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Sample records for adjunct nursing faculty

  1. Perceptions of Novice Clinical Adjunct Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmelberg, Layna

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and continues to be a topic of discussion. A nationwide solution has been for nursing programs to increase their enrollment of nursing students. This could be difficult for many nursing schools; as many have a shortage of qualified nursing faculty with which to instruct…

  2. Experience of Adjunct Novice Clinical Nursing Faculty: An Interpretive Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive case study was to describe the experience of adjunct novice clinical nursing faculty who has less than three years teaching experience or feels novice in this setting. The nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and is forecasted to have significant impacts on the health care delivery…

  3. An Orientation Program for Clinical Adjunct Faculty.

    PubMed

    Rice, Gwendolyn

    2016-01-01

    Having highly competent clinical faculty in an institution of higher learning is a prerequisite for graduating safe nurses in the future. The purpose of this project was to increase each clinical nurse's knowledge and skills for the new role of clinical adjunct nursing faculty. Successful implementation of this program will help promote consistency in effective job performance of clinical adjunct faculty and facilitate achievement of the projected goals and outcomes. This orientation program was presented in a one day face-to-face encounter with twelve (12) adjunct faculty members, tenured and others on the tenured track. These faculty members were hired by City Colleges of Chicago (CCC) School of Nursing Program at the Malcolm X College. Presentations were given by attendees with a lesson plan. Pre-test, post-test and evaluation forms were presented and it was agreed that an orientation program should be developed and presented to all newly hired clinical adjunct nursing faculty at CCC. PMID:26930766

  4. Adjunct Faculty Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Merle O'Rourke

    This handbook for Northern Virginia Community College (NVCC) adjunct faculty presents a variety of information designed for adjunct lecturers in English. Three short introductory sections focus on general information, helpful hints, and the use of office machines. The body of the handbook contains the following sections: (1) Services, including…

  5. Effective Leadership of Online Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipple, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Post secondary education leaders and administrators are currently facing two separate but inter-related trends: the growth in online education, and the significant increase in adjunct (part-time) faculty. In order to maximize the educational quality and institutional effectiveness, education leaders must develop an approach that levers the…

  6. Desire for Professional Development among Adjunct Business Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backhaus, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    This study provides a foundation for further work about motivation for training and the world of contingent employment in higher education and beyond for adjunct faculty. This sample of adjunct business faculty shows there is much to be learned about why adjunct faculty choose to work in higher education and how they view their own professional…

  7. Uses and Abuses of Adjunct Faculty in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twigg, Helen Parramore

    The extensive use of adjunct and temporary faculty to teach basic general education courses at community colleges can be professionally harmful to both tenured and adjunct faculty. Part-time faculty are guaranteed no health insurance, raises, promotions, nor voice in the decisions that affect them. Their plight affects all faculty in many ways,…

  8. Adjunct Faculty Organizational Sense of Belonging and Affective Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, Constance L.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years all public higher education institutions have increased their reliance on adjunct faculty. Adjuncts provide expertise in key areas, are available at times that meet the needs of the changing student demographic, and cover an increasing number of introductory courses. It has been suggested that adjunct faculty may be more weakly…

  9. Adjunct Info: A Journal for Managers of Adjunct and Part-Time Faculty, 1994-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greive, Donald, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This document consists of the twelve issues of the quarterly journal "Adjunct Info" during the three-year period 1994-1997. Individual issues contain articles, editorials, columns, teaching tips, and suggested resources related to management of adjunct and part-time faculty. Major articles include: "A Message to Managers: From an Adjunct" (June…

  10. Mentoring New Adjunct Faculty to Teach Science Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Delia Castro

    2007-01-01

    The author discusses mentoring and training strategies that enhance adjunct faculty members' teaching effectiveness in undergraduate science laboratories and foster a sense of common enterprise within the institutional environment. These strategies include the preparation of an "Adjunct Faculty Handbook", mentoring and peer-support programs, and…

  11. Predicting the Satisfaction and Loyalty of Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Jeff E.

    2012-01-01

    Satisfaction with the quality of students, autonomy, faculty support, honorarium, and preference for teaching were significant predictors of adjunct faculty loyalty. With the exception of autonomy, these factors along with a heavy teaching load, collaborative research with full-time faculty, and satisfaction with teaching schedule were predictive…

  12. A Systems Approach to Strategic Success with Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Vernon C.

    2007-01-01

    Rio Salado is a nontraditional community college that is highly integrated in the global economy. This chapter describes the Rio Salado College systems approach, which relies almost exclusively on adjunct faculty to accomplish its mission, vision, and purposes.

  13. Managing Adjunct & Part-Time Faculty for the New Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greive, Donald E., Ed.; Worden, Catherine A., Ed.

    The contributions in this book address issues related to the management of part-time and adjunct college faculty members, including the impact of new technology, and provide information necessary for effective management in the future. The chapters are: (1) "A Vision of the Future--From the CEO" (Roy A. Church); (2) "Managing Adjunct and Part-Time…

  14. Adjunct Faculty in Developmental Education: Best Practices, Challenges, and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datray, Jennifer L.; Saxon, D. Patrick; Martirosyan, Nara M.

    2014-01-01

    Adjunct and part-time faculty are an important resource for developmental education programs. Developmental courses and services are developed to serve underprepared, at-risk college students typically near the beginning of their college matriculation. According to Schults (2001), approximately 65% of the faculty teaching developmental education…

  15. Genomics Nursing Faculty Champion Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jean; Calzone, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Nurse faculty are challenged to keep up with the emerging and fast-paced field of genomics and the mandate to prepare the nursing workforce to be able to translate genomic research advances into routine clinical care. Using Faculty Champions and other options, the initiative stimulated curriculum development and promoted genomics curriculum integration. The authors summarize this yearlong initiative for undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty. PMID:24300251

  16. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  17. A Utilization-Focused Evaluation of a Community College Adjunct Faculty Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edenfield, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Nationally adjunct faculty comprise almost 70% of all two-year institution faculty while in the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) adjunct faculty teach 60% of the community college courses, and should past trends continue, the number of adjunct faculty members is expected to grow 10% within the next fifteen years (Caliber, 2007; Phillipe &…

  18. The Attraction of Adjunct Faculty to Rural Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlier, Hara Dracon

    2010-01-01

    As rural community colleges face mounting fiscal pressure, the ability to attract adjunct faculty members to support the institutional mission becomes increasingly important. Although the professional literature documents differences between rural, suburban, and urban community colleges, the effect of this institutional diversity on the role and…

  19. Orientation to Teaching for Adjunct Faculty (Instructors Manual).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greive, Donald; France, Richard E.

    Guidelines for conducting and facilitating a workshop designed as an orientation for both beginning and experienced adjunct faculty at community colleges are presented in this instructor's manual. The manual contains the following 11 sections, each defining an objective or activity to be undertaken during the workshop, and providing…

  20. Emotional Intelligence, Job Satisfaction, and Students' Perceptions of the Quality of Online Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Sara K.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between emotional intelligence and students' perceptions of quality of online adjunct faculty and the relationship between emotional intelligence and the job satisfaction of online adjunct faculty. Online adjunct faculty participants completed the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire--Short Form…

  1. Faculty Evaluation by Students: A Comparison between Full-Time and Adjunct Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Chan M.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the validity of the faculty evaluation instrument used at Tulsa Community College (Oklahoma). Compares student evaluations of adjunct instructors and full-time faculty members. Finds that (1) a single dimension construct existed; (2) item-level comparisons yielded no meaningful differences between evaluations of teachers; and (3) overall…

  2. Nursing Faculty and Academic Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Cecilia E.

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient information exists regarding the process influencing faculty decisions, specifically in the area of maintaining academic integrity in an online environment. The purpose of the study was to explore the experiences and decision-making process of nursing faculty related to maintaining academic integrity in an online environment. The…

  3. An Examination of Adjunct Faculty Characteristics: Comparison between Non-Profit and For-Profit Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starcher, Keith; Mandernach, B. Jean

    2016-01-01

    Institutions must understand the unique characteristics and motivations of adjunct faculty teaching online to more effectively support a diverse faculty population. The current study examines faculty characteristics and motivations to explore differences in the types of adjunct faculty teaching at non-profit or for-profit institutions. A survey of…

  4. The Invisible Professor At-Risk: How Departmental Disconfirmation Disempower Adjunct Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burk, Nanci M.

    The exploitation of adjunct faculty is a disgrace to the academy. The prominence and indispensability of part-time faculty is obvious, yet they are rarely acknowledged or compensated for their mandatory contributions to higher education. This paper seeks to explicate how adjunct faculty are at risk and disempowered by a lack of respect…

  5. The Silent Majority: Comparing Community College Full-Time and Adjunct Faculty Satisfaction with Campus Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Deborah Jean

    2013-01-01

    The faculty landscape has changed in higher education, particularly with community colleges. It is only through research that we can compare full-time and adjunct community college faculty satisfaction with campus climate. The purpose of this study was to explore the differences between full-time and adjunct community college faculty regarding…

  6. Nursing Faculty Perceptions on Teaching Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Doris A.

    2010-01-01

    The perceptions of nursing faculty teaching critical thinking (CT) affective attributes and cognitive skills are described in this quantitative, descriptive study. The study sample consisted of nurse educators from the National League of Nursing database. The purpose of the study was to gain nursing faculty perception of which teaching strategies…

  7. Retaining nursing faculty beyond retirement age.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Marvel L; Cook, Linda; Salmeron, Lois; Burton, Denise

    2010-01-01

    The number of nursing faculty planning to retire by 2020 is alarming. To develop strategies for retaining faculty, researchers asked: What factors influence the decision by nursing faculty to stay in the workforce past retirement age? What barriers could be removed that would encourage faculty to stay longer? Using Giorgi's analysis method, findings from 6 faculty teaching past retirement age revealed key meaning units and grand themes that match Maslow's Hierarchy of Inborn Needs. PMID:20548182

  8. The Adjunct Advocate @ FIT: Bringing Part Time Faculty into the Mainstream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado, Elaine; Riman, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The Adjunct Advocate @ FIT is an online, faculty development program at FIT, part of the State University of New York. This convenient new resource, developed by the Center for Excellence in Teaching, reaches out to adjunct and off-campus faculty with professional development that includes printable materials, video, discussion boards, and…

  9. Hiring, Orientation, Professional Development, and Evaluation: The Administrative Support of Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oprean, Celeste Pramik

    2012-01-01

    In North Carolina (NC) there are a total of 58 community colleges, each of which provides a unique approach to handling support for adjunct faculty. The NC Community College System provided a good setting to explore how one state in particular compares to current research on administrative support of adjunct faculty in the areas of hiring,…

  10. Narrative Inquiry Assessing the Retention of Part-Time Adjunct Faculty at Private Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Doris L.

    2014-01-01

    All institutions of higher education depend heavily on the contributions of adjunct faculty. The purpose of the qualitative narrative inquiry was to gather, analyze, and interpret stories offered by faculty members to make meaning of their experiences as adjuncts in non-traditional higher education institutions. The qualitative narrative inquiry…

  11. Herzberg's Theory of Motivation as Applied to Community College Full-Time and Adjunct Online Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullickson, Larry

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the factors that influence full-time and adjunct faculty perceptions regarding job satisfaction and dissatisfaction. It was also designed to determine if those factors relate differently to full-time and adjunct faculty. It is anticipated that this information will aid administrators in improving morale and…

  12. Information and Instructional Technology: Bringing Adjunct Faculty into the IT Fold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryesky, Kenneth H.

    2004-01-01

    Adjunct faculty members teach a significant percentage of courses at the various colleges of the City University of New York (CUNY). Adjunct employment circumstances and workplace conditions often differ from those of full-time faculty, thus posing many challenges and impediments to facilitating instructional technology and information technology…

  13. Not Just a Matter of Fairness: Adjunct Faculty and Writing Programs in Two-Year Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klausman, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Several years ago, when his college first financed a writing program administrator (WPA) position--reassigned time and a budget to pay adjunct faculty stipends for program development--the author met with all the most senior adjunct faculty. "Without you," he told them, "this effort to build a better writing program won't work. Participation and…

  14. Bullying of Adjunct Faculty at Community Colleges and Steps toward Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reigle, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Adjunct instructors benefit community colleges through their flexibility, diversity, innovation and contributions to student success; however, their part-time status can result in friction with full-time/tenured faculty, a problem that can lead to bullying. In an effort to determine what forms bullying of adjunct faculty take and how these…

  15. American Academic: A National Survey of Part-time/Adjunct Faculty. Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Plainly, part-time/adjunct faculty members now play a vital role in educating the nation's college students. Even so, the data and research on part-time/adjunct faculty members have tended to be pretty spotty. This survey, conducted by Hart Research Associates on behalf of the American Federation of Teachers, is one of the first nationwide…

  16. Including the Majority: Academic and Social Inclusion of Adjunct Faculty at Selected Texas Public Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaniel, Suzann Holland

    2012-01-01

    As the majority of teaching faculty on many community college campuses, adjuncts are accountable for the higher education of an increasing number of college-going students. However, adjunct faculty often are disconnected from the community colleges that depend upon them. The purpose of this nonexperimental quantitative study was to investigate the…

  17. Community College Adjunct Faculty Perceptions of Orientation, Mentoring, and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Dolly R.

    2013-01-01

    The problem addressed in this study was the paucity of professional development, mentoring, and orientation opportunities for adjunct faculty in the community college system. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate adjunct faculty member perceptions of their orientation, mentoring, and professional development experiences at a…

  18. Effective Orientation and Assimilation Needs of Adjunct Faculty in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Heather L.

    2013-01-01

    Adjunct faculty have become the majority workforce of instructional coursework in higher education. Once valued for their skills and knowledge in specialized areas, they are now a common, quick hire, budget fix utilized to instruct a variety of courses. Despite the need for and increased hiring of adjunct faculty, minimal orientation and welcome…

  19. Teaching Developmental English: Perceptions and Motivations of One Adjunct Faculty Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeas, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study describes members of the Liberal Arts/English adjunct faculty at one mid-Atlantic urban community college (MAUCC), their perceptions of the organizational climate of their program, and their satisfaction and motivation patterns. The study was designed as a case study focusing on one MAUCC department. Adjunct faculty members…

  20. Evaluation of an Online Model for Adjunct and Full-Time Community College Faculty Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    The utilization of adjunct faculty, especially in the community college setting, has steadily increased over the last several decades. Staff development for faculty at a community college, however, is often disproportionately targeted toward full-time faculty. This study used a program evaluation to assess an existing online faculty development…

  1. Undergraduate Nursing Student Experiences with Faculty Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Incivility and bullying in nursing education has become an area of increased interest. Incivility literature has focused primarily on student-to-faculty incivility. Less focus has been placed on faculty-to-student bullying. This study examined the lived experiences of undergraduate nursing students with faculty bullying. Using descriptive…

  2. [Nurses' uniforms as seen by patients, nurses and nursing faculty].

    PubMed

    da Silva, M J; Stefanelli, M C; Monetta, L; de Araujo, T L

    1995-04-01

    The exact role of the way people dress up on the nonverbal communication is still unknown. Nevertheless, we know that it influences the interpersonal answers and, in some situations, they are the main determinants of those answers. The objective of this study was to determinate differences between the perception os the nurse uniform through the answers of 100 patients, 30 nurses and 15 nursing school faculty. The data were collected by showing nine photographs of hospitals of the city of São Paulo (Brazil). White trousers and blouse was the favorite one among patients, nurses and nursing school faculty regarding personal care. White skirt above knees, white blouse and blazer was the most rejected one by three groups. PMID:8715721

  3. Relationship between Adjunct and Full-Time Faculty Teaching at a For-Profit University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom Kays, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the workplace relationships of adjunct and full-time faculty teaching at a for-profit university. The study was conducted at one campus of Segway University. Faculty in this study included men and women and represented different academic departments. All full-time faculty participants had experience teaching as…

  4. Critical Issue Bibliography (CRIB) Sheet: Part-Time and Adjunct Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education, Washington, DC.

    This CRitical Issue Bibliography (CRIB) Sheet focuses on issues related to part-time and adjunct faculty. It is clear that part-time faculty are now a substantial entity within academe and need to be understood better. This CRIB sheet lists resources that address: (1) trends in contracts, numbers, or conditions of part-time faculty; (2) issues…

  5. Understanding Burnout and Promoting Engagement among Adjunct Faculty in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Michael Alan

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored the phenomenon of job burnout among adjunct faculty at two suburban Illinois community colleges. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Educators' Survey (MBI-ES) was administered to adjuncts at both colleges to determine overall levels of burnout for the three dimensions of burnout--emotional exhaustion,…

  6. Faculty practice plan entrance strategy for nursing.

    PubMed

    Parsons, M A; Felton, G M; Chassie, M B

    1996-01-01

    Nursing is a practice discipline that places great value on members of the profession who excel as providers of direct care. With health care reform, nursing faculty have unprecedented opportunities for advanced practice and are implementing entrepreneurial ventures to meet their commitments to practice. The purpose of this article is to describe a nursing faculty practice plan in conjunction with a decentralized medical school plan. The major benefits and barriers to its adoption are addressed. PMID:9087037

  7. Nursing faculty practice: benefits vs costs.

    PubMed

    Budden, L

    1994-06-01

    The transfer of nurse education from the hospital setting to the university sector has increased the dichotomy between theory and practice. Nurse academics have been exploring methods of maintaining clinical competence and credibility through organizational structures such as faculty practice. Faculty practice is a formal arrangement which exists between a clinical setting and a university which allows nurse academics to consult and deliver client care resulting in research and scholarly outcomes. The most important advantage of faculty practice is its potential to contribute to nursing knowledge and validate theories through the use of reflective practice and professional journaling by nurse academics which can help demystify and analyse the intricate elements of nursing. Other advantages of faculty practice are described as improving student's learning and client care through the application of an advanced knowledge base and facilitation by a faculty member. It also facilitates communication with clinical staff and assists in the professional development of nurse academics. The major barriers which need to be addressed to facilitate faculty practice are the allocation of time in the nurse academic's workload which incorporates consultation and faculty practice, organization and administrative support and the recognition of clinical competence in the promotion and tenure process of universities. PMID:7930106

  8. Nursing education progression: associate degree nursing faculty perspective.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Dale; Zomorodi, Meg; Wagner, Jennie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to examine the attitudes, influences, and practices of associate degree nursing (ADN) faculty in relation to advising students about nursing education progression. The results indicated that ADN faculty have a sense of moral and personal role responsibility to encourage students to continue their education. Deficits in faculty knowledge of program details and multiple demands on their time are factors that influence advising practices. PMID:25581436

  9. Assessment of an Internet Training Program for Distance Education Adjunct Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, Thomas W.

    Recognizing that adjunct faculty in a distance education program may not have convenient access to campus-based training activities, a self-paced 12-week training program was developed by Nova Southeastern University (Fort Lauderdale, Florida). According to staffing by headcount, 63% of all faculty during Winter Term 1997 were part-time employees…

  10. Establishing an Adjunct Faculty Professional Development Program for Delaware Technical Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergner, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education is experiencing unprecedented change due to economic and demographic projections, largely focusing on the usage of adjunct faculty. No longer will community colleges be able to rely solely on full-time faculty to ensure that students persist to graduation. This executive position paper provides a proposed plan for a formalized…

  11. An Examination of Emotional Intelligence Factors: Their Relationship to Job Satisfaction among Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zupancic, Katherine Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Faculty at community colleges often prefer teaching to research despite facing challenges of teaching an ever increasingly more diverse student population. Despite being called upon to teach diverse student populations, adjunct faculty, in particular, within community college settings are often perceived as being at the bottom of the job status…

  12. Factors that Predict the Integration of Technology for Instruction by Community College Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paver, Jonathan; Walker, David A.; Hung, Wei-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges have responded to the increased use of technology for instruction by providing support and professional development opportunities for faculty. However, differences in perceptions, expectations, and opportunities exist between full-time faculty at community colleges and their adjunct colleagues when it comes to adopting…

  13. An Exploration into the Culture of the Community College Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutchin, Jeffery B.

    2012-01-01

    Current literature suggests there is a national state of dissatisfaction among community college adjunct faculty; further, this dissatisfaction among some community college faculty may be due, in part, to factors such as low pay, few or no benefits, and little or no participation in policy making. Despite these conditions, national statistics…

  14. Identifying, Recruiting, Developing, and Retaining Quality Adjunct Faculty in Rural Community Colleges in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Jessica L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine how to identify, recruit, develop, and retain suitable adjunct faculty in rural community colleges in Ohio. The research problem resulted from a limited availability of potential faculty possessing the required credentials and andragogical training in Ohio's rural and Appalachian areas. Research…

  15. The Influence of Nursing Faculty Workloads on Faculty Retention: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Nursing faculty workloads have come to the forefront of discussion in nursing education. The National League of Nursing (NLN) has made nursing faculty workloads a high priority in nursing education. Included in the priorities are areas of creating reform through innovations in nursing education, evaluating reform through evaluation research, and…

  16. Cultural competence among nursing students and faculty.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Sara E; Sedlak, Carol A; Martsolf, Donna S

    2005-04-01

    Healthcare consumers are entitled to culturally competent care. Therefore, nursing curricula need to include cultural content and student nurses and faculty members need to be culturally competent. The purpose of the study was to describe cultural competence of students and faculty at a college of nursing and to discuss the implications for nursing curricula related to cultural competence. Campinha-Bacote's model (Campinha-Bacote, J., 1994. Cultural competence in psychiatric mental health nursing. Nursing Clinics of North America 29 (1), 1-8.) of culturally competent care provided the theoretical framework. The Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence (IAPCC) (Campinha-Bacote, J., 1998. The Process of Cultural Competence in the Delivery of Healthcare Services: A Culturally Competent Model of Care. Transcultural C.A.R.E. Associates, Cincinnati, OH. Available from: .) was used to measure levels of self-reported cultural competence. A convenience sample of 88 first year, 121 fourth year baccalaureate students and 51 faculty members at a college of nursing was studied. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant difference (F=43.915, df=259, p<.0001) between the three groups. A positive correlation was found between IAPCC scores and several demographic variables. Findings suggest that cultural competence can be increased by including structured cultural content in nursing curricula. PMID:15795024

  17. Using an Online Curriculum Design and a Cooperative Instructional Approach to Orientate Adjunct Faculty to the Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Emily; Wang, Chihhsuan

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this study was to develop an orientation program that would assist adjunct faculty to gain specific competencies to facilitate an online course. The orientation curriculum employed a set of guiding questions that focused on the intellectual, cognitive, and applicable skills adjunct faculty would need to facilitate an online course. To…

  18. How Community College Adjunct Faculty Members Teaching Communications Courses Understand Diversity as It Relates to Their Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rediger, James N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore Midwestern Community College (MCC) communication adjunct faculty members' descriptions of techniques used to prepare for a diverse student population. This research was conducted in order to gain a better understanding of how adjunct faculty members teaching communications courses at MCC understood…

  19. The Lived Experience of Novice Nursing Faculty in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooley, Shirley S.

    2013-01-01

    To relieve the nursing faculty shortage, notable numbers of master's prepared clinical nurse experts are entering the ranks of nursing faculty to teach the prelicensure nursing student. The transition from clinical practice to the academia raises concern about the adequacy of preparation for the complex specialization role of nurse educator. In…

  20. Nursing Faculty Shortage Nurses' Perceptions as a Key to Administrative Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klocke, Evelyn M.

    2009-01-01

    The nursing faculty shortage is well documented. Higher education administrators turn away qualified student applicants because of the lack of qualified nursing faculty. Furthermore, they find recruitment and retention of qualified nursing faculty a challenge. The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of the nursing faculty role, causes…

  1. Factors Influencing the Integration of Technology by Community College Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paver, Jonathan David

    2012-01-01

    This research examined the factors that predict intention to integrate technology into instruction by community college adjunct faculty. For this study the integration of technology was defined as beyond simple occasional use, within the next academic year. The decomposed theory of planned behavior was tested for its predictive ability with this…

  2. Handbook II: Advanced Teaching Strategies for Adjunct and Part-Time Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greive, Donald E., Ed.

    This handbook is designed to help part-time and adjunct faculty who need professional enhancement but do not have the time for formal coursework. The focus is on the modern student, who differs in many ways from the traditional college student. The book provides more advanced strategies that those presented in the earlier "Handbook for…

  3. Relationship between Learning Style, Gender, and Satisfaction toward Training of Adjunct Online Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lees, Teresa Dotson

    2011-01-01

    Growth in distance education programs has required academic institutions to seek and train additional adjunct faculty. Training program content and delivery methods vary among institutions: however, there is an absence of research on whether incorporating learning strategies that consider assumptions about an adult learner increases satisfaction…

  4. Online Adjunct Faculty: Motivations for Working in the New Academic Frontier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Trish Isabella

    2013-01-01

    Distance education rapidly became the new frontier in higher education as more adults returned to college. Most research studies focused on the satisfaction of faculty members. However, little research reported the lived stories of online adjuncts pioneering a new educational landscape. The primary purpose of the qualitative study was to discover…

  5. Online Training Impact on Adjunct Faculty Compliance and Satisfaction with Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pete, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The problem addressed by this project study was low levels of adjunct faculty compliance and satisfaction with the professional development program at a local college. The purpose of the study was to determine if an alternative delivery method would yield higher levels of compliance and satisfaction than would a traditional professional…

  6. Adjunct Faculty Characteristics that May Predict Intention to Integrate Technology into Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paver, Jonathan; Walker, David A.; Hung, Wei-Chen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the demographic factors that predict intention to integrate technology into instruction by community college adjunct faculty. Regression model findings indicated that the demographic characteristics of years of teaching experience, teaching discipline, hours of preparation time, and years of experience using computers were…

  7. "Thanks for Asking": Adjunct Faculty Members' Views of Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the characteristics of effective teaching as perceived by undergraduate adjunct faculty members in a large proprietary university. Three factors were identified through an exploratory factor analysis: Regard for the Student, Instructor Competence, and Instructional Proficiency. The author concludes that additional studies are…

  8. The Isolation of Online Adjunct Faculty and Its Impact on Their Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Vera

    2011-01-01

    Using a grounded theory qualitative research approach, this article examines the experiences of 28 adjunct faculty members who work at the same university, exploring their views on whether periodically meeting face-to-face with management and peers has the potential to affect their motivation on the job and consequently the quality of education…

  9. Cultural competence in nursing faculty: a journey, not a destination.

    PubMed

    Montenery, Susan M; Jones, Angela D; Perry, Nancy; Ross, Debra; Zoucha, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Nurse educators work with the intention of empowering students to provide holistic and comprehensive care. One concept that is essential in the delivery of patient-centered comprehensive care is cultural competence. The process of cultural competence is an imperative for nurses, faculty, and students. Little research exists to substantiate cultural desire in nursing faculty. Subsequently, questions arise about the faculty's desire to teach and promote nursing care that is culturally competent. Therefore, are nursing faculty committed to the process of culturally competence for themselves, students, and the profession? This article reviews the literature on cultural competency as it applies to nursing faculty. Campinha-Bacote's model of cultural competence provides the theoretical underpinning for the discussion and implications of enhancing cultural competence for nursing faculty. Cultural competency among nursing faculty could yield a significant impact by facilitating achievement and provision of culturally competent care for nurses at the local, national, and global level. PMID:24267941

  10. Solving the nurse faculty shortage: exploring retention issues.

    PubMed

    Berent, Georgine R; Anderko, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have explored reasons why nurse faculty leave academia, but few have focused on factors that encourage them to stay. Using Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene Theory, an online cross-sectional survey was completed by 1,171 tenured nurse faculty nationwide. Factor analysis revealed that the most significant factor influencing retention was professional satisfaction with faculty identity, including the ability to shape nursing practice. Academia may benefit by considering these factors to promote nurse faculty retention. PMID:21857339

  11. Hitting the nursing faculty shortage head on: strategies to recruit, retain, and develop nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Harriet R; Greenberg, Martha J; Jaffe-Ruiz, Marilyn; Kaufman, Sophie Revillard; Cignarale, Stacie

    2015-01-01

    More than ever before, schools of nursing are challenged with finding qualified faculty to teach growing numbers of undergraduate and graduate students. Qualified applicants by the thousands are being turned away, in large part because of an insufficient pipeline of faculty. This article describes how one school hit the shortage head on by creating alternate models for employing and growing new faculty, and then instituting a variety of strategies to develop and keep them. PMID:25999189

  12. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  13. Design and Implementation of an International Nurse Faculty Partnership.

    PubMed

    Tuxbury, Janis S; Vilton, Yves; Hays, Antoinette; Street, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Haiti has the highest rates of infant, under 5 years old, and maternal mortality in the Americas. More nurses are needed throughout the country, but there is a deficit of nursing faculty. Increasing numbers and quality of nursing faculty members will ensure a sustainable, positive impact on the country's nursing profession. The International Nurse Faculty Partnership Initiative was designed to educate a total of 36 current Haitian nurse faculty members at the master's-degree level. The first cohort of 12 nurse faculty members completed the program of study in February 2014, graduating with a master's degree in nursing from the State University of Haiti. Performance evaluation by their respective deans revealed that the Haitian nursing faculty members demonstrated increases in teaching effectiveness and critical thinking in comparison to their premaster's-degree skill levels. The International Nurse Faculty Partnership Initiative expects to graduate a total of 36 master's-level-prepared nurse educators. Currently, program graduates and nursing leaders from Haiti's Ministry of Health are working with the State University of Haiti to establish the faculty of nursing within the institution, creating a system for the ongoing delivery of baccalaureate-level and master-level nursing education within that country. PMID:27000196

  14. The Reliance on and Demand for Adjunct Faculty Members in America's Rural, Suburban, and Urban Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlier, Hara D.; Williams, Mitchell R.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on a survey of chief academic officers at 347 community colleges nationwide, this study examined the impact of institutional type (rural, suburban, urban) on reliance on and demand for adjunct faculty members. Findings indicated that rural institutions rely less on adjuncts, whereas both rural and urban institutions report high levels of…

  15. The Shortage of Doctorally Prepared Nursing Faculty: A Dire Situation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Linda E.; Sechrist, Karen R.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of national survey data on nursing faculty identified the following trends: since 1993, the mean age of doctorally prepared faculty has increased; average retirement age is 62.5; 200-300 faculty are eligible for retirement annually from 2003-2012; mean number of years in nursing doctoral programs is 8.3. Earlier entry into doctoral…

  16. Nursing faculty experiences of students' academic dishonesty.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Joyce S

    2009-04-01

    Student academic dishonesty was examined using a qualitative critical method to determine the effects of this experience on nurse educators. Twelve faculty members were interviewed about confronting and reporting academic misconduct. Results indicated that educators perceived significant personal and professional risks associated with addressing academic dishonesty, including damage to their relationships with students and colleagues. Participants identified their primary responsibility as gatekeepers of the profession and therefore noted their willingness to bear the burden of being the accuser. PMID:19441633

  17. Faculty Development in Nursing Education Project. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This report describes some of the initial plans, activities, and opinions of southern nursing school faculty selected to participate in the Faculty Development in Nursing Education Project (FDN). Section 1 states that the project's overall objectives are to improve and to develop the teaching skills of nurse educators in meeting the needs of…

  18. The effects of student incivility on nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Luparell, Susan

    2007-01-01

    In this study, 21 nursing faculty who experienced uncivil encounters with nursing students were interviewed to determine what effects those encounters had on them. The uncivil encounters ranged from relatively mild to highly aggressive, including overt threats to the faculty members' well-being. The effects of the uncivil encounters on the nursing faculty involved were significant and included both short-term and long-term sequelae, such as physical and emotional reactions, decreased self-esteem, loss of confidence in their teaching abilities, significant time expenditures, and negative effects on the educational process. Three faculty members left nursing education and cited their interactions with students as an influential factor. PMID:17302095

  19. Examining the Effects of a National League for Nursing Core Competencies Workshop as an Intervention to Improve Nurse Faculty Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanBever Wilson, Robin R.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the complex challenges facing schools of nursing, a research study was implemented to introduce nurse faculty at one small rural northeastern Tennessee school of nursing to the NLN "Core Competencies for Nurse Educators". Utilizing Kalb's Nurse Faculty Self-Evaluation Tool as a pre- and post-intervention test, 30 nurse faculty members…

  20. Starting a job as adjunct clinical instructor.

    PubMed

    Koharchik, Linda; Jakub, Karen

    2014-08-01

    This article is the second in a new quarterly series on the roles of adjunct clinical faculty and preceptors, who teach nursing students to apply knowledge in clinical settings. Topics will include the preparation of clinical instructors and preceptors for these roles, the student evaluation process, and overcoming challenges that can come with teaching in the clinical field and with adjunct teaching. PMID:25075704

  1. Retaining the wisdom: Academic nurse leaders' reflections on extending the working life of aging nurse faculty.

    PubMed

    Falk, Nancy L

    2014-01-01

    Aging nurse faculty members are vital human resources who serve as educators, researchers, and leaders within baccalaureate nursing (BSN) programs. On average, aging nurse faculty members are over 50 years of age and face key retirement decisions over the next decade. The purpose of this study was to begin to build substantive theory about academic nurse leaders' perceptions of extending the academic working life of aging nurse faculty members. Nine academic nurse leaders from BSN programs nationwide were interviewed in this grounded theory study. Data were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Four categories emerged: valuing aging nurse faculty, enduring environmental challenges, recognizing stakeholder incongruence, and readjusting. Findings reveal that aging nurse faculty members are highly valued by academic nurse leaders, bringing wisdom, experience, and institutional, historical, and cultural awareness to their many roles. Yet, some aging nurse faculty fail to keep knowledge, skills, and teaching modes current, which is problematic given the multiple environmental challenges that academic nurse leaders face. Stakeholder incongruence arises as a mismatch between the needs of the BSN program and the skills and contributions of aging nurse faculty members. BSN programs, program leaders, and aging nurse faculty members can lessen incongruence by readjusting to address the pressures, tensions, and ongoing change. PMID:24503313

  2. When the mission is teaching: does nursing faculty practice fit?

    PubMed

    Sherwen, L N

    1998-01-01

    As nursing faculty practice becomes a part of academic life, nursing programs in liberal arts colleges, where the primary mission is teaching, must document not only that practice is scholarship but also that practice conforms to the teaching mission of the institution. Discussions of scholarly practice from the nursing literature, as well as from Schon and Boyer, serve to validate that nursing faculty practice is scholarship. Attributes of scholarly practice, to be used to evaluate nursing practice outcomes, are identified. Finally, the concept of "scholarship in support of teaching"--the standard used to evaluate scholarship at The College of New Jersey, a medium-sized liberal arts college with a school of nursing--is analyzed as a model to document that nursing faculty practice is not only scholarship but also supports the teaching mission of the institution. PMID:9610021

  3. Students' Perceptions of Bullying Behaviours by Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Janet R. M.; Walker, Jean; Askew, Rebecca; Robinson, Jennifer C.; McNair, Mary

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the types, sources, and frequency of bullying behaviours encountered by nursing students in their final year of nursing education. Six hundred thirty-six respondents reported encountering at least one bullying behaviour from School of Nursing (SON) Faculty during one year of classroom or clinical course work. The results of…

  4. Symbiosis – Undergraduate Research Mentoring and Faculty Scholarship in Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Erlinda C.; Hardie, Thomas; Schell, Kathleen; Plowfield, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    While teaching is the major focus of academia, research and professional publications frequently determine faculty eligibility for promotion and tenure. In universities where funded research is scarce, faculty need creative means to accomplish research goals. Research is an essential part of baccalaureate nursing education. The goal of research education at the baccalaureate level is to prepare knowledgeable consumers of nursing research. The purpose of this article is to describe an undergraduate nursing research course that provide students with hands on experience in the conduct of nursing research and provide faculty with assistance in moving their research agenda forward. Faculty members were solicited to work with 5-10 students in a research project that was either in the planning stages or actively in progress. After one year of program implementation, faculty and students were involved in presenting poster and oral presentations at state, regional, and international research conferences. Manuscripts as well as proposals for funding are in the process of submission. PMID:18237619

  5. The Relationship of Perceived Organizational Support, Job Satisfaction, and Years of Online Teaching Experience to Work Engagement among Online Undergraduate Adjunct Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zone, Emma J.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid growth of online higher education has necessitated increased employment of adjunct faculty. Correlational analyses were implemented to determine whether a relationship exists between adjunct undergraduate faculty's perceptions of organizational support, overall job satisfaction, and online teaching experience, and their work…

  6. Professional culture brokers: Nursing faculty perceptions of nursing culture and their role in student formation.

    PubMed

    Strouse, Susan M; Nickerson, Carolyn J

    2016-05-01

    Socialization, or formation of students to the professional nurse role, is an expectation of nursing education. This process is complex and challenging for students, who continue to experience culture shock moving from academe to practice settings. Viewing formation as enculturation is one way to address culture shock. Nursing faculty are key figures in this process, yet their views are not known. This focused ethnography study explored nursing faculty's perceptions about the culture of nursing and how they bring students into that culture. Data collected at two accredited, undergraduate pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing programs were analyzed using Leininger's four phases of data analysis. Four themes emerged: 1. The culture of nursing is multifaceted, multivalent and at times contradictory 2. Many factors interact and have influence on the culture of nursing 3. Navigating the subcultures (academia, service and organizational culture) is challenging for faculty, and 4. Nursing faculty believe that the right conditions facilitate the enculturation of students. Nursing faculty believe nursing has a professional culture and they bring students into that culture. Viewing the faculty role in enculturation to professional nursing as a culture broker can facilitate the process for students and mitigate the culture shock new graduate nurses experience. PMID:27235560

  7. Professional Development for Adjunct Teaching Faculty in a Research-Intensive University: Engagement in Scholarly Approaches to Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Andrea S.; Wong, Tracy J.; Hubball, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    Research-intensive universities around the world are increasingly drawing upon leading practitioners in professional fields as adjunct faculty to deliver high quality student learning experiences in diverse undergraduate and graduate program contexts. To support effective professional development in these contexts, many universities have developed…

  8. Out of Sight--Out of Mind: The Importance of Integrating Adjunct Faculty into an Educational Administration Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Judy A.; MacGregor, Cynthia J.; Watson, Robert

    Many colleges and universities use "adjunct faculty" as a means to address increasingly unpredictable student populations, questionable funding formulas, and tightened education budgets. Initial evidence suggests, however, that the practice of using them contains flaws. This research was conducted to determine existing circumstances of adjunct…

  9. Orientation, Evaluation, and Integration of Part-Time Nursing Faculty.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joanne S

    2015-01-01

    This study helps to quantify and describe orientation, evaluation, and integration practices pertaining to part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing education programs. A researcher designed Web-based survey was used to collect information from a convenience sample of part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Survey questions focused on the amount and type of orientation, evaluation, and integration practices. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze results. Respondents reported on average four hours of orientation, with close to half reporting no more than two hours. Evaluative feedback was received much more often from students than from full-time faculty. Most respondents reported receiving some degree of mentoring and that it was easy to get help from full-time faculty. Respondents reported being most informed about student evaluation procedures, grading, and the steps to take when students are not meeting course objectives, and less informed about changes to ongoing curriculum and policy. PMID:26151905

  10. Faculty research productivity and organizational structure in schools of nursing.

    PubMed

    Kohlenberg, E M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between faculty research productivity and organizational structure in schools of nursing. The need for nursing research has been widely recognized by members of the nursing profession, yet comparatively few engage in conducting research. Although contextual variables have been investigated that facilitate or inhibit nursing research, the relationship between organizational structure and nursing research productivity has not been examined. This problem was examined within the context of the Entrepreneurial Theory of Formal Organizations. A survey methodology was used for data collection. Data on individual faculty research productivity and organizational structure in the school of nursing were obtained through the use of a questionnaire. A random sample of 300 faculty teaching in 60 master's and doctoral nursing schools in the United States was used. The instruments for data collection were Wakefield-Fisher's Adapted Scholarly Productivity Index and Hall's Organizational Inventory. The data were analyzed using Pearson Product-Moment Correlation Coefficients and multiple correlation/regression techniques. The overall relationship between faculty research productivity and organizational structure in schools of nursing was not significant at the .002 level of confidence. Although statistically significant relationships were not identified, scholarly research productivity and its subscale prepublication and research activities tended to vary positively with procedural specifications in a highly bureaucratic organizational structure. Further research may focus on identification of structural variables that support highly productive nurse researchers. PMID:1401563

  11. Nursing Faculty Professional Development: A Study Using the National League for Nursing (NLN) Core Competencies for Nurse Educators for Development of Novice to Expert Nurse Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luoma, Kari L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify core competencies that are most significant for nursing faculty to develop as they transition from novice to expert faculty. Professional development in a systematic approach may guide faculty to learn what is significant as they progress in the nurse faculty role. A quantitative…

  12. Mentoring Relationships and the Levels of Role Conflict and Role Ambiguity Experienced by Neophyte Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Specht, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    After an examination of the current issues related to the shortages of nurses and nursing faculty in the United States, the importance of facilitating the transition of interested nurse clinicians into their roles as nurse educators in order to address the decreased number of nurses and nursing faculty became apparent. Mentoring in nursing…

  13. Psychiatric Nursing Faculty Practice: Care within the Community Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richie, Mary Fern; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing faculty practice offers the academic nurse opportunity to generate salary support and integrate students into the real world of mental health care. It promotes scholarship and knowledge-building and has a direct impact on the lives of patients. (Author/JOW)

  14. Characteristics Students View as Important in Nurse Faculty Role Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Geneva

    Nursing students' views concerning the behavior of faculty role models were studied. The sample consisted of 75 senior-level baccalaureate nursing students, 69 females and 6 males. The theoretical framework for the research was role theory and Bandura's social learning and modeling theory. The Clinical Instructor Characteristics Ranking Scale…

  15. Faculty perception of bullying in schools of nursing.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Claudia A; Cannella, Barbara L; Wantland, Dean

    2013-01-01

    This article is a report of a study conducted to determine the prevalence of bullying among faculty members in schools or colleges of nursing. The issue of bullying of nursing faculty in the academic setting is of interest in terms of recruitment, retention, job satisfaction, and the overall quality of the work environment. This cross-sectional, descriptive study of faculty in three northeastern states of the United States was carried out in 2010. The Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) was used to survey faculty members in schools of nursing who award a baccalaureate degree (or higher) in nursing. A total of 473 faculty members met the inclusion criteria and responded to the NAQ-R. An iterative exploratory principal components analysis with orthogonal rotation was performed. Of the original 22 items, 13 were retained to measure the experiences of negative acts in the nursing faculty workplaces. The mean total score for the 13-item instrument was 17.90 (SD = 6.07) and ranged from 13 to 56. The resulting components structure produced three clear subscales identifying the experiences of verbal abuse, physical abuse, and devaluing. The revised 13-item instrument had a Cronbach's alpha value of .88. Experiences of bullying were reported in 169 of the 473 (36%) respondents. A significant correlation was found between meeting frequency and the report of bullying (r = .18, P ≤ .001). Administrators and senior faculty were more likely than expected to be the perpetrators of bullying. If the leaders are identified as bullies, the environment cannot be perceived as supportive and healthy. These unhealthy environments may have serious consequences related to retaining nursing faculty. PMID:24075262

  16. Application of the Symphonological approach to faculty-to-faculty incivility in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Burger, Kathleen G; Kramlich, Debra; Malitas, Mary; Page-Cutrara, Karin; Whitfield-Harris, Lisa

    2014-10-01

    The nature of ethical interactions among nurse educators is crucial in modeling ethically based relationships for nursing students. This article focuses on the issue of uncivil faculty-to-faculty relationships in nursing education and is supported by a literature review of incivility in academic settings and the experiential reflections of seasoned nurse educators. The bioethical practice-based theory of symphonology provides a new perspective for framing these reviews and reflections. This theory can facilitate decision making in difficult interactions and sustain a focus on the central agreements that are foundational to nursing education. Incivility exemplars are explored within the context of autonomy, freedom, objectivity, beneficence, and fidelity, and the integration of academia and ethics is discussed as essential to nursing education and human caring. PMID:25275989

  17. Faculty encounters with uncivil nursing students: an overview.

    PubMed

    Luparell, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The critical incident technique (CIT) was used to explore faculty experiences with uncivil nursing students. Twenty-one nursing faculty with various years of experience in teaching were interviewed to ascertain what they considered critical incidents of uncivil encounters with nursing students and what effect those encounters had on them. Thirty-six encounters were described by the faculty. Of the 36 encounters, 33 occurred with individual students and 3 occurred with groups of students. Twenty-three encounters occurred in the context of poor student performance requiring constructive criticism or resulting in course failure. A battlefield metaphor is used to describe the incidents, their antecedents, and their consequences. The encounters were precipitated by a period of escalating tensions and effort by the faculty to diffuse the situation. The faculty were surprised and caught off guard by the encounters, which ranged in severity from mild to highly aggressive. The faculty often perceived significant threats to well-being of self, loved ones, job security, and/or possessions. The aftermath of the encounters included physical and emotional tolls on faculty, decreased self-esteem and loss of confidence in teaching ability, significant time expenditures, and negative consequences to the educational process. Three of the faculty left teaching in part due to encounters with students. PMID:15011194

  18. Perceptions of the Other: Voices of Adjunct and Fulltime Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backlin, William Wayne

    2012-01-01

    The practice of hiring adjunct instructors was initially considered to be an anomalous event (Todd, 2004). Community college employment of adjunct instructors, however, witnessed a 50% increase during the 1970s (Cain, 1999) and, by 1984, adjunct instructor utilization in community colleges rose dramatically with an additional 80% growth. Over a…

  19. Illuminating the Experiences of African-American Nursing Faculty Seeking Employment in Higher Education in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loyd, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    This study explored and described the experience of female African-American nursing faculty seeking employment in higher education in nursing. The lack of diversity in the nursing workforce has been attributed as a major underlying cause of disparity in healthcare in the United States. The importance of increasing the number of minority nursing…

  20. A faculty created strategic plan for excellence in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Evans, Connie Joan; Francis Shackell, Eileen; Jean Kerr-Wilson, Selma; Joan Doyle, Glynda; McCutcheon, Jodie Anita; Budz, Bernice

    2014-01-01

    Strategic planning for nursing education, when seen through a faculty lens creates a deeper, more meaningful critical analysis of effective program development. New strategies are required for academic institutions to transform their curricula to meet the needs of a dynamic healthcare and changing global environment to provide quality education for students. In this article, an evidence-informed process is presented that was progressively co-created by the faculty and facilitators. Seminal business frameworks, leadership development philosophies, and innovative interventions enabled faculty to become engaged and developed as they created a strategic plan for a future-driven nursing program. Phase One presents the process of developing a strategic plan for excellence in nursing education by leveraging faculty potential and preparing for an upcoming accreditation. In Phase Two, four team members from Phase One continue as part of Phase Two team serving as the collective memory for this initial work. This method of strategic planning encouraged faculty engagement and leadership and laid the groundwork for a positive culture change among nursing faculty. PMID:24516007

  1. Advancing a program of research within a nursing faculty role.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Marie T; Wenzel, Jennifer; Han, Hae-Ra; Allen, Jerilyn K; Paez, Kathryn A; Mock, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Doctoral students and new faculty members often seek advice from more senior faculty on how to advance their program of research. Students may ask whether they should choose the manuscript option for their dissertation or whether they should seek a postdoctoral fellowship. New faculty members wonder whether they should pursue a career development award and whether they need a mentor as they strive to advance their research while carrying out teaching, service, and practice responsibilities. In this article, we describe literature on the impact of selected aspects of pre- and postdoctoral training and faculty strategies on scholarly productivity in the faculty role. We also combine our experiences at a school of nursing within a research-intensive university to suggest strategies for success. Noting the scarcity of research that evaluates the effect of these strategies, we are actively engaged in collecting data on their relationship to the scholarly productivity of students and faculty members within our own institution. PMID:19022210

  2. Advancing a Program of Research within a Nursing Faculty Role

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Marie T.; Wenzel, Jennifer; Han, Hae-Ra.; Allen, Jerilyn K.; Paez, Kathryn A.; Mock, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Doctoral students and new faculty members often seek advice from more senior faculty on how to advance their program of research. Students may ask whether they should choose the manuscript option for their dissertation or whether they should seek a postdoctoral fellowship. New faculty members wonder whether they should pursue a career development (K) award and whether they need a mentor as they strive to advance their research while carrying out teaching, service, and practice responsibilities. In this paper, we describe literature on the impact of selected aspects of pre and postdoctoral training and faculty strategies on scholarly productivity in the faculty role. We also combine our experiences at a school of nursing within a research-intensive university to suggest strategies for success. Noting the scarcity of research that evaluates the effect of these strategies we are actively engaged in collecting data on their relationship to the scholarly productivity of students and faculty members within our own institution. PMID:19022210

  3. Nurses as Medical School Faculty: Students' Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Maura E.; Hitchcock, Maurice; Bruning, Madeleine; Logan, Moreen; Trial, Jan; Elliott, Donna; Taylor, Clive

    One solution to the problem of providing instruction for medical students is to use nurses as clinical instructors for each of the required clinical clerkships. A study was conducted to evaluate the use of nurses as instructors in a school of medicine by studying students' perceptions of nurse instructors. Focus groups and individual interviews…

  4. Using Classroom Assessment Techniques: The Experiences of Adjunct Faculty at a Vanguard Learning College and Two Non-Vanguard Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuby, Heidi S.

    Investigates the use of Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) by adjunct faculty at three Florida community colleges. A qualitative methodology, with a phenomenological approach, helped to describe the meaning that the experience of using CATs had for adjunct professors. Interviews with eighteen participants were the primary means of data…

  5. Exploring Job Satisfaction of Nursing Faculty: Theoretical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingchen; Liesveld, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The Future of Nursing report identified the shortage of nursing faculty as 1 of the barriers to nursing education. In light of this, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the work-life of nursing faculty. The current research focused on job satisfaction of nursing faculty from 4 theoretical perspectives: human capital theory, which emphasizes the expected monetary and nonmonetary returns for any career choices; structural theory, which emphasizes the impact of institutional features on job satisfaction; positive extrinsic environment by self-determination theory, which asserts that a positive extrinsic environment promotes competency and effective outcomes at work; and psychological theory, which emphasizes the proposed relationship between job performance and satisfaction. In addition to the measures for human capital theory, institutional variables (from structural theory and self-determination theory), and productivity measures (from psychological theory), the authors also selected sets of variables for personal characteristics to investigate their effects on job satisfaction. The results indicated that variables related to human capital theory, especially salary, contributed the most to job satisfaction, followed by those related to institutional variables. Personal variables and productivity variables as a whole contributed as well. The only other variable with marginal significance was faculty's perception of institutional support for teaching. PMID:26653042

  6. Preparing faculty and students for an international nursing education experience.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Kim; Sportsman, Susan; Eschiti, Valerie S; Bradshaw, Pam; Bol, Todd

    2006-01-01

    As society becomes increasingly globalized, it is imperative to include international educational perspectives in the nursing profession. This article shares experiences of a university and hospital in facilitating education of students of nursing from India. It includes implementing partnerships, student selection process, and transcultural considerations. These considerations include faculty preparation for receiving students from India. In addition, ways to prepare Indian and U.S. students are examined. PMID:16479846

  7. Faculty Narratives: Teaching, Technology, and the Nursing Professoriate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ava S.

    2010-01-01

    The use of the Internet and its associated technology in education are necessities at the 21st century university. Nursing faculty has, and continues to be, influenced by changes in the manner in which education is delivered. The changes are superimposed upon the traditional scholarship roles involving teaching, research, and service. In order to…

  8. How Nursing Faculty Experience Being Cared for in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehn, Mary Beth

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to describe how nursing faculty are cared for in the workplace. Participants were interviewed individually or in a focus group to understand their experience. Following data analysis, the following themes were created: the process of being cared for included connecting, openly sharing,…

  9. The Existence of Implicit Racial Bias in Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Kathleen A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the existence of implicit racial bias in nursing faculty using the Implicit Association Test (IAT). It was conducted within a critical race theory framework where race was seen as a permanent, pervasive, and systemic condition, not an individual process. The study was fueled by data showing continued disparate academic and…

  10. Enhancing baccalaureate nursing information technology outcomes: faculty perspectives.

    PubMed

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2008-01-01

    Baccalaureate nurses must be prepared to meet information technology expectations for practice and future professional development. Therefore, educational programs must evaluate curriculum and student outcomes and address areas for improvement. Faculty members were surveyed regarding barriers and strategies for improving information technology outcomes. Project findings have educational, clinical agency, legal, and policy implications. PMID:18312224

  11. The Utilization of the Seven Principles for Good Practices of Full-Time and Adjunct Faculty in Teaching Health & Science in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musaitif, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which undergraduate full-time and adjunct faculty members in the health and science programs at community colleges in Southern California utilize the seven principles of good practice as measured by the Faculty Inventory of the Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate…

  12. From the Hospital Room to the Classroom: Recruiting and Supporting New Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersey, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The health and safety of the public relies heavily on an adequate supply of nurses. The majority of California nurses receive their training in community colleges where the nursing faculty shortage is expected to worsen in the next ten years. The experience of new nursing faculty in community colleges has not been studied or reported in academic…

  13. Attitudes of Nursing Faculty towards Nursing Students with Disabilities: An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levey, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA, 1990) and Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA, 2008) provide students with disabilities access to postsecondary institutions and are applicable to nursing education in all learning environments. Nursing faculty members are charged with admitting, educating, and graduating students, with…

  14. Critical Thinking Dispositions of Undergraduate Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty in Southwestern Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojewole, Foluso O.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify the critical thinking dispositions of undergraduate nursing students and nursing faculty in Southwestern Nigeria. Critical thinking dispositions are required for critical thinking skills. People who have critical thinking disposition exhibit seven traits: truth-seeking,…

  15. The Business Management Preceptorship within the Nurse Practitioner Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wing, Donna Marie

    1998-01-01

    A nurse practitioner business preceptorship provides students with knowledge of basic business, accounting, finance, economics, marketing, and reimbursement. A lack of qualified faculty can be offset with adjunct business faculty. Selection of placement sites should provide challenging management experiences. (SK)

  16. The utilization of the seven principles for good practices of full-time and adjunct faculty in teaching health & science in community colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musaitif, Linda M.

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which undergraduate full-time and adjunct faculty members in the health and science programs at community colleges in Southern California utilize the seven principles of good practice as measured by the Faculty Inventory of the Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education. A second purpose was to compare degree of utilization for gender and class size. Methodology. This is a quantitative study wherein there exists a systematic and mathematical assessment of data gathered through the use of a Likert scale survey to process and determine the mathematical model of the use of the principles by the target population of both full-time and adjunct faculty of health/science programs of community colleges in Southern California. Findings. Examination of the data revealed that both full-time and adjunct faculty members of Southern California community colleges perceive themselves a high degree of utilization of the seven principles of good practice. There was no statistically significant data to suggest a discrepancy between full-time and adjunct professors' perceptions among the utilization of the seven principles. Overall, male faculty members perceived themselves as utilizing the principles to a greater degree than female faculty. Data suggest that faculty with class size 60 or larger showed to utilize the seven principles more frequently than the professors with smaller class sizes. Conclusions. Full-time and adjunct professors of the health and sciences in Southern California community colleges perceive themselves as utilizing the seven principles of good practice to a high degree. Recommendations. This study suggests many recommendations for future research, including the degree to which negative economic factors such as budget cuts and demands affect the utilization of the seven principles. Also recommended is a study comparing students' perceptions of faculty's utilization of the seven

  17. Best Faculty Practice Plan Model for a Small College of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Sharyn Neiman

    2010-01-01

    Bridging the gap between theory and practice has been a priority with universities and colleges of nursing. A mechanism for bridging this gap has been the establishment of faculty practices. Faculty practices have provided nurse practitioner faculty opportunities to mentor students, augment income, implement evidence-based research, provide…

  18. A Decade of International Activities by U.S. Nurse Faculty: A Descriptive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusk, Brigid; Lash, Ayhan Aytekin

    2002-01-01

    A study to assess scholarly activities of U.S. nursing faculty abroad from 1985-1995 resulted in descriptions of 805 visits to 109 countries by 247 scholars. Results showed that U.S. nurse faculty were involved in diverse and widespread international nursing activities. (Contains 25 references.) (JOW)

  19. Hiring Intentions of Directors of Nursing Programs Related to DNP- and PhD-Prepared Faculty and Roles of Faculty.

    PubMed

    Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R; Agger, Charlotte A

    2016-01-01

    This study surveyed administrators of associate degree in nursing (ADN) and bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) programs across the United States to identify hiring intentions and describe the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and PhD-prepared faculty members. The final sample included 253 ADN and 229 BSN programs. ADN programs were neither intentionally hiring nor looking to hire doctorally prepared nurse faculty. Deans and directors of BSN programs reported an average of 3 openings for the next academic year, 2 projected for new PhD-prepared faculty and 1 for a faculty member with a DNP. Schools have made varying decisions regarding the type of appointment (tenure or nontenure track) for DNP-prepared faculty members. Challenges that DNP-prepared faculty members encountered in meeting the role and promotion expectations in their schools focused predominantly on scholarship. PMID:27216125

  20. Career Technical Education Adjunct Faculty Teacher Readiness: An Investigation of Teacher Excellence and Variables of Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerra, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between teaching readiness and teaching excellence with three variables of preparedness of adjunct professors teaching career technical education courses through student surveys using a correlational design of two statistical techniques; least-squares regression and one-way analysis of…

  1. Identifying Barriers and Facilitators to Nurse Faculty Careers for PhD Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Fang, Di; Bednash, Geraldine D; Arietti, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    The shortage of doctorally educated nurses pursuing faculty careers is a major concern regarding the development of the nurse faculty workforce. This cross-sectional study aims to identify barriers and facilitators to academic careers for doctoral (PhD) nursing students. A total of 1,500 PhD students were randomly selected from nursing schools across the country to participate in our survey, and a 62.8% response rate was achieved. The study found that 72% of respondents planned to pursue faculty careers after graduating. Students with postgraduation plans for academic careers, nonacademic careers, and undecided careers showed distinct profiles of demographic and academic characteristics. They also perceived facilitators and barriers to faculty careers differently. The most influential facilitators were interest in teaching and an appreciation of the impact of nursing research on patient care, and the most considered barriers were poor financial compensation and a negative perception of academia. Minority students were more likely than White students to have plans for academic careers. Various experiences during doctoral education appeared to have a positive impact on students' decisions to pursue academic careers. PMID:27216127

  2. Faculty role modeling of professional writing: one baccalaureate nursing program's experience.

    PubMed

    Newton, Sarah E

    2008-01-01

    According to The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 1998), professional writing is an important outcome of baccalaureate nursing education. Most baccalaureate nursing programs in the United States expect formally written student papers to adhere to the style requirements outlined in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2001). It is essential for the baccalaureate nursing faculty members who evaluate student papers to be role models for the desired writing behaviors to facilitate student attainment of professional writing outcomes. However, to what extent nursing faculty members' writing behaviors and knowledge of the APA style requirements impact student writing outcomes is not known because the issue has not been addressed in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe one Midwestern baccalaureate nursing program's faculty development efforts to assess faculty familiarity with the APA style requirements and how such knowledge may impact baccalaureate nursing students' writing outcomes. PMID:18358441

  3. Alcohol Abuse Curriculum Guide for Nurse Practitioner Faculty. Health Professions Education Curriculum Resources Series. Nursing 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasselblad, Judith

    The format for this curriculum guide, written for nurse practitioner faculty, consists of learning objectives, content outline, teaching methodology suggestions, references and recommended readings. Part 1 of the guide, Recognition of Early and Chronic Alcoholism, deals with features of alcoholism such as epidemiological data and theories,…

  4. The Relationship of Nursing Faculty Clinical Teaching Behaviors to Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kube, Marcia L.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical experience is the most important component of nursing education (Gaberson & Oermann, 2007; Walker, 2005). As part of the clinical learning environment, the clinical teaching behaviors of nursing faculty have significant potential to influence students' learning. Nurse educators have a responsibility to provide nursing students with…

  5. The Relationships among Job Satisfaction, Length of Employment, and Mentoring of Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzan, Zelda

    2016-01-01

    The shortage of faculty in nursing education programs has been well documented by the National League for Nursing. Job satisfaction is important in retaining nurse educators, and one New York nursing program was interested in examining the potential impact of mentoring on satisfaction. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine job…

  6. A Faculty Peer Network for Integrating Consumer Health Solutions in Nursing Education: Contextual Influences and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Glynda

    2016-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing and Canada Health Infoway recently launched a national project to facilitate the integration of digital and consumer health solutions into undergraduate nursing programs across Canada. Led by eleven nursing faculty members with expertise in informatics, the Digital Health Nursing Faculty Peer Network provided a forum for mentorship and support to other nursing faculty (72) across Canada and facilitated the development of a number of strategies to advance the incorporation of digital health content into undergraduate nursing curricula (e.g., the creation of a Faculty Toolkit for teaching Consumer Health Solutions). In this panel presentation, contextual and regional influences as well as specific perspectives related to the experience of each of the panelists within the Faculty Peer Network project will be outlined and discussed. PMID:27332275

  7. Faculty-to-Faculty Incivility among Nurse Educators and Its Relationship to Role Satisfaction and Workplace Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frye, Nadeena D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this correlation study was to examine the perceptions of faculty-to-faculty incivility among nurse educators and its relationship to role satisfaction and workplace commitment in order to better understand the dynamics of these professionals. A purposeful convenience sample consisted of 114 volunteer participants from a population…

  8. Nursing directors' leadership styles and faculty members' job satisfaction in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Chin; Baron, Mark

    2006-10-01

    Nursing leaders in Taiwan seldom receive the leadership training necessary to lead an academic organization. As a result, leaders may experience burn out, and dissatisfaction among faculty may increase. This study examined nursing faculty members' perceptions of nursing directors' leadership and their job satisfaction levels to understand how perceptions of leadership styles related to job satisfaction in Taiwan. This descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study used self-administered questionnaires. Transformational leadership theory supported the research framework. Nine schools with nursing programs awarding diplomas to students participated in this study. A total of 175 questionnaires were returned (72% response rate). The findings indicated that Taiwan's nursing directors tend to display transformational leadership more frequently in their workplaces and that Taiwan's nursing faculty members are moderately satisfied in their jobs. In addition, nursing faculty in Taiwan are more satisfied with directors who practice the leadership style of attributed idealized influence. PMID:17058695

  9. From Faculty Development to the Classroom: A Qualitative Study of How Nurse Educators Turn Faculty Development into Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Kim Zuschek

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to better understand the transfer of learning by uncovering how various factors supported the integration of knowledge and skills gleaned from the Faculty Development: Integrated Technology into Nursing Education and Practice Initiative (ITNEP) programs into nursing education curricula. Through interviews…

  10. Qualitative Description of Global Health Nursing Competencies by Nursing Faculty in Africa and the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Lynda; Moran, Laura; Zarate, Rosa; Warren, Nicole; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena; Tamí-Maury, Irene; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze qualitative comments from four surveys asking nursing faculty to rate the importance of 30 global health competencies for undergraduate nursing programs. Method: qualitative descriptive study that included 591 individuals who responded to the survey in English (49 from Africa and 542 from the Americas), 163 who responded to the survey in Spanish (all from Latin America), and 222 Brazilian faculty who responded to the survey in Portuguese. Qualitative comments were recorded at the end of the surveys by 175 respondents to the English survey, 75 to the Spanish survey, and 70 to the Portuguese survey. Qualitative description and a committee approach guided data analysis. Results: ten new categories of global health competencies emerged from the analysis. Faculty also demonstrated concern about how and when these competencies could be integrated into nursing curricula. Conclusion: the additional categories should be considered for addition to the previously identified global health competencies. These, in addition to the guidance about integration into existing curricula, can be used to guide refinement of the original list of global health competencies. Further research is needed to seek consensus about these competencies and to develop recommendations and standards to guide nursing curriculum development. PMID:27276020

  11. A Faculty Development Program for Nurse Educators Learning to Teach Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Debra; Paulus, Trena M.; Loboda, Iryna; Phipps, Gina; Wyatt, Tami H.; Myers, Carole R.; Mixer, Sandra J.

    2010-01-01

    As the College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville prepared to move their graduate programs online, a nursing faculty grass-roots movement led to the implementation of a faculty development program. This instructional design portfolio describes the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of this program, with the goal…

  12. Association of faculty perceptions of work-life with emotional exhaustion and intent to leave academic nursing: report on a national survey of nurse faculty.

    PubMed

    Yedidia, Michael J; Chou, Jolene; Brownlee, Susan; Flynn, Linda; Tanner, Christine A

    2014-10-01

    The current and projected nurse faculty shortage threatens the capacity to educate sufficient numbers of nurses for meeting demand. As part of an initiative to foster strategies for expanding educational capacity, a survey of a nationally representative sample of 3,120 full-time nurse faculty members in 269 schools and programs that offered at least one prelicensure degree program was conducted. Nearly 4 of 10 participants reported high levels of emotional exhaustion, and one third expressed an intent to leave academic nursing within 5 years. Major contributors to burnout were dissatisfaction with workload and perceived inflexibility to balance work and family life. Intent to leave was explained not only by age but by several potentially modifiable aspects of work, including dissatisfaction with workload, salary, and availability of teaching support. Preparing sufficient numbers of nurses to meet future health needs will require addressing those aspects of work-life that undermine faculty teaching capacity. PMID:25275990

  13. Job stress, mentoring, psychological empowerment, and job satisfaction among nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Chung, Catherine E; Kowalski, Susan

    2012-07-01

    The National League for Nursing endorses mentoring throughout nursing faculty's careers as the method to recruit nurses into academia and improve retention of nursing faculty within the academy. A nationwide sample of 959 full-time nursing faculty completed a descriptive survey comprising a researcher-created demographic questionnaire plus Dreher's mentoring scale, Gmelch's faculty stress index, Spreitzer's psychological empowerment scale, and the National Survey for Postsecondary Faculty's job satisfaction scale. Results showed that 40% of the sample had a current work mentor. Variables showed significant relationships to job satisfaction (p < 0.01): mentoring quality (0.229), job stress (-0.568), and psychological empowerment (0.482). Multiple regression results indicated job satisfaction was significantly influenced (p < 0.01) by the presence of a mentoring relationship, salary, tenure status, psychological empowerment, and job stress. The regression model explained 47% of the variance in job satisfaction for the sample. PMID:22588567

  14. Faculty Shortages in Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Programs: Scope of the Problem and Strategies for Expanding the Supply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    This white paper summarizes the scope of the problem of faculty shortages in nursing education and discusses issues contributing to the shortage of faculty. It also outlines strategies for expanding the capacity of the current and future pool of nursing faculty. The United States is in the midst of an unprecedented shortage of registered nurses,…

  15. Survey of Nursing Faculty Preparation for Teaching About Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Marcia R; Suplee, Patricia Dunphy; Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has increased significantly in children and adults. Nursing faculty's ability to teach students about best practices in their care across the lifespan is important. This study explored nurse educators' perceived knowledge of, and levels of comfort in, their abilities to teach nursing students about nursing care of people with ASD. Strategies are proposed to incorporate competencies for care of people with ASD into nursing curricula. PMID:26771944

  16. Practice to Pedagogy: A Study of the Lived Experiences of Part-Time Nursing Faculty Transitioning from Expert Nurse to Novice Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testut, Tammy A.

    2013-01-01

    Part-time faculty in nursing programs are increasingly being hired as a supplement to the deteriorating pool of full-time nursing faculty. There is a growing need to fill the many vacant slots in nursing academe at the same time that there is substantial growth in prospective students inspiring to become nurses. While these "expert"…

  17. Nursing Faculty Decision Making about Best Practices in Test Construction, Item Analysis, and Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killingsworth, Erin Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    With the widespread use of classroom exams in nursing education there is a great need for research on current practices in nursing education regarding this form of assessment. The purpose of this study was to explore how nursing faculty members make decisions about using best practices in classroom test construction, item analysis, and revision in…

  18. Nursing Academic Administrators' Lived Experiences With Incivility and Bullying From Faculty: Consequences and Outcomes Demanding Action.

    PubMed

    LaSala, Kathleen B; Wilson, Vicki; Sprunk, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    There are an increasing number of nursing academic administrators who identify themselves as victims of faculty incivility. This study examined experiences that academic administrators encountered with faculty incivility using a phenomenological research design. Three major themes emerged: faculty inappropriate behaviors, consequences of faculty behaviors on administrator targets, and administrators call for action. Findings revealed that incivility had devastating effects on administrators personally and professionally. PMID:26673315

  19. Influence of Nursing Faculty Discussion Presence on Student Learning and Satisfaction in Online Courses.

    PubMed

    Claywell, Lora; Wallace, Cara; Price, Jill; Reneau, Margaret; Carlson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the relationships between faculty participation in online discussions with student satisfaction and perceived learning in online RN-BSN and MSN courses. Analysis of faculty participation in online courses (n = 280) demonstrated a relationship between faculty participation and student satisfaction and perceived learning. The results of this study offer guidance on the minimal faculty participation necessary in online discussions in nursing courses. PMID:26866734

  20. Preparing nurses for the new world order: a faculty development focus.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Anne; Roat, Cheryl; Kemper, Mori

    2012-01-01

    The new world order demands nursing faculty members be as competent in teaching and coaching students as they are about the art and science of nursing. The complexity associated with classroom management requires mastery of innovative learning modalities to assist students to think critically using research-based evidence in making patient care decisions. Grand Canyon University has made faculty competence a priority to ensure quality student outcomes. The College of Nursing has embraced a systematic process for creating faculty excellence through a comprehensive faculty development initiative. Developing faculty requires university support through policy and resources that is essential to prepare nurses for the new world order and therefore closing the education practice gap. PMID:22677966

  1. Enhancing the capacity to teach gerontological nursing: a faculty development project.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lois L; Van Son, Catherine R; Cartwright, Juliana C; Allen, Tiffany L

    2010-05-01

    This article describes a faculty development initiative implemented by baccalaureate school of nursing faculty to address the urgent need for education and development in gerontological nursing. The Gerontological Nursing Education Curriculum (G-NEC) project was implemented in five states between 2006 and 2009 to (a) increase faculty knowledge of gerontological nursing, and (b) increase gerontological content in participating schools of nursing. A 4-hour workshop presented at 11 schools introduced key concepts and instructional activities related to care of older adults. Participants rated content and format highly; follow-up reports indicated that many made curriculum changes to incorporate gerontological content. The authors describe workshop content and teaching strategies, curriculum changes participants made to incorporate gerontological content, and implications for faculty development. PMID:20481422

  2. Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty Competencies and Teaching Strategies to Enhance the Care of the Veteran Population: Perspectives of Veteran Affairs Nursing Academy (VANA) Faculty.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Judy

    2016-01-01

    It is critical that faculty competencies, teaching strategies, and the essential knowledge relating to the care of our veterans be delineated and taught to health care professionals in order for our Veterans to receive optimal care. The purpose of this qualitative study was to ascertain from nursing faculty members who have worked extensively with veterans, the necessary faculty competencies, essential knowledge, and teaching strategies needed to prepare baccalaureate level nurses to provide individualized, quality, and holistic care to veterans. Six Veteran Affairs Nursing Academy faculty members participated in two 2-hour focus group sessions. There were a total of 12 multidimensional major concepts identified: 5 faculty competencies, 4 essential knowledge areas, and 3 teaching strategies specifically related to veteran care. The information generated can be used for faculty, staff, and or nurse development. Having a comprehensive understanding of veteran health care needs enable effective patient-centered care delivery to veterans, which is the gold standard in health care our veterans deserve. PMID:27424932

  3. Salaries of Instructional and Administrative Nursing Faculty in Baccalaureate and Graduate Programs in Nursing, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Linda E.; Bednash, Geraldine D.; Hosier, Katherine L.

    This document presents data on salaries of instructional and administrative nursing faculty in U.S. undergraduate and graduate nursing programs in 95 tables. Data are based on a 1998 survey of 534 public and private universities and four-year colleges. Introductory information includes definitions of terms used in the survey, Carnegie…

  4. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students' performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties' expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students' skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. PMID:25419165

  5. Psychological type and explanatory style of nursing students and clinical faculty.

    PubMed

    Allchin, Lynn; Dzurec, Laura Cox; Engler, Arthur J

    2009-04-01

    Health care providers' collaboration and effective teamwork are essential to patient safety and quality care. Part of an ongoing project, this study focused on nursing faculty-student communication characteristics, specifically examining psychological type (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) and explanatory style (Attributional Style Questionnaire) of participating first-year baccalaureate nursing students (n = 286) and clinical nursing faculty (n = 59) from both 2-year and 4-year nursing programs. Modal student psychological type was ESFJ, and modal faculty psychological type was ISTJ. The two groups demonstrated significant differences in information processing styles and in making decisions and judgments. Students demonstrated slightly more optimistic outlooks than did faculty. Psychological type and level of optimism did not appear to correlate. Data from this study provide an initial framework on which to base research to examine quality of teamwork among health care providers and, consequently, the quality of patient care. PMID:19441635

  6. Implementing a change to a learner-centered philosophy in a school of nursing: faculty perceptions.

    PubMed

    Colley, Sharon L

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explores faculty experiences with their school of nursing's change to a learner-centered teaching philosophy. The primary research goals were to determine what change conditions faculty perceived as significant and how they viewed overall faculty progress and unity in adopting the philosophy. Nine nurse faculty members from a four-year public university were interviewed and also responded to two narrative questionnaires over a period of three months. Thematic analysis revealed five categories with a total of 20 themes. Certain conditions were found to be important to the process, such as availability of time and resources. Other conditions were found to be of lesser importance, such as dissatisfaction with the status quo and participation in the decision to make the change. This study provides an in-depth understanding of how one nursing faculty group experienced the implementation of change to a learner-centered philosophy. PMID:22916625

  7. Incorporating geriatrics into baccalaureate nursing curricula: laying the groundwork with faculty development.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Deborah G; Thornlow, Deirdre K

    2006-01-01

    In June 2001, the John A. Hartford Foundation of New York awarded the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) a 3.99 million dollar grant to enhance gerontology curriculum development and new clinical experiences in 20 baccalaureate and 10 graduate schools of nursing. Over the 4-year grant implementation period, AACN learned a valuable lesson from the grant's site directors: Faculty development is the single most necessary precursor to the successful implementation and maintenance of geriatric curricular enhancements. Unless faculty members foster positive attitudes toward aging, expand their geriatric nursing knowledge base, and are able to integrate geriatric content into the curricula, progress cannot be made. Enhancing Geriatric Nursing Education project directors recommend that the following steps be taken toward the creation of successful faculty development activities: (1) anoint a champion to mentor and persuade faculty members to embrace gerontology; (2) garner faculty buy-in by engaging the faculty early so that they become active participants in the curricular change process; (3) assess faculty knowledge and comfort level by administering tools developed by the John A. Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing and by conducting surveys based on AACN geriatric core competencies; (4) conduct faculty development workshops that include cutting-edge knowledge and research and provide the faculty with opportunities to discuss feelings and stereotypes about aging; (5) elicit the dean's support to encourage and allow time and opportunities for training; and (6) use the many excellent resources that help the faculty integrate geriatric content into their courses. This article will further elucidate such strategies and will highlight the range of faculty development activities in which grant-funded schools engaged. PMID:16564471

  8. Comparison of syllabi expectations between faculty and students in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    PubMed

    Davis, Shoni; Schrader, Vivian

    2009-03-01

    This study aimed to explore and compare expectations of syllabi between students and faculty in a university baccalaureate nursing department. Knowing what students expect from syllabi can lead to improved student success and may reduce faculty time in clarifying class policies. Faculty and nursing students from eight semesters volunteered to complete a survey exploring syllabi definitions, pertinent content, and the importance of student involvement in syllabi development. The findings suggest there are differences between faculty and student perceptions regarding important syllabi content. Students wanted syllabi that provided the nuts and bolts of how to accomplish each assignment and course requirement most efficiently. Faculty preferred information about student behavior, such as student conduct, participation, and attendance rules. Adult Learning Theory was used to explain these differences. This article points out that faculty may not be as in touch with the needs of adult learners as they claim to be. PMID:19297962

  9. A Critical-Holistic Analysis of Nursing Faculty and Student Interest in International Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Maria da Gloria Miotto; Korniewicz, Denise M.; Zerbe, Melissa

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 211 undergraduate and 23 graduate nursing students and 38 faculty revealed substantial interest in international health. Faculty had numerous international experiences; many students had traveled abroad and one-third considered international health a career priority. The need for a broad interdisciplinary framework rather than…

  10. Burnout in Nurse Faculty: Relationships with Management Style, Collegial Support, and Work Load in Collegiate Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Margaret Jorgensen

    1986-01-01

    A study of the relationship of management behavior of the dean, collegial support, and workload to burnout among faculty in collegiate nursing programs found that collegial support, positive feedback from the dean, and a participatory management style are more important for protecting faculty against burnout than attention to workload. (MSE)

  11. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students’ performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties’ expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students’ skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. PMID:25419165

  12. What Prevents Nurses from Entering Faculty Positions Early in Their Professional Career: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreland, Jack E.

    2011-01-01

    There is a nursing faculty shortage in the United States today and projections are that over the next decade nurses will retire at a rate faster than they are being replaced. The projected shortage at a time when the largest part of the population will begin to retire and enter the ranks of the elderly could potentially cause serious problems…

  13. A Statewide Faculty Development Program for Community College Associate Degree and Other Nursing Educators. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roush, Robert E.; And Others

    This final report describes a Texas educational improvement project designed to: (1) increase the amount of geriatric content in the curricula of community college associate degree nursing (ADN) programs; (2) further the development of baccalaureate nursing faculty in a Historically Black College/University (HBCU); and (3) facilitate other Texas…

  14. The Consistency of Change in the Development of Nursing Faculty Practice Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNiel, Nancy O.; Mackey, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The University of Texas-Houston Health Sciences Center uses a linkage model and a nursing center model for faculty practice. In addition to high quality educational opportunities and patient care, the models are based on sound financial and business principles and respond to the changing needs of the nursing school and clients. (JOW)

  15. Online Faculty Mentoring and Transition Balance in Family Nurse Practitioner Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poronsky, Cathlin B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of online faculty mentoring on Registered Nurse (RN) to Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) role transition balance during graduate education. Making the transition from RN to an FNP can seem daunting and there is limited information in the literature about RN to FNP role transition during graduate…

  16. Nursing Faculty Collaborate with Embedded Librarians to Serve Online Graduate Students in a Consortium Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillot, Ladonna; Stahr, Beth; Meeker, Bonnie Juve'

    2010-01-01

    Nursing and library faculty face many information literacy challenges when graduate nursing programs migrate to online course delivery. The authors describe a collaborative model for providing cost-effective online library services to new graduate students in a three-university consortium. The embedded librarian service links a health sciences…

  17. Current Issues Related to Associate Degree Nursing: Their Impact on Directors, Faculty, and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavenar, Mary G.

    Perceptions of students, faculty members, and associate degree nursing (ADN) program directors/coordinators concerning seven issues affecting ADN programs were obtained in 1982. The issues, which were identified through a review of the literature, were: entry into practice, professional and technical nurses, developing competency statements,…

  18. Clinical Evaluation of Baccalaureate Nursing Students Using SBAR Format: Faculty versus Self Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saied, Hala; James, Joemol; Singh, Evangelin Jeya; Al Humaied, Lulawah

    2016-01-01

    Clinical training is of paramount importance in nursing education and clinical evaluation is one of the most challenging responsibilities of nursing faculty. The use of objective tools and criteria and involvement of the students in the evaluation process are some techniques to facilitate quality learning in the clinical setting. Aim: The aim of…

  19. Professional Socialization in Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs: Attitudes and Beliefs of Faculty Members and Recent Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buettner, Kevin Charles

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand professional socialization in nurse anesthesia educational programs through an exploration of the attitudes and beliefs of faculty members and recent graduates. Participants for this cross-sectional, quasi-experimental online study included a convenience sample of 178 nurse anesthesia faculty…

  20. Faculty for the Millennium: Changes Needed To Attract the Emerging Workforce into Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, K. Lynn

    2003-01-01

    In responses of the emerging (n=176, "twenty-something" students) and entrenched (n=49, nurses aged 40-68) nursing work force, the older group cited competence, approachability, and caring as desirable faculty traits; the younger group chose approachability, communication, professionalism, and supportiveness. There were similar differences in…

  1. Survey of Current Academic Practices for Full-Time Postlicensure Nursing Faculty Who Teach Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanford, Karen J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine current academic practices of compensation, workload, rewards, and tenure and promotion for nursing faculty who teach graduate and postlicensure programs that are delivered 50% to 100% online. Deans and directors who are members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) were the…

  2. Nursing Faculty Roles in Teaching Racially and Ethnically Diverse Nursing Students in a Registered Nurse Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Kenya V.

    2009-01-01

    Racial and ethnic health care disparities continue to plague the United States, placing a tremendous personal and societal burden on individuals. A culturally diverse nursing work force can help eliminate these disparities and improve the quality of health care that is delivered. However, the nursing profession does not reflect the nation's…

  3. The impact of the Georgia Health Sciences University nursing faculty practice on tobacco cessation rates.

    PubMed

    Heath, Janie; Inglett, Sandra; Young, Sara; Joshua, Thomas V; Sakievich, Nita; Hawkins, James; Andrews, Jeannette O; Tingen, Martha S

    2012-03-01

    Nursing faculty practice groups can play a vital role in tobacco cessation in academic medical centers. Outcomes from the Georgia Health Sciences University Nursing Faculty Practice Group Tobacco Cessation Program revealed 64% abstinence outcomes at the end of treatment (N = 160) over a 2-year period from the campus-wide tobacco-free policy initiation. A nurse-led, evidence-based, interdisciplinary approach can be an effective strategy to make a difference in the lives of tobacco-dependent individuals, while at the same time integrating practice with education and research. PMID:22289393

  4. Transition to the tenure track for nurse faculty with young children: a case study.

    PubMed

    Poronsky, Cathlin B; Doering, Jennifer J; Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy; Rice, Elizabeth I

    2012-01-01

    Recent efforts to ease the nursing shortage focus on recruiting and retaining younger faculty. The first years in a tenure-track position are especially challenging for new faculty who struggle to negotiate demands of academia along with parenting young children. These struggles may influence retention and require further exploration. A case study using qualitative content analysis was conducted on the transitioning experiences of three assistant professors of nursing, who had young children, during their first two years on tenure track at a research-intensive public university. Three main content areas emerged: adapting to the academic role, negotiating work/life demands, and benefiting from mentoring. To help ease the nurse faculty shortage, colleges and universities should strive to implement family-friendly policies and mentoring programs to retain faculty with young children. PMID:22916630

  5. Experiences of Iranian Nursing Faculty Members on Working in Conflict Climate

    PubMed Central

    Pishgooie, Amir Hosein; Rahimi, Abolfazl; Khaghanizadeh, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few studies have been conducted on role conflict in nursing faculty in the world. This research reports the first study about this subject in Iran. Objectives: The purpose of this research was to explore the experiences of role conflict in Iranian nursing faculty members. Materials and Methods: We conducted a qualitative study using a conventional content analysis approach. We used semi-structured and in-depth interviews by purposive sampling of 19 (15 instructors, three group managers and one educational assistant) participants to identify the influential factors of role conflict among nurse faculty members, working in seven nursing colleges in Iran. Results: The three following categories emerged from data analysis: “roles Interference”; “role ambiguity”, and “conflicting expectations”. The main theme was “working in conflict climate”. Conclusions: This study highlighted the influential factors that could produce role conflict for nursing faculty members. The results can help university leaders to improve nursing faculty working conditions. PMID:26889384

  6. NURSING FACULTY DIVERSITY: BARRIERS AND PERCEPTIONS ON RECRUITMENT, HIRING AND RETENTION.

    PubMed

    Salvucci, Christine; Lawless, Carolyn A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify perceptions of nursing faculty on the barriers to recruitment, hiring, and retention of minority nursing faculty who are Black/African-American, and Hispanic/Latina (o) in order to understand the current dynamics limiting the representation of these two minority groups in nursing education. The design was a descriptive, comparative design, using an online survey. A multi-stage sampling method selected 667 nursing faculty from 56 colleges, resulting in a final sample size of 103 (15.4%). The two minority groups reported physical appearance and speech pattern had an affect on being hired. In comparing the perceptions of White, Black/African-American, and His panic/Latina (o) nurse faculty on recruitment, hiring, and retention issues, there were two statistically significant items. Responses on the major barriers to retention indicated six items were statistically significant. In conclusion, Black/African-American and Hispanic/Latina (o) nurse faculty indicated the barriers and perceptions to hiring and retention that still affect them, and confirmed the lack of financial assistance and mentors continues to be key issues for hiring and retention. PMID:27439233

  7. A model for preparing faculty to teach model C clinical nurse leader students.

    PubMed

    Webb, Sherry; McKeon, Leslie

    2014-07-01

    Model C clinical nurse leader (CNL) programs are complex because they must meet the The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice and The Essentials of Master's Education in Nursing, as well as the graduate level competencies outlined in the white paper Competencies and Curricular Expectations for Clinical Nurse Leader Education and Practice. Faculty assigned to teach in these programs may be experts in education or areas of clinical specialty, but they may not have a clear understanding of the CNL role to teach and mentor CNL students. This article describes a faculty development model that includes an introduction to the CNL role, course mapping of the essentials, integration of CNL professional values into clinical evaluation, consultation with practicing model C graduates, and participation in a comprehensive CNL certification review course. The model was effective in preparing faculty to teach and mentor students in a model C CNL program. PMID:24971734

  8. The integration of simulation into a clinical foundations of nursing course: student and faculty perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kardong-Edgren, Suzan E; Starkweather, Angela Renee; Ward, Linda D

    2008-01-01

    Taking the initial steps to integrate simulation into a nursing program can appear overwhelming to faculty and supportive personnel. This paper will describe an approach taken by one undergraduate nursing program in the United States that focused on integrating simulation into a clinical foundations nursing course. Current research was used to guide the design and implementation of simulation. Several key points from the literature were applied to the process; linking scenarios with didactic information, the importance of debriefing, and the need for repetitive practice. Using these concepts, simulation scenarios were constructed following the Nursing Education Simulation Framework. Three scenarios were subsequently implemented during the course, with data from students and faculty collected after each scenario. The results indicate the students perceived the design and implementation to be very agreeable, while faculty reactions to simulation remain mixed. However, there was universal support concerning the use of repetitive practice of foundational skills to enhance learning outcomes. PMID:18673294

  9. Removal of nursing faculty practice barriers in academia: an evidence-based model.

    PubMed

    Aquadro, Lynn C; Bailey, Birdie Irene

    2014-11-01

    The goal of this faculty practice model is to provide a clinical practice site for faculty and provide clinical instruction for baccalaureate nursing students and primary health care services to an underserved, uninsured population in a nonprofit outpatient clinic setting. Community partnerships include a regional university, the city housing authority, local hospitals, the tri-county dental association, the United Way, and other community organizations. The facility is provided by the city housing authority, and the laboratory and diagnostic services are provided by the local hospital. The clinic nurse practitioners are university faculty, and clinical time is part of the faculty workload. Many barriers have been overcome, including lack of funding, increased faculty workloads, and proration of the state's allocation for higher education. Because the organization was initially set up as a nonprofit organization, federal, state, and local grants are available. PMID:25350046

  10. Exploring the Pursuit of Doctoral Education by Nurses Seeking or Intending to Stay in Faculty Roles.

    PubMed

    Dreifuerst, Kristina Thomas; McNelis, Angela M; Weaver, Michael T; Broome, Marion E; Draucker, Claire Burke; Fedko, Andrea S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the factors influencing the pursuit and completion of doctoral education by nurses intending to seek or retain faculty roles. Traditionally, doctoral education evolved to focus on the preparation of nurses to conduct scientific research, primarily through the doctor of philosophy programs. Most recently, the doctor of nursing practice degree emerged and was designed for advanced practice nurses to be clinical leaders who translate research into practice and policy. Nurses who pursue doctoral education in order to assume or maintain faculty roles must choose between these degrees if they desire a doctorate within the discipline; however, factors influencing their decisions and the intended outcomes of their choice are not clear. During this study, 548 nurses (current students or recent graduates of doctoral programs) completed a comprehensive survey to generate critical evidence about the factors influencing the choices made. Principal findings are related to the issues of time, money, and program selection. These findings can be used to develop strategies to increase enrollment and, therefore, the number of doctorally prepared faculty who are specifically prepared to excel as nursing faculty. PMID:27216128

  11. The challenge of closing the diversity gap: development of Hispanic nursing faculty through a Health Resources and Services Administration Minority Faculty Fellowship Program grant.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Susan R; Sánchez, Zoila V

    2011-01-01

    Underrepresentation of minority faculty in schools of nursing is well reported. Recently, there have been multiple initiatives from both public and private sectors to alleviate the shortage of minority faculty. This article describes how the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) College of Nursing took advantage of one such initiative: the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Minority Faculty Fellowship Program (MFFP) grant. This program grant provides stipends to enable health professions educational programs to increase the number of faculty who are racial and ethnic minorities underrepresented in the health professions. It enabled the college to recruit a Hispanic nurse and to assist her in preparing for a successful academic career. HRSA provided a stipend in an amount not exceeding 50% of regular faculty salary of the institution for 3 years, to be matched by the institution. Expert faculty mentored the nurse's development in the areas of pedagogy, administration and leadership, design and conduct of research, grant writing and scientific writing for publication in peer-reviewed journals, and cultural competence. Dr. Susan Jacob was the project director of the MFFP grant received by the College of Nursing at UTHSC, and Zoila Sanchez, a Cuban American, was the minority faculty fellow supported by an HRSA MFFP grant. Dr. Sanchez was the first minority faculty fellow selected from the nursing profession. Past fellows represented the other health professions such as medicine and dentistry. PMID:21420043

  12. Knowledge and Competency of Nursing Faculty Regarding Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Orta, Roxana; Messmer, Patricia R; Valdes, Guillermo R; Turkel, Marian; Fields, Sheldon D; Wei, Christina Cardenas

    2016-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine recommended that 90% of clinical decisions should be evidenced based by 2020. Both the IOM and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses identified evidenced-based practice (EBP) as a core competency for practice. EBP can reduce costs, improve patient outcomes, and ensure optimal nursing interventions. Because nursing faculty may have deficits in knowledge, attitudes, and competencies to teach EBP, few nursing students conduct EBP reviews. The purpose of this project was to develop EBP educational resources to increase nursing faculty knowledge and competency of EBP in a southeastern college with both a multicultural faculty and student body. A pre- and postsurvey design using Stevens' ACE Star Model of Knowledge Transformation and Evidence Based Practice Readiness Inventory (ACE-ERI) determined the effectiveness of the educational intervention. Results indicated that faculty's self-confidence about their competency in EBP increased significantly from presurvey to postsurvey, t(17) = -2.04, p = .028, but there was no significant change from pretest to posttest, t(17) = -0.576, p =.572, for the EBP knowledge component of ACE-ERI. The results of the study suggest that educational programs for RN-to-BSN faculty are vital in increasing participant's readiness for EBP. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(9):409-419. PMID:27580508

  13. Integrating oral health into professional nursing practice: an interprofessional faculty tool kit.

    PubMed

    Dolce, Maria C

    2014-01-01

    Millions of children and adults in the United States have unmet oral health care needs, and professional nurses can play a central role in reducing oral health disparities and expanding access to care. Interprofessional education is requisite to improving oral health care outcomes. Baccalaureate nursing programs need to prepare collaborative practice-ready professional nurses to improve oral health care especially for vulnerable and underserved individuals, communities, and populations. This article presents an interprofessional faculty tool kit that builds upon The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice as a framework for preparing professional nurses with basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes in oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention across the life cycle. Expectations for professional nursing practice are described within the context of The Essentials and contemporary oral health care issues. Exemplars of interprofessional teaching-learning strategies are provided to assist nurse faculty with integrating oral health into baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Nurse educators are called to prioritize oral health as an essential component of overall health and well-being, increase the visibility of evidence-based oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention in baccalaureate nursing curricula, and support interprofessional oral health education and collaborative care. PMID:24503317

  14. When the Mission Is Teaching: Does Nursing Faculty Practice Fit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwen, Laurie

    1998-01-01

    Asserts that nursing programs in liberal arts colleges must document that clinical practice is scholarship and conforms to the teaching mission. Discusses scholarly practice from nursing literature and from the work of Schon and Boyer. (SK)

  15. Professional collaboration in students of Medicine Faculty and School of Nursing.

    PubMed

    Ardahan, Melek; Akçasu, Başak; Engin, Esra

    2010-05-01

    This descriptive study has been planned to analyze the professional collaboration among the students of Ege University, Faculty of Medicine and School of Nursing. The study group consisted of 137 5th and 6th grade students from the Faculty of Medicine and 142 3rd and 4th grade students from the School of Nursing. The participation rate is 94%. For data collection, a questionnaire form (30 questions) which was specially developed for the purpose of the study and the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration (15 questions) were used. Permission was granted for the research by Ege University School of Nursing Ethical Committee and the Office of the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. The professional collaboration mean score of the students from the Faculty of Medicine who participated in the study was 30.40+/-5.82 and the professional collaboration mean score of the students from the School of Nursing was 26.11+/-5.27. The difference between the mean scores of professional collaboration was found to be significant in terms of their profession (p<0.01). Physicians expressed more positive attitudes toward collaboration than nurses while female physicians expressed more positive attitudes toward collaboration than male physicians. PMID:19804922

  16. SREB Study Indicates Serious Shortage of Nursing Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA. Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing.

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing appointed an ad hoc committee to study the implications of nursing shortages for nursing education programs in the 16 SREB states and the District of Columbia. In May 2001, surveys were sent to 491 colleges and universities that prepare students for licensure…

  17. Implementing Web-based instruction in a school of nursing: implications for faculty and students.

    PubMed

    Halstead, J A; Coudret, N A

    2000-01-01

    The World Wide Web, a rich educational resource that can promote and enhance student learning, is increasingly being used in nursing programs to deliver course content. When implementing Web-based instruction into the curriculum, it is essential to consider carefully the implications for faculty and student development needs so that the technology can be efficiently and effectively used to support student learning. Teaching a Web-based course is a new experience for many faculty and requires a reconceptualization of the faculty role. Faculty issues to consider when implementing Web-based instruction include instructional design concerns, faculty-student interactions, time and technology management skills, and student outcome evaluation. Students, especially those who have a preference for faculty-directed classroom learning, also will find student role challenges in Web-based learning. Time and technology management skills, student-faculty interactions, and becoming more self-directed in their learning are student role development needs. This article describes the strategies used by one school of nursing to meet faculty and student development needs when the RN-BSN completion program was redesigned for Web-based instruction. PMID:11033937

  18. Sustaining nursing programs in the face of budget cuts and faculty shortages.

    PubMed

    Yucha, Carolyn; Smyer, Tish; Strano-Perry, Sybil

    2014-01-01

    When asked what their major problems are, many nursing deans would state that they are very concerned about budget cuts and faculty shortages. Yet, there is little, if anything in the literature describing how administrators are dealing with these problems. This article describes three strategies that we employed to address these issues. The first strategy, our home hospital program, involves qualified hospital staff serving as clinical instructors. The second strategy, a collaborative on-line doctor of nursing practice program, reduces the number of courses our faculty must teach, while ensuring adequate numbers of students. Lastly, differential fees is a strategy whereby students enrolled in high-cost educational programs (e.g., nursing) pay greater fees but reap supportive benefits that increase their success in the program. These strategies have allowed us to enhance our educational programs despite budget cuts and faculty shortages. PMID:24503309

  19. Students' academic performance in nursing as a function of student and faculty learning style congruency.

    PubMed

    Joyce-Nagata, B

    1996-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify learning styles of traditional baccalaureate nursing students, registered nurse baccalaureate students, baccalaureate nursing students holding a previous non-nursing degree, and nursing educators and to determine the effects of teacher/student learning style congruency on academic performance, when controlled for students' previous academic achievement. Kolb's Learning Style Inventory and a Descriptive Data Questionnaire were administered to 334 nursing students and their respective nurse educators from two nursing schools in Mississippi. Learning style scores were computed and faculty and student learning style congruency was described as: 1) matched on both abstract-concrete and active-reflective dimensions; 2) matched on only the abstract-concrete dimension; 3) matched on only the active-reflective dimension; or 4) not matched on either dimension. There were no significant differences in learning style among the three groups of nursing students, and learning style congruency between student and faculty did not appear to significantly affect academic performance of students. PMID:8926523

  20. Attrition of full-time faculty from schools of nursing with baccalaureate and graduate programs, 2010 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Fang, Di; Bednash, Geraldine D

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of qualified faculty has been consistently reported as a major barrier impeding acceptance of all qualified applicants into nursing programs. In addition to faculty recruitment, the attrition of faculty is also a concern for schools of nursing. In this study, we found that nationally 11.8% of full-time faculty who worked in 2010 left their full-time jobs by 2011. Nearly half of total attrition, or 5.7% of full-time faculty members, were related to leaving for nonacademic nursing positions, whereas another 20% of attrition, or 2.4% of full-time faculty, resulted from retirement. Nearly 20% of faculty egressions, or 2.2% of full-time faculty, was due to leaving for nursing administrative positions or full-time faculty positions in an academic setting. Leaving for part-time faculty positions made up slightly more than 10% of faculty attrition or 1.3% of full-time faculty. Our bivariate analysis identifies distinctive academic and demographic profiles of faculty who left full-time positions for different reasons, and our multivariate analysis further shows that different individual and institutional attributes are significantly associated with different types of attrition. PMID:24564921

  1. Faculty Perceptions of Student-Faculty Relationships in Associate Degree Programs of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gramas, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Although the nursing shortage has eased in some areas of the U.S. due to the downturn of the economy, an impending nursing shortage is still predicted to occur. There is a need to increase the number of ethnic, cultural, and racial minority nurses to meet the health needs of an increasingly diverse population. Positive student-faculty…

  2. The Entrepreneurial Adjunct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, John

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly, the higher education community is witnessing what the author calls the "entrepreneurial adjunct phenomenon": a kind of merchandising of the needs, concerns, and activities of faculty with short-term, often part-time, appointments that depend on factors like enrollment, budget, and program changes. These faculty members are called any…

  3. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Competencies of Nursing Students and Faculty: Results of Integrating CAM Into the Nursing Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Scott, Craig S.; Heitkemper, Margaret M.; Cornman, B. Jane; Lan, Ming-Chih; Bond, Eleanor F.; Swanson, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) R25 Education Grant Program, a faculty development program for integrating CAM into the nursing curriculum was instituted in 2003-2006. The Integrating CAM program comprised a number of elements; the primary strategy included a series of 4-week didactic and experiential summer CAM “camps,” attended by a total of 27 faculty members. Camps were designed to influence faculty integration of CAM material into course offerings. The Integrating CAM program was evaluated via a series of faculty and student surveys regarding CAM competencies, attitudes, and perceptions. For more than half of the faculty (out of the 43 who responded), the program yielded a moderate-to-strong influence on incorporation of CAM material into course content; and moderate-to-great increases in both enthusiasm for CAM and perceived CAM knowledge gains. Students at all levels (undergraduate, masters, doctoral; n = 184) reported that their courses contained CAM content; for 70% of students, their CAM knowledge increased; for 50% of students, level of CAM interest increased. Self-reported student CAM competencies were significantly greater in 2006-2007 (n = 191) than in 2003-2004 (n = 143). Results support the strategy of broadly infusing the nursing curriculum with CAM content via faculty development. PMID:20869029

  4. Prediction of Job Satisfaction Based on Workplace Facets for Adjunct Business Faculty at Four-Year Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Vance Johnson

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the job satisfaction of adjuncts in the curriculum area of business at four-year universities and to determine the roles that individual job facets play in creating overall job satisfaction. To explore which job facets and demographics predict job satisfaction for the population, participants were asked to…

  5. Building a Community Discourse for a Writing Program: Creating a Handbook and a Common Experience Teaching Program for Adjunct Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Carol

    Adjunct professors are used widely to teach the great number of elementary composition courses for freshmen. Too often, they are underpaid, overworked, and undertrained. One sad result of this is that the experience for students in these classes varies from class to class as novice teachers cast about for a way of handling a writing curriculum…

  6. Everything that New and Adjunct Business Faculty Members Should Ask about Teaching, but Don't Know Enough to Ask

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berschback, Rick

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a user-friendly manual designed to minimize the growing pains associated with college-level teaching. Specific topics include syllabus development, classroom teaching methods, proper use of the initial class session, and advice related to answering student questions. Many new and adjunct instructors are met with unexpected challenges…

  7. The Faculty Learning About Geriatrics (FLAG) program: bringing together experts in geriatric nursing education.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Janice A; Cheung, Corjena K; Voss, Jo A; Kaas, Merrie J

    2011-08-01

    Strengthening geriatric content in schools of nursing is a key initiative for the Minnesota Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence. The first Faculty Learning About Geriatrics (FLAG) program was implemented in the summer of 2008. Selected nursing faculty from across the Upper Midwest and tribal colleges have successfully completed the FLAG program in the last 2 years. Participants completed a 5-day summer institute at the University of Minnesota and a 1-year mentorship program. The FLAG program is designed to broaden expertise in geriatric nursing through building teaching and academic leadership skills and to increase content knowledge through collaboration with academic and geriatric leaders. This article provides an overview of the educational experience of FLAG participants who have earned the title of FLAG program fellow. The perspectives of the FLAG mentors and fellows are highlighted. PMID:21598851

  8. A Critical Challenge: The Engagement and Assessment of Contingent, Part-Time Adjunct Faculty Professors in United States Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolley, Michael R.; Cross, Emily; Bryant, Miles

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, according to a National Center for Education Statistics report, part-time instructional staff in all higher education institutions exceeded full-time faculty members for the first time, accounting for 50% of all instructional staff (National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2012). The same report indicates part-time faculty in…

  9. The consistency of change in the development of nursing faculty practice plans.

    PubMed

    McNiel, N O; Mackey, T A

    1995-01-01

    Nursing faculty practice plans need to be inherently flexible to meet the changing needs of nursing schools and the external clients of the practice plans. The University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center (UT-Houston) School of Nursing has constructed two integrated models of faculty practice to meet the challenges of change. Our linkage model with outside agencies and our academic nursing center provided in excess of one million dollars of support to the School of Nursing in fiscal year 1992-1993. Flexibility in our linkage model is discussed in such areas as the negotiation process for contracts with outside agencies, methods of payment for services, calculations of cost recoveries, methods of setting consultant rate levels, revisions of fund-disbursement policies, and development of fund-tracking systems. UT-Houston School of Nursing's nursing center model is based on a business plan and was established without outside funding assistance. Over time, the areas of concentration have changed because of changing community needs and market conditions. Its revenues depend on marketing efforts by the clinic staff. Evaluation and outcome research, to be based on computerized financial and patient record information systems, are considered critical elements in maintaining the UT-Houston cutting-edge leadership as an academic nursing center. PMID:7665797

  10. Faculty perceptions of key factors in interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Loversidge, Jacqueline; Demb, Ada

    2015-01-01

    Embedding interprofessional education (IPE) into academic programs presents structural, curricular and human factor challenges. Nurses and physicians comprise the dominant dyad in healthcare, and therefore nursing and medical faculty are key in guiding future IPE approaches. However, faculty experiences with IPE are rarely reported. This paper presents perceptions of medical and nursing faculty about key factors related to IPE for pre-licensure medical and nursing students. Semi-structured interviews with 32 faculty from three Midwest universities were analyzed thematically in this phenomenological study based on collaboration and cooperation theories. Findings clustered into six categories. Specific subthemes little discussed in the literature are addressed in detail. Study participants felt the most powerful interprofessional student experiences were authentic and faculty-facilitated, that constructive clinical environments were crucial, that curriculum design challenges included disparities between undergraduate and graduate education, and that leadership commitment to full-time and adjunct faculty engagement and development was imperative. PMID:25495176

  11. Recruitment and retention of Canadian undergraduate psychiatric nursing faculty: challenges and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Morrissette, P J

    2011-09-01

    The education of psychiatric nurses in Canada has gradually evolved since its inception early in the 20th century. The most obvious advancement has been a move away from institutionally based training to undergraduate university preparation. Associated with this advancement is the ongoing challenge of recruiting and retaining qualified nurse educators. This essay addresses external factors (e.g. title disparity, association affiliation, societal perception of psychiatric nursing and professional identity) and internal factors (e.g. career transition and tenure and promotion) that influence faculty recruitment and retention. Existing challenges and recommendations designed to enhance recruitment and retention efforts are outlined. PMID:21848593

  12. Building nurse education capacity in India: insights from a faculty development programme in Andhra Pradesh

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background India faces an acute shortage of nurses. Strategies to tackle the human resource crisis depend upon scaling up nursing education provision in a context where the social status and working conditions of nurses are highly variable. Several national and regional situation assessments have revealed significant concerns about educational governance, institutional and educator capacity, quality and standards. Improving educational capacity through nursing faculty development has been proposed as one of several strategies to address a complex health human resource situation. This paper describes and critically reflects upon the experience of one such faculty development programme in the state of Andhra Pradesh. Discussion The faculty development programme involved a 2 year partnership between a UK university and 7 universities in Andhra Pradesh. It adopted a participatory approach and covered training and support in 4 areas: teaching, research/scholarship, leadership/management and clinical education. Senior hospital nurses were also invited to participate. Summary The programme was evaluated positively and some changes to educational practice were reported. However, several obstacles to wider change were identified. At the programme level, there was a need for more intensive individual and institutional mentorship as well as involvement of Indian Centres of Excellence in Nursing to provide local (as well as international) expertise. At the organisational level, the participating Colleges reported heavy workloads, lack of control over working conditions, lack of control over the curriculum and poor infra-structure/resources as ongoing challenges. In the absence of wider educational reform in nursing and government commitment to the profession, faculty development programmes alone will have limited impact. PMID:23537273

  13. Re-Envisioning Nurse Faculty Mentoring: Developmental Network Connections That Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Margaret Babb

    2012-01-01

    Fears surrounding the nurse faculty shortage in the United States have prompted significant emphasis on supporting novice educators and those in transition to new roles within academia through mentoring. Yet a continued focus on traditionally held notions of a hierarchical dyad limits possibilities for facilitating rich, diverse, mentoring…

  14. The Influence of Leadership Practices on Faculty Job Satisfaction in Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afam, Clifford C.

    2012-01-01

    Using a correlational, cross-sectional study design with self-administered questionnaires, this study explored the extent to which leadership practices of deans and department heads influence faculty job satisfaction in baccalaureate degree nursing programs. Using a simple random sampling technique, the study survey was sent to 400 faculty…

  15. Balancing Survival and Resistance: Experiences of Faculty of Color in Predominantly Euro American Schools of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Kristin F.; Hassouneh, Dena; Akeroyd, Jen; Beckett, Ann K.

    2013-01-01

    This report of findings from a grounded theory study conducted with 23 faculty of color (FOC) in predominately Euro American schools of nursing presents the central process used by FOC as they navigate academic careers as persons of color. As FOC struggled to progress in their careers and influence their academic environments they engaged in a…

  16. Use of a Faculty Investment Model To Attain the Goals of a College of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnick, Ann F.; Halstead, Lois

    2001-01-01

    A nursing school's faculty investment model, which included strategic planning, benchmarking, continuous quality improvement, and management by objectives, was developed through goal determination, market understanding, and resource allocation. It achieved 10% labor savings, 3% revenue enhancement, and a human capital pool equal to 12% full-time…

  17. Matching Social Support and Sources of Stress in Female Nursing Faculty Pursuing Doctoral Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenty, Janet R.

    This study surveyed 111 women faculty in four-year nursing education programs who were also enrolled in doctoral study to determine the stresses involved in balancing the two roles of teacher and student. The theoretical framework was an extension of Cutrona and Russell's social support model which proposes that stressful life events impact…

  18. A systematic assessment of strategies to address the nursing faculty shortage, U.S.

    PubMed

    Allan, Janet D; Aldebron, Jillian

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an assessment of strategies implemented nationwide to counter the nursing faculty shortage, highlights those indicating most promise, and proposes a basis for evaluating outcomes. The deficit of educators is a key impediment to filling the growing demand for nurses generated by an aging population and a weak supply of new graduates, which has left up to 13% of hospital RN positions vacant. Educational institutions have adopted various approaches to expand faculty resources with the goal of increasing nursing student enrollment. After conducting a systematic review of the literature from 2000 onward, we analyzed and coded these initiatives using techniques of content analysis and constant comparison. We induced 4 large domains from the data: advocacy, educational partnerships, academic innovation, and external funding. For each domain we identified an exemplar that is substantial, sustainable and replicable. We then proposed a basis for evaluating the impact of these strategies to facilitate replication. PMID:19041450

  19. Virtual Nursing Intervention Adjunctive to Conventional Care: The Experience of Persons Living With HIV

    PubMed Central

    Rouleau, Geneviève; Ramirez-Garcia, Pilar; Bourbonnais, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background Persons living with HIV (PLHIV) must adhere optimally to antiretroviral therapy (ART) on a daily basis and for their lifetime to maintain an undetectable viral load, allowing them to preserve their health. Taking advantage of the opportunity that information and communication technologies provide to broaden intervention modalities and intensify clinical follow-up, a virtual nursing intervention consisting of four interactive computer sessions was developed to empower PLHIV to manage their ART and symptoms optimally. Compared with other types of information and communication technologies-assisted interventions such as text messages, HIV Treatment, Virtual Nursing Assistance and Education (VIH-TAVIE) requires a certain degree of active engagement on the part of the user to develop and strengthen the self-management skills to optimize adherence. After the intervention’s impact on ART adherence was measured quantitatively, a qualitative study was undertaken to describe how users experience the intervention. Understanding how PLHIV perceive being assisted asynchronously by a virtual nurse was of particular interest. Objective The objective of the study was to explore and describe how PLHIV experience VIH-TAVIE, that is, receiving customized asynchronous accompaniment via a virtual nurse. Methods A qualitative study was conducted with 26 PLHIV (20 men, 6 women) who received all four VIH-TAVIE sessions. Participants had been diagnosed with HIV 14 years earlier on average and had been on ART for a mean period of 10 years. The sessions lasted 20-30 minutes each and were received two weeks apart. They are hosted by a virtual nurse who engages the user in a self-management skills-learning process for the purpose of treatment adherence. Semistructured interviews were conducted lasting 30-40 minutes to get participants to share their experience of the intervention through personal stories and what they thought and felt during their participation. Data were analyzed

  20. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

  1. Generational differences of baccalaureate nursing students' preferred teaching methods and faculty use of teaching methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahoyde, Theresa

    Nursing education is experiencing a generational phenomenon with student enrollment spanning three generations. Classrooms of the 21st century include the occasional Baby Boomer and a large number of Generation X and Generation Y students. Each of these generations has its own unique set of characteristics that have been shaped by values, trends, behaviors, and events in society. These generational characteristics create vast opportunities to learn, as well as challenges. One such challenge is the use of teaching methods that are congruent with nursing student preferences. Although there is a wide range of studies conducted on student learning styles within the nursing education field, there is little research on the preferred teaching methods of nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive study was to compare the preferred teaching methods of multi-generational baccalaureate nursing students with faculty use of teaching methods. The research study included 367 participants; 38 nursing faculty and 329 nursing students from five different colleges within the Midwest region. The results of the two-tailed t-test found four statistically significant findings between Generation X and Y students and their preferred teaching methods including; lecture, listening to the professor lecture versus working in groups; actively participating in group discussion; and the importance of participating in group assignments. The results of the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) found seventeen statistically significant findings between levels of students (freshmen/sophomores, juniors, & seniors) and their preferred teaching methods. Lecture was found to be the most frequently used teaching method by faculty as well as the most preferred teaching method by students. Overall, the support for a variety of teaching methods was also found in the analysis of data.

  2. The Rural Clinical Option: An Implementation Handbook for Nursing Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siddall, Sandra S.; And Others

    This how-to-do-it handbook is designed to help the potential rural clinical option (RCO) coordinator develop a program in which nursing students can have an in-depth clinical experience in a rural health facility. Separate sections detail how to: (1) determine the amount of release time and financial resources available to run the program; (2)…

  3. Having influence: faculty of color having influence in schools of nursing.

    PubMed

    Hassouneh, Dena; Lutz, Kristin F

    2013-01-01

    Faculty of color (FOC) play an important role in mentoring students and other FOC in schools of nursing. However, the unique nature of mentoring that FOC provide, which includes transmission of expert knowledge of the operations of racism in nursing academe, is not well understood. Furthermore, the influence FOC have on school cultures has not been well documented. To address this gap in knowledge we conducted a critical grounded theory study with 23 FOC in predominately Euro-American schools of nursing. Findings indicate that FOC Having Influence is a key process that explicates the influence FOC wield, exposing their work, which is often taken for granted, hidden, and, unacknowledged. FOC Having Influence occurred in two areas: 1) the survival and success of students and FOC and 2) shaping practices in schools of nursing and impacting health in communities. Implications for educational practice and future research are presented, based on study findings. PMID:23158848

  4. Initial evaluation of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars program

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Kathleen T.; Hodges, Eric A.; Thomas, Tami L.; Coffman, Maren J.; Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E.; Johnson-Mallard, Versie M.; Goodman, Janice H.; Jones, Randy A.; Kuntz, Sandra; Galik, Elizabeth; Gates, Michael G.; Casida, Jesus M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars (RWJF NFS) program was developed to enhance the career trajectory of young nursing faculty and to train the next generation of nurse scholars. Although there are publications that describe the RWJF NFS, no evaluative reports have been published. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the first three cohorts (n = 42 scholars) of the RWJF NFS program. Methods A descriptive research design was used. Data were derived from quarterly and annual reports, and a questionnaire (seven open-ended questions) was administered via Survey Monkey Inc. (Palo Alto, CA, USA). Results During their tenure, scholars had on average six to seven articles published, were teaching/mentoring at the graduate level (93%), and holding leadership positions at their academic institutions (100%). Eleven scholars (26%) achieved fellowship in the American Academy of Nursing, one of the highest nursing honors. The average ratings on a Likert scale of 1 (not at all supportive) to 10 (extremely supportive) of whether or not RWJF had helped scholars achieve their goals in teaching, service, research, and leadership were 7.7, 8.0, 9.4, and 9.5, respectively. The majority of scholars reported a positive, supportive relationship with their primary nursing and research mentors; although, several scholars noted challenges in connecting for meetings or telephone calls with their national nursing mentors. Conclusions These initial results of the RWJF NFS program highlight the success of the program in meeting its overall goal—preparing the next generation of nursing academic scholars for leadership in the profession. PMID:25085329

  5. Preparing student nurses, faculty and clinicians for 21st century informatics practice: findings from a national survey of nursing education programs in the United States.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Barbara J; Elfrink, Victoria L; Pierce, Susan T

    2004-01-01

    Because healthcare delivery increasingly mandates data-driven decision-making, it is imperative that informatics knowledge and skills are integrated into nursing education curricula for all future nurse clinicians and educators. A national online survey of deans/directors of 266 baccalaureate and higher nursing education programs in the U.S. identified perceived informatics competencies and knowledge of under-graduate and graduate nursing students; determined the preparedness of nurse faculty to teach and use informatics tools; and elicited perceptions of informatics requirements of local practicing nurses. Frequency data and qualitative responses were analyzed. Approximately half of the programs reported requiring word processing and email skills upon entry into the nursing major. The use of standardized languages and the nurse's role in the life cycle of an information system were the least visible informatics content at all levels. Half of program faculty, rated as "novice" or "advanced beginners", are teaching information literacy skills. Findings have major implications for nurse educators, staff developers, and program administrators who are planning faculty/staff development opportunities and designing nursing education curricula that prepare nurses for professional practice. PMID:15360943

  6. Role stress and strain among nondoctorally prepared undergraduate faculty in a school of nursing with a doctoral program.

    PubMed

    Lott, J W; Anderson, E R; Kenner, C

    1993-01-01

    Initiation of a doctoral program within existing schools of nursing causes significant change in organizational structure and function. The role expectations of the current faculty change as well. The purpose of the qualitative study was to identify if role stress and strain are present in nondoctorally prepared undergraduate nursing faculty in a southern university school of nursing with a doctoral program. The design was a qualitative, open-ended interview. The primary research question was: Does the initiation of a doctoral program in a school of nursing impose role stress and strain on nondoctorally prepared faculty members? Academic educators will find our results interesting because faculty report that role stress and strain affect both their teaching and decisions to remain in academia. Use of these findings may contribute toward improved role relationships, better role performance, greater job satisfaction, and decreased job turnover. PMID:8421122

  7. A successful academic collaborative to increase nurse faculty in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Louie, Kem; Campbell, Minnie; Donaghy, Claire P; Rice, Leslie; Sabatini, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a successful academic collaboration of 4 New Jersey state colleges and universities. The aim of the collaborative is to prepare and graduate students in a dual role as advanced clinical/practice nurses and nurse faculty within an innovative master of nursing educational program. This effort was funded by a 4-year grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation NJ Nursing Initiative and the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce. The New Jersey Nursing Education Collaborative (NJNEC) is discussed using E. O'Neil and P. Krauel's (2004) factors for an effective collaborative. The four factors for an effective partnership include a coherent institutional strategy, partners that bring value and assets to the collaborative, mutually beneficial goals, and accountability to each other. The NJNEC is composed of four independent state colleges and universities with separate governing structures and student characteristics. The four schools are located in different geographical locations in the state. Several challenging issues in preparation of faculty and maintaining a collaborative will be presented for future consideration. PMID:22142919

  8. American Association of Colleges of Nursing essential values: national study of faculty perceptions, practices, and plans.

    PubMed

    Elfrink, V; Lutz, E M

    1991-01-01

    A representative national sample of bachelor's-degree nurse educators (N = 697) were surveyed about the seven professional values identified by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (1986) in Essentials of College and University Education for Professional Nursing. Participants agreed that these values were representative of values nurses need to use in practice, and that educational opportunities related to these values should be included in the curriculum. Eighty-six per cent of the sample perceived that they included some or all of these values predominantly through the informal lesson plan. Esthetics was the most frequently mentioned value that was not considered in any form in the nursing curriculum. Nurse educators teaching at religious-affiliated institutions, and those who had educational preparation in values, already included these values in their formal teaching (P less than .04 and P less than .0001, respectively) and they had discussions about including them differently in the future more frequently (P less than .005 and P less than .006) than did other educators. Faculty members teaching at religious-affiliated institutions also established more plans for including these values within the curriculum than those who taught at public institutions (P less than .0004). One conclusion from this study was that values may continue to be treated differently than other nursing education content, ie, predominantly through the informal lesson plan. PMID:1894844

  9. Innovation in Faculty Practice: A College of Nursing and Juvenile Justice Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Jennifer M; Roberts, Leissa A

    2016-01-01

    Residential Juvenile Justice Services (JJS) facilities are located in every state and, in general, represent an underserved and diverse adolescent population. The JJS centers present an exciting and innovative opportunity for collaboration with colleges of nursing to initiate faculty practice sites. The University of Utah College of Nursing has been serving 5 JJS centers for 14 years and recently doubled its services to incorporate 10 different JJS Centers in the state of Utah. Each center offers a unique patient population and setting providing the student with an opportunity to learn health assessment and physical examination skills not typically presented in more traditional hospital or outpatient facilities. This type of community collaboration affords an opportunity for faculty practice, education, research, and service. An interprofessional focus enriches the experience. PMID:27000193

  10. Evaluating Nursing Students' Clinical Performance.

    PubMed

    Koharchik, Linda; Weideman, Yvonne L; Walters, Cynthia A; Hardy, Elaine

    2015-10-01

    This article is one in a series on the roles of adjunct clinical faculty and preceptors, who teach nursing students to apply knowledge in clinical settings. This article describes aspects of the student evaluation process, which should involve regular feedback and clearly stated performance expectations. PMID:26402292

  11. Faculty Student Mentoring of First Year Traditional Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Students to Increase Retention and Decrease Attrition Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalski, Melissa S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the results of a faculty mentoring program of first year traditional baccalaureate degree nursing students at a university in the mid-west with multiple campuses, including three nursing campuses. One campus site was chosen for this project. The students were asked to participate in the project and informed…

  12. Understanding Faculty and Non-Traditional Student Perceptions of Self-Directed Learning in a Practical Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to identify and investigate nursing faculty and student perspectives of self-directed learning in a practical nursing program. It also explored the degree to which student's perceptions of self-directed learning exhibited factors consistent with that of critical thinking. This study is important because self-directed…

  13. The Relationship of Leadership Style of the Department Head to Nursing Faculty Professional Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Daria McConnell

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine if there was a relationship between the leadership style of the nursing department head and the level of professional satisfaction and organizational commitment by nursing faculty members. The survey instrument was a self-constructed four point Likert scale designed by the researcher to determine the…

  14. Differences and commonalities in difficulties faced by clinical nursing educators and faculty in Japan: a qualitative cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To clarify the current state of communication between clinical nursing educators and nursing faculty members and the perceived difficulties encountered while teaching nursing students in clinical training in Japan. Methods We collected data via focus group interviews with 14 clinical nursing educators, two nursing technical college teachers, and five university nursing faculty members. Interview transcripts were coded to express interview content as conclusions for each unit of meaning. Similar compiled content was categorized. Results Difficulties in providing clinical training mentioned by both clinical educators and faculty members were classified into four categories: “difficulties with directly exchanging opinions,” “mismatch between school-required teaching content and clinical teaching content,” “difficulties with handling students who demonstrate a low level of readiness for training,” and “human and time limitations in teaching.” In some categories, the opinions of educators matched those of the faculty members, whereas in others, the problems differed according to position. Conclusions The Japanese culture and working conditions may affect communication between clinical educators and faculty members; however, a direct “opinion exchange” between them is crucial for improving the clinical teaching environment in Japan. PMID:23098211

  15. The Associate Program for Adjunct Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerda, Joe; And Others

    At the College of the Canyons in California, the majority of faculty are adjunct instructors, many of whom have had little formal background in teaching. In an effort to support these faculty and to assure the quality of instruction, the Associate Program for Adjunct Instructors was instituted. The program emphasizes the development and evaluation…

  16. Anti-racist pedagogy: challenges faced by faculty of color in predominantly white schools of nursing.

    PubMed

    Hassouneh, Dena

    2006-07-01

    Despite the significant effects of systems of oppression on health, nursing education tends not to include anti-racist pedagogy in its curricula, preferring instead to focus more narrowly on culture. This narrow focus allows nurses to depoliticize discussions of race and other social differences, largely ignoring the influence that systems of oppression, imperialism, and historical trauma have had on health in marginalized populations. In contrast, anti-racist pedagogy educates students in ways that make racialized power relations explicit, deconstruct the social construction of race, and analyze interlocking systems of oppression that serve to marginalize and exclude some groups while privileging others. This article describes anti-racist pedagogy from the perspective of a faculty member of color, drawing on personal experience and a review of the anti-racist pedagogical literature. Specifically, this article highlights some of the personal and professional challenges faced by faculty of color when engaged in anti-racist pedagogy in predominantly white schools of nursing. PMID:16863105

  17. Assessment of the Impact of Teaching Demands on Research Productivity Among Doctoral Nursing Program Faculty.

    PubMed

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Heverly, Mary Ann; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study that examined the research and scholarship productivity of doctorally prepared nursing faculty teaching and mentoring doctoral students and the conflicting demands on them to maintain programs of research and scholarship. The specific aims were to (a) examine the research productivity and scholarship of faculty members teaching in doctoral programs and mentoring doctoral students to examine the perceived effectiveness of existing institutional mechanisms to support scholarship, (b) explore institutional features and personal practices used by doctoral program faculty to develop and maintain research and scholarship productivity, and (c) analyze predictors of scholarship productivity. Data were collected via an on-line researcher-developed survey that examined doctoral faculty roles/responsibilities and their relationship to their scholarly productivity, overall research productivity, and institutional features and personal practices to support research/scholarship activities. Survey respondents reported spending a large amount of time engaged in research-related activities with 58.9% (n = 326) spending anywhere from 6 to 20 hours per week conducting research, writing research-based papers, giving presentations, grant writing, or conducting evidence-based improvement projects. Scholar productivity among the respondents was robust. Personal practices that most strongly supported faculty members' scholarship productivity were the belief that engaging in scholarship made them better teachers and the personal gratification in experiencing doctoral students' successes. A multiple regression analysis conducted to determine predictors of productivity indicated that the strongest predictor was the average number of hours spent on research/scholarship-related activities, followed by time bought out from teaching and other responsibilities of the faculty role for research. PMID:27216126

  18. Five Years Later: Maryland Adjuncts Tell Us (Again) Who They Are and What They Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Dallas M.; Hall, Marilyn S.; Karlsson, Carl Richard; Martinak, M. Linda

    2013-01-01

    Adjunct faculty make up a large contingent of faculty teaching in today's colleges and universities. In fact, the use of adjunct faculty allows these institutions to fulfill their educational missions. Much is written in the popular press and in periodicals dedicated to higher education about adjunct faculty. While some of this is accurate, a…

  19. African American nurse faculty satisfaction and scholarly productivity at predominantly white and historically black colleges and universities.

    PubMed

    McNeal, Gloria J

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine faculty satisfaction and the relationships among selected elements of African American women nurse faculty productivity at two types of institutions: predominantly white (PWCUs) and historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). Organizational Culture Theory was used as the conceptual framework to provide the basis to explore the extent of productivity and levels of satisfaction among the study participants. Satisfaction was measured using a six-point Likert attitudinal scale. Scholarly Productivity was measured as the extent of published/submitted works (authorship), number and dollar amounts of grant submissions (grantsmanship) and elected/appointed positions held in professional organizations (leadership). Consistent with previous research studies of minority faculty in other disciplines, the current study found that the majority of African American women nurse faculty tended not to hold senior professorial rank, administrative positions, or tenure status. When comparisons were made between HBCU and PWCU faculty, however, a higher percentage of HBCU faculty reported holding Deanships or program coordinator positions and, on average, had slightly larger dollar amounts for funded grant awards and held significantly more leadership positions in professional nursing organizations. The aggregated data findings of this study did not support a strong relationship between selected elements of satisfaction with the academic institution's organizational culture and the scholarly productivity of African American women nurse faculty teaching at HBCUs and PWCUs. However, when the data were disaggregated by type school, moderately significant differences between HBCU and PWCU faculty were found, such that along several dimensions of the constructs of organizational culture the levels of dissatisfaction among PWCU faculty significantly skewed the overall data findings. In general, while PWCU faculty demonstrated higher levels of

  20. The Place of Race in Cultural Nursing Education: The Experience of White BSN Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Ann Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The growing cultural diversity in the United States confronts human service professions such as nursing with challenges to fundamental values of social justice and caring. Non-White individuals have experienced long-documented and persistent disparities in health outcomes and receipt of health care services when compared to whites. Medical…

  1. Adjunct Mentoring, a Vital Responsibility in a Changing Educational Climate: The Lesley University Adjunct Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Carol A.; Reiff, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    Lesley University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, has established an adjunct mentoring process in response to its growing number of adjunct faculty. Lesley's adjunct corps serves in Lesley programs offered both on and off campus. The primary goals of the mentoring program are to support excellence in teaching, and to engage in mentoring that…

  2. The Effect of Nursing Faculty Presence on Students' Level of Anxiety, Self-Confidence, and Clinical Performance during a Clinical Simulation Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsley, Trisha Leann

    2012-01-01

    Nursing schools design their clinical simulation labs based upon faculty's perception of the optimal environment to meet the students' learning needs, other programs' success with integrating high-tech clinical simulation, and the funds available. No research has been conducted on nursing faculty presence during a summative…

  3. A Comparison of the Perceptions of Associate Degree and Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Faculty and Nursing Service Administrators in Regard to Terminal Competencies of Associate and Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Jeanne A.

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether associate and baccalaureate faculties and nursing service administrators have different perceptions regarding the competencies required of baccalaureate, associate, and service nursing graduates. The competencies studied were: (1) preparation for patient care; (2) carrying out patient care; (3)…

  4. Adjunct Accounting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesesne, Cherise

    2012-01-01

    With colleges and universities recruiting more adjunct professors, schools have been able to reduce the costly expenses of large salary and benefit packages that are typically associated with full-time employees. Yet, schools have started to re-evaluate their use of adjunct professors in order to comply with the Affordable Care Act (ACA), dubbed…

  5. Integrating patient safety into health professionals’ curricula: a qualitative study of medical, nursing and pharmacy faculty perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tregunno, Deborah; Ginsburg, Liane; Clarke, Beth; Norton, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background As efforts to integrate patient safety into health professional curricula increase, there is growing recognition that the rate of curricular change is very slow, and there is a shortage of research that addresses critical perspectives of faculty who are on the ‘front-lines’ of curricular innovation. This study reports on medical, nursing and pharmacy teaching faculty perspectives about factors that influence curricular integration and the preparation of safe practitioners. Methods Qualitative methods were used to collect data from 20 faculty members (n=6 medical from three universities; n=6 pharmacy from two universities; n=8 nursing from four universities) engaged in medical, nursing and pharmacy education. Thematic analysis generated a comprehensive account of faculty perspectives. Results Faculty perspectives on key challenges to safe practice vary across the three disciplines, and these different perspectives lead to different priorities for curricular innovation. Additionally, accreditation and regulatory requirements are driving curricular change in medicine and pharmacy. Key challenges exist for health professional students in clinical teaching environments where the culture of patient safety may thwart the preparation of safe practitioners. Conclusions Patient safety curricular innovation depends on the interests of individual faculty members and the leveraging of accreditation and regulatory requirements. Building on existing curricular frameworks, opportunities now need to be created for faculty members to act as champions of curricular change, and patient safety educational opportunities need to be harmonises across all health professional training programmes. Faculty champions and practice setting leaders can collaborate to improve the culture of patient safety in clinical teaching and learning settings. PMID:24299734

  6. 21st century challenges faced by nursing faculty in educating for compassionate practice: embodied interpretation of phenomenological data.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine

    2013-07-01

    Nursing faculty are facing challenges in facilitating student learning of complex concepts such as compassionate practice. Compassion is a stated expectation of Registered Nurse (RN) and student nurse practice, and yet how it is enabled and learned within the challenging environments of university and health service provider organisations are not yet understood. There is currently an international concern that student nurses are not being adequately prepared for compassion to flourish and for compassionate practice to be sustained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate the experiences of nursing faculty in their preparation of student nurses for compassionate practice, an exploratory aesthetic phenomenological research study was undertaken using in depth interviews with five nurse teachers in the North of England. Findings from this study were analysed and presented using embodied interpretation, and indicate that nurse teachers recognise the importance of the professional ideal of compassionate practice alongside specific challenges this expectation presents. They have concerns about how the economically constrained and target driven practice reality faced by RNs promotes compassionate practice, and that students are left feeling vulnerable to dissonance between learned professional ideals and the RNs' practice reality they witness. Nurse teachers also experience dissonance within the university setting, between the pressures of managing large student groups and the time and opportunity required for small group discussion with students that enables compassion to develop in a meaningful and emotionally sustainable way. Teachers also express discomfort due to a perceived promotion of an 'unachievable utopia' within practice, identifying how the constraints within practice could be better managed to support professional ideals. The nurse teachers within this exploratory study identify the need for strong nurse leadership in practice to challenge

  7. The Influence of Orientation, Integration, and Evaluation on Intent to Stay in Part-Time Clinical Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Joanne S.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which orientation, evaluation, and integration practices, along with other select job aspects and demographic characteristics, were correlated with and explained intent to stay among part-time clinical nursing faculty. A conceptual model was developed and tested. A researcher…

  8. Student-Faculty Trust and Its Relationship with Student Success in Pre-Licensure BSN Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarbrough, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Student-faculty trust and related concept characteristics have been shown to be factors associated with successful student learning. Research investigating the role of trust in communications and education has been conducted with students in other disciplines but not with nursing students. The purpose of the research is to investigate…

  9. Toward More Effective Teaching in WCHEN Schools; The Report of a Course in New Training Techniques for Nurse Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Jo Eleanor

    Forty-five abstracts represent projects prepared by faculty personnel from Western Council on Higher Education for Nursing (WCHEN) member schools who were participants in a short-term course, "Improving Instruction Through the Use of Selected Tools and Techniques." Programed instruction projects involve various clinical areas and deal with such…

  10. Faculty Retention Study, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Texas Community Coll., McAllen. Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness.

    This survey attempted to study factors important to making faculty decide to continue or terminate employment at South Texas Community College (STCC). Surveys were e-mailed to 276 full time, regular faculty and 170 adjunct faculty with valid STCC e-mail addresses. Although 54% (150) of the full time faculty responded to the survey, it remains a…

  11. Motivating Nursing Faculty to Use Active Learning Strategies: A Qualitative Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardell, Traci Lee

    2011-01-01

    The nursing shortage remains of great concern to the nursing profession and to nursing educators. With the projected need for Registered Nurses high and the attrition rate in nursing programs remaining high, a focus on retention of qualified nursing students may be needed. One way to contribute to enhanced retention is using active learning…

  12. Faculty Bullying: An Exploration of Leadership Strategies to Reduce Relational Violence in Nursing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Melody F.

    2010-01-01

    Nurses eat their young. Bullying in nursing is well documented and an almost inherent part of the nursing subculture. There is no research exploring the origin of bullying in nursing. The basic premise of the study was that bullying is a learned behavior that begins in nursing school when nurse educators bully their students. With the…

  13. Adjunct Professorships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2011-01-01

    Colleges of education have come to rely heavily on superintendents to teach graduate-level classes in educational administration. While no national organization tracks this phenomenon, anecdotal evidence points to widespread and perhaps growing involvement in the adjunct ranks. While the majority reported being assigned to teach semester-long…

  14. Nursing Faculty Members' Use of Web 2.0 Technology and Perceptions of Importance of Online Faculty Presence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhns, Kelly A. Kratzer

    2012-01-01

    Since the creation of the Internet in 1991 (Casey, 2008), the use of online tools to deliver academic higher education has continued to grow exponentially (Allen & Seaman, 2010b). The existing base of literature is replete with studies of online education modalities, outcomes and faculty concerns. However, little of this research has focused…

  15. Expectations, Motivations, and Barriers to Professional Development: Perspectives from Adjunct Instructors Teaching Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey-Hebert, Amber; Mandernach, B. Jean; Donnelli-Sallee, Emily; Norris, Virgil Rusty

    2014-01-01

    Adjunct instructors are the fastest growing population of faculty in the academy; and, given the current economic condition and its impact on institutions of higher learning, the proportion of adjunct faculty is likely to increase (Gappa, Austin & Trice, 2007; NCES, 2011). Yet the adjunct population continues to remain disconnected from the…

  16. Improving Practitioners' Effectiveness as Adjunct Educators through Comprehensive Training and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Adjunct faculty members make up an increasing percentage of the faculty in the community colleges. By some estimates, the percentage may be as high as seventy percent (70%). Many of these adjunct faculty members are practitioners, individuals who work full-time in business, industry or government, or who have recently retired. Practitioners bring…

  17. Adjuncts to opioid therapy.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Frederick J

    2002-09-01

    Administration of opioids to alleviate moderate to severe acute pain and chronic cancer pain is an established management process. However, advancements in clinical pharmacologic research have shown that opioids are also effective in chronic noncancerous pain. Many patients properly treated for prolonged periods with opioids develop tolerance and subsequently, physical dependence. This process is not necessarily harmful to the patient and will not cause the patient to develop an addiction (properly defined as psychologic dependence). For many patients who have been on opioid therapy for months or years, analgesic effectiveness tragically becomes less. In addition, opioid-induced constipation can be severe and cause pain; patients do not develop tolerance to this adverse reaction. Therefore, such issues become a management problem and require additional intervention. Currently, many different classes of drugs can serve as effective adjuncts to opioids for treatment of pain. Adding adjunctive medication to opioid therapy improves pain management primarily by nonopioid mechanisms of action. Clinical outcomes of such combinations include greater analgesia and attenuation of opioid-induced adverse reactions such as nausea and vomiting, constipation, sedation, and respiratory depression. Adjuncts include acetaminophen, antiarrhythmics, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, antipsychotics, baclofen, benzodiazepines, capsaicin, calcium channel blockers, clonidine hydrochloride, central nervous system stimulants, corticosteroids, local anesthetics, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, pentoxifylline, and scopolamine. Some adjuncts (eg, acetaminophen) are routinely used today, whereas others (eg, nifedipine [calcium channel blocker]) are used on a limited basis but have great potential for more widespread application. All professionals (eg, nurses, pharmacists, physicians, physicians' assistants, social workers, members of the clergy

  18. The Development of Teaching Efficacy for Drug-Dosage Calculation Instruction: A Nursing Faculty Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitale, Gail A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how nursing efficacy for drug-dosage calculation instruction is determined. Medication administration is a critical function of nurses in healthcare settings. An essential component of safe medication administration is accurate drug-dosage calculation, but instruction in drug-dosage calculation methods…

  19. Sharing a Faculty Position.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Kane, Patricia K.; Meyer, Mary

    1982-01-01

    Describes the experience of two nursing faculty members who shared an assistant professor of nursing position. Discusses positive and negative aspects of the experience and notes that a unified and creative approach must be taken for it to succeed. (JOW)

  20. Nurse Educators' Perceptions of Quality in Online Graduate Education as a Credential for Hiring Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Jerri L.

    2013-01-01

    The problem explored in this study focused on the attitudes of nurse educators toward online degrees in relation to hiring practices. With the proliferation of online courses and degrees, research has shown that the acceptability of online degrees has become a concern for graduates of online programs seeking jobs and for potential employers. A…

  1. Building the capacity of nursing professionals in Cambodia: Insights from a bridging programme for faculty development.

    PubMed

    Koto-Shimada, Kyoko; Yanagisawa, Satoko; Boonyanurak, Puangrat; Fujita, Noriko

    2016-04-01

    To upgrade nursing instruction capacity in Cambodia, two bridging programmes were opened for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing simultaneously in-country and out-of-country (Thailand). A descriptive qualitative study was conducted to assess effectiveness of both programmes jointly and to explore needs concerning the further development of nursing education. This study included interviews with 34 current or previous programme participants (nursing instructors or hospital preceptors) and 10 managers of collaborating institutions. New learning content, personal outcomes, challenges and obstacles and future needs were qualitatively coded to create categories and subcategories of data. Findings show that programme participants were most influenced by the new content areas (e.g. nursing theory and professionalism), active teaching-learning strategies and the full-time educational immersion afforded by the out-of-country programme. Programme participants who had returned to their workplaces also identified on-going needs for employing new active teaching-learning approaches, curriculum revision, national standardization of nursing curricula and improvements in the teaching-learning infrastructure. Another outcome of this study is the development of a theoretical model for Nursing Capacity Building in Developing Countries that describes the need for intermediate and long-term planning as well as using both Bottom-Up and Edge-Pulling strategies. PMID:27184699

  2. Characteristics of racism and the health consequences experienced by black nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ora V

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined the health consequences of racism experienced by Black nursing professors. A cohort of nine Black nursing professors at various academic ranks responded to a series of questions on racism, coping and intervention strategies to reduce the harmful health consequences. Findings identified behavioral characteristics of racism, resiliency factors of coping, and suggested workshops to minimize the effects of racism within the nursing profession. Implications include workshops on critical self reflection and rules of engagement. A question raised for future research "how to create a racially/ethnic inclusive and psychosocial healthy academic work environment"? PMID:25612397

  3. Integrating a Career Planning and Development Program into the Baccalaureate Nursing Curriculum: Part III. Impact on Faculty's Career Satisfaction and Confidence in Providing Student Career Coaching.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Janice; Spalding, Karen; Navarro, Justine; Gaitana, Gianina

    2015-01-01

    As career satisfaction has been identified as a predictor of retention of nurses across all sectors, it is important that career satisfaction of both new and experienced nursing faculty is recognized in academic settings. A study of a curriculum-based career planning and development (CPD) program was conducted to determine the program's effects on participating students, new graduate nurses, and faculty. This third in a series of three papers reports on how the CPD intervention affected faculty participants' sense of career satisfaction and confidence in their role as career educators and coaches. Faculty who participated in the intervention CPD intervention group reported an increase in confidence in their ability to provide career coaching and education to students. They further indicated that their own career development served to enhance career satisfaction; an outcome identified as a predictor of faculty career satisfaction. Study results suggest that interventions such as the one described in this paper can have a potentially positive impact in other settings as well. PMID:26618575

  4. International nursing leadership related to the drugs phenomenon: a case study of the partnership experience between the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) and the University of Alberta--Faculty of Nursing.

    PubMed

    Wright, Maria da Gloria Miotto; Caufield, Catherine; Gray, Genevieve; Olson, Joanne; Ludueña, Alicia del Carmen; Musayon Oblitas, Flor Yesenia; Huaiquian Silva, Julia; David, Helena Maria Scherlowski; Piedra Chavez, Ketty Aracely; Bernal Roldán, Maria Carmen; Cartana, Maria do Horto Fontoura; Allonso Castillo, Maria Magdalena; Pillon, Sandra; Galera, Sueli Aparecida Frari; Randuz, Vera

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the value of international health in advancing the nursing profession through the development of strong leadership in the area of drug demand reduction. Paradigms for nursing leadership are briefly reviewed and linked to the development of the "International Nursing Leadership Institutes" organized by the Inter-American Commission for the Control of Drug Abuse (CICAD). The "International Nursing Leadership Institutes" have facilitated the implementation of Phase III of the CICAD Schools of Nursing Project: a) planning and implementing the first "International Research Capacity-Building Program for Nurses to Study the Drug Phenomenon in Latin America", b) development of Regional and National Strategic Plans for Nursing Professionals in the Area of Demand Reduction in Latin America, and c) preparation of a document that provides guidelines on how to include drug content into undergraduate and graduate nursing curricula. The article also brings reflections directly from several of the participants in the first International Research Capacity-Building Program for Nurses to Study the Drug Phenomenon in the Americas, offered in collaboration with the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. These reflections demonstrate the multiplicity of ways in which this capacity-building program has made it easier for these members of Latin American Schools of Nursing to show leadership in the area of drug demand reduction. PMID:16501780

  5. All Adjuncts Are Not Created Equal: An Exploratory Study of Teaching and Professional Needs of Online Adjuncts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedford, Laurie; Miller, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Online education programs continue to rely on a significant contingent of adjunct faculty to meet the instructional needs of the students. Discourse relating to this situation primarily focuses on the extent to which adjuncts are able to ensure the rigor and quality of instruction as well as the ability of the organization to attract, retain, and…

  6. Adjuncts: Solutions for a Mistreated Majority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louis, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    According to best estimates, some 800,000 faculty members, close to two-thirds of the total nationwide, are adjunct, "contingent," or "lecturer." The severity of their plight, rapidly worsening in today's economic crisis, intersects the interrelated domains of human rights, fair employment, and the future of higher education. In those areas where…

  7. Recognizing and avoiding intercultural miscommunication in distance education a study of the experiences of Canadian faculty and aboriginal nursing students.

    PubMed

    Russell, Cynthia K; Gregory, David M; Care, W Dean; Hultin, David

    2007-01-01

    Language differences and diverse cultural norms influence the transmission and receipt of information. The online environment provides yet another potential source of miscommunication. Although distance learning has the potential to reach students in cultural groups that have been disenfranchised from traditional higher education settings in the past, intercultural miscommunication is also much more likely to occur through it. There is limited research examining intercultural miscommunication within distance education environments. This article presents the results of a qualitative study that explored the communication experiences of Canadian faculty and Aboriginal students while participating in an online baccalaureate nursing degree program that used various delivery modalities. The microlevel data analysis revealed participants' beliefs and interactions that fostered intercultural miscommunication as well as their recommendations for ensuring respectful and ethically supportive discourses in online courses. The unique and collective influences of intercultural miscommunication on the experiences of faculty and students within the courses are also identified. Instances of ethnocentrism and othering are illustrated, noting the effects that occurred from holding dualistic perspectives of us and them. Lastly, strategies for preventing intercultural miscommunication in online courses are described. PMID:18053961

  8. Faculty Integrity and Its Contribution to the Culture of Integrity in Online Nursing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    In higher education there exists a growing concern about the potential for student cheating in online programs. At the same time, online nursing programs are increasing in number. While there is clarity about how educators perceive and experience a lack of student integrity, there is little clarity about how educators define and experience the…

  9. Implementing Web-based Instruction in a School of Nursing: Implications for Faculty and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halstead, Judith A.; Coudret, Nadine A.

    2000-01-01

    A description of web-based nursing education at the University of Southern Indiana is used to frame a discussion of changes distance education causes in the teacher role (instructional design, interaction, time and technology management, outcome evaluation) and student role (time and technology management, interaction, self-direction). (SK)

  10. The Development of Online Courses for Undergraduate Nursing Education: A Faculty Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenlund, Carol; Damask-Bembenek, Betty; Hugie, Pamela; Matsumura, Geraldine

    1999-01-01

    Describes the design and development of online courses for nursing education at Weber State University, based on empowerment of adult learners, collaborative learning, and diverse learning styles. Explains the provisions for student orientation and e-mail and phone support. (SK)

  11. A Comparison of Student Success by Faculty Qualifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Kristine A.

    2012-01-01

    Providing the best qualified faculty to ensure the most successful student outcomes is a priority in higher education. The use of adjunct faculty in colleges and universities is continually increasing, especially for lower level courses. Previous research has come to conflicting conclusions regarding the quality of adjunct faculty. Indicators of…

  12. Academic Incivility in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlow, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    A well-documented and growing problem impacting the nursing shortage in the United States is the increasing shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Many factors contribute to the nursing faculty shortage such as retirement, dissatisfaction with the nursing faculty role and low salary compensation (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN),…

  13. Four Cornerstones to Mentoring Adjunct Faculty Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Carolyn; McIntyre, Melissa; Jazzar, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Online teaching and learning in higher education is growing at an exponential rate! This growth will continue to escalate during the 21st century! The powerful tools of technology will deliver instruction in unprecedented ways. Yet, the tools of technology are only as effective as the masters of this craft. Those using technology to teach online…

  14. Adjunct Faculty Loan Fairness Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Durbin, Richard [D-IL

    2014-07-30

    07/30/2014 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (text of measure as introduced: CR S5145-5146) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Using a serious game to complement CPR instruction in a nurse faculty.

    PubMed

    Boada, Imma; Rodriguez-Benitez, Antonio; Garcia-Gonzalez, Juan Manuel; Olivet, Josep; Carreras, Vicenç; Sbert, Mateu

    2015-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a first aid key survival technique used to stimulate breathing and keep blood flowing to the heart. Its effective administration can significantly increase the chances of survival for victims of cardiac arrest. LISSA is a serious game designed to complement CPR teaching and also to refresh CPR skills in an enjoyable way. The game presents an emergency situation in a 3D virtual environment and the player has to save the victim applying the CPR actions. In this paper, we describe LISSA and its evaluation in a population composed of 109 nursing undergraduate students enrolled in the Nursing degree of our university. To evaluate LISSA we performed a randomized controlled trial that compares the classical teaching methodology, composed of self-directed learning for theory plus laboratory sessions with a mannequin for practice, with the one that uses LISSA after self-directed learning for theory and before laboratory sessions with a mannequin. From our evaluation we observed that students using LISSA (Group 2 and 3) gave significantly better learning acquisition scores than those following traditional classes (Group 1). To evaluate the differences between students of these groups we performed a paired samples t-test between Group 1 and 2 (μ1=35, 67, μ2=47, 50 and p<0.05) and between students of Group 1 and 3 (μ1=35, 67, μ3=50, 58 and p<0.05). From these tests we observed that there are significant differences in both cases. We also evaluated student performance of main steps of CPR protocol. Students that use LISSA performed better than the ones that did not use it. PMID:26319184

  16. Student-Faculty Lunch Program to Increase Mentoring and Facilitate Cross-Program Relationships in School of Nursing.

    PubMed

    Lewinski, Allison; Wainwright, Kristin; Gordon, Helen; Derouin, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Let's DU Lunch is a pilot program launched to explore the impact of a low-cost, student-faculty lunch program to increase mentoring and facilitate cross-program relationships. This program gave students the opportunity to go to lunch with a faculty member of their choice. A total of 71 students and 25 faculty participated. This program provided the opportunity for positive student-faculty interaction and mentoring and facilitated cross-program relationships. PMID:26465347

  17. Faculty Assessment of General Education. Spring 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Tyler Community Coll., Chester, VA. Office of Assessment, Research, and Planning.

    In spring 1995, Virginia's John Tyler Community College (JTCC) conducted a survey of faculty to assess their perceptions of the integration of general education into classes and programs at the college. A total of 100 surveys were distributed to full-time faculty members and a random sample of adjunct faculty members, receiving a 34% response…

  18. Mission possible: twenty-five years of university and college collaboration in baccalaureate nursing education.

    PubMed

    Zawaduk, Cheryl; Duncan, Susan; Mahara, M Star; Tate, Betty; Callaghan, Doris; McCullough, Deborah; Chapman, Marilyn; Van Neste-Kenny, Jocelyne

    2014-10-01

    In Canada, nurse educators from five postsecondary institutions in the province of British Columbia established a collaborative nursing education initiative in 1989, with a vision to transform RN college diploma programs to baccalaureate degree programs. The principles, processes, and structures that served to develop and sustain this nursing education initiative are briefly reviewed. Curriculum, scholarship, and education legislation serve as platforms to critically explore a 25-year history (1989-2014) of successes, challenges, and transitions within this unique nursing education collaboration. The importance of curriculum development as faculty development, program evaluation as an adjunct to pedagogical scholarship, diversity of cross-institutional mandates, political interplay in nursing education, collegiality, and courageous leadership are highlighted. Nurse educators seeking to create successful collaborations must draw upon well-defined principles and organizational structures and processes to guide pedagogical practices and inquiry while remaining mindful of and engaged in professional and societal developments. PMID:25275991

  19. Analysis of Adjunct Faculty at Des Moines Area Community College: Use and Application of Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene Theory to Predict Job Satisfaction in Teaching Improvement and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boord, Margi

    2010-01-01

    "During the past two decades, two-year and four-year colleges have increased their reliance on part-time faculty" (Antony & Valadez, 2002, p. 41). The hiring of part-time faculty started as a convenient way to meet the demands for instruction while remaining financially responsible during tough budgetary times. Currently "...hiring part-time…

  20. Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness of Part-Time and Full-Time Clinical Nursing Faculty of BSN Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSantis, Kimberly L.

    2012-01-01

    The United States faces a critical shortage of full-time registered nurses, which is . directly affected by the shortage of nurse educators. Many schools of nursing are already seeing the impact as qualified program applicants are being turned away due to the lack of qualified educators available to teach them. The trend has become to employ…

  1. Spiritual Perspective and Needs: A Comparative Study of Nursing Faculty in a Christian University and a State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Jennifer; Garner, Linda; Snow, Diane; Wright, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    To care for the whole person, nurses must provide spiritual care (Narayanasamy, 1995; Wright, 1998). The inability to consistently and effectively provide spiritual care has been linked to the lack of educational preparation in our basic nursing programs (Govier, 2000; Piles, 1990). This lack of preparation is unacceptable because patients…

  2. Faculty Perceptions of Effective Practices for Utilizing a Framework to Develop a Concept-Based Curriculum in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magorian, Kathryn G.

    2013-01-01

    All programs of healthcare education face increasing change and daunting challenges to prepare new graduates for the real world of practice as care providers in complex systems. The necessity for change in nursing education is at a critical level, called on from a variety of sources. New nurses must be able to enter practice as competent, safe,…

  3. Faculty and Student Perceptions of Preparation for and Implementation of High Fidelity Simulation Experiences in Associate Degree Nursing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conejo, Patricia E.

    2010-01-01

    High fidelity simulation technology is being used as an alternative way to expose students to complex patient care. Research has shown that simulation experiences can improve critical thinking skills and increase students' self-confidence (Jeffries & Rizzolo, 2006). The purpose of this study was to examine nurse educator and nursing student…

  4. Framework for a virtual nursing faculty and student learning collaboration between universities in Sweden and the United States: A theoretical paper.

    PubMed

    Wihlborg, Monne; Friberg, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    A sound pedagogical framework must be explored and identified to implement opportunities for collaborative learning through international exchange. This paper identifies the framework used by two universities, in Sweden and the United States. Virtual learning environments and meaningful learning activities can be constructed using web-based learning platforms. The goal for this initiative was 'internationalisation on home plan' for nursing faculty and students that opened up internationalised learning opportunities for all students, including those who do not participate in study abroad/mobility activities. This broader opportunity supports the development of cultural awareness and understanding of global health care practices and the nursing profession on mutual topics of concern, in this case patient safety. Learning activities and learning outcomes can be stipulated. The pedagogical framework was compatible with the Bologna Process' constructive alignment, deep learning and a student focus. The student nurses were not only given the opportunity to explore the learning objective of patient safety and participate in an international collaboration with another university, but also gained university academic credit for fulfilling the task. There is a great gain in using virtual collaboration and learning modules that are embedded in courses for the purpose of 'internationalisation on home plan' since not all students can participate in student mobility activities. PMID:27138482

  5. Price of Gas Fuels Tough Choices for Adjuncts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grasgreen, Allie

    2008-01-01

    The cost of gasoline has made the art of juggling two or more teaching jobs at different institutions all the more difficult for many adjunct faculty members, as continuing price hikes at the nation's gasoline stations cut into salaries that often do not cover living expenses to begin with. These new pressures are particularly evident in…

  6. To Many Adjunct Professors, Academic Freedom Is a Myth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Alison

    1999-01-01

    Reports that adjunct faculty, which accounts for half the professoriate, does not have academic freedom and can lose jobs for such usually protected activities as teaching controversial material, fighting grade changes, or organizing unions. Accounts of such activities are offered from Jefferson Community College (Kentucky), Chestnut Hill College…

  7. How Faculty Identity Discourses of Community College Part-Time Faculty Change over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thirolf, Kathryn Q.

    2013-01-01

    Building on previous research (Thirolf, 2012), this longitudinal qualitative study uses positioning theory (Harre & van Lagenhove, 1999) and discourse analysis methods (Gee, 2011; Johnstone, 2007) to closely examine the faculty identities of three community college adjuncts who teach in the humanities. Results reveal that these adjuncts initially…

  8. Effects of bispectral index monitoring as an adjunct to nurse-administered propofol combined sedation during colonoscopy: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jun; Jung, Min Kyu; Lee, Hyun Seok; Cho, Chang Min; Jeon, Seong Woo; Kim, Sung Kook; Jeon, Young Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The efficacy of bispectral index (BIS) monitoring during colonoscopic sedation is debated. We aimed to determine whether BIS monitoring was useful for propofol dose titration, and to evaluate differences in sedative administration between expert and inexperienced medical personnel during colonoscopy procedures that required moderate sedation. Methods: Between February 2012 and August 2013, 280 consecutive patients scheduled to undergo a screening colonoscopy participated in this study and were randomly allocated to the expert or inexperienced endoscopist group. Each group was further divided into either a BIS or a modified Observer’s Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale (MOAA/S) subgroup. Trained nurses administered combined propofol sedation and monitored sedation using either the BIS or MOAA/S scale. Results: The mean BIS value throughout the procedure was 74.3 ± 6.7 for all 141 patients in the BIS group. The mean total propofol dose administered in the BIS group was higher than that in the MOAA/S group, independently of the endoscopists’ experience level (36.9 ± 29.6 and 11.3 ± 20.7, respectively; p < 0.001). The total dose of propofol administered was not significantly different between the inexperienced endoscopist group and the expert endoscopist group, both with and without the use of BIS (p = 0.430 and p = 0.640, respectively). Conclusions: Compared with monitoring using the MOAA/S score alone, BIS monitoring was not effective for titrating the dose of propofol during colonoscopy, irrespective of colonoscopist experience. PMID:26932401

  9. Use of a 360-Degree Evaluation in the Outpatient Setting: The Usefulness of Nurse, Faculty, Patient/Family, and Resident Self-Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Nicole; Henderson, Gavin; Park, Brittany; Byerley, Julie; Brown, Wallace D.; Steiner, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Faculty have traditionally evaluated resident physician professionalism and interpersonal skills without input from patients, family members, nurses, or the residents themselves. The objective of our study was to use “360-degree evaluations,” as suggested by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), to determine if nonfaculty ratings of resident professionalism and interpersonal skills differ from faculty ratings. Methods Pediatrics residents were enrolled in a hospital-based resident continuity clinic during a 5-week period. Patient/families (P/Fs), faculty (MD [doctor of medicine]), nurses (RNs [registered nurses]), and residents themselves (self) completed evaluator-specific evaluations after each clinic session by using a validated 10-item questionnaire with a 5-point Likert scale. The average Likert score was tallied for each questionnaire. Mean Likert scale scores for each type of rater were compared by using analysis of variance, text with pair-wise comparisons when appropriate. Agreement between rater types was measured by using the Pearson correlation. Results A total of 823 evaluations were completed for 66 residents (total eligible residents, 69; 95% participation). All evaluators scored residents highly (mean Likert score range, 4.4 to 4.9). However, MDs and RNs scored residents higher than did P/Fs (mean scores: MD, 4.77, SD [standard deviation], 0.32; RN, 4.85, SD, 0.30; P/F, 4.53, SD, 0.96; P < .0001). MD and RN scores also were higher than residents' self-evaluation scores, but there was no difference between self-scores and P/F scores (average resident self-score, 4.44, SD, 0.43; P < .0001 compared to MD and RN; P  =  .19 compared to P/F). Correlation coefficients between all combinations of raters ranged from −0.21 to 0.21 and none were statistically significant. Conclusion Our study found high ratings for resident professionalism and interpersonal skills. However, different members of the health care

  10. Who Will Teach the Nurses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRocco, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    In 1999, most deans of nursing schools that belonged to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing reported that they did not have a faculty shortage. By 2005, however, 75 percent of U.S. nursing schools cited faculty shortages as the major reason for denying admission to qualified students. The average age of nurse educators holding PhDs is…

  11. Factors Influencing Faculty Participation in Internationalization at the University of Minnesota's Schools of Nursing and Public Health: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The internationalization of higher education is no longer a desirable academic ideal. Rather, it is an essential component for higher education. In the era of globalization, colleges and universities are deploying widespread initiatives to infuse a global dimension into their teaching, research and service functions. Faculty play an important role…

  12. Inviting the "Outsiders" In: Local Efforts to Improve Adjunct Working Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreyer, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    An adjunct turned writing program administrator reflects on her professional journey and describes efforts to improve the teaching environment amongst composition faculty--primarily part-time--within her department. Based on a local program review, a pilot faculty relations plan was implemented that addressed two major areas: offering more…

  13. Inclusion of Part-Time Faculty for the Benefit of Faculty and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meixner, Cara; Kruck, S. E.; Madden, Laura T.

    2010-01-01

    The new majority of faculty in today's colleges and universities are part-time, yet sizable gaps exist in the research on their needs, interests, and experiences. Further, the peer-reviewed scholarship is largely quantitative. Principally, it focuses on the utility of the adjunct work force, comparisons between part-time and full-time faculty, and…

  14. Nursing's Image on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    In studying the nurse's image at a liberal arts college, it was found that faculty and administrators view nurses as long-suffering drones. On the whole, the image of nursing was positive, with those who had the most contact with the nursing program having a more enlightened image. (CT)

  15. Examining Differences among Online Faculty Reporting Student Plagiarism Using the Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeder Stowe, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    Among higher education faculty, having to address academic misconduct and plagiarism is often viewed as a negative aspect of teaching resulting in inconsistent reporting by faculty. Some faculty members take no action in response. Differences exist in attitudes between traditional regular full-time and part-time adjunct faculty members in terms of…

  16. Interprofessional Simulation and Education: Physical Therapy, Nursing, and Theatre Faculty Work Together to Develop a Standardized Patient Program.

    PubMed

    Swift, Marcie C; Stosberg, Tobey

    2015-01-01

    A well-conceived training program for standardized patients (SPs) can increase their effectiveness in portraying actual patients This article describes the development of an SP program that allows graduate and undergraduate students to engage in interprofessional experiences in a multifunctional simulation center. Three academic programs at a midwestern university developed an interdisciplinary course that trains undergraduate students as SPs for nursing and physical therapy simulation experiences. The SP program has opened doors for interprofessional collaboration beyond current simulation experiences and has exposed the university community to simulation. PMID:26753308

  17. Faculty Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillan, Bob, Ed.; McFerrin, Karen, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on faculty development and technology: "Involving Faculty in Faculty Development" (Kristine Blair and Dan Madigan); "Technology Use in Higher Education: A Faculty Development Model" (Jessica Kahn); "A Faculty of Education as a Community of Learners: Growing to Meet the Demands of Instruction and…

  18. Issues and challenges in nursing and nursing education in Japan.

    PubMed

    Turale, Sue; Ito, Misae; Nakao, Fujiko

    2008-01-01

    In this editorial we discuss the challenges and issues in nursing and nurse education in Japan. These include a rapid growth in the number of universities offering nursing programs without sufficient time for preparation of faculty; issues in the traditional ways of teaching in classrooms; the appearance of nursing shortages in a country with the highest rate of longevity in the world; and the position of nursing faculty in a society that is largely male dominated. PMID:17719851

  19. Caught in the Adjunct Trap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hose, Linda; Ford, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Based on personal experiences garnered through years of adjunct instruction, the authors explore the challenges associated with working in academia without the guarantees of a long-term contract or tenure. Further, adjuncts are desperate to accept any position that is remunerative and this willingness undermines contract negotiation leverage of…

  20. Help! My Students Can't Write and I Can't Edit: An Analysis of Editing Training for Wilmington University Adjunct Professors to Address Inadequacies in Student Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This executive position paper proposes recommendations for the development of editing workshops and editing training for adjunct faculty of Wilmington University. An editing workshop was developed and taught to two groups of adjunct instructors at Wilmington University. Surveys distributed to the adjuncts after the workshops provide relevant data…

  1. Professional Behavior in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Karren

    2016-04-01

    Being clear about what constitutes professional behavior is a pathway to effective leadership. Not all nurses come out of educational programs with an understanding about what aspects of behavior signal true professionalism. This article uses the American Organization of Nurse Executives' Nurse Executive Competency for Processional Behavior to help professional development nurse faculty identify role modeling behavior and other aspects that new nurses can use to help them advance in their careers, while improving care to patients and families. PMID:27031029

  2. Differences in Faculty Development Needs: Implications for Educational Peer Review Program Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toth, Kate E.; McKey, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of faculty development in terms of the educational role is to assist faculty in becoming better educators. Educational peer review (EPR) is one method of faculty development. This article is based on a study that explored the different development needs of nursing faculty within a school of nursing at an Ontario university. The study…

  3. Part Time Faculty Staff Development Model for the Nineties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostertag, Vesna

    The Central Texas College Europe Campus (CTCEC), in Hanau, Germany, provides associate degrees for American Armed Services personnel stationed in Europe. Between 1980 and 1990, part-time faculty at CTCEC increased from 60% to 80%. In order to meet the training needs of this growing number of adjunct faculty, a Committee for Professional…

  4. Preparing to Teach Online as Transformative Faculty Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuiggan, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    An action research study was conducted at a campus college of a large Research I institution of higher education to explore transformative learning among higher education faculty as a result of participating in a blended program to prepare them to teach online. The purposeful sample included six full-time and one adjunct faculty, teaching a mix of…

  5. Community-based Nursing Education and Nursing Accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ort, Suzanne; Townsend, Julie

    2000-01-01

    Interprets the accreditation standards of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (mission and governance, institutional commitment and resources, curriculum and teaching practices, student performance and faculty accomplishments) in terms of community-based nursing. (SK)

  6. Building Trust Relationships in Nursing. Midwest Alliance in Nursing Program Meeting (Des Moines, Iowa, April 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minckley, Barbara B., Ed.; Walters, Mary Dale, Ed.

    Focusing on issues concerning trust relationships within the nursing field, the papers in these proceedings consider relationships between nursing service and nursing education, staff or faculty and nursing administration, rural and urban nursing agencies, and among intercultural nursing groups. The proceedings contain: (1) "Trust: An Idealistic…

  7. The Creation and Implementation of a Formal Faculty Orientation and Training Program in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mujtaba, Bahaudin G.; Gibson, Jane

    2007-01-01

    This document provides an overview of a faculty training and orientation program used for adjunct faculty at the H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship at Nova Southeastern University. The model includes components for assessing, hiring, orienting, and providing initial training for a diverse cadre of part time faculty in many…

  8. Part-Time Faculty in Community Colleges: The Jury Is Still Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael

    This paper examines a number of issues associated with part-time faculty in community colleges. In the area of part-time faculty integration, the author surveyed 28 Florida colleges using an online survey, and received responses from 20, for a response rate of 71.4%. The survey contained five questions: (1) Are adjunct/part-time faculty listed in…

  9. Faculty Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Dysfunctional faculty performance behaviors related to stress are seldom openly discussed in professional circles, let alone with faculty members exhibiting these behaviors. If stress issues are discussed, they are often mentioned in a humorous vein with little, if any, solutions put forth to assist faculty who are experiencing aggravated stress…

  10. Characteristics of Adjunct Faculty Teaching Online: Institutional Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandernach, Jean; Register, Lexi; O'Donnell, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a steady increase in online learning enrollments. The proportion of college students taking at least one online course is at an all-time high and 66% of higher education institutions indicate that online learning is critical to their long-term strategy (Allen & Seaman, 2014). Universities are increasingly…

  11. A Guide to Classroom Instruction for Adjunct Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, John H.

    This book is a self-study instructional guide designed to explain how to deliver a course. The guide includes four modules: (1) Introduction to Classroom Instruction; (2) Fundamentals of Learning; (3) Methods of Delivering Instruction; and (4) Administration, Evaluation, and Feedback. Each module includes a case that presents a problem or…

  12. Staying Connected: Adjunct Faculty and the Community College Online Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villagran-Glover, Frances

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges face extraordinary challenges in the 21st century. Driven by the economic downturn, shrinking state funding, and limited facilities, these forces have created a significant impact on community college enrollments as well as instructional methods. Student retention and completion success rates have climbed to the top of the…

  13. Disruptive Innovations for Adjunct Faculty: Common Sense for Common Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Policy and practice in higher education today are defined and limited by what many have claimed are "new realities" confronting colleges and universities. Gary Rhoades contends that three of these are embedded in the just-in-time hiring practices, the at-will conditions of work, and the depersonalized curricular delivery models assigned…

  14. Qualifying Adjuncts Academic Worth and the Justification of Adjunct Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagnucco, Nicholas D.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation studies the organization of adjunct instruction within Departments of English and Mathematics at three colleges--a public research university, a private masters granting teaching college, and a public community college. Four questions lie at the core of this project. First, what higher principles and standards of evaluation (i.e.…

  15. Alloplastic adjuncts in breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cabalag, Miguel S.; Rostek, Marie; Miller, George S.; Chae, Michael P.; Quinn, Tam; Rozen, Warren M.

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been an increasing role of acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) and synthetic meshes in both single- and two-stage implant/expander breast reconstruction. Numerous alloplastic adjuncts exist, and these vary in material type, processing, storage, surgical preparation, level of sterility, available sizes and cost. However, there is little published data on most, posing a significant challenge to the reconstructive surgeon trying to compare and select the most suitable product. The aims of this systematic review were to identify, summarize and evaluate the outcomes of studies describing the use of alloplastic adjuncts for post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. The secondary aims were to determine their cost-effectiveness and analyze outcomes in patients who also underwent radiotherapy. Methods Using the PRSIMA 2009 statement, a systematic review was conducted to find articles reporting on the outcomes on the use of alloplastic adjuncts in post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. Multiple databases were searched independently by three authors (Cabalag MS, Miller GS and Chae MP), including: Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to present), Embase (1980 to 2015), PubMed and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Results Current published literature on available alloplastic adjuncts are predominantly centered on ADMs, both allogeneic and xenogeneic, with few outcome studies available for synthetic meshes. Outcomes on the 89 articles, which met the inclusion criteria, were summarized and analyzed. The reported outcomes on alloplastic adjunct-assisted breast reconstruction were varied, with most data available on the use of ADMs, particularly AlloDerm® (LifeCell, Branchburg, New Jersey, USA). The use of ADMs in single-stage direct-to-implant breast reconstruction resulted in lower complication rates (infection, seroma, implant loss and late revision), and was more cost effective when compared to non-ADM, two-stage reconstruction. The majority of studies demonstrated

  16. Adjunct Control in Telugu and Assamese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Youssef A.

    2007-01-01

    My study explores Adjunct Control in two South Asian languages, Telugu (Dravidian) and Assamese (Indo-Aryan), within the Minimalist Program of syntactic theory. Adjunct Control is a relation of obligatory co-referentiality between two subjects, one in the matrix clause and one in an adjunct/subordinate clause of the same structure. Telugu and…

  17. Faculty Inbreeding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eells, Walter Crosby; Cleveland, Austin Carl

    1999-01-01

    A study of 16,837 faculty members at 219 colleges and universities in 42 states found great variation in the extent to which faculties were hiring their own institution's graduates as teachers. Six institutions showed no such "inbreeding," whereas seven had over 60% inbreeding. (Originally published in 1935) (MSE)

  18. Faculty Remarks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Marvin

    A discussion is provided of the Fashion Institute of Technology's (FIT's) new faculty contract and its implications for the college. First, the paper traces the history of union-management negotiations. After looking at the bitter relationship that restricted faculty growth, development, and morale in the 1970s, the paper describes the "contract…

  19. Academic Inbreeding in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael H.

    1977-01-01

    Academic inbreeding, the employment for faculty positions of persons who receive their graduate training at the same academic institution, is considered detrimental to an institution's academic environment. Results of a study conducted at 54 universities revealed that almost half the faculty (48 percent) in collegiate nursing programs are drawn…

  20. Assessment of a Prototype Internet and Online Information System Training Program for Adjunct Personnel Removed from Campus-Based Training Resources. Report No. 97-02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, Thomas W.

    This report describes a prototype training program developed at Nova Southeastern University, Florida, to provide technology training to adjunct faculty, which comprises 60 percent of the university's faculty. The program relies mainly on self-paced instruction on the use of online information systems and Internet tools, and was structured so that…

  1. Faculty Motivations and Incentives for Teaching eCourses at a For-Profit Online Applied Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenzer, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    A shortage of qualified online faculty exists as learner demand rises. This replication research studied two sample populations--full-time and adjunct--of online faculty at a for-profit applied arts college. The purpose of this study was to discover the motivators and incentives that drive faculty to teach online, enabling college-level…

  2. WHERE Are the Faculty? Fulfilling the Traditional Faculty Role at a Distance.

    PubMed

    Wood, Felecia G

    2016-01-01

    Innovative approaches are needed to retain seasoned nursing faculty. Technology provides opportunities for faculty to fulfill the traditional roles of teaching, research, and service from a site removed from the traditional campus. The purpose of this article is to encourage faculty and administrators in traditional, land-based colleges and universities to thoughtfully consider the advantages and challenges of the remote worksite for faculty based on the experience of one faculty. Some faculty are better suited to a remote work environment than others. Long-term established faculty may be better able to successfully transition to the tripartite faculty roles with greater ease than novice nurse educators as a result of their familiarity with the institutional resources and comfort in the teaching role. Preparation for the remote experience must be diligent and thoughtful, considering equipment needs, connectivity, and support personnel and strategies for ensuring continued engagement within the nursing education program. Institutional policies must also be considered related to fulfillment of the faculty role via distance technology. A pilot experience for one faculty, as described here, may be useful for evaluating the cost-benefit to the individual and the institution. PMID:27424925

  3. Adjunctive therapies for Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anita J; Burns, Jane C

    2016-07-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in developed countries.(1,2) The primary goal of treatment is to prevent coronary artery aneurysms (CAA). Between 10 and 20% of KD patients are resistant to treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and have an almost nine-fold increased risk of developing CAA.(3) In addition, approximately 80-90% of patients who go on to develop CAA have abnormal coronary artery dimensions on their first echocardiogram and can therefore be identified as high-risk patients. These two subsets of KD patients are candidates for adjunctive therapy, in addition to IVIG. Understanding the mechanism of action of IVIG may provide insight into IVIG resistance and guidance for choosing adjunctive therapies in KD. Therapeutic options in the treatment of refractory KD and patients with early CAA include additional IVIG, glucocorticoids, tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, calcineurin inhibitors and interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockers.(3-10) Animal studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of statins may also be beneficial in blocking CAA progression.(6) It is unlikely that these therapies will be studied in large, randomized controlled trials in the future due to required sample size and funding constraints. Thus, data from the research laboratory may be helpful in guiding selection of the most promising adjunctive therapies. PMID:27241708

  4. Understanding Nursing Students' Stress: A Proposed Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V.

    1998-01-01

    The Adaptation Nursing Model suggests that nursing students' level of adaptation to stress is influenced by their hardiness and use of social resources. Faculty can use the information to facilitate students' coping. (SK)

  5. Evaluation of Faculty Competencies in the Delivery of Contracted Workforce Training with Recommendations for Faculty Development at Fox Valley Technical College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Susan A.

    This document describes an evaluation of the competencies of faculty who deliver contracted workforce training at Fox Valley Technical College (FVTC). A self-assessment questionnaire was administered to FVTC's 150 full-time and adjunct faculty who conduct workforce training; in addition, 157 employers who were clients of the college in the…

  6. Radiologic sciences. Faculty needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Powers, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    A total of 326 programs are represented in the data collected. Based on the average number of full- and part-time faculty members reported per program, this survey represents more than 1500 faculty positions. Based on the forecast of retirement and career change for all faculty members, there will be a turnover of 700 to 800 positions over the next 5 to 10 years. Part-time/adjunct faculty vacancies are expected to create the greatest number of opportunities for technologists to make the transition to education, with approximately one third of current part-time/adjunct educators planning on leaving radiologic sciences education within 5 years. To encourage retention of part-time/adjunct educators, annual evaluations should be modified to recognize the important educational role these instructors play. There is a need to create enthusiasm and interest in education as a career pathway for radiologic technologists. Resources are needed that help radiologic technologists make the transition to teaching. Finally, the retention of educators must be emphasized. Program applicant trends indicate radiologic technology students are older, have prior postsecondary education experience or are making a career change. This data emphasizes the need for educators, both full time and part time, to understand the characteristics and needs of the adult learner. Adult learners bring a wealth of education, experience and life skills that create both opportunities and challenges in the classroom and clinical setting. All categories of respondents indicated that their current salaries were greater than those of program graduates in their firstjob. Of interest is that 1 in 5 (20%) of part-time/adjunct educators indicated the opposite--that program graduates earn more in their firstjob than educators earn. When asked about salaries if working full time in clinical practice, the majority of all groups indicated their salary would be about the same or would decrease. Only 20% of program

  7. Distance education in nursing.

    PubMed

    Billings, D M

    1996-01-01

    Although not for everyone, distance education is a "connecting point" for faculty and students who are separated by time and space. As technology becomes increasingly available to nurse educators, the instructional and public relations advantages become significant benefits to nurse educators. PMID:8718839

  8. Adjunctive Psychotherapy for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Miklowitz, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Psychotherapy has long been recommended as adjunctive to pharmacotherapy for bipolar disorder, but it is unclear which interventions are effective for which patients, over what intervals, and for what domains of outcome. This article reviews randomized trials of adjunctive psychotherapy for bipolar disorder. Method Eighteen trials of individual and group psychoeducation, systematic care, family therapy, interpersonal therapy, and cognitive-behavioral therapy are described. Relevant outcome variables include time to recovery, recurrence, duration of episodes, symptom severity, and psychosocial functioning. Results The effects of the treatment modalities varied according to the clinical condition of patients at the time of random assignment and the polarity of symptoms at follow-up. Family therapy, interpersonal therapy, and systematic care appeared to be most effective in preventing recurrences when initiated after an acute episode, whereas cognitive-behavioral therapy and group psychoeducation appeared to be most effective when initiated during a period of recovery. Individual psychoeducational and systematic care programs were more effective for manic than depressive symptoms, whereas family therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy were more effective for depressive than manic symptoms. Conclusions Adjunctive psychotherapy enhances the symptomatic and functional outcomes of bipolar disorder over 2-year periods. The various modalities differ in content, structure, and associated mediating mechanisms. Treatments that emphasize medication adherence and early recognition of mood symptoms have stronger effects on mania, whereas treatments that emphasize cognitive and interpersonal coping strategies have stronger effects on depression. The placement of psychotherapy within chronic care algorithms and its role as a preventative agent in the early stages of the disorder deserve investigation. PMID:18794208

  9. Retention in Higher Education: Faculty and Student Perceptions of Retention Programs and Factors Impacting Attrition Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Malinda; O'Leary, Erin; Webb, Shekeita

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine faculty and student perceptions of what factors are contributing to drop-out rates in a Northern Indiana higher educational facility and to study whether or not the drop-out prevention programs that are in place are effective. Survey links were sent out to all adjuncts and some full-time faculty at a local…

  10. Faculty Perceptions of Organizational Leadership at Christian Colleges and Universities with Missions of Servant Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Marila Dollahite

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differences in faculty perceptions of organizational leadership at Christian institutions with servant leadership missions. The study evaluated faculty members' perceptions based on the independent variables of employment status (full- or part-time/adjunct), number of years employed at the institution, and attendance at an…

  11. Career College Governance: A Study of the Faculty's Propensity to Participate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated faculty perceptions of and propensity to participate in shared governance activities in proprietary, post-secondary educational institutions. The sample population for this study (n = 22) included adjunct and full-time faculty members and administrators selected through a snowball sampling method and initially inclusive of…

  12. Training Faculty Members and Resident Assistants to Respond to Bereaved Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Taub, Deborah J.

    2008-01-01

    Scholarship about campus responses to death-related events emphasizes the need for members of the campus community to be open to discussing grief-related issues. Faculty members and resident assistants (RAs) are ideally situated to observe and respond to bereaved students. Faculty--tenure-track, adjunct, and teaching assistants--have regular…

  13. Academic dishonesty among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Gaberson, K B

    1997-01-01

    Student cheating on college campuses is believed to be a common occurrence, but academic dishonesty among nursing students is a source of legitimate concern to nursing faculty members because of its potential effect on present and future professional practice. Strategies are outlined that can promote academic honesty in the nursing program through moral and character development of nursing students, teaching moral decision-making skills, role-modeling of honest academic behavior, and developing and enforcing an appropriate academic integrity policy. PMID:9362877

  14. AACN White Paper: Distance Technology in Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    Technological advances have increased opportunities for nursing education, affording increased collaboration among nursing faculties in teaching, practice, and research. In an era when nurses are in demand, technology may help the profession educate nurses, prepare future educators, and advance the science of nursing. Several factors should be…

  15. The serendipity of faculty practice: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Novak, D A

    1999-01-01

    The contemporary social issues impacting healthcare coupled with the increasing demands for academic units to generate income have contributed to the emergence of faculty practice as an integral component of the nurse educator's role. As a result, faculty are encouraged increasingly to assume entrepreneurial joint appointments with the service industry. For nurse educators who engage in faculty practice, serendipity occurs when they immerse themselves in situations and emerge from the experience making unexpected discoveries. The author shares practical recommendations and strategies resulting from a successful 9-month faculty practice. PMID:10335212

  16. Athletic Trainers' Knowledge Regarding Airway Adjuncts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edler, Jessica R.; Eberman, Lindsey E.; Kahanov, Leamor; Roman, Christopher; Mata, Heather Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Context: Research suggests that knowledge gaps regarding the appropriate use of airway adjuncts exist among various health care practitioners, and that knowledge is especially limited within athletic training. Objective: To determine the relationship between perceived knowledge (PK) and actual knowledge (AK) of airway adjunct use and the…

  17. Precursors and adjuncts of a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    The automated, teleoperated, robotic and human-tended subsystems which will precede and accompany a lunar base program are discussed. The information about lunar conditions that can be provided by such precursors and adjuncts is addressed. The use of precursors and adjuncts for communications and navigation, for safety and survival, for lunar archives, and for entertainment and leisure is examined.

  18. The Lived Experience of Professional Identity in Master Nursing Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Brenda Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Minimal research exists regarding professional identity in nursing faculty. The established literature from teaching, nursing, and medicine shows professional identity promotes resilience, collaboration, and positive practice outcomes. These factors would be beneficial in the recruitment, orientation, and retention of nursing faculty.…

  19. The library from the nursing educator's point of view.

    PubMed

    Treece, E W

    1971-07-01

    Libraries are accessible to faculties of schools of nursing but tend not to be fully utilized by them. The author describes the results of her surveys of nursing literature concerning libraries and one faculty's opinions and knowledge about its school library. Suggestions are made for assisting nurse educators and students to use the library to its fullest extent. PMID:5146768

  20. Connecting Non Full-time Faculty to Institutional Mission: A Guidebook for College/University Administrators and Faculty Developers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron-Nixon, Leora

    2007-01-01

    Non full-time faculty--whether adjunct, part-time or contingent--has become the lifeline of a vast majority of colleges and universities. They teach many of the foundation and core courses taken by first- and second-year students, teach professional courses in which their own life experiences are invaluable, and step in at short notice to fill-in…

  1. The faculty and information specialist partnership: stimulating student interest and experiential learning.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Regina M; Bonsteel, Susan H

    2010-01-01

    Faculty are challenged to find innovative ways to teach the skills for evidenced-based practice and information literacy. Librarians are natural partners with nurse educators because of their information literacy expertise. Literature shows that an experiential approach is an effective strategy for teaching undergraduate nursing research. The authors describe the development and implementation of simple research projects in an undergraduate nursing research course and the collaboration among course faculty, nursing students, and the information literacy specialist. PMID:20410754

  2. Academic nurse leaders' role in fostering a culture of civility in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Clark, Cynthia M; Springer, Pamela J

    2010-06-01

    Academic incivility is disruptive behavior that substantially or repeatedly interferes with teaching and learning. Incivility on college campuses jeopardizes the welfare of all members of the academy. Academic nurse leaders play a critical role in preventing and addressing academic incivility because these behaviors can negatively affect learning and harm faculty-student relationships. Although studies on student and faculty incivility have been conducted in nursing education, there are no known studies regarding the perceptions of academic nurse leaders about this problem. This is the first known study to investigate the perceptions of 126 academic nurse leaders (deans, directors, and chairpersons) from 128 associate degree in nursing and bachelor of science nursing programs in a large western state. Academic nurse leaders responded to five open-ended questions regarding their perceptions of stressors that affect nursing faculty and students, the uncivil behaviors exhibited by both groups, and the role of leadership in preventing and addressing incivility in nursing education. PMID:20210272

  3. A comprehensive community nursing center model: maximizing practice income--a challenge to educators.

    PubMed

    Walker, P H

    1994-01-01

    The potential role of community nursing centers to generate revenue through faculty practice is critical for the survival of nursing centers in the future. A nursing center entrepreneurial model for faculty practice within the University of Rochester School of Nursing uses sound business principles to enhance financial success and challenges current paradigms in education, practice, and research. PMID:8034852

  4. Cultural Characteristics of a Nursing Education Center of Excellence: A Naturalistic Inquiry Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiker, Tona L.

    2011-01-01

    Nursing education is at a crossroad today. Stressors in nursing programs include expanding enrollments to meet growing workforce demands for more registered nurses, demanding workloads with low average nursing faculty salaries compared to practice peers, and growing numbers of faculty retirements. The purpose of this study was to identify the…

  5. Part-time faculty and gerontology programs:dilemmas and solutions.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Tonya M; Grabinski, C Joanne; Silverstein, Nina M; Spencer, Marian; Takayanagi, Paul W; Yee-Melichar, Darlene

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the use of adjunct faculty generally and within gerontology programs and discusses the benefits, drawbacks and possible solutions for both adjunct faculty and gerontology programs to utilize part-time teaching staff. The benefits reported for being a part-time faculty member include wanting to be in academia and supplementing an income. The reasons gerontology programs hire adjunct faculty members include their being less costly and bringing new skills to the programs. There are also practical and substantive drawbacks faced by part-time faculty. Practical issues include confusion with the pay schedule and last-minute class cancellations. Substantive issues include a lack of both respect and opportunities for professional development. The solutions to these issues include assigned space and support to part-time faculty members, maintaining peer and student evaluations, and affirming diversity in gerontology by recruiting adjunct faculty with knowledge and research capabilities for tenure-track positions as a strategy for successful gerontology program development. PMID:17537716

  6. Relationships between Self-Regulating Behaviors and Predictor Exam Scores for Senior Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Low pass rates on the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses have directed nursing faculty to examine how to predict the readiness of the nursing student. Exit exam testing that predicts readiness has become one way to assess the nursing student's readiness. Nursing students at the research site's school of nursing are…

  7. Developing a Professional Competence Model for Nursing Education. Final Report, Research Report Number Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentkowski, Marcia; And Others

    A generic competence model for effective nursing performance was developed and compared with nurses' perceptions of job elements that discriminate outstanding nursing performance and that are critical in the selection and education of nurses. The model is to be used to validate the nursing faculty's existing competence model for nursing education…

  8. Faculty Evaluation System: Counseling Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Louis Community Coll., MO.

    This manual provides a series of forms and instruments and outlines the procedures used by St. Louis Community College in its annual evaluation of counseling faculty performance. First, general information is provided in lists of the performance indicators and other criteria upon which the assessment of teachers, counselors, and instructional…

  9. Adjunctive analgesic therapy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Leigh A

    2008-11-01

    Adjunctive analgesic therapies are interventions for pain that involve agents or techniques other than the traditional analgesics (opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and local anesthetics). Adjunctive therapies may be pharmacologic or nonpharmacologic in nature. The focus of this article is on pharmacologic interventions with potential utility as adjunctive analgesics in veterinary medicine. Pharmacology of selected agents, including medetomidine, ketamine, amantadine, gabapentin, systemic lidocaine, and pamidronate, is discussed in addition to evidence for their safety and efficacy and guidelines for their use in veterinary patients. PMID:18954680

  10. Empowerment of nurse educators through organizational culture.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Barbara H

    2009-01-01

    Presenting the findings of a correlational study, the author discusses the implications of organizational culture and empowerment within a nurse faculty sample. The findings of the study indicate that organizational culture has a significant impact on empowerment of associate degree nursing faculty. The knowledge gained from this research may be useful in creating environments in which nurse educators emulate empowering behaviors for future graduates. Recommendations for further research are provided. PMID:19331033

  11. Improving the quality of geriatric nursing care: enduring outcomes from the geriatric nursing education consortium.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; Wilson, Laurie Dodge; Stanley, Joan; Watman, Rachael; Shire, Amy; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Mezey, Mathy

    2014-01-01

    The nation's aging demography, few nursing faculty with gerontological nursing expertise, and insufficient geriatric content in nursing programs have created a national imperative to increase the supply of nurses qualified to provide care for older adults. Geriatric Nursing Education Consortium (GNEC), a collaborative program of the John A. Hartford Foundation, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and the New York University (NYU) Nursing Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, was initiated to provide faculty with the necessary skills, knowledge, and competency to implement sustainable curricular innovations in care of older adults. This article describes the background, step-by-step process approach to the development of GNEC evidence-based curricular materials, and the dissemination of these materials through 6-, 2-, and a half-day national Faculty Development Institutes (FDIs). Eight hundred eight faculty, representing 418 schools of nursing, attended. A total of 479 individuals responded to an evaluation conducted by Baruch College that showed faculty feasibility to incorporate GNEC content into courses, confidence in teaching and incorporating content, and overall high rating of the GNEC materials. The impact of GNEC is discussed along with effects on faculty participants over 2 years. Administrative- and faculty-level recommendations to sustain and expand GNEC are highlighted. PMID:25455325

  12. Violence and the Nursing Curriculum: Nurse Educators Speak Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodtli, M. Anne; Breslin, Eileen T.

    1997-01-01

    Focus groups of 100 nurse educators and survey responses from 107 at a national convention revealed overwhelming agreement that nursing curricula do not adequately address violence and that faculty are not prepared to teach violence assessment and abuse reporting, despite agreement that it is a high-priority issue. (SK)

  13. 32 CFR 728.93 - Chart of adjuncts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chart of adjuncts. 728.93 Section 728.93... FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Adjuncts to Medical Care § 728.93 Chart of adjuncts. The following chart and footnotes provide information relative to adjuncts which may be...

  14. A Four-Phase Multidisciplinary Faculty Development Model in Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batsche, Catherine N.; Monoson, Patricia

    1993-01-01

    A faculty development program combining social services, human performance, psychology, nutrition, audiology, and nursing had four phases: study of gerontology theories, practical experience, course development, and test of curriculum materials. Ten faculty developed 50 instructional units; 300 undergraduate students demonstrated significant gains…

  15. Improving Faculty Publication Output: The Role of a Writing Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Claire; Chandler, Genevieve E.

    2002-01-01

    In a nursing school, a writing coach supported faculty publishing using a situational leadership framework and offering instrumental, informational, appraisal, and emotional support at all phases of the writing process. Sixteen of 26 faculty were coached, generating 21 journal article submissions and 15 published articles. (SK)

  16. Impact of Faculty Development on Physical Therapy Professors' Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S.; Zafar, Mueen A.; Roberts, Kellie W.

    2012-01-01

    Physical therapy faculty share similarities with faculty across allied health fields, such as nursing, and other clinical disciplines that educate students in licensing and board certification programs. Most have clinical experience and discipline-based expertise, however they may not have had the benefit of continuous learning aimed at enhancing…

  17. Teaching Perspectives and Usage of Journal Writing by Clinical Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alschuler, Mari L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between teaching perspectives (TPs), faculty usage and perceptions of reflective journaling (RJ), and demographic characteristics among clinical faculty in nursing, social work, and counseling. A combination of causal-comparative and correlational designs was utilized, with stratified…

  18. Using art to express a personal philosophy of nursing.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Brenda L; Rose, Wanda J

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe an innovative teaching strategy using art to express personal philosophy of nursing. This teaching strategy gives students and faculty an opportunity to be creative and to express their personal feelings about the nature of nursing. PMID:12878894

  19. Challenges to the Identity Formation of the School Nurse Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donoghue, Patricia Drogos; Hogan, Eleanor Phipps

    1980-01-01

    The problems arising in using nurse practitioners as school nurses are discussed, including the training program involved, the individual's self-concept within the position, and the faculty's attitude. (JMF)

  20. Developing the next generation of nurse scientists.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Patricia V; Hall, Lynne A

    2015-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate nursing research internship program in which students are engaged in research with a faculty mentor. Since 2002, more than 130 undergraduate nursing students have participated. Interns coauthored publications, presented papers and posters at conferences, and received awards. This highly successful program provides a model that can be easily replicated to foster the development of future nurse scientists. PMID:25581434

  1. The Influence of a Lilly Endowment Grant to Recruit and Retain Part-Time Faculty in a Community College System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lepper, Charles Wilmer

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the influence of a grant from the Lilly Endowment to recruit and retain intellectual capital of part-time faculty in a community college system. Through the use of grant funds, the college used in this study developed and implemented nine college-wide initiatives. This study examined adjunct faculty members'…

  2. Reversing Course in Pennsylvania Higher Education: The Two Tiers in Faculty Pay and Benefits and a Way Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Deidre; Herzenberg, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Over the last generation, the instructional staffing system in U.S. higher education has experienced a significant reduction in the proportion of jobs for full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty members and a dramatic growth in "contingent" instructors--full-time non tenure track, part-time/adjunct faculty and graduate employees. About 70…

  3. International Dimensions of Nursing and Health Care in Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Nursing Programs in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooneyhan, Esther L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Results of a national survey of undergraduate and graduate nursing programs to determine the extent of curriculum content and faculty training in international health issues are reported. The importance of this aspect of nursing education is discussed. (MSE)

  4. More than Colleagues: Tracing the Experiences of Career and Technical Education Instructors Engaged in Faculty-to-Faculty Mentoring Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findley, Daniel E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of faculty-to-faculty mentoring programs on the experiences of both mentors and first-year instructor proteges in Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs with an emphasis on practitioner-educators in nursing and in welding-fabrication. The study was undertaken for four reasons: (a)…

  5. Collaborative graduate education: executive nurse practice and health care leadership.

    PubMed

    Elaine, Hardy; DeBasio, Nancy; Warmbrodt, Lynn; Gartland, Myles; Bassett, William; Tansey, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Research College of Nursing and the Rockhurst University Helzberg School of Management Health Care Initiative collaborated to offer the Executive Nurse Practice: Health Care Leadership track to Research College of Nursing graduate students. This effort was not only cost effective, but also offered expert faculty in both the fields of nursing and business. The curriculum is an integration of both fields and faculties from both institutions as they communicate and collaborate each semester to successfully coordinate the track. PMID:15495758

  6. An emerging role: the nurse content curator.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Beth A

    2015-01-01

    A new phenomenon, the inverted or "flipped" classroom, assumes that students are no longer acquiring knowledge exclusively through textbooks or lectures. Instead, they are seeking out the vast amount of free information available to them online (the very essence of open source) to supplement learning gleaned in textbooks and lectures. With so much open-source content available to nursing faculty, it benefits the faculty to use readily available, technologically advanced content. The nurse content curator supports nursing faculty in its use of such content. Even more importantly, the highly paid, time-strapped faculty is not spending an inordinate amount of effort surfing for and evaluating content. The nurse content curator does that work, while the faculty uses its time more effectively to help students vet the truth, make meaning of the content, and learn to problem-solve. Brooks. PMID:24935444

  7. Partners in Research: Developing a Model for Undergraduate Faculty-Student Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Reitmaier Koehler, Amy; Reveling Smith, Linda; Davies, Susan; Mangan-Danckwart, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining scholarship while delivering an undergraduate nursing program is a challenge for nursing faculty. In this paper, we describe an approach that involves undergraduate nursing students in a program of faculty research, which evaluates new approaches to teaching and learning. Students work with faculty to develop a research proposal, identifying specific questions and exploring relevant literature. Projects may include original data collection with faculty supervision, or secondary analysis of existing datasets. Foci have included partnership learning between nursing students and older adults, models of sustainability for a traveling health clinic, and experiences of aging. Findings and recommendations feed into the broader faculty research agenda, provide a foundation for subsequent projects, and inform further development of educational programs. Students have presented at local and national conferences and developed papers for publication based on this joint work. We describe the benefits and challenges of these partnerships, drawing upon student and faculty reflections. PMID:26451917

  8. Perspectives on nursing: using multimedia interviews to influence career decisions.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Karen M; Johnson, Michael C; Corbet, Cheryl; Thompson, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students often have misconceptions regarding the reality of nursing and the opportunities available to nurses that sometimes result in poor choices related to pursuing nursing as a career. To help prenursing students make better-informed career decisions and address misunderstandings, faculty developed the DVD and Web site Perspectives on Nursing, a collection of 15 nurse interviews. The authors describe and discuss the project, the value of recorded nurses' stories, analysis of student feedback, and recommendations. PMID:21135682

  9. Transforming Associate Degree Nursing Education with Internet Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremel, Maureen D.

    2004-01-01

    In light of today's dynamic health care delivery system, nursing education cannot be passive and still produce competent and effective registered nurses. Registered nurses must be able to communicate confidently in order to advocate for their patients and themselves. The nursing faculty at Seminole Community College have accepted the challenge to…

  10. Standards for nursing.

    PubMed

    Kamel, E; Elliott, E; Zaki, H

    1994-01-01

    In 1990, funded by a grant from the United States Agency for International Development, Project HOPE/Egypt began a three-year scheme for the development of professional nursing. The board consists of national medical and nursing leaders in the institutes of higher education, faculties of medicine, the nursing association, and ministries of health. A subcommittee works on the development of standards for nursing education, practice, and research, and produced a definition of nursing which conforms with Egyptian social values and the national strategy for health. Standards established by the American Nurses' Association and the International Council of Nurses provided guidance on format, structure, and modes of expression. It was decided that the development of the criteria would take place subsequently. There are sets of standards for nurses, clinical practice, research, and education accompanied by an explanatory statement. Professional development, collaboration and ethics are particularly important for nurses. They are expected to function with a degree of independence and to adopt leadership roles within interdisciplinary health teams. The standards for education are the most comprehensive in order to upgrade the nursing profession. The standards for nursing research remain the least comprehensive. In Egypt, research is still largely concerned with student nurses, while little attention is given to clinical practice. The standards for clinical practice were devised for a role that is not yet universal in Egypt. The English-language version of the standards was completed in July 1991. An Arabic translation was accepted by Project HOPE/Egypt to be distributed to the ministries concerned, directors of nursing in hospitals, higher institutes of nursing, and nursing schools. Feedback was gathered during 1992 and the subcommittee undertook a review in 1993 to refine the standards and develop criteria. This process is expected to be completed later in 1994. PMID

  11. "I Want to Be a Nurse!": A Qualitative Descriptive Study on the Impact of an "Introduction to Nursing" Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of nursing students is not the issue. Each year, nursing programs across the country turn away highly qualified applicants due to faculty shortage and limited clinical space. Therefore, it is imperative to retain those who secure one of these valuable spots as a nursing student. An "Introduction to Nursing" course was offered…

  12. Recruitment strategies for baccalaureate nursing students in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Laureen J

    2007-06-01

    This study explored the nature of recruitment practices for basic baccalaureate degree nursing programs in Ontario. Using a case study approach at three university sites, interviews of nursing faculty and institutional liaison officers were conducted, and recruitment publications and relevant institutional Web sites were examined. The findings show that nursing faculty members participate in student recruitment, but the recruitment activities are organized and carried out primarily at the institutional level to promote the university and its programs. Given the concerns regarding nursing shortages, recruitment objectives for nursing should reflect health system needs, as well as the needs of the individual institutions. Nursing faculty are in a favorable position to ensure nursing applicants receive information that is relevant and accurate to promote realistic expectations of nursing education and practice, which, in turn, may minimize student attrition and early withdrawal from nursing practice. PMID:17580738

  13. Adjunct processors in embedded medical imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepanier, Marc; Goddard, Iain

    2002-05-01

    Adjunct processors have traditionally been used for certain tasks in medical imaging systems. Often based on application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), these processors formed X-ray image-processing pipelines or constituted the backprojectors in computed tomography (CT) systems. We examine appropriate functions to perform with adjunct processing and draw some conclusions about system design trade-offs. These trade-offs have traditionally focused on the required performance and flexibility of individual system components, with increasing emphasis on time-to-market impact. Typically, front-end processing close to the sensor has the most intensive processing requirements. However, the performance capabilities of each level are dynamic and the system architect must keep abreast of the current capabilities of all options to remain competitive. Designers are searching for the most efficient implementation of their particular system requirements. We cite algorithm characteristics that point to effective solutions by adjunct processors. We have developed a field- programmable gate array (FPGA) adjunct-processor solution for a Cone-Beam Reconstruction (CBR) algorithm that offers significant performance improvements over a general-purpose processor implementation. The same hardware could efficiently perform other image processing functions such as two-dimensional (2D) convolution. The potential performance, price, operating power, and flexibility advantages of an FPGA adjunct processor over an ASIC, DSP or general-purpose processing solutions are compelling.

  14. Selecting Standardized Tests in Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Mee, Cheryl L; Hallenbeck, Virginia J

    2015-01-01

    Nursing faculty frequently utilize or consider the use of nationally standardized tests to evaluate nursing student performance and their potential to pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX)(©) after graduation. There is little literature available to advise and guide nursing faculty in criteria to consider when selecting a standardized testing company to assess student readiness for NCLEX. The intent of this article is to share criteria to consider when evaluating a standardized test or testing program that has been gathered through an informal survey of faculty who are currently using standardized tests. PMID:26653043

  15. Priorities and challenges of health system chief nursing executives: insights for nursing educators.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lauren; Campbell, Ann; Dubree, Marilyn; Fuchs, Mary Ann; Davis, Nancy; Hertzler, Barbara; Talarek, Diane; Wessman, Joan

    2006-01-01

    The health system chief nursing executive (CNE) is responsible for providing high-quality, service-oriented nursing care; delivering such care with disciplined cost management; leading and developing a group of nursing executives and managers at the facility level to establish nursing professional development programs and to build and maintain an effective supply of nurses; and advocating nurses and patients. This article provides insight into the strategies and priorities of large health system CNEs in balancing their obligations to their health systems, to patients and their families, and to the nurses they lead. It is hoped that these insights will provide perspectives that will support the ability of nursing educators to meet their own obligations to their schools of nursing, the faculty and students they represent, and to the profession. These insights will also set a context for further dialogue between two very important groups of nursing leaders-nursing executives and nursing educators. PMID:16873043

  16. A Nursing School Cooperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Carolyn; Polacsek, Barbara K.

    1975-01-01

    Faculty in five suburban Chicago nursing programs successfully joined together to share inservice programs and curtail duplication of resources and costs, through newsletters, computerized inventories of instructional materials and media owned by each, and inservice training luncheons. Coordinating the scheduling of students' clinical time at…

  17. Faculty Perceptions of Basic Skills Faculty Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Michelle Moreau

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of faculty regarding why they choose to attend basic skills faculty development; what they choose to implement in their classrooms; and how they determine the effectiveness of the strategies selected. A survey was completed by 173 full and part-time faculty from a large, suburban single-campus community…

  18. What goes around comes around: improving faculty retention through more effective mentoring.

    PubMed

    Dunham-Taylor, Janne; Lynn, Cynthia W; Moore, Patricia; McDaniel, Staci; Walker, Jane K

    2008-01-01

    In the midst of a nursing faculty shortage, recruitment and retention of new faculty are of utmost importance if the country is to educate and graduate a sufficient number of nurses to fill the health care demands. The pressure of horizontal hostility combined with lack of support, guidance, and knowledge about the educational system makes the novice nurse faculty members vulnerable to burnout and early resignations. Mentorship is the single most influential way to successfully develop new nursing faculty, reaping the benefits of recruitment, retention, and long-term maturation of future nurse mentors. Mentoring is a developmental process designed to support and navigate the novice nurse educator through the tasks and experiences of nursing education. The essential elements of an effective mentorship program include the following: socialization, collaboration, operations, validation/evaluation, expectations, transformation, reputation, documentation, generation, and perfection. The mentoring process can lead to an upward spiral of success. If negative, the new faculty experience is at risk for a downward spiral. In this spiral, the final outcome will ultimately be the creation of productive faculty (and future nurse mentors), along with improved faculty group dynamics and teamwork, or just another vacant position. PMID:19022206

  19. Adjuncts to colonic cleansing before colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Sanghoon; Lim, Yun Jeong

    2014-03-21

    Pre-procedural cleansing of the bowel can maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of colonoscopy. Yet, efficacy of the current gold standard colonic preparation method - high-volume oral administration of purgative agents 12-24 h prior to the procedure - is limited by several factors, such as patient compliance (due to poor palatability and inconvenience of the dosing regimen) and risks of complications (due to drug interactions or intolerance). Attempts to resolve these limitations have included providing adjunctive agents and methods to promote the colonic cleansing ability of the principal purgative agent, with the aim of lessening unpleasant side effects (such as bloating) and reducing the large ingested volume requirement. Several promising adjunctive agents are bisacodyl, magnesium citrate, senna, simethicone, metoclopramide, and prokinetics, and each are being investigated for their potential. This review provides an up to date summary of the reported investigations into the potencies and weaknesses of the key adjuncts currently being applied in clinic as supplements to the traditional bowel preparation agents. While the comparative analysis of these adjuncts showed that no single agent or method has yet achieved the goal of completely overcoming the limitations of the current gold standard preparation method, they at least provide endoscopists with an array of alternatives to help improve the suboptimal efficacy of the main cleansing solutions when used alone. To aid in this clinical endeavor, a subjective grade was assigned to each adjunct to indicate its practical value. In addition, the systematic review of the currently available agents and methods provides insight into the features of each that may be overcome or exploited to create novel drugs and strategies that may become adopted as effective bowel cleansing adjuncts or alternatives. PMID:24659864

  20. Predictors of Retention and Passing National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The current nursing shortage has challenged colleges to educate nurses at a faster pace than in previous times. Successful completion of the nursing programs and passing the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) exam is important for the students, faculty, and nursing programs. The purpose of this retrospective…

  1. Neurology Academic Advisory Committee: a strategy for faculty retention and advancement.

    PubMed

    Schenkenberg, T; Foster, N L; Bromberg, M B; DeWitt, L D; Flanigan, K M

    2011-08-16

    Major effort and expense are devoted to faculty recruitment. Subsequent direction, support, and guidance of faculty members for retention and academic advancement are often inconsistent and ineffective. Individual mentorship is widely endorsed as an important element in advancement but often does not occur or is uneven in its pragmatic benefit. We formed a Departmental Academic Advisory Committee to provide individualized advice and guidance about career development and institutional promotion, retention, and tenure procedures. To assess the effectiveness of this process, a survey was sent to faculty members. A 100% response rate was achieved. The results of the survey demonstrated high levels of acceptance by faculty members and described benefits experienced by faculty, including better understanding of promotion and tenure policies and specific actions taken to achieve professional goals. An academic advisory committee can be a valuable adjunct to individual mentorship and to meetings with department chairs to enhance faculty satisfaction and advancement of neurology faculty members. PMID:21795659

  2. A collective community approach to preparing nursing students for the NCLEX RN examination.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Laura; Shelton, Patricia; Zimmerman, Lynn

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the challenges that nursing faculty at one historically black college and university (HBCU) embark upon when preparing students for first time passage on the NCLEX RN examination. In response to these challenges, the nursing faculty advocate a collective community approach which focuses on nurse educators working together to share ideas and strategies to ensure NCLEX-RN success for nursing graduates and subsequently, their nursing programs. PMID:15307364

  3. Reiki therapy: the benefits to a nurse/Reiki practitioner.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Kathleen M; Wishnia, Gracie S

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluates how nurses who gave Reiki therapy perceived the benefit of this therapy on their clients and on themselves concurrently as providers of the therapy. As an adjunct, the study's purpose was to enhance the understanding and credibility of nurse/Reiki practitioners. PMID:12889549

  4. PhD or DNP: planning for doctoral nursing education.

    PubMed

    Bednash, Geraldine; Breslin, Eileen T; Kirschling, Jane M; Rosseter, Robert J

    2014-10-01

    Leading authorities from inside and outside of nursing are calling for a rapid increase in the number of nurses holding doctoral degrees. More nurses with the terminal degree are needed to serve as Advanced Practice Registered Nurses, assume faculty roles, embark on research careers, and pursue top leadership positions. Today's prospective nursing student can choose from doctoral programs focused on research or practice. The authors explore the differences in these degree options, expectations for students enrolled in these programs, key questions to ask when selecting a degree type, and the career choices available to doctorally-prepared nurses, including faculty positions. PMID:25248773

  5. Student Immersion in Perioperative Nursing.

    PubMed

    Penprase, Barbara; Monahan, Janean; Poly-Droulard, Lynda; Prechowski, Stephanie

    2016-02-01

    The aging workforce and the lack of perioperative clinical practice and theoretical content in nursing education programs are factors contributing to the perioperative nursing shortage. This article discusses the implementation of a creatively designed perioperative program, which includes a didactic course and a 210-hour clinical course, developed by the faculty members of a Michigan school of nursing in collaboration with administrators at area hospitals. The didactic content covers materials presented during the first three months of orientation for newly employed perioperative nurses. Interested baccalaureate nursing students in their senior year are selected to participate in the program after being interviewed by hospital personnel and university faculty members. To date, the program has 18 student graduates in two semesters; all have been offered positions in the perioperative setting, and 14 have accepted positions. The active learning strategies used in the course are described with examples. PMID:26849984

  6. Strengthening the Role of Part-Time Faculty in Community Colleges. Example Job Description for Part-Time Faculty: Valencia College--Job Description and Essential Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Community College Student Engagement, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to support college conversations regarding strengthening the role of part-time faculty, this brief document presents the job description for a Valencia College part-time/adjunct professor (revised as of July 19, 2013). The description includes essential functions, qualifications, and knowledge, skills, and abilities. This is followed…

  7. Outward Bound as an Adjunct to Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Nelson K.

    The Colorado Outward Bound School (COBS) provides successful adjunct programs for special populations undergoing therapy at the Adventure Home (Boulder, CO), the Juvenile Justice Program and the St. Luke's Hospital Alcoholism Recovery Unit (Denver, CO), and the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Department of Psychiatry (Hanover, NH). The goals of…

  8. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF ADJUNCT AUTO-INSTRUCTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KINZER, JOHN R.; WORCESTER, DEAN A.

    THE QUESTION OF PRIMARY CONCERN IN FOUR STUDIES WAS IMMEDIATE FEEDBACK IN ADJUNCT AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL EXERCISES (LEARNING EXERCISES DEFINED AS THOSE DESIGNED TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE STRUCTURE INHERENT IN SUBJECT MATTER). IN A CONTROLLED SITUATION, DIFFERENT FEEDBACK DELAYS (IMMEDIATE, 1-HOUR DELAY, 2-DAY DELAY, AND 1-WEEK DELAY) WERE TESTED. OTHER…

  9. Nurses' perceptions of administrative social support.

    PubMed

    Ihlenfeld, J T

    1996-01-01

    A meta-analysis of 125 nurses in three types of nursing roles investigated whether these nurses received social support from their administrators, the types of social support received, and whether more or less social support from these managers was desired. The Arizona Social Support Interview Schedule (ASSIS) was used to assess these questions. Results showed that home health nurses received social participation and physical assistance, whereas staff nurses received positive feedback and physical assistance. Nursing faculty received little support from their managers. Social exchange theory predicts that intangibles such as social support should exist in equitable relationships. It is possible that the difference in the nurses' and administrators' statuses and power levels affected staff nurses' results. Mental health clinical nurse specialists can use these results to help nurses understand their work relationships. PMID:8920344

  10. Nurses for Wisconsin: A Collaborative Initiative to Enhance the Nurse Educator Workforce.

    PubMed

    Young, Linda K; Adams, Jan L; Lundeen, Sally; May, Katharyn A; Smith, Rosemary; Wendt, L Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Wisconsin, like much of the nation, is currently suffering from a growing nursing shortage. The University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire College of Nursing and Health Sciences, in partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and University of Wisconsin Oshkosh nursing programs, took advantage of a University of Wisconsin System Incentive Grant for economic and workforce development to address this problem. With a $3.2 million award, the Nurses for Wisconsin goal is to increase the number of baccalaureate registered nurses by expanding the nursing education capacity within the University of Wisconsin System. Nurses for Wisconsin is accelerating the preparation of nursing faculty by supporting nurses to enroll in doctor of nursing practice or nursing doctor of philosophy programs with pre- and postdoctoral fellowship awards ranging from $21,500 to $90,000 and the recruitment of faculty with a loan repayment program of up to $50,000. In exchange for the financial support, fellows and faculty must make a 3-year commitment to teach in a UW System nursing program. Two conferences for program participants are also funded through the award. The first conference was held in October 2014. The second conference is scheduled for summer 2015. With the first year of the 2-year project completed, this article describes Nurses for Wisconsin from inception to implementation and midterm assessment with a focus on lessons learned. A follow-up article addressing final outcomes and next steps is planned. PMID:27424929

  11. Bringing nursing to the public.

    PubMed

    Kazis, Cornelia; Schwendimann, René

    2009-11-01

    For the past 5 years, an unusual program has been evolving in the University of Basel's Institute of Nursing Science master's program in Basel, Switzerland. A special course designed to help nurses master public communication skills requires students to play the roles of journalist, exhibition curator, conference organizer, radio reporter, and news producer. Two faculty members, an experienced radio and newspaper journalist and a nurse scientist, teach and support the students. By developing their competence in media relations, participants prepare themselves to tackle the course's long-term goal of bringing the nursing profession into the public eye. PMID:19731893

  12. Adjuncts in Social Work Programs: Good Practice or Unethical?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearlman, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Social work education programs rely heavily on adjunct instructors, as do most academic institutions. This article adds to existing literature on adjuncts by focusing on the unique issues in social work education, using social work values and ethics as a focus. The benefits and detriments for adjuncts, programs, and students in schools of social…

  13. Promoting integrity among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Langone, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Unethical practices among college students are concerning for any profession, but especially for nursing because these students will become health care providers after graduation. Studies have found correlations between unethical practices as a student with future professional behavior; therefore, it is important to instill a sense of ethics in all nursing students. Honor codes facilitate communication about behavioral expectations between faculty and students and emphasize the importance of ethical behavior. The HIRRE (honesty, integrity, respect, responsibility, and ethics) program at Pasco-Hernando Community College is an example of a modified honor code. Through the use of faculty and student situation reports, this program has enabled faculty to monitor the integrity status of the nursing program and establish policy protocols for unethical behaviors. PMID:17302100

  14. Community College Dual Enrollment Faculty Orientation: A Utilization-Focused Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlier, Hara D.; Duggan, Molly H.

    2010-01-01

    The current climate of accountability demands that institutions engage in data-driven program evaluation. In order to promote quality dual enrollment (DE) programs, institutions must support the adjunct faculty teaching college courses in high schools. This study uses Patton's utilization-focused model (1997) to conduct a formative evaluation of a…

  15. Narrowing the Distance: Bridging the Gap between Teaching Online and Faculty Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochefort, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    Online education is a steadily growing industry, and financial pressure at institutions, combined with the rising demand for online education, have caused many universities and colleges to rely on adjunct faculty to staff their online courses For instructors, the transition to teaching online can pose a variety of barriers not the least of which…

  16. The Faculty of the Future: Leaner, Meaner, More Innovative, Less Secure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The faculty workplace has changed significantly in the last 20 years: More women, minority professors, and adjuncts have joined the professoriate. Information technology has led to new opportunities and expectations. The economic crisis has complicated long-term planning for scholars and institutions alike. Seven scholars from several fields and…

  17. Directory of Faculty Contracts and Bargaining Agents in Institutions of Higher Education, Volume 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Joel M.; And Others

    Data on 1986 regular and adjunct faculty bargaining agents and collective bargaining agreements in public and private U.S. and Canadian colleges are presented, along with a brief narrative description of 1986 trends. For each institution, information is provided on the bargaining agent, unit size, the year the current agent was elected, the year…

  18. Business Continuity Planning for Nursing Schools: Preparation for Potential Disasters.

    PubMed

    Zerwic, Julie J; Rosen, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Nursing schools are vulnerable to disasters, ranging from pandemics to weather emergencies, fires, and acts of terrorism. To ensure minimal disruptions to teaching, provision of care, research, and other critical missions, nursing faculty and administrative leaders should develop a business continuity plan. The business continuity plan can help faculty, students, and administration identify critical functions and alternative plans if an emergency occurs. We offer our experience as a guide for other nursing schools. PMID:26312823

  19. Current Status of Nursing Informatics Education in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Eunjoo; Kim, Jeongeun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jungha; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Shinae; Jun, Jooyeon; Song, Healim; On, Jeongah; Jung, Hyesil; Hong, Yeong Joo; Yim, Suran

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study presents the current status of nursing informatics education, the content covered in nursing informatics courses, the faculty efficacy, and the barriers to and additional supports for teaching nursing informatics in Korea. Methods A set of questionnaires consisting of an 18-item questionnaire for nursing informatics education, a 6-item questionnaire for faculty efficacy, and 2 open-ended questions for barriers and additional supports were sent to 204 nursing schools via email and the postal service. Nursing schools offering nursing informatics were further asked to send their syllabuses. The subjects taught were analyzed using nursing informatics competency categories and other responses were tailed using descriptive statistics. Results A total of 72 schools (35.3%) responded to the survey, of which 38 reported that they offered nursing informatics courses in their undergraduate nursing programs. Nursing informatics courses at 11 schools were taught by a professor with a degree majoring in nursing informatics. Computer technology was the most frequently taught subject (27 schools), followed by information systems used for practice (25 schools). The faculty efficacy was 3.76 ± 0.86 (out of 5). The most frequently reported barrier to teaching nursing informatics (n = 9) was lack of awareness of the importance of nursing informatics. Training and educational opportunities was the most requested additional support. Conclusions Nursing informatics education has increased during the last decade in Korea. However, the proportions of faculty with degrees in nursing informatics and number of schools offering nursing informatics courses have not increased much. Thus, a greater focus is needed on training faculty and developing the courses. PMID:27200224

  20. The clinical nurse educator as leader.

    PubMed

    Adelman-Mullally, Theresa; Mulder, Cindy K; McCarter-Spalding, Deborah E; Hagler, Debra A; Gaberson, Kathleen B; Hanner, Mary Beth; Oermann, Marilyn H; Speakman, Elizabeth T; Yoder-Wise, Patricia S; Young, Patricia K

    2013-01-01

    The National League for Nursing recognizes leadership as an important aspect of the educator role. The purpose of this article is to describe leadership in the context of clinical nursing education and how clinical nurse educators enact leadership. The article identifies particular nursing practice skills and strengths that clinicians bring to nursing education that enhance leadership knowledge, skills, and abilities. After review of several leadership models, we identified five overarching themes that demonstrate how clinical nurse educators exemplify the various models including role modeling, providing vision, helping students to learn, challenging the system or status quo, and seeking relational integrity. We explicate the themes with examples affirming the leadership potential of clinical nurse educators, and suggest ways in which nursing faculty members and administrators might draw on the leadership capital of clinical nurse educators. PMID:22854312

  1. Mentoring: a supporting act for African American students and faculty.

    PubMed

    Fox, O H; Broome, B S

    2001-01-01

    Part of the reason for the low numbers of African-America nurses is related to nursing student attrition. One approach described to help students to successfully complete educational objectives is mentoring. Mentoring is a supportive act for both minority students and faculty. Although numerous definitions of mentoring exist it is recognized that a mentor can be a role model, confidante, friend, and support system. Mentors may be the passageway into the work force or a bypass around the many obstacles that impede success. Because of the limited African American faculty available, many are overworked and may never reach full potential, contributing to the problem of limited minority nursing faculty available to institutions of higher learning. This article describes the markers of both poor and positive mentoring universities. PMID:11760475

  2. Interference in the processing of adjunct control.

    PubMed

    Parker, Dan; Lago, Sol; Phillips, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on the memory operations used in language comprehension has revealed a selective profile of interference effects during memory retrieval. Dependencies such as subject-verb agreement show strong facilitatory interference effects from structurally inappropriate but feature-matching distractors, leading to illusions of grammaticality (Pearlmutter et al., 1999; Wagers et al., 2009; Dillon et al., 2013). In contrast, dependencies involving reflexive anaphors are generally immune to interference effects (Sturt, 2003; Xiang et al., 2009; Dillon et al., 2013). This contrast has led to the proposal that all anaphors that are subject to structural constraints are immune to facilitatory interference. Here we use an animacy manipulation to examine whether adjunct control dependencies, which involve an interpreted anaphoric relation between a null subject and its licensor, are also immune to facilitatory interference effects. Our results show reliable facilitatory interference in the processing of adjunct control dependencies, which challenges the generalization that anaphoric dependencies as a class are immune to such effects. To account for the contrast between adjunct control and reflexive dependencies, we suggest that variability within anaphora could reflect either an inherent primacy of animacy cues in retrieval processes, or differential degrees of match between potential licensors and the retrieval probe. PMID:26441723

  3. Interference in the processing of adjunct control

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dan; Lago, Sol; Phillips, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on the memory operations used in language comprehension has revealed a selective profile of interference effects during memory retrieval. Dependencies such as subject–verb agreement show strong facilitatory interference effects from structurally inappropriate but feature-matching distractors, leading to illusions of grammaticality (Pearlmutter et al., 1999; Wagers et al., 2009; Dillon et al., 2013). In contrast, dependencies involving reflexive anaphors are generally immune to interference effects (Sturt, 2003; Xiang et al., 2009; Dillon et al., 2013). This contrast has led to the proposal that all anaphors that are subject to structural constraints are immune to facilitatory interference. Here we use an animacy manipulation to examine whether adjunct control dependencies, which involve an interpreted anaphoric relation between a null subject and its licensor, are also immune to facilitatory interference effects. Our results show reliable facilitatory interference in the processing of adjunct control dependencies, which challenges the generalization that anaphoric dependencies as a class are immune to such effects. To account for the contrast between adjunct control and reflexive dependencies, we suggest that variability within anaphora could reflect either an inherent primacy of animacy cues in retrieval processes, or differential degrees of match between potential licensors and the retrieval probe. PMID:26441723

  4. Faculty Discipline [and] Faculty Work Stoppages, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Joel M., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Faculty collective bargaining agreements were surveyed to determine the extent and frequency that contractual clauses dealing with discipline have been negotiated. Data on college faculty work stopages for 1986 were also collected. Excerpts from collective bargaining agreements concerning disciplinary actions, reprimands, just cause and due…

  5. The New Jersey Nursing Initiative: building sustainable collaboration.

    PubMed

    Bakewell-Sachs, Susan; Mertz, Lynn M; Egreczky, Dana; Ladden, Maryjoan

    2011-01-01

    The New Jersey Nursing Initiative was publically launched in 2009 as a 5-year, $22 million program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation based at the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce Foundation. It was reauthorized in 2011 through 2016 for an additional $8.5 million. The initiative includes a faculty preparation program and strategic tracks of work focusing on building education capacity, increasing current faculty capacity, making nurse faculty a preferred career, leading policy initiatives, creating sustainable funding in support of nursing education, and ultimately, building local, regional, and statewide collaborative networks. The tagline, "So a Nurse will be there for You," emphasizes both the reality of an aging nursing workforce needing replacement and the expected health care transformation that will result in the need for new knowledge and skills in the future nursing workforce. The purpose of this article was to describe the New Jersey Nursing Initiative, emphasizing the partnerships that have resulted from the project to date. PMID:22142935

  6. Cultural differences in therapeutic humor in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Chiang-Hanisko, Lenny; Adamle, Kathleen; Chiang, Ling-Chun

    2009-03-01

    Humor has been recognized by nurse researchers and practitioners as a constructive therapeutic intervention and has shown positive psychological and physiological outcomes for patient care. Because cross-cultural research on humor is sparse, this preliminary study investigates how nursing faculty members approach teaching therapeutic humor in the classroom and clinical education in different countries. Through an investigation of classroom (didactic) education and clinical practicum with direct patient care, the study may elucidate the linkage between theory and practice as well as how nursing faculty members view therapeutic humor in general. Researching nursing faculty teaching practices and viewpoints of therapeutic humor may help reveal cultural differences in the use of humor in healthcare settings. This cross-cultural study included 40 nursing faculty at three nursing programs: two in the United States and one in Taiwan. A qualitative approach was used to perform content analysis on responses to the open-ended questionnaires. Research findings revealed cultural differences between faculties from the two countries. Taiwanese faculty members indicated that they teach more theory and concepts related to therapeutic humor in the classroom than do nursing faculty members from the United States. However, nursing faculty members in Taiwan reported that they observe and practice less therapeutic humor in clinical settings out of respect for the cultural value of "reverence of illness" operating within Taiwanese society. Therapeutic humor was family centered and interdependent on relationships, roles, duties, and responsibilities of family members. In contrast, the U.S. faculty members stated that they teach less theory and concepts related to therapeutic humor in the classroom but observe and practice humor more in clinical settings. United States faculty approached teaching therapeutic humor in the classroom on an informal basis because the subject was not part of

  7. Creating a faculty community that values curricular assessment and improvement: one DNP program's experience.

    PubMed

    Meek, Julie A; Runshe, Debra; Young, Judith; Embree, Jennifer; Riner, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Developing faculty ownership of ongoing curricular improvement presents educational and management challenges for schools of nursing, yet little has been published about which components help build a faculty community that values curricular assessment and improvement. The purpose of this case study was to describe key features of and faculty satisfaction with one school of nursing's doctor of nursing practice curricular assessment process, with a description of key considerations for developing an ePortfolio-supported curricular assessment process. ePortfolio matrices were used as a curricular organizing structure for mapping and scoring each completed student assignment to an American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essential descriptor using a rubric that measured evidence of student learning. Faculty satisfaction with the process was also evaluated. First-year results indicated high levels of faculty satisfaction with the assessment process. The initial findings led to four actions for curricular improvement and agreement to continue the assessment process biannually. The curricular assessment was successful in generating faculty satisfaction, identifying needed areas to improve the curriculum, and obtaining faculty agreement to continue the process. A faculty community supportive of curricular assessment is essential to a transformational learning environment that prepares future nursing leaders. PMID:25601241

  8. Conquering technophobia: preparing faculty for today.

    PubMed

    Richard, P L

    1997-01-01

    The constantly changing world of technology creates excitement and an obligation for faculty of schools of nursing to address computer literacy in the curricula at all levels. The initial step in the process of meeting the goals was to assist the faculty in becoming computer literate so that they could foster and encourage the same in the students. The implementation of The Cure for Technophobia included basic and advanced computer skills designed to assist the faculty in becoming comfortable and competent computer users. The applications addressed included: introduction to windows, electronic mail, word processing, presentation and database applications, library on-line searches of literature databases, introduction to internet browsers and a computerized testing program. Efforts were made to overcome barriers to computer literacy and promote the learning process. Familiar, competent, computer literate individuals were used to conduct the classes to accomplish this goal. PMID:10175437

  9. "I Saw it in a Different Light": International Learning Experiences in Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Linda V.; DeJoseph, Jeanne

    2003-01-01

    Ten nursing students and two faculty mentors participated in an immersion experience in Guatemala. Themes from interviews included the experience of being "other," growth as a professional nurse, and expansion of world views. (Contains 16 references.) (SK)

  10. Education of nurses in genetics.

    PubMed Central

    Forsman, I

    1988-01-01

    The need for education of nurses in genetics was articulated more than 25 years ago. This article reviews the knowledge of practicing nurses about genetics as well as the content of genetics in nursing curricula. Implementation of federal legislation that mandated increased availability of genetic services and genetics education provided support for the examination of genetics content in curricula for health professionals, including nurses, and for the development of model programs to expand this content. Recent efforts to begin to develop a pool of nurse faculty who are well prepared in genetics will be described, as well as programs to provide the necessary content through continuing-education efforts. These efforts are expected to substantially improve the capability of nurses to contribute more effectively in the delivery of genetic services. PMID:3177390

  11. The Status of Nursing Education in the California Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The nursing shortage in California has prompted legislators to propose solutions that may be well intentioned but fail to recognize the complexity of the issues they are trying to address. In April 2005, the Academic Senate convened a nursing task force, comprised of community college nursing faculty from across the state, to examine the issues…

  12. Strategies the facilitate academic success of nursing students in HBCU's.

    PubMed

    Sheffler, S J

    1997-01-01

    Attrition of nursing students is a problem in nursing programs across the country and is not limited solely to programs in historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). This article will describe some of the strategies utilized by nursing faculty in one HBCU to assist students in overcoming barriers that inhibit their academic success. PMID:9460305

  13. The Competencies in Nutrition Essential for Comprehensive Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trooboff, Rebecca C.

    Faculty of nursing education programs within the Georgia university system were surveyed to ascertain their opinions about the nutrition competencies that they consider essential for comprehensive nursing practice and the level of nursing education program(s) to which these competencies are best suited. The survey instrument, 56 competency…

  14. Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Julie; O'Connor, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in…

  15. Meeting the Needs of the Transgender Nursing Student.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Student success has been linked to a supportive academic environment and faculty involvement. The college experience can be stressful for any nursing student. Transgender nursing students experience the additional stress of being in the gender minority. This article focuses on the needs of the transgender nursing student and suggests interventions to support academic and social success. PMID:25888107

  16. Faculty in Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clery, Suzanne

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews the current characteristics of faculty in higher education institutions compared to those of faculty members 20 years ago. It is based on fall 1995 data and 1976 comparison data. A major finding is a substantial increase (91 percent) in the number of part-time faculty compared with an increase of 27 percent in the number of…

  17. Faculty Workload Report, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada System of Higher Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In the fall of every even numbered year, the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) conducts a faculty workload study. The Fall 2004 Faculty Workload Report marks the first year of information collected under a newly redesigned methodology. During the 2003-04 academic year, the NSHE Board of Regents assembled a faculty workload task force to…

  18. Part-Time Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clery, Suzanne B.

    2001-01-01

    This study relates information regarding the role part-time faculty members fill in colleges and universities. Data are from the U.S. Department of Education's National Survey of Postsecondary Faculty, 1999. In that year, 2 of every 5 faculty members taught on a part-time basis, and they taught nearly 40% of all classes and students that were…

  19. Faculty Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Gordon E.

    This guide provides faculty at Westark Community College (WCC) with information regarding the resources for professional development available to them. Section I explains how staff members may advance on the Faculty Salary Scale by earning Continuing Education Units (CEU's). Section II outlines procedures for obtaining Faculty Development…

  20. Communication Faculty Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Dirk C.

    2001-01-01

    Offers a first-hand account of a faculty internship at a major international public relations firm. Discusses the internship host and the intern's duties; faculty internship advantages and benefits; and faculty internship disadvantages and limitations. Considers 10 experiential realizations stemming from the author's internship experience. (SR)

  1. Community Health Crisis: Solving the Nurse Shortage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitiello, Erie

    2003-01-01

    Describes how Los Rios Community College District (LRCCD), California, the major provider of nursing graduates to the Sacramento area, addressed the issue of the nursing shortage crisis. LRCCD faced the dual issues of student/faculty ratio restrictions of 10/1 and funding that accommodated a 40/1 ratio. Describes LRCCD's new off-campus,…

  2. Computer-Based Education in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Susan M.

    This report describes instructional uses of computers, interactive videodisks, and related technologies in undergraduate and graduate nursing education and in continuing education and faculty development. Its principal aims are to document ongoing activities, to identify factors that inhibit technological applications in nursing education, and to…

  3. Prisons: Logical, Innovative Clinical Nursing Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Honore Culleton

    1991-01-01

    The nursing faculty at Mercy College (New York) affiliated with several prison facilities to provide clinical experiences for senior nursing students. An ideal setting for the clinical group leadership course, the prison affiliations also helped students develop social awareness and advocacy strategies for this at-risk population. (SK)

  4. Is History of Nursing Alive and Well?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalisch, Beatrice J.; Kalisch, Philip A.

    1976-01-01

    Responses from 936 schools to a nationwide survey of all basic nursing education programs revealed that while faculty believe history of nursing content to be valuable, they do not believe that students find it interesting. Better texts, teachers and audiovisuals are recommended to change the situation. (Author/MS)

  5. The Concerns of Beginning Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Rhea P.

    1993-01-01

    A descriptive correlational study looked at the concerns of nursing students (n=245) as they began their nursing education program. Among the most stressful areas cited were academic work, long hours of study, lack of sufficient clinical knowledge and experience to complete the task, and relationship with faculty. (JOW)

  6. Remodeling adult nursing.

    PubMed

    Mackie, J B; Graham, P B

    1996-01-01

    This article describes a nursing education experience in which a critical thinking approach was planned and implemented. Background discussion on critical thinking concepts and related research provides a foundation for presentation of the Mackie teaching model. The model uses a community-based, family-centered scenario as the basis for developing problem-focused nursing intervention skills from a holistic viewpoint. Role expectations of students and faculty are outlined, and related implementation difficulties, together with their resolution strategies, are described. Evaluation methods and outcomes are reviewed in the conclusion. PMID:9052186

  7. Empathy toward Patients with Mental Illness among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Impact of a Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Educational Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mousa, Marwa Abd El-Gawad Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is an ability and skill that can be learned and developed through appropriate education and practice. While the importance of nurses' empathy is widely acknowledged, little is known about the impact of passing through the psychiatric nursing and mental health educational experience at the Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria University on…

  8. Nursing informatics knowledge and competencies: a national survey of nursing education programs in the United States.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Barbara J; Elfrink, Victoria L; Pierce, Susan T; Beyea, Suzanne C; Bickford, Carol J; Averill, Carolyn

    2005-12-01

    An online survey of deans/directors of 266 baccalaureate and higher nursing programs in the U.S. was developed by informatics expert nurses. Participants (1) identified nursing informatics (NI) competencies and knowledge of undergraduate and/or graduate students in their nursing programs; (2) determined faculty preparedness to teach NI and to use informatics tools; and (3) provided perceptions of NI requirements of local practicing nurses. Frequency data and qualitative responses were analyzed. Approximately half of undergraduate nursing programs were teaching information literacy skills and required students to enter with word-processing and email skills. Least visible informatics content at all levels included the use of information system data standards, the Nursing Information and Data Set Evaluation Center criteria, the unified medical language system (UMLS), and the nurse's role in the life cycle of an information system. Almost 50% of respondents perceived faculty as "novice" and "advanced beginners" in teaching and using NI applications. Participants reported no future plans to offer NI training in their region. Findings have major implications for nurse faculty, staff developers, and program administrators who are planning continuing education opportunities and designing nursing curricula that prepare nurses for use of the electronic health record and 21st century professional practice. PMID:16046276

  9. Designing nursing learning centers of the future.

    PubMed

    Billings, D M

    1996-01-01

    As Drucker notes in The Atlantic Monthly (1994:53), the 21st century will be one of transformations and challenges. Nurse educators will need to think through the purposes, values, and content of educational programs and lifelong learning opportunities. Nurse educators as knowledge workers must prepare to meet challenges by developing nursing learning centers for future needs. Whereas a bold vision of the future, concrete plans that a customer driven, and monitoring for improvement are important, the nurse educator as manager/dean/director for the learning center and faculty teaching here will be key to facilitating nursings' transformation into the information age. PMID:8904359

  10. Integrating Just Culture into nursing student error policy.

    PubMed

    Penn, Cathy E

    2014-09-01

    Errors in health care settings are common and potentially dangerous to patients. Errors will arise as novice nursing students practice skills in complex health care settings. This article describes one baccalaureate nursing program's approach toward student errors that integrates core competencies described in the Institute of Medicine's Health Professions Education report, the Quality and Safety in Education for Nurses project, and the position statement on Just Culture by the American Nurses Association. A consistent approach to defining and categorizing data about nursing student errors provides faculty with a framework for coaching students to safer nursing practice. Aggregate data may be used to identify gaps in the nursing program's curriculum. PMID:25102128

  11. Survey of outcomes in a faculty development program on simulation pedagogy.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Mi Kang; Tangkawanich, Thitiarpha

    2016-06-01

    Although many nursing programs use simulation as a teaching-learning modality, there are few systematic approaches to help nursing educators learn this pedagogy. This study evaluates the effects of a simulation pedagogy nursing faculty development program on participants' learning perceptions using a retrospective pre-course and post-course design. Sixteen Thai participants completed a two-day nursing faculty development program on simulation pedagogy. Thirteen questionnaires were used in the final analysis. The participants' self-perceived learning about simulation teaching showed significant post-course improvement. On a five-point Likert scale, the composite mean attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control scores, as well as intention to use a simulator, showed a significant post-course increase. A faculty development program on simulation pedagogy induced favorable learning and attitudes. Further studies must test how faculty performance affects the cognitive, emotional, and social dimensions of learning in a simulation-based learning domain. PMID:26567469

  12. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  13. Predicting Success Using HESI A2 Entrance Tests in an Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodman, Susan

    2012-01-01

    A challenge presented to nurse educators is retention of nursing students. This has led nursing faculty to review admission requirements and question how well entrance tests predict success in Associate Degree Nursing Programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the HESI Admission Assessment Exam (HESI A2) and…

  14. From Vocational Training to Academic Education: The Situation of the Schools of Nursing in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Ewa Pilhammar

    1999-01-01

    The success of the change from vocational training to academic education for nurses in Sweden depends on faculty competence. Observations at three Swedish nursing schools and interviews with 59 nurse educators identified strategies educators used to maintain teaching competence: being "real" nurses, being prepared in different subjects, and having…

  15. An innovative model for nursing scholarship.

    PubMed

    Stull, Alison; Lantz, Cheryl

    2005-11-01

    Ernest Boyer made a significant contribution to the manner in which scholarship is envisioned by faculty with his 1990 publication, Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate. The National League for Nursing Accreditation Commission (NLNAC) incorporated Boyer's scholarship principles into its 2002 accreditation criteria for nursing education programs. This article describes a model of scholarship developed by nursing faculty practicing in an undergraduate setting in a non-research-intensive institution. The model stems from their collegial work on defining scholarship in a way that is both professionally and personally satisfying. In addition, the model is congruent with the NLNAC's vision regarding nursing faculty scholarship. The model, called "Pillars of Scholarship," incorporates Boyer's four scholarship entities of discovery, application, integration, and teaching. PMID:16342630

  16. Learner-centered characteristics of nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Greer, Annette G; Pokorny, Marie; Clay, Maria C; Brown, Sylvia; Steele, Linda L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the learner-centered teaching characteristics of nurse faculty who report using contemporary pedagogy. A secondary analysis of data collected by an international survey of nurse educators regarding pedagogical teaching approaches and strategies was used to answer the research questions. The study sought to: 1) describe characteristics emerging from faculty response, 2) make inferences from faculty responses regarding meaning, and 3) make inferences regarding the importance of the meaning to nursing. A qualitative research design was used to address the research question. Themes that emerged were placed under the concepts of power, role of teacher, responsibility of learner, and philosophy of evaluation guided by Weimer's (2002) conceptual framework of a learner-centered philosophy of teaching. Themes and meaning units derived from the study helped to generate textual and structure statements that represent the characterizations of learner-centered nurse educators. PMID:20196765

  17. Marketing nursing as a profession: integrated marketing strategies to address the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Somers, Mark John; Finch, Linda; Birnbaum, Dee

    2010-07-01

    The nursing shortage in the United States is at a crisis level characterized by critical shortages of highly trained nurses and of nursing faculty. Key issues in addressing these shortages include awareness and image-building, along with enhanced outreach programs. Although these issues are related to marketing theory, most studies in this area are based on a vocational choice model. This study was grounded in marketing theory and the results offer a new perspective for addressing the nursing shortage. In-depth interviews conducted with 31 first-year nursing students indicated that there were two distinct segments among nursing students: traditionals and instrumentals. Traditionals were attracted to nursing as a helping profession while instrumentals were interested in career-related rewards such as variety, mobility, and compensation. These findings were discussed in terms of building awareness and marketing programs for nursing students that are integrated across schools of nursing, private foundations and public agencies. PMID:20706896

  18. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. In addition, many doctors share office space ...

  19. Educating nurses for leadership roles.

    PubMed

    Heller, Barbara R; Drenkard, Karen; Esposito-Herr, Mary Beth; Romano, Carol; Tom, Sally; Valentine, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    As a result of the growing shortage of nurses and the dramatically changing role of the front-line nurse manager, leadership education for nurses is of critical importance. The purpose of the project described in this article was to design, implement, and evaluate an innovative model of nursing leadership development for students enrolled in registered nurse to bachelor of science in nursing or registered nurse to master of science in nursing programs. A guided "action-learning" course was designed that focused on both core knowledge and experiential learning. The course was developed with the assistance of an advisory panel of prominent nurse leaders with expertise in administration, health policy, informatics, and nursing education. The prototype course was offered for the first time as an elective in Spring 2003. Evaluation data indicated that the course was considered valuable by students and with modifications suggested by students, faculty, and advisory panel members, the course would be offered regularly as part of the curriculum. Recommendations also included adapting course content to a continuing education format. PMID:15481400

  20. Adjunctive treatment in septic shock: What's next?

    PubMed

    Annane, Djillali

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death and long-term sequels worldwide. For more than a decade, the scientific community is providing physicians, patients and policy makers with regularly updated guidelines. There is some evidence that implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines is associated with improved patients outcomes. Though there were major advances in the understanding of sepsis, the management of sepsis mainly relies on anti-infective treatments and restoration of cardiovascular and respiratory function according to quantitative protocolized care. Except some hormonal interventions such as insulin to maintain blood glucose levels of less than 180mg/dL and low doses of corticosteroids and vasopressin in highly selected patients, there is no adjunct therapy for the routine management of sepsis. Recent years have shown some interest in revolutionary concepts such as selective beta-1 receptor antagonists or interventions to boost the immune system. These provocative approaches yielded promising results in various experimental models of sepsis and in preliminary data in humans. The current narrative review summarized some of the numerous adjunct therapies that are currently being investigated in sepsis. PMID:27085987

  1. A case study: the clinical application of quadrangular dialogue--a caring in nursing teaching model.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Jane F

    2004-01-01

    Teaching caring in nursing is expected of nursing faculty, but the practical application is rarely explained. It has been regarded as the moral responsibility of faculty to teach in a caring way. This case study relates how one faculty applied the concepts to quadrangular dialogue a caring model of nursing education to the experience of baccalaureate student nurses in their first clinical rotation. The components of quadrangular dialogue will be described, and applied to a specific patient who was cared for by students in one semester. This model is developed from Habermas' (1995) Theory of Communicative Action and Moral Consciousness, Bishop and Scudder's (1990) Triadic Dialogue and a caring in nursing paradigm developed by this author. It explains how the patient, nursing student and nursing faculty are all first person in the interaction, while the illness is object. By acknowledging the humanness of participants, validation and fulfillment for each follow. PMID:16646898

  2. Teaching the Spiritual Dimension of Nursing Care: A Survey of U.S. Baccalaureate Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemmer, Corinne

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 132 baccalaureate nursing programs indicated that the majority include spiritual dimensions in program philosophy and curriculum, but few had definitions of spirituality and nursing care. Content typically addressed patients' spiritual needs, dying, and holism. Respondents were uncertain about faculty preparation to teach about…

  3. The Research Doctorate in Nursing: The PhD.

    PubMed

    Rice, David

    2016-03-01

    When nurses are considering an advanced degree beyond the master's level of educational preparation, a number of considerations may direct the decision-making process. The doctorate of philosophy (PhD) in nursing is a research degree that will well serve nurses who have the desire to apply theory and develop formal programs of research, become faculty of nursing, combine clinical practice with formal research, and advance through professional leadership in the ranks of hospitals and health systems organizations. 
. PMID:26906125

  4. An Analysis of Nursing Education in Ghana: Priorities for Scaling-up the Nursing Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Sue Anne; Rominski, Sarah; Bam, Victoria; Donkor, Ernestina; Lori, Jody

    2012-01-01

    The cross-sectional study sought to describe the strengths, challenges and current status of baccalaureate nursing education in Ghana, using a descriptive design. The World Health Organization Global Standards for the Initial Education of Nurses and Midwives standards were used as the organizing framework, with baseline data on the status of nursing education from two state funded universities in Ghana presented. A serious shortage of qualified faculty was identified, along with the need for significant upgrading to the existing infrastructure. Additionally, the number of qualified applicants far exceeds the available training slots. Faculty and infrastructure shortages are common issues in nursing education and workforce expansion, however in low resource countries such as Ghana, these issues are compounded by high rates of preventable disease and injury. An understanding of the strengths and challenges of nursing education in Ghana can inform the development of strategies for nursing workforce expansion for other low resource countries. PMID:23347003

  5. Library Instruction within the Curriculum--The Sciences, Business and Nursing. Projects Developed for a Faculty Development Seminar (Eau Claire, Wisconsin, May 21-22, August 19, and December 11, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Barbara R., Comp.; Engeldinger, Eugene A., Comp.

    A general list of suggestions for effective library instruction and library instruction projects in a variety of disciplines are presented in this guide. Developed for a faculty and academic staff development seminar, the Library Instruction within the Curriculum Project, these projects illustrate diverse approaches to library instruction with the…

  6. Enticing Students to Careers in Gerontology: Faculty and Student Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesley, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    Recognition of the increasing demand for gerontologically trained social work professionals prompted an investigation of the factors that attract undergraduate students to a career of working with older adults. Faculty (n = 10) and students (n = 10) from the disciplines of social work, nursing, consumer and family sciences, psychology, recreation,…

  7. Psychotherapeutic and Adjunctive Pharmacologic Approaches to Treating Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nisenoff, Carolina D.

    2008-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a potentially disabling illness that affects millions of people worldwide and can be very difficult to treat, especially the sleep disturbances often associated with this disorder. Successful treatment focuses on psychotherapy, and medications may be useful adjuncts. This article gives examples of successful therapeutic approaches and adjunctive medication use in PTSD. PMID:19727267

  8. A Philosopher Stirs up the World of Adjuncts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2008-01-01

    Keith Hoeller is an adjunct professor. He teaches philosophy for a living at Green River Community College, just outside Seattle. He has also spent much of the last two decades ruminating about the bigger picture for those at his level of the professorial pecking order. Over the years, Hoeller has lobbied relentlessly for adjunct-friendly…

  9. Adjunct Classes: Organizing Resources for High Risk Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Ida B.

    The University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire has attempted to solve the problem of underprepared freshmen by offering adjunct classes to freshman level content courses. Currently ten adjunct classes in seven departments are taught and are used to integrate the teaching of learning and study skills into the teaching of the regular course content. Two…

  10. Videoconferencing expands nursing students' cultural realm.

    PubMed

    Pirkey, Jean M; Levey, Janet A; Newberry, Shirley M; Guthman, Pamela L; Hansen, Judith M

    2012-10-01

    Nurse educators struggle to provide culturally diverse community health clinical placements that cultivate cultural awareness, knowledge, and competence among baccalaureate nursing students. Public health nurses observe that many new nursing graduates lack the fundamental knowledge, skills, and affective behaviors necessary to work with culturally diverse populations. To address this, nursing faculty from two schools partnered to strategize, design, implement, and evaluate a community health assessment project using the instructional method of videoconferencing. The goal was to maximize students' exposure to and engagement with geographically and demographically dissimilar populations. Through videoconferencing, students from two distant schools were able to exchange and actively discuss their community health assessments. Videoconferencing gave students the opportunity to exchange community assessments and perceptions augmented by technology and guided through faculty networking. This article describes a piloted teaching strategy by which students performed and exchanged their community health assessments from diverse populations to enhance their cultural awareness. PMID:22908884

  11. Social media use in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Terri L; Sims-Giddens, Susan S; Booth, Richard G

    2012-09-01

    As technological advances continue to expand connectivity and communication, the number of patients and nurses engaging in social media increases. Nurses play a significant role in identification, interpretation, and transmission of knowledge and information within healthcare. Social media is a platform that can assist nursing faculty in helping students to gain greater understanding of and/or skills in professional communication; health policy; patient privacy and ethics; and writing competencies. Although there are barriers to integration of social media within nursing education, there are quality resources available to assist faculty to integrate social media as a viable pedagogical method. This article discusses the background and significance of social media tools as pedagogy, and provides a brief review of literature. To assist nurse educators who may be using or considering social media tools, the article offers selected examples of sound and pedagogically functional use in course and program applications; consideration of privacy concerns and advantages and disadvantages; and tips for success. PMID:23036058

  12. Improving Faculty Perceptions of and Intent to Use Simulation: An Intervention Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Human patient simulation is an innovative teaching strategy that can facilitate practice development and preparation for entry into today's healthcare environment for nursing students. Unfortunately, the use of human patient simulation has been limited due to the perceptions of nursing faculty members. This project sought to explore those…

  13. Autonomy among Thieves: Template Course Design for Student and Faculty Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huun, Kathleen; Hughes, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Responding to a student-expressed need for consistency among courses within the online Baccalaureate Nursing Completion program at Midwestern University, an instructional designer and nursing faculty member collaborated to build a course evaluation rubric, learning management system template, and corresponding matrix to help support student…

  14. Structuring Long-Term Faculty Training According to Needs Exhibited by Students' Written Comments in Course Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulkerth, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive adjunct faculty training program is described, whose aim is to improve student perceptions of courses and programs in a private, not-for-profit MBA and Law degree granting university in San Francisco, The program is somewhat novel in that it uses (a) student input from open-ended responses on course evaluations to determine faculty…

  15. Laser turbinectomy as an adjunct to rhinoseptoplasty.

    PubMed

    Selkin, S G

    1985-07-01

    One hundred two inferior turbinectomies were done with the carbon dioxide laser as an adjunct to rhinoseptoplasty. Indications for surgery were airway obstruction on one or both sides not relieved by medical means (42 cases), patient inability to tolerate medication (36 cases), and patient unwillingness to continue to receive medication for prolonged periods (24 cases) in patients unhappy with their appearance. Pathologic processes included allergic rhinitis (34 cases), vasomotor rhinitis (28 cases), and rhinitis medicamentosum (40 cases). A newly designed suction speculum provided easy access to the internal nose and protected the alar rim and the face from laser energy. Only a few minutes of extra operating time were required. Relief of obstruction was comparable to that obtained from cryosurgery, submucous resection of the turbinate, and partial turbinectomy. Intraoperative and postoperative bleeding was less with laser turbinectomy than with any other means. PMID:4015497

  16. Scintimammography as an Adjunctive Breast Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective X-ray mammography (XMM) represents the most useful screening tool in breast cancer detection, especially for patients over 50. Unfortunately, XMM is not reliable in the assessment of dense breast tissue found in approximately 25% of women younger than 50 years of age, or in differentiating scar tissue from a tumor. Currently, ultrasound (US) is being used as an adjunct to XMM, with the purpose of improving sensitivity and specificity of XMM in breast cancer detection. In an attempt to reduce the biopsy rate resulting from false positive tests, other adjunctive technologies are being explored, including scintimammography (SMM). A number of papers in the current literature suggest the high value of SMM in breast cancer detection. This evaluation addresses the clinical indications for and effectiveness of SMM in the diagnosis of breast cancer. The Technology SMM is a nuclear medicine imaging technique that uses radionuclides and has the ability to image malignant breast tumors. SMM requires the administration of a gamma-ray emitting radiopharmaceutical to the patient, and a camera for imaging the lesion. The most commonly used radiopharmaceutical for SMM is TC-99m-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile MIBI. Review Strategy In the 2003 Medical Advisory Secretariat assessment of SMM in the diagnosis of breast cancer, a structured search was used to identify English-language studies published between 1992 and October 2002. A meta-analysis was then conducted of the literature which compared the diagnostic value of SMM with US as the second line imaging technique. An updated search strategy was developed in order to identify all studies published from October 2002 to January 2007. Summary of Findings The results of the meta-analysis showed that SMM is as effective as US in differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions. However, there may be a role for SMM as a third line adjunctive technique in the evaluation of breast abnormalities, in particular

  17. Improving perceptions of patient care--a nursing education and nursing practice initiative.

    PubMed

    Watson, Pamela G; Marshall, David R; Sexton, Karen H

    2006-01-01

    In January 2005, the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) School of Nursing and the UTMB Hospitals and Clinics launched the first phase of a project to improve perceptions of patient care on the part of nursing faculty and nursing clinicians. A finding on the UTMB annual employee satisfaction survey that nursing faculty and clinicians tended to rate quality of UTMB patient care lower than other UTMB employees provided the impetus for the initiative. When UTMB colleagues noticed the findings, various entities including human resources and the Faculty Senate called for explanations from the dean of the School of Nursing, the chief nursing officer, and the CEO for the hospitals and clinics. In the process of attempting to give reasons for the findings, each of us determined we would take definitive action to address the situation. This article describes our accomplishments for Phase 1 of the initiative. Beginning with a vision for a productive professional community characterized by a pedagogical partnership between nursing education and practice, we share the processes we followed to (1) achieve mutual understanding among task force members, (2) obtain input on perceptions from nursing colleagues, (3) identify the clinical and nursing education aspects of the perceptions, (4) reach consensus on target perceptions for Phase 2 of the project, and (5) outline the next steps for the project. PMID:16990119

  18. Infusing geropsychiatric nursing content into curricula: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Batchelor-Aselage, Melissa; DiMeglio, Brittney; Aaron, Charlene S; Dugger, B Renee

    2014-07-01

    Nurses of the 21st century are unprepared to care for the increasing older adult population's mental health care needs. Nursing schools across the country struggle to identify and infuse geropsychiatric nursing content into curricula. In 2008, the John A. Hartford Foundation partnered with the American Academy of Nursing to fund a 4-year project, the Geropsychiatric Nursing Collaborative (GPNC). In 2011, four schools of nursing were selected to participate in the GPNC consultation project. This article describes two major challenges that schools currently face as they work to infuse geropsychiatric nursing content into nursing curricula and the solutions offered. Core geropsychiatric nursing competencies and content were identified to assist curriculum mapping, and examples of faculty resources for teaching about depression, dementia, and delirium were outlined. Incorporation of geropsychiatric nursing content is critical for preparing our future workforce to meet the increasing mental health care needs of older adults. PMID:24983239

  19. Engendering Faculty Professional Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Meara, KerryAnn; Terosky, Aimee LaPointe

    2010-01-01

    During the last 20 years, faculty have faced rising workloads, increasing amounts of top-down accountability and oversight, mounting publication demands, decreasing numbers of tenure-track positions, and an increasingly dismal job market. The current recession has exacerbated the pressure by requiring departmental budget cuts, faculty layoffs,…

  20. Faculty Unionism and Tenure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, William F.

    1973-01-01

    With reference to personal experience, labor board decisions, and faculty collective bargaining agreements, the author discusses the causes of faculty unionism, what constitutes a tenure system and what problems it creates, what is involved in the bargaining process, and the implications involved in negotiating tenure. (JT)

  1. Faculty Retirement Transitions Revitalized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ummersen, Claire; Duranleau, Lauren; McLaughlin, Jean

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost ten years since the American Council on Education (ACE) began to raise awareness of the importance of workplace flexibility in faculty careers and to encourage colleges and universities to support faculty in better integrating their professional and personal lives. With the generous support of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, ACE…

  2. Learner and Faculty Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Sharon; Stanford, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This chapter identifies effective ways to address learner and faculty support. It introduces methods for building a successful learner support system by providing sufficient resources and proactively addressing learner motivation. It also addresses effective faculty support through institutional policies, resources, training, and course…

  3. Can Faculty Afford Honors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzy, Annmarie

    2012-01-01

    In "Costs and Benefits in the Economy of Honors," Richard Badenhausen identifies several pressing issues regarding the economic status of honors in the current financial climate of higher education, including the role of faculty in addressing those issues. In her response to Badenhausen's essay, Annmarie Guzy, a faculty member at the…

  4. Faculty Salaries in Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hexter, Holly

    1990-01-01

    This research brief highlights data on faculty salaries in colleges and universities, outlines recent trends and their implications, and identifies major sources of data on the subject. Tables provide data on average faculty salaries for 1988-89 by academic rank and institution type (public, church, independent); by gender and academic rank; and…

  5. Defining Faculty Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Peter J.; Diamond, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    A process of planned change is proposed for redefining college faculty work. Legitimate faculty work is defined in broad terms, and information sources and methods for collecting information to support redefinition are identified. The final step in the redefinition process is the development of new mission statements for the institution and its…

  6. Preparing Faculty in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kioumourtzoglou, Efthimis

    2003-01-01

    The current article aimed to describe the process followed for faculty preparation and development in Greece. More specifically, it includes information regarding (a) the possibilities for professional development through Master and PhD programs, (b) the existing faculty categories, (c) the procedure followed by the departments in collaboration…

  7. Rating Faculty Collegiality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipriano, Robert E.; Buller, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Most position descriptions for college and university faculty include benchmarks that indicate assumptions about collegiality. Criticism about this practice has been voiced for years. But case law in the United States has upheld the use of collegiality as a factor in decisions regarding faculty employment, tenure, and promotion. Indeed, several…

  8. Supporting Faculty Grassroots Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Lester, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Various factors are making faculty leadership challenging including the rise in part-time and non-tenure-track faculty, the increasing pressure to publish and teach more courses and adopt new technologies and pedagogies, increasing standards for tenure and promotion, ascension of academic capitalism, and heavy service roles for women and people of…

  9. Professional autonomy and the work satisfaction of nursing educators.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, B D; Aiken, L H; Bonjean, C M

    1976-01-01

    The importance and satisfaction associated with 21 characteristics of a nurse faculty position were examined, using 1974 questionnaire data from schools of nursing at four major state universities. Teaching, supportive colleagues, keeping clinical knowledge current, and faculty autonomy were seen as the most important aspects of the job by the 154 nursing educators surveyed, while salary, fringe benefits, and other extrinsic rewards ranked substantially lower in importance. Satisfaction with the more important conditions was generally low, with lack of faculty participation in decision making a particularly noteworthy source of dissatisfaction. Importance and satisfaction ranking of the 21 characteristics remained fairly stable across the four schools and across groups broken down by martial status, experience, and other personal attributes. Increased professional autonomy, it was suggested, would benefit faculty morale, recruitment, retention, and overall effectiveness in nursing education. PMID:1046190

  10. Critical Incident Nursing Management Using Human Patient Simulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehring, Wendy M.; Lahsley, Felissa R.; Ellis, Wayne E.

    2002-01-01

    Human patient simulators are computerized mannequins that present patient scenarios in which nursing students learn to assess critical health incidents. Their use involves faculty time and commitment, maintenance and upgrading investment, and careful scenario preparation. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  11. Investigating Relationships between Sense of Belonging and Organizational Citizenship Behavior among Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgren, Gerald R., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) is a social science construct defined by Organ (1988) as employee actions that are discretionary, not formally recognized or rewarded, and that are helpful to the effectiveness of the organization. This study explored part-time work as a base of OCB by investigating the relationship between this construct…

  12. Case Study: The Transfer of Tacit Knowledge from Community College Full-Time to Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzzo, Linda R.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge is a valuable resource that fosters innovation and growth in organizations. There are two forms of knowledge: explicit knowledge or documented information and tacit knowledge or undocumented information which resides in individuals' minds. There is heightened interest in knowledge management and specifically the transfer of tacit…

  13. What New and Adjunct Faculty Need to Know about Exams, Grades, and Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berschback, Rick

    2011-01-01

    College professors often regard their time in the classroom fulfilling and rewarding; the chance to affect the academic and professional development of their students is most likely a key reason why they chose to be professional educators. Unfortunately, with college courses come college credits, which necessitate a course grade for each student,…

  14. Mentoring Adjunct Faculty Using the Cornerstones of Effective Communication and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Carolyn B. H.; McIntyre, Melissa; Jazzar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Online teaching in higher education is growing at an exponential rate and it will continue to escalate. Powerful tools of technology have been delivering instruction in unprecedented ways, yet these are only as effective as the masters of this craft. Those using technology to teach online in increasing numbers are educational leadership adjunct…

  15. Introducing baccalaureate student nurses to gerontological nursing.

    PubMed

    Aud, Myra A; Bostick, Jane E; Marek, Karen Dorman; McDaniel, Roxanne W

    2006-01-01

    The faculty at the University of Missouri-Columbia Sinclair School of Nursing (MUSSON) developed and implemented a gerontological nursing care course, with support from the Health Resources and Services Administration, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and the John A. Hartford Foundation. The course, with both didactic and clinical components, was mandatory for all students in the baccalaureate program. The course drew on two resources unique to the MUSSON: Senior Care, the school's home care agency, and TigerPlace, a retirement community closely linked to the school. Goals of the course were to increase knowledge of gerontology and gerontological nursing and to promote more positive student attitudes toward older adults. Evaluation of six semesters of pretest and posttest data found that knowledge increased although attitudes toward older adults did not become more positive. However, despite the lack of quantifiable improvement in attitudes, some students wrote positive comments on end-of-semester course evaluations about experiences and interactions with older adults during the course. PMID:16564470

  16. English Language Acculturation, Perception of Faculty Caring, Networks, Campus Racial Climate, and Race as Predictors of Student Success among Mexican-American and Non-Hispanic White Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torregosa, Marivic B.

    2011-01-01

    There have been increased efforts to recruit and retain underrepresented groups (Asians, African-Americans, and Hispanics) and students who speak English as a second language (ESL) into nursing. However their success rates lag behind those students who speak English as a first language. As little is known about the influence of non-cognitive…

  17. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  18. A cardiological web as an adjunct to medical teaching: prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Arbonés, X; Ferreira, A; Piqué, M; Roca, J; Tomás, J; Frutos, J L; Vinyas, J; Prat, J; Ballester, M

    2004-03-01

    The aim of the study was to deliver and evaluate an educational web for medical students. A web of the complete cardiovascular course was prepared as an adjunct educational material for the classes. The use and utility of the web was assessed through a questionnaire (frequency of use, impact on in-class attendance and students' satisfaction). The number of visits, the time of the week and the hour when the web was used were registered. A total of 76 students returned the questionnaire. The web was available for 10 weeks and was visited 1062 times, especially at weekends. An increase in visits was noted prior to final examination. The web was accessed preferentially from the faculty or hospital computers. The quality of the web was assessed and rated a mean of 7.7 (score: 1-10); 93.4% students attended the class, but the web freed them from transcribing the contents; 88.2% of students evaluated the web as a useful or very useful adjunct to medical teaching. The Internet can be used to deliver learning in medical students and could be considered as added value to the pedagogic process and did not deter students from attending ordinary classes. PMID:15203530

  19. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  20. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Nursing Positions KidsHealth > For Parents > Nursing Positions Print A ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ...

  1. Testing the social cognitive career theory in Thai nurses' interest to become nurse educators: A structural equation modeling analysis.

    PubMed

    Thungjaroenkul, Petsunee; G Cummings, Greta; Tate, Kaitlyn

    2016-09-01

    A shortage of nurse educators generates a systemic problem in nursing education. A model to develop interventions directed at enhancing graduate nursing student interest in assuming a future faculty role is needed. This study used a social cognitive career theory perspective to examine the effects of past performance in teaching and supervision, social influence, observing others teaching, perceived task demands for nurse educators, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations on Thai graduate nursing students' (n=236) interest to become a nurse educator. Results of structural equation modeling analyses revealed that social influence and past performance in teaching and supervision had significant effects on interest to become a nurse educator when mediated by self-efficacy and outcome expectations. Observing others teaching and perceived task demands for nurse educators did not significantly predict interest in faculty roles. These findings provide new knowledge about factors and their influence on the development of interest to assume faculty roles. Implications for nursing education include the design of feasible graduate curricula that enhance students' abilities in faculty role and increases valuation of teaching careers. PMID:27429345

  2. Cultural competencies for graduate nursing education.

    PubMed

    Clark, Lauren; Calvillo, Evelyn; Dela Cruz, Felicitas; Fongwa, Marie; Kools, Susan; Lowe, John; Mastel-Smith, Beth

    2011-01-01

    Nursing is challenged to meet the health needs of ethnic and socioculturally diverse populations. To this end, American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) charged an expert nursing faculty advisory group to formulate competencies for graduate nursing education, expanding them to integrate leadership and scholarship. The Cultural Competency in Baccalaureate Nursing Education served as the springboard for the initiative. In formulating the graduate cultural competencies and the toolkit, the advisory group reviewed all AACN Essentials documents and the cultural competency literature, drew upon their collective experiences with cultural diversity, and used cultural humility as the supporting framework. Six core competencies were formulated and endorsed by the AACN board of directors and key professional nursing organizations. A companion toolkit was compiled to provide resources for the implementation of the competencies. A 1-day conference was held in California to launch the cultural competencies and toolkit. Dissemination to graduate nursing programs is in process, with emphasis on faculty readiness to undertake this graduate educational transformation. The AACN Cultural Competencies for Graduate Nursing Education set national standards to prepare culturally competent nurses at the graduate level who will contribute to the elimination of health disparities through education, clinical practice, research, scholarship, and policy. PMID:21596352

  3. Re-envisioning pediatric nursing education.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    A majority of children are healthy and never hospitalized in acute care settings. With the challenges faced in the delivery of pediatric nursing education, is it reasonable to continue to insist that all nursing students have an acute care pediatric nursing experience? This article presents arguments for the need to re-envision pediatric nursing education to use limited pediatric nursing faculty and pediatric clinical sites in innovative ways to maintain high-quality outcomes for undergraduate nursing students. The article outlines issues, provides ideas, and advocates for increased use of available innovations. Virtual learning communities and a wealth of other new technologies provide new and inventive ways to deliver essential content. Pediatric nursing leaders need to demonstrate new pedagogies and discourage teaching specialty content in the same manner it has been taught for more than 40 years. The challenges are important to practicing nurses as well as academic faculty because of the implications for the future nursing workforce in pediatric settings and healthcare of children. PMID:23073251

  4. Telecommunications and nursing education.

    PubMed

    Yeaworth, R C; Benschoter, R A; Meter, R; Benson, S

    1995-01-01

    Telecommunications are becoming increasingly important to nursing educators. At the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, communication by two-way television, computers, facsimile machines, and telephone conferences is essential to the administration and operation of a school with four divisions located across 500 miles. Two-way television is available through one system that uses satellite and fiberoptic technology and another that uses telephone lines. The four campuses of the college share classes, administrative meetings, and conferences through television. Faculty members teaching via TV are oriented to designing instructional material for transmission and to the minor quirks of the technology. Students in TV classes must be aware of their responsibility for active involvement in learning. Studies have found no significant differences in the grades of students in "live" classrooms and those in TV classrooms, but both faculty and students prefer the face-to-face situation. The College of Nursing uses computers extensively on an internal network linking the four campuses for E-mail, file transfer, computer-assisted instruction, and administrative information sharing. Another computer network, Synapse Health Resources Online, links the college and the Medical Center with health professionals in rural areas throughout the state. PMID:7545192

  5. Nursing: Registered Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses for jobs in health planning and development, marketing, consulting, policy development, and quality assurance. Some RNs ... workers was $36,200. Recommend this page using: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn tools Areas at a Glance Industries ...

  6. Introducing personal digital assistants to enhance nursing education in undergraduate and graduate nursing programs.

    PubMed

    Cibulka, Nancy J; Crane-Wider, Lottchen

    2011-02-01

    This article describes how a school of nursing implemented an innovative program to introduce personal digital assistants to undergraduate and graduate nursing students. Undergraduate students studying pharmacology and nurse practitioner graduate students in an adult health course were asked to purchase a personal digital assistant privately or through the university bookstore. Faculty selected an appropriate software package. After students were oriented to the hardware and software package, innovative teaching strategies were implemented to help guide students to use their mobile devices to access clinically relevant information. Student feedback about this experience was positive. The most important elements for successful adoption of personal digital assistants are to provide training for both faculty and students, and to develop learning opportunities using the technology. Use of mobile technologies is an important competency that will improve the quality of nursing practice and therefore should be included in nursing curricula. PMID:21210606

  7. The emerging Doctor of Education (EdD) in instructional leadership for nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Graves, Barbara A; Tomlinson, Stephen; Handley, Marilyn; Oliver, JoAnn S; Carter-Templeton, Heather; Gaskins, Susan; Adams, Marsha H; Wood, Felecia

    2013-01-01

    The nursing faculty shortage is directly related to the ongoing shortage of nurses. As a result of many nursing faculty retiring, the discipline of nursing is losing its most experienced educators. The need is great for programs that will increase access and prepare nurse educators. Doctorate degrees for nurses have evolved in myriad ways. Discussions over the nature of doctoral education for the preparation of nurse educators are at the forefront of debates in nursing education. In response to National League for Nursing (2007; Core competencies of nurse educators, http://www.nln.org/profdev/corecompletter.htm) and Institute of Medicine (2010; The future of nursing: Leading change, advancing health. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, http://thefutureofnursing.org/IOM-Report) calls to increase the number of nursing faculty, the colleges of nursing and education at a major university have combined to establish a collaborative doctoral program. This article describes the historical evolution of the nursing doctorate degrees and the development and implementation of the EdD in Instructional Leadership for Nurse Educators. PMID:23995833

  8. Doctoral Education in Nursing: Evaluation of a Nontraditional Program Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakalys, Jurate A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    An intensive summer doctoral program in nursing was assessed using data from 20 summer students and 10 faculty, as well as 34 regular students and 11 faculty. Summer students found the program satisfying but stressful; program interventions did not affect stress levels. Regular and summer students differed in long-term goals. (SK)

  9. Which Fringes for Faculty?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, R. Jerry; Cooper, Lloyd G.

    1972-01-01

    This survey of 464 junior college teachers from 60 institutions was designed to determine the relative importance to faculty members of four categories of employee benefits--security, teaching, research, and income supplement. (NF)

  10. Transitioning associate degree in nursing students to the Bachelor of Science in nursing and beyond: a mandate for academic partnerships.

    PubMed

    Sportsman, Susan; Allen, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine recommendation for 80% of nurses to achieve a baccalaureate degree in nursing by 2020 becomes a major challenge in Texas with only 37.3% of nurses holding this degree in 2010 (Institute of Medicine, 2011). The challenge requires a 42.7% increase in the percentage of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. Regionally, nurse educators together with nurse practice partners are seeking solutions to this challenge. One region in west Texas approached this challenge by first developing and launching a needs assessment for current associate degree nurses, nursing students, faculty, and nurse managers. The results of this needs assessment are presented in this article. Following institutional review board approval, three surveys were developed to capture the perceptions of students enrolled in Texas associate degree nursing (ADN) programs and their faculty regarding enrollment in a bachelor of science in nursing program. A similar survey was developed for chief nursing officers in acute care settings in west Texas. Respondents in all categories suggested that time, financial constraints, and perceived difficulty in completing needed prerequisite general education courses were barriers to RNs continuing their education. Because most of the respondents hoped to return to school within 5 years, recruiting ADN graduates who have been out of school 5 years or less seems to be where schools of nursing should invest their recruitment efforts. PMID:22142922

  11. Task Force on Faculty Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hozeski, Bruce W.; And Others

    A survey was conducted of 532 faculty members and 11 administrators at Ball State University (Indiana) concerning the number of hours that faculty typically work; extent of their time devoted to teaching, research, and service/administration; how faculty workload differs by rank and status; and how faculty feel about productivity issues. Findings…

  12. Hiring and Recruiting Female Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Jaime; Bers, Trudy

    2010-01-01

    Community colleges are generally more inclusive to female faculty as compared to four-year institutions. Women represent 49 percent of fulltime and 50 percent of part-time community college faculty, a stark contrast to the low numbers of female faculty in four-year institutions. Female faculty at community colleges also receive similar rates of…

  13. Adjunctation and Scalar Product in the Dirac Equation - I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.

    2016-02-01

    The Bargmann-Pauli adjunctator (hermitiser) of {C}{l}_{_{1,3}}(C) is derived in a representation independent way, circumventing the early derivations (Pauli, Ann. inst. Henri Poincaré 6, 109 and 121 1936) using representation-dependent arguments. Relations for the adjunctator's transformation with the scalar product and space generator set are given. The S U(2) adjunctator is shown to determine the {C}{l}_{_{1,3}}(C) adjunctator. Part-II of the paper will approach the problem of the two scalar products used in Dirac theory - an unphysical situation of "piece-wise physics" with erroneous results. The adequate usage of scalar product - via calibration - will be presented, in particular under boosts, yielding the known covariant transformations of physical quantities.

  14. Technological adjuncts to increase adherence to therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Clough, Bonnie A; Casey, Leanne M

    2011-07-01

    This paper identified and reviewed technological adjuncts to increase client adherence to therapy. Three areas of adherence were identified, namely treatment dropout and non-attendance, engagement during and between therapy sessions, and aftercare. Database searches were conducted in each of these areas to identify relevant studies published between the years of 1990 and 2010. Adjuncts designed to replace or reduce direct therapist contact, change the medium of communication between the client and therapist, or alter the content or style of the therapy were not included in this review. Adjuncts were reviewed in light of theories of adherence, including Self Determination Theory, the Transtheoretical Model, and the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Adjuncts reviewed included appointment reminders, exercises and monitoring delivered by mobile phone, and exercises and data collection delivered by computer. Limitations and directions for future research were addressed and discussed. PMID:21497153

  15. Tricyclic antidepressant overdose treated with adjunctive lipid rescue and plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Odigwe, Chibuzo Clement; Tariq, Madiha; Kotecha, Tulsi; Mustafa, Usman; Senussi, Nizar; Ikwu, Isaac; Bhattarcharya, Anirban; Ngene, John Ifeanyi; Ojiako, Kizito; Iroegbu, Nkemakolam

    2016-07-01

    Tricyclic antidepressant poisoning remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of suicidal attempts. The current standard of care for treatment is the administration of sodium bicarbonate infusion. Adjunctive lipid emulsion therapy and plasmapheresis have received attention recently. We report an 18-year-old patient who was successfully managed with lipid emulsion and plasmapheresis as adjuncts to sodium bicarbonate treatment and review some of the recent literature. PMID:27365872

  16. Tricyclic antidepressant overdose treated with adjunctive lipid rescue and plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Madiha; Kotecha, Tulsi; Mustafa, Usman; Senussi, Nizar; Ikwu, Isaac; Bhattarcharya, Anirban; Ngene, John Ifeanyi; Ojiako, Kizito; Iroegbu, Nkemakolam

    2016-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressant poisoning remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of suicidal attempts. The current standard of care for treatment is the administration of sodium bicarbonate infusion. Adjunctive lipid emulsion therapy and plasmapheresis have received attention recently. We report an 18-year-old patient who was successfully managed with lipid emulsion and plasmapheresis as adjuncts to sodium bicarbonate treatment and review some of the recent literature. PMID:27365872

  17. Relevance of the test content of the Korean Nursing Licensing Examination to nursing job

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed at identifying if there is a relevance of content of the Korean Nursing Licensing Examination (KNLE) revised in 2014 to nursing job. It will be able to provide the validity of revised content of the KNLE. Methods: From October 13 to November 13, 2015, print version of 8 duties with 49-tasks, 155-job item questionnaires were distributed to 1,305 hospital nurses and 202 nursing faculties in Korea. Results were treated by descriptive statistics and comparison analysis. There were responses from 946 nurses or professors (72.5%). Results: The relevance of test content of KNLE to nursing job was shown to be valid with over 3 points out of 4 point Likert scale in all items: from 3.23 at lowest to 3.64 at top. Conclusion: Above results showed that the revised version of KNLE in 2014 was valid to test the nursing students’ knowledge for job performance. PMID:27270986

  18. Teaching nurses to focus on the health needs of populations: a Master's Degree Program in Population Health Nursing.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Noreen Cavan; George, Valerie; Govoni, Amy L; Jennings-Sanders, Andrea; McCahon, Cheryl P

    2003-01-01

    Responding to the mandate to prepare nurses for practice in population-based healthcare, the faculty at Cleveland State University (CSU) developed a unique Master of Science in Nursing program to prepare Population Health Nurse Experts. The program prepares nurses to examine the health status of populations and to design, implement, and evaluate nursing interventions accounting for the varied factors impacting on the health of a defined group. The speciality of population health nursing is practiced by nurses who can use population sciences (epidemiology, demography, population projections, and population behavioral theories) along with post-baccalaureate nursing competencies to work with defined populations across care environments. The authors discuss a curriculum that prepares nurses for this emerging speciality. PMID:14506352

  19. Faculty intent to engage in interprofessional education

    PubMed Central

    Olenick, Maria; Allen, Lois Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Background This descriptive correlational and comparative study explored health-care faculty (HCF) attitudes toward interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional health-care teams, HCF perceptions of subjective norms, the influence of subjective norms on HCF intent to engage in IPE, and HCF intent to engage in IPE. In addition, differences among seven disciplines of HCF were explored. Methods Nursing, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistants, and social work faculty were identified. Stratified random sampling was used to ensure that the population surveyed was representative of the target population. The total sample for this study included 439 HCF from the seven identified health-care professions in the US. Data collection included measures of attitudes toward IPE and attitudes toward interprofessional health-care teams. Subjective norms were measured using two 7-point rating scales. Intent to engage in IPE was measured using a 10-point rating scale. Results There were no significant differences among HCF groups regarding attitudes toward IPE or interprofessional health-care teams. Administrative faculty reported greater intent to engage in IPE than teaching faculty. HCF who were currently in or had previously engaged in IPE reported greater intent to engage in or continue to engage, and had higher attitude and subjective norm scores than faculty without IPE experience. The combination of perceived pressure from school administrators and attitudes toward IPE was the best predictor of intent to engage in IPE. Conclusion IPE has the potential to influence patient quality of care and lead to better working relationships between health-care providers. HCF are more likely to engage in IPE when they believe their school’s administrators think they should engage in IPE and when they have positive attitudes toward IPE. PMID:23637541

  20. Selection and Implementation of a Simulated Electronic Medical Record (EMR) in a Nursing Skills Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, David G.

    2011-01-01

    SUNY Plattsburgh has a baccalaureate nursing program that has been active in integrating technology in nursing education for many years. Recently, the faculty implemented human simulation (Laerdal's SimMan) in the Nursing Skills Lab (NSL) to provide some uniform clinical experiences (high frequency or high risk scenarios) not always available in…

  1. Guided Design: Sensitivity to Black-White Interactions When Giving Nursing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Theresa M.

    This paper discusses the use of guided design with white student nurses at the Medical College of Virginia Nursing School to help them develop an awareness of and reduce stereotypic responses when they are providing nursing care to black patients. The need for this type of training for both faculty and students is discussed, a series of seminars…

  2. Creating a Learner-Centered Environment in Nursing Education: An Immersion Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Susan H.; Floyd, Evelyn; Hewett, Beverly J.; Lewis, Nicole C.; Walker, Eldon H.

    2010-01-01

    A call for change in nursing education has been issued in order to prepare the nurse of the future in a changing health care delivery system with increasing complexity. The learning environment is changing, including the faculty role. Innovative research-based pedagogies are suggested as a way to challenge traditional nursing education. The…

  3. Developmental Reading and Nursing Program Partnerships: Helping Students Succeed in Reading-Intensive Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costanzo, Ryan D.; Fitzpatrick, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    While clinical competence and hands-on ability are crucial to nursing, students in college-based nursing programs face almost certain failure if they lack skills and strategies for textbook reading. Faculty and staff at a small liberal arts college with a two-year nursing program used focus groups consisting of first-semester and final-semester…

  4. The flipped classroom: strategies for an undergraduate nursing course.

    PubMed

    Schlairet, Maura C; Green, Rebecca; Benton, Melissa J

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the authors' experience with flipping a fundamental concepts of nursing course for students in an undergraduate baccalaureate program. Authors describe implementing a flipped class, practical strategies to transform students' learning experience, and lessons learned. This article serves as a guide to faculty and programs seeking to develop and implement the flipped class model in nursing education. PMID:25290966

  5. International Nursing Education: Challenges and Strategies for Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Deborah; Markowski, Kathy; Ura, Darla; Liu-Chiang, Chong-Yeu

    1998-01-01

    The Nursing Education Partnership Program enables Taiwanese associate degree nurses to earn bachelor's degrees through Emory University. Four culturally significant aspects are community resources to assist adaptation to a foreign country; redesigned teaching for international students; faculty and staff development to prepare for work with…

  6. The Development and Infrastructure Needs Required for Success--One College's Model: Online Nursing Education at Drexel University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, Fran; Glasgow, Mary Ellen Smith

    2007-01-01

    Technology's impact on the delivery of health care mandates that nursing faculty use all technologies at their disposal to better prepare students to work in technology-infused health care environments. Essential components of an infrastructure to grow technology-infused nursing education include a skilled team comprised of tech-savvy faculty and…

  7. Computer technology: implications for nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Rambo, A

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss implications of computer technology for nursing education. Effects of computer anxiety and strategies to minimize them are presented. Computer assisted instruction (CAI) and interactive videodisc (IVD) are alternative instructional strategies for content dissemination and learning enhancement. Faculty must be cognizant of design factors facilitating usage when selecting programs. Issues of privacy, confidentiality, information security, and impact on nursing practice have risen with increased computer usage. PMID:7831133

  8. Engaging external senior faculty members as faculty mentors.

    PubMed

    Haines, Seena L; Popovich, Nicholas G

    2014-06-17

    A small nonprofit private college with limited resources and a high proportion of junior faculty developed a nontraditional external faculty mentor program in the summer of 2011 in response to the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) faculty survey data regarding the professional development needs of pharmacy faculty members. Experienced faculty members with national reputations from other colleges and schools of pharmacy were hired as consultants to serve as mentors for assigned faculty members. Program goals were to provide directed, individual mentorship for pharmacy practice and basic science faculty members, expand peer review of faculty teaching prowess, and enhance monthly faculty development programming. The latter was based upon the specific needs assessment of the faculty. Program outcomes reported will include faculty satisfaction (AACP faculty survey data) changes over time, achievement of board certification for clinical faculty members and other credentialing, and other benchmarks, eg, publications, grant funding, service engagement (site development, professional organizations), after the implementation of the nontraditional faculty-mentoring program. PMID:24954941

  9. Electronic toolkit for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Trangenstein, Patricia A

    2008-12-01

    In an ever-increasing hectic and mobile society, Web-based instructional tools can enhance and supplement student learning and improve communication and collaboration among participants, give rapid feedback on one's progress, and address diverse ways of learning. Web-based formats offer distinct advantages by allowing the learner to view course materials when they choose, from any Internet connection, and as often as they want. The challenge for nurse educators is to assimilate the knowledge and expertise to understand and appropriately use these tools. A variety of Web-based instructional tools are described in this article. As nurse educators increase their awareness of these potential adjuncts they can select appropriate applications that are supported by their institution to construct their own "toolkit." PMID:18940410

  10. Professional Development Opportunities for Two-Year College Geoscience Faculty: Issues, Opportunities, and Successes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, E. M.; Macdonald, H.; McDaris, J. R.; Granshaw, F. D.; Wenner, J. M.; Hodder, J.; van der Hoeven Kraft, K.; Filson, R. H.; Guertin, L. A.; Wiese, K.

    2011-12-01

    Two-year colleges (2YCs) play a critical role in geoscience education in the United States. Nearly half of the undergraduate students who take introductory geoscience do so at a 2YC. With awide reach and diverse student populations, 2YCs may be key to producing a well-trained, diverse and sufficiently large geoscience workforce. However, faculty at 2YCs often face many barriers to professional development including lack of financial resources, heavy and inflexible teaching loads, lack of awareness of opportunities, and few professional development resources/events targeted at their needs. As an example, at the 2009 GSA meeting in Portland, fewer than 80 of the 6500 attendees were from community colleges, although this was more than twice the 2YC faculty attendance the previous year. Other issues include the isolation described by many 2YC geoscience faculty who may be the only full time geoscientist on a campus and challenges faced by adjunct faculty who may have even fewer opportunities for professional development and networking with other geoscience faculty. Over the past three years we have convened several workshops and events for 2YC geoscience faculty including technical sessions and a workshop on funding opportunities for 2YC faculty at GSA annual meetings, a field trip and networking event at the fall AGU meeting, a planning workshop that examined the role of 2YCs in geoscience education and in broadening participation in the geosciences, two workshops supporting use of the 'Math You Need, When You Need It' educational materials that included a majority of 2YC faculty, and marine science summer institutes offered by COSEE-Pacific Partnerships for 2YC faculty. Our experience indicates that 2YC faculty desire professional development opportunities when the experience is tailored to the needs and character of their students, programs, and institutions. The content of the professional development opportunity must be useful to 2YC faculty -workshops and

  11. Expert clinician to clinical teacher: developing a faculty academy and mentoring initiative.

    PubMed

    Reid, Tina P; Hinderer, Katherine A; Jarosinski, Judith M; Mister, Brenda J; Seldomridge, Lisa A

    2013-07-01

    The lack of sufficient numbers of qualified nursing faculty to prepare nursing students for entry into the field of nursing is of national and international concern. Recruiting expert clinicians and preparing them as clinical teachers is one approach to addressing the faculty shortage. Adequate training for the new role is paramount to promote job satisfaction and reduce attrition. Various models for orienting and preparing expert nurse clinicians as clinical educators are reported in the literature with little consensus or research to support a single approach. This paper describes a collaborative effort to prepare experienced registered nurse clinicians for new roles as part-time clinical faculty. Using a blend of learning strategies (face-to-face, online, simulation, and group mentoring sessions), this training experience was designed to cover content while promoting discussion of issues and challenges and providing much-needed mentorship. Outcomes include 12 new clinical faculty, 25% from groups underrepresented in nursing, with nine newly employed as part-time clinical teachers. PMID:23615037

  12. The Integrated Nursing Pathway: An Innovative Collaborative Model to Increase the Proportion of Baccalaureate-Prepared Nurses.

    PubMed

    Goode, Colleen J; Preheim, Gayle J; Bonini, Susan; Case, Nancy K; VanderMeer, Jennifer; Iannelli, Gina

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript describes a collaborative, seamless program between a community college and a university college of nursing designed to increase the number of nurses prepared with a baccalaureate degree. The three-year Integrated Nursing Pathway provides community college students with a non-nursing associate degree, early introduction to nursing, and seamless progression through BSN education. The model includes dual admission and advising and is driven by the need for collaboration with community colleges, the need to increase the percentage of racial-ethnic minority students, the shortage of faculty, and employer preferences for BSN graduates. PMID:27209872

  13. Mobilizing gerontological nursing education: The GNEC Podcast Project.

    PubMed

    Aselage, Melissa

    2010-07-01

    Capturing baccalaureate nursing student interest in gerontological nursing content can be challenging. Using technology, a joint project based on the Geriatric Nursing Education Consortium (GNEC) modules produced podcasts focused on nine major topics of care for older adults: atypical presentation, cancer, critical thinking, dementia, diabetes, geriatric resources, heart disease, intensive care, and interdisciplinary teams. Each podcast lays a foundation of content for faculty to build on in the classroom and at the bedside. PMID:20608595

  14. A mentoring needs assessment: validating mentorship in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V; Enns, Carol L

    2009-01-01

    A shortage of nursing faculty is imminent. Factors contributing to this looming crisis include the aging professoriate, as well as a host of recruitment and retention issues. Mentoring programs enhance recruitment, promote retention, and create a caring environment that capacitates and enriches the teaching role. The purpose of this research was to complete a mentoring needs assessment of our nursing faculty, with the overall goal of establishing the foundation and validation for a formal mentoring program. We recruited 60% (n = 29) of our full-time faculty to complete the Faculty of Nursing Mentoring Needs Assessment survey/questionnaire. Consistent with previous research, primarily from other disciplines, career function and caring were cited as important roles and responsibilities for mentors. The most significant stressor for novice faculty was "fitting in" to the academic milieu; teaching expertise and caring were important qualities of "good mentors." Barriers to mentoring were related to lack of time and faculty support. The evidence from this study lends support for mentorship in nursing education. A caring mentoring environment is an important and timely strategy to ensure that the integrity of nursing education is sustained in the years to come. PMID:19450785

  15. Measuring Outcomes of Nursing Practice, Education, and Administration. Proceedings of the Annual SCCEN Research Conference (1st, Austin, Texas, December 4-5, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, William E., Jr., Ed.

    Thirty-five papers on the measurement of outcomes of nursing practice, education, and administration are presented from the 1981 research conference of the Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing. Papers and authors include the following: "Why Nursing Research?" (Hildegard E. Peplau); "Job Satisfaction in Nurse Faculty: Test of a…

  16. Cultural Diversity in Nursing Education: Perils, Pitfalls, and Pearls

    PubMed Central

    Bednarz, Hedi; Schim, Stephanie; Doorenbos, Ardith

    2010-01-01

    Increasing diversity in the classroom challenges nursing educators to identify issues that complicate teaching (perils), analyze barriers for themselves and their students (pitfalls), and select new strategies for working with nontraditional students (pearls). This article identifies concerns arising from attitudes and values within nursing and common approaches to diversity education, and then discusses key issues in nursing education that relate to human nature, culture, faculty workload, and student demographics. Finally, some strategies are proposed for increasing the effectiveness of professional preparation with diverse students through a focus on culturally congruent education and development of faculty cultural competence. PMID:20143759

  17. Nursing academic administration: who will take on the challenge?

    PubMed

    Adams, Lavonne

    2007-01-01

    To address the shortage of qualified candidates interested in nursing academic administration, this study explored factors that influence nursing faculty to pursue administrative positions. Nursing academic administrators and full-time faculty from randomly selected accredited nursing programs in private colleges and universities in the United States participated in this study. Administrators completed the Leadership Practices Inventory-Self and a recruitment questionnaire, whereas faculty completed the Leadership Practices Inventory-Observer and a career aspiration questionnaire. Most faculty respondents (63%) indicated that they would not consider a position with greater administrative responsibility. Respondents identified workload and conflict-related issues as factors likely to discourage their pursuit of administration. Respondents identified additional challenge/variety of work, opportunity to influence organizational climate for change, opportunity to facilitate faculty growth and development, and mix of administration with teaching as likely to encourage their pursuit of administration. Faculty interest in a position with greater administrative responsibility was significantly increased for those who had completed additional course work beyond their highest degree. Practice recommendations included making leadership development opportunities available for faculty interested in administration, exploring methods to manage workload and conflict, and exploring methods to maximize factors identified as likely to encourage the pursuit of academic administration. PMID:17903790

  18. Leveraging Quality and Safety Education for Nurses to Enhance Graduate-Level Nursing Education and Practice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jean; Drenkard, Karen; Emard, Esther; McGuinn, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide information about the efforts to educate faculty teaching in graduate programs about the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies, provide examples of teaching strategies for each graduate competency, and finally provide information about the outcomes of the graduate-faculty QSEN project. Examples are given of the critical QSEN work that remains to be done to ensure that care for patients and communities is high quality, safe, and reliable. PMID:25997153

  19. Nursing student anxiety as a context for teaching/learning.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Terri L; Janiszewski Goodin, Heather

    2013-03-01

    Experiential learning in nursing programs includes role-play, simulation, and live clinical experiences. Anxiety levels can heighten during experiential learning as students attempt to gain psychomotor skills and transfer knowledge into critical thinking. Nursing students may experience anxiety that can interfere with learning and critical thinking. However, the presence of student anxiety can be used to initiate a purposeful caring transaction between nursing faculty and student. The caring transaction is a way for faculty to model both caring and presence, create experiential learning of caring by students, and lead students to initiate self-care interventions to manage anxiety through the nursing program and beyond. Multiple learning outcomes can be achieved as the students integrate faculty-modeled concepts of caring and presence into simulated or real clinical situations, reduce or manage their anxiety, and improve their clinical judgment and critical thinking skills. PMID:23065057

  20. Neonatal nursing: an unmet challenge in India.

    PubMed

    Kalyan, Geetanjli; Vatsa, Manju

    2014-11-01

    Nurses comprise a key component to maternal and newborn health care delivery, including the care of 'at-risk' or sick newborns. However, the efficiency and effectiveness of services rely heavily on adequate numbers of highly skilled neonatal nurses. Currently, in India, a significant shortage of trained nurses in the field of newborn care is contributing to poor neonatal outcomes. Specifically, nurses caring for newborns lack the competency and experience needed to ensure optimal care. This deficiency has been linked to a lack of expert faculty, standardized training and minimal or no exposures to newborn clinical care areas during pre service education. Moreover, in addition to a lack of operational research in the area, nurses who provide care for newborns are often faced with numerous system related issues that impede their ability to provide optimal care. Most notably, frequent changes of work place, poor wages, and lack of continuing education, skill maintenance, recognition, and collaborative team culture further compromise the nursing care. All these lead to poor motivation and competency. To meet this challenge, it is essential that emphasis be placed on the identification and support of nursing faculty with expertise in newborn and neonatal care who are able to ensure that nurses receive standardized education for pre-service, in-service and ongoing care. In addition, importance should be placed on encouraging newborn nursing research as well as on governmental increases in salary compensation. Lastly, given the shortage of physicians to take care of sick neonates in remote areas, the creation of a cadre of Neonatal nurse practitioner/ advanced practice nurses would be an invaluable solution in developing countries. Furthermore, centralized oversight of newborn education and training would be best served, if responsibility was placed with Reproductive maternal newborn child health (RMNCH) workers and district level officers. PMID:25278279