Honig, P J; Leyden, J J; McGinley, K J

    1982-01-01

    Selenium sulfide lotion used as a shampoo has been shown to be an effective adjunctive agent to griseofulvin in the treatment of tinea capitis. Of 16 children with Trichophyton tonsurans infections 15 had negative fungal cultures at two weeks following a regimen of daily oral griseofulvin and selenium sulfide shampooing twice weekly. All patients treated with griseofulvin alone or in combination with either a bland shampoo or topical clotrimazole had positive cultures not only at the two-week interval but also as long as eight weeks later. In vitro analysis shows selenium sulfide to be sporicidal, correlating well with the in vivo observations. It is postulated that selenium sulfide usage may lessen the chances for spreading of infectious spores to other individuals.

  8. Pharmacogenetics in electroconvulsive therapy and adjunctive medications.

    PubMed

    Mirzakhani, Hooman; van Noorden, Martijn S; Swen, Jesse; Nozari, Ala; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has shown apparent efficacy in treatment of patients with depression and other mental illnesses who do not respond to psychotropic medications or need urgent control of their symptoms. Pharmacogenetics contributes to an individual's sensitivity and response to a variety of drugs. Clinical insights into pharmacogenetics of ECT and adjunctive medications not only improves its safety and efficacy in the indicated patients, but can also lead to the identification of novel treatments in psychiatric disorders through understanding of potential molecular and biological mechanisms involved. In this review, we explore the indications of pharmacogenetics role in safety and efficacy of ECT and present the evidence for its role in patients with psychiatric disorders undergoing ECT.

  9. Scintimammography as an Adjunctive Breast Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective X-ray mammography (XMM) represents the most useful screening tool in breast cancer detection, especially for patients over 50. Unfortunately, XMM is not reliable in the assessment of dense breast tissue found in approximately 25% of women younger than 50 years of age, or in differentiating scar tissue from a tumor. Currently, ultrasound (US) is being used as an adjunct to XMM, with the purpose of improving sensitivity and specificity of XMM in breast cancer detection. In an attempt to reduce the biopsy rate resulting from false positive tests, other adjunctive technologies are being explored, including scintimammography (SMM). A number of papers in the current literature suggest the high value of SMM in breast cancer detection. This evaluation addresses the clinical indications for and effectiveness of SMM in the diagnosis of breast cancer. The Technology SMM is a nuclear medicine imaging technique that uses radionuclides and has the ability to image malignant breast tumors. SMM requires the administration of a gamma-ray emitting radiopharmaceutical to the patient, and a camera for imaging the lesion. The most commonly used radiopharmaceutical for SMM is TC-99m-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile MIBI. Review Strategy In the 2003 Medical Advisory Secretariat assessment of SMM in the diagnosis of breast cancer, a structured search was used to identify English-language studies published between 1992 and October 2002. A meta-analysis was then conducted of the literature which compared the diagnostic value of SMM with US as the second line imaging technique. An updated search strategy was developed in order to identify all studies published from October 2002 to January 2007. Summary of Findings The results of the meta-analysis showed that SMM is as effective as US in differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions. However, there may be a role for SMM as a third line adjunctive technique in the evaluation of breast abnormalities, in particular

  10. Theater in professor Charcot's galaxy.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Jacques; Philippon, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot, famous professor of the Chair of Clinic for Diseases of the Nervous System at Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris, was himself an artist, surrounded by artists, and adored the theater. His close colleague Charles Brown-Séquard was ridiculed by Georges Feydeau in a brief freakish monologue recited by Coquelin Cadet, from the Comédie-Française, concerning his claims to rejuvenate himself and others with animal testicle extracts. His friend and patient Alphonse Daudet had written many novels, short stories, and plays. Léon Daudet, Alphonse Daudet's son (and friend of Jean-Baptiste Charcot, the son of the professor), after having abandoned his medical studies, became a writer whose novel Les morticoles was a cruel satire of the medical profession. Among Charcot's pupils, Alfred Binet, Gilbert Ballet, Édouard Brissaud, and Joseph Babinski were particularly involved in the theater. Gilbert Ballet wrote the foreword to La folie au théâtre (Madness in Theatre) by André de Latour. Édouard Brissaud wrote a satiric play Le chèque (The Check), and Joseph Babinski, under the pseudonym of Olaf, was the coauthor with Palau of the drama Les détraquées (The Deranged Women). However, when all is said and done, perhaps the greatest actor in his entourage was Charcot himself.

  11. Redox pioneer: professor Barry Halliwell.

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, Shazib

    2011-05-01

    Professor Barry Halliwell is recognized as a Redox Pioneer because he has published eight articles on redox biology that have been each cited more than 1000 times, and 158 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. His contributions go back as far as 1976, when he was involved in elucidation of the Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle, an efficient mechanism for preventing oxidative damage to chloroplasts. His subsequent work established the important role of iron and zinc in free radical reactions and their relevance to human pathologies. Professor Halliwell is also a leader in developing novel methodology for detecting free radical intermediates in vivo, and his contributions to our knowledge of reactive nitrogen species are highly significant. His sustained excellence won him the top-cited scientist award in the United Kingdom in biomedical sciences in 1999, and in 2003 he was recognized as a highly cited scientist by Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) for work on plant antioxidants, and the same year ranked 28 out of 5494 biochemists/biologists for scientific impact. Two pieces of his scholarly work have been listed as Citation Classics by ISI, and in 2007 his laboratory was ranked number 1 worldwide based on highest citation score in research on free radicals. PMID:20969479

  12. Interview with Professor Mark Wilcox.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Mark Wilcox speaks to Georgia Patey, Commissioning Editor: Professor Mark Wilcox is a Consultant Microbiologist and Head of Microbiology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals (Leeds, UK), the Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds (Leeds, UK), and is the Lead on Clostridium difficile and the Head of the UK C. difficile Reference Laboratory for Public Health England (PHE). He was the Director of Infection Prevention (4 years), Infection Control Doctor (8 years) and Clinical Director of Pathology (6 years) at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals. He is Chair of PHE's Rapid Review Panel (reviews utility of infection prevention and control products for National Health Service), Deputy Chair of the UK Department of Health's Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection Committee and a member of PHE's HCAI/AR Programme Board. He is a member of UK/European/US working groups on C. difficile infection. He has provided clinical advice as part of the FDA/EMA submissions for the approval of multiple novel antimicrobial agents. He heads a healthcare-associated infection research team at University of Leeds, comprising approximately 30 doctors, scientists and nurses; projects include multiple aspects of C. difficile infection, diagnostics, antimicrobial resistance and the clinical development of new antimicrobial agents. He has authored more than 400 publications, and is the coeditor of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (5th/6th/7th Editions, 15 December 2007). PMID:27494150

  13. Redox pioneer: professor Barry Halliwell.

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, Shazib

    2011-05-01

    Professor Barry Halliwell is recognized as a Redox Pioneer because he has published eight articles on redox biology that have been each cited more than 1000 times, and 158 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. His contributions go back as far as 1976, when he was involved in elucidation of the Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle, an efficient mechanism for preventing oxidative damage to chloroplasts. His subsequent work established the important role of iron and zinc in free radical reactions and their relevance to human pathologies. Professor Halliwell is also a leader in developing novel methodology for detecting free radical intermediates in vivo, and his contributions to our knowledge of reactive nitrogen species are highly significant. His sustained excellence won him the top-cited scientist award in the United Kingdom in biomedical sciences in 1999, and in 2003 he was recognized as a highly cited scientist by Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) for work on plant antioxidants, and the same year ranked 28 out of 5494 biochemists/biologists for scientific impact. Two pieces of his scholarly work have been listed as Citation Classics by ISI, and in 2007 his laboratory was ranked number 1 worldwide based on highest citation score in research on free radicals.

  14. Adjunctive pregabalin vs gabapentin for focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Glue, Paul; Friedman, Daniel; Almas, Mary; Yardi, Nandan; Knapp, Lloyd; Pitman, Verne; Posner, Holly B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the comparative safety and adjunctive efficacy of pregabalin and gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency in patients with partial-onset seizures based on prestudy modeling showing superior efficacy for pregabalin. Methods: The design of this comparative efficacy and safety study of pregabalin and gabapentin as adjunctive treatment in adults with refractory partial-onset seizures was randomized, flexible dose, double blind, and parallel group. The study included a 6-week baseline and a 21-week treatment phase. The primary endpoint was the percentage change from baseline in 28-day seizure rate to the treatment phase. Results: A total of 484 patients were randomized to pregabalin (n = 242) or gabapentin (n = 242). Of these, 359 patients (187 pregabalin, 172 gabapentin) completed the treatment phase. The observed median and mean in percentage change from baseline was −58.65 and −47.7 (SD 48.3) for pregabalin and −57.43 and −45.28 (SD 60.6) for gabapentin. For the primary endpoint, there was no significant difference between treatments. The Hodges-Lehman estimated median difference was 0.0 (95% confidence interval −6.0 to 7.0). Safety profiles were comparable and consistent with prior trials. Conclusions: The absence of the anticipated efficacy difference based on modeling of prior, nearly identical trials and the larger-than-expected response rates of the 2 antiepileptic drugs were unexpected. These findings raise questions that are potentially important to consider in future comparative efficacy trials. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00537940. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with partial seizures enrolled in this study, pregabalin is not superior to gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency. Because of the atypical response rates, the results of this study are poorly generalizable to other epilepsy populations. PMID:27521437

  15. Promotion to professor: a career development resource.

    PubMed

    Sanfey, Hilary

    2010-10-01

    By the time a faculty member is being considered for promotion to full professor, he/she will be about 10 years out of residency training and will almost certainly have prior experience with the academic promotion process. The preparation for promotion to full professor should begin soon after the promotion to associate professor. This is a time to reassess opportunities, resources, skills, and career goals. The timing of the promotion to full professor is usually less rigid than the timeframe for promotion at lower ranks, but schools vary in this regard.

  16. How Undergraduates Perceive Their Professors: A Corpus Analysis of Rate My Professor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    While many may disparage the online website Rate my Professor, it remains a popular public evaluation site for students to post their evaluations and commentary on their professors. What implications can be drawn about students' perceptions of instruction and what are the implications of students' perceptions for professors and their work? Using…

  17. The Education Professorate: Teaching an "Artificial" Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagener, James W.

    This paper argues that conceiving the education professor's role in higher education as that of teaching an "artificial" science is a helpful metaphor for re-contextualizing this mission. How the use of the metaphor of an artificial science bears on the role of the education professorate is examined by applying the purposive-inner…

  18. One Ad, 88 Professors, and No Apologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Thomas; Lipka, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Last month Duke University's student newspaper published a letter signed by 17 economics professors. It said that, in the wake of the lacrosse scandal, the professors regretted the perception that Duke faculty members were prejudiced against some students. It also publicly welcomed all students--including lacrosse players--to enroll in the…

  19. The Professionalism of Professors at German "Fachhochschulen"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    In the debate about the (de-)professionalising effects of current higher education reforms in Germany, the non-university institutions ("Fachhochschulen") have mostly remained silent. Unlike university professors, "Fachhochschul" professors do not seem to regard managerial and market-oriented reforms as a threat to their professionalism. While the…

  20. The Professors behind the MOOC Hype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolowich, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The largest-ever survey of professors who have taught MOOCs, or massive open online courses, shows that the process is time-consuming, but, according to the instructors, often successful. Nearly half of the professors felt their online courses were as rigorous academically as the versions they taught in the classroom. The survey, conducted by "The…

  1. Hidden Expectations for College Professors: A Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, John E.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Stone believes that lowered standards, declining enrollment, and student complaints are placing unfair expectations on college teachers. Gephart contends that it is a professor's responsibility to teach all levels of students. Stone recognizes the need for remedial instruction but feels that professors are not obligated to provide it free. (CP)

  2. Professor Delight: Cultivating Organizational Citizenship Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazen, Abdelmagid; Herman, Susan; Ornstein, Suzyn

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rationale for and use of a class innovation the authors call "professor delight." This inexpensive, high-yield concept allows students and professors to enact their understanding of citizenship throughout the term, and often beyond. The authors explain the concept, describe its implementation in class, and link it to the…

  3. [Nurse's training: professor's characteristics and academic success].

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Maria Romana; Moreira, Maria Teresa de Arbués

    2006-01-01

    The present report describes the characteristics of the professor who teaches the disciplines that obtained the highest success indexes in the evaluation carried out by the students. It was executed at a Nursing Superior Education School in Lisbon (Portugal), regarding 16 professors who answered a questionnaire. We concluded that a professor who is well evaluated by the students has the following attributes: he is mature, well qualified for education, with a solid experience in teaching and a good experience in the exercise of the profession. In the professor's own opinion, they are able to establish a good relationship with their students, they consider themselves as being solidly efficient in teaching practice and they have a deep knowledge of their lectured disciplines. All of the professors use expository lectures, with student's interaction and dialogue, and complemented by the sharing of experiences and practical way of life, debates, discussions, dramatisations and simulations. The authors alert the need for further research on the subject.

  4. More than Child's Play: North Carolina Professor Explores the History of Dolls and Their Sociological Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Eleanor Lee

    2004-01-01

    For Dr. Sabrina Thomas, dolls are not just child's play. In fact, they are the subject of her research, which recently landed her a $40,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Thomas, an assistant professor of family and consumer sciences at North Carolina Central University, was awarded the grant to write a book on the history…

  5. Inclusive Education at the Post-Secondary Level: Attitudes of Students and Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindes, Yvonne; Mather, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Little research has focused on inclusion of students with disabilities at the university level. We asked students and professors at the University of Lethbridge to indicate their acceptance of three levels of inclusion (included in classes, provided with assistance and provided with professorial accommodation) for students with five categories of…

  6. Adjunctive Orthodontic Applications in Dental Implantology.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Ali; Zadeh, Homayoun H

    2015-08-01

    Implant placement is often necessitated for replacement of teeth with pathologically damaged alveolar bone due to periodontitis or traumatic injury. Surgical augmentation of resorbed bone has many limitations, including lower efficacy of vertical augmentation than horizontal augmentation, as well as morbidity associated with grafting procedure. Orthodontic therapy has been proposed as a useful method for augmenting the resorbed alveolar bone and reforming aesthetically appealing gingival margin, prior to implant placement. This narrative review summarizes the available evidence for the application of orthodontic strategies that can be used as adjunct in selected cases to augment bone volume for the future implant site and maintain space for the prosthetic parts of the implant. These are (1) orthodontic extrusion of compromised teeth to generate vertical bone volume and enhance gingival architecture, (2) tooth preservation and postponing orthodontic space opening to maintain bone volume in future implant site, (3) orthodontic implant site switching to eliminate the deficient bone volume or risky implant sites, and (4) the provision of a rigid fixed-bonded retainer to maintain the implant site. Although there are no randomized controlled clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy of orthodontic therapy for implant site development, clinical case reports and experience document the efficacy of orthodontic therapy for this application.

  7. Memorial to Professor Antonio Barone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafuri, Francesco; Pepe, Giampiero; Vaglio, Ruggero

    2014-04-01

    Antonio Barone prematurely passed away on 4 December 2011 at the age of 72, after a one-year battle with cancer. He left behind his wife Sveva and his two sons, Alberto and Livio. Antonio was Professor Emeritus at the University of Napoli Federico II, where he had been teaching for about 40 years. The initial research activity of Antonio was in the field of nuclear physics. In this context, almost 45 years ago, the Ge 'Lithium drift' semiconductor detectors represented a novelty, due to the high energy resolution enabled by those devices. Superconductors stimulated new approaches to radiation detection and this motivated Antonio's interest towards superconductivity. Following the birth of the Laboratorio di Cibernetica of the CNR in 1967 he was given the opportunity to work on a joint USA-Italy project (University of Wisconsin, Madison and CNR Naples) in the field of superconductivity on the peculiar subject of the superconductive 'Neuristors'. His research activity on Josephson junctions opened up a wide variety of very stimulating subjects in which he was deeply involved, ranging from the soliton propagation in 'long' Josephson structures to fluctuations phenomena, from light-sensitive junctions and proximity effect to the development of innovative superconducting devices. The strong interaction of Antonio with the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Academy of Sciences in Moscow, characterizes a long period of his research activity with a precious merging of theoretical and experimental aspects. This body of work converged into the famous monograph on the 'Physics and Applications of the Josephson Effect', written in collaboration with Gianfranco Paternò in 1982. This rapidly became the reference text for the Josephson effect, as documented by thousands of citations and the fact that it was translated into Russian, Japanese and Chinese. In 1983 Antonio was awarded the highest academic title of 'Doctor of the Physical-Mathematical Sciences' by the

  8. Adjunctation and Scalar Product in the Dirac Equation - I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.

    2016-02-01

    The Bargmann-Pauli adjunctator (hermitiser) of {C}{l}_{_{1,3}}(C) is derived in a representation independent way, circumventing the early derivations (Pauli, Ann. inst. Henri Poincaré 6, 109 and 121 1936) using representation-dependent arguments. Relations for the adjunctator's transformation with the scalar product and space generator set are given. The S U(2) adjunctator is shown to determine the {C}{l}_{_{1,3}}(C) adjunctator. Part-II of the paper will approach the problem of the two scalar products used in Dirac theory - an unphysical situation of "piece-wise physics" with erroneous results. The adequate usage of scalar product - via calibration - will be presented, in particular under boosts, yielding the known covariant transformations of physical quantities.

  9. A Systems Approach to Strategic Success with Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Vernon C.

    2007-01-01

    Rio Salado is a nontraditional community college that is highly integrated in the global economy. This chapter describes the Rio Salado College systems approach, which relies almost exclusively on adjunct faculty to accomplish its mission, vision, and purposes.

  10. Tricyclic antidepressant overdose treated with adjunctive lipid rescue and plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Madiha; Kotecha, Tulsi; Mustafa, Usman; Senussi, Nizar; Ikwu, Isaac; Bhattarcharya, Anirban; Ngene, John Ifeanyi; Ojiako, Kizito; Iroegbu, Nkemakolam

    2016-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressant poisoning remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of suicidal attempts. The current standard of care for treatment is the administration of sodium bicarbonate infusion. Adjunctive lipid emulsion therapy and plasmapheresis have received attention recently. We report an 18-year-old patient who was successfully managed with lipid emulsion and plasmapheresis as adjuncts to sodium bicarbonate treatment and review some of the recent literature. PMID:27365872

  11. Photodynamic therapy as adjunctive therapy for morpheaform basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Torres, T; Fernandes, I; Costa, V; Selores, M

    2011-01-01

    The authors decided to evaluate the possible use of methyl-aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) as adjunctive therapy for morpheaform basal cell carcinoma prior to standard surgical excision in order to reduce tumor size and volume and to facilitate surgical treatment. It was observed that MAL-PDT may be an option as an adjunctive therapy prior to standard surgical excision of morpheaform basal cell carcinoma, leading to less invasive surgery.

  12. Tricyclic antidepressant overdose treated with adjunctive lipid rescue and plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Odigwe, Chibuzo Clement; Tariq, Madiha; Kotecha, Tulsi; Mustafa, Usman; Senussi, Nizar; Ikwu, Isaac; Bhattarcharya, Anirban; Ngene, John Ifeanyi; Ojiako, Kizito; Iroegbu, Nkemakolam

    2016-07-01

    Tricyclic antidepressant poisoning remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of suicidal attempts. The current standard of care for treatment is the administration of sodium bicarbonate infusion. Adjunctive lipid emulsion therapy and plasmapheresis have received attention recently. We report an 18-year-old patient who was successfully managed with lipid emulsion and plasmapheresis as adjuncts to sodium bicarbonate treatment and review some of the recent literature. PMID:27365872

  13. A Worthy Asset: The Adjunct Faculty and the Influences on Their Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Telvis

    2015-01-01

    The author explored the intrinsic factors that foster job satisfaction of adjunct faculty members working in the southeastern United States. The literature concerning adjunct work experiences is limited, although adjuncts comprise the great majority of the faculty pool in many community and technical colleges. Twenty-seven adjuncts' work…

  14. Redox Pioneer: Professor Joseph Loscalzo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Professor Joseph Loscalzo Dr. Joseph Loscalzo (M.D., 1978; Ph.D., 1977) is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer because he has published two articles in the field of antioxidant/redox biology that have been cited more than 1,000 times and 22 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. Dr. Loscalzo is known for his seminal contributions to our understanding of the vascular biology of nitric oxide. His initial discovery that the antiplatelet effects of organic nitrates are potentiated by thiols through a mechanism that involved metabolism to S-nitrosothiols was followed by the demonstration that S-nitrosothiols are formed endogenously through S-transnitrosation, stabilize nitric oxide, and facilitate the transport and transfer of nitric oxide between and within cells of the vessel wall. These properties led to the development of S-nitrosothiol–containing pharmacotherapies to treat disease states characterized by nitric oxide deficiency. Dr. Loscalzo's other scientific contributions include identifying the vascular functional consequences of genetic deficiencies of antioxidant enzymes that decrease nitric oxide bioavailability, collectively termed the “oxidative enzymopathies,” and demonstrating the role of mitochondria in modulating the disulfide subproteome, and in redox signaling in hypoxia. He has received numerous awards and honors for his scientific contributions, including election to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 1125–1132. PMID:20443733

  15. Adjunctive Azithromycin Prophylaxis for Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tita, Alan T N; Szychowski, Jeff M; Boggess, Kim; Saade, George; Longo, Sherri; Clark, Erin; Esplin, Sean; Cleary, Kirsten; Wapner, Ron; Letson, Kellett; Owens, Michelle; Abramovici, Adi; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Cutter, Gary; Andrews, William

    2016-09-29

    Background The addition of azithromycin to standard regimens for antibiotic prophylaxis before cesarean delivery may further reduce the rate of postoperative infection. We evaluated the benefits and safety of azithromycin-based extended-spectrum prophylaxis in women undergoing nonelective cesarean section. Methods In this trial conducted at 14 centers in the United States, we studied 2013 women who had a singleton pregnancy with a gestation of 24 weeks or more and who were undergoing cesarean delivery during labor or after membrane rupture. We randomly assigned 1019 to receive 500 mg of intravenous azithromycin and 994 to receive placebo. All the women were also scheduled to receive standard antibiotic prophylaxis. The primary outcome was a composite of endometritis, wound infection, or other infection occurring within 6 weeks. Results The primary outcome occurred in 62 women (6.1%) who received azithromycin and in 119 (12.0%) who received placebo (relative risk, 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.68; P<0.001). There were significant differences between the azithromycin group and the placebo group in rates of endometritis (3.8% vs. 6.1%, P=0.02), wound infection (2.4% vs. 6.6%, P<0.001), and serious maternal adverse events (1.5% vs. 2.9%, P=0.03). There was no significant between-group difference in a secondary neonatal composite outcome that included neonatal death and serious neonatal complications (14.3% vs. 13.6%, P=0.63). Conclusions Among women undergoing nonelective cesarean delivery who were all receiving standard antibiotic prophylaxis, extended-spectrum prophylaxis with adjunctive azithromycin was more effective than placebo in reducing the risk of postoperative infection. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; C/SOAP ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01235546 .). PMID:27682034

  16. Meeting Report: Standing Conference of Astronomy Professors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Phil; Bode, Mike

    2002-08-01

    Phil Charles and Mike Bode present the minutes of the 13th Standing Conference of Astronomy Professors (SCAP) meeting held at the NAM in Bristol on 12 April. Thirteen universities/groups were represented.

  17. A Critical Challenge: The Engagement and Assessment of Contingent, Part-Time Adjunct Faculty Professors in United States Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolley, Michael R.; Cross, Emily; Bryant, Miles

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, according to a National Center for Education Statistics report, part-time instructional staff in all higher education institutions exceeded full-time faculty members for the first time, accounting for 50% of all instructional staff (National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2012). The same report indicates part-time faculty in…

  18. Redox Pioneer: Professor Helmut Sies

    PubMed Central

    Radi, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Professor Helmut Sies Dr. Helmut Sies (MD, 1967) is recognized as a Redox Pioneer, because he authored five articles on oxidative stress, lycopene, and glutathione, each of which has been cited more than 1000 times, and coauthored an article on hydroperoxide metabolism in mammalian systems cited more than 5000 times (Google Scholar). He obtained preclinical education at the University of Tübingen and the University of Munich, clinical training at Munich (MD, 1967) and Paris, and completed Habilitation at Munich (Physiological Chemistry and Physical Biochemistry, 1972). In early research, he first identified hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a normal aerobic metabolite and devised a method to quantify H2O2 concentration and turnover in cells. He quantified central redox systems for energy metabolism (NAD, NADP systems) and antioxidant GSH in subcellular compartments. He first described ebselen, a selenoorganic compound, as a glutathione peroxidase mimic. He contributed a fundamental discovery to the physiology of GSH, selenium nutrition, singlet oxygen biochemistry, and health benefits of dietary lycopene and cocoa flavonoids. He has published more than 600 articles, 134 of which are cited at least 100 times, and edited 28 books. His h-index is 115. During the last quarter of the 20th century and well into the 21st, he has served as a scout, trailblazer, and pioneer in redox biology. His formulation of the concept of oxidative stress stimulated and guided research in oxidants and antioxidants; his pioneering research on carotenoids and flavonoids informed nutritional strategies against cancer, cardiovascular disease, and aging; and his quantitative approach to redox biochemistry provides a foundation for modern redox systems biology. Helmut Sies is a true Redox Pioneer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2459–2468. The joy of exploring the unknown and finding something novel and noteworthy: what a privilege! —Prof. Helmut Sies PMID:25178739

  19. PILOT EVALUATION OF A SIMPLE ADJUNCTIVE METHOD FOR IMPROVED REMOVAL OF ORAL BIOFILM DURING CONVENTIONAL SCALING AND ROOT PLANING THERAPY.

    PubMed

    Bracke, J; Basara, M; Savord, E; Dunaway, A; Watkins, M

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have evaluated the adjunctive use of chemical and antimicrobial treatments to assist in the mechanical removal of oral microbial biofilm from tissue surfaces during scaling and root planning therapy (SRP). The current study demonstrates the elimination of two classes of surrogate molecular markers from periodontal disease sites. This suggests the current agent may be a more effective adjunctive cleansing agent for complete biofilm removal. A patient with advanced chronic periodontitis was subjected to standard SRP therapy, supplemented by irrigation with HYBENX® (HBX). Samples of gingival crevicular fluid were collected with triplicate absorbent paper points from each of three quadrants at three time points: 1) at baseline prior to treatment; 2) after irrigation with the topical agent for 20 seconds and rinsing; and 3) after SRP followed by a second irrigation/rinsing treatment with the agent. Paper points were extracted to assess the presence of 13 bacterial species known to be primarily associated with periodontal disease using DNA pyrosequencing. In addition, the presence of Matrix Metalloproteinase-8 (MMP8), as well as IL-1ß, IL-6, and TNF-alpha were also assessed by immunoassay of the paper point sample extracts. The combined adjunctive treatment indicated a complete absence of detectable bacterial DNA and the four inflammatory mediators from samples taken from the gingival sulci treated with HBX. The advantage of the current adjunctive topical treatment technique is that it is simple and easy to administer in conjunction with standard SRP techniques. It appears to provide a level of cleanliness not currently achieved with other SRP adjunctive procedures.

  20. Best and Worst Professors: Gender Patterns in Students' Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basow, Susan A.

    2000-01-01

    Examined the qualities college students valued or disliked in their professors and whether they varied by student or professor gender. Students picked their best and worst professors, described their qualities, and rated their gender-linked personality traits. Gender factors operated more strongly in considerations of best versus worst professors.…

  1. Accounting Professor Qualification in Digital Age: A Perception Study on Brazilian Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendruscolo, Maria Ivanice; Behar, Patrícia Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    This papers aims at analyzing the perception of Accounting professors about the necessary qualifications in Accounting undergraduate courses. The contribution of this study is to theoretically discuss the education of Accounting professors, with empirical data, because Accounting teaching requires specific competencies in the digital area. The…

  2. Can Email Communication Enhance Professor-Student Relationship and Student Evaluation of Professor?: Some Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheer, Vivian C.; Fung, Timothy K.

    2007-01-01

    Four hundred and eight undergraduate students participated in this study that examined professor-student email communication, interpersonal relationship and teaching evaluation. Several findings have been gleaned. First, academic task was the most frequent email topic and social-relationship less frequent between professors and students. Second,…

  3. Reminiscences regarding Professor R.N. Christiansen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarup, Govind

    2008-11-01

    In this short paper I describe my initiation into the field of radio astronomy fifty years ago, under the guidance of Professor W.N. ('Chris') Christiansen, soon after I joined the C.S.I.R.O.'s Division of Radiophysics (RP) in Sydney, Australia, in 1953 under a 2-year Colombo Plan Fellowship. During the early 1950s Christiansen had developed a remarkable 21 cm interferometric grating array of 32 east-west aligned parabolic dishes and another array of 16 dishes in a north-south direction at Potts Hill. Christiansen and Warburton used these two arrays to scan the Sun strip-wise yielding radio brightness distribution at various position angles. During a three month period I assisted them in making a 2-dimensional map of the Sun by a complex Fourier transform process. In the second year of my Fellowship, Parthasarathy and I converted the 32-antenna east-west grating array to study solar radio emission at 60cm. During this work, I noticed that the procedure adopted by Christiansen for phase adjustment of the grating array was time consuming. Based on this experience, I later developed an innovative technique at Stanford in 1959 for phase adjustment of long transmission lines and paths in space. In a bid to improve on the method used by Christiansen to make a 2-dimensional map of the Sun from strip scans, I suggested to R.N. Bracewell in 1962 a revolutionary method for direct 2-dimensional imaging without Fourier transforms. Bracewell and Riddle developed the method for making a 2-dimensional map of the Moon using strip scans obtained with the 32 element interferometer at Stanford. The method has since revolutionized medical tomography. I describe these developments here to highlight my initial work with Christiansen and to show how new ideas often are developed by necessity and have their origin in prior experience! The 32 Potts Hill solar grating array dishes were eventually donated by the C.S.I.R.0. to India and were set up by me at Kalyan near Mumbai, forming the

  4. Samuel Smith, M.D.: first American professor of psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Pinta, E R

    1994-04-01

    In 1847 Samuel M. Smith, M.D., was appointed professor of medical jurisprudence and insanity at the Willoughby Medical College of Columbus, Ohio, making him the first person to chair a department of psychiatry at an American medical school. Using materials from newspaper reports, records of the medical school and state medical society, and other sources, the author presents a biographical sketch of this pioneer educator. Dr. Smith received his first practical experience in psychiatry as an assistant to William M. Awl, M.D., one of the 13 founders of the American Psychiatric Association. Over the course of his career, he held many prominent positions, including lecturer and dean at the medical school, president of the Ohio State Medical Society, and surgeon general of Ohio during the Civil War.

  5. Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS): Does Gender Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geerlings, Peter M.; Cole, Helen; Batt, Sharryn; Martin-Lynch, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Peer-learning is an effective way to assist students to acquire study skills and content knowledge, especially in university courses that students find difficult, and it is an effective adjunct to improve student retention. In 2014, Murdoch University in Perth, Western Australia, commenced Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS) in two first-year…

  6. Transformations: The World Religions Survey through an Adjunct Feminist Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downie, Alison

    2015-01-01

    This essay describes a transformation in my experience as an adjunct teaching underprepared students from one of shame toward a desire to assert the value of this work. Insights from my feminist theological training helped me to affirm the importance of encouraging transformative learning in teaching the academically marginalized and prompted my…

  7. Seeking the Path to Adjunct Justice at Marquette University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Daniel C.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the outcomes from a case at Marquette University (USA), brought by seven Ph.D. adjuncts who had completed their doctoral programs and were currently teaching part-time as they sought full-time positions elsewhere. The case identified a disparity that is happening at many U.S. colleges and universities that increasing rely…

  8. The running meditation response: an adjunct to psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E G; Bumpus, A K

    1978-10-01

    The physical technique of slow, long distance running and the mental centering devices of T. M. are combined, using hypnosis in some cases, to enhance a "peak experience," or altered state of consciousness. Indications and contraindications to this technique are described for various psychiatric, psychosomatic and somatic syndromes, and its use as an adjunct to formal individual and group psychotherapy is discussed.

  9. The Attraction of Adjunct Faculty to Rural Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlier, Hara Dracon

    2010-01-01

    As rural community colleges face mounting fiscal pressure, the ability to attract adjunct faculty members to support the institutional mission becomes increasingly important. Although the professional literature documents differences between rural, suburban, and urban community colleges, the effect of this institutional diversity on the role and…

  10. Predicting the Satisfaction and Loyalty of Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Jeff E.

    2012-01-01

    Satisfaction with the quality of students, autonomy, faculty support, honorarium, and preference for teaching were significant predictors of adjunct faculty loyalty. With the exception of autonomy, these factors along with a heavy teaching load, collaborative research with full-time faculty, and satisfaction with teaching schedule were predictive…

  11. Price of Gas Fuels Tough Choices for Adjuncts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grasgreen, Allie

    2008-01-01

    The cost of gasoline has made the art of juggling two or more teaching jobs at different institutions all the more difficult for many adjunct faculty members, as continuing price hikes at the nation's gasoline stations cut into salaries that often do not cover living expenses to begin with. These new pressures are particularly evident in…

  12. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  13. Nonfixed Retirement Age for University Professors: Modeling Its Effects on New Faculty Hires.

    PubMed

    Larson, Richard C; Diaz, Mauricio Gomez

    2012-03-01

    We model the set of tenure-track faculty members at a university as a queue, where "customers" in queue are faculty members in active careers. Arrivals to the queue are usually young, untenured assistant professors, and departures from the queue are primarily those who do not pass a promotion or tenure hurdle and those who retire. There are other less-often-used ways to enter and leave the queue. Our focus is on system effects of the elimination of mandatory retirement age. In particular, we are concerned with estimating the number of assistant professor slots that annually are no longer available because of the elimination of mandatory retirement. We start with steady-state assumptions that require use of Little's Law of Queueing, and we progress to a transient model using system dynamics. We apply these simple models using available data from our home university, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  14. Nonfixed Retirement Age for University Professors: Modeling Its Effects on New Faculty Hires

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Richard C.; Diaz, Mauricio Gomez

    2013-01-01

    We model the set of tenure-track faculty members at a university as a queue, where “customers” in queue are faculty members in active careers. Arrivals to the queue are usually young, untenured assistant professors, and departures from the queue are primarily those who do not pass a promotion or tenure hurdle and those who retire. There are other less-often-used ways to enter and leave the queue. Our focus is on system effects of the elimination of mandatory retirement age. In particular, we are concerned with estimating the number of assistant professor slots that annually are no longer available because of the elimination of mandatory retirement. We start with steady-state assumptions that require use of Little’s Law of Queueing, and we progress to a transient model using system dynamics. We apply these simple models using available data from our home university, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. PMID:23936582

  15. Adjunctive Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement for Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, V. M.; Lee-Llacer, J.; Williams, J.; Ubaissi, H.; Gutierrez, G.

    2010-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are sometimes placed as an adjunct to full anticoagulation in patients with significant pulmonary embolism (PE). We aimed to determine the prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement in individuals diagnosed with PE, as well as the effect of adjunctive filter placement on mortality in patients with right heart strain associated with PE. This was a retrospective study of patients with acute PE treated with full anticoagulation admitted to a single academic medical center. Information abstracted from patient charts included presence or absence of right heart strain and of deep-vein thrombosis, and whether or not an IVC filter was placed. The endpoint was in-hospital mortality. Over 2.75 years, we found that 248 patients were diagnosed with acute PE, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 4.4%. The prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement was 13.3% (33 of 248), and the prevalence of documented right heart strain was 27.0% (67 of 248). In-hospital mortality was 10.2% in the non-filter-treated group (5 of 49), whereas there were no deaths in the filter-treated group (0 of 18); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.37). Both the presence of deep-vein thrombosis and of right heart strain increased the likelihood that an adjunctive IVC filter was placed (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively). At our institution, patients were treated with IVC filters in addition to anticoagulation in 13.3% of cases of acute PE. Prospective studies or large clinical registries should be conducted to clarify whether this practice improves outcomes.

  16. Professor Brand Advocacy: Do Brand Relationships Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Wilcox, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The trend among students to advocate their professors online continues to generate interest within marketing academia. Brand advocacy in products and services has played a vital role in marketing. However, no known research to date has embraced the idea of brand advocacy in marketing education. This research builds on the recent human brand…

  17. "Dear Professor: I Hate You"--Anonymous

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Flip through a stack of anonymous student evaluations of professors and the mild comments, even the compliments, tend to blend together. But often, hidden among them, is a dagger. Then there are the out-and-out insults. Students' comments can be more than simply mean. Sometimes student comments aren't cruel, just weird. In this article, some…

  18. Copyright law and the nursing professor.

    PubMed

    Clegg, R L

    1991-01-01

    The copyright law affects the resources that are available to faculty for educating students. The author discusses the concept of fair use in academe, the process for obtaining permission to copy materials that have been copyrighted, and the rights of the professor who has created works during employment. An application of the copyright law to the publication of students' papers is presented.

  19. Professors' Freedoms under Assault in the Courts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Recent court rulings have challenged the long-held concept of academic freedom for faculty members. As an associate professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, Kevin J. Renken says he felt obliged to speak out about his belief that administrators there were mishandling a National Science Foundation grant to him…

  20. The Decisive Difference between Dean and Professor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2009-01-01

    A friend and fellow academic recently told the author that her dean, who directs a professional school at a state university, spends most of his time at conferences hanging out with professors from his institution, as well as with their graduate students and his co-authors on research papers. She said, and the author agreed, that such habits…

  1. For Professors, "Friending" Can Be Fraught

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipka, Sara

    2007-01-01

    People connect on Facebook by asking to "friend" one another. A typical user lists at least 100 such connections, while newbies are informed, "You don't have any friends yet." A humbling statement. It might make one want to find some. But friending students can be even dicier than befriending them. In the real world, casual professors may ask…

  2. Aging Professors Create a Faculty Bottleneck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2012-01-01

    A growing proportion of the nation's professors are at the same point in their career: still working, but with the end of their careers in sight. Their tendency to remain on the job as long as their work is enjoyable--or, during economic downturns, long enough to make sure they have enough money to live on in retirement--has led the professoriate…

  3. Storytime with Fresh Professor, Part One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, James

    2016-01-01

    James Miles writes that he wasn't always the Fresh Professor. At one point, he was just another starving actor, trying to make a living. But stories change over time, as do professional desires. This article presents Part One of his story.

  4. Fueling Educational Reform: The HHMI Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkanic, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) believes that fundamental change is possible in the tradition-bound world of college and university science education and recently announced new grants to empower individual scientist-educators--the HHMI Professors--to develop innovative approaches for changing the way they teach biology to…

  5. Classroom Incivilities: Students' Perceptions about Professors' Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stork, Elizabeth; Hartley, Nell Tabor

    2009-01-01

    A learning environment is a social one, and as a social environment it impacts what learners retain, how they form ideas, and what connections are made and lost when acquiring new skills and knowledge (Goleman, 2006). Today's college students' expectations for and perceptions of professors in the classroom are likely to influence their learning…

  6. String theorist takes over as Lucasian Professor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-11-01

    String theorist Michael Green will be the next Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University. Green, 63, will succeed Stephen Hawking, who held the chair from 1980 before retiring last month at the age of 67 and taking up a distinguished research chair at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Canada (see above).

  7. An Analysis of Adjuncts: A Syntacto-Discoursal Approach (A Case Study in Contemporary Persian)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jafari, Azita; Sedigh Ziabari, Roya

    2008-01-01

    In broad terms, this paper is concerned with adjunct construction in Persian, which is an Indo-Iranian Language. During the recent century, specially in its final decades, different researches have been done about adjuncts and adjunction among different languages, but despite the fact that they are very important in Persian language, no attempts…

  8. Emotional Intelligence, Job Satisfaction, and Students' Perceptions of the Quality of Online Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Sara K.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between emotional intelligence and students' perceptions of quality of online adjunct faculty and the relationship between emotional intelligence and the job satisfaction of online adjunct faculty. Online adjunct faculty participants completed the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire--Short Form…

  9. Identifying the Professional Development Needs of Adjunct Faculty Using an Online Delphi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuddie, Stephani B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this online Delphi was to explore the professional development needs and preferences of adjunct faculty, specifically those who teach online. The study involved adjunct faculty who were categorized by their self-selected type of adjunct faculty member: specialist, aspiring academic, professional/freelancer, and career-ender. Through…

  10. Perceptions of the Other: Voices of Adjunct and Fulltime Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backlin, William Wayne

    2012-01-01

    The practice of hiring adjunct instructors was initially considered to be an anomalous event (Todd, 2004). Community college employment of adjunct instructors, however, witnessed a 50% increase during the 1970s (Cain, 1999) and, by 1984, adjunct instructor utilization in community colleges rose dramatically with an additional 80% growth. Over a…

  11. A Utilization-Focused Evaluation of a Community College Adjunct Faculty Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edenfield, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Nationally adjunct faculty comprise almost 70% of all two-year institution faculty while in the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) adjunct faculty teach 60% of the community college courses, and should past trends continue, the number of adjunct faculty members is expected to grow 10% within the next fifteen years (Caliber, 2007; Phillipe &…

  12. Expectations, Motivations, and Barriers to Professional Development: Perspectives from Adjunct Instructors Teaching Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey-Hebert, Amber; Mandernach, B. Jean; Donnelli-Sallee, Emily; Norris, Virgil Rusty

    2014-01-01

    Adjunct instructors are the fastest growing population of faculty in the academy; and, given the current economic condition and its impact on institutions of higher learning, the proportion of adjunct faculty is likely to increase (Gappa, Austin & Trice, 2007; NCES, 2011). Yet the adjunct population continues to remain disconnected from the…

  13. Five Years Later: Maryland Adjuncts Tell Us (Again) Who They Are and What They Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Dallas M.; Hall, Marilyn S.; Karlsson, Carl Richard; Martinak, M. Linda

    2013-01-01

    Adjunct faculty make up a large contingent of faculty teaching in today's colleges and universities. In fact, the use of adjunct faculty allows these institutions to fulfill their educational missions. Much is written in the popular press and in periodicals dedicated to higher education about adjunct faculty. While some of this is accurate, a…

  14. Professor Attitudes and Beliefs about Teaching Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Maryann Elizabeth

    Teaching evolution has been shown to be a challenge for faculty, in both K-12 and postsecondary education. Many of these challenges stem from perceived conflicts not only between religion and evolution, but also faculty beliefs about religion, it's compatibility with evolutionary theory, and it's proper role in classroom curriculum. Studies suggest that if educators engage with students' religious beliefs and identity, this may help students have positive attitudes towards evolution. The aim of this study was to reveal attitudes and beliefs professors have about addressing religion and providing religious scientist role models to students when teaching evolution. 15 semi-structured interviews of tenured biology professors were conducted at a large Midwestern universiy regarding their beliefs, experiences, and strategies teaching evolution and particularly, their willingness to address religion in a class section on evolution. Following a qualitative analysis of transcripts, professors did not agree on whether or not it is their job to help students accept evolution (although the majority said it is not), nor did they agree on a definition of "acceptance of evolution". Professors are willing to engage in students' religious beliefs, if this would help their students accept evolution. Finally, professors perceived many challenges to engaging students' religious beliefs in a science classroom such as the appropriateness of the material for a science class, large class sizes, and time constraints. Given the results of this study, the author concludes that instructors must come to a consensus about their goals as biology educators as well as what "acceptance of evolution" means, before they can realistically apply the engagement of student's religious beliefs and identity as an educational strategy.

  15. "What Do You Mean by Whiteness?": A Professor, Four Doctoral Students, and a Student Affairs Administrator Explore Whiteness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stephanie Power; Honeyford, Michelle; McKaskle, Dionne; Guthrie, Frank; Mahoney, Susan; Carter, Ghangis D.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, four doctoral students--two White females, one African American female, a White male--an African American female assistant professor, and an African American male student affairs administrator reflect on the difficult dialogues that took place during a seminar on whiteness. Watt's (2007) Privilege Identity Model (PIE) was integral…

  16. Categorization of Quantum Mechanics Problems by Professors and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the categorization of 20 quantum mechanics problems by physics professors and undergraduate students from two honours-level quantum mechanics courses. Professors and students were asked to categorize the problems based upon similarity of solution. We also had individual discussions with professors who categorized the problems. Faculty…

  17. 22 CFR 62.20 - Professors and research scholars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Professors and research scholars. 62.20 Section... Specific Program Provisions § 62.20 Professors and research scholars. (a) Introduction. These regulations govern Exchange Visitor Program participants in the categories of professor and research scholar,...

  18. 22 CFR 62.20 - Professors and research scholars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Professors and research scholars. 62.20 Section... Specific Program Provisions § 62.20 Professors and research scholars. (a) Introduction. These regulations govern Exchange Visitor Program participants in the categories of professor and research scholar,...

  19. 22 CFR 62.20 - Professors and research scholars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Professors and research scholars. 62.20 Section... Specific Program Provisions § 62.20 Professors and research scholars. (a) Introduction. These regulations govern Exchange Visitor Program participants in the categories of professor and research scholar,...

  20. Law Professors Rule Laptops out of Order in Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Andrea L.

    2008-01-01

    The forbidden-laptop zone is territory into which few professors dare tread. Students have been known to protest when laptops are banned from a classroom, and even claim that they are being denied a proper education. Professors who have taken the bold step, though, sound like they've experienced an epiphany. A professor at the University, Don…

  1. E-Mail from Professor Enhances Student Motivation and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legg, Angela M.; Wilson, Janie H.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, professors use the first day of class to build rapport. However, current technology allows professors to contact students prior to the first day of class. This study assessed how the receipt of a welcoming e-mail from a female professor 1 week before the first day of class affected student motivation and attitudes toward the…

  2. Social Networking Sites: An Adjunctive Treatment Modality for Psychological Problems

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Indu S.; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Chandra, Prabha S.; Thennarasu, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Social networking is seen as a way to enhance social support and feeling of well-being. The present work explores the potentials of social networking sites as an adjunctive treatment modality for initiating treatment contact as well as for managing psychological problems. Materials and Methods: Interview schedule, Facebook intensity questionnaire were administered on 28 subjects with a combination of 18 males and 10 females. They were taken from the in-patient and out-patient psychiatry setting of the hospital. Results: Facebook was the most popular sites and used to seek emotional support on the basis of the frequent updates of emotional content that users put in their profile; reconciliations, escape from the problems or to manage the loneliness; getting information about illness and its treatment and interaction with experts and also manifested as problematic use. Conclusions: It has implications for developing social networking based adjunctive treatment modality for psychological problems. PMID:25035548

  3. [Homage to Professor Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda].

    PubMed

    1998-11-01

    During a solemn academic act, de Main Classroom of the Facultad de Odontologia de Buenos Aires was named after Prof. Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda. He has been the first professor at the Escuela de Odontologia and its organizer, after having obtained his Dentistry degree at the Dental School of Paris, in 1882. The new school was founded in 1891, and its activities began the following year.

  4. Professor Witold Nowicki - a greatly spirited pathologist.

    PubMed

    Wincewicz, A; Szepietowska, A; Sulkowski, S

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a complete overview of the scientific, professional and social activity of a great Polish pathologist, Witold Nowicki (1878-1941), from mainly Polish-written, original sources with a major impact on mostly his own publications. The biographical commemoration of this eminent professor is not only due to the fact that he provided a profound microscopic characterization of pneumatosis cystoides in 1909 and 1924. Nowicki greatly influenced the development of anatomical pathology in Poland, having authored over 82 publications, with special reference to tuberculosis, lung cancer, sarcomatous carcinomas, scleroma and others. However, the first of all his merits for the readership of Polish pathologists was his textbook titled Anatomical Pathology, which was a basic pathology manual in pre-war Poland. Witold Nowicki - as the head of the academic pathological anatomy department and former dean of the medical faculty - was shot with other professors by Nazi Germans in the Wuleckie hills in Lvov during World War Two. Professor Nowicki was described as being "small in size but great in spirit" by one of his associates, and remains an outstanding example of a meticulous pathologist, a patient tutor and a great social activist to follow. PMID:27543863

  5. Similarities and Differences in Perceptions of Adjunct Faculty and Division Chairpersons regarding Teaching Support, Mentoring, and Professional Development Opportunities for Adjunct Faculty at a Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diegel, Betsy L.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines the similarities and differences in perceptions between division chair people and adjunct faculty regarding teaching support, mentoring, and professional development opportunities. Adjunct faculty have a significant presence in higher education institutions and need to feel supported so they are prepared to teach. A…

  6. Editorial: A dedication to Professor Jan Evetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Harald; Dew-Hughes, David; Campbell, Archie; Barber, Zoe; Somekh, Rob; Glowacki, Bartek

    2006-03-01

    A few days before the beginning of the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity we learned that Professor Jan Evetts, a pioneer of superconductor research, a brilliant scientist, a wonderful person and a great personal friend, had passed away. We therefore decided to dedicate the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity to the memory of Jan Evetts. The following citation is based on material provided by his former supervisor (D Dew-Hughes) and his closest co-workers in Cambridge. Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Jan Evetts passed away after losing his second battle with cancer on 24th August 2005. He made an outstanding series of contributions to the science of superconductivity and to the understanding of superconducting materials and was an indefatigable champion of the development of applications of superconductivity. The loss to the superconductivity community is incalculable, as attested by the many communications received from colleagues throughout the world. Jan was born on 31 March 1939, and attended the Dragon School in Oxford, and later Haileybury. He was awarded an exhibition to read Natural Sciences at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He entered the college in 1958 and took his BA degree in 1961. He then undertook a Certificate of Postgraduate Study in Physics under the supervision of Professor Neville Mott. He was the first student to undertake this newly-instituted course; the title of his thesis was `The Resistance of Transition Metals'. In 1962 he joined David Dew-Hughes' superconducting materials research group, along with Archie Campbell and Anant Narlikar. In fact it was Jan's enthusiasm for the proposed course of research that helped convince David that he should follow Professor Alan Cottrell's suggestion to apply metallurgical methodology to the study of the factors that controlled critical current density in the type II superconductors that were then under development for

  7. A second opinion: response to 100 professors.

    PubMed

    Wechter, Daniel; Harrison, Donna; Adams, Robert; Beard, Scott; Blaskiewicz, Robert; Bush, Freda; Calhoun, Byron; Cirucci, Christina A; Christiansen, Sandy; Cook, Curtis; Davenport, Mary; DeCook, Joseph; Delgado, George; Dood, Jeffrey J; Dotto, Myles; Dumpe, Kevin; Friedman, Wayne H; Glass, Tracy; Gray, Thomas L; Gray, J Paul; Hale, Kathryn Azelia; Hersh, Camilla; Hines, James; Jackson, Angela; Johannson, Joshua; Keenan, Jeffrey A; Linn, James; Long, James D; Marshall, Joseph F; McDonald, Daniel P; McCloskey, Leslie; Mickelson, Julie; Pestoff, Marianne R; Parker, E William; Sawyer, Allan T; Schwering, Christina; Seale, Fred; Schoutko, Walter; Showalter, Anita; Skakalski, Tonia; Skop, Ingrid; Smith, Leonard F; Stalter, Wililam; Steele, Andrew; Thiele, Scott A; Varasteh, Nicole; Ward, D Gregory; Wittingen, Jerry A

    2014-01-01

    Induced abortion is a controversial topic among obstetricians. "100 Professors" extolled the benefits of elective abortion in a Clinical Opinion published in AJOG. However, scientific balance requires the consideration of a second opinion from practitioners who care for both patients, and who recognize the humanity of both. Alternative approaches to the management of a problem pregnancy, as well as short and long term risks to women as published in the peer reviewed medical literature are discussed. Maintaining a position of "pro-choice" requires that practitioners also be given a right to exercise Hippocratic principles in accordance with their conscience. PMID:25189014

  8. Individual psychotherapy as an adjunct to group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Amaranto, E A; Bender, S S

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a form of combined psychotherapy in which the individual sessions are used as an adjunct to group therapy. Each group member is seen regularly in individual sessions to focus primarily on the member's ongoing group work. The individual sessions are scheduled on a rotating basis. Typically, each group member is seen in an individual session once every four weeks. Additional individual sessions are available only when immediate attention is appropriate and necessary. The group is viewed as the primary therapeutic component. A cost-effective therapeutic approach that uses both individual and group methods, this modality lends itself well to a clinic and to a private practice setting.

  9. Adjunct Methods of the Standard Diabetic Foot Ulceration Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Waniczek, Dariusz; Kozowicz, Andrzej; Kokot, Teresa; Świętochowska, Elżbieta; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of management of diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is poor and insufficient. DFU therapy includes the standard management as debridement of the wound, revascularization procedures, off-loading of the ulcer and antibacterial actions, and supplementation of growth factors and cytokines, leading to stimulation of granulation, epidermization, and angiogenesis. The aim of the present review is to summarize the adjunct methods of the standard DFU therapy as hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), maggot therapy (MT), and platelet-rich plasma therapy (PRPT). The results of preclinical and clinical trials indicated that the methods may reduce time of therapy, short-term morbidity, and the risk of major amputation. PMID:23843866

  10. Imaging of neuronal tissue using a prism adjunct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbridge, Philip; Bradu, Adrian; Lall, Gurprit; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-03-01

    We present the use of a prism as an imaging adjunct with a multimodal system of optical coherence tomography and confocal microscopy operating at 1320 nm and 970 nm respectively. A comparison is performed between en-face OCT images acquired using the system and cross section OCT images obtained through a prism inserted into neuronal tissue of an intact ex-vivo murine brain. The en-face images and cross section images are scans of the same area; however each method has shown different aspects, allowing for greater interpretation of the neuronal tissue.

  11. Individual psychotherapy as an adjunct to group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Amaranto, E A; Bender, S S

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a form of combined psychotherapy in which the individual sessions are used as an adjunct to group therapy. Each group member is seen regularly in individual sessions to focus primarily on the member's ongoing group work. The individual sessions are scheduled on a rotating basis. Typically, each group member is seen in an individual session once every four weeks. Additional individual sessions are available only when immediate attention is appropriate and necessary. The group is viewed as the primary therapeutic component. A cost-effective therapeutic approach that uses both individual and group methods, this modality lends itself well to a clinic and to a private practice setting. PMID:2318559

  12. Mindfulness meditation practices as adjunctive treatments for psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Marchand, William R

    2013-03-01

    Mindfulness meditation-based therapies are being increasingly used as interventions for psychiatric disorders. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) have been studied extensively. MBSR is beneficial for general psychological health and pain management. MBCT is recommended as an adjunctive treatment for unipolar depression. Both MBSR and MBCT have efficacy for anxiety symptoms. Informed clinicians can do much to support their patients who are receiving mindfulness training. This review provides information needed by clinicians to help patients maximize the benefits of mindfulness training and develop an enduring meditation practice.

  13. Pyriform Aperture Augmentation as An Adjunct to Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Yaremchuk, Michael J; Vibhakar, Dev

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal deficiency in the central midface impacts nasal aesthetics. This lack of lower face projection can be corrected by alloplastic augmentation of the pyriform aperture. Creating convexity in the deficient midface will make the nose seem less prominent. Augmentation of the pyriform aperture is, therefore, often a useful adjunct during the rhinoplasty procedure. Augmenting the skeleton in this area can alter the projection of the nasal base, the nasolabial angle, and the vertical plane of the lip. The implant design and surgical techniques described here are extensions of others' previous efforts to improve paranasal aesthetics. PMID:26616706

  14. Students' Ratings of Professors: The Teaching Style Contingency for Latino/a Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gabriel; Anderson, Kristin J.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the influence of gender, ethnicity (Latino/a or Anglo), and teaching style (lenient or strict) on students' perceptions of professors teaching a social science course. Undergraduates read and responded to a syllabus and rated the course and the instructor on dimensions such as warmth, knowledge, and political bias. Contrary…

  15. Social Styles of Students and Professors: Do Students' Social Styles Influence Their Preferences for Professors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlee, Regina P.

    2005-01-01

    This article uses Merrill and Reid's classification of social styles as drivers, analyticals, expressives, and amiables to examine differences between the personalities of different business majors and student choices of favorite professors. Significant differences were found in the social styles of different business majors. Furthermore, one's…

  16. Mipomersen as a potential adjunctive therapy for hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neeraj; Hegele, Robert A

    2010-10-01

    Mipomersen, an antisense oligonucleotide directed against apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB), was investigated for its safety and efficacy in reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (C) as adjunctive treatment for patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) in a Phase III, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial. HoFH patients are very rare in the general population (∼ 1:1,000,000) and have very high risk for cardiovascular events. HoFH patients respond poorly to statins and most other existing lipid-lowering therapies. Mipomersen (200 or 160 mg) administered subcutaneously to 34 HoFH patients for 26 weeks significantly reduced LDL-C by 24.7% from baseline. In addition, mipomersen lowered plasma lipoprotein (a). In most patients, mipomersen administration was most associated with injection-site reactions; influenza-like symptoms were also more common in mipomersen-treated patients. Four patients had elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentrations, one of whom also had a significant increase in intrahepatic triglyceride content. Another patient met the stopping rules for increased ALT concentrations. No patient developed steatohepatitis during the study. Thus, so far short-term data indicate that mipomersen is safe and effective as an adjunctive drug for lowering LDL-C. Despite these promising results, the longer-term safety and efficacy of mipomersen still needs to be determined. PMID:20707601

  17. The centriole adjunct of insects: Need to update the definition.

    PubMed

    Dallai, Romano; Paoli, Francesco; Mercati, David; Lupetti, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    The ancestral eukaryotes presumably had an MTOC (microtubule organizing center) which late gave origin to the centriole and the flagellar axoneme. The centrosome of insect early spermatids is in general composed of two components: a single centriole and a cloud of electron-dense pericentriolar material (PCM). During spermiogenesis, the centriole changes its structure and gives rise to a flagellar axoneme, while the proteins of PCM, gamma tubulin in particular, are involved in the production of microtubules for the elongation and shaping of spermatid components. At the end of spermiogenesis, in many insects, additional material is deposited beneath the nucleus to form the centriole adjunct (ca). This material can also extend along the flagellum in two accessory bodies (ab) flanking the axoneme. Among Homoptera Sternorrhyncha, a progressive modification of their sperm flagella until complete disappearance has been verified. In the Archaeococcidae Matsucoccus feytaudi, however, a motile sperm flagellum-like structure is formed by an MTOC activity. This finding gives support to the hypothesis that an evolutionary reversal has occurred in the group and that the cell, when a non-functional centriole is present, activates an ancestral structure, an MTOC, to form a polarized motile bundle of microtubules restoring sperm motility. The presence and extension of the centriole adjunct in the different insect orders is also enlisted. PMID:26899558

  18. Efficacy of Adjunctive Tofacitinib Therapy in Mouse Models of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Maiga, Mamoudou; Ahidjo, Bintou Ahmadou; Maiga, Mariama C; Cheung, Laurene; Pelly, Shaaretha; Lun, Shichun; Bougoudogo, Flabou; Bishai, William R

    2015-08-01

    The global tuberculosis (TB) epidemic and the spread of multi- and extensively-drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) have been fueled by low adherence to following lengthy treatment protocols, and the rapid spread of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus). Persistence of the infection in immunocompetent individuals follows from the ability of M.tb to subvert host immune responses in favor of survival within macrophages. Alternative host-directed strategies are therefore being currently sought to improve treatment efficacy and duration. In this study, we evaluated tofacitinib, a new oral Janus kinase (JAK) blocker with anti-inflammatory properties, in shortening tuberculosis treatment. BALB/c mice, which are immunocompetent, showed acceleration of M.tb clearance achieving apparent sterilization after 16 weeks of adjunctive tofacitinib therapy at average exposures higher than recommended in humans, while mice receiving standard treatment alone did not achieve clearance until 24 weeks. True sterilization with tofacitinib was not achieved until five months. C3HeB/FeJ mice, which show reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines during M.tb infection, did not show improved clearance with adjunctive tofacitinib therapy, indicating that the nature of granulomatous lesions and host immunity may influence responsiveness to tofacitinib. Our findings suggest that the JAK pathway could be explored further for host-directed therapy in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:26425693

  19. Efficacy of Adjunctive Tofacitinib Therapy in Mouse Models of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Maiga, Mamoudou; Ahidjo, Bintou Ahmadou; Maiga, Mariama C.; Cheung, Laurene; Pelly, Shaaretha; Lun, Shichun; Bougoudogo, Flabou; Bishai, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The global tuberculosis (TB) epidemic and the spread of multi- and extensively-drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) have been fueled by low adherence to following lengthy treatment protocols, and the rapid spread of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus). Persistence of the infection in immunocompetent individuals follows from the ability of M.tb to subvert host immune responses in favor of survival within macrophages. Alternative host-directed strategies are therefore being currently sought to improve treatment efficacy and duration. In this study, we evaluated tofacitinib, a new oral Janus kinase (JAK) blocker with anti-inflammatory properties, in shortening tuberculosis treatment. BALB/c mice, which are immunocompetent, showed acceleration of M.tb clearance achieving apparent sterilization after 16 weeks of adjunctive tofacitinib therapy at average exposures higher than recommended in humans, while mice receiving standard treatment alone did not achieve clearance until 24 weeks. True sterilization with tofacitinib was not achieved until five months. C3HeB/FeJ mice, which show reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines during M.tb infection, did not show improved clearance with adjunctive tofacitinib therapy, indicating that the nature of granulomatous lesions and host immunity may influence responsiveness to tofacitinib. Our findings suggest that the JAK pathway could be explored further for host-directed therapy in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:26425693

  20. Do Graduate Assistants Get a Fair Deal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malveaux, Julianne

    2004-01-01

    There is nothing like a campus environment to reinforce the concept of teamwork. Few on a campus can do their jobs alone. From the loftiest endowed chair holder, hefty salary in pocket, to the newest assistant professor, everyone makes a contribution, of sorts, and relies on others to reinforce that contribution. But in the campus world, the…

  1. The AAS Visiting Professor Programs: Three Anniversaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. Davis

    2003-05-01

    The AAS Program of Visiting Professors was started in 1958 with three astronomers as lecturers. They were Paul Merrill (Mt. Wilson and Palomar Observatories), Seth Nicholson (Mt. Wilson and Palomar Observatories) and Harlow Shapley (Harvard College Observatory). The program was run by a Committee on Visiting Professors from 1958 through 1963. The program was funded by grants from the National Science Foundation. The Executive Officer of the AAS, Paul Routley headed the program from the 1963 - 64 academic year through the 1968 - 69 academic year. Larry Fredrick headed the program for 1969 - 70 and then Hank Gurin headed it through 1973 -74, the last year of the program. At the end of this summer meeting, the combined Visiting Professors Program and the Shapley Program will be starting their 47th year. The Shapley Visiting Lectureships in Astronomy Program was started in the 1974 - 75 academic year under the leadership of Hank Gurin. The original funding came from the Perkin Fund and a three year grant from the Research Corporation. In 1975 the Shapley Endowment fund was set up to help pay the expenses of the program. In 1976 there was support from the Slipher fund which lasted through the 1978 - 79 academic year. From 1979 to the present the program is financed by the Shapley Endowment Fund and by the contributions made by institutions which host the visits. In the fall of 1998 the fee that Institutions pay to the AAS in support of their Shapley visits was reduced from 300 to 250 to make it easier for them to apply for visits. Members of the AAS have made contributions to the program over the years and we are very appreciative of this support. In 1974 there were 42 lecturers in the program, of whom four are still active giving lectures (George Carruthers, Larry Fredrick, Arlo Landolt and Davis Philip). After the summer meeting, the Shapley Program will be embarking on its 30th year. Now there are 82 astronomers in the program and we get from 40 to 60 requests a year

  2. Teaching Assistant Training and Teaching Opportunity (TATTO) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Eleanor C.

    The Teaching Assistant Training and Teaching Opportunity (TATTO) program began in spring 1991 at Emory University to prepare graduate students to be teaching assistants, instructors, and tomorrow's professors, and is based on the premise that doctoral students should be trained in both teaching and research. The first part of the four-stage…

  3. [Konstanty Janicki: scientist, university professor, discoverer].

    PubMed

    Kuźnicki, Leszek

    2005-01-01

    Janicki born in Moscow (1876) lived in Warsaw up to graduation from high school (1893). Then he emigrated to the Western Europe for the next 25 years. Janicki had studied and curried out scientific researches in the field of helminthology and protozoology at universities and institutes in Germany, Switzerland and Italy. In 1918 Poland reagained independence and Konstanty Janicki returned from abroad to Warsaw. He was nominated as a professor and chairman of the Department of Systematic and Morphological Zoology at the Warsaw University. In helminthology Janicki was a world wide known discoverer of the life cycles Diphyllobothrium latum and Amphilina foliacea. In the protozoology the most important are the studies on the Metamonadina and Paramoeba (Janickina). During period 1919-1932 Janicki was surrounded by numerous students. Some completed Ph.D. under his guidance. He was main founder of the parasitology, protozoology and hydrobiology in the first half of the XX century in Poland.

  4. Becoming the professors of lesbian love.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Liela J; Taylor, Verta

    2005-01-01

    We tell here our all-too-unusual story of living and working together, reflecting on both the obstacles and the forces that made it possible for us to find each other, stay together, and develop a collaborative working relationship. Despite experiencing various forms of discrimination, we have been able over the years to contribute to the creation of a queer community through hiring lesbian colleagues, attracting lesbian and gay students, participating in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender movement, and advocating social justice for women and gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people in our respective professional associations. This is the story of becoming the "professors of lesbian love," a title bestowed upon us by the drag queens we studied in our most recent joint project.

  5. Establishing the Golitsyn Hospital: the contribution of Professor Efrem Osipovich Mukhin (1766-1850).

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Mark B

    2010-08-01

    Golitsynsky Hospital is one of the oldest Moscow clinics founded by the Russian Aristocrat Count Golitsyn in 1802. A prominent Russian surgeon and Professor at Moscow University, Efrem Mukhin became the first senior medical doctor at this hospital and played a crucial role in its development. Six hundred and eighty-eight operations were performed at Golitsynsky Hospital between 1802 and 1807 including obstetric, gynaecological, eye and ear interventions. Mukhin performed 444 operations himself. The hospital continued functioning when Napoleon's troops occupied Moscow in September 1812. The French surgeons D Larrey, Degenet and De la Fliz worked there during this period, assisted by their Russian pupils A Migachev and V Sherbakov.

  6. Professor Ludwik Hirszfeld in his relations with students and junior researchers.

    PubMed

    Kierzek, Andrzej; Kuciel-Lewandowska, Jadwiga; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Pozowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Ludwik Hirszfeld (1874-1954) as an educator of medical personnel. Hirszfeld was an eminent immunologist, bacteriologist and seroanthropologist; the originator of the Polish school of immunology; a professor at Warsaw University, Maria Sklodowska-Curie University in Lublin and the University and Technical University in Wroclaw; and the founder of the Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy in Wroclaw. An account of his relations with university students and junior research personnel - relations based on respect, on multi-faceted assistance in everyday life, but above all on a love for science - is presented, depicting Hirszfeld as a teacher of scientific thinking.

  7. Training Faculty Members and Resident Assistants to Respond to Bereaved Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Taub, Deborah J.

    2008-01-01

    Scholarship about campus responses to death-related events emphasizes the need for members of the campus community to be open to discussing grief-related issues. Faculty members and resident assistants (RAs) are ideally situated to observe and respond to bereaved students. Faculty--tenure-track, adjunct, and teaching assistants--have regular…

  8. 22 CFR 62.20 - Professors and research scholars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., mutual enrichment, and linkages between research and educational institutions in the United States and... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Professors and research scholars. 62.20 Section... Specific Program Provisions § 62.20 Professors and research scholars. (a) Introduction. These...

  9. Professor Perceptions of College Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Teresa Ann; Weyandt, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Objective: From April to June 2005, the authors investigated professor perceptions of college students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Participants: 253 participants completed the ADHD Beliefs Survey-Revised, a 40-question survey measuring professor perceptions of ADHD. Methods: Analysis of variance measured false and…

  10. Two Professors Retake the SAT: Is It a Good Test?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Christopher; Vanderbei, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, two professors retake the college-entrance exam and arrive at very different conclusions about its performance. Even though Christopher Harper has worked as a college professor for 15 years, he decided last winter to take the SAT and ACT examinations that his students needed to enter the institution where he teaches, Temple…

  11. 26 CFR 521.114 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Visiting professors or teachers. 521.114... of Denmark and of Danish Corporations § 521.114 Visiting professors or teachers. Under Article XIV of... States for the purpose of teaching, lecturing, or instructing at any university, college, school,...

  12. Effects of Social Support on Professors' Work Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeller, Christin; Chung-Yan, Greg A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how various types of workplace social support from different support sources interact with occupational stressors to predict the psychological well-being of university professors. Design/method/approach: A total of 99 full-time professors participated via an online or paper questionnaire. Findings:…

  13. [Double jubilee of undervalued professor J. D. John].

    PubMed

    Hlaváčková, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Paper draws attention to an interesting personality of a professor of medical police and forensic medicine, overlooked by historians. This year 250 years has passed since his birth and 200 years since his death. Professor Johns biography is given and his work appraised. PMID:25994826

  14. 22 CFR 62.20 - Professors and research scholars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... exchange visitor program. (f) Location of the exchange. Professors or research scholars must conduct their... 62.20 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Specific Program Provisions § 62.20 Professors and research scholars. (a) Introduction. These...

  15. My Time as a Professor in Residence: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Josephine Peyton

    2013-01-01

    This commentary is based on two of the lessons the author learned as the professor in residence at ASU Preparatory Academy-Phoenix (ASU Prep), a Title I school operated in partnership with the Phoenix Elementary School District. Her role as a university professor on special assignment as a literacy coach, staff developer, and co-researcher. The…

  16. Decrypting God's Language, and Other Items from Professors' Crackpot Files

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how professors became magnets for crackpots bearing pet theories and searching for validation. Scott A. Hughes, an associate professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, received a 22-page, single-spaced screed this May just begging for a place in the crackpot file. The subject line read, in part,…

  17. Do Professors Have Customer-Based Brand Equity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Jillapalli, Regina

    2014-01-01

    This research endeavors to understand whether certain professors have customer-based brand equity (CBBE) in the minds of students. Consequently, the purpose of this study is to conceptualize, develop, and empirically test a model of customer-based professor brand equity. Survey data gathered from 465 undergraduate business students were used to…

  18. Job Satisfaction of Experienced Professors at a Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marston, Susan H.; Brunetti, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined career satisfaction among experienced professors at a moderate-sized liberal arts college and explored their motivations for staying in the profession. Experienced professors were defined as tenure-track faculty who had been teaching in higher education for at least 15 years. Data sources included the Experienced Teacher…

  19. What I Wish My Professors Had Told Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    What do you wish your undergraduate professors told you before you ever set foot in a classroom? Jennifer Collins, one such professor who prepares pre-service teachers, has a list of six "truths" she shares with her students. In this article, Collins outlines those pieces of advice, which include understanding your larger purpose,…

  20. Psychometric Characteristics of the Professor-Student Rapport Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Rebecca G.; Wilson, Janie H.; Pugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors assessed the psychometric properties of the Professor-Student Rapport Scale, the first scale to measure professor-student rapport. The scale was found to have adequate test-retest and internal-consistency reliability. In addition to these findings, measures used to determine convergent validity included the Working…

  1. Professor-Student Rapport Scale Predicts Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Janie H.; Ryan, Rebecca G.; Pugh, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Rapport traditionally has been measured in therapy or in other one-on-one relationships such as with roommates. As yet, no scale is available to measure professor-student rapport. In this study, 51 undergraduates created items to measure professor-student rapport, and subsequently, 195 different college students rated their agreement with items…

  2. Exemplary Chinese University Professors: Qualities and Impact on Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Eugene P.; Olson, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the qualities of Chinese university professors as perceived by their students and the effects of those qualities on student learning and motivation. Specifically, what qualities and personal characteristics do Chinese university students attribute to their favorite and least favorite professors, and how do those qualities and…

  3. Professors' Facebook content affects students' perceptions and expectations.

    PubMed

    Sleigh, Merry J; Smith, Aimee W; Laboe, Jason

    2013-07-01

    Abstract Facebook users must make choices about level of self-disclosure, and this self-disclosure can influence perceptions of the profile's author. We examined whether the specific type of self-disclosure on a professor's profile would affect students' perceptions of the professor and expectations of his classroom. We created six Facebook profiles for a fictitious male professor, each with a specific emphasis: politically conservative, politically liberal, religious, family oriented, socially oriented, or professional. Undergraduate students randomly viewed one profile and responded to questions that assessed their perceptions and expectations. The social professor was perceived as less skilled but more popular, while his profile was perceived as inappropriate and entertaining. Students reacted more strongly and negatively to the politically focused profiles in comparison to the religious, family, and professional profiles. Students reported being most interested in professional information on a professor's Facebook profile, yet they reported being least influenced by the professional profile. In general, students expressed neutrality about their interest in finding and friending professors on Facebook. These findings suggest that students have the potential to form perceptions about the classroom environment and about their professors based on the specific details disclosed in professors' Facebook profiles. PMID:23614794

  4. More Professors Could Share Lectures Online: But Should They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the issues surrounding the production of lecture videos by professors and administrators which are free to the world. Professors across the country are now wrestling with this issue. More and more colleges have installed microphones or cameras in lecture halls and bought easy-to-use software to get lecture…

  5. Leadership and Strategic Choices: Female Professors in Australia and Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkanli, Ozlem; White, Kate

    2008-01-01

    This study explores leadership styles and gender in higher education (HE) by examining representation of female professors in Australian and Turkish universities and identifying barriers to achieving seniority. The paper explores factors, including leadership styles, which explain the higher representation of female professors in Turkey, despite…

  6. Engaging Undergraduates in Feminist Classrooms: An Exploration of Professors' Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Leland G.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the results of a feminist action research project that sought to ascertain professors' best practices for engaging undergraduates in feminist classrooms. In semi-structured interviews, professors recommended assigning readings from a variety of positionalities; creating a safe space for class discussion; relying on data to…

  7. When Web Sites Post Test Answers, Professors Worry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Several Web sites have emerged in recent years that encourage students to upload old exams to build a bank of test questions and answers that can be consulted by other students. This article reports that some professors have raised concerns about these sites, arguing that these could be used to cheat, especially if professors reuse old tests.…

  8. Two Great Professors: Formidable Intellects with Affection for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltzien, O. Allan

    1994-01-01

    This article profiles the teaching careers of history professor Giovanni Costigan of the University of Washington and English professor Tommy Howells of Whitman College in Walla Walla (Washington). It maintains that both men were accomplished lecturers who set the standard for their respective campuses and corners of Washington State. (MDM)

  9. Hiring, Orientation, Professional Development, and Evaluation: The Administrative Support of Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oprean, Celeste Pramik

    2012-01-01

    In North Carolina (NC) there are a total of 58 community colleges, each of which provides a unique approach to handling support for adjunct faculty. The NC Community College System provided a good setting to explore how one state in particular compares to current research on administrative support of adjunct faculty in the areas of hiring,…

  10. American Academic: A National Survey of Part-time/Adjunct Faculty. Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Plainly, part-time/adjunct faculty members now play a vital role in educating the nation's college students. Even so, the data and research on part-time/adjunct faculty members have tended to be pretty spotty. This survey, conducted by Hart Research Associates on behalf of the American Federation of Teachers, is one of the first nationwide…

  11. The Benefits of Embedded Question Adjuncts for Low and High Structure Builders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callender, Aimee A.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of two types of adjunct questions, standard embedded questions and "why" questions (elaborative interrogation), was investigated for readers differing in structure-building ability (Gernsbacher, 1990). Participants read a textbook chapter either with or without the adjunct questions. Learning was assessed with typical classroom…

  12. Herzberg's Theory of Motivation as Applied to Community College Full-Time and Adjunct Online Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullickson, Larry

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the factors that influence full-time and adjunct faculty perceptions regarding job satisfaction and dissatisfaction. It was also designed to determine if those factors relate differently to full-time and adjunct faculty. It is anticipated that this information will aid administrators in improving morale and…

  13. Real-time production of arguments and adjuncts in normal and agrammatic speakers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyeon; Thompson, Cynthia K

    2011-10-01

    Two eyetracking experiments examined the real-time production of verb arguments and adjuncts in healthy and agrammatic aphasic speakers. Verb argument structure has been suggested to play an important role during grammatical encoding (Bock & Levelt, 1994) and in speech deficits of agrammatic aphasic speakers (Thompson, 2003). However, little is known about how adjuncts are processed during sentence production. The present experiments measured eye movements while speakers were producing sentences with a goal argument (e.g., the mother is applying lotion to the baby) and a beneficiary adjunct phrase (e.g., the mother is choosing lotion for the baby) using a set of computer-displayed written words. Results showed that the sentence production system experiences greater processing cost for producing adjuncts than verb arguments and this distinction is preserved even after brain-damage. In Experiment 1, healthy young speakers showed greater gaze durations and gaze shifts for adjuncts as compared to arguments. The same patterns were found in agrammatic and older speakers in Experiment 2. Interestingly, the three groups of speakers showed different time courses for encoding adjuncts: young speakers showed greater processing cost for adjuncts during speech, consistent with incremental production (Kempen & Hoenkamp, 1987). Older speakers showed this difference both before speech onset and during speech, while aphasic speakers appeared to preplan adjuncts before speech onset. These findings suggest that the degree of incrementality may be affected by speakers' linguistic capacity.

  14. Including the Majority: Academic and Social Inclusion of Adjunct Faculty at Selected Texas Public Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaniel, Suzann Holland

    2012-01-01

    As the majority of teaching faculty on many community college campuses, adjuncts are accountable for the higher education of an increasing number of college-going students. However, adjunct faculty often are disconnected from the community colleges that depend upon them. The purpose of this nonexperimental quantitative study was to investigate the…

  15. A Study of the Adjunct Faculty Experiences in the Creation of a Teacher Work Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Anna L.

    2010-01-01

    Part-time and adjunct faculty members have been present in institutions of higher learning since the founding of this country. These groups of faculty provide a variety of unique professional experiences to their students; they offer financial savings and scheduling flexibility for their colleges and on many levels, adjuncts offer a range of other…

  16. Effective Orientation and Assimilation Needs of Adjunct Faculty in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Heather L.

    2013-01-01

    Adjunct faculty have become the majority workforce of instructional coursework in higher education. Once valued for their skills and knowledge in specialized areas, they are now a common, quick hire, budget fix utilized to instruct a variety of courses. Despite the need for and increased hiring of adjunct faculty, minimal orientation and welcome…

  17. Understanding Burnout and Promoting Engagement among Adjunct Faculty in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Michael Alan

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored the phenomenon of job burnout among adjunct faculty at two suburban Illinois community colleges. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Educators' Survey (MBI-ES) was administered to adjuncts at both colleges to determine overall levels of burnout for the three dimensions of burnout--emotional exhaustion,…

  18. An Examination of Adjunct Faculty Characteristics: Comparison between Non-Profit and For-Profit Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starcher, Keith; Mandernach, B. Jean

    2016-01-01

    Institutions must understand the unique characteristics and motivations of adjunct faculty teaching online to more effectively support a diverse faculty population. The current study examines faculty characteristics and motivations to explore differences in the types of adjunct faculty teaching at non-profit or for-profit institutions. A survey of…

  19. The Silent Majority: Comparing Community College Full-Time and Adjunct Faculty Satisfaction with Campus Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Deborah Jean

    2013-01-01

    The faculty landscape has changed in higher education, particularly with community colleges. It is only through research that we can compare full-time and adjunct community college faculty satisfaction with campus climate. The purpose of this study was to explore the differences between full-time and adjunct community college faculty regarding…

  20. Narrative Inquiry Assessing the Retention of Part-Time Adjunct Faculty at Private Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Doris L.

    2014-01-01

    All institutions of higher education depend heavily on the contributions of adjunct faculty. The purpose of the qualitative narrative inquiry was to gather, analyze, and interpret stories offered by faculty members to make meaning of their experiences as adjuncts in non-traditional higher education institutions. The qualitative narrative inquiry…

  1. Community College Adjunct Faculty Perceptions of Orientation, Mentoring, and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Dolly R.

    2013-01-01

    The problem addressed in this study was the paucity of professional development, mentoring, and orientation opportunities for adjunct faculty in the community college system. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate adjunct faculty member perceptions of their orientation, mentoring, and professional development experiences at a…

  2. Adjunct Faculty Perspectives regarding the Use of Technology in the Traditional Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Darryl L.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the perspectives of adjunct faculty regarding the use of technology in the traditional (brick and mortar) classroom. Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were utilized to gain the perspective of the adjunct faculty members from a two year and a four year institution. Over the last thirty years the number of adjunct…

  3. Bullying of Adjunct Faculty at Community Colleges and Steps toward Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reigle, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Adjunct instructors benefit community colleges through their flexibility, diversity, innovation and contributions to student success; however, their part-time status can result in friction with full-time/tenured faculty, a problem that can lead to bullying. In an effort to determine what forms bullying of adjunct faculty take and how these…

  4. Professional Online Adjuncts and the Three Pillars of Entrepreneurialism, Arbitrage, and Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollman, Wayne A.

    2013-01-01

    Significant growth in online programs has created demand for online courses and therefore opportunities for employment for online educators. The vast majority of these employment opportunities have been filled by online adjuncts. A special category of online adjunct has surfaced that leverages the autonomy of working online with freedom from…

  5. The Adjunct Advocate @ FIT: Bringing Part Time Faculty into the Mainstream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado, Elaine; Riman, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The Adjunct Advocate @ FIT is an online, faculty development program at FIT, part of the State University of New York. This convenient new resource, developed by the Center for Excellence in Teaching, reaches out to adjunct and off-campus faculty with professional development that includes printable materials, video, discussion boards, and…

  6. A National Survey of Adjunct Faculty in Rehabilitation Counseling Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degeneffe, Charles Edmund; Offutt, C. Raymond

    2008-01-01

    A national sample of 54 adjunct faculty members in rehabilitation counseling programs were surveyed to ascertain reasons why they chose to teach and how they contributed to their respective programs. Constant comparative analysis revealed a variety of reasons for why adjunct faculty enjoy teaching, including a desire to influence future…

  7. Effect of Level of Adjunct Questions on Achievement of Field Independent/Field Dependent Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pi-Sui-Hsu; Dwyer, Francis

    2004-01-01

    Adjunct questions inserted in text requires that an individual is retrieving known concepts and constructing the new meaning. In this process, the individual has to recall the knowledge just studied and locate exactly the location of the information. This study attempts to examine the (a) instructional effects of varied types of adjunct questions…

  8. Offering Acupuncture as an Adjunct for Tobacco Cessation: A Community Clinic Experience

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Emiley; Fung, Lei-Chun; Li, Chin-Shang; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Tam, Leonard; Tang, Carrie; Tong, Elisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Disparities in smoking rates remain prominent within Asian Americans. Medical pluralism and cultural tailoring may enhance Asian Americans engaging with tobacco cessation assistance. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a community clinic’s smoking cessation program targeting a Chinese population that offered acupuncture, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), and counseling from 2007 to 2010. Most participants used acupuncture, with about half choosing acupuncture and NRT, followed by more than 40% choosing acupuncture only; few chose NRT only. Tobacco cessation rates at 6 months were relatively high for the acupuncture + NRT group and only acupuncture group (37.7% vs. 28.9%). In comparing tobacco reduction >50% from baseline with an expanded only NRT group, the acupuncture + NRT group had a higher odds ratio than the only acupuncture group, which had a lower odds ratio. Our evaluation of this real-world community program offering acupuncture as a cultural adjunct to a tobacco cessation program suggests that acupuncture might help with engagement by Chinese American male smokers into a tobacco cessation program that offers counseling and NRT. Future larger studies should further evaluate the efficacy of offering acupuncture in combination with NRT on the outcomes of cessation and reduction. PMID:23667059

  9. Can procalcitonin levels indicate the need for adjunctive therapies in sepsis?

    PubMed

    Becze, Zsolt; Molnár, Zsolt; Fazakas, János

    2015-12-01

    After decades of extensive experimental and clinical research, septic shock and the related multiple organ dysfunction still remain the leading cause of mortality in intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide. Defining sepsis is a difficult task, but what is even more challenging is differentiating infection-induced from non-infection-induced systemic inflammatory response-related multiple organ dysfunction. As conventional signs of infection are often unreliable in intensive care, biomarkers are used, of which one of the most frequently investigated is procalcitonin. Early stabilisation of vital functions via adequate supportive therapy and antibiotic treatment has resulted in substantial improvements in outcome over the last decades. However, there are certain patients who may need extra help, hence modulation of the immune system and the host's response may also be an important therapeutic approach in these situations. Polyclonal intravenous immunoglobulins have been used in critical care for decades. A relatively new potential approach could be attenuation of the overwhelming cytokine storm by specific cytokine adsorbents. Both interventions have been applied in daily practice on a large scale, with firm pathophysiological rationale but weak evidence supported by clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to give an overview on the pathophysiology of sepsis as well as the role and interpretation of biomarkers and their potential use in assisting adjunctive therapies in sepsis in the future.

  10. Splenic Artery Embolization as an Adjunctive Procedure for Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Mitchell; Ray, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Splenic embolization is a technique that can be used alone or in conjunction with other treatments for the mitigation of portal hypertension and associated physiological effects of portal hypertension. This technique can be used safely when total embolization volume is ~50% and the procedural and periprocedural time periods are covered with antibiotics. In this patient population, partial splenic embolization can decrease the incidence of variceal bleeding, and protection can persist for at least a year. Additionally, liver function tests and serum cell counts can be expected to improve. Although not frequently used as primary therapy for patients with portal hypertension, splenic embolization can often be helpful as an alternative or adjunctive procedure. PMID:23729984

  11. Standard and alternative adjunctive treatments in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J K

    1993-01-01

    Cardiovascular rehabilitation is the process of restoring functional abilities degraded by a serious cardiovascular event or by a surgical procedure to preempt such an event. Cardiovascular rehabilitation also includes attempts to reverse risk factors that have contributed initially to the disease process. Rehabilitation programs generally comprise disease-related educational components, supervised prescriptive physical exercise, diet counseling and modification, cessation of tobacco use, psychoeducational interventions aimed at adjustment and coping, and relaxation and stress management to lower nonexertion-related sympathetic drive. The presence of so-called coronary-prone behavior patterns can be detected, and special behavioral modifications may be indicated to mitigate these putative risk factors. This paper reviews the roles of these behavioral adjuncts in treating cardiovascular disease and its aftermath, and notes new and unusual approaches to these components of treatment, such as alternative exercises, biofeedback, yoga, and other relaxation methods. Barriers to compliance are acknowledged, and enhancement of compliance is discussed briefly. PMID:8219823

  12. Adjunctive numerical relation codes in multimedia signal covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, James C.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2013-05-01

    This paper introduces a new redundant number system, the adjunctive numerical relation (ANR) codes, which offer improvements over other well known systems such as the Fibonacci, Lucas, and the Prime number systems when used in multimedia data hiding applications. It will be shown that this new redundant number system has potential applications in digital communications, signal, and image processing. the paper will also offer two illustrative applications for this new redundant coding system. First an enhanced bit-plane decomposition of image formatted files with data embedding (steganography and watermarking). Secondly, an example of an expanded bit-line decomposition of audio formatted files with data embedding and index-based retrieval capability will be described. The computer simulations will detail the statistical stability required for effective data encoding techniques and demonstrate the improvements in the embedding capacity in multimedia carriers.

  13. Polypodium leucotomos as an Adjunct Treatment of Pigmentary Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bucay, Vivian; Callender, Valerie; Cohen, Joel L.; Sadick, Neil; Waldorf, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Extracts of the tropical fern Polypodium leucotomos appear to possess beneficial properties for the skin attributed to the presence of numerous compounds within the extract that have antioxidant and photoprotective properties. Orally administered Polypodium leucotomos may provide protection against the detrimental photoaging effects of sunlight and can also help reduce the frequency and severity of polymorphous light eruption. Polypodium leucotomos has also been shown to be beneficial for the prevention and potential treatment of several aesthetically relevant conditions. Objective: The purpose of this review is to investigate the beneficial role of Polypodium leucotomos as an adjunct treatment for vitiligo, melasma, and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. Results: Based on a review of relevant literature including the results of a randomized, placebo-controlled study, the oral administration of Polypodium leucotomos significantly improved the severity of melasma in women after 12 weeks. Three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated significant improvements in vitiligo when oral Polypodium leucotomos therapy was combined with psoralens plus ultraviolet A and narrowband ultraviolet B. No controlled studies have assessed the efficacy of Polypodium leucotomos for the treatment of postinflammatory hyperpigmentation; however, its known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and demonstrated effectiveness for melasma support its use for treating this condition. No adverse events have been associated with the use of Polypodium leucotomos. Conclusion: In addition to preventing many harmful effects associated with sunlight exposure, orally administered Polypodium leucotomos also appears to provide adjunctive benefits in treating vitiligo, melasma, and may have the potential to help with postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. PMID:24688621

  14. Adjunctive Minocycline in Clozapine Treated Schizophrenia Patients with Persistent Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Deanna L.; Sullivan, Kelli M.; McEvoy, Joseph P; McMahon, Robert P.; Wehring, Heidi J.; Liu, Fang; Warfel, Dale; Vyas, Gopal; Richardson, Charles M.; Fischer, Bernard A.; Keller, William R.; Mathew Koola, Maju; Feldman, Stephanie; Russ, Jessica C.; Keefe, Richard S.; Osing, Jennifer; Hubzin, Leeka; August, Sharon; Walker, Trina M.; Buchanan, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clozapine is the most effective antipsychotic for treatment refractory people with schizophrenia, yet many patients only partially respond. Accumulating preclinical and clinical data suggest benefits with minocycline. We tested adjunct minocycline to clozapine in a 10 week, double blind placebo-controlled trial. Primary outcomes tested were positive and cognitive symptoms, while avolition, anxiety/depression and negative symptoms were secondary outcomes. Methods Schizophrenia and schizoaffective participants (N=52) with persistent positive symptoms were randomized to receive adjunct minocycline (100 mg oral capsule twice daily) (N=29) or placebo (N=23). Results Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) psychosis factor (p=0.098, effect size ES=0.39) and BPRS total score (p=0.075, effect size 0.55) were not significant. A ≥30% change in total BPRS symptoms was observed in 7/28 (25%) among minocycline and 1/23 (4%) among placebo participants, respectively (p=0.044). Global cognitive function (MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery, MCCB) did not differ, although there was a significant variation in size of treatment effects among cognitive domains (p=0.03), with significant improvement in working memory favoring minocycline (p=0.023, ES 0.41). The SANS total score did not differ, but significant improvement in avolition with minocycline was noted (p=0.012, ES=0.34). Significant improvement in the BPRS anxiety/depression factor was observed with minocycline (p=0.028, ES=0.49). Minocycline was well tolerated with significantly fewer headaches and constipation compared to placebo. Conclusion Minocycline’s effect on the MCCB composite score and positive symptoms were not statistically significant. Significant improvements with minocycline were seen in working memory, avolition and anxiety/depressive symptoms in a chronic population with persistent symptoms. Larger studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:26082974

  15. Role of adenosine as adjunctive therapy in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Forman, Mervyn B; Stone, Gregg W; Jackson, Edwin K

    2006-01-01

    Although early reperfusion and maintained patency is the mainstay therapy for ST elevation myocardial infarction, experimental studies demonstrate that reperfusion per se induces deleterious effects on viable ischemic cells. Thus "myocardial reperfusion injury" may compromise the full potential of reperfusion therapy and may account for unfavorable outcomes in high-risk patients. Although the mechanisms of reperfusion injury are complex and multifactorial, neutrophil-mediated microvascular injury resulting in a progressive decrease in blood flow ("no-reflow" phenomenon) likely plays an important role. Adenosine is an endogenous nucleoside found in large quantities in myocardial and endothelial cells. It activates four well-characterized receptors producing various physiological effects that attenuate many of the proposed mechanisms of reperfusion injury. The cardio-protective effects of adenosine are supported by its role as a mediator of pre- and post-conditioning. In experimental models, administration of adenosine in the peri-reperfusion period results in a marked reduction in infarct size and improvement in ventricular function. The cardioprotective effects in the canine model have a narrow time window with the drug losing its effect following three hours of ischemia. Several small clinical studies have demonstrated that administration of adenosine with reperfusion therapy reduces infarct size and improves ventricular function. In the larger AMISTAD and AMISTAD II trials a 3-h infusion of adenosine as an adjunct to reperfusion resulted in a striking reduction in infarct size (55-65%). Post hoc analysis of AMISTAD II showed that this was associated with significantly improved early and late mortality in patients treated within 3.17 h of symptoms. An intravenous infusion of adenosine for 3 h should be considered as adjunctive therapy in high risk-patients undergoing reperfusion therapy. PMID:16961725

  16. S.N.A.P. and T.W.I.L.: No Matter What You Call It, New Professors Get Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karanovich, Frances; Searby, Linda; Rosnick, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This paper details a non-tenured faculty peer mentoring program piloted at Uuuuu University. The Thinking, Writing, Inquiring and Learning (T.W.I.L.) pilot was modeled after a similar peer mentoring program, Support Network for Assistant/Associate Professors (S.N.A.P.), at the University of Xyyyy. The faculty development program offered structured…

  17. Increments of Transformation from Midnight to Daylight: How a Professor and Four Undergraduate Students Experienced an Original Philosophy of Teaching and Learning in Two Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arroyo, Andrew T.; Kidd, Angel R.; Burns, Susan M.; Cruz, Ivan J.; Lawrence-Lamb, Judy E.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from the qualitative tradition of narrative inquiry, and situated in an online learning environment at a historically Black college or university, this study explores the potential transformative impact of an original teaching philosophy from the perspectives of a tenure-track assistant professor and four former, nontraditional…

  18. OBITUARY: Professor Jan Evetts in memoriam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dew-Hughes, David; Campbell, Archie; Glowacki, Bartek

    2005-11-01

    It is with great sadness that we report the death of Jan Evetts, who lost his second battle with cancer on 18 August 2005. In 1988 he was appointed Founding Editor of this journal where his leadership created the foundation upon which its success rests today. He made an outstanding series of contributions to the science of superconductivity and to the understanding of superconducting materials, and was an indefatigable champion of the development of applications of superconductivity. The loss to the scientific community is incalculable, as is attested by the many communications received from colleagues throughout the world. Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Jan was born on 31 March 1939, and attended the Dragon School in Oxford, and later Haileybury. He was awarded an exhibition to read Natural Sciences at Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1958 and took his BA degree in 1961. He then undertook a Certificate of Postgraduate Study in Physics under the supervision of Professor Neville Mott. He was the first student to undertake this newly-instituted course; the title of his thesis was `The Resistance of Transition Metals'. In 1962 he joined David Dew-Hughes' embryonic superconducting materials research group, along with Archie Campbell and Anant Narlikar. In fact it was Jan's enthusiasm for the proposed course of research that helped convince David that he should follow Professor Alan Cottrell's suggestion to apply metallurgical methodology to the study of the factors that controlled critical current density in the type II superconductors that were then under development for applications in magnets. Competing theories for the critical current density at that time were fine filaments or `Mendelssohn Sponge' versus the pinning of Abrikosov quantized vortices. The results of the group's work, to which Jan made a major contribution, came down heavily in favour of the latter theory. Jan's outstanding characteristic was his

  19. A Field Study of Adjunct Faculty: The Impact of Career Stage on Reactions to Non-Tenure-Track Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Daniel C.; Turnley, William H.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 105 nontenure-track instructors and research associates identified advantages of adjunct status (flexibility, autonomy, challenge) and disadvantages (lack of advancement, remuneration, and respect). Late-career adjuncts had more positive attitudes and work behaviors. Midcareer adjuncts had the most difficulty balancing work and family.…

  20. Professor Thomas Lehner: archetypal translational scientist.

    PubMed

    Challacombe, S J

    2013-05-01

    Professor Thomas Lehner is one of the most distinguished oral and dental researchers to have come out of the UK. Over the past 40 years, he has made an astonishing number of discoveries which have had an impact on our understanding of the pathogenesis of a variety of mucosal diseases. He has consistently practiced both basic and clinical research and built an integrated group of clinical and non-clinical researchers, which allowed him easy transition from the laboratory to the clinic. Tom Lehner was among the early scientists studying mucosal immunology, initially exploring oral diseases, with special emphasis on the immunobiology of Streptococcus mutans, leading to active and passive vaccination against dental caries. He was the first to demonstrate cellular immunity as the immunopathological basis of periodontal diseases, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, and candidiasis. Over the past 20 years, his expertise in mucosal immunobiology has been applied to the immunology of HIV/SIV infections. His seminal contributions include regional innate mucosal immunity, prevention of SIV infection in macaques by secretory IgA antibodies, up-regulation of CC chemokines, and the first demonstration of protective CCR5 antibodies. Arguably, his leadership, his students, and the establishment of immunology applied to oral mucosal diseases will be his greatest legacy. His contributions continue unabated. PMID:23481587

  1. Professor Thomas Lehner: archetypal translational scientist.

    PubMed

    Challacombe, S J

    2013-05-01

    Professor Thomas Lehner is one of the most distinguished oral and dental researchers to have come out of the UK. Over the past 40 years, he has made an astonishing number of discoveries which have had an impact on our understanding of the pathogenesis of a variety of mucosal diseases. He has consistently practiced both basic and clinical research and built an integrated group of clinical and non-clinical researchers, which allowed him easy transition from the laboratory to the clinic. Tom Lehner was among the early scientists studying mucosal immunology, initially exploring oral diseases, with special emphasis on the immunobiology of Streptococcus mutans, leading to active and passive vaccination against dental caries. He was the first to demonstrate cellular immunity as the immunopathological basis of periodontal diseases, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, and candidiasis. Over the past 20 years, his expertise in mucosal immunobiology has been applied to the immunology of HIV/SIV infections. His seminal contributions include regional innate mucosal immunity, prevention of SIV infection in macaques by secretory IgA antibodies, up-regulation of CC chemokines, and the first demonstration of protective CCR5 antibodies. Arguably, his leadership, his students, and the establishment of immunology applied to oral mucosal diseases will be his greatest legacy. His contributions continue unabated.

  2. Editorial: A dedication to Professor Jan Evetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Harald; Dew-Hughes, David; Campbell, Archie; Barber, Zoe; Somekh, Rob; Glowacki, Bartek

    2006-03-01

    A few days before the beginning of the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity we learned that Professor Jan Evetts, a pioneer of superconductor research, a brilliant scientist, a wonderful person and a great personal friend, had passed away. We therefore decided to dedicate the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity to the memory of Jan Evetts. The following citation is based on material provided by his former supervisor (D Dew-Hughes) and his closest co-workers in Cambridge. Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Jan Evetts passed away after losing his second battle with cancer on 24th August 2005. He made an outstanding series of contributions to the science of superconductivity and to the understanding of superconducting materials and was an indefatigable champion of the development of applications of superconductivity. The loss to the superconductivity community is incalculable, as attested by the many communications received from colleagues throughout the world. Jan was born on 31 March 1939, and attended the Dragon School in Oxford, and later Haileybury. He was awarded an exhibition to read Natural Sciences at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He entered the college in 1958 and took his BA degree in 1961. He then undertook a Certificate of Postgraduate Study in Physics under the supervision of Professor Neville Mott. He was the first student to undertake this newly-instituted course; the title of his thesis was `The Resistance of Transition Metals'. In 1962 he joined David Dew-Hughes' superconducting materials research group, along with Archie Campbell and Anant Narlikar. In fact it was Jan's enthusiasm for the proposed course of research that helped convince David that he should follow Professor Alan Cottrell's suggestion to apply metallurgical methodology to the study of the factors that controlled critical current density in the type II superconductors that were then under development for

  3. [Αnti-Inflammatory medication as adjunctive antidepressive treatment].

    PubMed

    Boufidou, F; Nikolaou, C

    2016-01-01

    Mounting data of evidence that have emerged during the last twenty years, point towards the existence of an inflammatory mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of depressive disorder. These data have inspired a number of clinical studies characterized by the administration of inflammatory response altering medication in addition to conventional medication in depressive disorder patients. The drugs were either Non Steroid Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) or Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNFa) inhibitors and were selected among those that are already in use for various diseases related to the immune system. The choice of these specific immunomodulatory agents for the co-administration with conventional antidepressive medication was based on a number of laboratory data and clinical evidence. A total of seven relevant clinical trials have been conducted, all of them with promising results that have been published between 2006 and 2013. However, only four out of them were eligibly designed regarding the homogeneity of the study groups, randomization, double-blinding and placebo controlling. These three studies showed clinical advantages of the adjunctive medication as estimated by significant drops in Hamilton scores. Of interest are the findings of the most recent and largest clinical trial of the TNF-a antagonist infliximab which show that treatment with anti-inflammatory agents may be beneficial only in depressive patients with raised levels of baseline inflammatory markers. A limitation of the studies was that, since no guidelines currently exist for anti-inflammatory agents and depression, adjunctive medication could have been under or overdosed. Other limitations were the follow-up period that was rather small and the number of the participants that was also small. Recently, a lot of progress has been made in identifying therapeutic targets along metabolic pathways in the brain relevant to depression, which could be manipulated by immune mediators. In fact

  4. [Professor Hans Otto Lüders].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2014-11-01

    Professor Lüders has made significant contributions to Clinical Neurology and particularly to Epilepsy and Clinical Neurophysiology. Some of his most important contributions include the following: 1.He pioneered the use of chronically implanted, large plates of subdural electrodes in the presurgical evaluation of patient who were candidates for epilepsy surgery. These electrodes were used to record epileptic seizures and by electrical stimulation to establish the location of eloquent cortex. Lately he has also advocated the use in the USA of stereotactically implanted depth electrodes for presurgical evaluation of epilepsy patients who had deep seated epileptic foci which were impossible to assess with subdural electrodes. These techniques were imported from Europe. 2.Mapping studies with subdural electrodes led to the discovery of a number of cortical eloquent areas that had not been described before: a. The basal temporal language area located in the dominant fusiform gyrus. b. The "negative motor areas" located in the caudal region of the inferior frontal gyrus (bilaterally) and immediately in mesial frontal pre-SMA region (also bilaterally). He concluded that these "negative motor areas" most likely correspond to praxis regions. c. The dominant posterior fusiform gyrus which plays a crucial role in processing reading material. Stimulation of that area produces "alexia without agraphia". 3.He developed a new classification of epileptic seizures based exclusively on semiological ictal characteristics. With the development of the semiological seizure classification he also defined several new seizure types: a. Dialeptic seizures, b. Hypnopompic seizures, c. Hypomotor seizures. 4.Working with general epilepsy principles, he established the existence of 6 zones that characterize the epilepsies: the epileptogenic zone, the irritative zone, the seizure onset zone, the epileptogenic lesion, the symptomatogenic zone and functional deficit zone. 5.He described the ictal

  5. [Professor Hans Otto Lüders].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2014-11-01

    Professor Lüders has made significant contributions to Clinical Neurology and particularly to Epilepsy and Clinical Neurophysiology. Some of his most important contributions include the following: 1.He pioneered the use of chronically implanted, large plates of subdural electrodes in the presurgical evaluation of patient who were candidates for epilepsy surgery. These electrodes were used to record epileptic seizures and by electrical stimulation to establish the location of eloquent cortex. Lately he has also advocated the use in the USA of stereotactically implanted depth electrodes for presurgical evaluation of epilepsy patients who had deep seated epileptic foci which were impossible to assess with subdural electrodes. These techniques were imported from Europe. 2.Mapping studies with subdural electrodes led to the discovery of a number of cortical eloquent areas that had not been described before: a. The basal temporal language area located in the dominant fusiform gyrus. b. The "negative motor areas" located in the caudal region of the inferior frontal gyrus (bilaterally) and immediately in mesial frontal pre-SMA region (also bilaterally). He concluded that these "negative motor areas" most likely correspond to praxis regions. c. The dominant posterior fusiform gyrus which plays a crucial role in processing reading material. Stimulation of that area produces "alexia without agraphia". 3.He developed a new classification of epileptic seizures based exclusively on semiological ictal characteristics. With the development of the semiological seizure classification he also defined several new seizure types: a. Dialeptic seizures, b. Hypnopompic seizures, c. Hypomotor seizures. 4.Working with general epilepsy principles, he established the existence of 6 zones that characterize the epilepsies: the epileptogenic zone, the irritative zone, the seizure onset zone, the epileptogenic lesion, the symptomatogenic zone and functional deficit zone. 5.He described the ictal

  6. Colloidal oatmeal formulations as adjunct treatments in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Joseph F; Nebus, Judith; Wallo, Warren; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2012-07-01

    Colloidal oatmeal has been used for decades to soothe and ameliorate atopic dermatitis and other pruritic and/or xerotic dermatoses. In-vitro and/or in-vivo studies have confirmed the anti-inflammatory, barrier repair, and moisturizing properties of this compound. A broad set of studies has been conducted in recent years to assess the effects of colloidal oatmeal as adjunct treatment in the management of atopic dermatitis (AD). This paper will review these studies. In these investigations, patients in all age groups (3 months to 60 years) with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis were included and allowed to continue their prescribed topical medications. These studies found that the daily use of moisturizers and/or cleansers containing colloidal oatmeal significantly improved many clinical outcomes of atopic dermatitis from baseline: investigator's assessment (IGA), eczema area and severity index (EASI), itch, dryness, and quality of life indices. Safety results showed that the formulations were well tolerated in babies, children, and adults with AD. PMID:22777219

  7. Anti-muscarinic adjunct therapy accelerates functional human oligodendrocyte repair.

    PubMed

    Abiraman, Kavitha; Pol, Suyog U; O'Bara, Melanie A; Chen, Guang-Di; Khaku, Zainab M; Wang, Jing; Thorn, David; Vedia, Bansi H; Ekwegbalu, Ezinne C; Li, Jun-Xu; Salvi, Richard J; Sim, Fraser J

    2015-02-25

    Therapeutic repair of myelin disorders may be limited by the relatively slow rate of human oligodendrocyte differentiation. To identify appropriate pharmacological targets with which to accelerate differentiation of human oligodendrocyte progenitors (hOPCs) directly, we used CD140a/O4-based FACS of human forebrain and microarray to hOPC-specific receptors. Among these, we identified CHRM3, a M3R muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, as being restricted to oligodendrocyte-biased CD140a(+)O4(+) cells. Muscarinic agonist treatment of hOPCs resulted in a specific and dose-dependent blockade of oligodendrocyte commitment. Conversely, when hOPCs were cocultured with human neurons, M3R antagonist treatment stimulated oligodendrocytic differentiation. Systemic treatment with solifenacin, an FDA-approved muscarinic receptor antagonist, increased oligodendrocyte differentiation of transplanted hOPCs in hypomyelinated shiverer/rag2 brain. Importantly, solifenacin treatment of engrafted animals reduced auditory brainstem response interpeak latency, indicative of increased conduction velocity and thereby enhanced functional repair. Therefore, solifenacin and other selective muscarinic antagonists represent new adjunct approaches to accelerate repair by engrafted human progenitors.

  8. Colloidal oatmeal formulations as adjunct treatments in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Joseph F; Nebus, Judith; Wallo, Warren; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2012-07-01

    Colloidal oatmeal has been used for decades to soothe and ameliorate atopic dermatitis and other pruritic and/or xerotic dermatoses. In-vitro and/or in-vivo studies have confirmed the anti-inflammatory, barrier repair, and moisturizing properties of this compound. A broad set of studies has been conducted in recent years to assess the effects of colloidal oatmeal as adjunct treatment in the management of atopic dermatitis (AD). This paper will review these studies. In these investigations, patients in all age groups (3 months to 60 years) with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis were included and allowed to continue their prescribed topical medications. These studies found that the daily use of moisturizers and/or cleansers containing colloidal oatmeal significantly improved many clinical outcomes of atopic dermatitis from baseline: investigator's assessment (IGA), eczema area and severity index (EASI), itch, dryness, and quality of life indices. Safety results showed that the formulations were well tolerated in babies, children, and adults with AD.

  9. Perioperative adjunctive treatment in the management of operable gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Howard

    2005-06-01

    Outcome in the management of clinically resectable gastric carcinoma has been disappointing, at least in Western populations, despite increasingly radical surgery and extensive experience with adjunctive perioperative treatment with innumerable single and combined modality regimens. The United States Intergroup Study, a prospective, randomized, controlled trial of adjuvant chemoradiation, demonstrated significant improvement in disease-free and overall survival. Consequently, this regimen of postoperative fluoruracil plus leucovorin and locoregional radiation has been incorporated into current clinical practice. In hopes of further improving cure rates, many other regimens are under investigation, including the efficacy of neoadjuvant therapy alone, combined neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy, and adjuvant therapy alone. In these clinical trials, therapeutic agents are prescribed alone or in multimodal regimens and include systemic chemotherapy, intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy with or without hyperthermia, intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT), and postoperative external beam irradiation. Several molecular markers have been identified, which seem to predict that a given tumor may be effective or resistant to a drug, raising the possibility of customized chemotherapy regimens. Preclinical studies suggest potential efficacy of angiogenesis inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, and antisense agents.

  10. Intergenerational work as an adjunct to psychoanalysis and psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Braverman, S

    1995-01-01

    Psychotherapy and psychoanalysis are opportunities for individuals to repair faulty aspects of their development that have resulted in symptoms or other difficulties in living. Although transference is the major therapeutic tool in this work, it is not the only one. The potential resources for healing that exist in family relationships is great, especially as these relationships go on long after therapy has ended. We are all living longer; families of three and four generations are no longer uncommon. There are many adult patients who have one or both parents alive and well. Intergenerational work can be a useful adjunct where there is no severe narcissistic pathology or psychosis in either patient or parent. It is especially helpful in cases where there is severe resistance and insight is not effective in promoting change. "By focusing constantly on the patient's transference distortions and ignoring reality elements we undermine self-esteem and make him feel he is always wrong, sick or crazy" (Greenson, 1978b,p. 434). The addition of intergenerational work in the course of psychoanalysis/psychotherapy can shorten the time of therapy and be another tool for dealing with resistance. This work has theoretical implications for the modification of the place that transference has in psychoanalytic therapy. By placing greater emphasis on the patient's real relationships in influencing intrapsychic change we pave the way to exciting clinical and theoretical possibilities. PMID:8778077

  11. Omega-3 fatty acids as adjunctive therapy in Crohns disease.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Angie

    2006-01-01

    Crohns disease is an inflammatory bowel disease that can have a significant impact on the health of those afflicted. The etiology of the disease is unknown, but genetic, environmental, dietary, and immunological factors are thought to be involved. Multiple nutrients can become depleted during active disease due to inadequate intake or malabsorption. Preventing these deficiencies is paramount in the care of those suffering from Crohns disease. Often the traditional treatments (medications) have limited effectiveness and negative side effects that inhibit their use. Enteral nutrition has promising therapeutic benefits, but its use is often limited to the pediatric population due to poor patient acceptability. Omega-3 fatty acids have been investigated for their anti-inflammatory properties as an alternative to traditional care. This article reviews the etiology of Crohns disease, nutritional deficiencies, traditional treatments, and the use of omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention of Crohns recurrence. The results from clinical trials have been conflicting, but a new fish oil preparation that limits the side effects of traditional fish oil therapy shows promise as an adjunctive treatment for Crohns disease. Continued research is needed to validate these findings.

  12. Adjunctive use of mitomycin C on endoscopic lacrimal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Anadolu, Y.; Akturk, T.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—Endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) has some advantages over external DCR as a less invasive method with no skin incisions. But the success rate of the operation has not reached the level of external method. In this study, a wound healing inhibitor mitomycin C was used intraoperatively to prevent the closure of the osteum after the operation.
METHODS—Endoscopic endonasal DCR was performed on 40 eyes of 39 patients (26 female, 13 male). Mitomycin C was applied to the ostium in 14 of 23 patients who had undergone primary endoscopic DCR by means of a microdrill and in eight of 17 patients who had a revision endoscopic DCR secondary to a previously failed external DCR.
RESULTS—The postoperative follow up period was 9-27 (mean 18.2) months. The success rate of endoscopic DCR with intraoperative mitomycin C was 77.3%, whereas the success rate of endoscopic DCR without mitomycin C was 77.8%. The statistical analysis did not show a difference between the two groups according to the ostium size and their success rates.
CONCLUSIONS—Adjunctive use of a wound healing inhibitor is considered to increase the success rate of endoscopic endonasal DCR. Its intraoperative use seems to be easy and safe. But the study of this limited series shows no benefit in using it.

 Keywords: mytomycin C; lacrimal surgery; dacryocystorhinostomy PMID:9536884

  13. Radiation therapy for adjunctive treatment of adrenal cortical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Markoe, A.M.; Serber, W.; Micaily, B.; Brady, L.W. )

    1991-04-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare disease which is primarily approached surgically. There have been few reports of the efficacy of radiation therapy and, for the most part, these have been anecdotal. This paper reports on the potential adjuvant role of radiation therapy after surgical excision of primary adrenal cortical carcinoma and also comments about the efficacy of palliative radiation therapy for metastases. We have identified eight patients treated for adrenal cortical carcinomas at Hahnemann University Hospital (HUH) from 1962 until the present and have also identified five patients with the same diagnosis at Philadelphia General Hospital (PGH) from 1962 until its close in 1975. These two groups are examined separately. In the PGH group, in which two patients were diagnosed at autopsy and only one patient was treated by radiation therapy, the median survival was between 0 and 1 month for Stage IV disease with the only patient surviving to 6 months being that patient receiving radiation therapy. In the HUH group, five of eight patients were treated adjunctively after diagnosis, one was not and two received palliative therapy. The median survival for treated Stage III patients was between 34 months and 7 years. The suggestion, based on a limited patient series, is that patients treated postoperatively to the tumor bed and nodal areas in Stage III disease may have improved survival over historic series and improved local control.

  14. Hyperthermia as Adjunct to Intravesical Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Richmond A.; Abern, Michael R.; Inman, Brant A.

    2013-01-01

    Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer remains a very costly cancer to manage because of high recurrence rates requiring long-term surveillance and treatment. Emerging evidence suggests that adjunct and concurrent use of hyperthermia with intravesical chemotherapy after transurethral resection of bladder tumor further reduces recurrence risk and progression to advanced disease. Hyperthermia has both direct and immune-mediated cytotoxic effect on tumor cells including tumor growth arrest and activation of antitumor immune system cells and pathways. Concurrent heat application also acts as a sensitizer to intravesical chemotherapy agents. As such the ability to deliver hyperthermia to the focus of tumor while minimizing damage to surrounding benign tissue is of utmost importance to optimize the benefit of hyperthermia treatment. Existing chemohyperthermia devices that allow for more localized heat delivery continue to pave the way in this effort. Current investigational methods involving heat-activated drug delivery selectively to tumor cells using temperature-sensitive liposomes also offer promising ways to improve chemohyperthermia efficacy in bladder cancer while minimizing toxicity to benign tissue. This will hopefully allow more widespread use of chemohyperthermia to all bladder cancer patients, including metastatic bladder cancer. PMID:24073396

  15. Anti-Muscarinic Adjunct Therapy Accelerates Functional Human Oligodendrocyte Repair

    PubMed Central

    Abiraman, Kavitha; Pol, Suyog U.; O'Bara, Melanie A.; Chen, Guang-Di; Khaku, Zainab M.; Wang, Jing; Thorn, David; Vedia, Bansi H.; Ekwegbalu, Ezinne C.; Li, Jun-Xu; Salvi, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic repair of myelin disorders may be limited by the relatively slow rate of human oligodendrocyte differentiation. To identify appropriate pharmacological targets with which to accelerate differentiation of human oligodendrocyte progenitors (hOPCs) directly, we used CD140a/O4-based FACS of human forebrain and microarray to hOPC-specific receptors. Among these, we identified CHRM3, a M3R muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, as being restricted to oligodendrocyte-biased CD140a+O4+ cells. Muscarinic agonist treatment of hOPCs resulted in a specific and dose-dependent blockade of oligodendrocyte commitment. Conversely, when hOPCs were cocultured with human neurons, M3R antagonist treatment stimulated oligodendrocytic differentiation. Systemic treatment with solifenacin, an FDA-approved muscarinic receptor antagonist, increased oligodendrocyte differentiation of transplanted hOPCs in hypomyelinated shiverer/rag2 brain. Importantly, solifenacin treatment of engrafted animals reduced auditory brainstem response interpeak latency, indicative of increased conduction velocity and thereby enhanced functional repair. Therefore, solifenacin and other selective muscarinic antagonists represent new adjunct approaches to accelerate repair by engrafted human progenitors. PMID:25716865

  16. Chlorhexidine–thymol varnish as an adjunct to scaling and root planing: A clinical observation

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Vishal; Govila, Vivek; Gulati, Minkle; Anand, Bhargavi; Jhingaran, Rajesh; Rastogi, Pavitra

    2012-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the efficacy of chlorhexidine–thymol varnish (Cervitec Plus®) as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the improvement of periodontal parameters. Material and methods A split mouth randomized clinical trial was conducted in 25 subjects with chronic periodontitis receiving scaling and root planing alone and as an adjunct to chlorhexidine–thymol varnish (Cervitec Plus®) and chlorhexidine–thymol varnish (Cervitec Plus®) alone. Clinical examinations were performed at baseline, 1 month and 3 months. Results Short term advantages were observed in the clinical parameters in subjects receiving scaling and root planing and an adjunct, chlorhexidine–thymol varnish (Cervitec Plus®) who showed the greatest improvement in the periodontal parameters at 3 months. Conclusion Subjects with chronic periodontitis significantly benefit from scaling and root planing when used with an adjunct, chlorhexidine–thymol varnish (Cervitec Plus®). PMID:25737841

  17. "They Are Weighted with Authority": Fat Female Professors in Academic and Popular Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisanick, Christina

    2007-01-01

    The images of fat professors encountered in popular culture are few in number and negative in depiction. In this article, the author discusses on how will the professorial body affect the way in which students perceive the professor's teaching abilities. The author concludes that bias against fat professors, professors of color, and other…

  18. Web-Based Student Evaluations of Professors: The Relations between Perceived Quality, Easiness and Sexiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felton, James; Mitchell, John; Stinson, Michael

    2004-01-01

    College students critique their professors' teaching at RateMyProfessors.com, a web page where students anonymously rate their professors on Quality, Easiness, and Sexiness. Using the self-selected data from this public forum, we examine the relations between quality, easiness, and sexiness for 3190 professors at 25 universities. For faculty with…

  19. Forecasting the Student-Professor Matches That Result in Unusually Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Jennifer; Lakey, Brian; Lucas, Jessica L.; LaCross, Ryan; Plotkowski, Andrea R.; Winegard, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Two important influences on students' evaluations of teaching are relationship and professor effects. Relationship effects reflect unique matches between students and professors such that some professors are unusually effective for some students, but not for others. Professor effects reflect inter-rater agreement that some…

  20. Professor Louis Michel (1923-1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, J.

    2001-04-01

    Professor Louis Michel was born on May 4, 1923 in Roanne, France and died of aneurysm on December 30, 1999 in Bures-Sur-Yvette, France. With the untimely and sudden death of Louis Michel the world physics community has lost one of its most prominent members. The extraordinary popularity and respect to Louis as a scientist and a man was demonstrated in his funeral ceremony at l'Eglise de Bures-Sur-Yvette when many people from all over the world came to part from him. Many obituaries appeared in Louis' memory in different journals and among them Physics Today, Cern Courier, Physics Reports, in the Bulletin of the French Embassy in Israel and others. It is certainly impossible in this short lecture to give an adequate description of Prof. Michel's contributions in physics but if one looks for a way to identify a niche that Louis occupies in science of the 20th century, this can best be done by his relation to Eugene Wigner whom Louis much admired. On July 16, 1996 Prof. Michel gave the Wigner Memorial Lecture at the 21st International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics. 1 This was the first Colloquium after Wigner's death (who died on January 1, 1995). Wigner had a very great influence on Louis which started during Louis' membership at the Institute of Advanced Studies at Princeton in the years 1953-55. For Louis Wigner was (in Louis' words) a "model in science: a complete physicist, drawing, when necessary, from his deep mathematical culture". In my view, on the world arena of science, Prof. Michel was one of Wigner's successors in the field of symmetries in physics, and many of us would agree that the above quotation applies equally well to Louis himself. In his famous book "Group Theory" Wigner thanks in the Preface 4 people, with one of them being Louis Michel, and I quote: "The author also wishes to thank his colleagues for many stimulating discussions on the role of group theory in quantum mechanics as well as on more specific subjects. He wishes

  1. Supervised disulfiram as adjunct to psychotherapy in alcoholism treatment.

    PubMed

    Krampe, Henning; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2010-01-01

    Supervised intake of the alcohol deterrent (AD) disulfiram has proven to be an effective adjunct to biopsychosocial alcoholism therapy for more than 60 years. This article summarizes disulfiram literature between 1937 and 2000 and reviews 13 clinical trials of disulfiram in alcoholism treatment from the years 2000 to 2008. After giving an update of general safety issues and recent case reports concerning safety problems with disulfiram, we focus on the introduction of psychotherapeutic application of supervised disulfiram. The results of our review show: (1) Disulfiram proved to be an effective therapeutic tool in all clinical studies published from 2000 to 2008. (2) Comparisons with other pharmacological agents - naltrexone, acamprosate, topiramate and gamma-hydroxybutyrate - indicate that disulfiram was equal in two trials but superior in the majority of trials. (3) Therapy programs that make use of the psychological effects of supervised disulfiram have - independently of the dose - better results than programs that neglect psychological effects. As a consequence, we suggest that supervised low-dose disulfiram (not more than 100mg/d), will show highest success when it is carefully integrated into psychotherapeutic alcoholism therapy. The major program of psychotherapy with disulfiram comprises the steps "Initial psychoeducation about the effect of disulfiram and its therapeutic implications", "Advanced psychoeducation", and "Disulfiram as coping skill and extension of repertoire of coping skills". As psychological mechanisms of supervised disulfiram we suggest: (1) deterrence; (2) (auto)suggestion; (3) therapeutic ritual around (4) a frequently renewed active decision process; (5) continuous reinforcement of a sober lifestyle and development of new coping skills. PMID:20482514

  2. Indocyanine green as an adjunct for resection of insular gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Abhidha; Rangarajan, Vithal; Kaswa, Amol; Jain, Sonal; Goel, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Many controversies exist regarding the extent of resection for insular gliomas and the timing of resection. Several techniques and adjuncts are used to maximize safety during resection of these tumors. We describe the use of indocyanine green (ICG) to identify the branches of the middle cerebral artery and discuss its utility to increase safety for resection for insular gliomas. Materials and Methods: Five patients with insular gliomas were surgically treated by the authors from June 2013 to June 2014. The patients presented with complaints of either a headache or recurring episodes of convulsions. All the patients were operated with the aid of neuronavigation and tractography. The long perforating branches of the middle cerebral artery course through the insula and pass onward to supply the corona radiata. It is essential to preserve these vessels to prevent postoperative neurological deficits. ICG (Aurogreen) was used to identify and preserve the long perforating arteries of the middle cerebral artery. Results: ICG dye correctly identified the long perforating branches of the middle cerebral artery and easily distinguished these vessels from the short perforating branches. All the branches of the middle cerebral artery that coursed through the tumor and had an onward course were preserved in all the patients. Only one patient developed a transient right sided hemiparesis that had improved at follow-up. Conclusions: Surgery for insular gliomas is challenging due to its location adjacent to eloquent areas, important white fiber tracts and the course of the middle cerebral artery within it. ICG is useful to identify and preserve the long perforating branches of the middle cerebral artery that course through the tumor and traverse onward to supply the corona radiata. PMID:27366256

  3. Dedication to Professor Hannspeter Winter (1941 2006): Dedication to Professor Hannspeter Winter (1941 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Bob

    2007-03-01

    Professor H Winter. It was with great sadness that we learnt of the death of colleague and friend Professor Hannspeter Winter in Vienna on the 8 November 2006. In memory of him and the contribution he made both to our conference and to the field of the physics of highly charged ions we dedicate these proceedings. Hannspeter was one of our distinguished invited speakers at HCI2006 and gave a talk on the status of the ITER programme. His invited paper on the subject is included in these proceedings. Hannspeter will be particularly remembered for his pioneering work on ion-surface interactions that, together with his colleagues at the Vienna University of Technology (TUW), has stimulated a worldwide experimental and theoretical interest in this field. He was appointed Director of the Institut fuer Allgemeine Physik at TUW in 1987 and using both his scientific and management skills has made it one of the leading university physics laboratories in the world. His research publications, of which there are 270, have inspired many others to work in the field of atomic and plasma physics. He was also a great European playing a major role in the EURATOM fusion programme, the European Physical Society and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics and was an evaluator and advisory board member for many national and international institutions. Hannspeter was also an interesting and friendly social companion with interests in current affairs, music and fine wines and will be greatly missed both on a scientific and social level. Our condolences go to his wife Renate, son Dorian and his relatives. R W McCullough Co-chair HCI2006

  4. Robotic-assisted microsurgery for an elective microsurgical practice.

    PubMed

    Gudeloglu, Ahmet; Brahmbhatt, Jamin V; Parekattil, Sijo J

    2014-02-01

    Robotic-assisted microsurgery can be utilized for either intracorporal or extracorporeal surgical procedures. Three-dimensional high-definition magnification, a stable ergonomic platform, elimination of physiologic tremor, and motion scaling make the robotic platform attractive for microsurgeons for complex procedures. Additionally, robotic assistance enables the microsurgeon to take microsurgery to challenging intracorporeal locations in a minimally invasive manner. Recent adjunctive technological developments offer the robotic platform enhanced optical magnification, improved intraoperative imaging, and more precise ablation techniques for microsurgical procedures. The authors present the current state-of-the art tools available in the robotic-assisted microsurgical platform.

  5. DPT as an Adjunct in Brief Psychotherapy With Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, William A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Cancer patients suffering from psychological distress underwent conventional verbal interaction and a single intensive drug-assisted therapy session employing dipropyltriptamine (DPT), a short-acting psychedelic drug. Analysis indicates quality of life was enhanced. Relative merits of DPT in comparison with LSD and needs to pursue controlled…

  6. [Professor Kazimierz Jaegermann--forensic pathologist--scientist--thinker].

    PubMed

    Nasiłowski, Władysław

    2009-01-01

    Professor Kazimierz Jaegermann, a founder of the theory of medico-legal opinionating, passed away 20 years ago. Numerous specialists in forensic medicine and an ever increasing number of lawyers substantiate the importance and value of the creative thought and the entire research work of Professor Jaegermann that have been an inspiration of progress in forensic medicine and in the science of applied law. His unique ability to perform a scientific synthesis leading to recognizing forensic medicine as an applied bridging knowledge points to the eminently creative role played by Professor Jaegermann in development of forensic medicine. There is an urgent need to recall his research activities and to publish a complete collection of his articles and publications. With this idea in mind, I present below an article based on the text published in No. 1 of the Zeszyty Naukowe Katedry Medycyny Sadowej Slaskiej Akademii Medycznej in 1995. PMID:20073254

  7. Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment as a Useful Adjunctive Tool for Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Sheldon; Hassani, John; Gagne, Martin; George, Gebe; Gilliar, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Pneumonia, the inflammatory state of lung tissue primarily due to microbial infection, claimed 52,306 lives in the United States in 20071 and resulted in the hospitalization of 1.1 million patients2. With an average length of in-patient hospital stay of five days2, pneumonia and influenza comprise significant financial burden costing the United States $40.2 billion in 20053. Under the current Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines, standard-of-care recommendations include the rapid administration of an appropriate antibiotic regiment, fluid replacement, and ventilation (if necessary). Non-standard therapies include the use of corticosteroids and statins; however, these therapies lack conclusive supporting evidence4. (Figure 1) Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) is a cost-effective adjunctive treatment of pneumonia that has been shown to reduce patients’ length of hospital stay, duration of intravenous antibiotics, and incidence of respiratory failure or death when compared to subjects who received conventional care alone5. The use of manual manipulation techniques for pneumonia was first recorded as early as the Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918, when patients treated with standard medical care had an estimated mortality rate of 33%, compared to a 10% mortality rate in patients treated by osteopathic physicians6. When applied to the management of pneumonia, manual manipulation techniques bolster lymphatic flow, respiratory function, and immunological defense by targeting anatomical structures involved in the these systems7,8, 9, 10. The objective of this review video-article is three-fold: a) summarize the findings of randomized controlled studies on the efficacy of OMT in adult patients with diagnosed pneumonia, b) demonstrate established protocols utilized by osteopathic physicians treating pneumonia, c) elucidate the physiological mechanisms behind manual manipulation of the respiratory and lymphatic systems

  8. Osteopathic manipulative treatment as a useful adjunctive tool for pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yao, Sheldon; Hassani, John; Gagne, Martin; George, Gebe; Gilliar, Wolfgang

    2014-05-06

    Pneumonia, the inflammatory state of lung tissue primarily due to microbial infection, claimed 52,306 lives in the United States in 2007 (1) and resulted in the hospitalization of 1.1 million patients (2). With an average length of in-patient hospital stay of five days (2), pneumonia and influenza comprise significant financial burden costing the United States $40.2 billion in 2005 (3). Under the current Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines, standard-of-care recommendations include the rapid administration of an appropriate antibiotic regiment, fluid replacement, and ventilation (if necessary). Non-standard therapies include the use of corticosteroids and statins; however, these therapies lack conclusive supporting evidence (4). (Figure 1) Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) is a cost-effective adjunctive treatment of pneumonia that has been shown to reduce patients' length of hospital stay, duration of intravenous antibiotics, and incidence of respiratory failure or death when compared to subjects who received conventional care alone (5). The use of manual manipulation techniques for pneumonia was first recorded as early as the Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918, when patients treated with standard medical care had an estimated mortality rate of 33%, compared to a 10% mortality rate in patients treated by osteopathic physicians (6). When applied to the management of pneumonia, manual manipulation techniques bolster lymphatic flow, respiratory function, and immunological defense by targeting anatomical structures involved in the these systems(7,8, 9, 10). The objective of this review video-article is three-fold: a) summarize the findings of randomized controlled studies on the efficacy of OMT in adult patients with diagnosed pneumonia, b) demonstrate established protocols utilized by osteopathic physicians treating pneumonia, c) elucidate the physiological mechanisms behind manual manipulation of the respiratory and

  9. [Professor Frantisek Por MD and Professor Robert Klopstock MD, students at Budapest and Prague Faculties of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Mydlík, M; Derzsiová, K

    2010-11-01

    Professor Frantisek Por MD and Professor Robert Klopstock MD were contemporaries, both born in 1899, one in Zvolen, the other in Dombovar, at the time of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. Prof. Por attended the Faculty of Medicine in Budapest from 1918 to 1920, and Prof. Klopstock studied at the same place between 1917 and 1919. From 1920 until graduation on 6th February 1926, Prof. Por continued his studies at the German Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague. Prof. Klopstock had to interrupt his studies in Budapest due to pulmonary tuberculosis; he received treatment at Tatranske Matliare where he befriended Franz Kafka. Later, upon Kafka's encouragement, he changed institutions and continued his studies at the German Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, where he graduated the first great go. It is very likely that, during their studies in Budapest and Prague, both professors met repeatedly, even though their life paths later separated. Following his graduation, Prof. Por practiced as an internist in Prague, later in Slovakia, and from 1945 in Kosice. In 1961, he was awarded the title of university professor of internal medicine at the Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef Safarik University in Kosice, where he practiced until his death in 1980. Prof. Klopstock continued his studies in Kiel and Berlin. After his graduation in 1933, he practiced in Berlin as a surgeon and in 1938 left for USA. In 1962, he was awarded the title of university professor of pulmonary surgery in NewYork, where he died in 1972.

  10. Forecasting the student–professor matches that result in unusually effective teaching

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Jennifer; Lakey, Brian; Lucas, Jessica L; LaCross, Ryan; R Plotkowski, Andrea; Winegard, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background Two important influences on students' evaluations of teaching are relationship and professor effects. Relationship effects reflect unique matches between students and professors such that some professors are unusually effective for some students, but not for others. Professor effects reflect inter-rater agreement that some professors are more effective than others, on average across students. Aims We attempted to forecast students' evaluations of live lectures from brief, video-recorded teaching trailers. Sample Participants were 145 college students (74% female) enrolled in introductory psychology courses at a public university in the Great Lakes region of the United States. Methods Students viewed trailers early in the semester and attended live lectures months later. Because subgroups of students viewed the same professors, statistical analyses could isolate professor and relationship effects. Results Evaluations were influenced strongly by relationship and professor effects, and students' evaluations of live lectures could be forecasted from students' evaluations of teaching trailers. That is, we could forecast the individual students who would respond unusually well to a specific professor (relationship effects). We could also forecast which professors elicited better evaluations in live lectures, on average across students (professor effects). Professors who elicited unusually good evaluations in some students also elicited better memory for lectures in those students. Conclusions It appears possible to forecast relationship and professor effects on teaching evaluations by presenting brief teaching trailers to students. Thus, it might be possible to develop online recommender systems to help match students and professors so that unusually effective teaching emerges. PMID:24953773

  11. [Effective acupoints for bulbar paralysis by professor GAO Weibin].

    PubMed

    Kang, Lianru; Zheng, Shuang

    2016-04-01

    Professor GAO Weibin academically advocates, based on basic theory of TCM and theories of different schools, modern science technology should be used for the methods and principles of acupuncture and Chinese medicine for neuropathy, so as to explore and summarize the rules, characteristics and advantages of TCM for nervous system disease, especially bulbar paralysis. During the treatment of bulbar paralysis, professor GAO creatively proposes the effective acupuncture points such as Gongxue, Tunyan-1, Tunyan-2, Fayin, Tiyan and Zhifanliu from the aspects of neuroanatomy, and analyzes their anatomical structure and action mechanism.

  12. [Effective acupoints for bulbar paralysis by professor GAO Weibin].

    PubMed

    Kang, Lianru; Zheng, Shuang

    2016-04-01

    Professor GAO Weibin academically advocates, based on basic theory of TCM and theories of different schools, modern science technology should be used for the methods and principles of acupuncture and Chinese medicine for neuropathy, so as to explore and summarize the rules, characteristics and advantages of TCM for nervous system disease, especially bulbar paralysis. During the treatment of bulbar paralysis, professor GAO creatively proposes the effective acupuncture points such as Gongxue, Tunyan-1, Tunyan-2, Fayin, Tiyan and Zhifanliu from the aspects of neuroanatomy, and analyzes their anatomical structure and action mechanism. PMID:27352503

  13. Noncompliance by patients: a response to professor Dimond.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, J

    1998-03-01

    A recent article published in Nursing Ethics, written by Professor Bridgit Dimond, highlighted the topic of noncompliance by patients and attention was drawn to a number of issues relevant to health care professionals. In this response, some specific challenges facing nurses are considered in the light of Professor Dimond's arguments. In doing so, the notion of compliance as an appropriate concept in modern nursing practice is questioned. The recommendations to emerge include strategies to consider patient response to treatment regimens in the form of adherence to health care advice through negotiated therapy. The claimed benefits of health care recommendations are considered and caution about iatrogenesis is advised. PMID:9616614

  14. Effect of adjuncts on microbiological and chemical properties of Scamorza cheese.

    PubMed

    Guidone, Angela; Braghieri, Ada; Cioffi, Silvia; Claps, Salvatore; Genovese, Francesco; Morone, Giuseppe; Napolitano, Fabio; Parente, Eugenio

    2015-03-01

    Scamorza is a semi-hard, pasta filata cheese resembling low-moisture Mozzarella cheese, with a short ripening time (<30d). Scamorza has a bland flavor and, to provide diversification from similar cheeses, it was manufactured using 2 types of milk in the current study: 100% Italian Friesian milk (F) or 90% F and 10% Jersey cow milk (mixed, M), and 2 types of starter: Streptococcus thermophilus or S. thermophilus with peptidolytic Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus helveticus, and Lactobacillus paracasei strains as adjuncts). The cheeses were ripened for 30d. The adjunct did not significantly affect acid production or growth of the primary starter; 2 of the species used in the adjunct (Lb. paracasei and Lb. helveticus) rapidly colonized the cheese and persisted until the end of ripening, whereas the counts of nonstarter lactic acid bacteria in the control cheese were low until the end of ripening. The use of adjuncts affected pH, microbial composition (as assessed by both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods), total free amino acid content, and volatile profile (measured using an electronic nose), whereas milk type had only a minor effect. Although differences in primary proteolysis were found, they were probably indirect and related to the effects on pH and moisture. We conclude that, even with a short ripening time (30d), use of a peptidolytic adjunct may significantly affect important features of Scamorza and may be used to create a product that is measurably different from competing products.

  15. Adjunctive Therapies to Cerclage for the Prevention of Preterm Birth: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    DeFranco, Emily A.; Valent, Amy Miyoshi; Newman, Tondra; Regan, Jodi; Smith, Jessica; Muglia, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a thorough summary of published studies that have assessed the efficacy of adjunctive therapies used in addition to cervical cerclage as a preventive measure for preterm birth. We limited our paper to patients treated with cerclage plus an additional prophylactic therapy compared to a reference group of women with cerclage alone. The specific adjunctive therapies included in this systematic review are progesterone, reinforcing or second cerclage placement, tocolytics, antibiotics, bedrest, and pessary. We searched PubMed and Cochrane databases without date criteria with restriction to English language and human studies and performed additional bibliographic review of selected articles and identified 305 total studies for review. Of those, only 12 studies compared the use of an adjunctive therapy with cerclage to a reference group of cerclage alone. None of the 12 were prospective randomized clinical trials. No comparative studies were identified addressing the issues of antibiotics, bedrest, or pessary as adjunctive treatments to cerclage. None of the 12 studies included in this paper demonstrated a clear benefit of any adjunctive therapy used in addition to cerclage over and above cerclage used alone; however, few studies with small numbers limited the strength of the conclusions. PMID:23606847

  16. Assessment of stereotypic and self-injurious behavior as adjunctive responses.

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, D C; Iwata, B A; Zarcone, J R; Ringdahl, J

    1994-01-01

    Certain responses of both humans and nonhumans appear to be maintained indirectly by intermittent reinforcement schedules and have been referred to collectively as adjunctive behavior. Although basic research has examined adjunctive behavior extensively, relatively few studies have been conducted with humans, particularly those with developmental disabilities who often engage in frequent and varied stereotypic behavior. This study assessed possible adjunctive characteristics of self-injurious and stereotypic behaviors using a multielement design containing two types of control conditions. Four subjects who engaged in both self-injurious behavior and stereotypy participated after variables maintaining their self-injury were identified via functional analyses. Each day, subjects were exposed to three 15-min sessions in random order: (a) noncontingent presentation of food on a fixed-time schedule (e.g., FT 30 s), (b) a massed-reinforcement (food) control, and (c) a no-reinforcement control. A variety of fixed-time schedules were examined during different experimental phases. Results of this preliminary study suggested that self-injury was not induced by intermittent reinforcement schedules, whereas the stereotypic behavior of some individuals showed characteristics of adjunctive behavior. The importance of research on adjunctive behavior and suggestions for future studies are discussed. PMID:7844059

  17. Effect of adjuncts on microbiological and chemical properties of Scamorza cheese.

    PubMed

    Guidone, Angela; Braghieri, Ada; Cioffi, Silvia; Claps, Salvatore; Genovese, Francesco; Morone, Giuseppe; Napolitano, Fabio; Parente, Eugenio

    2015-03-01

    Scamorza is a semi-hard, pasta filata cheese resembling low-moisture Mozzarella cheese, with a short ripening time (<30d). Scamorza has a bland flavor and, to provide diversification from similar cheeses, it was manufactured using 2 types of milk in the current study: 100% Italian Friesian milk (F) or 90% F and 10% Jersey cow milk (mixed, M), and 2 types of starter: Streptococcus thermophilus or S. thermophilus with peptidolytic Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus helveticus, and Lactobacillus paracasei strains as adjuncts). The cheeses were ripened for 30d. The adjunct did not significantly affect acid production or growth of the primary starter; 2 of the species used in the adjunct (Lb. paracasei and Lb. helveticus) rapidly colonized the cheese and persisted until the end of ripening, whereas the counts of nonstarter lactic acid bacteria in the control cheese were low until the end of ripening. The use of adjuncts affected pH, microbial composition (as assessed by both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods), total free amino acid content, and volatile profile (measured using an electronic nose), whereas milk type had only a minor effect. Although differences in primary proteolysis were found, they were probably indirect and related to the effects on pH and moisture. We conclude that, even with a short ripening time (30d), use of a peptidolytic adjunct may significantly affect important features of Scamorza and may be used to create a product that is measurably different from competing products. PMID:25582584

  18. Adverse Effects of Second-Generation Antipsychotics as Adjuncts to Antidepressants: Are the Risks Worth the Benefits?

    PubMed

    Thase, Michael E

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decades, several adjunctive therapies have been introduced for treatment-resistant depression (TRD), and these strategies have ebbed and flowed in popularity. Currently, adjunctive therapy with the second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) is most commonly used by psychiatrists. Four SGAs are FDA approved for indications related to TRD (aripiprazole, brexpiprazole, olanzapine, and quetiapine extended release); some evidence also supports use of risperidone and ziprasidone as adjunctive therapies. This article briefly reviews the role of adjunctive therapy with SGAs in contemporary algorithms for TRD, considering both the evidence of benefit and the adverse effects. PMID:27514300

  19. The Student Assistance Program: Meeting the Needs of Students in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJong, William; DeRicco, Beth

    2003-01-01

    Examines the ethical questions involved in intervening when a student has emotional difficulties. Particularly asks how adjunct faculty can be prepared to handle these situations, given their busy schedules and minimal institutional involvement. Describes the student assistance program (SAP), a committee that offers guidance to faculty and…

  20. Use of animal-assisted therapy with psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Jeanette; King, Camille

    2010-11-01

    The use of animal-assisted therapy (AAT) as an adjunct treatment approach in psychiatric settings has received much attention in the literature. This article explores the use of AAT with psychiatric patients. The authors performed a literature review and found that AAT can have a significant effect on the improvement of psychiatric patients' socialization and provides a variety of psychological benefits. Nurses can benefit from learning about the potential benefits of AAT for psychiatric patients.

  1. Feasibility of an acceptance and commitment therapy adjunctive web-based program for counseling centers.

    PubMed

    Levin, Michael E; Pistorello, Jacqueline; Hayes, Steven C; Seeley, John R; Levin, Crissa

    2015-07-01

    Web-based adjunctive tools provide a promising method for addressing the challenges college counseling centers face in meeting the mental health needs of students. The current study tested an initial adjunctive prototype based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in a pre-post open trial with 30 counselors and 82 student clients across 4 counseling centers. Results indicated high ratings of program satisfaction and usability with counselors and students. The majority of students completed at least part of the program. Significant improvements were found across almost all outcome and ACT process measures with student clients. Improvements in student outcomes were predicted by both changes in psychological inflexibility and how often counselors discussed the program with students. Results are discussed in relation to support for and future development of a flexible, adjunctive ACT program for counseling centers.

  2. Whisper It Softly, Professors Are Really Academic Developers Too

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macfarlane, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The university system has expanded worldwide and with it the number of those holding a full professorial title. Around a third of US academics eventually become full professors, and the title is used still more exclusively in an Australasian and UK context, representing around 10-12% of university faculty. The professoriate undertake a range of…

  3. Professors as Intellectual Leaders: Formation, Identity and Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macfarlane, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The literature on leadership in higher education is predominantly concerned with the role of formally designated senior managers such as heads of department and deans of faculty. By contrast, relatively little attention has focused on those performing informal and distributed forms of leadership, such as (full) university professors. This article…

  4. For Professors' Children, the Case for Home Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannapacker, W. A.

    2005-01-01

    The number of families who home school their children is growing between five and 15% per year and it is believed that home schoolers outperform their public-educated peers, though critics believe that home schooling is a form of religious fanaticism and a means of avoiding diversity. A professor explains how he and his wife, home school their…

  5. Professional Dispositions: What's a Social Studies Education Professor to Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duplass, James A.; Cruz, Barbara C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent changes in accreditation standards now require professors to systematically assess whether a teacher candidate actually possesses a "disposition" appropriate to the profession. This new mandate from accreditation bodies is controversial on a number of fronts. As social studies educators in particular, we like to think of ourselves as…

  6. The Effect of Professor's Attractiveness on Distance Learning Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jeanny; Tomasi, Stella D.

    2015-01-01

    Technology enabled learning is becoming more popular and pervasive in education. While the effectiveness of distance learning versus traditional classroom education is strongly debated, human factors such as students' perception of their professors can influence their desire to learn. This research examines the perceptual effect of attractive…

  7. Teaching the College "Nones": Christian Privilege and the Religion Professor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riswold, Caryn D.

    2015-01-01

    Working with undergraduate students invites teachers into relationship and conversation with young people at a time when they are emerging as adults and forming their identities. Faith is one area of identity formation often attended to by scholars, college professors, and their institutions. But within that, little attention has been paid to…

  8. Humor and the Emeritus Professor: An Interview with Gene Roth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivona, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a compilation of several conversations with Dr. Gene Roth, Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus at Northern Illinois University. Dr. Roth is past President of the Academy of Human Resource Development, and although he is well known for his efforts in bringing humor into the field of HRD, he is not the same Gene Roth that played…

  9. Developing Student Character: Community College Professors Who Share Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Connie K.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the definitions, values, and experiences of seven community college professors who have tried to promote student character development by sharing some of their power in the classroom. Power sharing is a participative gesture, and participative teachers can encourage students to become more engaged in their own…

  10. Effects of Procedural Fairness on Student Judgments of Professors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodabaugh, Rita Cobb; Kravitz, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Three experiments (n=300) were conducted to investigate college student reactions to classroom fairness issues. In two experiments, student ratings of fairness were affected by manipulations of procedural fairness and grade outcome. Effects of procedural fairness were stronger than grade. In the third experiment, ratings of professors were…

  11. University Professors and Teaching Ethics: Conceptualizations and Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kathy Lund; Beggs, Jeri Mullins

    2006-01-01

    After the spectacular ethical breaches in corporate America emerged, business school professors were singled out as having been negligent in teaching ethical standards. This exploratory study asked business school faculty about teaching ethics, including conceptualizations of ethics in a teaching context and opinions of the extent to which…

  12. Career Vitality of Professors: A Cognitive Restructuring Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumpus, J. Frank

    An attributional model that conceptualizes the pressures that reduce professors' personal and career vitality is presented. The model is based primarily on the locus of control literature and especially the reformulated model of learned helplessness by Lynn Abramson, Martin Seligman, and John Teasdale. The analysis deals only with the cognitive…

  13. Professors Get Their Own Study-Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Karin

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that at Rollins College, a liberal-arts institution, professors are paid to get away for overseas travel so that their students will learn to be more globally minded. The college's president, Lewis M. Duncan, has pledged to send every faculty and staff member with teaching duties abroad once every three years. Since 2006, 128…

  14. Further Views from Professors, State Directors, and Analysts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arthur M.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the reactions of twenty-seven professors now teaching in community college leadership programs who responded to the question, "What issues do you emphasize in your courses and what issues most concern your students/practitioners?" It also draws on a separate survey of forty-seven state directors and on the writings of four…

  15. Inside the Classroom of Harvard Law School Professor David Wilkins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence-Lightfoot, Sara

    1999-01-01

    Examines the teaching methods of David Wilkins, an African American Harvard Law School professor considered an exciting teacher by his students and colleagues. Describes his skill in getting students to attend class, engage in legal thinking, feel comfortable in the classroom, and learn the formal rituals and procedures for the court. (SM)

  16. How Not to Lose Face on Facebook, for Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    For years college administrators have warned students to watch their step in online social realms, noting that sharing too much could hurt them later on if future employees saw their drunken party pictures or boorish writings. Now that professors and administrators are catching Facebook fever, they should heed their own advice. The author…

  17. Championing Inclusion: An Interview with Professor Luanna Meyer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevan-Brown, Jill

    2012-01-01

    In May 2012, after a long and impressive career, Luanna Meyer retired from her role as Professor of Education and Director of the Jessie Hetherington Centre for Educational Research at Victoria University. The tributes paid at her retirement ceremony bear testament to a woman who is held in high esteem in the educational community. In this…

  18. Job Coaches Help Get Professors Back on Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2008-01-01

    In the publish-or-perish world of colleges and universities, writing is incredibly important because without published work professors do not get promoted and never earn tenure. Some are turning to outsiders called faculty coaches to help them overcome this career killer. Faculty coaches, often clinical psychologists, focus on helping professors…

  19. University Professor Approaches to Case Studies: Virtual Field Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patron, Luis; Ellis, Robert A.; Barrett, Brendan F. D.

    2008-01-01

    Representatives from more than 20 institutions making up a research and teaching network met to discuss and investigate a web application designed to promote knowledge sharing and understanding. The web application, called Fieldtrip, enables students, professors and researchers to virtually share their experiences and findings from real field…

  20. In India, Economic Success Leaves Universities Desperate for Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neelakantan, Shailaja

    2007-01-01

    India's universities are suffering from an acute faculty shortage, with some institutions unable to fill as many as 35 percent of their positions. From the country's elite Indian Institutes of Technology to regional engineering colleges, the dearth of professors has led to overcrowded classrooms, student discontent, and deep concerns about how…

  1. Professor-Student Rapport Scale: Six Items Predict Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Janie H.; Ryan, Rebecca G.

    2013-01-01

    Rapport between students and teachers leads to numerous positive student outcomes, including attitudes toward the teacher and course, student motivation, and perceived learning. The recent development of a Professor-Student Rapport scale offers assessment of this construct. However, a Cronbach's [alpha] of 0.96 indicated item redundancy, and the…

  2. The Role of Professors of Method in Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emans, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Professors of methodology and curriculum in teacher education are the most effective conduit to bring research findings to the practitioner. More involvement of methods teachers in research funded by the National Institute of Education, particularly in reading research, would have a greater effect on classroom research. (PP)

  3. Identity Issues: Expatriate Professors Teaching and Researching in Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanowski, Michael H.; Nasser, Ramzi

    2015-01-01

    Today, academics are more transient, working outside their home countries, than at any other time in the history of academics especially in the Arab World were there is great demand for faculty members educated in Western' culture and academia. However, many of these professors face considerable social, professional and academic challenges in…

  4. 26 CFR 509.115 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.115 Visiting professors or teachers. (a... resident of Switzerland, who temporarily visits the United States for the purpose of teaching for a period... States or who is not a resident of Switzerland. (d) Nonresidence presumed. An individual who...

  5. 26 CFR 509.115 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.115 Visiting professors or teachers. (a... resident of Switzerland, who temporarily visits the United States for the purpose of teaching for a period... States or who is not a resident of Switzerland. (d) Nonresidence presumed. An individual who...

  6. 26 CFR 509.115 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.115 Visiting professors or teachers. (a... resident of Switzerland, who temporarily visits the United States for the purpose of teaching for a period... States or who is not a resident of Switzerland. (d) Nonresidence presumed. An individual who...

  7. 26 CFR 509.115 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.115 Visiting professors or teachers. (a... resident of Switzerland, who temporarily visits the United States for the purpose of teaching for a period... States or who is not a resident of Switzerland. (d) Nonresidence presumed. An individual who...

  8. 26 CFR 509.115 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.115 Visiting professors or teachers. (a... resident of Switzerland, who temporarily visits the United States for the purpose of teaching for a period... States or who is not a resident of Switzerland. (d) Nonresidence presumed. An individual who...

  9. The Imperative of Service in the Professor's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.; Achilles, Susan H.

    In the professorial role's traditional triad of teaching, research, and service, research (publishing) and teaching get more attention than service. If professors are to be part of improving education in America's schools, they must define service more broadly, and they must give greater attention to the service role. Education should be…

  10. "Friending" Professors, Parents and Bosses: A Facebook Connection Conundrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karl, Katherine A.; Peluchette, Joy V.

    2011-01-01

    The ever-growing popularity of Facebook has led some educators to ponder what role social networking might have in education. The authors examined student reactions to friend requests from people outside their regular network of friends including professors, parents, and employers. We found students have the most positive reactions to friend…

  11. The Perpetual Professor in the 21st Century University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leidman, Mary Beth; Piwinsky, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of electronic mail and other portable and wireless devices on the traditional out of classroom communications which take place between students and professors in colleges and universities. The environment in which higher education instruction occurs has changed dramatically in the last two…

  12. Rethinking Theory After Practice: Education Professor as Elementary Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winograd, Ken

    1998-01-01

    Describes the difficulties encountered when a college professor of education returned to an elementary school mathematics classroom. Provides excerpts from his daily journal, which is organized by themes (e.g., planning, uncertainties about students' learning, the adult as stranger, classroom management, and teaching skills), and reflects on how…

  13. Ten Things Every Professor Should Know about Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kenneth; Dunlap, Joanna; Stevens, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes ten key assessment practices for advancing student learning that all professors should be familiar with and strategically incorporate in their classrooms and programs. Each practice or concept is explained with examples and guidance for putting it into practice. The ten are: learning outcomes, performance assessments,…

  14. Professor Bolesław Rutkowski's 70th birthday Laudatio

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Janusz; Durlik, Magdalena; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja; Klinger, Marian; Manitius, Jacek; Sułowicz, Władysław; Więcek, Andrzej; Zdrojewski, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    On 5 December 2014 Professor Bolesław Rutkowski, the outstanding Polish nephrologist, doctor and researcher, renowned organizer, our teacher, colleague and friend, will celebrate his 70th birthday. We would like to take this opportunity to present to you his life and his scientific achievements.

  15. An Analysis of Contemporary Academics and John Galbraith's "Tenured Professor."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lara Anderson; Miller, Michael

    This paper analyzes the novel, "A Tenured Professor," by John Kenneth Galbraith, in an exploration of the impact of fictional writing and other popular and mass media on public perceptions of higher education. In the book Galbraith offers his views on his own experience as a leading educator and on the world of higher education. The book tells…

  16. Clothing Professors with Immunity: Points of Law on Academic Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerman, Ed; Cornelius, Luke

    Over the years the Supreme Court has given academic freedom a special First Amendment status. This study reviewed a selected group of recent cases at public universities, focusing particularly on several where rulings were based either on a professor's public comments or in-class verbiage, in an attempt to assess the current status of academic…

  17. Professor Age and Gender Affect Student Perceptions and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joye, Shauna W.; Wilson, Janie H.

    2015-01-01

    Student evaluations provide rich information about teaching performance, but a number of factors beyond teacher effectiveness influence student evaluations. In this study we examined the effects of professor gender and perceived age on ratings of effectiveness and rapport as well as academic performance. We also asked students to rate professor…

  18. A Professor Explores the "Legacy of May 4."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Jim

    1995-01-01

    An instructional technology professor has created a documentary film about the killing of four college students at an antiwar protest at Kent State University (Ohio) in 1970. The film highlights the events and their social symbolism. It will be turned into an interactive exhibit housed at the university. (MSE)

  19. Professor Rastislav Dzúrik: the Man and the Scientist.

    PubMed

    Derzsiová, Katarina; Mydlík, Miroslav

    2016-02-01

    Rastislav Dzrik, finished his medical study at the Medical School of Comenius University in Bratislava in 1953. After graduation he began to work at the Institute of chemistry and biochemistry of the Medical School and in 1957 he continued working at the IIIrd Internal Clinic of this faculty, which became later the base of "Internal School of Professor T. R. Niederland" with biochemical focusing. In the year 1967 ProfessorDzrik in cooperation with ProfessorJan Brod founded the Nephrological Section of the Slovak Internal Society and then the postgraduate scientific-research activity in nephrology began. The main topics of his scientific activity, in which he received many priority results, were: Isolation and characteristic of inhibitor of glucose utilisation and of inhibitor of renal gluconeogenesis; Effect of "middle molecular substances, especially in the development of renal insufficiency; Isolation and identification of hippurate and pseudouridine. His publishing activity was manifested in more than 500 scientific papers, several monographs and many chapters in various textbooks and manuals of internal medicine and clinical biochemistry, and more than 1,000 citations. The most important success of Professor Dzrik was the textbook "Nephrology which was published in 2004 and he was its main editor. Rastislav Dzriks impact on the field of Nephrology in Slovakia was manifold. It included his complex work of clinical nephrology, his pedagogical activities, and last but not least his excellent organizing abilities. PMID:26913883

  20. Some Professors Pop Pills for an Intellectual Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Professors know that some of their students pop Ritalin and other stimulants to give themselves a mental edge, but an informal survey suggests that some faculty members are also taking drugs for the express purpose of helping their careers. In an online survey of 1,400 readers published this month, the journal "Nature" found that 20 percent had…

  1. Finding Our Stride: Young Women Professors of Educational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewcomb, Whitney Sherman; Beaty, Danna M.; Sanzo, Karen; Peters-Hawkins, April

    2013-01-01

    This work is grounded in the literature on women in the academy and offers glimpses into four young women professors' experiences in the field of educational leadership. We utilized reflective practice and interpersonal communication to create a dialogue centered on three qualitative research questions that allows a window into our lives. We…

  2. Reflections on the Scholarly Contributions of Professor David H. Jonassen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Thomas C.; Lee, Chwee Beng; Hung, Woei

    2013-01-01

    The six papers in this special issue of "Computers and Education" honoring Professor David H. Jonassen are diverse in nature. They also reflect differing interpretations of the implications of Jonassen's work for research and development focused on instructional models and the factors influencing instruction as well as the directions for future…

  3. Reflections on Finally Becoming a Professor after Forty Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, J. Foster

    2016-01-01

    I wrote this reflective piece in 1999 as I was assuming my first full-time position as a professor with limited administrative responsibilities at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). After 30-plus years in administrative roles in higher education that provided the opportunity to teach on a part-time basis only, I quickly became aware of…

  4. Dismantling the Wall: A White Professor and African American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koger, Alicia Kae

    1995-01-01

    A white woman professor teaching a black theater history course describes her experiences in the classroom, including the realization of students' expectations of her, her own fears of miscommunicating, the perspectives expressed by students in their journals, differences in white and African American student responses to the same material, and…

  5. Dilemmas of a Newly Recruited Academic Qualified Professor: A Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Anand

    2015-01-01

    This case describes the situation of a newly recruited academic professor who volunteered to teach a course on Research Methods to first-term MBA students in a practitioner-oriented case method Business School. Research Methods is a unique course due to its relevance not only in business but also across all graduate programs. Instructional and…

  6. Professor Lesley Parker: A Science Educator "Writ Large"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahle, Jane Butler

    2011-01-01

    Professor Lesley Parker's career has moved from teaching and advising graduate students at Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia to leadership roles and advocacy positions in state and national governments and in international organizations. Throughout her distinguished career, she has been committed to social justice,…

  7. A Professor Goes to Washington: An Open Letter to Colleagues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speece, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I reflect on my experiences and lessons learned while serving as Commissioner of the National Center for Special Education Research, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Although I was in the grant writing business for my nearly 30 years as a professor of special education, I learned that I knew very little…

  8. Maladaptive Perfectionism, Hassles, Coping, and Psychological Distress in University Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Joshua C.; Whelton, William J.; Sharpe, Donald

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the roles of hassles, avoidant and problem-focused coping, and perceived social support as mediating the relationship between maladaptive perfectionism and psychological distress in a sample of university professors. Hassles and avoidant coping both partially mediated a strong association between maladaptive perfectionism and…

  9. The Life of the Mind: A Tribute to Three Professors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamamoto, Kaoru

    2000-01-01

    This speech by a distinguished scholar in educational psychology recounts, with appreciation, his educational experiences under three distinguished professors: Toshio Maki, his undergraduate thesis supervisor in Japan; E. Paul Torrance, the prominent educational psychologist; and C. Gilbert Wrenn, his doctoral advisor. (DB)

  10. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... but they don't need full-time nursing care. Some assisted living facilities are part of retirement ... change. Assisted living costs less than nursing home care. It is still fairly expensive. Older people or ...

  11. Assistive Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Assistive Technology Assistive technology (AT) is any service or tool that helps ... be difficult or impossible. For older adults, such technology may be a walker to improve mobility or ...

  12. A mindful eating group as an adjunct to individual treatment for eating disorders: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Natasha S

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate potential benefits of a Mindful Eating Group as an adjunct to long-term treatment for a variety of eating disorders. Individuals (N = 33) attending treatment at an outpatient treatment facility participated in the 10-week intervention designed to enhance awareness around hunger and satiety cues. Disordered eating symptoms were assessed pre- and post-intervention using the EAT-26. Significant reductions were found on all subscales of the EAT-26 with large effect sizes. No significant differences were identified between eating disorder diagnoses. Results suggest potential benefits of an adjunct mindfulness group intervention when treating a variety of eating disorders. Limitations are discussed.

  13. Assistive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auat Cheein, Fernando A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book offers the reader new achievements within the Assistive Technology field made by worldwide experts, covering aspects such as assistive technology focused on teaching and education, mobility, communication and social interactivity, among others. Each chapter included in this book covers one particular aspect of Assistive Technology that…

  14. The Educational Philosophies of Training and Development Professors, Leaders, and Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spurgeon, Linda P.; Moore, Gary E.

    1997-01-01

    Training and development professors, leaders, and practitioners (n=500) identified their philosophies in a survey. Professors and leaders preferred progressivism first and behaviorism second. Practitioners chose behaviorism over progressivism. Radicalism was least preferred by all three. (SK)

  15. EDITORIAL: 65th Birthday of Professor Hauptmann 65th Birthday of Professor Hauptmann

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucklum, Ralf

    2009-12-01

    The papers in this special feature have been contributed by scientific partners in international research projects and from former PhD students of the Editor-in-Chief of this journal, Professor Dr Peter Hauptmann. The motivation for this feature is the occasion of Peter Hauptmann's 65th birthday on 24 July 2009 and his retirement from his chair at the Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg, Germany this autumn. Peter graduated in Physics at the Technical University Dresden and received his PhD from the Technical University Leuna-Merseburg in 1973. He habilitated in 1979. With his appointment at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology in 1985 the Chair of Measurement Science extended its profile to the fast growing area of sensors. Peter was one of the very early developers of ultrasonic sensor systems for process monitoring and quality assurance. The working style here was characteristic of all his future activities. He combined his background in theory and experiment on ultrasonic wave propagation and its application to material science with the advantages of rapidly developing capabilities in microelectronics and data processing. The results have meanwhile found their way into products that are now on the market worldwide. Germany's reunification opened the door to the international sensor community and the most challenging sensor research areas. Peter Hauptmann very soon became a well respected colleague and was consequently appointed as member of the Technical Program Committee of the most important sensor conferences, elected member and head of expert groups of research associations and funding organizations, and of course reviewer of many scientific journals. Nowadays Peter Hauptmann can rightly be called one of the key players in the area of sensors. Professor Hauptmann's research interests combine fundamental aspects of the sensor transduction scheme with application issues up to the use of the sensor system in the industrial world

  16. Why Did the Professor Cross the Road? How and Why College Professors Intentionally Use Humor in Their Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckman, Karen Hildebrant

    2010-01-01

    College professors face many pressing challenges: staying current in their disciplines, becoming familiar with new technology, responding to national accountability issues, publishing scholarly research in their fields, and facilitating student learning in their classes. Teaching and learning are complex processes. Humor is a powerful…

  17. Ultrasound as an Adjunct to Mammography for Breast Cancer Screening: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Screening with mammography can detect breast cancer early, before clinical symptoms appear. Some cancers, however, are not captured with mammography screening alone. Ultrasound has been suggested as a safe adjunct screening tool that can detect breast cancers missed on mammography. We investigated the benefits, harms, cost-effectiveness, and cost burden of ultrasound as an adjunct to mammography compared with mammography alone for screening women at average risk and at high risk for breast cancer. Methods We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, EBM Reviews, and the NHS Economic Evaluation Database, from January 1998 to June 2015, for evidence of effectiveness, harms, diagnostic accuracy, and cost-effectiveness. Only studies evaluating the use of ultrasound as an adjunct to mammography in the specified populations were included. We also conducted a cost analysis to estimate the costs in Ontario over the next 5 years to fund ultrasound as an adjunct to mammography in breast cancer screening for high-risk women who are contraindicated for MRI, the current standard of care to supplement mammography. Results No studies in average-risk women met the inclusion criteria of the clinical review. We included 5 prospective, paired cohort studies in high-risk women, 4 of which were relevant to the Ontario context. Adjunct ultrasound identified between 2.3 and 5.9 additional breast cancers per 1,000 screens. The average pooled sensitivity of mammography and ultrasound was 53%, a statistically significant increase relative to mammography alone (absolute increase 13%; P < .05). The average pooled specificity of the combined test was 96%, an absolute increase in the false-positive rate of 2% relative to mammography screening alone. The GRADE for this body of evidence was low. Additional annual costs of using breast ultrasound as an adjunct to mammography for high-risk women in Ontario contraindicated for MRI would range from $15,500 to $30,250 in the next 5 years

  18. How Community College Adjunct Faculty Members Teaching Communications Courses Understand Diversity as It Relates to Their Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rediger, James N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore Midwestern Community College (MCC) communication adjunct faculty members' descriptions of techniques used to prepare for a diverse student population. This research was conducted in order to gain a better understanding of how adjunct faculty members teaching communications courses at MCC understood…

  19. Effects of Time-Compressed Narration and Representational Adjunct Images on Cued-Recall, Content Recognition, and Learner Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritzhaupt, Albert Dieter; Barron, Ann

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of time-compressed narration and representational adjunct images on a learner's ability to recall and recognize information. The experiment was a 4 Audio Speeds (1.0 = normal vs. 1.5 = moderate vs. 2.0 = fast vs. 2.5 = fastest rate) x Adjunct Image (Image Present vs. Image Absent) factorial…

  20. The Reliance on and Demand for Adjunct Faculty Members in America's Rural, Suburban, and Urban Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlier, Hara D.; Williams, Mitchell R.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on a survey of chief academic officers at 347 community colleges nationwide, this study examined the impact of institutional type (rural, suburban, urban) on reliance on and demand for adjunct faculty members. Findings indicated that rural institutions rely less on adjuncts, whereas both rural and urban institutions report high levels of…

  1. Argument-Adjunct Asymmetry in the Acquisition of Inversion in "Wh"-Questions by Korean Learners of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates an argument-adjunct asymmetry in English as a second language (ESL) learners' acquisition of inversion in "wh"-questions. A generative approach (DeVilliers, 1991; Stromswold, 1990) claims that inversion is acquired earlier in argument "wh"-questions than in adjunct "wh"-questions, the asymmetry resulting from their…

  2. The Professor in an Urban School District. A Renewal/Service Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunnery, Michael Y.; Deck, L. Linton, Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Previous models for providing professors of educational administration opportunities to spend a year working as urban school district administrators have a number of problems. Professors must make decisions they will not be around to implement, and they often find it difficult to return to the university. Instead, the professor might be provided…

  3. An Interview with Professor Ohtomo: The Founding Father of Language Testing in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Miyoko; Negishi, Masashi

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Professor Kenji Ohtomo who retired in March 2006 from the post of Dean, College of Applied International Studies, Tokiwa University, Mito, in Japan. Professor Ohtomo is currently a Professor Emeritus at the University of Tsukuba and Honorary President of the Japan Language Testing Association, of which he…

  4. Factors Predicting Online Graduate Students' Responsiveness to Feedback from Their Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslin, Mary R.

    2012-01-01

    College students act on their professors' feedback less often and less completely than their professors would like. The problem this study addressed is that the relative predictive value of factors concerning graduate students in online courses acting on their professors' feedback is unknown. By focusing on graduate students in…

  5. Latina University Professors, Insights into the Journeys of Those Who Strive to Leadership within Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez-Guignard, Sandra Jeannette

    2010-01-01

    The statistics on Latinas who hold positions as professors and leaders in higher education are grim. Although there are more Latinas going to college, only 1% of professors in the U.S. are Latina. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of 4 Latina professors to learn about their journeys to secure positions…

  6. The Association of Professors' Style, Trait Anxiety, and Experience with Students' Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodory, George C.; Day, Richard C.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the style, trait anxiety, and experience of professors and students' grades was investigated using Fiedler's contingency theory. Results indicated professors' trait anxiety is significant influencing student grades; professors having a high Least Preferred co-worker score assigned grades negatively correlated related with…

  7. University Student Expectations of Confidentiality When Disclosing Information to Their Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Gregory E.; Dalton, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore university students' expectations of confidentiality when they make disclosures to their university professors. A secondary purpose was to consider if students have a higher expectation of confidentiality when talking with Psychology professors versus professors in other disciplines. Students were asked to…

  8. A Changing Role for University Professors? Professorial Academic Leadership as It Is Perceived by "The Led"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the academic leadership role of university professors in the UK (a grade title which in that national context generally refers only to the most distinguished, senior academics, who equate to the North American full professor). Drawing on theoretical interpretations of professionalism and applying these to professors, it…

  9. Accelerated Degree Completion Programs: The Effects of Core Professors in Nontraditional Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadd, Dale Fredrick

    2012-01-01

    Nontraditional Accelerated Degree Completion Programs (ADCPs) became popular in the 1980s at many private, higher education institutions, and involved cohort groups facilitated by core or major professors. There has been little research addressing the effectiveness of a core-professor or multiple-professor approach within ADCPs, or research on how…

  10. Students' Stereotypes of Professors: An Exploration of the Double Violations of Ethnicity and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kristin J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined students' stereotypes of professors based on professor ethnicity, gender, teaching style, and course taught. An ethnically diverse sample of undergraduates (N = 594) rated hypothetical professors on several dimensions including perceived warmth, professional competence, and difficulty. Evidence consistent with response…

  11. The Effects of Professors' Race and Gender on Student Evaluations and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basow, Susan A.; Codos, Stephanie; Martin, Julie L.

    2013-01-01

    This experimental study examined the effects of professor gender, professor race, and student gender on student ratings of teaching effectiveness and amount learned. After watching a three-minute engineering lecture presented by a computer-animated professor who varied by gender and race (African American, White), female and male undergraduates…

  12. PREFACE: Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsuya

    2011-08-01

    This issue includes a special section on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in memory of the late Professor Kunio Kuwahara, who passed away on 15 September 2008, at the age of 66. In this special section, five articles are included that are based on the lectures and discussions at `The 7th International Nobeyama Workshop on CFD: To the Memory of Professor Kuwahara' held in Tokyo on 23 and 24 September 2009. Professor Kuwahara started his research in fluid dynamics under Professor Imai at the University of Tokyo. His first paper was published in 1969 with the title 'Steady Viscous Flow within Circular Boundary', with Professor Imai. In this paper, he combined theoretical and numerical methods in fluid dynamics. Since that time, he made significant and seminal contributions to computational fluid dynamics. He undertook pioneering numerical studies on the vortex method in 1970s. From then to the early nineties, he developed numerical analyses on a variety of three-dimensional unsteady phenomena of incompressible and compressible fluid flows and/or complex fluid flows using his own supercomputers with academic and industrial co-workers and members of his private research institute, ICFD in Tokyo. In addition, a number of senior and young researchers of fluid mechanics around the world were invited to ICFD and the Nobeyama workshops, which were held near his villa, and they intensively discussed new frontier problems of fluid physics and fluid engineering at Professor Kuwahara's kind hospitality. At the memorial Nobeyama workshop held in 2009, 24 overseas speakers presented their papers, including the talks of Dr J P Boris (Naval Research Laboratory), Dr E S Oran (Naval Research Laboratory), Professor Z J Wang (Iowa State University), Dr M Meinke (RWTH Aachen), Professor K Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor U Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor F Hussain (University of Houston), Professor M Farge (École Normale Superieure), Professor J Y Yong (National

  13. Ventricular assist device

    MedlinePlus

    VAD; RVAD; LVAD; BVAD; Right ventricular assist device; Left ventricular assist device; Biventricular assist device; Heart pump; Left ventricular assist system; LVAS; Implantable ventricular assist device

  14. An Exploration into the Culture of the Community College Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutchin, Jeffery B.

    2012-01-01

    Current literature suggests there is a national state of dissatisfaction among community college adjunct faculty; further, this dissatisfaction among some community college faculty may be due, in part, to factors such as low pay, few or no benefits, and little or no participation in policy making. Despite these conditions, national statistics…

  15. Selective Attentional Effects of Adjunct Study Questions on Achievement in Nigerian Secondary School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okoye, Nnamdi S.

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated the selective attentional effects of adjunct study questions inserted before or after the presentation of science flow diagrams. The basic design for the study was a post-test only control group design involving a total of 252 students randomly selected from six secondary schools in Ile-Ife, Oshun State Nigeria. These were…

  16. Handbook II: Advanced Teaching Strategies for Adjunct and Part-Time Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greive, Donald E., Ed.

    This handbook is designed to help part-time and adjunct faculty who need professional enhancement but do not have the time for formal coursework. The focus is on the modern student, who differs in many ways from the traditional college student. The book provides more advanced strategies that those presented in the earlier "Handbook for…

  17. Factors Influencing the Integration of Technology by Community College Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paver, Jonathan David

    2012-01-01

    This research examined the factors that predict intention to integrate technology into instruction by community college adjunct faculty. For this study the integration of technology was defined as beyond simple occasional use, within the next academic year. The decomposed theory of planned behavior was tested for its predictive ability with this…

  18. Hypnosis as an Adjunct Treatment for Distress Associated with Pediatric Cancer Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Jerre Lee

    This paper reviews research literature pertaining to the pain and anxiety associated with pediatric cancer and the use of hypnosis as an adjunct treatment. It is noted that pain and anxiety are most often associated with the procedural treatment of cancer, and that the literature suggests that both pain and anxiety are multi-faceted constructs.…

  19. An Examination of Emotional Intelligence Factors: Their Relationship to Job Satisfaction among Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zupancic, Katherine Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Faculty at community colleges often prefer teaching to research despite facing challenges of teaching an ever increasingly more diverse student population. Despite being called upon to teach diverse student populations, adjunct faculty, in particular, within community college settings are often perceived as being at the bottom of the job status…

  20. Online Adjunct Faculty: Motivations for Working in the New Academic Frontier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Trish Isabella

    2013-01-01

    Distance education rapidly became the new frontier in higher education as more adults returned to college. Most research studies focused on the satisfaction of faculty members. However, little research reported the lived stories of online adjuncts pioneering a new educational landscape. The primary purpose of the qualitative study was to discover…

  1. Healthy Hands: Use of Alcohol Gel as an Adjunct to Handwashing in Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Jennifer L.; Schultz, Alyce A.

    2004-01-01

    Elementary school-age children are particularly vulnerable to infections. While handwashing is the best method of preventing infections, many elementary schools are housed in buildings that have barriers to effective hand hygiene. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an alcohol gel as an adjunct to handwashing in…

  2. Online Training Impact on Adjunct Faculty Compliance and Satisfaction with Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pete, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The problem addressed by this project study was low levels of adjunct faculty compliance and satisfaction with the professional development program at a local college. The purpose of the study was to determine if an alternative delivery method would yield higher levels of compliance and satisfaction than would a traditional professional…

  3. Carry-Over Effects of Focusing Postquestions Adjunct to Computer-Animated Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Barry L. S.; Holliday, William G.

    Adjunct questions were inserted after each of 12 computer-animated graphics sequences shown to 160 eighth-grade science students. These sequences presented two relationships in a purely spatial fashion. Four randomly assigned treatment groups received questions targeting one of the two relationships (temperature or molecular motion) over all or…

  4. A Pilot Study of Adjunctive Family Psychoeducation in Adolescent Major Depression: Feasibility and Treatment Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Mark; Boyle, Michael; McCleary, Lynn; Miller, Jennifer; Steele, Margaret; Duku, Eric; Offord, David

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To obtain preliminary evidence of the feasibility and effectiveness of adjunctive family psychoeducation in adolescent major depressive disorder. Method: Participants were from outpatient clinics in Hamilton and London, Ontario. Over 24 months, 41 adolescents ages 13 through 18 years meeting major depressive disorder criteria were…

  5. Colleges Are Slashing Adjuncts' Hours to Skirt New Rules on Health-Insurance Eligibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Sydni

    2013-01-01

    Allison G. Armentrout, an adjunct instructor at Stark State College, does not get paid by the hour. She earns $4,600 to teach two English composition courses. But now she carefully tracks how many hours she works on an electronic time sheet. During a recent week, she spent three hours preparing for her lectures, close to six hours in the…

  6. The Isolation of Online Adjunct Faculty and Its Impact on Their Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Vera

    2011-01-01

    Using a grounded theory qualitative research approach, this article examines the experiences of 28 adjunct faculty members who work at the same university, exploring their views on whether periodically meeting face-to-face with management and peers has the potential to affect their motivation on the job and consequently the quality of education…

  7. Project LINC: Supporting Lecturers and Adjunct Instructors in Foreign Language Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sally S.; Edwards, Wade

    2012-01-01

    Foreign language learning can pose a barrier to some students with disabilities. This practice brief describes a collaborative process used on one campus to provide professional development for foreign language instructors. Training opportunities were intentionally focused on the needs of adjunct and temporary lecturers in providing inclusive…

  8. WH-Questions and Extraction from Temporal Adjuncts: A Case for Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodluck, Helen; And Others

    A study investigated young children's knowledge of the constraint that prevents questioning from a position inside a temporal adjunct: i.e., knowledge of the ungrammaticality of a question such as "Who did Fred kiss Sue before hugging...?" Subjects were 30 children aged 3 to 5 years, who listened to stories accompanied by pictures and were asked…

  9. Adjunct Position: One Way to Keep Up with Technology and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Richard D.

    1985-01-01

    The author is a chemical engineer (doing a research in mass transfer operations at a national laboratory) and an adjunct faculty member. The advantages of being such a faculty member are discussed, indicating that this is an effective mechanism for maintaining technical as well as educational skills. (JN)

  10. Measuring Adjunct Instructor Job Satisfaction by Using Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Durrell

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to use Herzberg's motivation-hygiene theory to investigate the different levels of job satisfaction among adjunct college instructors at eight institutions of higher education located in southeast Texas. Differences in job satisfaction were measured by instructor gender, ethnicity, age, teaching experience, type of…

  11. Oculoplethysmography: an adjunct to arteriography in the diagnosis of extracranial carotid occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Kartchner, M M; McRae, L P; Crain, V; Whitaker, B

    1976-12-01

    A four and a half year study documents that oculoplethysmography, in conjunction with carotid phonoangiography, fulfills the criteria of an effective noninvasive adjunct to arteriography in the diagnosis of extracranial carotid occlusive disease. The risk and expense of unnecessary arteriographic studies can be reduced and accuracy of arteriographic technics and interpretations can be enhanced by routine application of oculoplethysmography.

  12. Factors that Predict the Integration of Technology for Instruction by Community College Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paver, Jonathan; Walker, David A.; Hung, Wei-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges have responded to the increased use of technology for instruction by providing support and professional development opportunities for faculty. However, differences in perceptions, expectations, and opportunities exist between full-time faculty at community colleges and their adjunct colleagues when it comes to adopting…

  13. Establishing an Adjunct Faculty Professional Development Program for Delaware Technical Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergner, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education is experiencing unprecedented change due to economic and demographic projections, largely focusing on the usage of adjunct faculty. No longer will community colleges be able to rely solely on full-time faculty to ensure that students persist to graduation. This executive position paper provides a proposed plan for a formalized…

  14. Experience of Adjunct Novice Clinical Nursing Faculty: An Interpretive Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive case study was to describe the experience of adjunct novice clinical nursing faculty who has less than three years teaching experience or feels novice in this setting. The nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and is forecasted to have significant impacts on the health care delivery…

  15. Inviting the "Outsiders" In: Local Efforts to Improve Adjunct Working Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreyer, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    An adjunct turned writing program administrator reflects on her professional journey and describes efforts to improve the teaching environment amongst composition faculty--primarily part-time--within her department. Based on a local program review, a pilot faculty relations plan was implemented that addressed two major areas: offering more…

  16. Relationship between Adjunct and Full-Time Faculty Teaching at a For-Profit University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom Kays, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the workplace relationships of adjunct and full-time faculty teaching at a for-profit university. The study was conducted at one campus of Segway University. Faculty in this study included men and women and represented different academic departments. All full-time faculty participants had experience teaching as…

  17. Perspectives from within: Adjunct, Foreign, English-Language Teachers in the Internationalization of Japanese Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitsed, Craig; Wright, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study is part of a broader study that explored how adjunct foreign English-language teachers (AFELT) in the Japanese university sector conceptualize their role against the backdrop of internationalization. Forty-three teachers across a range of universities participated in this study. The results report on AFELT perceptions of…

  18. A Bricolage Exploration in "Genkan" Space: "Tengu" and Adjunct TEFL in the Japanese University Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitsed, Craig; Wright, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on research focusing on a group of adjunct teachers of English employed in Japanese universities. Grounded in interpretive epistemology foregrounding constructionist traditions, this research employed bricolage as way of inquiring into, then representing, these teacher's experiences utilising multi-perspectival,…

  19. Studies on development and storage stability of instant spice adjunct mix from seaweed (Eucheuma).

    PubMed

    Senthil, Amudha; Mamatha, B S; Vishwanath, Prema; Bhat, K K; Ravishankar, G A

    2011-12-01

    Seaweed is a macroscopic marine algae which has been used as human food since ancient times. Food values of seaweed are mainly due to significant amounts of protein, vitamin, mineral, trace elements and dietary fibre apart from substances of antibiotic nature. In this study edible red seaweed Eucheuma (Kappaphycus alvarezzi), was used as an ingredient in the preparation of spice adjunct. Functional properties such as soluble solids, water-holding capacity, oil holding capacity and swelling capacity of Eucheuma were studied. Steamed Eucheuma powder was added at levels of 15, 20 and 25% in the preparation of spice adjunct. Sensory analysis and consumer acceptability study of spice adjunct showed that the incorporation of Eucheuma upto 20% had high acceptability. Spice adjunct containing 20% Eucheuma had 6.2% moisture, 22.2% ash, 29.2% fat, 10.0% protein, 9.4% crude fibre and 23% carbohydrates. Based on equilibrium relative humidity studies metallized polyester was selected as the packaging material. Storage studies indicated that metallized polyester provided a shelf life of 120 days at both the ambient and accelerated conditions. PMID:23572809

  20. Relationship between Learning Style, Gender, and Satisfaction toward Training of Adjunct Online Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lees, Teresa Dotson

    2011-01-01

    Growth in distance education programs has required academic institutions to seek and train additional adjunct faculty. Training program content and delivery methods vary among institutions: however, there is an absence of research on whether incorporating learning strategies that consider assumptions about an adult learner increases satisfaction…

  1. "Thanks for Asking": Adjunct Faculty Members' Views of Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the characteristics of effective teaching as perceived by undergraduate adjunct faculty members in a large proprietary university. Three factors were identified through an exploratory factor analysis: Regard for the Student, Instructor Competence, and Instructional Proficiency. The author concludes that additional studies are…

  2. Biology Adjunct Faculty Employment, Support, and Professional Development across Three Sizes of Rural Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Kevin Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to identify the employment of biology adjunct faculty, and to determine what support and professional development is provided for them across three sizes of rural community colleges. This study used a mixed-method research design. Nine rural community colleges participated in the study. Quantitative data were…

  3. Pharmacy Students' Opinions on Civility and Preferences Regarding Professors

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Catherine; Broedel-Zaugg, Kimberly

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine the types of classroom behavior that pharmacy students consider uncivil, participation in such behaviors, what type of professor and classroom setting they prefer, and changes in these opinions over time. Methods A survey instrument was used to collect data about students' feelings concerning incivility, participation in uncivil behaviors, and preferences concerning classroom experience. Demographic data were used to identify characteristics of student populations and ensure the same students were studied over different time periods. Results Younger students felt cheating was the most uncivil classroom behavior while older students most disliked cell phone/beeper use. Chewing gum was least offensive for all groups. Students desired that teachers cared about their learning experience, but few would phone a professor at home. Conclusions Differences in views concerning civility were found among pharmacy students in their first, third, and fourth years, which may indicate that students' beliefs, actions, and preferences change as they progress through the curriculum. PMID:17136207

  4. [Professor CHENG Zhifan and PUMHS Department of Medical History].

    PubMed

    Zhen, Cheng

    2011-11-01

    Professor Zhifan Cheng is a notable expert on medical history in modern China. Since 1950 when he graduated from Peking University Medical School, Prof. Cheng was working in the Department of Medical History until he retired in 2002. During the Cultural Revolution, he was sent to the TCM Department of Bei Da Hospital (Now Peking University First Hospital). Professor Cheng devoted himself to teaching medical history, exploring the aim and methods of teaching in China, writing and editing textbooks, developing postgraduate education, training teachers and promoting the research of medical history in academic communications. Prof. Cheng, working for over a half century in the department, had made every effort for the development of this office. PMID:22335850

  5. [Professor SONG Nanchang's experience for treatment of peripheral facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    He, Yong; Pan, Hao; Xu, Hanbin

    2015-06-01

    Professor SONG Nanchang's clinical experience and characteristics for treatment of peripheral facial paralysis are introduced. In clinical treatment, professor SONG has adopted staging treatment strategy, and performed acupuncture stimulation with different levels. He attaches great importance to the acupoint selection on distal limbs. For the treatment on the face, he takes temperature as necessity; he inherits from famous Chinese doctor ZONG Ruilin's acupuncture technique of slow-twisting and gentle-pressing. Meanwhile, he excels in combination, of different therapies, using acupuncture, moxibustion, electroacupuncture, auricular point sticking, Chinese herbal medicine, etc. according to individual condition and disease stages. He also emphasizes on psychological counseling and daily life care to achieve rehabilitation within the shortest time.

  6. Adjunctive raloxifene treatment improves attention and memory in men and women with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Weickert, T W; Weinberg, D; Lenroot, R; Catts, S V; Wells, R; Vercammen, A; O'Donnell, M; Galletly, C; Liu, D; Balzan, R; Short, B; Pellen, D; Curtis, J; Carr, V J; Kulkarni, J; Schofield, P R; Weickert, C S

    2015-06-01

    There is increasing clinical and molecular evidence for the role of hormones and specifically estrogen and its receptor in schizophrenia. A selective estrogen receptor modulator, raloxifene, stimulates estrogen-like activity in brain and can improve cognition in older adults. The present study tested the extent to which adjunctive raloxifene treatment improved cognition and reduced symptoms in young to middle-age men and women with schizophrenia. Ninety-eight patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were recruited into a dual-site, thirteen-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of adjunctive raloxifene treatment in addition to their usual antipsychotic medications. Symptom severity and cognition in the domains of working memory, attention/processing speed, language and verbal memory were assessed at baseline, 6 and 13 weeks. Analyses of the initial 6-week phase of the study using a parallel groups design (with 39 patients receiving placebo and 40 receiving raloxifene) revealed that participants receiving adjunctive raloxifene treatment showed significant improvement relative to placebo in memory and attention/processing speed. There was no reduction in symptom severity with treatment compared with placebo. There were significant carryover effects, suggesting some cognitive benefits are sustained even after raloxifene withdrawal. Analysis of the 13-week crossover data revealed significant improvement with raloxifene only in attention/processing speed. This is the first study to show that daily, oral adjunctive raloxifene treatment at 120 mg per day has beneficial effects on attention/processing speed and memory for both men and women with schizophrenia. Thus, raloxifene may be useful as an adjunctive treatment for cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. PMID:25980345

  7. Professor Created On-line Biology Laboratory Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Arthur W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will share the creation, implementation, and modification of an online college level general biology laboratory course offered for non-science majors as a part of a General Education Curriculum. The ability of professors to develop quality online laboratories will address a growing need in Higher Education as more institutions combine course sections and look for suitable alternative course delivery formats due to declining departmental budgets requiring reductions in staffing, equipment, and supplies. Also, there is an equal or greater need for more professors to develop the ability to create online laboratory experiences because many of the currently available online laboratory course packages from publishers do not always adequately parallel on-campus laboratory courses, or are not as aligned with the companion lecture sections. From a variety of scientific simulation and animation web sites, professors can easily identify material that closely fit the specific needs of their courses, instructional environment, and students that they serve. All too often, on-campus laboratory courses in the sciences provide what are termed confirmation experiences that do NOT allow students to experience science as would be carried out by scientists. Creatively developed online laboratory experiences can often provide the type of authentic investigative experiences that are not possible on-campus due to the time constraints of a typical two-hour, once-per-week-meeting laboratory course. In addition, online laboratory courses can address issues related to the need for students to more easily complete missing laboratory assignments, and to have opportunities to extend introductory exercises into more advanced undertakings where a greater sense of scientific discovery can be experienced. Professors are strongly encourages to begin creating online laboratory exercises for their courses, and to consider issues regarding assessment, copyrights, and Intellectual Property

  8. Anne S. Young: Professor and Variable Star Observer Extraordinaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracher, K.

    2012-06-01

    One of the original eight members of the AAVSO, but not well known today, was Professor Anne Sewell Young of Mount Holyoke College. Miss Young taught there for thirty-seven years, and trained many women astronomers during the first third of the 20th century. This paper will attempt to present her life as an inspiring teacher, as well as a contributor of more than 6,500 variable star observations to the AAVSO.

  9. YouTube Professors: Scholars as Online Video Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at the rising popularity of professors as the latest YouTube stars. The popularity of their appearances on YouTube and other video-sharing sites is making it possible for classrooms to be opened up and making teaching--which once took place behind closed doors--a more public art. Web video has generated a new form of…

  10. YouTube Professors Scholars as Online Video Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at how professors are becoming the latest YouTube stars. The popularity of their appearances on YouTube and other video-sharing sites end up opening the classroom and making teaching--which once took place behind closed doors--a more public art. Web videos open a new form of public intellectualism to scholars looking to…

  11. Gravitational Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, R.

    1995-01-01

    Deep-space missions some times use close gravity-assist 'swingbys' of planets and moons to gain or lose velocity. These maneuvers increase the amount of mass that can be delivered and/or decrease mission flight times. The two Voyager spacecraft used gravity assists to leave the solar system. The Galileo spacecraft is using gravity assists to move among the various moons of Jupiter and the Cassini spacecraft will do similar maneuvers around Saturn.

  12. From Walking the Walk to Talking the Talk: A School Superintendent Turns Assistant Professor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Casey G.; Vornberg, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Casey Brown has moved from a job as a school administrator to one in which she will help teach the school administrators of tomorrow. As she looks back over her university experiences thus far, she shares a few of the tips she has learned in leaping from the world of PK-12 education into the world of higher education. Each suggestion is followed…

  13. Criteria for Recruitment as Assistant Professor of Accounting in Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Dixie; Iyer, Venkat M.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 264 business schools found the top criteria for recruiting entry-level accounting faculty were teaching skills and experience. Doctoral programs emphasize research potential. Interpersonal and communication skills were extremely important. (SK)

  14. Teaching climate change to four hundred freshmen GE students as a new Assistant Professor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    I discuss some lessons learned whilst porting an established mature climate change course to an unusually large classroom at University of California, Irvine while starting up as junior faculty. I will share some thoughts on the logistics of dealing with climate change material at this scale while starting up as new faculty, things that worked well, things that didn't, what the students thought, rapping about climate science, and what I will change next time around.

  15. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... it, too. Back to top What is the Cost for Assisted Living? Although assisted living costs less than nursing home care, it is still ... of services an older person chooses, the price costs can range from less than $25,000 a ...

  16. Adjunctive Corticotherapy for Community Acquired Pneumonia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Christophe; Grosgurin, Olivier; Harbarth, Stephan; Combescure, Christophe; Abbas, Mohamed; Rutschmann, Olivier; Perrier, Arnaud; Garin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) induces lung and systemic inflammation, leading to high morbidity and mortality. We systematically reviewed the risks and benefits of adjunctive corticotherapy in the management of patients with CAP. Methods We systematically searched Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials comparing adjunctive corticotherapy and antimicrobial therapy with antimicrobial therapy alone in patients with CAP. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. Secondary outcomes were length of hospital stay, time to clinical stability and severe complications. Results 14 trials (2077 patients) were included. The reported 30-day mortality was 7.9% (80/1018) among patients treated with adjunctive corticotherapy versus 8.3% (85/1028) among patients treated with antimicrobial therapy alone (RR 0.84; 95%CI 0.55 to1.29). Adjunctive corticotherapy was associated with a reduction of severe complications (RR 0.36; 95%CI 0.23 to 0.56), a shorter length of stay (9.0 days; 95%CI 7.6 to 10.7 vs 10.6 days; 95%CI 7.4 to 15.3) and a shorter time to clinical stability (3.3 days; 95% CI 2.8 to 4.1 vs 4.3 days; 95%CI 3.6 to 5.1). The risk of hyperglycemia was higher among patients treated with adjunctive corticotherapy (RR 1.59; 95%CI 1.06 to 2.38), whereas the risk of gastro-intestinal bleeding was similar (RR 0.83; 95%CI 0.35 to 1.93). In the subgroup analysis based on CAP severity, a survival benefit was found among patients with severe CAP (RR 0.47; 95%CI 0.23 to 0.96). Conclusion Adjunctive corticotherapy is associated with a reduction of length of stay, time to clinical stability, and severe complications among patients with CAP, but the effect on mortality remains uncertain. PMID:26641253

  17. EDITORIAL: 65th Birthday of Professor Hauptmann 65th Birthday of Professor Hauptmann

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucklum, Ralf

    2009-12-01

    The papers in this special feature have been contributed by scientific partners in international research projects and from former PhD students of the Editor-in-Chief of this journal, Professor Dr Peter Hauptmann. The motivation for this feature is the occasion of Peter Hauptmann's 65th birthday on 24 July 2009 and his retirement from his chair at the Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg, Germany this autumn. Peter graduated in Physics at the Technical University Dresden and received his PhD from the Technical University Leuna-Merseburg in 1973. He habilitated in 1979. With his appointment at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology in 1985 the Chair of Measurement Science extended its profile to the fast growing area of sensors. Peter was one of the very early developers of ultrasonic sensor systems for process monitoring and quality assurance. The working style here was characteristic of all his future activities. He combined his background in theory and experiment on ultrasonic wave propagation and its application to material science with the advantages of rapidly developing capabilities in microelectronics and data processing. The results have meanwhile found their way into products that are now on the market worldwide. Germany's reunification opened the door to the international sensor community and the most challenging sensor research areas. Peter Hauptmann very soon became a well respected colleague and was consequently appointed as member of the Technical Program Committee of the most important sensor conferences, elected member and head of expert groups of research associations and funding organizations, and of course reviewer of many scientific journals. Nowadays Peter Hauptmann can rightly be called one of the key players in the area of sensors. Professor Hauptmann's research interests combine fundamental aspects of the sensor transduction scheme with application issues up to the use of the sensor system in the industrial world

  18. Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ali H.; Al-Saeed, Samar H.; Al-Maghlouth, Basma A.; Bahammam, Maha A.; Linjawi, Amal I.; El-Bialy, Tarek H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically review the literature to assess the quality of evidence related to corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment (CAOT) as adjunctive treatment in orthodontics. Methods: The study was conducted in the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between 2013 and 2014. Various electronic databases were searched and abstracts were retrieved. Defined inclusion criteria were then applied to the obtained original articles for further evaluation by 2 examiners independently. The criteria of selection included human, or animal studies, which assessed some aspects of CAOT and/or the biological principles behind it. Case reports and series were excluded. The quality of the studies was evaluated by the methodological score for clinical trials developed. Results: Fourteen articles were retrieved initially, but only 12 articles were finally selected for the study. The CAOT was found to accelerate tooth movement by 2-2.5 folds when compared with conventional orthodontic tooth movement. The CAOT was found safe on periodontal health and exhibits no or little risk of root resorption. A localized turnover of alveolar spongiosa and the absence of a hyalinized zone was the acceptable biological explanation of CAOT. There is no evidence to support that CAOT enhances the movement of ankylosed teeth, closing old extraction sites, post-orthodontic stability, or transverse expansion. Conclusions: Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment should be considered with caution. Long term randomized clinical trials are still needed. PMID:26108582

  19. Adjunctive intra-coronary imaging for the assessment of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Ussen, Bassey

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease remains a leading cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. Invasive angiography currently remains the gold standard method of diagnosing and treating coronary disease; however, more sophisticated adjunctive interventional technologies have been developed to combat the inter and intra-observer variability frequently encountered in the assessment of lesion severity. Intravascular imaging now plays a key role in optimising percutaneous coronary interventions and provides invaluable information as part of the interventional cardiologist’s diagnostic arsenal. The principles, technical aspects and uses of two modalities of intracoronary imaging, intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography, are discussed. We additionally provide examples of cases where the adjunctive intracoronary imaging was superior to angiography alone in successfully identifying and treating acute coronary syndromes. PMID:27540480

  20. Clinical review: Acute respiratory distress syndrome - clinical ventilator management and adjunct therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating form of acute inflammatory lung injury with a high short-term mortality rate and significant long-term consequences among survivors. Supportive care, principally with mechanical ventilation, remains the cornerstone of therapy - although the goals of this support have changed in recent years - from maintaining normal physiological parameters to avoiding ventilator-induced lung injury while providing adequate gas exchange. In this article we discuss the current evidence base for ventilatory support and adjunctive therapies in patients with ARDS. Key components of such a strategy include avoiding lung overdistension by limiting tidal volumes and airway pressures, and the use of positive end-expiratory pressure with or without lung recruitment manoeuvres in patients with severe ARDS. Adjunctive therapies discussed include pharmacologic techniques (for example, vasodilators, diuretics, neuromuscular blockade) and nonpharmacologic techniques (for example, prone position, alternative modes of ventilation). PMID:23672857

  1. A more global approach to musculoskeletal pain: expressive writing as an effective adjunct to physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Luisa; Milani, Roberta; Di Trani, Michela; Di Folco, Gianluca; Lanna, Vittorio; Solano, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of written emotional disclosure as an adjunct to physiotherapy. Forty outpatients with musculoskeletal pain were treated with Mézières physiotherapy for 10 sessions. Half of the subjects also wrote about difficult life experiences immediately after four of these sessions. Data analysis showed that although both the writing and non-writing groups displayed lower pain scores after physiotherapy, the difference was stronger in the writing group. Pain scores continued to decrease six months after physiotherapy in the writing group alone. The postural evaluation revealed a greater improvement in the writing group than in the non-writing group, while the TAS-20 and SCL-90 scores decreased in the writing group alone. These results indicate that written emotional disclosure is an effective adjunct to physiotherapy insofar as it promotes further health improvements at both the physical and psychological levels.

  2. Adjunctive therapy for cerebral malaria and other severe forms of Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    John, Chandy C; Kutamba, Elizabeth; Mugarura, Keith; Opoka, Robert O

    2010-01-01

    Severe malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum causes more than 800,000 deaths every year. Primary therapy with quinine or artesunate is generally effective in controlling P. falciparum parasitemia, but mortality from cerebral malaria and other forms of severe malaria remains unacceptably high. Long-term cognitive impairment is also common in children with cerebral malaria. Of the numerous adjunctive therapies for cerebral malaria and severe malaria studied over the past five decades, only one (albumin) was associated with a reduction in mortality. In this article, we review past and ongoing studies of adjunctive therapy, and examine the evidence of efficacy for newer therapies, including inhibitors of cytoadherence (e.g., levamisole), immune modulators (e.g., rosiglitazone), agents that increase nitric oxide levels (e.g., arginine) and neuroprotective agents (e.g., erythropoietin). PMID:20818944

  3. Design of price incentives for adjunct policy goals in formula funding for hospitals and health services

    PubMed Central

    Duckett, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    Background Hospital policy involves multiple objectives: efficiency of service delivery, pursuit of high quality care, promoting access. Funding policy based on hospital casemix has traditionally been considered to be only about promoting efficiency. Discussion Formula-based funding policy can be (and has been) used to pursue a range of policy objectives, not only efficiency. These are termed 'adjunct' goals. Strategies to incorporate adjunct goals into funding design must, implicitly or explicitly, address key decision choices outlined in this paper. Summary Policy must be clear and explicit about the behaviour to be rewarded; incentives must be designed so that all facilities with an opportunity to improve have an opportunity to benefit; the reward structure is stable and meaningful; and the funder monitors performance and gaming. PMID:18384694

  4. Postmortem whole-body magnetic resonance imaging as an adjunct to autopsy: preliminary clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, L; Kassarjian, A; Barish, M; Casserley, L; O'Brien, M; Andry, C; Eustace, S

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cadavers as an adjunct to autopsy. Eight consecutive patients underwent both whole-body MRI and autopsy [either conventional (six), limited (one), or percutaneous (one)] within 24 hours of death. Comparison was made of major and minor abnormalities and predicted cause of death recorded by independent readers at both MRI and autopsy. Major discrepancies between the recorded primary cause of death at imaging and autopsy occurred in five (5) patients. These included a myocardial infarction found at autopsy alone, bowel infarction and portal venous gas found at MRI alone, and aortic dissection and occipital infarct found at MRI alone in a patient on whom only limited autopsy was performed. Postmortem MRI may represent a useful adjunct to autopsy, particularly in patients in whom autopsy is limited due to patient/family consent, inoculation risks, and ethnic doctrines.

  5. [Needling technique of Professor Li Yan-Fang].

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Experiences of needling techniques of Professor LI Ya- fang is introduced in this article. Gentle and superficial insertion is adopted by Professor LI in clinic. Emphases are put on the qi regulation function, needling sensation to the affected region and insertion with both hands, especially the function of the left hand as pressing hand. The gentle and superficial insertion should be done as the follows: hold the needle with the right hand, press gently along the running course of meridians with the left hand to promote qi circulation, hard pressing should be applied at acupoints to disperse the local qi and blood, insert the needle gently and quickly into the subcutaneous region with the right hand, and stop the insertion when patient has the needling sensation. While the fast needling is characterized with shallow insertion and swift manipulation: the left hand of the manipulator should press first along the running course of the meridian, and fix the local skin, hold the needle with the right hand and insert the needle quickly into the acupoint. Withdrawal of the needle should be done immediately after the reinforcing and reducing manipulations. Professor LI is accomplished in qi regulation. It is held by him that regulating qi circulation is essence of acupuncture, letting the patient get the needling sensation is the most important task of needling. Lifting, thrusting and rotation manipulations should be applied to do reinforcing or reducing. The tissue around the tip of the needle should not be too contracted or too relaxed, and the resistance should not be too strong or too weak. The feeling of the insertion hand of the practitioner should not be too smooth or too hesitant. Needle should be inserted into the skin quickly at the moment of hard pressing by the left hand. And then, slow rotation and gentle lifting and thrusting can be applied to promote the needling sensation like electric current pass through and to reach the affected region along the

  6. Massage as an adjunct to meditation in the psychological treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Meares, A

    1980-02-01

    In the treatment of cancer by meditation the patient is led into a profoundly calm state of mind in which thought practically ceases. Talking alerts the patient and prevents this process. Massage can be used as a simple form of communication to help the patient towards this state of mind. Massage can also be used as an adjunct in teaching the cancer patient to transcend frustrations, discomfort and pain, and so reduce the level of anxiety.

  7. Mini-laparotomy with Adjunctive Care versus Laparoscopy for Placement of Gastric Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, ALISON; CACCHIONE, ROBERT; MILLER, ED; McELMURRAY, LINDSAY; ALLEN, ROBERT; STOCKER, ABIGAIL; ABELL, THOMAS L.; HUGHES, MICHAEL G.

    2016-01-01

    We compared outcomes for two gastric electrical stimulation placement strategies, mini-laparotomy with adjunctive care (MLAC) versus laparoscopy without adjunctive care (LAPA). For electrode placement, the peritoneal cavity was accessed with either a single 2.5 to 3.0 cm midline incision (MLAC) or three trocar incisions (LAPA). For both groups, generator was placed subcutaneously over the anterior rectus sheath. For MLAC, adjunctive pain control measures were used for placement of both electrode and generator (transversus abdominus plane block). For LAPA, those that could not be completed by laparoscopy were converted to traditional open approach and kept in the analysis. MLAC (n = 128) resulted in shorter operative times than LAPA (n = 37) (median operative time: 87.5 vs 137.0 minutes, P ≤ 0.01). Hospital length of stay was also shorter for MLAC than for LAPA (median: 2.0 vs 3.0 days, P ≤ 0.01) without any increase in readmission rates to the hospital within 30 days of discharge (11.0 vs 16.2%, P = 0.39). After equalizing learning curves, these differences were even greater (median operative time: 84.5 vs 137.0 minutes, P < 0.01; median length of stay: 1.0 vs 3.0 days; P < 0.01) without increasing 30-day readmission rates (9.1 vs 16.2%, P = 0.25). For implantation of gastric electrical stimulators, mini-laparotomy can result in improved outcomes when coupled with adjunctive pain control measures. PMID:27097627

  8. An Open Label Pilot Study of Adjunctive Asenapine for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pilkinton, Patricia; Berry, Carlos; Norrholm, Seth; Bartolucci, Al; Birur, Badari; Davis, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) remain the first-line treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, adjunctive atypical antipsychotics are often used to target residual or refractory symptoms. Asenapine is a novel atypical antipsychotic that possesses a high serotonin (5-HT2A) to dopamine (D2) affinity ratio and alpha-adrenergic antagonism, which may be advantageous in treating PTSD. This pilot study aimed to identify the therapeutic potential of asenapine as an adjunctive treatment for PTSD. Method Eighteen subjects initiated treatment in this single-site prospective, open-label, 12-week trial of flexibly-dosed asenapine in Veterans with PTSD who had not responded to an adequate course of treatment with an SSRI, venlafaxine, or mirtazapine. Subjects remained on their antidepressant medication and were started on adjunctive asenapine 5 mg sublingual at bedtime, which was gradually titrated to a maximum of 10 mg twice per day, as tolerated. The primary outcome measure was the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) for DSM-IV. Results Fifteen subjects finished at least 4 weeks and eleven completed the 12 week study. There was a significant and clinically meaningful decrease in CAPS from baseline (77.56 ± 14.48) to week 4 (48.7 ± 30.6), and to week 12 (35.3 ± 19.7). Six participants experienced adverse events possibly related to asenapine; however, only three participants discontinued early due to related adverse events. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrated that adjunctive treatment with asenapine may provide additional benefit to some patients experiencing residual PTSD symptoms in spite of optimal antidepressant therapy. A larger efficacy study may be warranted. PMID:27738377

  9. Anti-inflammatory Actions of Adjunctive Tetracyclines and Other Agents in Periodontitis and Associated Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Tilakaratne, Aruni; Soory, Mena

    2014-01-01

    The non-antimicrobial properties of tetracyclines such as anti-inflammatory, proanabolic and anti-catabolic actions make them effective pharmaceuticals for the adjunctive management of chronic inflammatory diseases. An over-exuberant inflammatory response to an antigenic trigger in periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory diseases could contribute to an autoimmune element in disease progression. Their adjunctive use in managing periodontitis could have beneficial effects in curbing excessive inflammatory loading from commonly associated comorbidities such as CHD, DM and arthritis. Actions of tetracyclines and their derivatives include interactions with MMPs, tissue inhibitors of MMPs, growth factors and cytokines. They affect the sequence of inflammation with implications on immunomodulation, cell proliferation and angiogenesis; these actions enhance their scope, in treating a range of disease entities. Non-antimicrobial chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) sustain their diverse actions in organ systems which include anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-proteolytic actions, inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor metastasis. A spectrum of biological actions in dermatitis, periodontitis, atherosclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, malignancy and prevention of bone resorption is particularly relevant to minocycline. Experimental models of ischemia indicate their specific beneficial effects. Parallel molecules with similar functions, improved Zn binding and solubility have been developed for reducing excessive MMP activity. Curbing excessive MMP activity is particularly relevant to periodontitis, and comorbidities addressed here, where specificity is paramount. Unique actions of tetracyclines in a milieu of excessive inflammatory stimuli make them effective therapeutic adjuncts in the management of chronic inflammatory disorders. These beneficial actions of tetracyclines are relevant to the adjunctive management of periodontitis subjects

  10. Mini-laparotomy with Adjunctive Care versus Laparoscopy for Placement of Gastric Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alison; Cacchione, Robert; Miller, Ed; McElmurray, Lindsay; Allen, Robert; Stocker, Abigail; Abell, Thomas L; Hughes, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    We compared outcomes for two gastric electrical stimulation placement strategies, minilaparotomy with adjunctive care (MLAC) versus laparoscopy without adjunctive care (LAPA). For electrode placement, the peritoneal cavity was accessed with either a single 2.5 to 3.0 cm midline incision (MLAC) or three trocar incisions (LAPA). For both groups, generator was placed subcutaneously over the anterior rectus sheath. For MLAC, adjunctive pain control measures were used for placement of both electrode and generator (transversus abdominus plane block). For LAPA, those that could not be completed by laparoscopy were converted to traditional open approach and kept in the analysis. MLAC (n = 128) resulted in shorter operative times than LAPA (n = 37) (median operative time: 87.5 vs 137.0 minutes, P ≤ 0.01). Hospital length of stay was also shorter for MLAC than for LAPA (median: 2.0 vs 3.0 days, P ≤ 0.01) without any increase in readmission rates to the hospital within 30 days of discharge (11.0 vs 16.2%, P = 0.39). After equalizing learning curves, these differences were even greater (median operative time: 84.5 vs 137.0 minutes, P < 0.01; median length of stay: 1.0 vs 3.0 days; P < 0.01) without increasing 30-day readmission rates (9.1 vs 16.2%, P = 0.25). For implantation of gastric electrical stimulators, minilaparotomy can result in improved outcomes when coupled with adjunctive pain control measures. PMID:27097627

  11. Host modulation therapeutics in periodontics: role as an adjunctive periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Shinwari, Muhammad Saad; Tanwir, Farzeen; Hyder, Pakiza Raza; Bin Saeed, Muhammad Humza

    2014-09-01

    Host Modulation Therapy (HMT) is a treatment concept that reduces tissue destruction and stabilizes or even regenerates inflammatory tissue by modifying host response factors. It has been used for treating osteoporosis and arthritis for several decades. However, its use in dentistry has only been recently reported. The objective of this article is to present a review of the various literatures available on HMT and also its role as adjunct therapy in periodontics. For identifying studies for this review, a PUBMED search was carried out in 2013 for all articles published till December 2012. The search was restricted to English language publications only. Longitudinal prospective and retrospective studies were included in the search. The key words used were: Host Modulation Therapy; Sub antimicrobial dose doxycycline and Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy. The main outcomes sought were host modulation therapeutics in periodontics. Exclusion criteria included cross sectional studies, short case series as well as studies with short follow-up periods. There is a paucity of literature on HMT in periodontics although the only drug approved by United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a subantimicrobial dose of doxycycline (SDD) with highly predictable results as a host modulating agent in periodontal diseases and also an effective adjunctive therapy in various diseases of periodontium. However, more randomized controlled trials are needed to obtain clinical guidelines on the usage of other host modulating agents as adjunct as well as definite therapy for periodontal diseases. SDD is an effective adjunct therapy when used in dosage of 20mg twice daily for minimum 3 months duration in various periodontal diseases with predictable clinical outcomes. It is also recommended that future clinical research on anti cytokine drugs, chemically modified tetracycline and other HMT agents should be conducted so that new drugs are available with highly predictable results.

  12. The Forgetful Professor and the Space Biology Adventure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Jones, Wanda; Munoz, Angela; Santora, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This video was created as one of the products of the 2013 ISS Faculty Fellows Summer Program. Our High School science teacher faculty fellows developed this video as an elementary/middle school education component. The video shows a forgetful professor who is trying to remember something, and along the journey she learns more about the space station, space station related plant science, and the Kennedy Space Center. She learns about the Veggie hardware, LED lighting for plant growth, the rotating garden concept, and generally about space exploration and the space station. Lastly she learns about the space shuttle Atlantis.

  13. Where are the female science professors? A personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The first woman to earn a Professorship at a University in Europe was Laura Maria Caterina Bassi, who earned a professorship in physics at the University of Bologna in 1732. Almost 300 years and three waves of feminism later, in 2016, women typically still only comprise 20% (or less) of the number of full professors in Europe. This opinion article will discuss the experiences of being a female academic today and the factors contributing to the academic gender gap from the perspective of a "young" natural scientist, as well as providing constructive suggestions for strategies to empower women in the academic world. PMID:27347383

  14. Where are the female science professors? A personal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The first woman to earn a Professorship at a University in Europe was Laura Maria Caterina Bassi, who earned a professorship in physics at the University of Bologna in 1732. Almost 300 years and three waves of feminism later, in 2016, women typically still only comprise 20% (or less) of the number of full professors in Europe. This opinion article will discuss the experiences of being a female academic today and the factors contributing to the academic gender gap from the perspective of a “young” natural scientist, as well as providing constructive suggestions for strategies to empower women in the academic world. PMID:27347383

  15. Where are the female science professors? A personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The first woman to earn a Professorship at a University in Europe was Laura Maria Caterina Bassi, who earned a professorship in physics at the University of Bologna in 1732. Almost 300 years and three waves of feminism later, in 2016, women typically still only comprise 20% (or less) of the number of full professors in Europe. This opinion article will discuss the experiences of being a female academic today and the factors contributing to the academic gender gap from the perspective of a "young" natural scientist, as well as providing constructive suggestions for strategies to empower women in the academic world.

  16. [Operation and essence of Toutianliang manipulation by professor ZHANG Jin].

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Wang, Long; Yu, Xueping; Sun, Xiaowei; Liu, Jinrui

    2016-01-01

    Toutianliang manipulation is the most representative compound needling technique of traditional reinforcing and reducing and has the remarkable efficacy on heat syndrome with muscle and bone involved for example. Professor ZHANG Jin is one of the famous acupuncture master in China and has contributed his lifelong to the research of acupuncture manipulation techniques. He has summarized 24 single-type manipulations and has given the comprehensive explanation of the manipulations for meridian conduction, reinforcing or reducing techniques for the excess or deficiency. In the paper, Toutianliang manipulation was introduced briefly and the key operation steps had been discussed. PMID:26946736

  17. [Professor XIAO Ji-fang's idea on acupuncture-moxibustion ].

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu-Shan; Liao, Yu-Heng; Rui, Jing-Lin; Zhang, Cui-Zhou

    2012-03-01

    Professor XIAO Ji-fang, an experienced practitioner of Chinese medicine of Guangxi, is famous for his medical ethics, wide range of studies, comprehensive understanding of the classics, innovation, as well as u nique academic ideas. He focuses on mind-regulating in acupuncture and pulse diagnosis. At the same time, differentiation of syndromes, diseases and meridians are emphasized. The combination of acupuncture and moxibustion and integration of acupuncture and medicine are promoted. He is especially skilled at slow twisting needle insertion, Taiji needling therapy, scalp acupuncture and moxibustion with a herb prepared thread of Zhuang nationality, which all achieve remarkable effects.

  18. Adjunctive magnesium sulfate infusion does not alter metabolic changes associated with ritodrine tocolysis.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, J E; Holbrook, R H; Stevenson, D K; Hensleigh, P A; Kredentser, D

    1987-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate, an agent whose cellular actions might cause metabolic disturbances, has been used concomitantly with ritodrine hydrochloride for preterm labor tocolysis. Although the profound metabolic effects of beta-adrenergic agents have been well described, the possibility that adjunctive magnesium might cause further or unexpected alterations in maternal metabolic parameters has not been fully evaluated. To investigate this question, we prospectively randomized patients, in a blinded fashion, to receive ritodrine plus placebo or ritodrine plus adjunctive magnesium sulfate for preterm labor tocolysis. Serial measurements of potassium, glucose, blood urea nitrogen, and hematocrit were obtained and compared between tocolytic treatment groups. The metabolic changes found were similar in each group and appear to result predominantly from beta-adrenergic stimulation with no apparent perturbations caused by the direct cellular actions of magnesium sulfate. From the metabolic standpoint, it appears that the clinician may use adjunctive magnesium sulfate without fear of accentuating or obscuring the expected beta-adrenergic-induced alterations in the above-mentioned maternal metabolic parameters. PMID:3541613

  19. Adjunctive and Long-Acting Nanoformulated Antiretroviral Therapies for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gendelman, Howard E.; Gelbard, Harris A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review focuses on current and future strategies to modulate neuroinflammation while reducing residual viral burden in the central nervous system (CNS). This has been realized by targeted long acting antiretroviral nano- and adjunctive therapies being developed for HIV infected people. Our ultimate goal is to eliminate virus from its CNS reservoirs and, in so doing, reverse the cognitive and motor dysfunctions seen in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Recent findings Herein, we highlight our laboratories development of adjunctive and nanomedicine therapies for HAND. An emphasis is placed on drug-drug interactions that target both the viral life cycle and secretory pro-inflammatory neurotoxic factors and signaling pathways. Summary Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has improved the quality and duration of life for people living with HIV-1. A significant long-term comorbid illness is HAND. Symptoms, while reduced in severity, are common. Disease occurs, in part, through continued low-level viral replication inducing secondary glial neuroinflammatory activities. Our recent works and those of others have seen disease attenuated in animal models through the use of adjunctive and long-acting reservoir targeted nanoformulated ART. The translation of these inventions from animals to humans is the focus of this review. PMID:25226025

  20. Use of wild Lactobacillus strains in an adjunct culture for a Roncal-type cheese.

    PubMed

    Ortigos, María; Arizcun, Cristina; Torre, Paloma; Izco, Jesús María

    2005-05-01

    The effect of an added adjunct culture consisting of facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli (FHL) on the volatile compounds and sensory characteristics of a Spanish ewes'-milk cheese was examined. Three cheese batches were prepared using a commercial starter, one from raw milk, another from pasteurized milk, and a third from pasteurized milk with an added culture of wild Lactobacillus. paracasei+Lb. plantarum. Analysis of the volatile compounds was carried out by the purge and trap method and gas chromatography with a mass spectrometer and disclosed a total of 86 compounds belonging to the chemical families hydrocarbons, fatty acids, esters, ketones, aldehydes, and alcohols. After ageing for 120 and 240 days, the cheese samples underwent sensory analysis by a panel of expert assessors. The attributes evaluated were characteristic odour and odour intensity and characteristic aroma and aroma intensity. Pasteurization of the milk had an effect on the formation of certain volatile compounds, adversely affecting the characteristic flavour of the cheese. Use of the adjunct culture in addition to the commercial starter improved the flavour of the cheese made from the pasteurized milk, which earned sensory scores similar to those awarded to the cheese made from the raw milk. Use of adjunct cultures consisting of indigenous FHL strains could help to conserve the traditional characteristics of Roncal cheese made from pasteurized milk, although some technical adjustments to the Regulations would be needed.

  1. Zonisamide for Bipolar Depression: A Randomized, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Adjunctive Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dauphinais, Deborah; Knable, Michael; Rosenthal, Joshua; Polanski, Mark; Rosenthal, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Objective This is the first multicenter, double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adjunctive zonisamide for the treatment of bipolar depression. Experimental design One hundred two patients with bipolar disorder, type I or II in the depressed phase of illness were randomized to either adjunctive zonisamide or placebo. The study consisted of three phases, a 7 to 30 day screening and stabilization phase, 6 weeks of blinded treatment and a 1 to 3 week discontinuation phase. MADRS score was the primary outcome variable. Secondary outcome measures included the YMRS, CGI-S, CGI-I, Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q), and an a priori analysis of response and remission. Metabolic parameters including weight, waist-hip ratio, body mass index, fasting glucose, cholesterol and triglyceride levels were also evaluated. Side effects were measured using the SAFTEE. Principal observations There were no statistically significant differences in response between subjects treated with adjunctive zonisamide vs. placebo controls for the primary or secondary outcome measures. There were also no differences between the groups with regard to response rate or remission rate. Conclusions In contrast to preliminary open label studies that suggested a role for zonisamide in bipolar depression, we could not confirm these results in a large double blind controlled study.

  2. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... meals, medication management or assistance, bathing, dressing and transportation. Some residents may have memory disorders including Alzheimer's, ... served in a common dining area Housekeeping services Transportation 24-hour security Exercise and wellness programs Personal ...

  3. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recreational activities Security Transportation How to Choose a Facility A good match between a facility and a resident's needs depends as much on the philosophy and services of the assisted living facility as it does on the quality of care. ...

  4. Financial Assistance

    MedlinePlus

    Health care can be costly. If you have health insurance, it usually pays at least part of your medical costs. If you don't have insurance or need help with costs that aren't covered, financial assistance ...

  5. Cellular fatty acid composition as an adjunct to the identification of asporogenous, aerobic gram-positive rods.

    PubMed

    Bernard, K A; Bellefeuille, M; Ewan, E P

    1991-01-01

    Cellular fatty acid (CFA) compositions of 561 asporogenous, aerobic gram-positive rods were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography as an adjunct to their identification when grown on blood agar at 35 degrees C. The organisms could be divided into two groups. In the first group (branched-chain type), which included coryneform CDC groups A-3, A-4, and A-5; some strains of B-1 and B-3; "Corynebacterium aquaticum"; Brevibacterium liquefaciens; Rothia dentocariosa; and Listeria spp., the rods had sizable quantities of antiesopentadecanoic (Ca15:0) and anteisoheptadecanoic (Ca17:0) acids. Other species with these types of CFA included B. acetylicum, which contained large amounts of isotridecanoic (Ci13:0) and anteisotridecanoic (Ca13:0) acids. CFAs useful for distinguishing among Jonesia denitrificans, Oerskovia spp., some strains of CDC groups B-1 and B-3, Kurthia spp., and Propionibacterium avidum were hexadecanoic (C 16:0) acid, isopentadecanoic (Ci15:0) acid, and Ca15:0). The second group (straight-chained type), which included Actinomyces pyogenes; Arcanobacterium haemolyticum; C. bovis; C. cystitidis; C. diphtheriae; C. flavescens, "C. gentalium"; C. jeikeium; C. kutscheri; C. matruchotii; C .minutissimum; C. mycetoides; C. pilosum; C. pseudodiphtheriticum; "C. pseudogenitalium"; C. pseudotuberculosis; C. renale; CDC groups 1, 2, ANF-1, D-2, E, F-1, F-2, G-1, G-2, and I-2; C. striatum; "C. tuberculostearicum"; C. ulcerans; C. vitarumen; C. xerosis; and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, was typified by significant quantities of hexadecanoic (C16:0) and oleic acids (C18:cis9), with differences in the amounts of linoleic acid (C18:2), stearic acid (C18:0), an unnamed peak (equivalent chain length, 14.966), and small quantities of other known saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. CFA composition of these organisms was sufficiently discriminatory to assist in classification but could not be used as the sole means of identification.

  6. Using A Facebook Group As An Adjunct To A Pilot mHealth Physical Activity Intervention: A Mixed Methods Approach.

    PubMed

    Pumper, Megan A; Mendoza, Jason A; Arseniev-Koehler, Alina; Holm, Matthew; Waite, Alan; Moreno, Megan A

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, most adolescents do not obtain the recommended amounts of physical activity for optimal health. Around 80% of adolescents own a mobile device, and social media is frequently used by adolescents on mobile devices. Few studies have examined the use of social media as part of an intervention to promote physical activity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a Facebook group as part of a mHealth physical activity intervention trial. Adolescents, ages 14-18 years, were recruited for a four week physical activity intervention using the FitBit Flex. Participants were also given the option to join a private Facebook group where they could interact and were given badges for fitness accomplishments. The research assistant moderator posted on the Facebook group an average of 25.3 times (SD=7.2). Post-intervention, participants completed a phone interview about their experience. Of 30 intervention participants (avg age 16.0 (SD=1.1), 60.0% female), 17 opted to join the Facebook group (avg age 16.3 (SD=1.2), 47.0% female) of which 10 completed a qualitative interview. Participants averaged 4.9 interactions (SD=8.7) on the Facebook group wall throughout the intervention. From the interview responses, major themes included enjoying the badge feature of the Facebook group and wanting more content and interaction. In conclusion, participants used and enjoyed having the Facebook group, particularly the badge feature of the group, as an adjunct to the physical activity intervention.

  7. Effect of adjuncts on sensory properties and consumer liking of Scamorza cheese.

    PubMed

    Braghieri, A; Piazzolla, N; Romaniello, A; Paladino, F; Ricciardi, A; Napolitano, F

    2015-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of a peptidolytic adjunct (Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus helveticus, and Lactobacillus paracasei), as a tool to accelerate ripening, on sensory properties and acceptability of Scamorza cheese obtained using 2 types of milk (Friesian and Friesian+Jersey) and Streptococcus thermophilus as primary starter. A 10-member panel was trained using a specific frame of references and used a specific vocabulary to assess cheese sensory properties through quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA), whereas 87 consumers were used to evaluate product acceptability. Analysis of variance showed that milk type did not markedly alter cheese sensory properties. Conversely, panelists perceived higher intensities of butter, saltiness, and sweetness flavors in cheese without adjunct culture (ST), whereas the addition of the adjunct culture (ST+A) induced higher and sourness flavors, oiliness and grainy textures, and lower adhesiveness, moisture, springiness, and tenderness. Principal component analysis showed positive relationships between pH and tenderness, sweetness and saltiness and a negative correlation between pH and grainy, oiliness, color and structure uniformity, sourness, and milk. Most of the differences observed in QDA and most of the relationships observed in the principal component analysis were linked to the higher microbial activity induced by the adjunct culture. Independently of milk and starter types, consumers perceived Scamorza cheese as characterized by a good eating quality (mean liking scores were all above the neutral point of the hedonic scale). Although ST cheeses showed higher values for overall liking, 2 homogeneous groups of consumers were identified using partial least squares regression analysis. One group preferred ST cheeses with higher levels of tenderness, adhesiveness, springiness, and moisture in terms of texture, butter in terms of flavor, and sweetness in terms of taste, whereas a second group

  8. Effect of adjuncts on sensory properties and consumer liking of Scamorza cheese.

    PubMed

    Braghieri, A; Piazzolla, N; Romaniello, A; Paladino, F; Ricciardi, A; Napolitano, F

    2015-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of a peptidolytic adjunct (Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus helveticus, and Lactobacillus paracasei), as a tool to accelerate ripening, on sensory properties and acceptability of Scamorza cheese obtained using 2 types of milk (Friesian and Friesian+Jersey) and Streptococcus thermophilus as primary starter. A 10-member panel was trained using a specific frame of references and used a specific vocabulary to assess cheese sensory properties through quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA), whereas 87 consumers were used to evaluate product acceptability. Analysis of variance showed that milk type did not markedly alter cheese sensory properties. Conversely, panelists perceived higher intensities of butter, saltiness, and sweetness flavors in cheese without adjunct culture (ST), whereas the addition of the adjunct culture (ST+A) induced higher and sourness flavors, oiliness and grainy textures, and lower adhesiveness, moisture, springiness, and tenderness. Principal component analysis showed positive relationships between pH and tenderness, sweetness and saltiness and a negative correlation between pH and grainy, oiliness, color and structure uniformity, sourness, and milk. Most of the differences observed in QDA and most of the relationships observed in the principal component analysis were linked to the higher microbial activity induced by the adjunct culture. Independently of milk and starter types, consumers perceived Scamorza cheese as characterized by a good eating quality (mean liking scores were all above the neutral point of the hedonic scale). Although ST cheeses showed higher values for overall liking, 2 homogeneous groups of consumers were identified using partial least squares regression analysis. One group preferred ST cheeses with higher levels of tenderness, adhesiveness, springiness, and moisture in terms of texture, butter in terms of flavor, and sweetness in terms of taste, whereas a second group

  9. What New and Adjunct Faculty Need to Know about Exams, Grades, and Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berschback, Rick

    2011-01-01

    College professors often regard their time in the classroom fulfilling and rewarding; the chance to affect the academic and professional development of their students is most likely a key reason why they chose to be professional educators. Unfortunately, with college courses come college credits, which necessitate a course grade for each student,…

  10. The Gresham Professors of Astronomy 1597-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrimplin, V.

    2016-01-01

    Gresham College is named after Sir Thomas Gresham (1519-1579), an English merchant and financier who worked for the four key Tudor monarchs, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I. He studied at Cambridge before going to Antwerp where he was a merchant as well as the financial agent of the crown—negotiating loans, and procuring funds and goods. Gresham also acted as ambassador and was well rewarded with a salary, lands, and a knighthood in 1559, becoming one of the richest men in England. Sadly, Sir Thomas's only son and legitimate heir died in 1564. As a result he left his vast fortune to the Corporation of London and the Mercers' Company for the purpose of founding a College in London. Seven professors were to be appointed to read lectures daily—in various subjects including astronomy. The first Gresham professor of astronomy (predating chairs in astronomy at Oxford and Cambridge) was appointed in 1597 and a continuous line of professors—and their lectures—has taken place ever since, up to the present day when lectures are both free and open to the public in London as well as being recorded and available globally via the internet.

  11. Puddles, parties, and professors: linking word categorization to neural patterns of visuospatial coding.

    PubMed

    Quadflieg, Susanne; Etzel, Joset A; Gazzola, Valeria; Keysers, Christian; Schubert, Thomas W; Waiter, Gordon D; Macrae, C Neil

    2011-10-01

    Behavioral evidence suggests that during word processing people spontaneously map object, valence, and power information to locations in vertical space. Specifically, whereas "overhead" (e.g., attic), positive (e.g., party), and powerful nouns (e.g., professor) are associated with "up," "underfoot" (e.g., carpet), negative (e.g., accident), and powerless nouns (e.g., assistant) are associated with "down." What has yet to be elucidated, however, is the precise nature of these effects. To explore this issue, an fMRI experiment was undertaken, during which participants were required to categorize the position in which geometrical shapes appeared on a computer screen (i.e., upper or lower part of the display). In addition, they also judged a series of words with regard to location (i.e., up vs. down), valence (i.e., good vs. bad), and power (i.e., powerful vs. powerless). Using multivoxel pattern analysis, it was found that classifiers that successfully distinguished between the positions of shapes in subregions of the inferior parietal lobe also provided discriminatory information to separate location and valence, but not power word judgments. Correlational analyses further revealed that, for location words, pattern transfer was more successful the stronger was participants' propensity to use visual imagery. These findings indicate that visual coding and conceptual processing can elicit common representations of verticality but that divergent mechanisms may support the reported effects.

  12. Hearing Assistive Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public / Hearing and Balance Hearing Assistive Technology Hearing Assistive Technology: FM Systems | Infrared Systems | Induction ... Assistive Technology Systems Solutions What are hearing assistive technology systems (HATS)? Hearing assistive technology systems (HATS) are ...

  13. Physical activity status of academic professors during their early career transition: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Megan A; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2012-01-01

    Life-transitions (e.g. parenthood) have been linked to physical inactivity, yet the topic requires further exploration. In this study, we evaluated changes in the physical activity (PA) of adults during their early career transition using retrospective analysis and the theory of planned behavior. Recruitment from January to March 2010 yielded a random sample of 267 assistant professors, ages 25-44, employed within the last five years. Repeated measures analysis of variance (RM ANOVA) concluded that PA declined across the transition (d = 0.36-0.43) and was further attenuated by marriage, work hours, and parenthood status. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) identified specific behavioral and control correlates about PA enjoyment, limited time, inconsistent schedule, work demands, and job pressures to distinguish between those who remained active from those who did not across the transition. PA interventions administered prior to career transitions may be needed to prevent physical inactivity.

  14. Physical activity status of academic professors during their early career transition: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Megan A; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2012-01-01

    Life-transitions (e.g. parenthood) have been linked to physical inactivity, yet the topic requires further exploration. In this study, we evaluated changes in the physical activity (PA) of adults during their early career transition using retrospective analysis and the theory of planned behavior. Recruitment from January to March 2010 yielded a random sample of 267 assistant professors, ages 25-44, employed within the last five years. Repeated measures analysis of variance (RM ANOVA) concluded that PA declined across the transition (d = 0.36-0.43) and was further attenuated by marriage, work hours, and parenthood status. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) identified specific behavioral and control correlates about PA enjoyment, limited time, inconsistent schedule, work demands, and job pressures to distinguish between those who remained active from those who did not across the transition. PA interventions administered prior to career transitions may be needed to prevent physical inactivity. PMID:22348598

  15. An Interview with Janet W. Lerner: Observations on a Career and the Evolving Field of Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giacobbe, Alice C.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Janet W. Lerner, professor emerita of special education at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Lerner also serves as an adjunct professor in the Professional Assistant Center for Education (PACE) for Young Adults with Multiple Learning Disabilities at National Louis University and as…

  16. Is it time to retire the A.V. Hill Model?: A rebuttal to the article by Professor Roy Shephard.

    PubMed

    Noakes, Timothy D

    2011-04-01

    Recent publications by Emeritus Professor Roy Shephard propose that a "small group of investigators who have argued repeatedly (over the past 13 years) for a 'Central Governor'," should now either "Put up or shut up." Failing this, their 'hypothesis' should be 'consigned to the bottom draw for future reference'; but Professor Shephard's arguments are contradictory. Thus, in different sections of his article, Professor Shephard explains: why there is no need for a brain to regulate exercise performance; why there is no proof that the brain regulates exercise performance; and why the brain's proven role in the regulation of exercise performance is already so well established that additional comment and research is unnecessary. Hence, "The higher centres of an endurance athlete … call forth an initial effort … at a level where a minimal accumulation of lactate in the peripheral muscles is sensed." Furthermore, "a variety of standard texts have illustrated the many mutually redundant feedback loops (to the nervous system) that limit exercise." Yet, the figure from Professor Shephard's 1982 textbook does not contain any links between the nervous system, "many mutually redundant feedback loops" and skeletal muscle. This disproves his contradictory claims that although there is neither any need for, nor any proof of, any role of the brain in the regulation of exercise performance, the physiological mechanisms for this (non-existent) control were already well established in 1982. In contrast, the Central Governor Model (CGM) developed by our "small group … in a single laboratory" after 1998, provides a simple and unique explanation of how 'redundant feedback loops' can assist in the regulation of exercise behaviour. In this rebuttal to his article, I identify (i) the numerous contradictions included in Professor Shephard's argument; (ii) the real meaning of the facts that he presents; (iii) the importance of the evidence that he ignores; and (iv) the different

  17. Professor Lesley Parker: a science educator writ large

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahle, Jane Butler

    2011-09-01

    Professor Lesley Parker's career has moved from teaching and advising graduate students at Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia to leadership roles and advocacy positions in state and national governments and in international organizations. Throughout her distinguished career, she has been committed to social justice, particularly in gender equity. Indeed, that commitment infuses her professional contributions as teacher, advisor, administrator, and policy maker. In this Key Contribution, many of her colleagues describe their admiration for her as well as provide information that helps the reader place her work in a national and an international perspective. She has received many of Australia's highest honors, and she continues to contribute to her university, her state, and her nation. Her contributions form a lasting legacy in social justice, particularly in gender equity and in educational leadership.

  18. Tribute to Professor Anthony J. McMichael

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Ashwin; Lucas, Robyn M.; Harley, David

    2014-01-01

    Emeritus Professor A. J. “Tony” McMichael (1942–2014) was an internationally renowned and pioneering Australian academic and advocate in epidemiology, who was passionate about understanding the influences of the environment on human health. In an illustrious career spanning more than four decades, he made significant contributions to the scientific community and policy discourse—including ground-breaking research related to the health of children. McMichael was a prolific academic writer with over 300 peer-reviewed papers; 160 book chapters and two sole-authored books. However, his outstanding talent was for integrating complex and seemingly unrelated strands from the environmental and health sciences into a cohesive narrative—and highlighting its relevance to lay persons, scientists and governments alike. He was instrumental in validating this nascent field of research and inspiring many others to follow his lead. PMID:27417490

  19. About Hydrotechnical Laboratory, Professor Smorodinsky, and Nucleon-Nucleon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryndin, R. M.

    2013-06-01

    Yakov Abramovich Smorodinsky... memory brings me back to those far-off days when we first met in March 1952. We saw each other for the first time at the Hydrotechnical Laboratory (GTL) of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, , where I obtained a position after graduation from The Physics Department of Leningrad State University. Already a well known professor, Yakov Abramovich (Ya.A.) was only eleven years older than me, a beginning physicist. Today, I would say that we were almost of the same age. We immediately liked each other, and worked closely together for 18 years until I moved back to St. Petersburg, at that time Leningrad, of course. I learned a lot from Ya.A. during those years: his intrinsic desire and ability to share his knowledge was a peculiarity of his talent...

  20. Dental Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide, developed for use in dental assistant education programs in Michigan, describes a task-based curriculum that can help a teacher to develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. It is based on task analysis and reflects the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that employers expect entry-level dental…

  1. Professor Ludwik Rydygier father and legend of Polish surgery.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, K

    2011-02-01

    Ludwik Rydygier is undoubtedly the father of Polish gastrointestinal surgery. He performed two pioneering stomach operations: on 16 November 1880, first in Poland and second in the world after Jules Pean, the surgical removal of the pylorus in a 64-year-old patient suffering from stomach cancer; the operation took about four hours, unfortunately the patient died 12 hours later, and on 21 November 1881 he performed the world's first pylorectomy due to gastric ulcer, applying his own method of pylorectomy followed by the restoration by end-to-end anastomosis of the duodenal stump with the stomach stump; the patient survived the operation and recovered. Three years later, Rydygier introduced a new method of surgical treatment of peptic ulcer disease by means of gastroenterostomy. This review was designed to commemorate the outstanding achievements of Professor Rydygier, who worked at two universities: at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow, and at the Lemberg (Lviv) University. He was one of the founders of the Association of Polish Surgeons and an organizer of the first Meeting of Polish Surgeons in 1889. He was the author of over 200 published papers and several text-books on surgical infections, surgical techniques, orthopaedics and traumatology, urology, neurosurgery, and gynaecology. Professor Ludwik Rydygier possessed comprehensive knowledge of surgery and other medical disciplines, he was a courageous surgeon and skilled operator, being at the same time an extremely gifted organizer. His promotion to the rank of General of Polish Army crowned his credits for country's defence. At the anniversary of 90 years after his death, Polish surgeons pay the tribute to their mentor. PMID:21451218

  2. A Comparison of Mathematics Teachers' and Professors' Views on Secondary Preparation for Tertiary Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Carol; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.; Hazari, Zahra; Watson, Charity

    2016-01-01

    This article compares the views of teachers and professors about the transition from secondary mathematics to tertiary calculus. Quantitative analysis revealed five categories where teachers and professors differed significantly in the relative frequency of addressing them. Using the rite of passage theory, the separation and incorporation phases…

  3. The Overseas Activities of Professors of Educational Administration, 1970-1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Robert E.; Boyle, David T.

    Forty-four professors of educational administration who had participated in the Overseas Clearinghouse file, a self-reporting of information about other nations, were surveyed about their activities. The instrument inquired about what professors were doing in terms of research, teaching, or consulting and how these tasks were being supported.…

  4. When Professors Create Software, Do They Own It, or Do Their Colleges?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Scott

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the legal problem of whether professors themselves or their colleges own faculty-created software. Questions center on whether software is like traditional scholarly publishing (thus owned by the professor) or more like an invention or work for hire (and thus owned by the university). Also addresses copyright issues, the use of college…

  5. Understanding Chemistry Professors' Use of Educational Technologies: An Activity Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahveci, Ajda; Gilmer, Penny J.; Southerland, Sherry A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the influences on chemistry professors' use of educational technology. For this, we use activity theory to focus on two university chemistry professors and the broader activity system in which they work. We analyse their beliefs and past experiences related to teaching, learning, and technology as well as…

  6. Influences on Women Counseling Psychology Associate Professors' Decisions regarding Pursuit of Full Professorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruitt, Nathan T.; Johnson, Adanna J.; Catlin, Lynn; Knox, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Twelve women tenured as associate professors in American Psychological Association--accredited counseling psychology doctoral programs were interviewed regarding their pursuit of promotion to full professor. Interview data were analyzed using a modified version of consensual qualitative research. Most participants indicated a strong desire to be…

  7. College Professors' Perceptions of and Responses to Relational Aggression in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fifield, Andrea Owens

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of selected factors on professors' responses to relational aggression in college students. Specifically, this study explored the relationships between professors' gender, class size, level of empathy, ratings of seriousness of a relationally aggressive scenario, the gender of the perpetrator…

  8. Researching and Teaching Social Issues: The Personal Stories and Pedagogical Efforts of Professors of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totten, Samuel; Pedersen, Jon E.

    2005-01-01

    In the United States, there is a long and rich tradition of professors of education addressing, in one way or another, the vital link between social issues and the educational process. This book is comprised of original personal essays in which noted professors of education of the last half of the twentieth century delineate the genesis and…

  9. A Tech-Happy Professor Reboots after Hearing His Teaching Advice Isn't Working

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Michael Wesch has been on the lecture circuit for years touting new models of active teaching with technology. The associate professor of cultural anthropology at Kansas State University has given TED talks. "Wired" magazine gave him a Rave Award. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching once named him a national professor of the…

  10. Evaluating the Absent Presence: The Professor's Body at Tenure and Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisanick, Christina

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author addresses how the professor's body is perceived and how those perceptions influence promotion and tenure decisions. She observes that many writers have argued that the "normal professor body" is white, male, middle-class, middle-aged, able, heterosexual, and thin, which also describes the "normal body" in American…

  11. "I Have Work To Do": Affirmation and Marginalization of Women Full Professors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamrick, Florence A.

    This study examined the work roles and events that signified affirmation or marginalization among female full professors at a research university. Semistructured interviews conducted with 26 female full professors at Iowa State University covered questions in four primary areas: promotion and tenure experiences, institutional citizenship and…

  12. Online Student Evaluation of Teaching: Will Professor "Hot and Easy" Win the Day?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Michael A.; Fleck, Bethany

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative content analysis of student comments on RateMyProfessors.com (RMP) identified the characteristics of professors rated as "good," "average," and "poor." Comments contained instructor characteristics consistent with prior research on the qualities of effective and ineffective college teachers. To better understand how students might…

  13. The Relationships among Teacher Immediacy, Professor/Student Rapport, and Self-Regulated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estepp, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships among teacher immediacy, professor/student rapport, and student self-regulated learning among selected undergraduate students in a college of agriculture. The independent variables for this study were verbal and nonverbal immediacy and professor/student rapport. The dependent variable in…

  14. Community Commitment and Activist Scholarship: "Chicana/o" Professors and the Practice of Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrieta, Luis, Jr.; Mendez Benavidez, Lina R.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we explored 12 "Chicana/o" Professors of Education's sense making about their role in the academy in terms of community commitments, activist scholarship, and practices of consciousness. Consciously exercising their agency, for these "Chicana/o" professors was not only in reaction to White dominance in the academy, but also in…

  15. Cal State-Long Beach Heeds Call to Investigate Professors' Online Biographies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that an essay by a film professor at California State University at Long Beach that questions the credentials of his colleagues is stirring controversy on the campus--and sparking investigations. The essay, written by Brian Alan Lane, an associate professor of film, accuses three of his colleagues in the department of film and…

  16. Perception and Experience of Transformative Learning and Faculty Authenticity among North American Professors of Christian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Hokyung Paul

    2012-01-01

    Through convenient purposeful sampling, 16 professors from North American Professors of Christian Education were recruited for this study. Through consulting key personnel in NAPCE a pool of participants were attained (n = 16). The findings from the research study revealed the elements contributing to the way that participants experienced and…

  17. (Re)Defining Departure: Exploring Black Professors' Experiences with and Responses to Racism and Racial Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Kimberly A.; Pifer, Meghan J.; Humphrey, Jordan R.; Hazelwood, Ashley M.

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of research demonstrates that many college environments present challenges for black professors, particularly as they face institutional and personal racism. While scholars have linked these experiences to their attrition, this qualitative study explores black professors' larger range of responses to difficult professional…

  18. Denial of Academic Freedom to Professors of Religion: A History of AAUP Complicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Gary

    The American Association of University Professors' (AAUP) support for the right of institutions to deny academic freedom to professors of religion is traced historically. It is suggested AAUP would not likely censor an institution that chose to restrain heretical opinions, although this position conflicts with AAUP's strong support for open…

  19. Two Oxford science professors, F. Soddy and J. S. E. Townsend.

    PubMed

    Bleaney, B

    2002-01-01

    Recounts some anecdotes about Frederick Soddy (1877-1956), a professor of chemistry at Oxford University between 1919 and 1936, and Sir John Townsend (1868-1957), Wykeham Professor of Physics at Oxford between 1900 and 1941. The anecdotes flesh out the human portraits of the two scientists, indicating, among other things, Soddy's capacity for intellectual quarrels and Townsend's sometimes forgetful nature.

  20. In the Midst of Their Journeys: Professors' Reports of Transitions in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langenegger, Joyce A.

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive study focused on the ways college and university professors described their transition process from reliance on traditional teaching strategies to the integration of nontraditional teaching methods in their classrooms. Study participants included 24 community college and university professors from 6 institutions in the…

  1. Enabling Possibility: Women Associate Professors' Sense of Agency in Career Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terosky, Aimee LaPointe; O'Meara, KerryAnn; Campbell, Corbin M.

    2014-01-01

    In this multimethod, qualitative study we examined associate women professors' sense of agency in career advancement from the rank of associate to full. Defining agency as strategic perspectives or actions toward goals that matter to the professor, we explore the perceptions of what helps and/or hinders a sense of agency in career advancement. Our…

  2. A New Approach to Faculty-Librarian Collaboration: A ''New Professors' Fund'' for Collection Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horava, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The University of Ottawa implemented a "New Professors" Fund as a targeted strategy for establishing a collaborative relationship between new faculty and librarians. An amount of $2000 per professor was earmarked for selection. The rationale, process, and outcomes of the initiative are described. The impact on collection development is explored.

  3. Chemistry Professors' Descriptions of the Impact of Research Engagement on Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hua, Olivia; Shore, Bruce M.

    2014-01-01

    Professors endorse a symbiotic relationship between research and teaching, but empirical evidence supporting this relationship is inconsistent. Many studies operationalized research and teaching too narrowly to detect the believed relationship. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 27 chemistry professors from a large…

  4. Conceptions and Images of Mathematics Professors on Teaching Mathematics in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pehkonen, Erkki

    1999-01-01

    Clarifies what kind of mathematical beliefs are conveyed to student teachers during their studies. Interviews mathematics professors (n=7) from five Finnish universities who were responsible for mathematics teacher education. Professors estimated that teachers' basic knowledge was poor and old-fashioned, requiring improvement, and they emphasized…

  5. The Coaching and Mentoring Process: The Obvious Knowledge and Skill Set for Organizational Communication Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stowers, Robert H.; Barker, Randolph T.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the uses of coaching and mentoring as they apply to organizational communication professors. The authors contend that these professors already are proficient at coaching and mentoring and the coaching and mentoring processes are routinely undertaken as part of their standard university teaching responsibilities. As coaches,…

  6. The Relationships between PCK Components: The Case of Quantum Chemistry Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Kira; Van Driel, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to capture the pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of university professors about quantum chemistry. More specifically, we aimed to identify and analyze relationships between specific PCK components, using an adapted version of the model of PCK of Magnusson "et al.". A sample of university professors (n = 6) who teach…

  7. Is Humor an Appreciated Teaching Tool? Perceptions of Professors' Teaching Styles and Use of Humor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torok, Sarah E.; McMorris, Robert F.; Lin, Wen-Chi

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the use of humor in college classrooms. We examined how students perceived professors' uses of various types of humor during class and the types of humor that students and faculty recommend for use in class. We also correlated the way professors incorporated humor into their class lectures with their perceived…

  8. Cognizance of Gifted Education among Elementary-Education Professors from MCREL Member States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlin, Scott A.; Moore, Alan D.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the extent of knowledge professors reported in regards to gifted and talented education. Participants were college professors and instructors (N = 62) from 4-year teacher preparation institutions who taught elementary-education methods classes. All participants were employed in Mid-Continent Research for Education and…

  9. Analysis of Job Satisfaction of University Professors from Nine Chinese Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Ping; Lai, Manhong; Lo, Leslie N. K.

    2010-01-01

    Research on work life and job satisfaction of university professors is becoming an important research issue in the field of higher education. This study used questionnaires administered to 1 770 teachers from different levels, types, and academic fields of Chinese universities to investigate job satisfaction among university professors and the…

  10. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "Are Tenure Track Professors Better Teachers?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    tenured/tenure track professor versus a nontenured/tenure track professor for first-term freshman-level courses (e.g., introductory economics) was associated with whether students enrolled and performed well in future classes in the same subject. The study uses a…

  11. Strategies for Professors Who Service the University to Earn Tenure and Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Ruben; Stokes, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Tenure and promotion are great aspirations for college professors. They are indicators of success in the professions. Universities stipulate in their official documents and numerous higher education publications specify what professors must achieve in order to earn tenure and promotion; which almost always cite effectiveness in teaching, research,…

  12. How REAL Teachers and Professors Learn: Threshold Crossing and Concepts in Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary findings from a study of teacher and professor learning. Using narrative inquiry, the author interviewed expert teachers and examined the process of teacher and professor learning. The study focused on how teachers learn as a form of self-study in informal action research. The study examined (1) the challenges…

  13. Efficacy of Retigabine in Adjunctive Treatment of Partial Onset Seizures in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Splinter, Michele Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate efficacy and tolerability of retigabine (ezogabine, US adopted name) in the adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults. Retigabine is the first anticonvulsant in its class, decreasing neuronal excitability by opening voltage-gated potassium channels. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE were systematically searched using search terms retigabine and ezogabine for randomized controlled trials published from 1980 through August 17, 2013. Additionally, articles relating to pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, tolerability and interactions were examined for inclusion. Published abstracts and websites of the Food and Drug Administration and European Medication Agency were reviewed for additional relevant information. Results One phase IIb and two phase III trials were identified. Retigabine has been reported to have dose dependent efficacy in adjunctive treatment of resistant partial-onset seizures in adults in doses of 600, 900 and 1200 mg/day. Similar to other anticonvulsants, the most common adverse events were central nervous system related. Retigabine has several unique adverse events compared to other anticonvulsants: urinary retention and, with extended use, pigment changes to the skin and retina. Retigabine is metabolized by glucuronidation and acetylation. There are few drug interactions with retigabine. Conclusions Retigabine has been shown to have efficacy when used as adjunctive therapy in partial-onset seizures. It has a novel mechanism of action, activation of voltage-gated potassium channels. It has less drug interactions than many other anticonvulsants because it is not metabolized through the P-450 system. Its place in therapy has yet to be determined, especially with recent reports of pigment discoloration of skin and the retina with extended use. PMID:24250245

  14. Incidence of delayed onset infection after trabeculectomy with adjunctive mitomycin C or 5-fluorouracil treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, K.; Jikihara, S.; Ando, Y.; Hori, N.; Yamamoto, T.; Kitazawa, Y.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—The introduction of the adjunctive use of antiproliferatives to trabeculectomy has greatly improved the success rate of this operation. Trabeculectomy with antiproliferative treatment, however, is usually associated with a cystic and thin walled filtering bleb, which may be more susceptible to infection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence, clinical findings, and risk factors of delayed onset, bleb related infection after trabeculectomy with adjunctive mitomycin C (MMC) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment.
METHODS—The records of 632 glaucoma patients who underwent 966 trabeculectomies, with and without the use of adjunctive MMC or 5-FU treatment, between January 1985 and February 1995 were analysed. The mean follow up period was 3.5 (2.4) years (range 0.1 to 11.2 years). The mean patient age was 54.8 (18.8) years (range 0 to 88 years).
RESULTS—Bleb related infection occurred in one of 76 trabeculectomies that did not receive antiproliferatives (1.3%), three of 228 treated with 5-FU (1.3%) trabeculectomies, and seven of 662 treated with MMC (1.1%). Five eyes developed blebitis; six eyes developed endophthalmitis. Bleb related infection developed an average of 3.1 (1.6) (range 0.4 to 6.0) years after trabeculectomy. All eyes had avascular or hypovascular blebs that were cystic in shape before infection and all eyes had reduced intraocular pressure. Early wound leaks and chronic, intermittent bleb leaks were identified to be risk factors for the bleb related infection.
CONCLUSION—The incidence of delayed onset, bleb related infection after trabeculectomy with antiproliferative treatment is similar to that after trabeculectomy without antiproliferatives.

 PMID:9486030

  15. Web-based support as an adjunct to group-based smoking cessation for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mermelstein, Robin; Turner, Lindsey

    2006-12-01

    Although group-based programs remain the most common treatment approach for adolescent smoking cessation, success rates for these programs have been relatively modest, and their reach may be limited. Web-based adjuncts may be one way to boost the efficacy and reach of group-based approaches. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of enhancing the American Lung Association's Not on Tobacco program (NOT) with a Web-based adjunct (NOT Plus). Twenty-nine high schools were randomly assigned to either the NOT program alone or to the NOT Plus condition, which included access to a specially designed Web site for teens, along with proactive phone calls from the group facilitator to the participant. Self-reported smoking behavior was obtained at end-of-program and at a 3-month follow-up. Using hierarchical linear modeling, accounting for the clustering of students in schools, and controlling for student gender, grade, race, and baseline smoking rate, there was a marginally significant (p=.06) condition effect at end-of-treatment and a significant effect at 3-month follow-up (p<.05) favoring the NOT Plus condition. Approximately 57% of adolescents reported visiting the Web site, and among the NOT Plus condition, use of the Web site was associated with cessation significantly at end-of-program (p<.05), but not at 3 months. Adolescents in urban schools were more likely to access the Web site than those in rural schools. Participants who visited the Web site rated it positively on several dimensions. Reasons for not using the Web site will be discussed, as well as its value as an adjunct.

  16. Web-based support as an adjunct to group-based smoking cessation for adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Mermelstein, Robin; Turner, Lindsey

    2008-01-01

    Although group-based programs remain the most common treatment approach for adolescent smoking cessation, success rates for these programs have been relatively modest, and their reach may be limited. Web-based adjuncts may be one way to boost the efficacy and reach of group-based approaches. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of enhancing the American Lung Association’s Not on Tobacco program (NOT) with a Web-based adjunct (NOT Plus). Twenty-nine high schools were randomly assigned to either the NOT program alone or to the NOT Plus condition, which included access to a specially designed Web site for teens, along with proactive phone calls from the group facilitator to the participant. Self-reported smoking behavior was obtained at end-of-program and at a 3-month follow-up. Using hierarchical linear modeling, accounting for the clustering of students in schools, and controlling for student gender, grade, race, and baseline smoking rate, there was a marginally significant (p = .06) condition effect at end-of-treatment and a significant effect at 3-month follow-up (p < .05) favoring the NOT Plus condition. Approximately 57% of adolescents reported visiting the Web site, and among the NOT Plus condition, use of the Web site was associated with cessation significantly at end-of-program (p < .05), but not at 3 months. Adolescents in urban schools were more likely to access the Web site than those in rural schools. Participants who visited the Web site rated it positively on several dimensions. Reasons for not using the Web site will be discussed, as well as its value as an adjunct. PMID:17491173

  17. Adjunct Antimicrobial Therapy and Periodontal Surgery to Treat Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Irokawa, Daisuke; Makino-Oi, Asako; Fujita, Takahisa; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Tomita, Sachiyo; Saito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a case of generalized aggressive periodontitis treated with periodontal therapy including adjunct antimicrobial therapy and periodontal surgery. The patient was a 22-year-old woman who presented with the chief complaint of gingival recession. Baseline examination revealed generalized plaque deposition and gingival inflammation. Thirty-nine percent of the sites had a probing depth (PD) of 4-6 mm and 2% a PD of ≥7 mm; 63% exhibited bleeding on probing (BOP). Radiographic examination revealed vertical bone loss in the molars and horizontal bone loss in other teeth. Microbiological examination of subgingival plaque revealed the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Tannerella forsythia. Oral health-related quality of life was assessed as a measure of patient-reported outcome. Based on a clinical diagnosis of generalized aggressive periodontitis, initial periodontal therapy and adjunct antimicrobial therapy were implemented. After reducing inflammation and subgingival bacteria, open flap debridement was performed for teeth with a PD of ≥4 mm. Reevaluation showed no sites with a PD of ≥5 mm, a minimal level of BOP, and a marked reduction in the level of the targeted periodontal pathogens. The patient's oral health-related quality of life was slightly worsened during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). Implementation of adjunct antimicrobial therapy targeting periodontal pathogens and subsequent periodontal surgery resulted in improvement in periodontal and microbiological parameters. This improvement has been adequately maintained over a 2-year period. However, additional care is necessary to further improve the patient's oral health-related quality of life during SPT. PMID:27320300

  18. Adjunctive therapy and management of the transition of care in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Feitell, Scott; Hankins, Shelley R; Eisen, Howard J

    2014-02-01

    Heart failure is a costly and difficult disease to treat. However, new metrics make it an imperative to keep these patients out of the hospital. Implementing and maintaining patients on successful treatment plans is difficult. A multitude of factors make transitioning care to the outpatient setting difficult. A careful and well-orchestrated team of cardiologists, general practitioners, nurses, and ancillary support staff can make an important difference to patient care. A strong body of literature supports the use of pharmacologic therapy, and evidence-based therapies can improve mortality and quality of life, and reduce hospital admissions. Adjunctive therapies can be equally important. PMID:24286587

  19. Rufinamide: a pharmacoeconomic profile of its use as adjunctive therapy in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Paul L

    2012-03-01

    Rufinamide (Inovelon®), a triazole derivative, is an oral antiepileptic drug approved in the EU as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) in patients aged ≥4 years. The efficacy of oral rufinamide as adjunctive therapy in patients with LGS uncontrolled on one to three concomitant antiepileptic drugs was demonstrated in a pivotal, 12-week, randomized, double-blind trial. Rufinamide significantly reduced the 28-day frequency of both drop attacks and total seizures compared with placebo, and significantly increased the proportions of patients experiencing a ≥50% reduction in each seizure frequency. A significantly higher proportion of rufinamide than placebo recipients recorded an improvement in seizure severity at the end of treatment. Reductions in the frequency of drop attacks and total seizures were maintained in a long-term (up to 3 years), open-label extension study. Oral rufinamide was generally well tolerated in patients with LGS. Somnolence and vomiting were the most common adverse events occurring more frequently with rufinamide than with placebo. Two pharmacoeconomic analyses, using decision-analysis models with 3-month cycles over a time horizon of 3 years, assessed the cost effectiveness and cost utility, respectively, of rufinamide compared with topiramate and lamotrigine as adjunctive therapy in patients with LGS from the perspective of the UK NHS. The cost-effectiveness analysis suggested that rufinamide would be associated with incremental costs of £62 (drop attacks) or £2151 (total seizures) per 1% increase in the number of patients achieving a >50% reduction in seizure frequency over 3 years. The cost-utility analysis predicted that the incremental cost per QALY gained for rufinamide compared with the next less-costly and undominated therapy would be more than 5-fold higher than the commonly accepted willingness-to-pay threshold range in the UK. In conclusion, the available

  20. Adjunctive Treatment in Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma: How Should We Approach Recurrence?

    PubMed

    Scholfield, Daniel W; Brundler, Marie-Anne; McDermott, Ann-Louise; Mussai, Francis; Kearns, Pamela

    2016-04-01

    A recent case of advanced, recurrent juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) at our institution has highlighted the limited evidence regarding adjunctive treatment. We present the case of a 10-year-old boy who is the first to undergo multiple-staged surgical resections alongside vincristine treatment. We performed a review of the literature analyzing the roles of radiation therapy, cytotoxic drugs, and novel targeted agents in JNA relapse. Small cohort studies suggest radiotherapy and flutamide are the most rational treatment options for residual and recurrent JNA. Our review highlights the need for further research into the management of primary and recurrent JNA. PMID:26907644

  1. Aberration correction for transcranial photoacoustic tomography of primates employing adjunct image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao; Nie, Liming; Schoonover, Robert W.; Guo, Zijian; Schirra, Carsten O.; Anastasio, Mark A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-06-01

    A challenge in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) brain imaging is to compensate for aberrations in the measured photoacoustic data due to their propagation through the skull. By use of information regarding the skull morphology and composition obtained from adjunct x-ray computed tomography image data, we developed a subject-specific imaging model that accounts for such aberrations. A time-reversal-based reconstruction algorithm was employed with this model for image reconstruction. The image reconstruction methodology was evaluated in experimental studies involving phantoms and monkey heads. The results establish that our reconstruction methodology can effectively compensate for skull-induced acoustic aberrations and improve image fidelity in transcranial PAT.

  2. Beta 2-adrenergic agonist as adjunct therapy to levodopa in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, G M; Schwartzman, R J; Nukes, T A; Grothusen, J R; Hooker, M D

    1994-08-01

    We studied the effect of the beta 2-adrenergic agonist albuterol on Parkinson's disease (PD) patients receiving chronic levodopa treatment. The albuterol-treated patients demonstrated reduced parkinsonian symptoms and an increased ability to tap their index finger between two points 20 cm apart, and were able to perform a "walk test" in 70% of their control time. Three patients currently on chronic albuterol therapy still show amelioration of their parkinsonian symptoms, and two have reduced their daily levodopa dose. This study suggests that beta 2-adrenergic agonists as adjunct therapy to levodopa may be beneficial in PD.

  3. Candida kefyr as a cause of bloodstream infection and adjunctive role of biomarkers in its diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z; Ahmad, S; Al-Obaid, K; Joseph, L; Chandy, R

    2015-03-01

    A rare case of bloodstream infection caused by Candida kefyr is described. The diagnosis was established by repeatedly isolating the yeast in blood cultures and by detecting C. kefyr-specific DNA in serum samples. Demonstration of elevated serum levels of β-D-glucan and Candida mannan also provided additional diagnostic evidence. The identity of the isolates was confirmed by PCR sequencing of the ITS region of rDNA. This is the first report of C. kefyr candidemia from Kuwait and the Middle East. The report highlights emerging clinical significance of rare Candida spp. in etiology of candidemia and reinforces the adjunctive role of biomarkers in diagnosis.

  4. Evaluation of Occipitocervical Arthrodesis Rates with Screw-based Fixation and Osteoinductive Fusion Adjuncts.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jeremy G; Panczykowski, David M; Tempel, Zachary J; Tormenti, Matthew; Kanter, Adam S; Okonkwo, David O

    2015-09-01

    Occipitocervical (OC) instability may be associated with neurologic impairment and even death. There is a paucity of research on the rate of arthrodesis utilizing modern screw-based constructs coupled with adjuvant osteoinductive agents. We reviewed our experience with OC constructs and compared the fusion rate, functional outcome, and rate of adverse events between recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, autologous iliac crest bone graft (ICBG), a combination of BMP and ICBG, and local bone autograft alone. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of all adult admissions for operative treatment of OC instability utilizing segmental screw-based constructs for OC arthrodesis between January 2003 and September 2012. Data concerning demographic characteristics, diagnostic and procedural details, radiographic pathology, and clinical course were abstracted from medical records. The primary end point was evidence of stable fixation and osseous union on either dynamic lateral radiographs or computed tomography (CT) imaging at most recent follow-up. Secondary end points included functional outcome as determined by Nurick scale and Neck disability index (NDI) at ≥ 1year postoperation, as well as perioperative morbidity and mortality at 30 days and 3 months. During the study period, 94 patients (mean age: 62 ± 18 years) underwent OC fixation with segmental screw-based constructs. The four fusion adjunct cohorts analyzed included local autograft alone (32%), ICBG (41%), BMP (14%), or a combination of ICBG and BMP (14%). Notably, demineralized bone matrix was also used in 61% of cases overall, but its use did not differ significantly among the four cohorts (p = 0.28). Median radiographic follow-up was 6 months postoperatively (range: 1.5-54 months). Clinical outcomes were assessed at a median postoperative follow-up of 45 months (range: 12-87 months). Overall, radiographic evidence of arthrodesis was present in 83% of patients assessed and was

  5. Adjunctive Systemic and Local Antimicrobial Therapy in the Surgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Carcuac, O; Derks, J; Charalampakis, G; Abrahamsson, I; Wennström, J; Berglundh, T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present randomized controlled clinical trial was to investigate the adjunctive effect of systemic antibiotics and the local use of chlorhexidine for implant surface decontamination in the surgical treatment of peri-implantitis. One hundred patients with severe peri-implantitis were recruited. Surgical therapy was performed with or without adjunctive systemic antibiotics or the local use of chlorhexidine for implant surface decontamination. Treatment outcomes were evaluated at 1 y. A binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors influencing the probability of treatment success, that is, probing pocket depth ≤5 mm, absence of bleeding/suppuration on probing, and no additional bone loss. Treatment success was obtained in 45% of all implants but was higher in implants with a nonmodified surface (79%) than those with a modified surface (34%). The local use of chlorhexidine had no overall effect on treatment outcomes. While adjunctive systemic antibiotics had no impact on treatment success at implants with a nonmodified surface, a positive effect on treatment success was observed at implants with a modified surface. The likelihood for treatment success using adjunctive systemic antibiotics in patients with implants with a modified surface, however, was low. As the effect of adjunctive systemic antibiotics depended on implant surface characteristics, recommendations for their use in the surgical treatment of peri-implantitis should be based on careful assessments of the targeted implant (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01857804).

  6. Foreign assistance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports that providing energy assistance to developing countries remains a relatively low priority of the Agency for International Development. AID is helping some developing countries meet their energy needs, but this assistance varies substantially because of the agency's decentralized structure. Most AID energy funding has gone to a handful of countries-primarily Egypt and Pakistan. With limited funding in most other countries, AID concentrates on providing technical expertise and promoting energy policy reforms that will encourage both energy efficiency and leverage investment by the private sector and other donors. Although a 1989 congressional directive to pursue a global warming initiative has had a marginal impact on the agency's energy programming, many AID energy programs, including those directed at energy conservation, help address global warming concerns.

  7. General anesthesia in a patient with citrullinemia using Precedex as an adjunct to prevent delayed emergence.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hersh; Kim, Jung; Huncke, Tessa Kate

    2016-09-01

    Citrullinemia type I is a rare autosomal recessive genetic condition that causes reduced activity of the enzyme, argininosuccinate synthase, which is needed for proper urea metabolism. The end result is hyperammonemia which can cause life-threatening neurologic symptoms and global developmental delay. Previous case reports of the anesthetic management of patients with citrullinemia describe delayed recovery possibly related to elevated ammonia levels postoperatively or choice of intraoperative anesthetics which have included narcotics. In this case report, we present the anesthetic management of a 16-year-old adolescent girl with citrullinemia type I undergoing a vagus nerve stimulator revision. We used the α-2-adrenergic agonist, dexmedetomidine, as an adjunct to avoid narcotics to prevent delayed emergence. She was admitted for hydration the night before the procedure and had a baseline ammonia level of 33 μmol/L (reference, 9-33 μmol/L). Anesthetic maintenance consisted of 2% sevoflurane, dexmedetomidine 0.5 μg/kg per hour, and intravenous acetaminophen given toward the conclusion of the surgery. The patient awoke immediately at the end of the procedure and was extubated in the operating room. Postprocedure, her ammonia level was less than 9 μmol/L. She appeared to be free of pain, was tolerating gastric tube feeds postprocedure, and was discharged to home on the day of surgery. Effective management of ammonia levels in this patient using preoperative hydration and dexmedetomidine as an adjunct to general anesthesia may have helped to prevent delayed emergence. PMID:27555199

  8. Effectiveness of Physical Therapy as an Adjunctive Treatment for Trauma-induced Chronic Torticollis in Raptors.

    PubMed

    Nevitt, Benjamin N; Robinson, Narda; Kratz, Gail; Johnston, Matthew S

    2015-03-01

    Management of trauma-induced chronic torticollis in raptors has historically been challenging. Euthanasia is common in affected birds because of their inability to maintain normal cervical position, although they may be able to function normally. To assess effectiveness of physical therapy of the neck and head as an adjunct treatment for this condition, a case-control study was done in raptors admitted to the Rocky Mountain Raptor Program from 2003 to 2010. Eleven cases were identified with a diagnosis of chronic torticollis resulting from traumatic brain injury. Five cases were treated with physical therapy of the head and neck, and 6 control cases did not receive any physical therapy for the torticollis. Of the control cases, 0 of 6 had resolution of the torticollis, 0 of 6 were released, and 5 of 6 were euthanatized. Of the treated cases, 4 of 5 had complete resolution of the torticollis and 5 of 5 were released. Resolution of torticollis differed significantly between cases receiving physical therapy and controls. These results indicate that physical therapy should be used as an adjunctive therapy in cases of chronic torticollis induced by trauma in raptors because it results in better resolution of the torticollis and increased likelihood of release.

  9. Adjunctive mirror exposure for eating disorders: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Tom; Loeb, Katharine; Troupe, Sara; Delinsky, Sherrie

    2012-12-01

    Mirror exposure therapy has proven efficacious in improving body image among individuals with shape/weight concerns and eating disorders. No randomized controlled trials have examined the effect of mirror exposure in a healthy-weight clinical sample of eating disordered individuals. The purpose of the current study was to test the efficacy of a five-session acceptance based mirror exposure therapy (A-MET) versus a non directive body image therapy (ND) control as an adjunctive treatment to outpatient eating disorder treatment. Thirty-three males and females aged 14-65 with a body mass index of 18.5-29.9 were randomized to five sessions of A-MET or ND with a 1-month follow-up. Results indicated large to moderate effect size differences for efficacy of A-MET across measures of body checking, body image dissatisfaction, and eating disorder symptoms (d = -0.38 to -1.61) at end of treatment and follow-up. Baseline measures of social comparison and history of appearance-related teasing were predictive of treatment response. There were also differential effects of treatment on participants' perceived homework quality, but no differences in therapeutic alliance. Results suggest that A-MET is a promising adjunctive treatment for residual body image disturbance among normal and overweight individuals undergoing treatment for an eating disorder. Future research and clinical implications are discussed.

  10. Exercise as an adjunct to nicotine gum in treating tobacco dependence among women

    PubMed Central

    Kinnunen, Taru; Leeman, Robert F.; Korhonen, Tellervo; Terwal, Donna M.; Garvey, Arthur J.; Quiles, Zandra N.; Hartley, L. Howard

    2013-01-01

    This was the first randomized, controlled smoking cessation trial assessing the efficacy of an exercise intervention as an adjunct to nicotine gum therapy in comparison to both equal contact control and standard care control conditions. Sedentary female smokers aged 18-55 were provided with nicotine gum treatment along with brief behavioral counseling and were randomized into one of these three behavioral adjunct conditions. In the “intent-to-treat” sample (N=182), at end of treatment and at one-year follow up, there were clear, but non-significant, trends in univariate analyses in which the exercise and equal contact control conditions both had higher rates of abstinence than the standard care control. However, when adjusting for other predictors of relapse in a multiple logistic regression, both exercise and equal contact control showed an advantage over standard care control in avoiding early relapse (i.e., after 1 week). In a multivariate survival model adjusting for other predictors, the equal contact condition had a significantly lower likelihood of relapse compared to the standard care condition and there was a near significant trend in which exercise offered an advantage over standard care as well. While these findings suggest a slightly improved likelihood of abstinence with exercise compared with standard care, exercise did not differ from equal contact control in its efficacy. Potential explanations for these equivalent levels of efficacy and implications for the findings are discussed. PMID:18418791

  11. Evaluation of emerging factors blocking filtration of high-adjunct-ratio wort.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ting; Zhu, Linjiang; Zheng, Feiyun; Li, Yongxian; Li, Qi

    2014-08-20

    Corn starch has become a common adjunct for beer brewing in Chinese breweries. However, with increasing ratio of corn starch, problems like poor wort filtration performance arise, which will decrease production capacity of breweries. To solve this problem, factors affecting wort filtration were evaluated, such as the size of corn starch particle, special yellow floats formed during liquefaction of corn starch, and residual substance after liquefaction. The effects of different enzyme preparations including β-amylase and β-glucanase on filtration rate were also evaluated. The results indicate that the emerging yellow floats do not severely block filtration, while the fine and uniform-shape corn starch particle and its incompletely hydrolyzed residue after liquefaction are responsible for filtration blocking. Application of β-amylase preparation increased the filtration rate of liquefied corn starch. This study is useful for our insight into the filtration blocking problem arising in the process of high-adjunct-ratio beer brewing and also provides a feasible solution using enzyme preparations.

  12. Adjunctive aripiprazole in risperidone-induced hyperprolactinaemia: double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Raghuthaman, G.; Venkateswaran, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperprolactinaemia is a troublesome side-effect of treatment with antipsychotics. Aims This double-blind, placebo-controlled study aimed at examining the effect of adjunctive treatment with 10 mg aripiprazole on prolactin levels and sexual side-effects in patients with schizophrenia symptomatically maintained on risperidone. Method Thirty patients taking risperidone were enrolled into the trial (CTRI/2012/11/003114). Aripiprazole was administered at a fixed daily dose of 10 mg/day for 8 weeks. Serum prolactin was measured at baseline and at 8 weeks. Hyperprolactinaemia-related problems, psychopathology and side-effects were evaluated every 2 weeks. Results Prolactin levels decreased by 58% in the aripiprazole group compared with an increase by 22% in the placebo group. Prolactin levels normalised in 46% of patients in the aripiprazole group (number needed to treat, NNT=2). Aripiprazole improved erectile dysfunction in five out of six patients. There were no significant differences in change in psychopathology or side-effects between groups. Conclusions Adjunctive aripiprazole reduced prolactin levels in those treated with risperidone, with no effect on psychopathology and extrapyramidal symptoms. This is a potential treatment for hyperprolactinaemia observed during treatment with second-generation antipsychotics. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703744

  13. Effect of hydrogen peroxide mouthwash as an adjunct to chlorhexidine on stains and plaque

    PubMed Central

    Jhingta, Pravesh; Bhardwaj, Ashu; Sharma, Deepak; Kumar, Naresh; Bhardwaj, Vinay Kumar; Vaid, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether the use of an oxidizing mouth rinse as an adjunct to chlorhexidine is efficacious in reducing stains and plaque. Materials and Methods: This study had a single-blind, three-group (n = 35 each) parallel design, including a 21 days experimental period during which group I rinsed with chlorhexidine (CHX) 0.2% alone, group II used chlorhexidine (CHX) followed by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) 1.5%. Group III rinsed with the same mouthwashes in reverse order. Patients were randomly assigned to one of the three groups. The examination for plaque, and stains was done after 1, 2, and 3 weeks of rinsing. Results: Group II showed significantly less stain intensity in comparison with group I after 14 and 21 days (P values 0.025 and 0.005, respectively). The proportion of stained surfaces was less in the group II than in the group I and was significant at the end of 1 week. The plaque formation was significantly less in groups II and III than group I at 7, 14, and 21 days. Conclusion: The adjunctive use of hydrogen peroxide to chlorhexidine proved to be superior to chlorhexidine alone with regard to the inhibition of plaque and development of stains. PMID:24174723

  14. Human percutaneous and intraoperative laser thermal angioplasty: initial clinical results as an adjunct to balloon angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Sanborn, T A; Greenfield, A J; Guben, J K; Menzoian, J O; LoGerfo, F W

    1987-01-01

    In this study, the safety and efficacy of percutaneous laser thermal angioplasty as an adjunct to balloon angioplasty were investigated in 13 patients with severe peripheral vascular disease. By means of a novel fiberoptic laser delivery system (Laserprobe) in which argon laser energy is converted to heat in a metallic tip at the end of the fiberoptic fiber, improvement in the angiographic luminal diameter was noted in 14 of 15 femoropopliteal vessels (93%) by delivering 8 to 13 watts of continuous argon laser energy as the Laserprobe was advanced through the lesion. Initial clinical success (indicated by relief of symptoms and increase in Doppler index) for the combined laser and balloon angioplasty procedures was obtained in 12 of 15 vessels (80%), with inadequate balloon dilatation being the limiting factor in three patients. No significant complications of vessel perforation, dissection, pain, spasm, or embolization of debris occurred. Of the 12 patients who had procedures with initial angiographic and clinical success, 10 (83%) were asymptomatic in the initial follow-up period of 1 to 9 months (mean 6 months). Thus, laser thermal angioplasty with a Laserprobe is a safe and effective adjunct to peripheral balloon angioplasty. This technique has the potential to increase the initial success rate of angioplasty for lesions that are difficult or impossible to treat by conventional means. By removing most of the obstructing lesion, this technique may also reduce recurrent stenosis.

  15. Traditional herbal medicine as adjunctive therapy for nasopharyngeal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woojin; Lee, Won-Bock; Lee, Jungwoo; Min, Byung-Il; Lee, HyangSook; Cho, Seung-Hun

    2015-05-01

    The effectiveness of traditional herbal medicine (THM) as treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) has not been clearly demonstrated. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of THM as adjunctive therapies for NPC using the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Five electronic databases, including English and Chinese databases, were systematically searched up to February 2014. All RCTs involving traditional herbal medicine in combination with conventional cancer therapy for NPC were included. Twenty-two RCTs involving 2,298 NPC patients were systematically reviewed. Of these 22 studies, 15 on 1482 patients reported a significant increase in the number surviving patients with survivals of more than 1, 3, or 5 years. Seven studies on 595 patients reported a significant increase in immediate tumor response, and three studies on 505 patients reported a significant decrease in distant metastasis. This meta-analysis of 22 studies suggests that THM combined with conventional therapy can provide an effective adjunctive therapy for NPC. More research and well-designed, rigorous, large clinical trials are required to address these issues.

  16. Mechanisms of non-pharmacologic adjunct therapies used during exercise in COPD.

    PubMed

    Moga, A M; de Marchie, M; Saey, D; Spahija, J

    2012-05-01

    Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are often limited in their ability to perform exercise due to a heightened sense of dyspnea and/or the occurrence of leg fatigue associated with a reduced ventilatory capacity and peripheral skeletal muscle dysfunction, respectively. Pulmonary rehabilitation programs have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and health related quality of life. Additional therapeutic approaches such as non-invasive ventilatory support (NIVS), heliox (He-O(2)) and supplemental oxygen have been used as non-pharmacologic adjuncts to exercise to enhance the ability of patients with COPD to exercise at a higher exercise-intensity and thus improve the physiological benefits of exercise. The purpose of the current review is to examine the pathophysiology of exercise limitation in COPD and to explore the physiological mechanisms underlying the effect of the adjunct therapies on exercise in patients with COPD. This review indicates that strategies that aim to unload the respiratory muscles and enhance oxygen saturation during exercise alleviate exercise limiting factors and improve exercise performance in patients with COPD. However, available data shows significant variability in the effectiveness across patients. Further research is needed to identify the most appropriate candidates for these forms of therapies. PMID:22341681

  17. The use of a heel-mounted accelerometer as an adjunct measure of slip distance.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Raymond W; DiDomenico, Angela; Chang, Chien-Chi

    2007-05-01

    A human-centered measure of floor slipperiness could be useful as an adjunct to conventional tribologic measures. This paper reports on the development and evaluation of a measure of slip distance based on variables derived from the signal of a heel-mounted accelerometer. Twenty-one participants walked on a laboratory runway under several surface slipperiness conditions at three walking speeds during a protocol designed to produce a wide range of slip distances at heel strike. Analysis of variance showed significant effects of slip distance (no-slip, micro-slip and slide), walking speed (1.52, 1.78 and 2.13 m/s) and their interactions on peak forward acceleration, peak vertical acceleration and deceleration time of the heel following heel strike in 704 trials. Regression analysis of slip distance and deceleration time showed the strongest relationship with R2=0.511. Large individual variation in the strength of this relationship was observed. The heel-mounted accelerometer may have utility as an adjunct measure in the evaluation of floor slipperiness, particularly for field applications where direct measurement may not be feasible.

  18. Liposomal bupivacaine in hallux valgus surgery: a multimodal pain management adjunct.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jeannie; Parekh, Selene G

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the use of liposomal bupivacaine as a multimodal pain management adjunct following hallux valgus surgery. The study was a prospective review of a consecutive series of patients who underwent hallux valgus surgery and received liposomal bupivacaine. From postoperative day (POD) 1 to 4, pain scores, number of narcotic rescue pills used, and adverse events were recorded. Wound complications, narcotic refills, and unscheduled clinic and emergency room (ER) visits or hospital admissions for pain were also recorded. The average pain rating was <3.4 (±2.4) during POD 1 to 4. Four patients (28.6%) reported never experiencing pain (Numeric Rating Scale ≤1). Seventy-one percent used narcotic rescue pills on POD 1. There were no unscheduled office or ER visits or hospital admissions. One adverse event and one wound complication occurred. Liposomal bupivacaine may be a safe and useful adjunct in a multimodal pain regimen for patients undergoing hallux valgus surgery. More rigorous studies are needed to determine its efficacy, safety profile, and cost-effectiveness compared to placebo. PMID:25785470

  19. Banana as adjunct in beer production: applicability and performance of fermentative parameters.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Giovani B M; Silva, Daniel P; Bento, Camila V; Vicente, António A; Teixeira, José A; Felipe, Maria das Graças A; Almeida E Silva, João B

    2009-05-01

    Traditionally, the raw materials for beer production are barley, hops, water, and yeast, but most brewers use also different adjuncts. During the alcoholic fermentation, the contribution of aroma compounds from other ingredients to the final beer flavor depends on the wort composition, on the yeast strain, and mainly on the process conditions. In this context, banana can also be a raw material favorable to alcoholic fermentation being rich in carbohydrates and minerals and providing low acidity. In this work, the objective was to evaluate the performance of wort adjusted with banana juice in different concentrations. For this, static fermentations were conducted at 15 degrees C at pilot scale (140 L of medium). The addition of banana that changed the concentration of all-malt wort from 10 degrees P to 12 and 15 degrees P were evaluated ( degrees P is the weight of the extract or the sugar equivalent in 100 g solution, at 20 degrees C). The results showed an increase in ethanol production, with approximately 0.4 g/g ethanol yield and 0.6 g/L h volumetric productivity after 84 h of processing when concentrated wort was used. Thus, it was concluded that banana can be used as an adjunct in brewing methods, helping in the development of new products as well as in obtaining concentrated worts.

  20. Understanding the role of adjunctive nonpharmacological therapies in management of the multiple pathways to depression.

    PubMed

    Velehorschi, Corina; Bleau, Pierre; Vermani, Monica; Furtado, Melissa; Klassen, Larry J

    2014-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 16.2% and the fourth highest cause of disability globally. It is hypothesized to be a syndromatic manifestation of multiple pathological processes leading to similar clinical manifestation. MDD is associated with at least three categories of peripheral hormone-type factors including neurotrophic factors, proinflammatory cytokines, and processes that impair regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Neuroimaging studies have identified functional abnormalities including subcortical systems associated with reward and emotion processing, medial prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortical regions and the lateral prefrontal cortical systems involved in cognitive control and voluntary emotion regulation. Studies investigating the effects of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy on functional brain measures show normalization of brain function with return to euthymia. Nevertheless, approximately 50% of patients with MDD will not respond sufficiently and 60 to 70% will not achieve full remission with first-line pharmacotherapy, therefore clinicians strive to improve patient responses through the use of adjunct therapies. This review discusses recent research in the various biological processes associated with MDD as well as recent data in support of the use of adjunctive non-pharmacological therapies including psychotherapy, bibliotherapy, Internet therapy, "natural" or herbal approaches, exercise therapy, and somatic therapies.