Science.gov

Sample records for adjusted bearing contact

  1. Design and Stress Analysis of Low-Noise Adjusted Bearing Contact Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Fuentes, Alfonso; Mullins, Baxter R.; Woods, Ron

    2002-01-01

    An integrated computerized approach for design and stress analysis of low-noise spiral bevel gear drives with adjusted bearing contact has been developed. The computation procedure is an iterative process, requiring four separate steps that provide: (a) a parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to reduce the effect of errors of alignment, and (b) reduction of the shift of bearing contact caused by misalignment. Application of finite element analysis permits the contact and bending stresses to be determined and investigate the formation of the bearing contact. The design of finite element models and boundary conditions is automated and does not require an intermediate CAD computer program. A commercially available finite element analysis computer program with contact capability was used to conduct the stress analysis. The theory developed is illustrated with numerical examples.

  2. Design and Stress Analysis of Low-Noise Adjusted Bearing Contact Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuentes, A.; Litvin, F. L.; Mullins, B. R.; Woods, R.; Handschuh, R. F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2002-01-01

    An integrated computerized approach for design and stress analysis of low-noise spiral bevel gear drives with adjusted bearing contact is proposed. The procedure of computations is an iterative process that requires four separate procedures and provide: (a) a parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to reduce the effect of errors of alignment on noise and vibration, and (b) reduction of the shift of bearing contact caused by misalignment. Application of finite element analysis enables us to determine the contact and bending stresses and investigate the formation of the bearing contact. The design of finite element models and boundary conditions is automated and does not require intermediate CAD computer programs for application of general purpose computer program for finite element analysis.

  3. Helical gears with circular arc teeth: Generation, geometry, precision and adjustment to errors, computer aided simulation of conditions of meshing and bearing contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Tsay, Chung-Biau

    1987-01-01

    The authors have proposed a method for the generation of circular arc helical gears which is based on the application of standard equipment, worked out all aspects of the geometry of the gears, proposed methods for the computer aided simulation of conditions of meshing and bearing contact, investigated the influence of manufacturing and assembly errors, and proposed methods for the adjustment of gears to these errors. The results of computer aided solutions are illustrated with computer graphics.

  4. Adjustable base for centering staked bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berson, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    Adjustable base permits housing and race to be supported separately so that unequal widths can be accounted for and bearing staked on center. If race is centered and staked on flat base and housing and race are not same width, then offset may occur and bearing will be set off center.

  5. Self-adjusting magnetic bearing systems

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1998-07-21

    A self-adjusting magnetic bearing automatically adjusts the parameters of an axially unstable magnetic bearing such that its force balance is maintained near the point of metastable equilibrium. Complete stabilization can be obtained with the application of weak restoring forces either from a mechanical bearing (running at near-zero load, thus with reduced wear) or from the action of residual eddy currents in a snubber bearing. In one embodiment, a torque is generated by the approach of a slotted pole to a conducting plate. The torque actuates an assembly which varies the position of a magnetic shunt to change the force exerted by the bearing. Another embodiment achieves axial stabilization by sensing vertical displacements in a suspended bearing element, and using this information in an electrical servo system. In a third embodiment, as a rotating eddy current exciter approaches a stationary bearing, it heats a thermostat which actuates an assembly to weaken the attractive force between the two bearing elements. An improved version of an electromechanical battery utilizing the designs of the various embodiments is described. 7 figs.

  6. Self-adjusting magnetic bearing systems

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1998-01-01

    A self-adjusting magnetic bearing automatically adjusts the parameters of an axially unstable magnetic bearing such that its force balance is maintained near the point of metastable equilibrium. Complete stabilization can be obtained with the application of weak restoring forces either from a mechanical bearing (running at near-zero load, thus with reduced wear) or from the action of residual eddy currents in a snubber bearing. In one embodiment, a torque is generated by the approach of a slotted pole to a conducting plate. The torque actuates an assembly which varies the position of a magnetic shunt to change the force exerted by the bearing. Another embodiment achieves axial stabilization by sensing vertical displacements in a suspended bearing element, and using this information in an electrical servo system. In a third embodiment, as a rotating eddy current exciter approaches a stationary bearing, it heats a thermostat which actuates an assembly to weaken the attractive force between the two bearing elements. An improved version of an electromechanical battery utilizing the designs of the various embodiments is described.

  7. Contact Sensors on Ceramic Ball Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jia; Just-Agosto, Frederick; Romero, Edwar

    2002-01-01

    Integration of micro contact sensors onto a ball bearing is a critical technology necessary for on-line bearing health monitoring in an industrial harsh environment and evaluation of the bearing performance and design. The current planner fabrication methods offered by the MEMS technology restrict the possibility of integrating micro sensor onto a double contoured bearing surface in a more traditional manufacturing environment. We have developed an unique technique to directly fabricate micron-sized pressure and temperature sensors onto a miniature ceramic ball bearing. A complete fabrication process, based on sensor design, surface preparation, optimized sputtering parameters, photolithographic techniques and sensor post-treatment, is described. Pressure and temperature measurement results on a miniature ceramic ball bearing show good correlation with numerical thermal-EHL analysis and good wear resistance. Keywords: Ball Bearing, Thin film Sensor, Pressure sensor, Temperature Sensor, adhesion, wear resistance, Non-developable surface, and thermal-EHL.

  8. Tool Indicates Contact Angles In Bearing Raceways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akian, Richard A.; Butner, Myles F.

    1995-01-01

    Tool devised for use in measuring contact angles between balls and races in previously operated ball bearings. Used on both inner and outer raceways of bearings having cross-sectional widths between approximately 0.5 and 2.0 in. Consists of integral protractor mounted in vertical plane on bracket equipped with leveling screws and circular level indicator. Protractor includes rotatable indicator needle and set of disks of various sizes to fit various raceway curvatures.

  9. Helical Gears with Circular Arc Teeth: Generation, Geometry, Precision and Adjustment to Errors, Computer Aided Simulation of Conditions of Meshing, and Bearing Contact.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    09 171 HELICAL GEARS NITH CIRCULAR ARC TEETH: GENERATION / GEOMETRY PRECISION AND (U) ILLINOIS UNIV AT CHICAGO CIRCLE F L LITYN ET AL OCT 87 NASA-CR...34",’ . " "" . ".- , ", ", " ",, -. ". , ’.,.,L jILI ..EILE.GO ;. - - . .. . AVSCOM .--NASA Contractor Report�.--TcnclRpr ZC1 i < Helical Gears With Circular Arc Teeth: Generation...AVSCOM Contractor Report 4089 Technical Report 87-C-18 Helical Gears With Circular Arc Teeth: Generation, Geometry, Precision and Adjustment to Errors

  10. Gas bearings. [fluid lubrication theory of sliding contact surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, C. H. T.

    1980-01-01

    The present work deals with the fundamentals of gas lubrication theory, which forms the foundation of all analytical design tools for gas bearings. Most of the hard lessons learned in the past are outlined with reference to dry contact, debris ingestion, sliding speed, and chemical stability of lubricant. The mathematical theory of gas lubrication is described for scaling rules in thin-film viscous flow, momentum conservation, mass conservation, energy conservation, isothermal gas bearing theory, coupling effects, and global bearing characteristics. Particular attention is given to the governing differential equations for common bearing configurations. Also discussed are representative solutions of self-acting gas bearings, externally pressurized bearings, and time-dependent effects.

  11. Cylindrical roller bearings with profiled contacting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creţu, S. S.

    2017-02-01

    An initial loading of cylindrical roller bearings in the elastic-plastic domain was performed to induce elastic shakedown phenomena able to change the basic profiles of both, rollers and raceways, which endorses a different value for the basic reference rating life. Fatigue life tests carried out on four lots of NJ206 cylindrical roller bearings revealed much higher values of L10 and Lm criteria for the bearings lots which experienced a suitable initial loading operation in the elastic-plastic domain. The reference rating lives, evaluated by using the lamina technique, confirmed the superiority of bearings lots which undergone an appropriate primary loading in the elastic-plastic domain.

  12. Ball bearing lubrication: The elastohydrodynamics of elliptical contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The history of ball bearings is examined, taking into account rollers and the wheel in the early civilizations, the development of early forms of rolling-element bearings in the classical civilizations, the Middle Ages, the Industrial Revolution, the emergence of the precision ball bearing, scientific studies of contact mechanics and rolling friction, and the past fifty years. An introduction to ball bearings is presented, and aspects of ball bearing mechanics are explored. Basic characteristics of lubrication are considered along with lubrication equations, the lubrication of rigid ellipsoidal solids, and elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory. Attention is given to the theoretical results for fully flooded elliptical hydrodynamic contacts, the theoretical results for starved elliptical contacts, experimental investigations, the elastohydrodynamics of elliptical contacts for materials of low elastic modulus, the film thickness for different regimes of fluid-film lubrication, and applications.

  13. Positive contact, self retaining bearing seals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.H.; Larsen, L.

    1992-05-05

    This patent describes a bearing. It comprises: an inner race; an outer race; bearing means engaged between the inner and outer races; means for sealing a space between the inner and outer races, a groove in one of the inner and outer races.

  14. Sliding Contact Bearings for Service to 700 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1996-01-01

    Cylindrical, sliding contact bearings made entirely of a self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite (PM212) or of super alloy shells lined with clad PM212 were tested in an oscillating mode at temperatures from 25 to 700 C. Tests of 100 hr duration or longer were conducted at a bearing unit load of 3.45 Mpa (500 psi). Shorter duration tests at various unit loads up to 24.1 Mpa (3500 psi) were also conducted. In comparison tests, bearings lubricated with PM212 had superior anti-wear characteristics compared to the baseline, unlubricated, super alloy bearings: no galling of PM212-lubricated bearings occurred, while severe surface damage including galling occurred, especially at high loads, during the baseline tests. A heat treatment procedure, which dimensionally stabilizes PM212 and thereby minimizes clearance changes during high temperature bearing operation, is described.

  15. Positive contact, self retaining bearing seals

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Bruce H.; Larsen, Lawrence E.; Welch, Edmund F.

    1992-05-05

    An ultra-low friction bearing including an inner race, an outer race, bearing elements engaged between the inner and outer races and a seal between the inner and outer races is disclosed. The seal includes first and second sealing washers. The first washer has an outer diameter greater than an inner diameter of the outer race and an inner diameter greater than the outer diameter of the inner race. The second washer has an inner diameter less than the outer diameter of the inner race and an outer diameter less than the inner diameter of the outer race. The first washer slidably engages the outer race, the second washer slidably engages the inner race and the washers overlap and slidably engage one another. One of the washers snap fits into its respective inner or outer race while the other washer engages a stepped surface of the other of the inner and outer races. The grooved and stepped surface are offset from one another in a longitudinal direction of the races such that the washers are conically loaded thus providing a seal between the inner and outer races sufficient to prevent lubricant and contaminating particles from passing therethrough. The washers are made from a non-metallic semi-flexible low-modulus material.

  16. Hybrid bearing technology for advanced turbomachinery: Rolling contact fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the basic structure and results to date of a major ARPA funded effort to provide a tribological performance database on ceramic bearing materials and their interaction with standard bearing steels. Program efforts include studies of material physical properties, machining characteristics, and tribological performance. The majority of the testing completed to date focuses on rolling contact fatigue testing of the ceramic materials, including efforts to arrive at optimum approaches to evaluating ceramic/steel hybrid combinations in rolling contact fatigue.

  17. Ball to separator contact forces in angular contact ball bearings under thrust and radial loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental data are reported on ball to cage contact forces in a 110 mm bore ball bearing operating at speeds to 12,000 rpm under radial and thrust loads. Information is also reported on cage to inner race land contact force, cage to inner race land clearance, and cage to shaft speed ratios.

  18. Solid lubricant mass contact transfer technology usage for vacuum ball bearings longevity increasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzymatov, B.; Deulin, E.

    2016-07-01

    A contact mass transfer technological method of solid lubricant deposition on components of vacuum ball bearings is presented. Physics-mathematical model of process contact mass transfer is being considered. The experimental results of ball bearings covered with solid lubricant longevity in vacuum are presented. It is shown that solid lubricant of contact mass transfer method deposition is prospective for ball bearing longevity increasing.

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of an adjustable patellar tendon bearing prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, J; Susak, Z; Bahar, A; Seliktar, R; Najenson, T

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between geometry of the patellar tendon (PT) insertion in the socket and the dynamic load transmitted through the PT, in a patellar tendon bearing (PTB) prosthesis. The dynamic load was measured by a specially constructed two-component load cell, which was mounted on the experimental prosthesis. Geometry of the PT insertion relative to the socket was altered by adjusting the location of the mounting frame-load cell assembly. Evaluation of performance of the prosthesis in the range of geometries investigated was made objectively by gait analysis of the patients. The latter was performed on a 10 m walkpath, including at halfway two forceplates, from which the foot-ground forces were recorded. Simultaneously, the PT forces on the prosthesis, as sensed by the load cell were monitored. Computer processing of the data included full analysis of the force-trace and the determination of criteria for optimization of the PT insertion. The resulting criteria were those which expressed minimization of abnormalities in the foot-ground forces of each patient, such as vertical and braking forces and their timings. The complete optimization procedure, which was undertaken for two below-knee male amputees, indicated the correct positioning of the PT insertion, actually taken in the final fitting procedure of the socket of the prosthesis.

  20. A new nonlinear dynamic model of the rotor-bearing system considering preload and varying contact angle of the bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuening; Han, Qinkai; Peng, Zhike; Chu, Fulei

    2015-05-01

    A great deal of research work has been done on the dynamic behaviors of the rotor-bearing system. However, the important effects of load and variation of contact angle on the bearing performance have not been focused on sufficiently. In this paper, a five-degree-of-freedom load distribution model is set up considering the bearing preload and the loads due to the rotor imbalance. Utilizing this model, the variation of the bearing contact angle is investigated thoroughly. The comparisons of the obtained contact angle against the results from literature validate that the proposed load distribution model is effective. With this model, the static ball deformations are obtained considering variation of the contact angle. Through resolving the dynamic displacements of the rotor, the dynamic ball deformations could also be obtained. Then the total restoring forces and moments of the bearings could be formulated. By introducing these nonlinear forces and moments into the rotating system, a new dynamic model considering the preload and the variation of contact angle is set up. The present analyses indicate that the bearing contact angle will be changed remarkably with the effect of bearing load. The deflection vibration of the rotor-bearing system will be underestimated without considering the varying contact angle. With the effect of varying contact angle, the ball passage frequency and its combinations with the shaft rotating frequency become more noticeable. The main resonance regions for the rotor-bearing system shift to the lower speed ranges when the variation of contact angle is taken into account.

  1. Design and Operating Characteristics of High-Speed, Small-Bore, Angular-Contact Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinel, Stanley I.; Signer, Hans R.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1998-01-01

    The computer program SHABERTH was used to analyze 35-mm-bore, angular-contact ball bearings designed and manufactured for high-speed turbomachinery applications. Parametric tests of the bearings were conducted on a high-speed, high-temperature bearing tester and were compared with the computer predictions. Four bearing and cage designs were studied. The bearings were lubricated either by jet lubrication or through the split inner ring with and without outer-ring cooling. The predicted bearing life decreased with increasing speed because of increased operating contact stresses caused by changes in contact angle and centrifugal load. For thrust loads only, the difference in calculated life for the 24 deg. and 30 deg. contact-angle bearings was insignificant. However, for combined loading, the 24 deg. contact-angle bearing gave longer life. For split-inner-ring bearings, optimal operating conditions were obtained with a 24 deg. contact angle and an inner-ring, land-guided cage, using outer-ring cooling in conjunction with low lubricant flow rates. Lower temperature and power losses were obtained with a single-outer-ring, land-guided cage for the 24 deg. contact-angle bearing having a relieved inner ring and partially relieved outer ring. Inner-ring temperatures were independent of lubrication mode and cage design. In comparison with measured values, reasonably good engineering correlation was obtained using the computer program SHABERTH for predicted bearing power loss and for inner- and outer-ring temperatures. The Parker formula for XCAV (used in SHABERTH, a measure of oil volume in the bearing cavity) may need to be refined to reflect bearing lubrication mode, cage design, and location of cage-controlling land.

  2. Effects of bolt-hole contact on bearing-bypass damage-onset strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, John H., Jr.; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1991-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical study was conducted to investigate the effects of bolt-hole contact on the bearing bypass strength of a graphite-epoxy laminate. Tests were conducted on specimens consisting of 16-ply quasi-isotropic T300/5208 laminates with a centrally located hole. Bearing loads were applied through a clearance-fit steel bolt. Damage onset strength and damage mode were determined for each test case. A finite element procedure was used to calculate the bolt-hole stresses and bolt contact for each test case. A finite element procedure was used to calculate the bolt-hole stresses and bolt contact for each measured damage-onset strength. For the tension bearing-bypass cases tested, the bolt contact half-angle was approximately 60 degrees at damage onset. For compression, the contact angle was 20 degrees as the bypass load increased. A corresponding decrease in the bearing damage onset strength was attributed to the decrease in contact angle which made the bearing loads more severe. Hole boundary stresses were also computed by superimposing stresses for separate bearing and bypass loading. Stresses at the specimen net section were accurately approximated by the superposition procedure. However, the peak bearing stresses had large errors because the bolt contact angles were not represented correctly. For compression, peak bearing stress errors of nearly 50 percent were calculated.

  3. Rolling-element bearings. [contact sliding friction study of solid bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    In contrast to hydrodynamic bearings, which depend for low-friction characteristics on a fluid film between the journal and the bearing surfaces, roller-element bearings employ a number of balls or rollers that roll in an annular space. The paper briefly outlines the advantages and disadvantages of roller-element bearings as compared to hydrodynamic bearings. The discussion covers bearing types, rolling friction, friction losses in rolling bearings, contact stresses, deformations, kinematics (normal and high speeds), bearing dynamics including elastohydrodynamics, load distribution, lubrication (grease, solid oil, oil-air mist), specific dynamic capacity and life, specific static capacity, and fatigue or wearout (elastohydrodynamics, wear). Rolling bearing wear factor as a function of operating environment is plotted and discussed.

  4. Stiffness matrix formulation for double row angular contact ball bearings: Analytical development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunduz, Aydin; Singh, Rajendra

    2013-10-01

    Though double row angular contact ball bearings are widely used in industrial, automotive, and aircraft applications, the scientific literature on double row bearings is sparse. It is also shown that the stiffness matrices of two single row bearings may not be simply superposed to obtain the stiffness matrix of a double row bearing. To overcome the deficiency in the literature, a new, comprehensive, analytical approach is proposed based on the Hertzian theory for back-to-back, face-to-face, and tandem arrangements. The elements of the five-dimensional stiffness matrix for double row angular contact ball bearings are computed given either the mean bearing displacement or the mean load vector. The diagonal elements of the proposed stiffness matrix are verified with a commercial code for all arrangements under three loading scenarios. Some changes in stiffness coefficients are investigated by varying critical kinematic and geometric parameters to provide more insight. Finally, the calculated natural frequencies of a shaft-bearing experiment are successfully compared with measurements, thus validating the proposed stiffness formulation. For double row angular contact ball bearings, the moment stiffness and cross-coupling stiffness terms are significant, and the contact angle changes under loads. The proposed formulation is also valid for paired (duplex) bearings which behave as an integrated double row unit when the surrounding structural elements are sufficiently rigid.

  5. Modal interaction and vibration suppression in industrial turbines using adjustable journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasalevris, Athanasios; Dohnal, Fadi

    2016-09-01

    The vibration suppression by deliberately introducing a parametric excitation in the fluid-film bearings is investigated for an industrial turbine rotor system. A journal bearing with variable adjustable geometry is operated in such a way that the effective stiffness and damping properties vary periodically in time. The proposed bearing is designed for having the ability of changing the bearing fluid film thickness in a semi-active manner. Such an adjustment of the journal bearing properties introduces in the system a time-periodic variation of the effective stiffness and damping properties of the fluid-film. If the time-periodicity is tuned properly to match a parametric anti-resonance, vibration suppression is achieved in the overall system. The paper presents the principle of operation of the recently developed bearings. The simulation of an industrial turbine rotor-bearing shaft line at induced parametric excitation motivates the further development and application of such bearings since the vibration amplitudes are considerably decreased in critical speeds.

  6. Bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yoshida, Fumihiko; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate a bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. The impeller levitates axially by balancing a gravitational force, buoyancy, a magnetic force, and hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. To adjust the levitation position of the impeller, the balance of acting forces on the impeller was adjusted by changing the shroud area on the bottom impeller. Three pumps having various shroud area were prepared as tested models: 817 mm(2) (HH-S), 875 mm(2) (HH-M) and 931 mm(2) (HH-L). First, for evaluating the bearing gap adjustment, the bearing gap was estimated by calculating a balancing position of the acting forces on the impeller. We actually measured the gravitational force, buoyancy and the magnetic force, and numerically analyzed hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. Second, to verify accuracy of the estimated bearing gap, the measurement test of the bearing gap was performed. Finally, an in-vitro hemolysis test was performed to evaluate a hemolysis level of the pump. As a result, bottom bearing gaps were estimated as 40 μm (HH-S), 60 μm (HH-M) and 238 μm (HH-L). In the measurement test, bottom bearing gaps were measured as 63 μm (HH-S), 219 μm (HH-M), and 231 μm (HH-L). The estimated bearing gaps had positively correlated with the measured bearing gaps in relation to the shroud area on the impeller. In the hemolysis test, hemolysis level in every model was almost equivalent to that of BPX-80, when the bearing gap was adjusted greater than 60 μm. We could adjust the bearing gap by changing the shroud area on the impeller for improvement of levitation performance to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level.

  7. Study of high-speed angular-contact ball bearings under dynamic load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geer, T. E.; Kannel, J. W.; Stockwell, R. D.; Walters, C. T.; Wilson, W. R. D.

    1969-01-01

    Research program studies behavior of specific high-speed, angular-contact ball bearings. Program is aimed at detailed investigation of ball-separator behavior and lubrication surface-finish effects in a specific gyro wheel.

  8. Estimation of bearing contact angle in-situ by X-ray kinematography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, P. H.; Manders, F.

    1982-01-01

    The mounted, preloaded contact angle of the structural bearings in the assembled design mechanical assembly was measured. A modification of the Turns method is presented, based upon the clarity and definition of moving parts achieved with X-ray technique and cinematic display. Contact angle is estimated by counting the number of bearings passing a given point as a function of number of turns of the shaft. Ball and pitch diameter variations are discussed. Ball train and shaft angle uncertainties are also discussed.

  9. Selection and Calculation of Optimum Generatrix of Rolling contacts for Roller Bearings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the rollers. The reason for the concentration of contact stresses at the edges of cylindrical rollers is the edge effect , a sharp increase in...inaccuracy in bearing manufacture. A new form of generatrix is suggested produced with large radius camber and elements decreasing the influence of the edge ... effect , considering the actual operating conditions of circles and rollers and providing increased bearing durability in bearings with rollers having rectangular generatrix.

  10. Analysis of rolling contact spall life in 440 C steel bearing rims

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastias, P. C.; Bhargava, V.; Bower, A. P.; Du, J.; Gupta, V.; Hahn, G. T.; Kulkarni, S. M.; Kumar, A. M.; Leng, X.; Rubin, C. A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a two year study of the mechanisms of spall failure in the HPOTP bearings are described. The objective was to build a foundation for detailed analyses of the contact life in terms of: cyclic plasticity, contact mechanics, spall nucleation, and spall growth. Since the laboratory rolling contact testing is carried out in the 3 ball/rod contact fatigue testing machine, the analysis of the contacts and contact lives produced in this machine received attention. The results from the experimentally observed growth lives are compared with calculated predictions derived from the fracture mechanics calculations.

  11. How to apply life adjustment factors for ball and roller bearings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crecelius, W. J., Jr.; Harris, T. A.; Moyer, C. A.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Sherlock, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Practical problems applicable to the selection, design, and lubrication of rolling-element bearings are presented and discussed. The solutions to these problems are based upon the new ASME Engineering Design Guide - Life Adjustment Factors for Ball and Roller Bearings. Design and selection criteria are based upon materials and processing factors such as melting practice, metalworking, and heat treatment. Environmental factors considered include bearing misalignment and speed. Selection of a lubricant is based upon elastohydrodynamic lubrication principles in addition to lubricant type and chemistry.

  12. Measurement of separator contact forces in ball bearings using a derotation prism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    A derotation prism was used to produce a stationary image of balls deflecting a portion of the separator. Ball to cage contact forces in a 110 mm bearing at speeds to 12,000 rpm were found to be 25 N (five lb) maximum. Inner race land contact force was found to vary up to 20 N (four lb).

  13. The properties of thin-section, four-point-contact ball bearings in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowntree, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Thin section, four-point-contact ball bearings are increasinly employed in spacecraft mechanisms because of the potential advantages they offer. However, litte was previously known of their torque, thermal conductance and stiffness properties at conditions anticipated for their use in space. An investigation of these properties are described. It was found that frictional (Coulomb) torque, thermal conductance and stiffness all show marked dependence on the bearing preload, the housing design, the bearing external fit (i.e., free fit or interference) and on the thermal gradient across the races. Optimum bearing performance is achieved only if these properties are well understood. The necessary data to understand these properties are provided.

  14. 78 FR 47215 - Petition to Amend Animal Welfare Act Regulations To Prohibit Public Contact With Big Cats, Bears...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Regulations To Prohibit Public Contact With Big Cats, Bears, and Nonhuman Primates AGENCY: Animal and Plant... certain exceptions, from coming into direct or physical contact with big cats, bears, or nonhuman primates... or immature big cats, bears, and nonhuman primates and the separation of such animals from their...

  15. 78 FR 63408 - Petition To Amend Animal Welfare Act Regulations To Prohibit Public Contact With Big Cats, Bears...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Animal Welfare Act Regulations To Prohibit Public Contact With Big Cats, Bears, and Nonhuman Primates... exceptions, from coming into direct or physical contact with big cats, bears, or nonhuman primates of any age... big cats, bears, and nonhuman primates and the separation of such animals from their dams before...

  16. Rolling-contact fatigue resistance of hard coatings on bearing steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.

    1999-08-18

    Ball- and roller-bearings of the 21st Century are expected to perform better and last longer while operating under more stringent conditions than before. To meet these great expectations, researchers have been constantly exploring new bearing designs or refining existing ones, optimizing microstructure and chemistry of bearing materials, and alternatively, they have been considering the use of thin hard coatings for improved bearing performance and durability. Already, some laboratory tests have demonstrated that hard nitride, carbide (such as TiN, TiC, etc.) and diamondlike carbon (DLC) coatings can be very effective in prolonging the fatigue lives of bearing steels. This paper provides an overview of the recent developments in hard coatings for bearing applications. Previous studies have demonstrated that thin, hard coatings can effectively prolong the fatigue lives of bearing steel substrates. In particular, thinner hard coatings (i.e., 0.2 - 1 {micro}m thick) provide exceptional improvements in the fatigue lives of bearing steel substrates. In contrast, thicker hard coatings suffer micro fracture and delamination when tested under high contact stresses, hence are ineffective and may even have a negative effect on bearing life. Overall, it was concluded that thin hard coatings may offer new possibilities for bearing industry in meeting the performance and durability needs of the 21st Century.

  17. Assessment of the Applicability of Hertzian Contact Theory to Edge-Loaded Prosthetic Hip Bearings

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Anthony P.; Brannon, Rebecca M.

    2011-01-01

    The components of prosthetic hip bearings may experience in-vivo subluxation and edge loading on the acetabular socket as a result of joint laxity, causing abnormally high, damaging contact stresses. In this research, edge-loaded contact of prosthetic hips is examined analytically and experimentally in the most commonly used categories of material pairs. In edge-loaded ceramic-on-ceramic hips, Hertzian contact theory yields accurate (conservatively, <10% error) predictions of the contact dimensions. Moreover, Hertzian theory successfully captures slope and curvature trends in the dependence of contact patch geometry on the applied load. In an edge-loaded ceramic-on-metal pair, a similar degree of accuracy is observed in the contact patch length; however, the contact width is less accurately predicted due to the onset of subsurface plasticity, which is predicted for loads >400 N. Hertzian contact theory is shown to be ill-suited to edge-loaded ceramic-on-polyethylene pairs due to polyethylene’s nonlinear material behavior. This work elucidates the methods and the accuracy of applying classical contact theory to edge-loaded hip bearings. The results help to define the applicability of Hertzian theory to the design of new components and materials to better resist severe edge loading contact stresses. PMID:21962465

  18. Parenting Stress, Alliance, Child Contact, and Adjustment of Imprisoned Mothers and Fathers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loper, Ann Booker; Carlson, L. Wrenn; Levitt, Lacey; Scheffel, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The present study contrasted the parenting stress and adjustment patterns of 100 mothers and 111 fathers incarcerated in one of 11 U.S. prisons. In comparison to inmate mothers, fathers had less contact with children, higher levels of parenting stress, and poorer alliance with caregivers. For inmate mothers, higher levels of contact with…

  19. Transmission errors and bearing contact of spur, helical and spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, J.; Lee, H.-T.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of transmission errors and bearing contact of spur, helical and spiral bevel gears was performed. Modified tooth surfaces for these gears have been proposed in order to absorb linear transmission errors caused by gear misalignment and localize the bearing contact. Numerical examples for spur, helical, and spiral bevel gears are presented to illustrate the behavior of the modified gear surfaces to misalignment and errors of assembly.The numerical results indicate that the modified surfaces will perform with a low level of transmission error in nonideal operating environment.

  20. Nonlinear dynamic model for skidding behavior of angular contact ball bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qinkai; Chu, Fulei

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional nonlinear dynamic model is proposed to predict the skidding behavior of angular contact ball bearings under combined load condition. The centrifugal and gyroscopic effects induced by ball rotation and revolution, Hertz contact between the ball and inner/outer races, discontinuous contact between the ball and cage and elastohydrodynamic lubrication are considered in the model. Through comparisons with the tested results of the reference, the dynamic model is verified. Based upon these, variations of ball slipping speed with time and space are discussed for the bearing under combined load condition. It is shown that radial load leads to the fluctuations in the slipping velocity of the ball contacting with inner/outer races, especially for the ball in load-decreasing regions. Adding the radial load would significantly increase the amplitude and range of slipping velocity, indicating that the skidding becomes more serious. As the ball still withstands contact load in the load-decreasing region, large slipping velocity would increase the temperature of both bearing and lubricant oil, intensify the wear and then might shorten the bearing service life. Therefore, the radial load should be considered carefully in the design and monitoring of rotating machinery.

  1. Nonlinear dynamic modeling of rotor system supported by angular contact ball bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Han, Qinkai; Zhou, Daning

    2017-02-01

    In current bearing dynamic models, the displacement coordinate relations are usually utilized to approximately obtain the contact deformations between the rolling element and raceways, and then the nonlinear restoring forces of the rolling bearing could be calculated accordingly. Although the calculation efficiency is relatively higher, the accuracy is lower as the contact deformations should be solved through iterative analysis. Thus, an improved nonlinear dynamic model is presented in this paper. Considering the preload condition, surface waviness, Hertz contact and elastohydrodynamic lubrication, load distribution analysis is solved iteratively to more accurately obtain the contact deformations and angles between the rolling balls and raceways. The bearing restoring forces are then obtained through iteratively solving the load distribution equations at every time step. Dynamic tests upon a typical rotor system supported by two angular contact ball bearings are conducted to verify the model. Through comparisons, the differences between the nonlinear dynamic model and current models are also pointed out. The effects of axial preload, rotor eccentricity and inner/outer waviness amplitudes on the dynamic response are discussed in detail.

  2. Friction and Wear of Solid-Lubricated Contact in Gas Turbine Engine Bearings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    Norton Corp. Test ball of NC-!32 were provided by WPAFB from a group manufac- tured by SKF Industries, Inc. -2- taking point. A new contact position was...desired contact plane on the disc rim. The contact was carefully aligned . The ball type specimen had the inherent advantage of self- alignment but as...assembly on the load arm. Alignment of the compliant specimen to the disc surface was achieved by adjustment to the loader arm’s universal joint on the

  3. Contact angle adjustment in equation-of-state-based pseudopotential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Anjie; Li, Longjian; Uddin, Rizwan; Liu, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The single component pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model has been widely applied in multiphase simulation due to its simplicity and stability. In many studies, it has been claimed that this model can be stable for density ratios larger than 1000. However, the application of the model is still limited to small density ratios when the contact angle is considered. The reason is that the original contact angle adjustment method influences the stability of the model. Moreover, simulation results in the present work show that, by applying the original contact angle adjustment method, the density distribution near the wall is artificially changed, and the contact angle is dependent on the surface tension. Hence, it is very inconvenient to apply this method with a fixed contact angle, and the accuracy of the model cannot be guaranteed. To solve these problems, a contact angle adjustment method based on the geometry analysis is proposed and numerically compared with the original method. Simulation results show that, with our contact angle adjustment method, the stability of the model is highly improved when the density ratio is relatively large, and it is independent of the surface tension.

  4. Contact angle adjustment in equation-of-state-based pseudopotential model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Anjie; Li, Longjian; Uddin, Rizwan; Liu, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The single component pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model has been widely applied in multiphase simulation due to its simplicity and stability. In many studies, it has been claimed that this model can be stable for density ratios larger than 1000. However, the application of the model is still limited to small density ratios when the contact angle is considered. The reason is that the original contact angle adjustment method influences the stability of the model. Moreover, simulation results in the present work show that, by applying the original contact angle adjustment method, the density distribution near the wall is artificially changed, and the contact angle is dependent on the surface tension. Hence, it is very inconvenient to apply this method with a fixed contact angle, and the accuracy of the model cannot be guaranteed. To solve these problems, a contact angle adjustment method based on the geometry analysis is proposed and numerically compared with the original method. Simulation results show that, with our contact angle adjustment method, the stability of the model is highly improved when the density ratio is relatively large, and it is independent of the surface tension.

  5. Microstructural and Material Quality Effects on Rolling Contact Fatigue of Highly Elastic Intermetallic Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Howard, S. Adam; Thomas, Fransua; Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2016-01-01

    Rolling element bearings made from highly-elastic intermetallic materials (HIM)s, such as 60NiTi, are under development for applications that require superior corrosion and shock resistance. Compared to steel, intermetallics have been shown to have much lower rolling contact fatigue (RCF) stress capability in simplified 3-ball on rod (ASTM STP 771) fatigue tests. In the 3-ball tests, poor material quality and microstructural flaws negatively affect fatigue life but such relationships have not been established for full-scale 60NiTi bearings. In this paper, 3-ball-on-rod fatigue behavior of two quality grades of 60NiTi are compared to the fatigue life of full-scale 50mm bore ball bearings made from the same materials. 60NiTi RCF rods with material or microstructural flaws suffered from infant mortality failures at all tested stress levels while high quality 60NiTi rods exhibited no failures at lower stress levels. Similarly, tests of full-scale bearings made from flawed materials exhibited early surface fatigue and through crack type failures while bearings made from high quality material did not fail even in long-term tests. Though the full-scale bearing test data is yet preliminary, the results suggest that the simplified RCF test is a good qualitative predictor of bearing performance. These results provide guidance for materials development and to establish minimum quality levels required for successful bearing operation and life.

  6. Rolling contact fatigue life of chromium ion plated 440C bearing steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.; Davis, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Rolling contact fatigue (RCF) test specimens of heat treated 440C bearing steel were chromium ion plated in thicknesses from 0.1 to 8.0 micron and tested in RCF tester using 700 ksi maximum Hertzian stress. Heavy coatings, greater than about 5 micron in thickness, peeled off or spalled readily, whereas thin coatings, less than 3 micron thick, were tenacious and did not come off. Furthermore, significant improvement in RCF life was obtained with thin chromium ion plated test specimens. The average increase in B10 life was 75% compared with unplated 440C. These preliminary results indicate that ion plating is a promising way to improve bearing life.

  7. Types and transformation conditions of bauxites in contact with coal-bearing rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Leiptsig, A.V.; Savel'eva, Z.I.; Vil'shanskii, V.N.

    1985-11-01

    The features of secondary alteration of bauxite at the contact with coaly rocks are examined. Bauxite alteration is linked to infiltration of reductive water from overlying coaly rocks and the structural features and composition of the suprajacent bauxite-bearing beds. From a detailed study of the peculiarly structured bauxite alteration zones in sections, the sequential evolution and alteration of geochemical environments is traced and their influence on bauxite quality examined.

  8. A microstructure sensitive study of rolling contact fatigue in bearing steels: A numerical and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandkar, Anup Surendra

    Bearings are an integral part of machine components that transmit rotary power such as cars, motors, engines etc. Safe bearing operation is essential to avoid serious failures and accidents, which necessitates their timely replacement. This calls for an accurate bearing life prediction methods. Based on the Lundberg-Palmgen (LP) model, current life models consistently under predict bearings lives. Improvement in life prediction requires understanding of the bearing failure mechanism i.e. Rolling Contact Fatigue (RCF). The goal of this research is to develop a mechanistic framework required for an improved bearing life prediction model. Such model should account for metal plasticity, influence of microstructural features and cyclically evolving stressstrain fields induced during RCF. To achieve this, elastic-plastic finite element (FE) study is undertaken to investigate the response of M50-NiL bearing steel during RCF. Specifically, a microstructure sensitive study of the influence of non-metallic inclusions on RCF response of bearings is presented. M50-NiL microstructure consists of carbides which are orders of magnitude smaller than bearing dimensions. To account for this size difference, a multi-scale FE modeling approach is employed. The FE results reveal that hard carbide particles act as local stress risers, alter surrounding stressstrain fields and cause micro-scale yielding of steel matrix. Moreover, they introduce a shear stress cycle with non-zero mean stress, which promotes micro-plastic strain accumulation via ratcheting mechanism. Localized ratcheting is primarily responsible for cyclic hardening within the RCF affected region. Such evolution of subsurface hardness can be used to quantify RCF induced damage. To investigate this further, cyclic hardening response of the RCF affected region is simulated. The results show good agreement with the experimental observations. The cyclic stress-strain fields obtained from these simulations and the knowledge of

  9. Rolling contact fatigue behavior of heat resistant bearing steels at high operational temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, H.J.; Hirsch, T.; Streit, E.

    1998-12-31

    An approach was made to estimate the endurance limit in rolling contact fatigue in dependence of the operational conditions for the bearing steels M50 (AMS 6491), M50 NiL (AMS 6278) and the nitrogen-alloyed Cronidur 30 (AMS 5898) by investigating the changes in the residual stress profiles after 5 million cycles of overrolling. Real main shaft bearings with a pitch diameter of 168 mm have been tested. To simulate the heat generated in the turbine engines even under boundary operational conditions oil inlet temperatures between 80 and 210 C have been applied, the rotational speed has been varied between 2,500 and 14,000 r/min and the interference fit has been changed to produce different hoop stress levels.

  10. Coupling system dynamics and contact behaviour: Modelling bearings subjected to environmental induced vibrations and ‘false brinelling’ degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massi, Francesco; Rocchi, J.; Culla, A.; Berthier, Y.

    2010-05-01

    During the last decades the increase in power of mechanical systems and the demand for increasing service life leads mechanical components of a system to work in extreme conditions. Moreover, actual mechanical systems include surfaces in sliding contact that are subjected to wear if exposed to high vibration. In fact, the vibration of components in contact results in large oscillations of the local contact stresses, due to the local deformation of the components at the contact interfaces. To approach correctly tribological problems, the coupling between the scale of the mechanism (system dynamics) and the scale of the contact needs to be accounted for. This paper presents an analysis concerning the influence of the vibrations induced by aircraft engines on the contact stresses of rolling bearings of the bleed system valves. To study the wear, resulting from false brinelling at the contact surfaces between balls and races of the bearings, it is then necessary to determine the forces due to the system vibrations and acting at the bearing connections with the structure. In order to perform a numerical transient analysis of the system dynamics a nonlinear simplified model of the valve (mechanism scale) is developed. The model is validated by comparing the numerical results with experimental tests. The time behaviour of the global forces on the bearings, and the respective displacements between the contact surfaces, are then used as inputs for a finite element model of the bearings (contact scale). The model is used to calculate and analyze the behaviour in time of the local contact constraints between race and balls. This analysis, developed in the framework of a European project, is an example of the proposed general approach to contact problems, by coupling the analysis of the mechanism and contact scales.

  11. Effects of Patellofemoral Taping on Patellofemoral Joint Alignment and Contact Area During Weight Bearing.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kai-Yu; Epstein, Ryan; Garcia, Ron; Riley, Nicole; Lee, Szu-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Although it has been theorized that patellofemoral joint (PFJ) taping can correct patellar malalignment, the effects of PFJ taping techniques on patellar alignment and contact area have not yet been studied during weight bearing. Objective To examine the effects of 2 taping approaches (Kinesio and McConnell) on PFJ alignment and contact area. Methods Fourteen female subjects with patellofemoral pain and PFJ malalignment participated. Each subject underwent a pretaping magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan session and 2 MRI scan sessions after the application of the 2 taping techniques, which aimed to correct lateral patellar displacement. Subjects were asked to report their pain level prior to each scan session. During MRI assessment, subjects were loaded with 25% of body weight on their involved/more symptomatic leg at 0°, 20°, and 40° of knee flexion. The outcome measures included patellar lateral displacement (bisect-offset [BSO] index), mediolateral patellar tilt angle, patellar height (Insall-Salvati ratio), contact area, and pain. Patellofemoral joint alignment and contact area were compared among the 3 conditions (no tape, Kinesio, and McConnell) at 3 knee angles using a 2-factor, repeated-measures analysis of variance. Pain was compared among the 3 conditions using the Friedman test and post hoc Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results Our data did not reveal any significant effects of either McConnell or Kinesio taping on the BSO index, patellar tilt angle, Insall-Salvati ratio, or contact area across the 3 knee angles, whereas knee angle had a significant effect on the BSO index and contact area. A reduction in pain was observed after the application of the Kinesio taping technique. Conclusion In a weight-bearing condition, this preliminary study did not support the use of PFJ taping as a medial correction technique to alter the PFJ contact area or alignment of the patella. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017

  12. Correlation of asperity contact-time fraction with elastohydrodynamic film thickness in a 20-millimeter-bore ball bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic film thicknesses and asperity contact-time fractions were measured for a 20 mm bore ball bearing by using the capacitance and conductance techniques. The bearing was thrust loaded to 90, 445, and 778 N. The corresponding maximum stresses on the inner race were 1.28, 2.09, and 2.45 GPa. The test speed ranged from 400 to 15,000 rpm. The test bearing was mist lubricated with a MIL-L-23699A turbine oil. The temperature was 27 C. The experimental results were correlated to give the percent film (no-contact-time fraction) as a function of measured film thickness. Measurements were made for three test series that represented the test bearing in various conditions of run-in. The measurements show that the percent film changes with bearing run-in time. The experimental results agreed well with theoretical predictions based on surface trace analysis for a new bearing. For the run-in state, they agreed with previously reported experimental results. The results show that asperity contact existed at a film thickness-roughness ratio lambda of 6.0 or less for a new bearing. After run-in, no asperity contact occurred at a lambda of 3.5 or greater.

  13. Long-term outcome of low contact stress total knee arthroplasty with different mobile bearing designs

    PubMed Central

    SOLARINO, GIUSEPPE; SPINARELLI, ANTONIO; CARROZZO, MASSIMILIANO; PIAZZOLLA, ANDREA; VICENTI, GIOVANNI; MORETTI, BIAGIO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose to evaluate the differences in clinical outcome and survivorship of three different mobile bearings for total knee arthroplasty. Methods a retrospective study was conducted in 60 patients (53 females, 7 males, mean age: 68 years and 5 months) each submitted to total knee replacement using one of the three different mobile bearings of the LCS system (Depuy Johnson & Johnson, Warsaw, IN). The diagnosis was knee osteoarthritis in 57 cases and rheumatoid arthritis in three cases. Three different groups of 20 cases each were identified: total knee arthroplasties with mobile menisci (group 1); total knee arthroplasties with the rotating platform (group 2); and total knee arthroplasties with the anteroposterior glide platform (group 3). As regards the component fixation, 33 implants were cementless, three were cemented, and in 24 only the tibial component was cemented. The patella was not replaced. Results although the duration of follow-up differed between the three groups, the clinical and radiological results at final follow-up showed no revision of femoral and/or tibial components for mechanical or septic reasons, and no signs of impending failure. One meniscal bearing, showing polyethylene wear after 17 years, was successfully replaced. Conclusions the present retrospective study confirmed the long-term effectiveness of knee implants with mobile bearings, in which the congruity of the surfaces makes it possible to overcome the problem of high contact stresses that may result in polyethylene wear and osteolysis; at the same time, these implants eliminate constraint forces thereby reducing the risk of mechanical loosening. Level of evidence Level III, retrospective comparative study. PMID:25606553

  14. Contact mechanics and elastohydrodynamic lubrication in a novel metal-on-metal hip implant with an aspherical bearing surface.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingen; Gao, Leiming; Liu, Feng; Yang, Peiran; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-03-22

    Diameter and diametral clearance of the bearing surfaces of metal-on-metal hip implants and structural supports have been recognised as key factors to reduce the dry contact and hydrodynamic pressures and improve lubrication performance. On the other hand, application of aspherical bearing surfaces can also significantly affect the contact mechanics and lubrication performance by changing the radius of the curvature of a bearing surface and consequently improving the conformity between the head and the cup. In this study, a novel metal-on-metal hip implant employing a specific aspherical bearing surface, Alpharabola, as the acetabular surface was investigated for both contact mechanics and elastohydrodynamic lubrication under steady-state conditions. When compared with conventional spherical bearing surfaces, a more uniform pressure distribution and a thicker lubricant film thickness within the loaded conjunction were predicted for this novel Alpharabola hip implant. The effects of the geometric parameters of this novel acetabular surface on the pressure distribution and lubricant thickness were investigated. A significant increase in the predicted lubricant film thickness and a significant decrease in the dry contact and hydrodynamic pressures were found with appropriate combinations of these geometric parameters, compared with the spherical bearing surface.

  15. Computerized Design and Generation of Low-Noise Gears with Localized Bearing Contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Chen, Ningxin; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Lu, Jian; Handschuh, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    The results of research projects directed at the reduction of noise caused by misalignment of the following gear drives: double-circular arc helical gears, modified involute helical gears, face-milled spiral bevel gears, and face-milled formate cut hypoid gears are presented. Misalignment in these types of gear drives causes periodic, almost linear discontinuous functions of transmission errors. The period of such functions is the cycle of meshing when one pair of teeth is changed for the next. Due to the discontinuity of such functions of transmission errors high vibration and noise are inevitable. A predesigned parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to absorb linear discontinuous functions of transmission errors and change the resulting function of transmission errors into a continuous one is proposed. The proposed idea was successfully tested using spiral bevel gears and the noise was reduced a substantial amount in comparison with the existing design. The idea of a predesigned parabolic function is applied for the reduction of noise of helical and hypoid gears. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been investigated by developed TCA (tooth contact analysis) programs. The bearing contact for the mentioned gears is localized. Conditions that avoid edge contact for the gear drives have been determined. Manufacturing of helical gears with new topology by hobs and grinding worms has been investigated.

  16. Contact sheet recording with a self-acting negative air bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muftu , Sinan (Inventor); Hinteregger, Hans F (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A flat head and a tape transport arrangement impart a wrap angle to the tape at the upstream corner of the head. The wrap angle, corner sharpness and tape stiffness are sufficient to cause a moving tape to form a hollow bump at the upstream corner, thereby creating a hollow into which entrained air can expand, causing a subambient pressure within and downstream of the bump. This pressure keeps the tape in contact with the head. It is created without the need for a groove or complex pressure relief slot(s). No contact pressure arises at the signal exchange site due to media wrap. The highest contact pressures are developed at a wrapped upstream corner. For a tape drive, traveling in both forward and reverse, the wrap can be at both the upstream and downstream (which is the reverse upstream) corners. Heads that are not flat can also be used, if the wrap angle relative to a main surface is sufficient and not too large. The wrapped head can also be used with rotating media, such as disks (floppy and hard) and rotating heads, such as helical wound heads for video recording. Multiple flat tape bearing surfaces can be separated by grooves and/or angles. Each flat can carry heads along one or more gap lines. Multiple adjacent narrow tracks can thus be written for extreme high track density recording.

  17. Self-adjusting unique nanoscale contact resistance of a single alumina grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Manjima; Dey, Arjun; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop Kumar

    2016-04-01

    This work evaluates the nanohardness of a single alumina grain for a coarse grain alumina ceramic of ∼10 μm grain size. The results reveal that the nanoscale contact deformation resistance of the single grain has a unique self-adjusting characteristic. It increases in response to enhancement in the externally applied load. The nanoscale contact deformation resistance of a single alumina grain is determined by controlled nano-indentation experiments. The corresponding load versus depth plots are carefully analysed to identify the critical load at which the very first burst of incipient nanoscale plasticity is initiated. To avoid any spurious effect from neighbouring grain boundaries the nano-indentations experiments are deliberately carried out with only single grains. A range of ultra low loads that span from 1000 to 12 000 μN is used for this purpose. Both partial unload and load controlled nano-indentation experiments are performed with a Berkovich indenter on single alumina grains. The indenter has a tip radius of 150 nm. The results show for the very first time that a mild indentation size effect exists even in single grain hardness at nanoscale. In addition the intrinsic nanoscale contact deformation resistance increases as the externally applied load is enhanced. The way it increases follows an empirical power law. These results are analysed in terms of the dislocation loop radius, critical resolved shear stress and the maximum shear stress that is generated just underneath the indenter.

  18. Nucleation and growth of rolling contact failure of 440C bearing steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, V.; Bastias, P. C.; Hahn, G. T.; Rubin, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    A 'two-body' elasto-plastic finite element model of 2-dimensional rolling and rolling-plus-sliding was developed to treat the effect of surface irregularities. The model consists of a smooth cylinder in contact with a semi-infinite half-space that is either smooth or fitted with one of 0.4 microns deep or 7 microns deep groove, or a 0.4 microns high ridge-like asperity. The model incorporates elastic-linear-kinematic hardening-plastic (ELKP) and non-linear-kinematic hardening-plastic (NLKP) material constitutive relations appropriate for hardened bearing steel and the 440C grade. The calculated contact pressure distribution is Hertzian for smooth body contact, and it displays intense, stationary, pressure spikes superposed on the Hertzian pressure for contact with the grooved and ridged surface. The results obtained for the 0.4 microns deep groove compare well with those reported by Elsharkawy and Hamrock for an EHD lubricated contact. The effect of translating the counterface on the half space as opposed to indenting the half space with the counter face with no translation is studied. The stress and strain values near the surface are found to be similar for the two cases, whereas they are significantly different in the subsurface. It is seen that when tiny shoulders are introduced at the edge of the groove in the finite element model, the incremental plasticity and residual stresses are significantly higher in the vicinity of the right shoulder (rolling direction is from left to right) than at the left shoulder. This may explain the experimental observation that the spall nucleation occurs at the exit end of the artificially planted indents. Pure rolling calculations are compared with rolling + sliding calculations. For a coefficient of friction, mu = 0.1, the effect of friction is found to be small. Efforts were made to identify the material constitutive relations which best describe the deformation characteristics of the bearing steels in the initial few cycles

  19. Computerized Design and Generation of Gear Drives With a Localized Bearing Contact and a Low Level of Transmission Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F.; Chen, J.; Seol, I.; Kim, D.; Lu, J.; Zhao, X.; Handschuh, R.

    1996-01-01

    A general approach developed for the computerized simulation of loaded gear drives is presented. In this paper the methodology used to localize the bearing contact, provide a parabolic function of transmission errors, and simulate meshing and contact of unloaded gear drives is developed. The approach developed is applied to spur and helical gears, spiral bevel gears, face-gear drives, and worm-gear drives with cylindrical worms.

  20. An evaluation and adjustment method for natural proximal contacts of crowns using diamond dental strips: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel S; Rothchild, John A; Suh, Kyu-Won

    2013-08-01

    The best way to adjust proximal contacts of newly fabricated indirect restorations has been a long-standing unresolved issue in dentistry. Excessively tight contacts cause incomplete seating of indirect restorations and intrusion of adjacent teeth, which leads to patient discomfort, hypersensitivity, and recurrent dental caries at the crown margins. When seating indirect restorations, interproximal relief should be restored as it exists in natural dentition. This article presents an innovative method of crown seating using diamond strips. This simple, consistent, method makes it easier for clinicians to provide comfortable and long-lasting restorations with minimal time and effort. Laboratory technicians utilize diamond strips to provide properly fitting indirect restorations that require minimal adjustment upon clinical delivery. Diamond strips also allow for accurate determination of heavier proximal contacts, allowing dentists to adjust the proximal contact properly in the patients' mouths. Clinically, restoring natural proximal contacts is a critical factor to the success of indirect restorations. Using this method standardizes proper proximal contact adjustments of laboratory-fabricated indirect restorations between dental labs and dental offices. The method also helps to limit or eliminate the lingering proximal contact issue between clinicians and laboratory technicians.

  1. Comparison of predicted and experimental thermal performance of angular-contact ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Predicted bearing heat generation and bearing temperature were verified by experimental data for ball bearings over a range of sizes, shaft speeds, and lubricant flow rates. The computer program Shaberth requires, as input, a factor which describes the air-oil mixture in the bearing cavity for calculation of the ball drag contribution to bearing heat generation. An equation for this lubricant percent volume in the bearing cavity was derived and appears to be valid over the range of test conditions including bearing bore sizes from 35 to 167 mm and shaft speeds from 1.0 to 3.0 million DN.

  2. Modelling the rate of change in a longitudinal study with missing data, adjusting for contact attempts.

    PubMed

    Akacha, Mouna; Hutton, Jane L

    2011-05-10

    The Collaborative Ankle Support Trial (CAST) is a longitudinal trial of treatments for severe ankle sprains in which interest lies in the rate of improvement, the effectiveness of reminders and potentially informative missingness. A model is proposed for continuous longitudinal data with non-ignorable or informative missingness, taking into account the nature of attempts made to contact initial non-responders. The model combines a non-linear mixed model for the outcome model with logistic regression models for the reminder processes. A sensitivity analysis is used to contrast this model with the traditional selection model, where we adjust for missingness by modelling the missingness process. The conclusions that recovery is slower, and less satisfactory with age and more rapid with below knee cast than with a tubular bandage do not alter materially across all models investigated. The results also suggest that phone calls are most effective in retrieving questionnaires.

  3. Microstructural and Material Quality Effects on Rolling Contact Fatigue of Highly Elastic Intermetallic NiTi Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Howard, S. Adam; Thomas, Fransua; Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling element bearings made from highly-elastic intermetallic materials (HIM)s, such as 60NiTi, are under development for applications that require superior corrosion and shock resistance. Compared to steel, intermetallics have been shown to have much lower rolling contact fatigue (RCF) stress capability in simplified 3-ball on rod (ASTM STP 771) fatigue tests. In the 3-ball tests, poor material quality and microstructural flaws negatively affect fatigue life but such relationships have not been established for full-scale 60NiTi bearings. In this paper, 3-ball-on-rod fatigue behavior of two quality grades of 60NiTi are compared to the fatigue life of full-scale 50mm bore ball bearings made from the same materials. 60NiTi RCF rods with material or microstructural flaws suffered from infant mortality failures at all tested stress levels while high quality 60NiTi rods exhibited no failures at lower stress levels. Similarly, tests of full-scale bearings made from flawed materials exhibited early surface fatigue and through crack type failures while bearings made from high quality material did not fail even in long-term tests. Though the full-scale bearing test data is yet preliminary, the results suggest that the simplified RCF test is a good qualitative predictor of bearing performance. These results provide guidance for materials development and to establish minimum quality levels required for successful bearing operation and life.

  4. How to apply life adjustment factors for ball and roller bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crecelius, W. J.; Harris, T. A.; Moyer, C. A.; Parker, R. J.; Sherlock, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    Practical problems applicable to the selection, design, and lubrication of rolling-element bearings are presented and discussed. Design and selection criteria are based upon materials and processing factors such as melting practice, metalworking, and heat treatment. Environmental factors are considered such as bearing misalignment and speed. Selection of a lubricant is based upon elastohydrodynamic lubrication principles in addition to lubricant type and chemistry.

  5. Computer-aided design analysis of 57-mm, angular-contact, cryogenic turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Coe, Harold H.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine high-pressure oxygen turbopumps have not experienced the sevice life required of them. This insufficiency has been due in part to the shortened life of the bearings. To improve the life of the existing turbopump bearings, an effort is under way to investigate bearing modifications that could be retrofitted into the present bearing cavity. Several bearing parameters were optimized using the computer program SHABERTH, which performs a thermomechanical simulation of a load support system. The computer analysis showed that improved bearing performance is feasible if low friction coefficients can be attained. Bearing geometries were optimized considering heat generation, equilibrium temperatures, and relative life. Thermal gradients through the bearings were found to be lower with liquid lubrication than with solid film lubrication, and a liquid oxygen coolant flowrate of approximately 4.0 kg/s was found to be optimal. This paper describes the analytical modeling used to determine these feasible modifications to improve bearing performance.

  6. Effect of speed and press fit on fatigue life of roller-bearing inner-race contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the effects of inner ring speed and press fit on the rolling element fatigue life of a roller bearing inner race contact. The effects of the resultant hoop and radial stresses on the principal stresses were considered. The maximum shear stresses below the Hertzian contact were determined for different conditions of inner ring speed, load, and geometry and were applied to a conventional ring life analysis. The race contact fatigue life was reduced by more than 90 percent for some conditions when speed and press fit were considered. The depth of the maximum shear stress remained virtually unchanged.

  7. Computer program for analysis of high speed, single row, angular contact, spherical roller bearing, SASHBEAN. Volume 1: User's guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1993-09-01

    The computer program SASHBEAN (Sikorsky Aircraft Spherical Roller High Speed Bearing Analysis) analyzes and predicts the operating characteristics of a Single Row, Angular Contact, Spherical Roller Bearing (SRACSRB). The program runs on an IBM or IBM compatible personal computer, and for a given set of input data analyzes the bearing design for it's ring deflections (axial and radial), roller deflections, contact areas and stresses, induced axial thrust, rolling element and cage rotation speeds, lubrication parameters, fatigue lives, and amount of heat generated in the bearing. The dynamic loading of rollers due to centrifugal forces and gyroscopic moments, which becomes quite significant at high speeds, is fully considered in this analysis. For a known application and it's parameters, the program is also capable of performing steady-state and time-transient thermal analyses of the bearing system. The steady-state analysis capability allows the user to estimate the expected steady-state temperature map in and around the bearing under normal operating conditions. On the other hand, the transient analysis feature provides the user a means to simulate the 'lost lubricant' condition and predict a time-temperature history of various critical points in the system. The bearing's 'time-to-failure' estimate may also be made from this (transient) analysis by considering the bearing as failed when a certain temperature limit is reached in the bearing components. The program is fully interactive and allows the user to get started and access most of its features with a minimal of training. For the most part, the program is menu driven, and adequate help messages were provided to guide a new user through various menu options and data input screens. All input data, both for mechanical and thermal analyses, are read through graphical input screens, thereby eliminating any need of a separate text editor/word processor to edit/create data files. Provision is also available to select

  8. Computer program for analysis of high speed, single row, angular contact, spherical roller bearing, SASHBEAN. Volume 1: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1993-01-01

    The computer program SASHBEAN (Sikorsky Aircraft Spherical Roller High Speed Bearing Analysis) analyzes and predicts the operating characteristics of a Single Row, Angular Contact, Spherical Roller Bearing (SRACSRB). The program runs on an IBM or IBM compatible personal computer, and for a given set of input data analyzes the bearing design for it's ring deflections (axial and radial), roller deflections, contact areas and stresses, induced axial thrust, rolling element and cage rotation speeds, lubrication parameters, fatigue lives, and amount of heat generated in the bearing. The dynamic loading of rollers due to centrifugal forces and gyroscopic moments, which becomes quite significant at high speeds, is fully considered in this analysis. For a known application and it's parameters, the program is also capable of performing steady-state and time-transient thermal analyses of the bearing system. The steady-state analysis capability allows the user to estimate the expected steady-state temperature map in and around the bearing under normal operating conditions. On the other hand, the transient analysis feature provides the user a means to simulate the 'lost lubricant' condition and predict a time-temperature history of various critical points in the system. The bearing's 'time-to-failure' estimate may also be made from this (transient) analysis by considering the bearing as failed when a certain temperature limit is reached in the bearing components. The program is fully interactive and allows the user to get started and access most of its features with a minimal of training. For the most part, the program is menu driven, and adequate help messages were provided to guide a new user through various menu options and data input screens. All input data, both for mechanical and thermal analyses, are read through graphical input screens, thereby eliminating any need of a separate text editor/word processor to edit/create data files. Provision is also available to select

  9. Wear mechanisms found in angular contact ball bearings of the SSME's LOX turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive experimental investigations were carried out on used flight bearings of the Phase 2 high-pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) in order to determine the wear mechanisms, dominant wear modes, and their extent and causes. The report shows methodology, surface analysis techniques used, result, and discussion. The mode largely responsible for heavy bearing wear in LOX was identified as adhesive/shear peeling of the upper layers of bearing balls and rings. The mode relies on the mechanisms of scale formation, breakdown, and removal, all of which are greatly enhanced by the heavy oxidation environment of the HPOTP. Major causes of the high wear in bearings appear to be lubrication and cooling, both inadequate for the imposed conditions of operation. Numerous illustrations and evidence are given.

  10. Self-lubricating plasma-sprayed composites for sliding contact bearings to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed composites which have good oxidation-resistance and self-lubricating characteristics to 900 C were developed. The composites are a Nichrome matrix containing dispersed glass for oxidation protection and calcium fluoride for lubrication. They are applied to bearing surfaces in layers about 0.050 cm thick by plasma-spraying; the layers are then machined to a thickness of 0.025 cm. Oscillating bearing tests were performed in air to 900 C at unit radial loads up to 3.5 times 10 to the 7th power Newtons per square meter (5000 psi) and a thrust load of 1960 Newtons (440 lb). Bearings with a composite liner in the bore were in good condition after over 50,000 oscillating cycles accumulated during repeated bearing temperature cycles between 25 and 900 C.

  11. Roller to separator contact forces and cage to shaft speed ratios in roller bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Cage to roller force measurements, cage to shaft speed ratios are reported for 115- and 118-mm bore roller bearings operating at speeds of 4000, 8000, and 12,000 rpm under loads ranging from 360 to 6670 N (80 to 1500 lb).

  12. Determination of time-varying contact length, friction force, torque and forces at the bearings in a helical gear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Chinmaya; Mohanty, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with determining various time-varying parameters that are instrumental in introducing noise and vibration in a helical gear system. The most important parameter is the contact line variation, which subsequently induces friction force variation, frictional torque variation and variation in the forces at the bearings. The contact line variation will also give rise to gear mesh stiffness and damping variations. All these parameters are simulated for a defect-free and two defective cases of a helical gear system. The defective cases include one tooth missing and two teeth missing in the helical gear. The algorithm formulated in this paper is found to be simple and effective in determining the time-varying parameters.

  13. Bearing material. [composite material with low friction surface for rolling or sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A composite material is described which will provide low friction surfaces for materials in rolling or sliding contact and is self-lubricating and oxidation resistant up to and in excess of about 930 C. The composite is comprised of a metal component which lends strength and elasticity to the structure, a fluoride salt component which provides lubrication and, lastly, a glass component which not only provides oxidation protection to the metal but may also enhance the lubrication qualities of the composite.

  14. Comparison Between Oil-mist and Oil-jet Lubrication of High-speed, Small-bore, Angular-contact Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinel, Stanley I.; Signer, Hans R.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2001-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted with an optimized 35-mm-bore-angular-contact ball bearing on a high-speed, high-temperature bearing tester. Results from both air-oil mist lubrication and oil-jet lubrication systems used to lubricate the bearing were compared to speeds of 2.5 x 10(exp 6) DN. The maximum obtainable speed with air-oil mist lubrication is 2.5 x 10(exp 6) DN. Lower bearing temperatures and higher power losses are obtained with oil-jet lubrication than with air-oil mist lubrication. Bearing power loss is a direct function of oil flow to the bearing and independent of oil delivery system. For a given oil-flow rate, bearing temperature and power loss increase with increases in speed. Bearing life is an inverse function of temperature, the difference in temperature between the individual bearing ring components, and the resultant elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thicknesses. Bearing life is independent of the oil delivery system except as it affects temperature. Cage slip increased with increases in speed. Cage slip as high as 7 percent was measured and was generally higher with air-oil mist lubrication than with oil-jet lubrication.

  15. Comparison Between Oil-Mist and Oil-Jet Lubrication of High-Speed, Small-Bore, Angular-Contact Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinel, Stanley I.; Signer, Hans R.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2001-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted with an optimized 35-mm-bore-angular-contact ball bearing on a high-speed, high-temperature bearing tester. Results from both air-oil mist lubrication and oil-jet lubrication systems used to lubricate the bearing were compared to speeds of 2.5x10(exp 6) DN. The maximum obtainable speed with air-oil mist lubrication is 2.5x10(exp 6) DN. Lower bearing temperatures and higher power losses are obtained with oil-jet lubrication than with air-oil mist lubrication. Bearing power loss is a direct function of oil flow to the bearing and independent of oil delivery system. For a given oil-flow rate, bearing temperature and power loss increase with increases in speed. Bearing life is an inverse function of temperature, the difference in temperature between the individual bearing ring components, and the resultant elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thicknesses. Bearing life is independent of the oil delivery system except as it affects temperature. Cage slip increased with increases in speed. Cage slip as high as 7% was measured and was generally higher with air-oil mist lubrication than with oil-jet lubrication.

  16. The analysis of the influence of the material antifrictional layer frictional properties on the parameters of the spherical bearing contact zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenskikh, A. A.; Trufanov, N. A.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents data on the influence of the frictional properties of a material antifrictional layer on the parameters of the spherical bearing contact zone. The dependences of the friction coefficient from the load were obtained as a result of the study. Series of numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the frictional properties of a materials contact pair in the work. Regularities of the relative contact pressure and relative contact tangential stress were obtained for seven variants of the load-friction coefficient for the spherical bearing with a layer of modified fluoroplastic. The study puts emphasis on the fact that that adhesion area of the contact surface is reduced and the load is increased taking into account the fact that the friction properties of the layer has been fixed in the study.

  17. Experimental Methodology for Determining Turbomachinery Blade Damping Using Magnetic Bearing Excitation and Non-Contacting Optical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenza, Andrew J.; Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2010-01-01

    Experiments to determine the effects of turbomachinery fan blade damping concepts such as passively shunted piezoelectric materials on blade response are ongoing at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A vertical rotor is suspended and excited with active magnetic bearings (AMBs) usually in a vacuum chamber to eliminate aerodynamic forces. Electromagnetic rotor excitation is superimposed onto rotor PD-controlled support and can be fixed to either a stationary or rotating frame of reference. The rotor speed is controlled with an air turbine system. Blade vibrations are measured using optical probes as part of a Non-Contacting Stress Measurement System (NSMS). Damping is calculated from these measurements. It can be difficult to get accurate damping measurements using this experimental setup and some of the details of how to obtain quality results are seemingly nontrivial. The intent of this paper is to present those details.

  18. Dynamically adjustable foot-ground contact model to estimate ground reaction force during walking and running.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yihwan; Jung, Moonki; Ryu, Jiseon; Yoon, Sukhoon; Park, Sang-Kyoon; Koo, Seungbum

    2016-03-01

    Human dynamic models have been used to estimate joint kinetics during various activities. Kinetics estimation is in demand in sports and clinical applications where data on external forces, such as the ground reaction force (GRF), are not available. The purpose of this study was to estimate the GRF during gait by utilizing distance- and velocity-dependent force models between the foot and ground in an inverse-dynamics-based optimization. Ten males were tested as they walked at four different speeds on a force plate-embedded treadmill system. The full-GRF model whose foot-ground reaction elements were dynamically adjusted according to vertical displacement and anterior-posterior speed between the foot and ground was implemented in a full-body skeletal model. The model estimated the vertical and shear forces of the GRF from body kinematics. The shear-GRF model with dynamically adjustable shear reaction elements according to the input vertical force was also implemented in the foot of a full-body skeletal model. Shear forces of the GRF were estimated from body kinematics, vertical GRF, and center of pressure. The estimated full GRF had the lowest root mean square (RMS) errors at the slow walking speed (1.0m/s) with 4.2, 1.3, and 5.7% BW for anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, and vertical forces, respectively. The estimated shear forces were not significantly different between the full-GRF and shear-GRF models, but the RMS errors of the estimated knee joint kinetics were significantly lower for the shear-GRF model. Providing COP and vertical GRF with sensors, such as an insole-type pressure mat, can help estimate shear forces of the GRF and increase accuracy for estimation of joint kinetics.

  19. Dynamics and stability of rigid rotors levitated by passive cylinder-magnet bearings and driven/supported axially by pointwise contact clutch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Søren B.; Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2013-12-01

    A stable rotor—supported laterally by passive magnetic bearings and longitudinally by magnetic forces and a clutch—loses suddenly its contact to the clutch and executes abruptly longitudinal movements away from its original equilibrium position as a result of small increases in angular velocity. Such an abrupt unstable behaviour and its reasons are thoroughly theoretically as well as experimentally investigated in this work. In this context, this paper gives theoretical as well as experimental contributions to the problem of two dimensional passive magnetic levitation and one dimensional pointwise contact stability dictated by mechanical-magnetic interaction. Load capacity and stiffness of passive multicylinder magnetic bearings (MCMB) are thoroughly investigated using two theoretical approaches followed by experimental validation. The contact dynamics between the clutch and the rotor supported by MCMB using several configurations of magnet distribution are described based on an accurate nonlinear model able to reliably reproduce the rotor-bearing dynamic behaviour. Such investigations lead to: (a) clear physical explanation about the reasons for the rotor's unstable behaviour, losing its contact to the clutch and (b) an accurate prediction of the threshold of stability based on the nonlinear rotor-bearing model, i.e. maximum angular velocity before the rotor misses its contact to the clutch as a function of rotor, bearing and clutch design parameters. passive cylinder-magnet bearings, imbalance ring with a screw, passive rotating cylinder-magnets, rotor, Pointwise contact clutch, and DC-motor. The rotor (4) is levitated in the two horseshoe-shaped bearing houses (1) which contain several cylinder-magnets arranged in a circular pattern. These permanent magnets form a magnetic field around the rotor which repels similar cylinder-magnets (3) embedded in the rotor, thereby counteracting the gravity forces. As the shape of the magnetic field generated by the

  20. Single-Molecule Conductance Studies of Organometallic Complexes Bearing 3-Thienyl Contacting Groups.

    PubMed

    Bock, Sören; Al-Owaedi, Oday A; Eaves, Samantha G; Milan, David C; Lemmer, Mario; Skelton, Brian W; Osorio, Henrry M; Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J; Cea, Pilar; Long, Nicholas J; Albrecht, Tim; Martín, Santiago; Lambert, Colin J; Low, Paul J

    2017-02-10

    The compounds and complexes 1,4-C6 H4 (C≡C-cyclo-3-C4 H3 S)2 (2), trans-[Pt(C≡C-cyclo-3-C4 H3 S)2 (PEt3 )2 ] (3), trans-[Ru(C≡C-cyclo-3-C4 H3 S)2 (dppe)2 ] (4; dppe=1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane) and trans-[Ru(C≡C-cyclo-3-C4 H3 S)2 {P(OEt)3 }4 ] (5) featuring the 3-thienyl moiety as a surface contacting group for gold electrodes have been prepared, crystallographically characterised in the case of 3-5 and studied in metal|molecule|metal junctions by using both scanning tunnelling microscope break-junction (STM-BJ) and STM-I(s) methods (measuring the tunnelling current (I) as a function of distance (s)). The compounds exhibit similar conductance profiles, with a low conductance feature being more readily identified by STM-I(s) methods, and a higher feature by the STM-BJ method. The lower conductance feature was further characterised by analysis using an unsupervised, automated multi-parameter vector classification (MPVC) of the conductance traces. The combination of similarly structured HOMOs and non-resonant tunnelling mechanism accounts for the remarkably similar conductance values across the chemically distinct members of the family 2-5.

  1. Computer program for analysis of high speed, single row, angular contact, spherical roller bearing, SASHBEAN. Volume 2: Mathematical formulation and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1993-01-01

    Spherical roller bearings have typically been used in applications with speeds limited to about 5000 rpm and loads limited for operation at less than about 0.25 million DN. However, spherical roller bearings are now being designed for high load and high speed applications including aerospace applications. A computer program, SASHBEAN, was developed to provide an analytical tool to design, analyze, and predict the performance of high speed, single row, angular contact (including zero contact angle), spherical roller bearings. The material presented is the mathematical formulation and analytical methods used to develop computer program SASHBEAN. For a given set of operating conditions, the program calculates the bearings ring deflections (axial and radial), roller deflections, contact areas stresses, depth and magnitude of maximum shear stresses, axial thrust, rolling element and cage rotational speeds, lubrication parameters, fatigue lives, and rates of heat generation. Centrifugal forces and gyroscopic moments are fully considered. The program is also capable of performing steady-state and time-transient thermal analyses of the bearing system.

  2. Gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission.

  3. Radiolucent lines in low-contact-stress mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty: a blinded and matched case control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low-contact-stress (LCS) mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ; previously: DePuy, Warsawa, USA) provides excellent functional results and wear rates in long-term follow-up analyses. Radiological analysis shows radiolucent lines (RLL) appearing immediately or two years after primary implantation, indicative of poor seat. Investigations proved RLL to be more frequent in uncemented TKA, resulting in a consensus to cement the tibial plateau, but their association with clinical findings and patients discomfort and knee pain is still unknown. Methods 553 patients with 566 low-contact-stress (LCS) total knee prostheses were screened for continuous moderate knee pain. We compared tibial stress shielding classified by Ewald in patients suffering from pain with a matched, pain-free control group on blinded X-rays. We hypothesized a positive correlation between pain and radiolucency and higher frequency of such radiolucent lines in the most medial and most lateral zones of the tibial plateau. Results Twenty-eight patients suffered from knee pain in total. Radiolucencies were detected in 27 of these cases and in six out of 28 matched controls without knee pain. We could demonstrate a significant correlation of knee pain and radiolucencies, which appeared significantly more frequently in the outermost zones of the tibial plateau. Conclusion Our findings suggest that radiolucent lines, representing poor implant seat, about the tibial plateau are associated with knee pain in LCS patients. Radiolucencies are observed more often in noncemented LCS, and cementing the tibial plateau might improve implant seat and reduce both radiolucent lines and associated knee pain. PMID:21714916

  4. Investigation of Wear and Friction Properties Under Sliding Conditions of Some Materials Suitable for Cages of Rolling-Contact Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Bisson, Edmond E

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of wear and friction properties of a number of materials sliding against SAE 52100 steel was conducted. These materials included brass, bronze, beryllium copper, monel, nichrome v, 24s-t aluminum, nodular iron, and gray cast iron. The metals investigated may be useful as possible cage (separator or retainer) materials for rolling-contact bearings of high-speed turbine engines. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding is a most important factor in both dry friction and boundary lubrication. On the basis of wear and resistance to welding only, the cast irons were the most promising materials investigated; they showed the least wear and the least tendency to surface failure when run dry, and when boundary lubricated they showed the highest load capacity. On the basis of mechanical properties, nodular iron is superior to gray cast iron. Bronze had the lowest friction coefficient under dry sliding conditions. The results with brass, beryllium copper, and aluminum were poor and these materials do not appear, with regard to friction and wear, to be suitable for cages.

  5. THRUST BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Heller, P.R.

    1958-09-16

    A thrust bearing suitable for use with a rotor or blower that is to rotate about a vertical axis is descrihed. A centrifagal jack is provided so thnt the device may opernte on one hearing at starting and lower speeds, and transfer the load to another bearing at higher speeds. A low viscosity fluid is used to lubricate the higher speed operation bearing, in connection with broad hearing -surfaces, the ability to withstand great loads, and a relatively high friction loss, as contraated to the lower speed operatio;n bearing which will withstand only light thrust loads but is sufficiently frictionfree to avoid bearing seizure during slow speed or startup operation. An axially aligned shaft pin provides the bearing surface for low rotational speeds, but at higher speed, weights operating against spring tension withdraw nthe shaft pin into the bearing proper and the rotor shaft comes in contact with the large bearing surfaces.

  6. Tooling Converts Stock Bearings To Custom Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleenor, E. N., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Technique for reworking stock bearings saves time and produces helicopter-rotor bearings ground more precisely. Split tapered ring at one end of threaded bolt expands to hold inside of inner race bearing assembly; nut, at other end of bolt, adjusts amount of spring tension. Piece of hardware grasps bearing firmly without interfering with grinding operation. Operation produces bearing of higher quality than commercially available bearings.

  7. Enhancement of the Excitation Efficiency of the Non-Contact Magnetostrictive Sensor for Pipe Inspection by Adjusting the Alternating Magnetic Field Axial Length

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Pengfei; Wu, Xinjun; Xu, Jiang; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    The non-contact magnetostrictive sensor (MsS) has been widely used in the guided wave testing of pipes, cables, and so on. However, it has a disadvantage of low excitation efficiency. A new method for enhancing the excitation efficiency of the non-contact MsS for pipe inspection using guided waves, by adjusting the axial length of the excitation magnetic field, is proposed. A special transmitter structure, in which two copper rings are added beside the transmitter coil, is used to adjust the axial length at the expense of weakening the excitation magnetic field. An equivalent vibration model is presented to analyze the influence of the axial length variation. The final result is investigated by experiments. Results show that the excitation efficiency of the non-contact MsS is enhanced in the whole inspection frequency range of the L(0,2) mode if the axial length is adjusted to a certain value. Moreover that certain axial length is the same for pipes of different sizes but made of the same material. PMID:24441769

  8. Wear modes active in angular contact ball bearings operating in liquid oxygen environment of the Space Shuttle turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Thaddeus J.

    1993-01-01

    Extensive experimental investigation has been carried out on used flight bearings of the high pressure oxidizer turbopumps (HPOTP) of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) in order to determine the dominant wear modes, their extent, and causes. The paper presents the methodology, various surface analysis techniques used, results, and discussion. The mode largely responsible for premature bearing wear has been identified as adhesive/shear peeling of the upper layers of bearing balls and rings. This mode relies upon the mechanisms of scale formation, breakdown, and removal, all of which are greatly enhanced by the heavy oxidation environment of the HPOTP. Major causes of the high wear rates appear to be lubrication and cooling, both inadequate for the imposed conditions of operation. Numerous illustrations and evidence are provided.

  9. Quantifying oil filtration effects on bearing life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needelman, William M.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1991-01-01

    Rolling-element bearing life is influenced by the number, size, and material properties of particles entering the Hertzian contact of the rolling element and raceway. In general, rolling-element bearing life increases with increasing level of oil filtration. Based upon test results, two equations are presented which allow for the adjustment of bearing L(sub 10) or catalog life based upon oil filter rating. It is recommended that where no oil filtration is used catalog life be reduced by 50 percent.

  10. Success Factors for International Postgraduate Students' Adjustment: Exploring the Roles of Intercultural Competence, Language Proficiency, Social Contact and Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Tony J.; Sercombe, Peter G.; Sachdev, Itesh; Naeb, Rola; Schartner, Alina

    2013-01-01

    The growth in the number of 'international' students in higher education is a phenomenon of increasing importance to educators, researchers and policymakers worldwide. This multi-methodological study explored factors associated with their adjustment, successful or otherwise. It integrated associations across three domains of enquiry which had…

  11. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  12. The effects of visitation on incarcerated juvenile offenders: how contact with the outside impacts adjustment on the inside.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Kathryn C; Goldweber, Asha; Cauffman, Elizabeth

    2011-04-01

    The present study investigates how visitation from parents impacts youths' mental health in the first two months of incarceration in a secure juvenile facility. A diverse sample of 276 male, newly incarcerated serious adolescent offenders (14-17 years) was interviewed over a 60-day period. Results indicate that youth who receive visits from parents report more rapid declines in depressive symptoms over time compared to youth who do not receive parental visits. Moreover, these effects are cumulative, such that the greater number of visits from parents, the greater the decrease in depressive symptoms. Importantly, the protective effect of receiving parental visits during incarceration exists regardless of the quality of the parent-adolescent relationship. Policy changes that facilitate visitation may be key for easing adjustment during the initial period of incarceration.

  13. Mechanical spin bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spin bearing assembly including, a pair of mutually opposing complementary bearing support members having mutually spaced apart bearing support surfaces which may be, for example, bearing races and a set of spin bearings located therebetween. Each spin bearing includes a pair of end faces, a central rotational axis passing through the end faces, a waist region substantially mid-way between the end faces and having a first thickness dimension, and discrete side surface regions located between the waist region and the end faces and having a second thickness dimension different from the first thickness dimension of the waist region and wherein the side surface regions further have respective curvilinear contact surfaces adapted to provide a plurality of bearing contact points on the bearing support members.

  14. Foil bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  15. Foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-11-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  16. Computer Program for Analysis of High Speed, Single Row, Angular Contact, Spherical Roller Bearing, SASHBEAN. Volume 1. User’s Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    actual fatigue test data for bearings manufactured from "Through Hard- ened" SAE 52100 steel. As per Palmgren [10], for conmmonly used bearing steels...and Palmgren , A., "Dynamic Capacity of Rolling Bearings ", ACTA POLYTECHNICA, Mech. Eng. Ser. 1, No. 3, Vol. 7, 1947. 8. Lundberg, G., and Palmgren , A...Mobil Technical Publications, 1981. 10. Palmgren , A. "Ball and Roller Bearing Engineering", Second Edition, Translated by Palmgren , G., and Ruley, B

  17. Ball Bearing Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Load-deflection relationships for different types of elliptical contacts such as those found in a ball bearing are developed. Simplified expressions that allow quick calculations of deformation to be made simply from a knowledge of the applied load, the material properties, and the geometry of the contacting elements are presented. Ball bearings subjected to radial, thrust and combined ball loads are analyzed. A design criterion for fatigue life of ball bearings is developed. The section of a satisfactory lubricant, as well as describing systems that provide a constant flow of lubricant to the contact, is considered.

  18. Roller bearing geometry design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Pinkston, B. H. W.

    1976-01-01

    A theory of kinematic stabilization of rolling cylinders is extended and applied to the design of cylindrical roller bearings. The kinematic stabilization mechanism puts a reverse skew into the rolling elements by changing the roller taper. Twelve basic bearing modification designs are identified amd modeled. Four have single transverse convex curvature in their rollers while eight have rollers which have compound transverse curvature made up of a central cylindrical band surrounded by symmetric bands with slope and transverse curvature. The bearing designs are modeled for restoring torque per unit axial displacement, contact stress capacity, and contact area including dynamic loading, misalignment sensitivity and roller proportion. Design programs are available which size the single transverse curvature roller designs for a series of roller slopes and load separations and which design the compound roller bearings for a series of slopes and transverse radii of curvature. The compound rollers are proportioned to have equal contact stresses and minimum size. Design examples are also given.

  19. Fault Tolerant Homopolar Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Ming-Hsiu; Palazzolo, Alan; Kenny, Andrew; Provenza, Andrew; Beach, Raymond; Kascak, Albert

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic suspensions (MS) satisfy the long life and low loss conditions demanded by satellite and ISS based flywheels used for Energy Storage and Attitude Control (ACESE) service. This paper summarizes the development of a novel MS that improves reliability via fault tolerant operation. Specifically, flux coupling between poles of a homopolar magnetic bearing is shown to deliver desired forces even after termination of coil currents to a subset of failed poles . Linear, coordinate decoupled force-voltage relations are also maintained before and after failure by bias linearization. Current distribution matrices (CDM) which adjust the currents and fluxes following a pole set failure are determined for many faulted pole combinations. The CDM s and the system responses are obtained utilizing 1D magnetic circuit models with fringe and leakage factors derived from detailed, 3D, finite element field models. Reliability results are presented vs. detection/correction delay time and individual power amplifier reliability for 4, 6, and 7 pole configurations. Reliability is shown for two success criteria, i.e. (a) no catcher bearing contact following pole failures and (b) re-levitation off of the catcher bearings following pole failures. An advantage of the method presented over other redundant operation approaches is a significantly reduced requirement for backup hardware such as additional actuators or power amplifiers.

  20. Study of rolling element dynamic interactions with separators and raceway paths: Roller to separator contact forces and cage to shaft speed ratios in roller bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Cage to roller force measurements, cage to shaft forces, and cage to shaft speed ratios are reported for 115 and 118mm bore roller bearings operating at speeds of 4,000, 8,000, and 12,000 rpm under loads ranging from 360 to 6670 N (80 to 1500 lb).

  1. Precision adjustable stage

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Silva, Leonard L.

    1988-01-01

    An improved mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A stage center block is mounted on each of two opposite sides by a pair of spaced ball bearing tracks which provide stability as well as simplicity. The use of the spaced ball bearing pairs in conjunction with an adjustment screw which also provides support eliminates extraneous stabilization components and permits maximization of the area of the center block laser transmission hole.

  2. Lubrication Of Nonconformal Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses advances in knowledge of lubrication of nonconformal contacts in bearings and other machine elements. Reviews previous developments in theory of lubrication, presents advances in theory of lubrication to determine minimum film thickness, and describes experiments designed to investigate one of regimes of lubrication for ball bearings.

  3. Computer Program for Analysis of High Speed, Single Row, Angular Contact, Spherical Roller Bearing, SASHBEAN. Volume 2: Mathematical Formulation and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    conformity of roller and raceway spherical crowns, while lending the bearing its self- aligning and high load capacity, also results in relative sliding...thus in the negative direction. A positive axial load, acting along the X-axis is also shown in Figure 1. Due to the self- aligning ability of a...Hadden, G.B., Kleckner, R.J., Ragen, M.A., and Sheynin, L., "Research’ Report and User’s Manual for Computer Program SHABERTH", SKF Report No. AT8YO0003

  4. Bearing Fault Detection in Induction Motor-Gearbox Drivetrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, Jaroslav; Ebbesen, Morten K.; Robbersmyr, Kjell G.

    2012-05-01

    The main contribution in the hereby presented paper is to investigate the fault detection capability of a motor current signature analysis by expanding its scope to include the gearbox, and not only the induction motor. Detecting bearing faults outside the induction motor through the stator current analysis represents an interesting alternative to traditional vibration analysis. Bearing faults cause changes in the stator current spectrum that can be used for fault diagnosis purposes. A time-domain simulation of the drivetrain model is developed. The drivetrain system consists of a loaded single stage gearbox driven by a line-fed induction motor. Three typical bearing faults in the gearbox are addressed, i.e. defects in the outer raceway, the inner raceway, and the rolling element. The interaction with the fault is modelled by means of kinematical and mechanical relations. The fault region is modelled in order to achieve gradual loss and gain of contact. A bearing fault generates an additional torque component that varies at the specific bearing defect frequency. The presented dynamic electromagnetic dq-model of an induction motor is adjusted for diagnostic purpose and considers such torque variations. The bearing fault is detected as a phase modulation of the stator current sine wave at the expected bearing defect frequency.

  5. Anti-backlash gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission. One preferred embodiment discloses and describes an anti-backlash feature to counter ''dead zones'' in the gear bearing movement.

  6. Bearing, gearing, and lubrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results of selected NASA research programs on rolling-element and fluid-film bearings, gears, and elastohydrodynamic lubrication are reported. Advances in rolling-element bearing material technology, which have resulted in a significant improvement in fatigue life, and which make possible new applications for rolling bearings, are discussed. Research on whirl-resistant, fluid-film bearings, suitable for very high-speed applications, is discussed. An improved method for predicting gear pitting life is reported. An improved formula for calculating the thickness of elastohydrodynamic films (the existence of which help to define the operating regime of concentrated contact mechanisms such as bearings, gears, and cams) is described.

  7. Psychological Adjustment and Homosexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonsiorek, John C.

    In this paper, the diverse literature bearing on the topic of homosexuality and psychological adjustment is critically reviewed and synthesized. The first chapter discusses the most crucial methodological issue in this area, the problem of sampling. The kinds of samples used to date are critically examined, and some suggestions for improved…

  8. Permanent-Magnet Meissner Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1994-01-01

    Permanent-magnet meissner bearing features inherently stable, self-centering conical configuration. Bearing made stiffer or less stiff by selection of magnets, springs, and spring adjustments. Cylindrical permanent magnets with axial magnetization stacked coaxially on rotor with alternating polarity. Typically, rare-earth magnets used. Magnets machined and fitted together to form conical outer surface.

  9. Magnetic bearings for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have been successfully applied to motorized rotor systems in the multi-kilogram range, at speeds up to 1200 radians per second. These engineering models also indicated the need for continued development in specific areas to make them feasible for spacecraft applications. Significant power reductions have recently been attained. A unique magnetic circuit, combining permanent magnets with electromagnetic control, has a bidirectional forcing capability with improved current sensitivity. The multi-dimensional nature of contact-free rotor support is discussed. Stable continuous radial suspension is provided by a rotationally symmetric permanent magnet circuit. Two bearings, on a common shaft, counteract the normal instability perpendicular to the rotational axis. The axial direction is servoed to prevent contact. A new bearing technology and a new field of application for magnetics is foreseen.

  10. Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

    2014-01-01

    Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

  11. Centrifugally decoupling touchdown bearings

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F

    2014-06-24

    Centrifugally decoupling mechanical bearing systems provide thin tensioned metallic ribbons contained in a support structure. This assembly rotates around a stationary shaft being centered at low speeds by the action of the metal ribbons. Tension springs are connected on one end to the ribbons and on the other end to the support structure. The ribbons pass through slots in the inner ring of the support structure. The spring preloading thus insures contact (or near-contact) between the ribbons and the shaft at rotation speeds below the transition speed. Above this speed, however, the centrifugal force on the ribbons produces a tensile force on them that exceeds the spring tensile force so that the ribbons curve outward, effectively decoupling them from mechanical contact with the shaft. They still remain, however, in position to act as a touchdown bearing in case of abnormally high transverse accelerations.

  12. HTS magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, Frank N.; Flögel-Delor, Uta; Rothfeld, Rolf; Wippich, Dieter; Riedel, Thomas

    2002-08-01

    Radial HTS magnetic bearings (SMB) up to 200 mm size are developed and tested in prototype fast rotating machines to demonstrate the potential to replace conventional bearings. The individual rotational bearing components HTS and PM, their physical interaction and technology is reviewed. Characterisation experiments are conducted to understand the rotor dynamic behaviour. In terms of unbalance and critical speeds the suspended wheels and rotors compare favourably with conventional bearing devices. The rationale of our present bearing technology lies in the assembling of both low-speed magnetic bearings for centrifugal and wafer processing units up to 20,000 rpm as well as a high-speed optical mirror accelerated to rim speed of more than 500 m/s (174,000 rpm) confirming stable low-drag and low energy operation. Two new-type U shaped semicircle HTS bearings coupled each with a 6 W/80 K cryocooler of the Stirling type allow the contact-free operation of a Si wafer carrier in semiconductor wet processes.

  13. Journal bearing

    DOEpatents

    Menke, John R.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-05-11

    1. An improved journal bearing comprising in combination a non-rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a first bearing surface, a rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a confronting second bearing surface having a plurality of bearing elements, a source of lubricant adjacent said bearing elements for supplying lubricant thereto, each bearing element consisting of a pair of elongated relatively shallowly depressed surfaces lying in a cylindrical surface co-axial with the non-depressed surface and diverging from one another in the direction of rotation and obliquely arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of said rotatable member to cause a flow of lubricant longitudinally along said depressed surfaces from their distal ends toward their proximal ends as said bearing members are rotated relative to one another, each depressed surface subtending a radial angle of less than 360.degree., and means for rotating said rotatable bearing member to cause the lubricant to flow across and along said depressed surfaces, the flow of lubricant being impeded by the non-depressed portions of said second bearing surface to cause an increase in the lubricant pressure.

  14. Equations For Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Of Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1993-01-01

    Equation for thickness of elastohydrodynamic (EHD) lubricant film in rolling-element bearing reduced to simplified form involving only inside and outside diameters of bearing, speed of rotation, parameter related to type of lubricant, and viscosity of lubricant at temperature of bearing. In addition, experimentally derived graph of EHD-film-thickness-reduction factor as function of contact-lubricant-flow number. Accounts for lubricant starvation within Hertzian contact. Graph relating ratio of minimum film thickness to composite roughness of bearing surfaces and to lubrication-life correction factor also provided. Life-correction factor used to determine resultant life of bearing.

  15. Bearing tester data compilation, analysis, and reporting and bearing math modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Shaberth bearing analysis computer program was developed for the analysis of jet engine shaft/bearing systems operating above room temperature with normal hydrocarbon lubricants. It is also possible to use this tool to evaluate the shaft bearing systems operating in cryogenics. Effects such as fluid drag, radial temperature gradients, outer race misalignments and clearance changes were simulated and evaluated. In addition, the speed and preload effects on bearing radial stiffness was evaluated. The Shaberth program was also used to provide contact stresses from which contact geometry was calculated to support other analyses such as the determination of cryogenic fluid film thickness in the contacts and evaluation of surface and subsurface stresses necessary for bearing failure evaluation. This program was a vital tool for the thermal analysis of the bearing in that it provides the heat generation rates at the rolling element/race contacts for input into a thermal model of the bearing/shaft assembly.

  16. Contact dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Dermatitis - contact; Allergic dermatitis; Dermatitis - allergic; Irritant contact dermatitis; Skin rash - contact dermatitis ... There are 2 types of contact dermatitis. Irritant dermatitis: This ... can be by contact with acids, alkaline materials such as soaps ...

  17. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOEpatents

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  18. GAS BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1960-09-01

    A gas lubricated bearing for a rotating shaft is described. The assembly comprises a stationary collar having an annular member resiliently supported thereon. The collar and annular member are provided with cooperating gas passages arranged for admission of pressurized gas which supports and lubricates a bearing block fixed to the rotatable shaft. The resilient means for the annular member support the latter against movement away from the bearing block when the assembly is in operation.

  19. Grizzly bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, C.C.; Miller, S.D.; Haroldson, M.A.; Feldhamer, G.; Thompson, B.; Chapman, J.

    2003-01-01

    The grizzly bear inspires fear, awe, and respect in humans to a degree unmatched by any other North American wild mammal. Like other bear species, it can inflict serious injury and death on humans and sometimes does. Unlike the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) of the sparsely inhabited northern arctic, however, grizzly bears still live in areas visited by crowds of people, where presence of the grizzly remains physically real and emotionally dominant. A hike in the wilderness that includes grizzly bears is different from a stroll in a forest from which grizzly bears have been purged; nighttime conversations around the campfire and dreams in the tent reflect the presence of the great bear. Contributing to the aura of the grizzly bear is the mixture of myth and reality about its ferocity. unpredictable disposition, large size, strength, huge canines, long claws, keen senses, swiftness, and playfulness. They share characteristics with humans such as generalist life history strategies. extended periods of maternal care, and omnivorous diets. These factors capture the human imagination in ways distinct from other North American mammals. Precontact Native American legends reflected the same fascination with the grizzly bear as modern stories and legends (Rockwell 1991).

  20. Design and Operating Characteristics of High-Speed, Small-Bore Cylindrical-Roller Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinel, Stanley, I.; Signer, Hans R.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2000-01-01

    The computer program SHABERTH was used to analyze 35-mm-bore cylindrical roller bearings designed and manufactured for high-speed turbomachinery applications. Parametric tests of the bearings were conducted on a high-speed, high-temperature bearing tester and the results were compared with the computer predictions. Bearings with a channeled inner ring were lubricated through the inner ring, while bearings with a channeled outer ring were lubricated with oil jets. Tests were run with and without outer-ring cooling. The predicted bearing life decreased with increasing speed because of increased contact stresses caused by centrifugal load. Lower temperatures, less roller skidding, and lower power losses were obtained with channeled inner rings. Power losses calculated by the SHABERTH computer program correlated reasonably well with the test results. The Parker formula for XCAV (used in SHABERTH as a measure of oil volume in the bearing cavity) needed to be adjusted to reflect the prevailing operating conditions. The XCAV formula will need to be further refined to reflect roller bearing lubrication, ring design, cage design, and location of the cage-controlling land.

  1. Tribological properties of novel imidazolium ionic liquids bearing benzotriazole group as the antiwear/anticorrosion additive in poly(ethylene glycol) and polyurea grease for steel/steel contacts.

    PubMed

    Cai, Meirong; Liang, Yongmin; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Weimin

    2011-12-01

    The imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) bearing benzotriazole group were synthesized and evaluated as antiwear (AW) and anticorrosion additive in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and polyurea grease for steel/steel contacts at room temperature and 150 °C. The physical properties of the synthetic ILs and PEG with the additive were measured. The anticorrosion property of the synthetic ILs was assessed via the accelerated corrosion test and copper strip corrosion test, which reveals the excellent anticorrosion properties in comparison with pure PEG and the selected conventional ILs having no benzotriazole group. Tribological results indicated that these ILs as the additives could effectively reduce friction and wear of sliding pairs in PEG and also in polyurea grease. The tribological properties were generally better than the normally used zincdialkyldithiophosphate-based additive package (T204) in polyurea grease. The wear mechanisms are tentatively discussed according to the morphology observation of worn surfaces of steel discs by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the surface composition analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  2. Himalayan black bear mauling: offense or defense?

    PubMed

    Thakur, Jagdeep Singh; Mohan, Chander; Sharma, Dev R

    2007-01-01

    The Asiatic Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus or Selenarctos thibetanus), also known as the Tibetan black bear, the Himalayan black bear, or the moon bear is a omnivorous mammal. This animal is declared threatened animal and rarely comes in human contact. Recent decrease in forest area has, however, increased the chances of bear-human interaction, hence causing injuries to humans. There is only one published report in English literature on Himalayan black bear mauling. We present 5 cases referred to our department over a period of 1 year.

  3. SSME turbopump bearing analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Merriman, T.

    1980-01-01

    Three shuttle pump bearings operating under severe overspeed and shut-down conditions are evaluated. The specific parameters investigated include outer race stresses, cage stresses, cage-race drag, bearing heating, and crush loading. A quasi-dynamic version of the BASDAP computer code was utilized which involved the calculation of ball-race forces (inner and outer), contact pressures, contact dimensions, and contact angles as a function of (1) axial load, (2) radial load, and (3) centrifugal load on the bearing. Generally, radial loads on the order of 13,300 N (3000 pounds) per bearing or 26,700 N (6000 pounds) per bearing pair, could be expected to cause severe problems to any of the bearings with a 17,800 N (4000 pounds) axial load. Further, when possible temperature excursions are considered, even a load of 8900 N (2000 pounds) may be excessive. However, high momentary radial loads with a 3800 N (850 pounds) axial load would not be anticipated to cause catastrophic failure of the fuel pump bearing.

  4. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; ,; Lentfer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  5. Introgressive hybridization: brown bears as vectors for polar bear alleles.

    PubMed

    Hailer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics and consequences of introgression can inform about numerous evolutionary processes. Biologists have therefore long been interested in hybridization. One challenge, however, lies in the identification of nonadmixed genotypes that can serve as a baseline for accurate quantification of admixture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Cahill et al. (2015) analyse a genomic data set of 28 polar bears, eight brown bears and one American black bear. Polar bear alleles are found to be introgressed into brown bears not only near a previously identified admixture zone on the Alaskan Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof (ABC) Islands, but also far into the North American mainland. Elegantly contrasting admixture levels at autosomal and X chromosomal markers, Cahill and colleagues infer that male-biased dispersal has spread these introgressed alleles away from the Late Pleistocene contact zone. Compared to a previous study on the ABC Island population in which an Alaskan brown bear served as a putatively admixture-free reference, Cahill et al. (2015) utilize a newly sequenced Swedish brown bear as admixture baseline. This approach reveals that brown bears have been impacted by introgression from polar bears to a larger extent (up to 8.8% of their genome), than previously known, including the bear that had previously served as admixture baseline. No evidence for introgression of brown bear into polar bear is found, which the authors argue could be a consequence of selection. Besides adding new exciting pieces to the puzzle of polar/brown bear evolutionary history, the study by Cahill and colleagues highlights that wildlife genomics is moving from analysing single genomes towards a landscape genomics approach.

  6. Non-contact measurement of contact wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yaxing; Ye, Xuemei; Li, Zhongke; Yue, Kaiduan

    2008-12-01

    The overhead contact system is the power supply unit of the electric locomotive. This article is to introduce our newly developed method to measure the height and pull out value of the contact wire. A carema dolly which can move on railway is applied to bear the weight of the measure equipment; two linear CCD cameras are installed on the dolly symmetrically about the midline of two rails. While the dolly move along the railway, two CCD cameras grasp the image synchronously, and a computer real-time process the images, the height and pull out value can be calculate out from the images.

  7. Improved Superconducting Magnetic Rotary Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Royston, James

    1992-01-01

    Improved magnetic rotary bearings designed by exploiting properties of type-II superconducting materials. Depending on design and application, bearing provides fixed or adjustable compensation for lateral vector component of weight or other lateral load on rotor. Allows applied magnetic field to penetrate partially in clusters of field lines, with concomitant establishment of undamped circulating electrical currents within material. Type-II superconductors have critical magnetic fields and critical temperatures greater than type-I superconductors.

  8. Predicting Temperatures In Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, William R.; Hemmings, Brad R.

    1988-01-01

    Computer simulations speed design studies. Analyses performed in two or three dimensions. Sizes and shapes of components approximated by zones or nodes connected by gridlines. From geometric information about grids and boundary conditions, properties of bearing and lubricant materials, and information supplied by users, thermal-analysis programs generate mathematical models for thermal transport. Thermal analysis of high-speed rolling contact bearings matured so much that computerized numerical simulations replace expensive time consuming full scale experiments.

  9. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term highspeed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the Ir shaft to support big speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  10. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  11. Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei-Kan

    1995-04-01

    Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings (HSMB's) utilize high temperature superconductors (HTS's) together with permanent magnets to form a frictionless interface between relatively rotating parts. They are low mass, stable, and do not incur expenditure of energy during normal operation. There is no direct physical contact between rotor and stator, and hence there is no wear and tear. However, just as any other applications of HTS's, it requires a very cold temperature to function. Whereas this might be perceived as a disadvantage on earth, it is of no great concern in space or on the moon. To astronomers, the moon is an excellent site for an observatory, but the cold and dusty vacuum environment on the moon precludes the use of mechanical bearings on the telescope mounts. Furthermore, drive mechanisms with very fine steps, and hence bearings with extremely low friction are needed to track a star from the moon, because the moon rotates very slowly. All aspects considered, the HSMB is about the only candidate that fits in naturally. Here, we present a design for one such bearing, capable of supporting a telescope that weighs about 3 lbs on Earth.

  12. Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Wei-Kan

    1995-01-01

    Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings (HSMB's) utilize high temperature superconductors (HTS's) together with permanent magnets to form a frictionless interface between relatively rotating parts. They are low mass, stable, and do not incur expenditure of energy during normal operation. There is no direct physical contact between rotor and stator, and hence there is no wear and tear. However, just as any other applications of HTS's, it requires a very cold temperature to function. Whereas this might be perceived as a disadvantage on earth, it is of no great concern in space or on the moon. To astronomers, the moon is an excellent site for an observatory, but the cold and dusty vacuum environment on the moon precludes the use of mechanical bearings on the telescope mounts. Furthermore, drive mechanisms with very fine steps, and hence bearings with extremely low friction are needed to track a star from the moon, because the moon rotates very slowly. All aspects considered, the HSMB is about the only candidate that fits in naturally. Here, we present a design for one such bearing, capable of supporting a telescope that weighs about 3 lbs on Earth.

  13. Optimal Synchronizability of Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, N. A. M.; Seybold, H.; Baram, R. M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.

    2013-02-01

    Bearings are mechanical dissipative systems that, when perturbed, relax toward a synchronized (bearing) state. Here we find that bearings can be perceived as physical realizations of complex networks of oscillators with asymmetrically weighted couplings. Accordingly, these networks can exhibit optimal synchronization properties through fine-tuning of the local interaction strength as a function of node degree [Motter, Zhou, and Kurths, Phys. Rev. E 71, 016116 (2005)PLEEE81539-3755]. We show that, in analogy, the synchronizability of bearings can be maximized by counterbalancing the number of contacts and the inertia of their constituting rotor disks through the mass-radius relation, m˜rα, with an optimal exponent α=α× which converges to unity for a large number of rotors. Under this condition, and regardless of the presence of a long-tailed distribution of disk radii composing the mechanical system, the average participation per disk is maximized and the energy dissipation rate is homogeneously distributed among elementary rotors.

  14. Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.

    1995-04-01

    Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings (HSMB`s) utilize high temperature superconductors (HTS`s) together with permanent magnets to form a frictionless interface between relatively rotating parts. They are low mass, stable, and do not incur expenditure of energy during normal operation. There is no direct physical contact between rotor and stator, and hence there is no wear and tear. However, just as any other applications of HTS`s, it requires a very cold temperature to function. Whereas this might be perceived as a disadvantage on earth, it is of no great concern in space or on the moon. To astronomers, the moon is an excellent site for an observatory, but the cold and dusty vacuum environment on the moon precludes the use of mechanical bearings on the telescope mounts. Furthermore, drive mechanisms with very fine steps, and hence bearings with extremely low friction are needed to track a star from the moon, because the moon rotates very slowly. All aspects considered, the HSMB is about the only candidate that fits in naturally. Here, the authors present a design for one such bearing, capable of supporting a telescope that weighs about 3 lbs on Earth.

  15. Development of new materials for turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. E.; Pallini, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The life requirement for the angular contact ball bearings in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) is 7.5 hours. In actual operation, significantly shorter service life was experienced. The objective is to identify bearing materials and/or materials processing techniques offering signficant potential for extending HPOTP bearing performance life. Interactive thermomechanical analysis of the HPOTP bearing-shaft system was performed with the SHABERTH computer program. Bearing fatigue life, ball-race contact stress, heat generation rate, bulk ring temperatures and circumferential stress in the inner rings were quantified as functions of radial load, thrust load and ball-race contact friction. Criteria established from the output of this analysis are being used for material candidate selection.

  16. Hybrid ceramic bearings for difficult applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dezzani, M.M.; Pearson, P.K.

    1996-04-01

    The Torrington Company, under contract from the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), has developed a hybrid bearing with improved properties for difficult applications. M50 and M50 NiL steel rings were nitrided to produce rolling contact raceway surfaces with hardnesses near Rockwell C 70. Rings were assembled with NBD-200 silicon nitride balls. Full-scale bearing tests were run under conditions that included 150 C temperature, surface flaws created by hard particle contamination, partial EHD lubrication, and the sliding action of balls running under thrust loading. The hybrid bearings had longer life than all steel bearings and demonstrated resistance to the surface peeling mode of failure initiation. Higher strength of the rolling contact surfaces, high residual compressive stresses in the nitrided layers, and a more favorable action in ceramic to steel rolling contact are discussed as the reasons for improved performance of the hybrid over all-steel bearings.

  17. Chiropractic Adjustment

    MedlinePlus

    ... structural alignment and improve your body's physical function. Low back pain, neck pain and headache are the most common ... treated. Chiropractic adjustment can be effective in treating low back pain, although much of the research done shows only ...

  18. Adjustment disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... from other people Skipped heartbeats and other physical complaints Trembling or twitching To have adjustment disorder, you ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  19. Powder-Metallurgical Bearings For Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.; Humphries, T. S.; Thom, R. L.; Moxson, V.; Friedman, G. I.; Dolan, F. J.; Shipley, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Bearings fabricated by powder metallurgy developed for use in machines subjected to extremes of temperature, rolling-contact cyclic stresses, and oxidizing or otherwise corrosive fluids. Bearings also extend operating lives of other machines in which bearings required to resist extreme thermal, mechanical, and chemical stresses. One alloy exhibiting outstanding properties was MRC-2001. Resistance to fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear found superior to that of 440C stainless steel.

  20. Analysis of ITT scan bearing package (bearing package S/N 7-1004)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelotte, Erik; Kauppinen, John

    1991-01-01

    A geostationary operational environments satellite (GOES) East-West scan-bearing assembly was examined after having completed two and one-half years of operation. The following results were found: (1) lubrication breakdown was found in both bearings; (2) patchy wear-bands running only approximately half-way around the races indicated a load distribution in the ball groups consistent with a very low preload; (3) contact angles of 31.2 deg (S/N 1004) and 28.7 deg (S/N 1004A) were found in bearings whose contact angles are supposed to be 20+/-2 deg; and (4) contamination was present in the bearings.

  1. Camshaft bearing arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Aoi, K.; Ozawa, T.

    1986-06-10

    A bearing arrangement is described for the camshaft of an internal combustion engine or the like which camshaft is formed along its length in axial order with a first bearing surface, a first cam lobe, a second bearing surface, a second cam lobe, a third bearing surface, a third cam lobe and a fourth bearing surface, the improvement comprising first bearing means extending around substantially the full circumference of the first bearing surface and journaling the first bearing surface, second bearing means extending around substantially less than the circumference of the second bearing surface and journaling the second bearing surface, third bearing means extending around substantially less than the circumference of the third bearing surface and journaling the third bearing surface, and fourth bearing means extending around substantially the full circumference of the fourth bearing surface and journaling the first bearing surface.

  2. CUSHIONED BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping device effective to dampen vibrations occurring at the several critical speeds encountered in the operation of a high-speed centrifuge is described. A self-centering bearing mechanism is used to protect both the centrifuge shaft and the damping mechanism. The damping mechanism comprises spaced-apant, movable, and stationary sleeve members arranged concentrically of a rotating shaft with a fluid maintained between the members. The movable sleeve member is connected to the shaft for radial movement therewith.

  3. Pratt and Whitney cryogenic turbopump bearing experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, W. E.; Bursey, R. W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Successful, reusable bearings require lubrication, traditionally, a transfer film from sacrificial cage wear. Early testing included materials screening programs to identify suitable cryogenic cage materials. A specially developed element tester that simulated the function of a ball bearing cage was used. Suitable materials must provide lubrication with an acceptably low wear rate, without abrading contacting surfaces. The most promising materials were tested in full scale bearings at speeds up to 4 MDN. Teflon, filled with 40 percent bronze powder, was the best performing material. A variety of bearings were designed and successfully tested in LH2 and LOX. Bearings with bronze filled Teflon cages were successfully tested for 150 hrs. In overload tests, the same design was tested for 5 hrs at maximum Hertz stresses above 450 ksi and an additional 5 hrs with a maximum Hertz stress exceeding 500 ksi. Four bearings were tested in LOX for 25 hrs, with a maximum time per bearing of 10 hrs.

  4. Modeling of rolling element bearing mechanics. Computer program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, Lyn M.; Merchant, David H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides the user's manual for the Rolling Element Bearing Analysis System (REBANS) analysis code which determines the quasistatic response to external loads or displacement of three types of high-speed rolling element bearings: angular contact ball bearings, duplex angular contact ball bearings, and cylindrical roller bearings. The model includes the defects of bearing ring and support structure flexibility. It is comprised of two main programs: the Preprocessor for Bearing Analysis (PREBAN) which creates the input files for the main analysis program, and Flexibility Enhanced Rolling Element Bearing Analysis (FEREBA), the main analysis program. This report addresses input instructions for and features of the computer codes. A companion report addresses the theoretical basis for the computer codes. REBANS extends the capabilities of the SHABERTH (Shaft and Bearing Thermal Analysis) code to include race and housing flexibility, including such effects as dead band and preload springs.

  5. Operating limitations of high speed jet lubricated ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.; Signer, H.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1975-01-01

    A parametric study was performed with 120-mm bore angular-contact ball bearings having a nominal contact angle of 20 degrees. The bearings had either an inner- or an outer-race land riding cage, and lubrication was by recirculating oil jets which had either a single or dual orifice. Thrust load, speed, and lubricant flow rate were varied. Test results were compared with those previously reported and obtained from bearings of the same design which were under-race lubricated but run under the same conditions. Jet lubricated ball bearings were limited to speeds less than 2,500,000 DN, and bearings having inner-race land riding cages produced lower temperatures than bearings with outer-race land riding cages. For a given lubricant flow rate dual orifice jets produced lower bearing temperatures than single orifice jets, but under-race lubrication produced lower bearing temperatures under all conditions of operation with no apparent bearing speed limitation.

  6. Modeling of rolling element bearing mechanics. Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, David H.; Greenhill, Lyn M.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the theoretical basis for the Rolling Element Bearing Analysis System (REBANS) analysis code which determines the quasistatic response to external loads or displacement of three types of high-speed rolling element bearings: angular contact ball bearings; duplex angular contact ball bearings; and cylindrical roller bearings. The model includes the effects of bearing ring and support structure flexibility. It is comprised of two main programs: the Preprocessor for Bearing Analysis (PREBAN) which creates the input files for the main analysis program; and Flexibility Enhanced Rolling Element Bearing Analysis (FEREBA), the main analysis program. A companion report addresses the input instructions for and features of the computer codes. REBANS extends the capabilities of the SHABERTH (Shaft and Bearing Thermal Analysis) code to include race and housing flexibility, including such effects as dead band and preload springs.

  7. Titanium carbide coatings for aerospace ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boving, Hans J.; Haenni, Werner; Hintermann, HANS-E.

    1988-01-01

    In conventional ball bearings, steel to steel contacts between the balls and the raceways are at the origin of microwelds which lead to material transfer, surface roughening, lubricant breakdown, and finally to a loss in the bearing performances. To minimize the microwelding tendencies of the contacting partners it is necessary to modify their surface materials; the solid to solid collisions themselves are difficult to avoid. The use of titanium carbide coated steel balls can bring spectacular improvements in the performances and lifetimes of both oil-grease lubricated and oil-grease free bearings in a series of severe applications.

  8. Transient Vibration Prediction for Rotors on Ball Bearings Using Load-dependent Non-linear Bearing Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.; Poplawski, J. V.

    2002-01-01

    Rolling-element bearing forces vary nonlinearly with bearing deflection. Thus an accurate rotordynamic transient analysis requires bearing forces to be determined at each step of the transient solution. Analyses have been carried out to show the effect of accurate bearing transient forces (accounting for non-linear speed and load dependent bearing stiffness) as compared to conventional use of average rolling-element bearing stiffness. Bearing forces were calculated by COBRA-AHS (Computer Optimized Ball and Roller Bearing Analysis - Advanced High Speed) and supplied to the rotordynamics code ARDS (Analysis of Rotor Dynamic Systems) for accurate simulation of rotor transient behavior. COBRA-AHS is a fast-running 5 degree-of-freedom computer code able to calculate high speed rolling-element bearing load-displacement data for radial and angular contact ball bearings and also for cylindrical and tapered roller beatings. Results show that use of nonlinear bearing characteristics is essential for accurate prediction of rotordynamic behavior.

  9. Advances In Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.

    1994-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum reviews state of technology of magnetic bearings, focusing mainly on attractive bearings rather than repulsive, eddy-current, or Lorentz bearings. Attractive bearings offer greater load capacities and preferred for aerospace machinery.

  10. Contact Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Media contacts Advertising contacts AAD logo Advertising, marketing and sponsorships Legal notice Copyright © 2017 American Academy ... prohibited without prior written permission. AAD logo Advertising, marketing and sponsorships Legal notice Copyright © 2017 American Academy ...

  11. Shaft adjuster

    DOEpatents

    Harry, H.H.

    1988-03-11

    Abstract and method for the adjustment and alignment of shafts in high power devices. A plurality of adjacent rotatable angled cylinders are positioned between a base and the shaft to be aligned which when rotated introduce an axial offset. The apparatus is electrically conductive and constructed of a structurally rigid material. The angled cylinders allow the shaft such as the center conductor in a pulse line machine to be offset in any desired alignment position within the range of the apparatus. 3 figs.

  12. Shaft adjuster

    DOEpatents

    Harry, Herbert H.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method for the adjustment and alignment of shafts in high power devices. A plurality of adjacent rotatable angled cylinders are positioned between a base and the shaft to be aligned which when rotated introduce an axial offset. The apparatus is electrically conductive and constructed of a structurally rigid material. The angled cylinders allow the shaft such as the center conductor in a pulse line machine to be offset in any desired alignment position within the range of the apparatus.

  13. Large bearing operation without retainer. [high speed ball bearings for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, E.

    1978-01-01

    The design and testing of large high-speed ball bearings for space application is described. A well-defined lubrication system to provide oil to both race contacts in zero g allows stable operation without ball retainer.

  14. Computer-aided selection of materials for cryogenic turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. E.; Pallini, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The life requirement for the angular contact ball bearings in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high-pressure-oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) is 7.5 hours. In actual operation, significantly shorter service life has been experienced. The objective of this current program is to identify bearing materials and/or materials processing techniques offering significant potential for extending HPOTP bearing performance life. A thermomechanical analysis of the HPOTP shaft/bearing system was performed with the SHABERTH (SHaft-BEaring-THermal) computer program. Bearing fatigue life, ball-race contact stress, heat generation rate, bulk ring temperatures, and circumferential stress in the inner rings were quantified as functions of radial load, thrust load, and ball-race contact friction. The analysis results were used to formulate criteria that are being used for the selection of special materials for future turbopump bearings.

  15. Telocyte's contacts.

    PubMed

    Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria-Simonetta; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela

    2016-07-01

    Telocytes (TC) are an interstitial cell type located in the connective tissue of many organs of humans and laboratory mammals. By means of homocellular contacts, TC build a scaffold whose meshes integrity and continuity are guaranteed by those contacts having a mechanical function; those contacts acting as sites of intercellular communication allow exchanging information and spreading signals. Heterocellular contacts between TC and a great variety of cell types give origin to mixed networks. TC, by means of all these types of contacts, their interaction with the extracellular matrix and their vicinity to nerve endings, are part of an integrated system playing tissue/organ-specific roles.

  16. Scaling laws for radial foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honavara Prasad, Srikanth

    The effects of fluid pressurization, structural deformation of the compliant members and heat generation in foil bearings make the design and analysis of foil bearings very complicated. The complex fluid-structural-thermal interactions in foil bearings also make modeling efforts challenging because these phenomena are governed by highly non-linear partial differential equations. Consequently, comparison of various bearing designs require detailed calculation of the flow fields (velocities, pressures), bump deflections (structural compliance) and heat transfer phenomena (viscous dissipation in the fluid, frictional heating, temperature profile etc.,) resulting in extensive computational effort (time/hardware). To obviate rigorous computations and aid in feasibility assessments of foil bearings of various sizes, NASA developed the "rule of thumb" design guidelines for estimation of journal bearing load capacity. The guidelines are based on extensive experimental data. The goal of the current work is the development of scaling laws for radial foil bearings to establish an analytical "rule of thumb" for bearing clearance and bump stiffness. The use of scale invariant Reynolds equation and experimentally observed NASA "rule of thumb" yield scale factors which can be deduced from first principles. Power-law relationships between: a. Bearing clearance and bearing radius, and b. bump stiffness and bearing radius, are obtained. The clearance and bump stiffness values obtained from scaling laws are used as inputs for Orbit simulation to study various cases. As the clearance of the bearing reaches the dimensions of the material surface roughness, asperity contact breaks the fluid film which results in wear. Similarly, as the rotor diameter increases (requiring larger bearing diameters), the load capacity of the fluid film should increase to prevent dry rubbing. This imposes limits on the size of the rotor diameter and consequently bearing diameter. Therefore, this thesis aims

  17. Fluid lubricated bearing construction

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John R.; Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A fluid lubricated thrust bearing assembly comprising, in combination, a first bearing member having a plain bearing surface, a second bearing member having a bearing surface confronting the bearing surface of said first bearing member and provided with at least one spiral groove extending inwardly from the periphery of said second bearing member, one of said bearing members having an axial fluid-tight well, a source of fluid lubricant adjacent to the periphery of said second bearing member, and means for relatively rotating said bearing members to cause said lubricant to be drawn through said groove and to flow between said bearing surfaces, whereby a sufficient pressure is built up between said bearing surfaces and in said well to tend to separate said bearing surfaces.

  18. Mechanical design problems associated with turbopump fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evces, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    Most high speed cryogenic turbopumps for liquid propulsion rocket engines currently use ball or roller contact bearings for rotor support. The operating speeds, loads, clearances, and environments of these pumps combine to make bearing wear a limiting factor on turbopump life. An example is the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) used in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Although the HPOTP design life is 27,000 seconds at 30,000 rpms, or approximately 50 missions, bearings must currently be replaced after 2 missions. One solution to the bearing wear problem in the HPOTP, as well as in future turbopump designs, is the utilization of fluid film bearings in lieu of continuous contact bearings. Hydrostatic, hydrodynamic, and damping seal bearings are all replacement candidates for contact bearings in rocket engine high speed turbomachinery. These three types of fluid film bearings have different operating characteristics, but they share a common set of mechanical design opportunities and difficulties. Results of research to define some of the mechanical design issues are given. Problems considered include transient strat/stop rub, non-operational rotor support, bearing wear inspection and measurement, and bearing fluid supply route. Emphasis is given to the HPOTP preburner pump (PBP) bearing, but the results are pertinent to high-speed cryogenic turbomachinery in general.

  19. Development and Evaluation of Titanium Spacesuit Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Richard; Battisti, Brian; Ytuarte, Raymond, Jr.; Schultz, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The Z-2 Prototype Planetary Extravehicular Space Suit Assembly is a continuation of NASA's Z-series of spacesuits, designed with the intent of meeting a wide variety of exploration mission objectives, including human exploration of the Martian surface. Incorporating titanium bearings into the Z-series space suit architecture allows us to reduce mass by an estimated 23 lbs per suit system compared to the previously used stainless steel bearing race designs, without compromising suit functionality. There are two obstacles to overcome when using titanium for a bearing race- 1) titanium is flammable when exposed to the oxygen wetted environment inside the space suit and 2) titanium's poor wear properties are often challenging to overcome in tribology applications. In order to evaluate the ignitability of a titanium space suit bearing, a series of tests were conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) that introduced the bearings to an extreme test profile, with multiple failures imbedded into the test bearings. The testing showed no signs of ignition in the most extreme test cases; however, substantial wear of the bearing races was observed. In order to design a bearing that can last an entire exploration mission (approx. 3 years), design parameters for maximum contact stress need to be identified. To identify these design parameters, bearing test rigs were developed that allow for the quick evaluation of various bearing ball loads, ball diameters, lubricants, and surface treatments. This test data will allow designers to minimize the titanium bearing mass for a specific material and lubricant combination and design around a cycle life requirement for an exploration mission. This paper reviews the current research and testing that has been performed on titanium bearing races to evaluate the use of such materials in an enriched oxygen environment and to optimize the bearing assembly mass and tribological properties to accommodate for the high bearing cycle life for an

  20. A. Palmgren Revisited: A Basis for Bearing Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1997-01-01

    Bearing technology, as well as the bearing industry, began to develop with the invention of the bicycle in the 1850's. At the same time, high-quality steel was made possible by the Bessemer process. In 1881, H. Hertz published his contact stress analysis. By 1902, R. Stribeck had published his work based on Hertz theory to calculate the maximum load of a radially loaded ball bearing. By 1920, all of the rolling bearing types used today were being manufactured. AISI 52100 bearing steel became the material of choice for these bearings. Beginning in 1918, engineers directed their attention to predicting the lives of these bearings. In 1924, A. Palmgren published a paper outlining his approach to bearing life prediction. This paper was the basis for the Lundberg-Palmgren life theory published in 1947. A critical review of the 1924 Palmgren paper is presented here together with a discussion of its effect on bearing life prediction.

  1. [Contact glass tonometer].

    PubMed

    Kanngiesser, H; Robert, Y; Dekker, P

    1996-10-01

    This paper present a tonometer incorporated in a contact lens, which allows simultaneous measurement of intraocular pressure and performance ophthalmoscopy. The tonometer can record the pulse curve continuously, which can give us an indication of any circulatory problem. The device is therefore expected to yield additional information useful for the diagnosis of early glaucoma. Te device has three force sensors built in, which allow continuous measurement of the force exerted on the eye surface by the contact lens. The force of the contact lens on the eye can be altered and makes the adjustment of different eye pressures possible. These induced changes of the eye pressure and their influence on the fundus can be checked. We have taken some measurements on enucleated human eyes to compare our device with a Statham tansducer in the vitreous. We found a good correlation. We are currently taking measurements in volunteers. The clinical relevance of these observations and measurements will be examined in a future study.

  2. Material and tribological considerations for turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedeven, L. D.; Miller, N. C.

    1991-01-01

    The frictional heat generation in the rolling/sliding contact areas of high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) bearings is a key factor in bearing life. Several bulk materials, surface treatments and coatings are examined for their attributes of rolling contact fatigue life, wear and friction. Emphasis is given to the frictional response of these materials under conditions of rolling with incipient sliding as predicted from HPOTP bearing analysis. Rolling contact fatigue life is shown to be significantly improved with silicon nitride. Fatigue life can also be improved by coating the chromium carbide-laden stainless steels (440C, BG42) with TiN and thin dense chrome. The traction (friction under rolling/sliding) of these materials is discussed in terms of microslip and the presence of interfacial films.

  3. Study of the Polycarbonate-Urethane/Metal Contact in Different Positions during Gait Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, a growing number of young and more active patients receive hip replacement. More strenuous activities in such patients involve higher friction and wear rates, with friction on the bearing surface being crucial to ensure arthroplasty survival in the long term. Over the last years, the polycarbonate-urethane has offered a feasible alternative to conventional bearings. A finite element model of a healthy hip joint was developed and adjusted to three gait phases (heel strike, mid-stance, and toe-off), serving as a benchmark for the assessment of the results of joint replacement model. Three equivalent models were made with the polycarbonate-urethane Tribofit system implanted, one for each of the three gait phases, after reproducing a virtual surgery over the respective healthy models. Standard body-weight loads were considered: 230% body-weight toe-off, 275% body-weight mid-stance, and 350% body-weight heel strike. Contact pressures were obtained for the different models. When comparing the results corresponding to the healthy model to polycarbonate-urethane joint, contact areas are similar and so contact pressures are within a narrower value range. In conclusion, polycarbonate-urethane characteristics are similar to those of the joint cartilage. So, it is a favorable alternative to traditional bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty, especially in young patients. PMID:25247180

  4. Apparatus Would Measure Temperatures Of Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, John C.; Fredricks, Thomas H.

    1995-01-01

    Rig for testing ball bearings under radial and axial loads and measuring surface temperatures undergoing development. Includes extensible thermocouples: by means of bellows as longitudinal positioners, thermocouples driven into contact with bearing balls to sense temperatures immediately after test run. Not necessary to disassemble rig or to section balls to obtain indirect indications of maximum temperatures reached. Thermocouple measurements indicate temperatures better than temperature-sensitive paints.

  5. Simulating Army-Relevant Spur Gear Contacts with a Ball-on-Disc Tribometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    bearing contacts under the extreme conditions present in high- speed and high-load contacts in aerospace and heavy-duty equipment is attainable with...wide variety of gear and bearing contacts due to the independent control over ball and disc velocities and the versatility of ball-disc positioning...on Steel Ceramic on Ceramic 23 amount of run in is a parameter that must be considered when simulating gear or bearing contacts, and can even be

  6. Contact Pressure and Shear Stress Analysis on Conforming Contact Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Haruo; Imou, Akitoshi

    Two methods to solve a conforming contact problem are proposed. First method is general and can be applicable to the contact case between elastic arbitrary shape bodies. For verification FEA is performed on the convex-concave sphere contact, and the result of this method is well corresponding to the FEA result. However, the accuracy deteriorates when the mesh aspect ratio is extremely large. This phenomenon is caused by the usage of numerical integration for the calculation of influence coefficient. The second method is devised to avoid this problem, while this improved method is applicable only to the case when the contact area can be considered to be on a cylinder surface. By using this method, the contact pressure can be obtained without the deterioration even in the case of edge load occurring between ball bearing race shoulder and ball. The results of the contact pressure and the shear stress that is necessary for bearing life estimation are compared with the FEA result, which showed well correspondence.

  7. Mobile bearings in primary knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vertullo, C J; Easley, M E; Scott, W N; Insall, J N

    2001-01-01

    Mobile-bearing knee arthroplasty (MBKA) has potential advantages compared with conventional fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). By allowing unconstrained axial rotation, MBKA can offer greater articular conformity without an increased probability of loosening due to increased axial torque. Increased articular conformity minimizes polyethylene contact stresses, thereby reducing linear wear and subsurface fatigue failure. Axial rotation of the platform also enables self-correction of tibial component malrotation. Despite these advantages, the long-term clinical results obtained with current MBKA devices are similar to those obtained with well-designed fixed-bearing TKA prostheses, with no data suggesting their superiority. The disadvantages of MBKA include bearing dislocation and breakage, soft-tissue impingement, a steep technique learning curve, and concerns about volumetric wear. Hypothetically, longer-term follow-up of MBKA results may reveal a significant difference from fixed-bearing TKA results as the fatigue failure threshold of incongruent polyethylene is exceeded.

  8. Ceramic Bearings For Gas-Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1989-01-01

    Report reviews data from three decades of research on bearings containing rolling elements and possibly other components made of ceramics. Ceramic bearings attractive for use in gas-turbine engines because ceramics generally retain strengths and resistances to corrosion over range of temperatures greater than typical steels used in rolling-element bearings. Text begins with brief description of historical developments in field. Followed by discussion of effects of contact stress on fatigue life of rolling element. Supplemented by figures and tables giving data on fatigue lives of rolling elements made of various materials. Analyzes data on effects of temperature and speed on fatigue lives for several materials and operating conditions. Followed by discussion of related topic of generation of heat in bearings, with consideration of effects of bearing materials, lubrication, speeds, and loads.

  9. Status of understanding for bearing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, E.N.

    1984-04-01

    The structural materials and potential failure modes for high technology aircraft gas turbine bearings are reviewed. Among the failure modes discussed for iron-base through-hardened bearing materials are fatigue, surface distress, and corrosion. It is shown that the sub-surface initiated rolling-contact fatigue failure mode is reasonably well understood and in most cases can be controlled by proper material selection and design. Current bearing materials provide long life and high reliability in existing applications. A new generation of materials are being developed which will provide improved fracture toughness, better corrosion resistance, and a further extension of bearing fatigue life. Bearing problems due to surface distress, caused by a variety of surface and near surface anomalies, are less well understood. This area will require the implementation of an interdisciplinary effort to improve the level of understanding of metallic surface-lubricant reactions and interactions.

  10. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  11. Static Load Distribution in Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, Mario

    2010-01-01

    A numerical procedure for computing the internal loading distribution in statically loaded, single-row, angular-contact ball bearings when subjected to a known combined radial and thrust load is presented. The combined radial and thrust load must be applied in order to avoid tilting between inner and outer rings. The numerical procedure requires the iterative solution of Z + 2 simultaneous nonlinear equations - where Z is the number of the balls - to yield an exact solution for axial and radial deflections, and contact angles. Numerical results for a 218 angular-contact ball bearing have been compared with those from the literature and show significant differences in the magnitudes of the ball loads, contact angles, and the extent of the loading zone.

  12. Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are a precision, yet simple, machine element of great utility. A brief history of rolling element bearings is reviewed and the type of rolling element bearings, their geometry and kinematics, as well as the materials they are made from and the manufacturing processes they involve are described. Unloaded and unlubricated rolling element bearings, loaded but unlubricated rolling element bearings and loaded and lubricated rolling element bearings are considered. The recognition and understanding of elastohydrodynamic lubrication covered, represents one of the major development in rolling element bearings.

  13. Cryogenic foil bearing turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, Alston L.

    1993-01-01

    Cryogenic foil bearing turbopumps offer high reliability and low cost. The fundamental cryogenic foil bearing technology has been validated in both liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. High load capacity, excellent rotor dynamics, and negligible bearing wear after over 100 starts and stops, and over many hours of testing, were observed in both fluids. An experimental liquid hydrogen foil bearing turbopump was also successfully demonstrated. The results indicate excellent stability, high reliability, wide throttle-ability, low bearing cooling flow, and two-phase bearing operability. A liquid oxygen foil bearing turbopump has been built and is being tested at NASA MSFC.

  14. Introduction to ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of a ball bearing is to provide a relative positioning and rotational freedom while transmitting a load between two structures, usually a shaft and a housing. For high rotational speeds (e.g., in gyroscope ball bearings) the purpose can be expanded to include rotational freedom with practically no wear in the bearing. This condition can be achieved by separating the bearing parts with a coherent film of fluid known as an elastohydrodynamic film. This film can be maintained not only when the bearing carries the load on a shaft, but also when the bearing is preloaded to position the shaft to within micro- or nano-inch accuracy and stability. Background information on ball bearings is provided, different types of ball bearings and their geometry and kinematics are defined, bearing materials, manufacturing processes, and separators are discussed. It is assumed, for the purposes of analysis, that the bearing carries no load.

  15. Two gimbal bearing case studies: Some lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, Stuart H.

    1988-01-01

    Two troublesome, torque related problems associated with gimbal actuators are discussed. Large, thin section angular contact bearings can have a surprisingly high torque sensitivity to radial thermal gradients. A predictive thermal-mechanical bearing analysis, as described, was helpful in establishing a safe temperature operating envelope. In the second example, end-of-travel torque limits of an oscillatory gimbal bearing appoached motor stall during limit cycling life tests. Bearing modifications required to restore acceptable torque performance are described. The lessons learned from these case studies should benefit designers of precision gimbals where singular bearing torque related problems are not uncommon.

  16. Improved Electrical Contact For Dowhhole Drilling Networks

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron

    2005-08-16

    An electrical contact system for transmitting information across tool joints while minimizing signal reflections that occur at the tool joints includes a first electrical contact comprising an annular resilient material. An annular conductor is embedded within the annular resilient material and has a surface exposed from the annular resilient material. A second electrical contact is provided that is substantially equal to the first electrical contact. Likewise, the second electrical contact has an annular resilient material and an annular conductor. The two electrical contacts configured to contact one another such that the annular conductors of each come into physical contact. The annular resilient materials of each electrical contact each have dielectric characteristics and dimensions that are adjusted to provide desired impedance to the electrical contacts.

  17. Conical Magnetic Bearing Development and Magnetic Bearing Testing for Extreme Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Jansen, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The main proposed research of this grant were: to design a high-temperature, conical magnetic bearing facility, to test the high-temperature, radial magnetic bearing facility to higher speeds, to investigate different backup bearing designs and materials, to retrofit the high-temperature test facility with a magnetic thrust bearing, to evaluate test bearings at various conditions, and test several lubricants using a spiral orbit tribometer. A high-temperature, conical magnetic bearing facility has been fully developed using Solidworks. The facility can reuse many of the parts of the current high-temperature, radial magnetic bearing, helping to reduce overall build costs. The facility has the ability to measure bearing force capacity in the X, Y, and Z directions through a novel bearing mounting design. The high temperature coils and laminations, a main component of the facility, are based upon the current radial design and can be fabricated at Texas A&M University. The coil design was highly successful in the radial magnetic bearing. Vendors were contacted about fabrication of the high temperature lamination stack. Stress analysis was done on the laminations. Some of the components were procured, but due to budget cuts, the facility build up was stopped.

  18. Optical fibre bragg gratings based magnetic force measurement of magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guoping; Zhou, Zude; Hu, Yefa; Zhou, Jianhua

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic bearings are typical electromechanical systems of high performance. Current-displacement-force relationship between stator and rotor is an important research topic of magnetic bearings. The critical issue is to realize magnetic force online dynamic measurement. This paper presents a novel method on magnetic force measurement of magnetic bearings with optical fibre bragg gratings (FBG), which realizes a non-contact and online force measurement with simple configuration, good noise immunity even when the rotor is running. A novel micro force transducer is designed and fabricated, which is mounted within the stator magnetic pole. To obtain current-displacement-force relationship a FBG based magnetic force measurement test rig is setup to simulate magnetic bearing working states as the stator coils currents, air gap between stator and rotor, rotor speed is adjustable. Magnetic force is measured under three classifications of test conditions and test results are presented. The measurement data show good consistency with the theory analysis and calculation, which means that the FBG based magnetic force measurement is available and of good accuracy.

  19. Introduction to magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skowronski, Lori; Bisese, Anne

    1993-01-01

    Multi-axis suspension has several advantages over single axis system, in that it provides control of an object with precision in two or three orthogonal axes. In this report, we discuss the primary use of magnetic-bearing suspension and it's relevance to what was formally known as NASA's Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS). This system is an experimental pointing system with applications for the space shuttle and the space station programs. The objectives behind this magnetic suspension research project are to provide insight to the use of the ASPS configuration, to control the solar panels of the space station. This is important to maintain the correct position of the panels in relation to the sun and orbiting space station for the continuous supply of solar energy. Since the panels are suspended, they can be aligned with minimum outside interference. The approach of using magnetic suspension technology guarantees mechanical isolation since there are no contacting surfaces. This isolation reduces vibration transmission and mechanical wear which in turn extends the life of the payload and of the carrier. It should be noted that ASPS has a high pointing accuracy along the line of 0.01 arc-second. This research will be done in a laboratory setting by incorporating five bearing stations and one motion control station. We will attempt to suspend an object of dead weight similar to that of a solar panel. The long term applications may include deep-space navigation, fire control in weapon systems, and an improved mass transit system.

  20. Precision instrumentation for rolling element bearing characterization.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Eric R; Vigliano, Vincent C; Weiss, Jeffrey R; Moerlein, Alex W; Vallance, R Ryan

    2007-03-01

    This article describes an instrument to measure the error motion of rolling element bearings. This challenge is met by simultaneously satisfying four requirements. First, an axial preload must be applied to seat the rolling elements in the bearing races. Second, one of the races must spin under the influence of an applied torque. Third, rotation of the remaining race must be prevented in a way that leaves the radial, axial/face, and tilt displacements free to move. Finally, the bearing must be fixtured and measured without introducing off-axis loading or other distorting influences. In the design presented here, an air bearing reference spindle with error motion of less than 10 nm rotates the inner race of the bearing under test. Noninfluencing couplings are used to prevent rotation of the bearing outer race and apply an axial preload without distorting the bearing or influencing the measurement. Capacitive displacement sensors with 2 nm resolution target the nonrotating outer race. The error motion measurement repeatability is shown to be less than 25 nm. The article closes with a discussion of how the instrument may be used to gather data with sufficient resolution to accurately estimate the contact angle of deep groove ball bearings.

  1. Precision instrumentation for rolling element bearing characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Eric R.; Vigliano, Vincent C.; Weiss, Jeffrey R.; Moerlein, Alex W.; Vallance, R. Ryan

    2007-03-15

    This article describes an instrument to measure the error motion of rolling element bearings. This challenge is met by simultaneously satisfying four requirements. First, an axial preload must be applied to seat the rolling elements in the bearing races. Second, one of the races must spin under the influence of an applied torque. Third, rotation of the remaining race must be prevented in a way that leaves the radial, axial/face, and tilt displacements free to move. Finally, the bearing must be fixtured and measured without introducing off-axis loading or other distorting influences. In the design presented here, an air bearing reference spindle with error motion of less than 10 nm rotates the inner race of the bearing under test. Noninfluencing couplings are used to prevent rotation of the bearing outer race and apply an axial preload without distorting the bearing or influencing the measurement. Capacitive displacement sensors with 2 nm resolution target the nonrotating outer race. The error motion measurement repeatability is shown to be less than 25 nm. The article closes with a discussion of how the instrument may be used to gather data with sufficient resolution to accurately estimate the contact angle of deep groove ball bearings.

  2. Adjustable extender for instrument module

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, J.B.; Stein, A.D.

    1975-11-01

    A blank extender module used to mount an instrument module in front of its console for repair or test purposes has been equipped with a rotatable mount and means for locking the mount at various angles of rotation for easy accessibility. The rotatable mount includes a horizontal conduit supported by bearings within the blank module. The conduit is spring-biased in a retracted position within the blank module and in this position a small gear mounted on the conduit periphery is locked by a fixed pawl. The conduit and instrument mount can be pulled into an extended position with the gear clearing the pawl to permit rotation and adjustment of the instrument.

  3. Improvement of the Corrosion Resistance of Turbine Engine Bearings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    Thermomechanical Processing of the RSP565 Race Blanks ................ 154 蘏 RSP565 Heat Treat Schedule...as a tool steel , was selected for turbine engine bearing use because of its good rolling contact fatigue life and high hot hardness. In its current...turbine engine bearings are made from AISI M50 steel . The material wae selected for turbine engine use due to its good rolling contact fatigue (RCF

  4. Autonomous Sensor Motes Employing Liquid-Bearing Rotary Stages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-06

    loaded (c) deformed and (d) undergoing necking before breaking off. Initially, the force readout remains unchanged as the actuator translates...the bearing and deformation of the liquid bearing meniscus occurs as shown in Fig. 27b. The liquid bridge gradually necks (Fig. 27c) and eventually...a factor of 2, a reasonable result given uncertainty about the initial bearing thickness and static contact angle. However, in the necking regime

  5. Investigating Science through Bears (and Teddy Bears).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Karlene Ray

    1997-01-01

    Presents cooperative classroom projects using science as the initial basis for the study of bears. These projects may also involve other areas of the curriculum such as mathematics, art, and music. "Black Bear" activities include following a park ranger to study our National Parks and researching and building a full-sized brown bear…

  6. Effect of Silicon Nitride Balls and Rollers on Rolling Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Three decades have passed since the introduction of silicon nitride rollers and balls into conventional rolling-element bearings. For a given applied load, the contact (Hertz) stress in a hybrid bearing will be higher than an all-steel rolling-element bearing. The silicon nitride rolling-element life as well as the lives of the steel races were used to determine the resultant bearing life of both hybrid and all-steel bearings. Life factors were determined and reported for hybrid bearings. Under nominal operating speeds, the resultant calculated lives of the deep-groove, angular-contact, and cylindrical roller hybrid bearings with races made of post-1960 bearing steel increased by factors of 3.7, 3.2, and 5.5, respectively, from those calculated using the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. An all-steel bearing under the same load will have a longer life than the equivalent hybrid bearing under the same conditions. Under these conditions, hybrid bearings are predicted to have a lower fatigue life than all-steel bearings by 58 percent for deep-groove bearings, 41 percent for angular-contact bearings, and 28 percent for cylindrical roller bearings.

  7. Contact hysteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baggish, M S; Barbot, J

    1983-06-01

    In 1907 innovations in optics and illumination made by Maximilian Nitze were applied to hysteroscopy by Charles David, who wrote a treatise of hysteroscopy. David improved illumination by placing an electric incandescent bulb at the intrauterine end of his endoscope and also sealed the distal end of the tube with a piece of glass. The history of the contact endoscope that the authors personally used is connected to the invention by Vulmiere (1952) of a revolutionary illumination process in endoscopy--the "cold light" process. The components of cold light consist of a powerful external light source that is transmitted via a special optical guide into the endometrial cavity. The 1st application of his principle (1963) was an optical trochar contained in a metallic sheath. This simple endoscope was perfected, and in 1973 Barbot and Parent, in France, began to use it to examine the uterine cavity. Discussion focuses on methods, instrumentation, method for examination (grasping the instrument, setup, light source, anesthesia, dilatation, technique, and normal endometrium); cervical neoplasia; nonneoplastic lesions of the endometrium (endometrial polyp, submucous myoma, endometrial hyperplasia); intrauterine device localization; neoplastic lesions of the endometrium; precursors (adenocarcinoma); hysteroscopy in pregnancy (embryoscopy, hydatidiform mole, postpartum hemorrhage, incomplete abortion, spontaneous abortion, induced abortions, and amnioscopy); and examinations of children and infants. The contact endoscope must make light contact with the structure to be viewed. The principles of contact endoscopy depend on an interpretation of color, contour, vascular pattern, and a sense of touch. These are computed together and a diagnosis is made on the basis of previously learned clinical pathologic correlations. The contact endoscope is composed of 3 parts: an optical guide; a cylindric chamber that collects and traps ambient light; and a magnifying eyepiece. The phase of

  8. Bearing Tester Data Compilation Analysis, and Reporting and Bearing Math Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of fluid induced torques and forces on the 57 mm bearing cage is considered to be a contributing factor in possible cage instabilities that can produce intermittent high heating in the bearing. Analyses of the fluid forces and torques are presented. Heat generated by viscous fluid work was estimated for two flow diverter configurations and a coolant flow of 10 lbs/sec to support the thermal evaluation of the LOX Bearing Materials Tester. Results of the analysis of the LOX turbopump turbine end bearings are discussed. Coolant velocities for the no. 4 LOX turbopump turbine end bearings were estimated as a function of shaft speed and coolant flow rate. Contact angles and track width data were developed for the 57 mm bearing as functions of shaft speed, and axial and radial loads. The Advanced Dynamics of Rolling Elements (ADORE) computer program was installed on the MSFC UNIVAC 1100 and a test case successfully run. Both the text output and the plotting output were verified. The Bearing Seal and Materials Tester - Test Condition Data Base was developed. The parametric analysis of the operating characteristics of the LOX turbopump pump end bearing using the 45 mm bearing thermal model was begun.

  9. Development of hydrodynamic micro-bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Zhang, J.; Spikes, H. A.; Reddyhoff, T.; Holmes, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the modelling and testing of mm-scale hydrodynamic bearings which are being developed to improve the efficiency of a cm-scale turbine energy harvester, whose efficiency was previously limited by poorly lubricated commercial jewel-bearings. The bearings were fabricated using DRIE and their performance was assessed using a custom built MEMS tribometer. Results demonstrate that acceptably low friction is achieved when low viscosity liquid lubricants are used in combination with an appropriate choice of friction modifier additive. Further reduction in friction is demonstrated when the step height of bearing is adjusted in accordance with hydrodynamic theory. In parallel with the experiments, hydrodynamic lubricant modelling has been carried out to predict and further optimize film thickness and friction performance. Modelling results are presented and validated against experimental friction data.

  10. Bearing tester data compilation, analysis and reporting and bearing math modeling, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. D.; Montgomery, E. E.; New, L. S.; Stone, M. A.; Tiller, B. K.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical models of high speed angular contact ball bearings operating in LOX and LN2 were developed and verified with limited test data in an effort to further understand the parameters that determine or effect the SSME turbopump bearing operational characteristics and service life. The SHABERTH bearing analysis program which was adapted to evaluate shaft bearing systems in cryogenics is not capable of accommodating varying thermal properties and two phase flow. A bearing model with this capability was developed using the SINDA thermal analyzer. Iteration between the SHABERTH and the SINDA models enable the establishment of preliminary bounds for stable operation in LN2. These limits were established in terms of fluid flow, fluid inlet temperature, and axial load for a shaft speed of 30,000 RPM.

  11. Ceramic Rail-Race Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balzer, Mark A.; Mungas, Greg S.; Peters, Gregory H.

    2010-01-01

    Non-lubricated ball bearings featuring rail races have been proposed for use in mechanisms that are required to function in the presence of mineral dust particles in very low-pressure, dry environments with extended life. Like a conventional ball bearing, the proposed bearing would include an inner and an outer ring separated by balls in rolling contact with the races. However, unlike a conventional ball bearing, the balls would not roll in semi-circular or gothic arch race grooves in the rings: instead, the races would be shaped to form two or more rails (see figure). During operation, the motion of the balls would push dust particles into the spaces between the rails where the particles could not generate rolling resistance for the balls

  12. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  13. Research on the Mechanical Properties of "Z" Type Double-Decker Ball Bearings.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chengtao; Xu, Longxiang; Yu, Xudong

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical model of a "Z" type double-decker ball bearing under the action of radial load is established in this paper on the basis of the Hertz contact theory. According to the security contact angle theory, the influences of inner and outer bearings' internal clearances on the bearing's static load carrying capacity, radial deformation, radial stiffness, and load distribution of balls are analyzed. This model is verified in both stationary and rotational loading experiments. Moreover, the simulation results show that the static load carrying capacity of Z type bearing is smaller than that of either inner bearing or outer bearing that is contributed to compose the Z type bearing. The static load carrying capacity of a Z type bearing reduces with the increase of the inner and outer bearings' internal clearance. These simulation results also indicate that the contact angle of the maximum loaded ball in the outer bearing easily exceeds its security contact angle compared with the inner bearing, which, as the main factor, may cause the Z type bearing to overload and to fail. In this sense, the investigated Z type bearings are unfit to apply to situations with heavy load, high speed, or high precision.

  14. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  15. 75 FR 42376 - Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... Foreign Agricultural Service Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers AGENCY: Foreign Agricultural Service... began a review of a petition for trade adjustment assistance filed under the FY 2011 Program by three... benefits. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers Staff, FAS, USDA,...

  16. Operating limitations of high-speed jet-lubricated ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.; Signer, H.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1975-01-01

    A parametric study was performed with 120-mm bore angular-contact ball bearings having a nominal contact angle of 20 deg. The bearings either had an inner- or an outer-race land riding cage. Lubrication was by recirculating oil jets. The oil jets either had a single or dual orifice. Thrust load, speed, and lubricant flow rate were varied. Test results were compared with those previously reported and obtained from bearings of the same design which were under-race lubricated but run under the same conditions. Jet lubricated ball bearings were limited to speeds less than 2,500,000 DN. Bearings having inner-race land riding cages produced lower temperatures than bearings with outer-race land riding cages. For a given lubricant flow rate dual orifice jets produced lower bearing temperatures than single orifice jets. However, under-race lubrication produced under all conditions of operation lower bearing temperatures with no apparent bearing speed limitation.

  17. Design of High-speed Wear Lifetime Tester of the Instrument Ball Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. H.; Gu, J. M.; Sun, Y.; Chen, X. Y.

    2006-10-01

    The instrument ball bearings are the key components of movable components for various kinds of measuring and control instruments; they often operate in the environmental condition of high-speed and light preload. In general, the non metal, disposable oilimpregnated retainer material has been used for these kinds of high precision miniature bearing. The engineering practice shows that the common failure mode of them is the wear which appears under the condition of insufficient lubrication condition. As the results, the vibration and noise will be enlarged, so does the frictional torque, which makes the ball bearings to lose its original working accuracy. It is the lifetime test of bearings that can enable the designers and manufacturers to chose the material of the bearing properly, optimize the product structure, mend the manufacturing technique process, and to enhance the technical level of the bearing products significantly. In this paper, the wear lifetime tester has been designed according to the requirements of the life test for the instrument ball bearings, which consists of the main body of tester, electric system, drive unit and computer measure and control system, etc. The motor spindle has been selected to drive the device which is supported by the aerostatic bearing; frequency conversion speed adjustment mode, its scope of rotating speed is between 0 and 10,000 rpm. A pair of bearings can be tested under the pure axial preload condition, the maximum load is up to 50N, the control accuracy is ±2% the scope of temperature control is up to 200°C. The variation of frictional torque on the bearing couple will be measured by an online torque transducer. The variation of power dissipation can be monitored under arbitrary speed by use of an on-line high-precision power meter. The wear and quality situation of the contact surface of the bearings will be reflected on these two parameters. Meanwhile, the values of temperature and vibration will also be monitored

  18. Magnetic bearings for a high-performance optical disk buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockney, Richard; Hawkey, Timothy

    1993-01-01

    An optical disk buffer concept can provide gigabit-per-second data rates and terabit capacity through the use of arrays of solid state lasers applied to a stack of erasable/reusable optical disks. The RCA optical disk buffer has evoked interest by NASA for space applications. The porous graphite air bearings in the rotary spindle as well as those used in the linear translation of the read/write head would be replaced by magnetic bearings or mechanical (ball or roller) bearings. Based upon past experience, roller or ball bearings for the translation stages are not feasible. Unsatisfactory, although limited experience exists with ball bearing spindles also. Magnetic bearings, however, appear ideally suited for both applications. The use of magnetic bearings is advantageous in the optical disk buffer because of the absence of physical contact between the rotating and stationary members. This frictionless operation leads to extended life and reduced drag. The manufacturing tolerances that are required to fabricate magnetic bearings would also be relaxed from those required for precision ball and gas bearings. Since magnetic bearings require no lubricant, they are inherently compatible with a space (vacuum) environment. Magnetic bearings also allow the dynamics of the rotor/bearing system to be altered through the use of active control. This provides the potential for reduced vibration, extended regions of stable operation, and more precise control of position.

  19. Nonlinear electromagnetic effects on magnetic bearing performance and power loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Andrew

    Magnetic bearings are now being used in many applications. One of their features is their ability to apply force without contact. Thus they do not wear out from friction and are quiet. Magnetic bearings have very low levels of parasitic drag torque and force, especially at lower speeds. Active magnetic bearings can utilize microprocessors and feedback to control or excite vibrations in a manner that is unique from all other types of bearings. This dissertation presents methods to design magnetic bearings and makes some advances to them. The circuit model equations for a homopolar bearing are presented and a solution is found including the effects of magnetic flux saturation and laminate stacking. Circuit model equations for thrust bearings are presented. Linearized frequency dependent reluctance elements are incorporated into these equations. The equations are arranged to predict the frequency dependence of thrust bearings and the predictions agree with measurements. Finite element models are used extensively to back up the circuit model results. The drag torque caused by high rotation speed is calculated by the finite element method. The accuracy of these calculations is confirmed by comparison to measurements available in previously published experiments. Predictions of the drag torque in homopolar bearing rotor spacers are presented. The finite element method is also used to confirm the performance equations derived for a novel thrust bearing and a novel radial bearing, and it is also used to confirm the advanced circuit equations which are demonstrated on homopolar bearings.

  20. Temperature distribution and scuffing of tapered roller bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ailin; Wang, Jiugen

    2014-11-01

    In the field of aerospace, high-speed trains and automobile, etc, analysis of temperature filed and scuffing failure of tapered roller bearings are more important than ever, and the scuffing failure of elements of such rolling bearings under heavy load and high speed still cannot be effectively predicted yet. A simplified model of tapered roller bearings consisted of one inner raceway, one outer raceway and a tapered roller was established, in which the interaction of several heat sources is ignored. The contact mechanics model, temperature model and model of scuffing failure are synthesized, and the corresponding computer programs are developed to analyze the effects of bearings parameters, different material and operational conditions on thermal performance of bearings, and temperature distribution and the possibility of surface scuffing are obtained. The results show that load, speed, thermal conductivity and tapered roller materials influence temperature rise and scuffing failure of bearings. Ceramic material of tapered roller results in the decrease of scuffing possibility of bearings to a high extent than the conventional rolling bearing steel. Compared with bulk temperature, flash temperature on the surfaces of bearing elements has a little influence on maximum temperature rise of bearing elements. For the rolling bearings operated under high speed and heavy load, this paper proposes a method which can accurately calculate the possibility of scuffing failure of rolling bearings.

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Superconducting bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, John R.

    2000-02-01

    The physics and technology of superconducting bearings is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in rotating bearings. The basic phenomenology of levitational forces is presented, followed by a brief discussion of the theoretical models that can be used for conceptual understanding and calculations. The merits of various HTS bearing designs are presented, and the behaviour of HTS bearings in typical situations is discussed. The article concludes with a brief survey of various proposed applications for HTS bearings.

  2. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  3. Types of Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Types of Contact Lenses Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Orthokeratology (Ortho-K) Decorative (Plano) Contact Lenses Soft Contact Lenses Soft contact lenses are made of soft, ...

  4. Prioritized Contact Transport Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Walter Lee, Jr. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A detection process, contact recognition process, classification process, and identification process are applied to raw sensor data to produce an identified contact record set containing one or more identified contact records. A prioritization process is applied to the identified contact record set to assign a contact priority to each contact record in the identified contact record set. Data are removed from the contact records in the identified contact record set based on the contact priorities assigned to those contact records. A first contact stream is produced from the resulting contact records. The first contact stream is streamed in a contact transport stream. The contact transport stream may include and stream additional contact streams. The contact transport stream may be varied dynamically over time based on parameters such as available bandwidth, contact priority, presence/absence of contacts, system state, and configuration parameters.

  5. Bearing-bypass loading on bolted composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Naik, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of simultaneous bearing and bypass loading on a graphite-epoxy (T300/5208) laminate were investigated. Onset damage and ultimate strengths were determined for each test case. A finite element stress analysis was conducted for each test case. The computed local stresses were used with appropriate failure criteria to analyze the observed failure modes and strengths. An unexpected interaction of the effect of the bypass and bearing loads was found for the onset of compression reacted bearing damage. The interaction was caused by a decrease in the bolt-hole contact arc and a corresponding increase in the severity of the bearing loads. The amount of bolt-hole contact had a significant effect on local stresses and, thus, on the calculated damage-onset and ultimate strengths. An offset-compression failure mode was identified for laminate failure under compression bearing-bypass loading.

  6. 77 FR 20808 - Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Ready for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing... October 7, 2011, January 20, 2012, and March 14, 2012. d. Applicant: Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC. e...: Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 791a-825r. h. Applicant Contact: Mr. Scott D. Hall, Black Bear Hydro...

  7. Hydrostatic shoe bearing system for the TIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Schneider, Elfego; Sohn, Erika; Quiros-Pacheco, Fernando; Godoy, Javier; Farah Simon, Alejandro; Quintanilla, R.; Soto, P.; Salas, Luis; Cruz-Gonzales, Irene

    2000-08-01

    We present an active, low cost hydrostatic shoe bearing system for the Mexican Infrared Telescope which solves the suspension and motion of a 100 ton, 7.8 m telescope. Different geometries are analyzed to optimize the shoe's pressure print. These designs offer a self-adjusting action between the shoe's sliding path and the girth track. Different parameters such as pressure, temperature and proximity are measured and implemented into a control system in order to stabilize the bearing from the fluid's thermal viscosity effects. A simple method for fluid injection is discussed.

  8. Wear analysis of unicondylar mobile bearing and fixed bearing knee systems: a knee simulator study.

    PubMed

    Kretzer, J Philippe; Jakubowitz, Eike; Reinders, Jörn; Lietz, Eva; Moradi, Babak; Hofmann, Kerstin; Sonntag, Robert

    2011-02-01

    Unicondylar knee arthroplasty is an attractive alternative to total knee arthroplasty for selected patients with osteoarthritis. Mobile bearing knee designs have been developed to improve knee kinematics, lower contact stresses and reduced wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene compared with fixed bearing designs. This study compared in vitro wear behavior of fixed and mobile unicondylar bearing designs. Analysis was performed using a force-controlled AMTI knee simulator according to ISO 14243-1:2002(E). The wear volume of the implants was determined gravimetrically. Optical surface characterization and an estimation of wear particle size and morphology were performed. Implant kinematic data for both designs were determined. The wear rates averaged 10.7 ± 0.59 mg per 10(6) cycles for the medial and 5.38 ± 0.63 mg per 10(6) cycles for the lateral components of the mobile bearings, compared with 7.51 ± 0.29 mg per 10(6) cycles and 3.04 ± 0.35 mg per 10(6) cycles for the fixed bearings. The mobile bearings therefore exhibited higher wear rates (P<0.01) compared with the fixed bearings. The tibial polyethylene inserts of the mobile bearings showed pronounced backside wear at the inferior surface. The kinematics of both designs was similar. However, anterior-posterior translation was lower in the mobile bearings. The wear particles were mainly elongated and small in size for both designs (P=0.462). This study shows that wear may play an important role in unicondylar mobile bearing knee designs. Advantages of unicondylar mobile designs compared with fixed bearing designs, which have been proposed in terms of wear behavior and improved kinematics, could not be confirmed.

  9. Large deflection analysis of a tension-foil bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are as follows: rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's. CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contacts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exist for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. Recently, a new tension-foil bearing configuration has been proposed for turbomachinery applications.

  10. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Investigation of High-Speed-Shaft Bearing Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jonathan; Guo, Yi

    2016-06-01

    The loads and contact stresses in the bearings of the high speed shaft section of the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative gearbox are examined in this paper. The loads were measured though strain gauges installed on the bearing outer races during dynamometer testing of the gearbox. Loads and stresses were also predicted with a simple analytical model and higher-fidelity commercial models. The experimental data compared favorably to each model, and bearing stresses were below thresholds for contact fatigue and axial cracking.

  11. Incorporating general race and housing flexibility and deadband in rolling element bearing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. R.; Vallance, C. S.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for including the effects of general race and housing compliance and outer race-to-housing deadband (clearance) in rolling element bearing mechanics analysis is presented. It is shown that these effects can cause significant changes in bearing stiffness characteristics, which are of major importance in rotordynamic response of turbomachinery and other rotating systems. Preloading analysis is demonstrated with the finite element/contact mechanics hybrid method applied to a 45 mm angular contact ball bearing.

  12. Misalignment in Gas Foil Journal Bearings: An Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    As gas foil journal bearings become more prevalent in production machines, such as small gas turbine propulsion systems and microturbines, system-level performance issues must be identified and quantified in order to provide for successful design practices. Several examples of system-level design parameters that are not fully understood in foil bearing systems are thermal management schemes, alignment requirements, balance requirements, thrust load balancing, and others. In order to address some of these deficiencies and begin to develop guidelines, this paper presents a preliminary experimental investigation of the misalignment tolerance of gas foil journal bearing systems. Using a notional gas foil bearing supported rotor and a laser-based shaft alignment system, increasing levels of misalignment are imparted to the bearing supports while monitoring temperature at the bearing edges. The amount of misalignment that induces bearing failure is identified and compared to other conventional bearing types such as cylindrical roller bearings and angular contact ball bearings. Additionally, the dynamic response of the rotor indicates that the gas foil bearing force coefficients may be affected by misalignment.

  13. Bearings: Technology and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    A brief status report on bearing technology and present and near-term future problems that warrant research support is presented. For rolling element bearings a material with improved fracture toughness, life data in the low Lambda region, a comprehensive failure theory verified by life data and incorporated into dynamic analyses, and an improved corrosion resistant alloy are perceived as important needs. For hydrodynamic bearings better definition of cavitation boundaries and pressure distributions for squeeze film dampers, and geometry optimization for minimum power loss in turbulent film bearings are needed. For gas film bearings, foil bearing geometries that form more nearly optimum film shapes for maximum load capacity, and more effective surface protective coatings for high temperature operation are needed.

  14. Adaptive Spindle Balancing Using Magnetically Levitated Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    BARNEY,PATRICK S.; LAUFFER,JAMES P.; PETTEYS,REBECCA; REDMOND,JAMES M.; SULLIVAN,WILLIAM N.

    1999-09-20

    A technological break through for supporting rotating shafts is the active magnetic bearing (AMB). Active magnetic bearings offer some important advantages over conventional ball, roller or journal bearings such as reduced frictional drag, no physical contact in the bearing, no need for lubricants, compatibility with high vacuum and ultra-clean environments, and ability to control shaft position within the bearing. The disadvantages of the AMB system are the increased cost and complexity, reduced bearing stiffness and the need for a controller. Still, there are certain applications, such as high speed machining, biomedical devices, and gyroscopes, where the additional cost of an AMB system can be justified. The inherent actuator capabilities of the AMB offer the potential for active balancing of spindles and micro-shaping capabilities for machine tools, The work presented in this paper concentrates on an AMB test program that utilizes the actuator capability to dynamically balance a spindle. In this study, an unbalanced AMB spindle system was enhanced with an LMS (Least Mean Squares) algorithm combined with an existing PID (proportional, integral, differential) control. This enhanced controller significantly improved the concentricity of an intentionally unbalanced shaft. The study included dynamic system analysis, test validation, control design and simulation, as well as experimental implementation using a digital LMS controller.

  15. Development and Evaluation of Titanium Space Suit Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Richard; Battisti, Brian; Ytuarte, Ray, Jr.; Schultz, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The Z-2 Prototype Planetary Extravehicular Space Suit Assembly is a continuation of NASA's Z series of spacesuits, designed with the intent of meeting a wide variety of exploration mission objectives, including human exploration of the Martian surface. Incorporating titanium bearings into the Z series space suit architecture allows us to reduce mass by an estimated 23 pounds per suit system compared to the previously used stainless steel bearing designs without compromising suit functionality. There are two obstacles to overcome when using titanium for a bearing race: 1) titanium is flammable when exposed to the oxygen wetted environment inside the space suit and 2) titanium's poor wear properties are often challenging to overcome in tribology applications. In order to evaluate the ignitability of a titanium space suit bearing, a series of tests were conducted at White Sands Test Facility that introduced the bearings to an extreme test profile, with multiple failures imbedded into the test bearings. The testing showed no signs of ignition in the most extreme test cases; however, substantial wear of the bearing races was observed. In order to design a bearing that can last an entire exploration mission (approximately 2 years), bearing test rigs were developed that allow for the quick evaluation of various bearing ball loads, ball diameters, lubricants, and surface treatments. This test data will allow designers to minimize the titanium bearing mass for a specific material and lubricant combination around a maximum contact stress that will allow the bearing to survive the life of an exploration mission. This paper reviews the current research and testing that has been performed on titanium bearing races to evaluate the use of such materials in an enriched oxygen environment and to optimize the bearing assembly mass and tribological properties to accommodate for the high bearing cycle life for an exploration mission.

  16. Bear Spray Safety Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, C.D.; Kuzniar, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    A bear spray safety program for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was officially initiated by the Firearms Safety Committee to address accident prevention and to promote personnel training in bear spray and its transportation, storage, and use for defense against wild animals. Used as part of a system including firearms, or used alone for those who choose not to carry a firearm, bear spray is recognized as an effective tool that can prevent injury in a wild animal attack.

  17. Bearing restoration by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  18. Linear magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A linear magnetic bearing system having electromagnetic vernier flux paths in shunt relation with permanent magnets, so that the vernier flux does not traverse the permanent magnet, is described. Novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing having electromagnetic flux paths that bypass high reluctance permanent magnets. Particular novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing with a pair of axially spaced elements having electromagnets for establishing vernier x and y axis control. The magnetic bearing system has possible use in connection with a long life reciprocating cryogenic refrigerator that may be used on the space shuttle.

  19. Foot-and-mouth disease in Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus).

    PubMed

    Officer, Kirsty; Lan, Nguyen Thi; Wicker, Leanne; Hoa, Nguyen Thi; Weegenaar, Annemarie; Robinson, Jill; Ryoji, Yamaguchi; Loukopoulos, Panayiotis

    2014-09-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious, debilitating, and globally significant viral disease typically affecting cloven-hoofed hosts. The diagnosis of FMD in bears in Vietnam is described. The current study describes a confirmed case of FMD in a bear species, and the clinical signs compatible with FMD in a Malayan sun bear. Thirteen Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus) and 1 Malayan sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) were apparently affected. In August 2011, an adult bear became lethargic, and developed footpad vesicles. Over 15 days, 14 out of 17 bears developed similar signs; the remaining 3 co-housed bears and another 57 resident bears did not. All affected bears developed vesicles on all footpads, and most were lethargic for 24-48 hr. Nasal and oral lesions were noted in 6 and 3 cases, respectively. Within 1 month, all looked normal. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, classified as serotype O, and isolated by virus isolation techniques. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated clustering of 3 bear isolates, in a branch distinct from other FMDV type O isolates. The outbreak likely occurred due to indirect contact with livestock, and was facilitated by the high density of captive bears. It showed that Asiatic black bears are capable of contracting FMDV and developing clinical disease, and that the virus spreads easily between bears in close contact.

  20. Process for depositing Cr-bearing layer

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, T.W.; Lograsso, T.A.; Eshelman, M.A.

    1995-05-09

    A method of applying a Cr-bearing layer to a substrate, comprises introducing an organometallic compound, in vapor or solid powder form entrained in a carrier gas to a plasma of an inductively coupled plasma torch or device to thermally decompose the organometallic compound and contacting the plasma and the substrate to be coated so as to deposit the Cr-bearing layer on the substrate. A metallic Cr, Cr alloy or Cr compound such as chromium oxide, nitride and carbide can be provided on the substrate. Typically, the organometallic compound is introduced to an inductively coupled plasma torch that is disposed in ambient air so to thermally decompose the organometallic compound in the plasma. The plasma is directed at the substrate to deposit the Cr-bearing layer or coating on the substrate. 7 figs.

  1. Powder metallurgy bearings for advanced rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleck, J. N.; Killman, B. J.; Munson, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional ingot metallurgy was pushed to the limit for many demanding applications including antifriction bearings. New systems require corrosion resistance, better fatigue resistance, and higher toughness. With conventional processing, increasing the alloying level to achieve corrosion resistance results in a decrease in other properties such as toughness. Advanced powder metallurgy affords a viable solution to this problem. During powder manufacture, the individual particle solidifies very rapidly; as a consequence, the primary carbides are very small and uniformly distributed. When properly consolidated, this uniform structure is preserved while generating a fully dense product. Element tests including rolling contact fatigue, hot hardness, wear, fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance are underway on eleven candidate P/M bearing alloys and results are compared with those for wrought 440C steel, the current SSME bearing material. Several materials which offer the promise of a significant improvement in performance were identified.

  2. Process for depositing Cr-bearing layer

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Timothy W.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Eshelman, Mark A.

    1995-05-09

    A method of applying a Cr-bearing layer to a substrate, comprises introducing an organometallic compound, in vapor or solid powder form entrained in a carrier gas to a plasma of an inductively coupled plasma torch or device to thermally decompose the organometallic compound and contacting the plasma and the substrate to be coated so as to deposit the Cr-bearing layer on the substrate. A metallic Cr, Cr alloy or Cr compound such as chromium oxide, nitride and carbide can be provided on the substrate. Typically, the organometallic compound is introduced to an inductively coupled plasma torch that is disposed in ambient air so to thermally decompose the organometallic compound in the plasma. The plasma is directed at the substrate to deposit the Cr-bearing layer or coating on the substrate.

  3. Low cost lobed bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Separate sectors for each lobed area of the bearing are assembled into the bearing housing individually and bolted tightly against the housing inside diameter. The center of a grinding wheel and the center of the housing are offset, resulting in the desired inner radius and tilt of the sector.

  4. Damper bearing rotordynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1990-01-01

    High side loads reduce the life of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) bearings. High stiffness damper seals were recommended to reduce the loads on the pump and turbine end bearings in the HPOTP. The seals designed for use on the pump end are expected to adequately reduce the bearing loads; the predicted performance of the planned turbine end seal is marginal. An alternative to the suggested turbine end seal design is a damper bearing with radial holes from the pressurized center of the turbopump rotor, feeding a smooth land region between two rough-stator/smooth-rotor annular seals. An analysis was prepared to predict the leakage and rotor dynamic coefficients (stiffness, damping, and added mass) of the damper bearing. Governing equations of the seal analysis modified to model the damper bearing; differences between the upstream conditions of the damper bearing and a typical annular seal; prediction of the damper bearing analysis; and assumptions of the analysis which require further investigation are described.

  5. Bearing fatigue investigation 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Signer, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The operating characteristics of large diameter rolling-element bearings in the ultra high speed regimes expected in advanced turbine engines for high performance aircraft were investigated. A high temperature lubricant, DuPont Krytox 143 AC, was evaluated at bearing speeds to 3 million DN. Compared to the results of earlier, similar tests using a MIL-L-23699 (Type II) lubricant, bearings lubricated with the high density Krytox fluid showed significantly higher power requirements. Additionally, short bearing lives were observed when this fluid was used with AISI M50 bearings in an air atmosphere. The primary mode of failure was corrosion initiated surface distress (fatigue) on the raceways. The potential of a case-carburized bearing to sustain a combination of high-tangential and hertzian stresses without experiencing race fracture was also investigated. Limited full scale bearing tests of a 120 mm bore ball bearing at a speed of 25,000 rpm (3 million DN) indicated that a carburized material could sustain spalling fatigue without subsequent propagation to fracture. Planned life tests of the carburized material had to be aborted, however, because of apparent processing-induced material defects.

  6. Cylindrical bearing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.

    1981-01-01

    Program CYBEAN computes behavior of rolling-element bearings including effects of bearing geometry, shaft misalinement, and temperature. Accurate assessment is possible for various outer-ring and housing configurations. CYBEAN is structured for coordinated execution of modules that perform specific analytical tasks. It is written in FORTRAN IV for use on the UNIVAC 1100/40 computer.

  7. Effect of Hoop Stress on Ball Bearing Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; August, Richard; Coe, Harold H.

    1995-01-01

    A finite-element analysis (FEA) of a generic, dimensionally normalized inner race of an angular-contact ball bearing was performed under varying conditions of speed and the press (or interference) fit of the inner-race bore on a journal. The FEA results at the ball-race contact were used to derive an equation from which was obtained the radius of an equivalent cylindrical bearing race with the same or similar hoop stress. The radius of the equivalent cylinder was used to obtain a generalized closed-form approximation of the hoop stresses at the ball-inner-race contact in an angular-contact ball bearing. A life analysis was performed on both a 45- and a 120-mm-bore, angular-contact ball bearing. The predicted lives with and without hoop stress were compared with experimental endurance results obtained at 12000 and 25000 rpm with the 120-mm-bore ball bearing. A life factor equation based on hoop stress is presented.

  8. Arcturus and the Bears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, E.

    2009-08-01

    Arcturus is the brightest star in Bootes. The ancient Greek name Arktouros means Bear Guard. The star, however, is not close to Ursa Maior (Big She-Bear) and Ursa Minor (Little She-Bear), as the name would suggest. This curious discrepancy could be explained by the star proper motion, assuming the name Bear Guard is a remote cultural heritage. The proper motion analysis could allow us to get an insight also into an ancient myth regarding Ursa Maior. Though we cannot explain scientifically such a myth, some interesting suggestions can be obtained about its possible origin, in the context of the present knowledge of the importance of the cult of the bear both during the Palaeolithic times and for several primitive populations of modern times, as shown by the ethnological studies.

  9. EDITORIAL: Close contact Close contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-07-01

    The development of scanning probe techniques, such as scanning tunnelling microscopy [1], has often been touted as the catalyst for the surge in activity and progress in nanoscale science and technology. Images of nanoscale structural detail have served as an invaluable investigative resource and continue to fascinate with the fantastical reality of an intricate nether world existing all around us, but hidden from view of the naked eye by a disparity in scale. As is so often the case, the invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope heralded far more than just a useful new apparatus, it demonstrated the scope for exploiting the subtleties of electronic contact. The shrinking of electronic devices has been a driving force for research into molecular electronics, in which an understanding of the nature of electronic contact at junctions is crucial. In response, the number of experimental techniques in molecular electronics has increased rapidly in recent years. Scanning tunnelling microscopes have been used to study electron transfer through molecular films on a conducting substrate, and the need to monitor the contact force of scanning tunnelling electrodes led to the use of atomic force microscopy probes coated in a conducting layer as studied by Cui and colleagues in Arizona [2]. In this issue a collaboration of researchers at Delft University and Leiden University in the Netherlands report a new device architecture for the independent mechanical and electrostatic tuning of nanoscale charge transport, which will enable thorough studies of molecular transport in the future [3]. Scanning probes can also be used to pattern surfaces, such as through spatially-localized Suzuki and Heck reactions in chemical scanning probe lithography. Mechanistic aspects of spatially confined Suzuki and Heck chemistry are also reported in this issue by researchers in Oxford [4]. All these developments in molecular electronics fabrication and characterization provide alternative

  10. Radial displacement sensor for non-contact bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, John A. (Inventor); Sixsmith, Herbert (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A radial position sensor includes four capacitive electrodes oriented about a shaft, arranged in two diametrically opposite pairs. Sensor circuitry generates an output signal in proportion to the capacitance between the electrodes and the shaft; the capacitance between an electrode and the shaft increases as the shaft approaches the electrode and decreases as the shaft recedes from the electrode. The sensor circuitry applies an alternating voltage to one electrode of a pair and a 180 degree out of phase alternating voltage to the other electrode of the pair. The electrical responses of the two electrodes to their respective input signals are summed to form a radial deviation signal which is relatively free from the alternating voltage and accurately represents the position of the shaft relative to the electrodes of the pair.

  11. Lubrication of an 85-mm ball bearing with RP-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Schuller, Fredrick T.

    1993-01-01

    A parametric experimental investigation of an 85 millimeter bore angular contact ball bearing running in RP-1 fuel was performed at speeds of 10,000 to 24,000 rpm. Thrust loads were varied from 4450 to 17,800 Newtons (1000 to 4000 lbs.). Radial loads were varied from 1335 to 13,350 Newtons (300 to 3000 lbs.). RP-1 lubrication for the bearing was provided through a stationary jet ring located adjacent to the test bearing outer ring. Increases in both the thrust and radial loads resulted in increased bearing temperature, while increases in shaft speed resulted in much more dramatic increases in bearing temperature. These trends are typical for ball bearings operating under these types of conditions. Results are given for outer ring temperatures of the test bearing at the various test conditions employed. In addition, the heat energy removed from the bearing by the RP-1 was determined by measuring the increase in temperature as the RP-1 passed through the bearing. Results showed that the amount of heat energy removed by the RP-1 increased with both shaft speed and RP-1 flow rate to the bearing.

  12. Lubrication of an 85-mm ball bearing with RP-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Schuller, Frederick T.

    1993-01-01

    A parametric experimental investigation of an 85 millimeter bore angular contact ball bearing running in RP-1 fuel was performed at speeds of 10000 to 24000 RPM. Thrust loads were varied from 4450 to 17800 Newtons (1000 to 4000 lbs.). Radial loads were varied from 1335 to 13350 Newtons (300 to 3000 lbs.). RP-1 lubrication for the bearing was provided through a stationary jet ring located adjacent to the test bearing outer ring. Increases in both the thrust and radial loads resulted in increased bearing temperature, while increases in shaft speed resulted in much more dramatic increases in bearing temperature. These trends are typical for ball bearings operating under these types of conditions. Results are given for outer ring temperatures of the test bearing at the various test conditions employed. In addition, the heat energy removed from the bearing by the RP-1 was determined by measuring the increase in temperature as the RP-1 passed through the bearing. Results showed that the amount of heat energy removed by the RP-1 increased with both shaft speed and RP-1 flow rate to the bearing.

  13. Residual contact restraints in cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretegny, J. F.; Demonicault, J. M.

    The use of residual stress measurements to evaluate the state of cryogenic turbomachines, whose surfaces are worn by the working conductions in dry contact, is addressed. Their contribution to the understanding of the reasons of possible ruptures is considered. It is stated that residual stress measurements should be used as a complementary tool rather than as input data for models. It is shown, thanks to two examples concerning the ball bearings and splines of the liquid hydrogen turbopump of the Vulcain engine, what can be expected from such techniques. Total exploitation of the results has still to be done, but preliminary results are quite encouraging.

  14. F117-PW-100 hybrid ball bearing ceramic technology insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Miner, J.R.; Dell, J.; Galbato, A.T.; Ragen, M.A.

    1996-04-01

    Results of an Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) sponsored project to demonstrate the operational benefits of incorporating advanced structural ceramic ball elements into the F117-PW-100 aircraft gas turbine engine high rotor thrust bearings is described. This program consists of design, fabrication, and experimental evaluation of candidate hybrid ball bearing designs in Pratt and Whitney and MRC Bearings test facilities. The bearing design criteria and development test conditions utilized for the project are compatible with the requirements of the F117-PW-100 engine system application. Two hybrid bearing designs were produced by analytically varying internal geometry features such as M-50 race curvatures and contact angles to optimize for the modulus of elasticity of the ceramic balls. CERBEC grade NBD 200 silicon nitride ceramic balls (1 1/8 in. size) demonstrated integrity and a quadruple rolling contact fatigue life improvement versus state-of-the-art M-50 steel balls in single ball test rigs. Thermal performance data obtained in full-scale bearing rig performance testing with 178 mm size hybrid and all-steel baseline bearings will be fabricated for full-scale bearing rig endurance tests to be conducted in 1995--1996 as a prerequisite to validation in operating F117-PW-100 engines in 1996--1997.

  15. Generation of spiral bevel gears with zero kinematical errors and computer aided tooth contact analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Tsung, W. J.; Coy, J. J.; Heine, C.

    1986-01-01

    Kinematic errors in spiral bevel gears are a major source of noise and vibrations in transmissions. A method for the generation of Gleason's spiral bevel gears which provides conjugated gear tooth surfaces and an improved bearing contact was developed. A computer program for the simulation of meshing, misalignment, and bearing contact was written.

  16. Touchdown Ball-Bearing System for Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, Edward P.; Price, Robert; Gelotte, Erik; Singer, Herbert B.

    2003-01-01

    The torque-limited touchdown bearing system (TLTBS) is a backup mechanical-bearing system for a high-speed rotary machine in which the rotor shaft is supported by magnetic bearings in steady-state normal operation. The TLTBS provides ball-bearing support to augment or supplant the magnetic bearings during startup, shutdown, or failure of the magnetic bearings. The TLTBS also provides support in the presence of conditions (in particular, rotational acceleration) that make it difficult or impossible to control the magnetic bearings or in which the magnetic bearings are not strong enough (e.g., when the side load against the rotor exceeds the available lateral magnetic force).

  17. "Contacting" the Fundamentals: A New Paradigm for Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munjee, Tara

    2012-01-01

    Contact improvisation can serve as a way to access new understandings of Bartenieff Fundamentals. Inherent elements of contact improvisation such as thinking and feeling bodily in the moment, sensitivity to activated weight along with weight sharing and bearing, flow, whole-body organization, and immediacy of embodied presence provide fertile…

  18. Predicted and experimental performance of large-bore high-speed ball and roller bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    The values of inner and outer race temperature, cage speed, and heat transferred to the lubricant or bearing power loss, calculated using the computer programs Shaberth and Cybean, with the corresponding experimental data for the large bore ball and roller bearings were compared. After the development of computer program, it is important that values calculated using such program are compared with actual bearing performance data to assess the programs predictive capability. Several comprehensive computer programs currently in use are capable of predicting rolling bearing operating and performance characteristics. These programs accept input data of bearing internal geometry, bearing material and lubricant properties, and bearing operating conditions. The programs solve several sets of equations that characterize rolling element bearings. The output produced typically consists of rolling element loads and Hertz stresses, operating contact angles, component speed, heat generation, local temperatures, bearing fatigue life, and power loss. Two of these programs, Shaberth and Cybean were developed.

  19. Ball and Roller Bearings. A Teaching Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Vocational Instructional Materials, Athens, GA.

    The manual provides a subject reference for ball and roller bearings. The following topics are included: (1) bearing nomenclature, (2) bearing uses, (3) bearing capacities, (4) shop area working conditions, (5) bearing removal, (6) bearing cleaning and inspection, (7) bearing replacement, (8) bearing lubrication, (9) bearing installation, (10)…

  20. Friction Mapping as a Tool for Measuring the Elastohydrodynamic Contact Running-in Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    lubricated gear and bearing contacts typically demonstrate a period of wear called “running-in” when they are first put into service, during which time the...values, depending on the ramp direction and extent of mapping range. 15. SUBJECT TERMS elastohydrodynamic, lubrication, wear, gears, bearings 16...1. Introduction Elastohydrodynamic lubricated contacts are common in vehicle transmission gears and bearings . The hydrodynamic pressure built up

  1. Arkansas black bear hunter survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pharris, Larry D.; Clark, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    Questionnaires were mailed to black bear (Ursus americanus) hunters in Arkansas following the 1980-84 bear seasons to determine participation, hunter success, and number of bears observed by hunters. Man-days of hunting to harvest a bear ranged from 148 to 671 and hunter success ranged from 0.4% to 2.2%. With the exception of 1980, number of permits issued, man-days of bear hunting, and bears harvested appear affected by hunting permit cost. 

  2. Evaluation of a hybrid hydrostatic bearing for cryogenic turbopump application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spica, P. W.; Hannum, N. P.; Meyer, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    A hybrid hydrostatic bearing was designed to operate in liquid hydrogen at speeds to 80,000 rpm and radial loads to 440 n (100 lbf). The bearing assembly consisted of a pair of 20-mm angular-contact ball bearings encased in a journal, which was in turn supported by a fluid film of liquid hydrogen. The size and operating conditions of the bearing were selected to be compatible with the operating requirements of an advanced technology turbopump. Several test parameters were varied to characterize the bearing's steady-state operation. The rotation of the tester shaft was varied between 0 and 80,000 rpm. Bearing inlet fluid pressure was varied between 2.07 and 4.48 MPa (300 and 650 psia), while the fluid sump pressure was independently varied between 0.34 and 2.07 MPa (50 and 300 psia). The maximum radial load applied to the bearing was 440 N (110 lbf). Measured hybrid-hydrostatic-bearing stiffness was 1.5 times greater than predicted, while the fluid flow rate through the bearing was 35 to 65 percent less than predicted. Under two-phase fluid conditions, the stiffness was even greater and the flow rate was less. The optimal pressure ratio for the bearing should be between 0.2 and 0.55 depending on the balance desired between bearing efficiency and stiffness. Startup and shutdown cyclic tests were conducted to demonstrate the ability of the hybrid-hydrostatic-bearing assembly to survive at least a 300-firing-duty cycle. For a typical cycle, the shaft was accelerated to 50,000 rpm in 1.8 sec. The bearing operated for 337 start-stop cycles without failure.

  3. Evaluation of worn SSME low pressure liquid oxygen turbopump bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrane, K. F.; Kannel, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    The larger of two ball bearings used to support the rotor of the low pressure liquid oxygen turbopump in each of the shuttle main engines was analyzed to identify the cause of severe internal wear. The actual operating loads were calculated along with their direction and length of time at each load based on the size and location of the race contact paths. It is suggested that the engine component design be modified to reduce bearing stress and enhance lubrication.

  4. Experimental investigation of thermoelastic deformation in turbojet-engine bearings under maintenance inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Kochevar, A.J.; Bert, C.W.

    1995-04-01

    The present investigation examined the vertical and horizontal thermoelastic changes in the outside diameter of a turbojet-engine roller bearing. Thermal loads were imparted to the bearing by the hands of a bearing technician during a rework operation. A worst-case analysis was examined by assuming a three-minute dwell time and diametrically symmetric thermal loading. Contact temperature was experimentally determined and used in conjunction with a numerical model to simulate thermal propagation throughout the bearing outer ring. Diametric deflection data, obtained using the contact temperature in conjunction with analytic and finite elements, have been shown for comparative purposes. Experimental diametric expansions of the bearing outer ring were determined and compared with the predicted results. Assuming a worst-case scenario, this investigation yielded vertical expansions in the bearing outer ring`s diameter, which would be problematic for some bearings during the rework operation; appropriate corrective action was discussed.

  5. Tooth contact shift in loaded spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Altidis, P. C.; Lewicki, D. G.; Coy, J. J.; Litvin, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical method is presented to predict the shifts of the contact ellipses of spiral bevel gear teeth under load. The contact ellipse shift is the motion of the tooth contact position from the ideal pitch point to its location under load. The shifts are due to the elastic motions of the gear and pinion supporting shafts and bearings. The calculations include the elastic deflections of the gear shafts and the deflections of the four shaft bearings. The method assumes that the surface curvature of each tooth is constant near the unloaded pitch point. Results from these calculations will help designers reduce transmission weight without seriously reducing transmission performance.

  6. Tooth Contact Shift in Loaded Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Altidis, P. C.; Lewicki, D. G.; Coy, J. J.; Litvin, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical method is presented to predict the shifts of the contact ellipses of spiral bevel gear teeth under load. The contact ellipse shift is the motion of the tooth contact position from the ideal pitch point to its location under load. The shifts are due to the elastic motions of the gear and pinion supporting shafts and bearings. The calculations include the elastic deflections of the gear shafts and the deflections of the four shaft bearings. The method assumes that the surface curvature of each tooth is constant near the unloaded pitch point. Results from these calculations will help designers reduce transmission weight without seriously reducing transmission performance.

  7. Reexamination of Ball-Race Conformity Effects on Ball Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.; Root, Lawrence E.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis in this report considers the life of the ball set as well as the respective lives of the races to reassess the effect of ball-race conformity on ball bearing life. The related changes in ball bearing life are incorporated in life factors that can be used to modify the bearing predicted life using the Lundberg-Palmgren equations and the ANSI/ABMA and ISO Standards. Two simple algebraic relationships were established to calculate life factors LF(sub c) to determine the effect of inner- and outer-race conformity combinations on bearing L(sub 10) life for deepgroove and angular-contact ball bearings, respectively. Depending on the bearing type and series as well as conformity combinations, the calculated life for deep-groove ball bearings can be over 40 percent less than that calculated by the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. For angular-contact ball bearings, the life can vary between +16 and -39 percent from that calculated by the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. Comparing the two ball bearing types, the life factors LF(sub c) for the deep-groove bearings can be as much as 40 percent lower than that for angular-contact ball bearings.

  8. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  9. Grizzly bear density in Glacier National Park, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, K.C.; Stetz, J.B.; Roon, David A.; Waits, L.P.; Boulanger, J.B.; Paetkau, David

    2008-01-01

    We present the first rigorous estimate of grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) population density and distribution in and around Glacier National Park (GNP), Montana, USA. We used genetic analysis to identify individual bears from hair samples collected via 2 concurrent sampling methods: 1) systematically distributed, baited, barbed-wire hair traps and 2) unbaited bear rub trees found along trails. We used Huggins closed mixture models in Program MARK to estimate total population size and developed a method to account for heterogeneity caused by unequal access to rub trees. We corrected our estimate for lack of geographic closure using a new method that utilizes information from radiocollared bears and the distribution of bears captured with DNA sampling. Adjusted for closure, the average number of grizzly bears in our study area was 240.7 (95% CI = 202–303) in 1998 and 240.6 (95% CI = 205–304) in 2000. Average grizzly bear density was 30 bears/1,000 km2, with 2.4 times more bears detected per hair trap inside than outside GNP. We provide baseline information important for managing one of the few remaining populations of grizzlies in the contiguous United States.

  10. High speed hybrid bearing comprising a fluid bearing and a rolling bearing convected in series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A description is given of an antifriction bearing and a process by which its fatigue life may be extended. The method involves a rotating shaft supported by a fluid bearing and a rolling element bearing coupled in series. Each bearing turns at a fraction of the rotational speed of the shaft. The fluid bearing is preferably conical, thereby providing thrust and radial load support in a single bearing structure.

  11. 75 FR 43140 - Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... Foreign Agricultural Service Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers AGENCY: Foreign Agricultural Service... assistance and cash benefits. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers Staff... ; or visit the TAA for Farmers' Web site: http://www.fas.usda.gov/itp/taa . Dated: July 14, 2010....

  12. 75 FR 49886 - Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Foreign Agricultural Service Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers AGENCY: Foreign Agricultural Service... CONTACT: Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers Program Staff, FAS, USDA by phone: (202) 720-0638 or (202) 690- 0633; or by e-mail at: tradeadjustment@fas.usda.gov ; or visit ] the TAA for Farmers' Web...

  13. 75 FR 42375 - Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... Foreign Agricultural Service Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers AGENCY: Foreign Agricultural Service... began a review of a petition for trade adjustment assistance filed under the FY 2011 Program by the... for free technical assistance and cash benefits. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Trade...

  14. 75 FR 23667 - Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... Foreign Agricultural Service Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers AGENCY: Foreign Agricultural Service... of a petition, for trade adjustment assistance by the Prune Bargaining Association on behalf of prune... remarks for the record by faxing them to (202) 720-0876. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Trade...

  15. Bearing tester data compilation, analysis, and reporting and bearing math modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A test condition data base was developed for the Bearing and Seal Materials Tester (BSMT) program which permits rapid retrieval of test data for trend analysis and evaluation. A model was developed for the Space shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Liquid Oxygen (LOX) turbopump shaft/bearing system. The model was used to perform parametric analyses to determine the sensitivity of bearing operating characteristics and temperatures to variations in: axial preload, contact friction, coolant flow and subcooling, heat transfer coefficients, outer race misalignments, and outer race to isolator clearances. The bearing program ADORE (Advanced Dynamics of Rolling Elements) was installed on the UNIVAC 1100/80 computer system and is operational. ADORE is an advanced FORTRAN computer program for the real time simulation of the dynamic performance of rolling bearings. A model of the 57 mm turbine-end bearing is currently being checked out. Analyses were conducted to estimate flow work energy for several flow diverter configurations and coolant flow rates for the LOX BSMT.

  16. A technique to measure rotordynamic coefficients in hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaldi, Russell J.

    1993-11-01

    An experimental technique is described for measuring the rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film journal bearings. The bearing tester incorporates a double-spool shaft assembly that permits independent control over the journal spin speed and the frequency of an adjustable-magnitude circular orbit. This configuration yields data that enables determination of the full linear anisotropic rotordynamic coefficient matrices. The dynamic force measurements were made simultaneously with two independent systems, one with piezoelectric load cells and the other with strain gage load cells. Some results are presented for a four-recess, oil-fed hydrostatic journal bearing.

  17. A technique to measure rotordynamic coefficients in hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capaldi, Russell J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental technique is described for measuring the rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film journal bearings. The bearing tester incorporates a double-spool shaft assembly that permits independent control over the journal spin speed and the frequency of an adjustable-magnitude circular orbit. This configuration yields data that enables determination of the full linear anisotropic rotordynamic coefficient matrices. The dynamic force measurements were made simultaneously with two independent systems, one with piezoelectric load cells and the other with strain gage load cells. Some results are presented for a four-recess, oil-fed hydrostatic journal bearing.

  18. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing for passively suspending a rotatable element subjected to axial and radial thrust forces is disclosed. The magnetic bearing employs a taut wire stretched along the longitudinal axis of the bearing between opposed end pieces and an intermediate magnetic section. The intermediate section is segmented to provide oppositely directed magnetic flux paths between the end pieces and may include either an axially polarized magnets interposed between the segments. The end pieces, separated from the intermediate section by air gaps, control distribution of magnetic flux between the intermediate section segments. Coaxial alignment of the end pieces with the intermediate section minimizes magnetic reluctance in the flux paths endowing the bearing with self-centering characteristics when subjected to radial loads. In an alternative embodiment, pairs of oppositely wound armature coils are concentrically interposed between segments of the intermediate section in concentric arcs adjacent to radially polarized magnets to equip a magnetic bearing as a torsion drive motor. The magnetic suspension bearing disclosed provides long term reliability without maintenance with application to long term space missions such as the VISSR/VAS scanning mirror instrument in the GOES program.

  19. Investigation of Pressurized Wave Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Dimofte, Florin

    2003-01-01

    The wave bearing has been pioneered and developed by Dr. Dimofte over the past several years. This bearing will be the main focus of this research. It is believed that the wave bearing offers a number of advantages over the foil bearing, which is the bearing that NASA is currently pursuing for turbomachinery applications. The wave bearing is basically a journal bearing whose film thickness varies around the circumference approximately sinusoidally, with usually 3 or 4 waves. Being a rigid geometry bearing, it provides precise control of shaft centerlines. The wave profile also provides good load capacity and makes the bearing very stable. Manufacturing techniques have been devised that should allow the production of wave bearings almost as cheaply as conventional full-circular bearings.

  20. On the performance of hybrid foil-magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmat, H.; Chen, H.M.; Walton, J.F. II.

    2000-01-01

    Recent technological advancements make hybridization of the magnetic and foil bearing both possible and extremely attractive. Operation of the foil/magnetic bearings takes advantage of the strengths of each individual bearing while minimizing each others weaknesses. In this paper one possible hybrid foil and magnetic bearing arrangement is investigated and sample design and operating parameters are presented. One of the weaknesses of the foil bearings, like any hydrodynamic bearing, is that contact between the foil bearing and the shaft occurs at rest or at very low speeds and it has low load carrying capacity at low speed. For high speed applications, AMBs are, however, vulnerable to rotor-bending or structural resonances that can easily saturate power amplifiers and make the control system unstable. Since the foil bearing is advantageous for high speed operation with a higher load carrying capacity, and the magnetic bearing is so in low speed range, it is a natural evolution to combine them into a hybrid bearing system thus utilizing the advantages of both. To take full advantage of the foil and magnetic elements comprising a hybrid bearing, it is imperative that the static and dynamic characteristics of each bearing be understood. This paper describes the development of a new analysis technique that was used to evaluate the performance of a class of gas-lubricated journal bearing. Unlike conventional approaches, the solution of the governing hydrodynamic equations dealing with compressible fluid is coupled with the structural resiliency of the bearing surface. The distribution of the fluid film thickness and pressures, as well as the shear stresses in a finite-width journal bearing, are computed. Using the Finite Element (FE) method, the membrane effect of an elastic top foil was evaluated and included in the overall analytical procedure. Influence coefficients were generated to address the elasticity effects of combined top foil and elastic foundation on the

  1. Detailed ball bearing model for magnetic suspension auxiliary service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G.; Palazzolo, A. B.; Provenza, Andrew; Montague, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    Catcher bearings (CBs) provide backup protection for rotating machines with active magnetic bearings (AMBs). The CBs are required in the event of an AMB failure or high transient loads. Numerical simulations of a rotor drop on CBs in flywheel energy storage system are conducted with a detailed CB model which includes a Hertzian load-deflection relationship between mechanical contacts, speed-and-preload-dependent bearing stiffness due to centrifugal force, and a Palmgren's drag friction torque. The transient simulation results show the rotor shaft response variations with the design parameters: shaft/bearing friction coefficients, axial preload, support damping of damper liner, and side loads from magnetic bearings. The results reveal that friction coefficients, support damping, and side loads are critical parameters to satisfy CB design objectives and prevent backward (super) whirl.

  2. Bearing-Bypass Loading on Bolted Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Naik, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical study has been conducted to investigate the effects of simultaneous bearing and bypass loading on a graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) laminate. Tests were conducted with a test machine that allows the bearing-bypass load ratio to be controlled while a single-fastener coupon is loaded to failure in either tension or compression. Test coupons consisted of 16-ply quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminates with a centrally-located 6.35 mm bolt having a clearance fit. Onset-damage and ultimate strengths were determined for each test case. Next, a finite element stress analysis was conducted for each test case. The computed local stresses were used with appropriate failure criteria to analyze the observed failure modes and strengths. An unexpected interaction of the effect of the bypass and bearing loads was found for the onset of compression-reacted bearing damage. This interaction was caused by a decrease in the bolt-hole contact arc and a corresponding increase in the severity of the bearing loads. The amount of bolt-hole contact had a significant effect on local stresses and, thus, on the calculated damage-onset and ultimate strengths. An offset-compressible failure mode was identified for laminate failure under compression bearing-bypass loading. This failure mode appears to be unique to compression bearing-bypass loading and, therefore, cannot be predicted from simple tests.

  3. Computer program analyzes whirl critical speeds and bearing loads for shafts coupled by nonlinear springs to machine housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severud, L. K.

    1969-01-01

    Computerized method of analysis predicts bearing loads, shaft deflections, and critical speeds for shafts coupled by rolling contact bearings to the machine housing. The bearing nonlinearities, casing as well as rotor dynamics, and rotor-imbalance forcing functions are all included in the system dynamics analysis.

  4. In vivo kinematic comparison between mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty during step-up activity.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Nobukazu; Nakamura, Eiichi; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Karasugi, Tatsuki; Okada, Tatsuya; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) expects high conformity and low contact stress. It is designed to correct the rotational mismatch between femoral and tibial components. We examined the difference in weight-bearing knee kinematics in patients with mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing TKA performing step-up activities. We randomly assigned 40 knees (37 patients) to mobile-bearing TKA (n=20) or fixed-bearing TKA (n=20). Using fluoroscopic imaging we evaluated knee kinematics during step-up activity one year after surgery. The total extent of rotation was not different for the two TKAs. Due to the axial rotation of the polyethylene insert, patients with mobile-bearing TKA had a wider range of absolute axial rotation. The position of the medial and the lateral condyles was significantly more posterior in the fixed-bearing TKA. There were only minor kinematic differences between the two TKAs. The polyethylene insert in the mobile-bearing TKA moved as designed especially with respect to the self-alignment feature.

  5. Contact Lens Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health and Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Contact Lens Risks Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... redness blurred vision swelling pain Serious Hazards of Contact Lenses Symptoms of eye irritation can indicate a ...

  6. Contact Lens Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Contact Lens Care Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... 1088, www.fda.gov/medwatch Learn More about Contact Lens Care Other Tips on Contact Lenses Decorative ...

  7. The impact of contact patterns on epidemic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qiuju; Shi, Tianyu; Dong, Chao; Yan, Zhijun

    2017-01-01

    In social networks, individuals have relationships with their neighbor nodes (acquaintance contacts) and also randomly contact other nodes without direct links (stranger contacts). However, these two types of contact patterns are rarely considered together. In this paper, we propose a modified SIS (Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible) model in which a node not only contacts neighbor nodes but also randomly contacts other nodes in the network. We implement the model on a scale-free network and study the influence of different types of contact patterns on epidemic dynamics as well as three possible strategies people adopt when disease outbreaks. The results show that a greater preference for acquaintance contacts makes a disease outbreak less likely. Moreover, the best protective strategy to control the disease is to adjust both the contact number and the contact pattern. In addition, the epidemic is more likely to be controlled when individuals take more information into consideration.

  8. The impact of contact patterns on epidemic dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Qiuju; Shi, Tianyu; Dong, Chao; Yan, Zhijun

    2017-01-01

    In social networks, individuals have relationships with their neighbor nodes (acquaintance contacts) and also randomly contact other nodes without direct links (stranger contacts). However, these two types of contact patterns are rarely considered together. In this paper, we propose a modified SIS (Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible) model in which a node not only contacts neighbor nodes but also randomly contacts other nodes in the network. We implement the model on a scale-free network and study the influence of different types of contact patterns on epidemic dynamics as well as three possible strategies people adopt when disease outbreaks. The results show that a greater preference for acquaintance contacts makes a disease outbreak less likely. Moreover, the best protective strategy to control the disease is to adjust both the contact number and the contact pattern. In addition, the epidemic is more likely to be controlled when individuals take more information into consideration. PMID:28291800

  9. Rolling bearing life models and steel internal cleanliness

    SciTech Connect

    Beswick, J.; Gabelli, A.; Ioannides, S.; Tripp, J.H.; Voskamp, A.P.

    1999-07-01

    The most widely used steel grade for rolling bearings is based on a steel composition first used almost a hundred years ago, the so-called 1C-1.5Cr steel. This steel is used either in a selective surface induction hardened conditions or in a through hardened heat treated condition, both yielding exceptional structural and contact fatigue properties. The Lundberg and Palmgren rolling bearing life prediction model, published in 1947, was the first analytical approach to bearing performance prediction, subsequently becoming a widely accepted basis for rolling bearing life calculations. At that time the fatigue life of rolling bearings was dominated by the classical sub-surface initiated failure mode. This mode results from the accumulation of micro-plastic strain at the depth of maximum Hertzian stress and is accelerated by the stress concentrations occurring at the micro internal defects. In common with all fatigue processes, rolling bearing failure is a statistical process: the failures of bearings with high inclusion content tested at high stress levels belong to the well-known family of Weibull distributions. Steady improvements in bearing steel cleanliness due, amongst other things, to the introduction of secondary metallurgy steel making techniques, have resulted in a significantly increased rolling bearing life and load carrying capacity. In recognition of this, in 1985 Ioannides and Harris introduced a new fatigue life model for rolling bearings, comprising a more widely applicable approach to the modeling of bearing life based on the relevant failure mode. Subsequently this has been extended to include effects of hardness and of micro-inclusion distributions in state-of-the-art clean bearing steel.

  10. Climate Drives Polar Bear Origins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In their provocative analysis of northern bears (“Nuclear genomic sequences reveal that polar bears are an old and distinct bear lineage,” Reports, 20 April, p. 344), F. Hailer et al. use independent nuclear loci to show that polar bears originated during the middle Pleistocene, rather than during t...

  11. Polar bears: the fate of an icon.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T

    2013-11-01

    the bears are so vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Polar bears have few alternatives if their habitat (the sea ice) and their access to their ringed seal prey rapidly disappear. Predictions that polar bears may be able to adjust and sustain themselves on alternative food sources are not based on reality. Spring breakup of the sea ice is happening much earlier as well as fall freezeup is getting later, thereby prolonging the open water period that the bears are shore bound. If trends continue and the ice continues to disappear, the effect on polar bears would be devastating. Veterinarians must stay involved in polar bear studies and in multidisciplinary conservation studies dealing with threatened and endangered species worldwide. On account of their training, veterinarians can offer a unique skill set that can provide access to a number of technologies critical to conservation efforts. The oath veterinarians take on graduation from veterinary school charges them to be sworn to the "conservation of animal resources" and in the education of the public. We are only as good as the oaths we keep.

  12. Fluid lubricated bearing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.; Menke, John R.

    1976-01-01

    1. A support for a loaded rotatable shaft comprising in combination on a housing having a fluid-tight cavity encasing an end portion of said shaft, a thrust bearing near the open end of said cavity for supporting the axial thrust of said shaft, said thrust bearing comprising a thrust plate mounted in said housing and a thrust collar mounted on said shaft, said thrust plate having a central opening the peripheral portion of which is hermetically sealed to said housing at the open end of said cavity, and means for supplying a fluid lubricant to said thrust bearing, said thrust bearing having a lubricant-conducting path connecting said lubricant supplying means with the space between said thrust plate and collar intermediate the peripheries thereof, the surfaces of said plate and collar being constructed and arranged to inhibit radial flow of lubricant and, on rotation of said thrust collar, to draw lubricant through said path between the bearing surfaces and to increase the pressure therebetween and in said cavity and thereby exert a supporting force on said end portion of said shaft.

  13. Fault tolerant magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, E.H.; Sortore, C.K.; Gillies, G.T.; Williams, R.D.; Fedigan, S.J.; Aimone, R.J.

    1999-07-01

    A fault tolerant magnetic bearing system was developed and demonstrated on a large flexible-rotor test rig. The bearing system comprises a high speed, fault tolerant digital controller, three high capacity radial magnetic bearings, one thrust bearing, conventional variable reluctance position sensors, and an array of commercial switching amplifiers. Controller fault tolerance is achieved through a very high speed voting mechanism which implements triple modular redundancy with a powered spare CPU, thereby permitting failure of up to three CPU modules without system failure. Amplifier/cabling/coil fault tolerance is achieved by using a separate power amplifier for each bearing coil and permitting amplifier reconfiguration by the controller upon detection of faults. This allows hot replacement of failed amplifiers without any system degradation and without providing any excess amplifier kVA capacity over the nominal system requirement. Implemented on a large (2440 mm in length) flexible rotor, the system shows excellent rejection of faults including the failure of three CPUs as well as failure of two adjacent amplifiers (or cabling) controlling an entire stator quadrant.

  14. Tribology of alternative bearings.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin; Tipper, Joanne; Stone, Martin; Ingham, Eileen

    2006-12-01

    The tribological performance and biological activity of the wear debris produced has been compared for highly cross-linked polyethylene, ceramic-on-ceramic, metal-on-metal, and modified metal bearings in a series of in vitro studies from a single laboratory. The functional lifetime demand of young and active patients is 10-fold greater than the estimated functional lifetime of traditional polyethylene. There is considerable interest in using larger diameter heads in these high demand patients. Highly cross-linked polyethylene show a four-fold reduction in functional biological activity. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have the lowest wear rates and least reactive wear debris. The functional biological activity is 20-fold lower than with highly cross-linked polyethylene. Hence, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings address the tribological lifetime demand of highly active patients. Metal-on-metal bearings have substantially lower wear rates than highly cross-linked polyethylene and wear decreases with head diameter. Bedding in wear is also lower with reduced radial clearance. Differential hardness ceramic-on-metal bearings and the application of ceramic-like coatings reduce metal wear and ion levels.

  15. Ball Bearings Equipped for In Situ Lubrication on Demand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchetti, Mario; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.; Jansen, Mark; Predmore, Roamer

    2005-01-01

    In situ systems that provide fresh lubricants to ball/race contacts on demand have been developed to prolong the operational lives of ball bearings. These systems were originally intended to be incorporated into ball bearings in mechanisms that are required to operate in outer space for years, in conditions in which lubricants tend to deteriorate and/or evaporate. These systems may also be useful for similarly prolonging bearing lifetimes on Earth. Reservoirs have been among the means used previously to resupply lubricants. Lubricant- resupply reservoirs are bulky and add complexity to bearing assemblies. In addition, such a reservoir cannot be turned on or off as needed: it supplies lubricant continuously, often leading to an excess of lubricant in the bearing. A lubricator of the present type includes a porous ring cartridge attached to the inner or the outer ring of a ball bearing (see Figure 1). Oil is stored in the porous cartridge and is released by heating the cartridge: Because the thermal expansion of the oil exceeds that of the cartridge, heating causes the ejection of some oil. A metal film can be deposited on a face of the cartridge to serve as an electrical-resistance heater. The heater can be activated in response to a measured increase in torque that signals depletion of oil from the bearing/race contacts. Because the oil has low surface tension and readily wets the bearing-ring material, it spreads over the bearing ring and eventually reaches the ball/race contacts. The Marangoni effect (a surface-tension gradient associated with a temperature gradient) is utilized to enhance the desired transfer of lubricant to the ball/race contacts during heating. For a test, a ball bearing designed for use at low speed was assembled without lubricant and equipped with a porous-ring lubricator, the resistance heater of which consumed a power of less than 1 W when triggered on by a torque-measuring device. In the test, a load of 20 lb (.89 N) was applied and the

  16. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  17. Solving bearing overheating problems

    SciTech Connect

    Jendzurski, T.

    1995-05-08

    Overheating is a major indicator, along with vibration and noise, of an underlying problem affecting a bearing or related components. Because normal operating temperatures vary widely from one application to another, no single temperature is a reliable sign of overheating in every situation. By observing an application when it is running smoothly, a technician can establish a benchmark temperature for a particular bearing arrangement. Wide deviations from this accepted norm generally indicate troublesome overheating. The list of possible causes of over-heating ranges from out-of-round housings and oversize shaft diameters to excessive lubrication and bearing preloading. These causes fall into two major categories: improper or faulty lubrication and mechanical problems, such as incorrect fits and tolerances. These are discussed along with solutions.

  18. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Radial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Radial Halbach magnetic bearings are based on the same principle as that of axial Halbach magnetic bearings, differing in geometry as the names of these two types of bearings suggest. Both radial and axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings were described in Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings (LEW-18066-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 85. In the remainder of this article, the description of the principle of operation from the cited prior article is recapitulated and updated to incorporate the present radial geometry. In simplest terms, the basic principle of levitation in an axial or radial Halbach magnetic bearing is that of the repulsive electromagnetic force between (1) a moving permanent magnet and (2) an electric current induced in a stationary electrical conductor by the motion of the magnetic field. An axial or radial Halbach bearing includes multiple permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array ("Halbach array" is defined below) in a rotor and multiple conductors in the form of wire coils in a stator, all arranged so the rotary motion produces an axial or radial repulsion that is sufficient to levitate the rotor. A basic Halbach array (see Figure 1) consists of a row of permanent magnets, each oriented so that its magnetic field is at a right angle to that of the adjacent magnet, and the right-angle turns are sequenced so as to maximize the magnitude of the magnetic flux density on one side of the row while

  19. Contact Lenses for Vision Correction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Glasses & Contacts Contact Lenses Sections Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Proper ... to Know About Contact Lenses Colored Contact Lenses Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  20. Local Synthesis and Tooth Contact Analysis of Face-Milled, Uniform Tooth Height Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Wang, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    Face-milled spiral bevel gears with uniform tooth height are considered. An approach is proposed for the design of low-noise and localized bearing contact of such gears. The approach is based on the mismatch of contacting surfaces and permits two types of bearing contact either directed longitudinally or across the surface to be obtained. Conditions to avoid undercutting were determined. A Tooth Contact Analysis (TCA) was developed. This analysis was used to determine the influence of misalignment on meshing and contact of the spiral bevel gears. A numerical example that illustrates the theory developed is provided.

  1. Modular gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gearing system using modular gear bearing components. Each component is composed of a core, one or more modules attached to the core and two or more fastening modules rigidly attaching the modules to the core. The modules, which are attached to the core, may consist of gears, rollers or gear bearing components. The core orientation affects the orientation of the modules attached to the core. This is achieved via the keying arrangement of the core and the component modules that attach to the core. Such an arrangement will also facilitate the phase tuning of gear modules with respect to the core and other gear modules attached to the core.

  2. The Process and Reason of the Change of Oil-Water Contact of Shahejie Formation in BZ25-1 Oilfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, F.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the influence of Neo-tectonic movement, the Shahejie reservoirs in Bohai Bay Basin has undergone late-stage transformation and adjustment, causing the oil-water contact to change. Through studying the changing history of oil-water contact, we can better restore petroleum accumulation process and analyze oil distribution pattern. Based on reservoir geochemistry theory and drilling and logging data, grains with oil inclusion was analyzed, and oil-bearing property, organic extracts and biomarkers was used to determine the present and paleo-oil water contact of Shahejie formation in BZ25-1 oilfield. It suggested that the paleo and present oil-water contact in Shahejie formation locates in different depth, and that Shahejie formation has gone through three petroleum charging stages and has also undergone reservoir adjustment. The POWC(paleo-oil-water contact) of E2S2 reservoirs in BZ25-1-5 well and E2S2 reservoirs in BZ25-1-3 well is lower than OWC(present oil-water contact) at least for 9m and at most for 400m, but the POWC of E2S3 reservoirs in BZ25-1-5 well is higher than OWC at least for 20m and at most for 27.5m. The petroleum accumulation process and the reason for oil-water contact adjustment were studied based on burial history, petroleum generation history, fault re-activation rate and petroleum charging history. It suggested that the three petroleum charging stages are Mid-Miocene(11.5Ma), Late Miocene-Pliocene(6.5-3.5Ma) and Quaternary(2.5Ma-present), among which the second~third charging episode is seen as the major petroleum accumulation stage. The re-activeted faults in several different periods not only served as preferential path for petroleum vertical migration, but also caused petroleum leakage through faults. The petroleum leakage mainly occurred in Neo-tectonic movement period(after 3.5Ma), during which petroleum vertically leaked through re-activated faults and migrated to shallow reservoirs or spilled over surface, meanwhile due to constant

  3. Development and Testing of a Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center has developed and tested a revolutionary Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearing. The objective of this work is to develop a viable non-contact magnetic bearing utilizing Halbach arrays for all-electric flight, and many other applications. This concept will help reduce harmful emissions, reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels and mitigate many of the concerns and limitations encountered in conventional axial bearings such as bearing wear, leaks, seals and friction loss. The Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is inherently stable and requires no active feedback control system or superconductivity as required in many magnetic bearing designs. The Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is useful for very high speed applications including turbines, instrumentation, medical applications, manufacturing equipment, and space power systems such as flywheels. Magnetic fields suspend and support a rotor assembly within a stator. Advanced technologies developed for particle accelerators, and currently under development for maglev trains and rocket launchers, served as the basis for this application. Experimental hardware was successfully designed and developed to validate the basic principles and analyses. The report concludes that the implementation of Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings can provide significant improvements in rotational system performance and reliability.

  4. Development and Testing of an Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed and tested a revolutionary Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing. The objective of this work is to develop a viable non-contact magnetic thrust bearing utilizing Halbach arrays for all-electric flight, and many other applications. This concept will help to reduce harmful emissions, reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels and mitigate many of the concerns and limitations encountered in conventional axial bearings such as bearing wear, leaks, seals and friction loss. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is inherently stable and requires no active feedback control system or superconductivity as required in many magnetic bearing designs. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is useful for very high speed applications including turbines, instrumentation, medical systems, computer memory systems, and space power systems such as flywheels. Magnetic fields suspend and support a rotor assembly within a stator. Advanced technologies developed for particle accelerators, and currently under development for maglev trains and rocket launchers, served as the basis for this application. Experimental hardware was successfully designed and developed to validate the basic principles and analyses. The report concludes that the implementation of Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings can provide significant improvements in rotational system performance and reliability.

  5. Ohmic contacts to semiconducting diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, James R.; Taylor, M. J.; Zeisse, Carl R.; Hewett, C. A.; Delahoussaye, Paul R.

    1990-10-01

    Work was carried out to improve the electron beam evaporation system in order to achieve better deposited films. The basic system is an ion pumped vacuum chamber, with a three-hearth, single-gun e-beam evaporator. Four improvements were made to the system. The system was thoroughly cleaned and new ion pump elements, an e-gun beam adjust unit, and a more accurate crystal monitor were installed. The system now has a base pressure of 3 X 10(exp -9) Torr, and can easily deposit high-melting-temperature metals such as Ta with an accurately controlled thickness. Improved shadow masks were also fabricated for better alignment and control of corner contacts for electrical transport measurements. Appendices include: A Thermally Activated Solid State Reaction Process for Fabricating Ohmic Contacts to Semiconducting Diamond; Tantalum Ohmic Contacts to Diamond by a Solid State Reaction Process; Metallization of Semiconducting Diamond: Mo, Mo/Au, and Mo/Ni/Au; Specific Contact Resistance Measurements of Ohmic Contracts to Diamond; and Electrical Activation of Boron Implanted into Diamond.

  6. Interfacial closure of contacting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, F.; Rauer, C.; Moriceau, H.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the contact between solid surfaces is a long-standing problem which has a strong impact on the physics of many processes such as adhesion, friction, lubrication and wear. Experimentally, the investigation of solid/solid interfaces remains challenging today, due to the lack of experimental techniques able to provide sub-nanometer scale information on interfaces buried between millimeters of materials. Yet, a strong interest exists improving the modeling of contact mechanics of materials in order to adjust their interface properties (e.g., thermal transport, friction). We show here that the essential features of the residual gap between contacting surfaces can be measured using high energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity. The presence of this nano-gap is general to the contact of solids. In some special case however, it can be removed when attractive forces take over repulsive contributions, depending on both height and wavelength of asperity distributions (roughness). A criterion for this instability is established in the standard case of van der Waals attractive forces and elastic asperity compression repulsive forces (Hertz model). This collapse instability is confirmed experimentally in the case of silicon direct bonding, using high-energy X-ray synchrotron reflectivity and adhesion energy measurements. The possibility to achieve fully closed interfaces at room temperature opens interesting perspectives to build stronger assemblies with smaller thermal budgets.

  7. Sensing Position With Approximately Constant Contact Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturdevant, Jay

    1996-01-01

    Computer-controlled electromechanical system uses number of linear variable-differential transformers (LVDTs) to measure axial positions of selected points on surface of lens, mirror, or other precise optical component with high finish. Pressures applied to pneumatically driven LVDTs adjusted to maintain small, approximately constant contact forces as positions of LVDT tips vary.

  8. Class Racial Composition, the Friendliness of Interracial Contact and Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patchen, Martin; And Others

    This paper presents further evidence bearing on the hypothesis that the academic performance of students is associated more closely with the friendliness or unfriendliness of interracial contact than with the sheer opportunity for interracial contact. In addition, evidence is presented concerning the relationship of interracial contact and of…

  9. Remotely Adjustable Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouns, H. H.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    Outlet pressure adjusted to match varying loads. Electrohydraulic servo has positioned sleeve in leftmost position, adjusting outlet pressure to maximum value. Sleeve in equilibrium position, with control land covering control port. For lowest pressure setting, sleeve shifted toward right by increased pressure on sleeve shoulder from servovalve. Pump used in aircraft and robots, where hydraulic actuators repeatedly turned on and off, changing pump load frequently and over wide range.

  10. Adjustable Pitot Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Robbins, W. Eugene; Horsley, Lewis A.

    1991-01-01

    Probe readily positionable in core of uniform flow in hypersonic wind tunnel. Formed of pair of mating cylindrical housings: transducer housing and pitot-tube housing. Pitot tube supported by adjustable wedge fairing attached to top of pitot-tube housing with semicircular foot. Probe adjusted both radially and circumferentially. In addition, pressure-sensing transducer cooled internally by water or other cooling fluid passing through annulus of cooling system.

  11. Family Adjustment to Aphasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. Read more Connect with ASHA Information For Audiologists Speech-Language Pathologists Students Faculty Contact Us The ASHA Action Center welcomes ...

  12. Weighted triangulation adjustment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Walter L.

    1969-01-01

    The variation of coordinates method is employed to perform a weighted least squares adjustment of horizontal survey networks. Geodetic coordinates are required for each fixed and adjustable station. A preliminary inverse geodetic position computation is made for each observed line. Weights associated with each observed equation for direction, azimuth, and distance are applied in the formation of the normal equations in-the least squares adjustment. The number of normal equations that may be solved is twice the number of new stations and less than 150. When the normal equations are solved, shifts are produced at adjustable stations. Previously computed correction factors are applied to the shifts and a most probable geodetic position is found for each adjustable station. Pinal azimuths and distances are computed. These may be written onto magnetic tape for subsequent computation of state plane or grid coordinates. Input consists of punch cards containing project identification, program options, and position and observation information. Results listed include preliminary and final positions, residuals, observation equations, solution of the normal equations showing magnitudes of shifts, and a plot of each adjusted and fixed station. During processing, data sets containing irrecoverable errors are rejected and the type of error is listed. The computer resumes processing of additional data sets.. Other conditions cause warning-errors to be issued, and processing continues with the current data set.

  13. Composite Bear Canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, W. Richard; Jara, Steve; Suffel, Susan

    2003-01-01

    To many national park campers and mountain climbers saving their foods in a safe and unbreakable storage container without worrying being attacked by a bear is a challenging task. In some parks, the park rangers have mandated that park visitors rent a bear canister for their food storage. Commercially available bear canisters are made of ABS plastic, weigh 2.8 pounds, and have a 180 cubic inch capacity for food storage. A new design with similar capacity was conducted in this study to reduce its weight and make it a stiffer and stronger canister. Two prototypes incorporating carbon prepreg with and without honeycomb constructions were manufactured using hand lay-up and vacuum bag forming techniques. A 6061-T6-aluminum ring was machined to dimensions in order to reinforce the opening area of the canister. Physical properties (weight and volume) along with mechanical properties (flexural strength and specific allowable moment) of the newly fabricated canisters are compared against the commercial ones. The composite canister weighs only 56% of the ABS one can withstand 9 times of the force greater. The advantages and limitations of using composite bear canisters will be discussed in the presentation.

  14. The Teddy Bears' Disc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurillard, Diana

    1985-01-01

    Reports an evaluation of the Teddy Bear disc, an interactive videodisc developed at the Open University for a second-level course in metallurgy and materials technology. Findings from observation of students utilizing the videodisc are reviewed; successful design features and design problems are considered; and development costs are outlined. (MBR)

  15. History of ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowson, D.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The familiar precision rolling-element bearings of the twentieth century are products of exacting technology and sophisticated science. Their very effectiveness and basic simplicity of form may discourage further interest in their history and development. Yet the full story covers a large portion of recorded history and surprising evidence of an early recognition of the advantages of rolling motion over sliding action and progress toward the development of rolling-element bearings. The development of rolling-element bearings is followed from the earliest civilizations to the end of the eighteenth century. The influence of general technological developments, particularly those concerned with the movement of large building blocks, road transportation, instruments, water-raising equipment, and windmills are discussed, together with the emergence of studies of the nature of rolling friction and the impact of economic factors. By 1800 the essential features of ball and rolling-element bearings had emerged and it only remained for precision manufacture and mass production to confirm the value of these fascinating machine elements.

  16. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  17. Bearings Incorporating Deadband Rollers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gualtieri, Guy V.

    1996-01-01

    Bearings in high-pressure turbopump redesigned to incorporate rollers allowing limited axial motion within small deadband. Does not permit radial deadband motion. Axial deadband motion used for rotor-thrust-balance control. Design eliminates some nonlinearities in dynamics of pump rotor and assists in suppressing vibrations at harmonics of frequency of rotation.

  18. Fretting fatigue mechanism of bearing cap bolted joints.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zuo, Zhengxing; Qin, Wenjie

    2014-05-01

    Fretting fatigue is a common type of failure of the bearing cap bolted joints. This paper proposes a methodology to analyze the fretting fatigue mechanism of the bearing cap bolted joint. A biaxially loading system was designed to simulate fretting fatigue failure under typical engine working condition. Meanwhile, a submodel was developed in the finite element calculation to analyze the contact status and stress distribution of the structural models. The test result shows that long inclined cracks (about 650 μm long, orientation at 17°-34°) initiate at the middle region of the contact interface. As the increase of the bolt pretension load (from 6000 N to 10,000 N), the crack initial location is getting away from the bolt screw, and the fretting fatigue lives is increasing (from 7.8 × 10(5) to 6.0 × 10(6)). With the fatigue phenomenon and the stress field analysis result, it concludes that the crack initiation is governed by the maximum shear stress; the bolt pretension load and the additional rotate torque caused by the bearing load are the two main factors which affect the fretting fatigue mechanism of the bearing cap bolted joints. It is beneficial to fretting fatigue lives of the bearing cap joints by increasing the bolt pretension load and restraining the oscillation of the bearing cap.

  19. Tibiofemoral conformity and kinematics of rotating-bearing knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, D D; Trice, M; Urquhart, A G; Colwell, C W

    2001-05-01

    Increasing tibiofemoral articular conformity theoretically increases articular contact area and reduces contact stresses in total knee arthroplasty. Fixed-bearing knee designs possess relatively low tibiofemoral conformity, in part to allow tibiofemoral rotation without generating excessive stresses at the articulation or the implant-bone interface. This study analyzed knee kinematics of mobile-bearing designs in a closed chain dynamic knee extension model in posterior cruciate-retaining design with high- and low tibiofemoral conformity and posterior cruciate-substituting designs with and without rotational constraint. Overall, for all conditions, the mobile-bearing insert rotated with the femur in the presence of tibiofemoral axial rotation. In addition, the correlation of bearing rotation with femoral rotation was stronger for the high-conformity and rotationally-constrained designs than for the low-conformity designs and strongest for the posterior cruciate-retaining high-conformity condition. Changes in conformity or rotational constraint did not appear to affect femoral roll back, tibiofemoral axial rotation, or varus-valgus angulation. The results suggest that mobile-bearing inserts rotate with the femur and increasing conformity or rotational constraint in mobile-bearing design knee prostheses does not affect knee kinematics adversely, at least under closed chain knee extension conditions in vitro.

  20. Fretting fatigue mechanism of bearing cap bolted joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Zuo, Zhengxing; Qin, Wenjie

    2014-05-01

    Fretting fatigue is a common type of failure of the bearing cap bolted joints. This paper proposes a methodology to analyze the fretting fatigue mechanism of the bearing cap bolted joint. A biaxially loading system was designed to simulate fretting fatigue failure under typical engine working condition. Meanwhile, a submodel was developed in the finite element calculation to analyze the contact status and stress distribution of the structural models. The test result shows that long inclined cracks (about 650 μm long, orientation at 17°-34°) initiate at the middle region of the contact interface. As the increase of the bolt pretension load (from 6000 N to 10 000 N), the crack initial location is getting away from the bolt screw, and the fretting fatigue lives is increasing (from 7.8 × 105 to 6.0 × 106). With the fatigue phenomenon and the stress field analysis result, it concludes that the crack initiation is governed by the maximum shear stress; the bolt pretension load and the additional rotate torque caused by the bearing load are the two main factors which affect the fretting fatigue mechanism of the bearing cap bolted joints. It is beneficial to fretting fatigue lives of the bearing cap joints by increasing the bolt pretension load and restraining the oscillation of the bearing cap.

  1. Magnetic-Bearing Test Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.; Poole, William L.

    1991-01-01

    Microcomputer-controlled magnetic-bearing test fixture used to develop approaches to design of controls for magnetic bearing actuators designed and constructed. Includes load cells connected to bar, in turn, connected through screw positioners to geared drive motors. Position of equivalent suspended element sensed by position sensors and controlled by drive motors. Provides control of gap in magnetic bearing and of current in electromagnet coil. Measurements made include magnetic-bearing gaps, magnetic flux in bearing gaps, and bearing forces. Approaches to linearization and control developed by use of fixture applicable to wide range of small-gap suspension systems.

  2. Bearing-Cartridge Damping Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goggins, David G.; Scharrer, Joseph K.; Chen, Wei C.

    1991-01-01

    In proposed design for improved ball-bearing cartridge, damping seal in form of thin-layer fluid journal bearing incorporated into cartridge. Damping seal acts as auxiliary bearing, relieving bearing balls of significant portions of both static and dynamic bearing loads. Damping from seal reduces dynamic loads even further by reducing amplitude of vibrations in second vibrational mode of rotor, which mode occurs when rotor turning at nearly full operating speed. Intended for use in high-pressure-oxygen turbopump of Space Shuttle main engine, also applicable to other turbomachinery bearings.

  3. Flexure Bearing Reduces Startup Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, W. Dean

    1991-01-01

    Design concept for ball bearing incorporates small pieces of shim stock, wire spokes like those in bicycle wheels, or other flexing elements to reduce both stiction and friction slope. In flexure bearing, flexing elements placed between outer race of ball bearing and outer ring. Elements flex when ball bearings encounter small frictional-torque "bumps" or even larger ones when bearing balls encounter buildups of grease on inner or outer race. Flexure of elements reduce high friction slopes of "bumps", helping to keep torque between outer ring and inner race low and more nearly constant. Concept intended for bearings in gimbals on laser and/or antenna mirrors.

  4. Lubricant effects on bearing life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1986-01-01

    Lubricant considerations for rolling-element bearings have within the last two decades taken on added importance in the design and operation of mechanical systems. The phenomenon which limits the useful life of bearings is rolling-element or surface pitting fatigue. The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness which separates the ball or roller surface from those of the raceways of the bearing directly affects bearing life. Chemical additives added to the lubricant can also significantly affect bearings life and reliability. The interaction of these physical and chemical effects is important to the design engineer and user of these systems. Design methods and lubricant selection for rolling-element bearings are presented and discussed.

  5. Stress analysis method for clearance-fit joints with bearing-bypass loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Within a multi-fastener joint, fastener holes may be subjected to the combined effects of bearing loads and loads that bypass the hole to be reacted elsewhere in the joint. The analysis of a joint subjected to search combined bearing and bypass loads is complicated by the usual clearance between the hole and the fastener. A simple analysis method for such clearance-fit joints subjected to bearing-bypass loading has been developed in the present study. It uses an inverse formulation with a linear elastic finite-element analysis. Conditions along the bolt-hole contact arc are specified by displacement constraint equations. The present method is simple to apply and can be implemented with most general purpose finite-element programs since it does not use complicated iterative-incremental procedures. The method was used to study the effects of bearing-bypass loading on bolt-hole contact angles and local stresses. In this study, a rigid, frictionless bolt was used with a plate having the properties of a quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminate. Results showed that the contact angle as well as the peak stresses around the hole and their locations were strongly influenced by the ratio of bearing and bypass loads. For single contact, tension and compression bearing-bypass loading had opposite effects on the contact angle. For some compressive bearing-bypass loads, the hole tended to close on the fastener leading to dual contact. It was shown that dual contact reduces the stress concentration at the fastener and would, therefore, increase joint strength in compression. The results illustrate the general importance of accounting for bolt-hole clearance and contact to accurately compute local bolt-hole stresses for combined bearings and bypass loading.

  6. Bacteriology of a bear bite wound to a human: case report.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, Dennis; Rennie, Robert; Citron, Diane M; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2004-07-01

    Human contact with bears has become more frequent, as has the resultant bear maulings and bite injuries. We report the bacteriology of a patient bitten by a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) from the Rocky Mountains foothills area east of Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada. The patient received field care, including metronidazole and cefazolin. Subsequent deep-wound cultures grew Serratia fonticola, Serratia marcescens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, and Enterococcus durans but no anaerobes.

  7. Interference-Fit Life Factors for Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of hoop stresses on the rolling-element fatigue life of angular-contact and deep-groove ball bearings was determined for common inner-ring interference fits at the ABEC-5 tolerance level. The analysis was applied to over 1150 bearing configurations and load cases. Hoop stresses were superimposed on the Hertzian principal stresses created by the applied bearing load to calculate the inner-race maximum shearing stress. The resulting fatigue life of the bearing was recalculated through a series of equations. The reduction in the fatigue life is presented as life factors that are applied to the unfactored bearing life. The life factors found in this study ranged from 1.00 (no life reduction)--where there was no net interface pressure--to a worst case of 0.38 (a 62-percent life reduction). For a given interference fit, the reduction in life is different for angular-contact and deep-groove ball bearings. Interference fits also affect the maximum Hertz stress-life relation. Experimental data of Czyzewski, showing the effect of interference fit on rolling-element fatigue life, were reanalyzed to determine the shear stress-life exponent. The Czyzewski data shear stress-life exponent c equals 8.77, compared with the assumed value of 9. Results are presented as tables and charts of life factors for angular-contact and deep-groove ball bearings with light, normal, and heavy loads and interference fits ranging from extremely light to extremely heavy.

  8. Vygotsky and the Three Bears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulczewski, Peggy

    2004-01-01

    Peggy Kulczewski, a kindergarten classroom teacher, remembers the day when students enjoyed a story she told them from the book "The Three Bears". The students' discussion about comparison of the bears was very helpful to the whole group.

  9. Recirculating valve lash adjuster

    SciTech Connect

    Stoody, R.R.

    1987-02-24

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine with a valve assembly of the type including overhead valves supported by a cylinder head for opening and closing movements in a substantially vertical direction and a rotatable overhead camshaft thereabove lubricated by engine oil pumped by an engine oil pump. A hydraulic lash adjuster with an internal reservoir therein is solely supplied with run-off lubricating oil from the camshaft which oil is pumped into the internal reservoir of the lash adjuster by self-pumping operation of the lash adjuster produced by lateral forces thereon by the rotative operation of the camshaft comprising: a housing of the lash adjuster including an axially extending bore therethrough with a lower wall means of the housing closing the lower end thereof; a first plunger member being closely slidably received in the bore of the housing and having wall means defining a fluid filled power chamber with the lower wall means of the housing; and a second plunger member of the lash adjuster having a portion being loosely slidably received and extending into the bore of the housing for reciprocation therein. Another portion extends upwardly from the housing to operatively receive alternating side-to-side force inputs from operation of the camshaft.

  10. Salto Talaris fixed-bearing total ankle replacement system.

    PubMed

    Rush, Shannon M; Todd, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement is an anatomically designed fixed bearing prosthesis available in the United States based on the successful design of the mobile-bearing Salto prosthesis available outside the United States. The original mobile-bearing design was modified and the mobile-bearing was transferred to the precision instrumentation at the trial phase evaluation. Instrumentation and technique allow the surgeon to determine the functional joint axis before final implantation. The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement design blends minimal bone resection and optimizes surface area, cortical contact, and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene conformity. The authors present an overview of the Salto Talaris total ankle replacement surgical technique and pearls for successful application.

  11. Study of ball bearing torque under elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Allen, C. W.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    Spinning and rolling torques were measured in an angular-contact ball bearing with and without a cage under several lubrication regimes in a modified NASA spinning torque apparatus. Two lubricants were used, a di-2 ethylhexyl sebacate and a synthetic paraffinic oil, at shaft speeds of 1000, 2000, and 3000 rpm and bearing loads from 10 lbs to 90 lbs. An analytical model was developed from previous spinning friction models to include rolling with spinning under lubrication regimes from thin film to flooded conditions. The bearing torque values have a wide variation, under any condition of speed and load, depending on the amount of lubricant present in the bearing. The analytical model compared favorably with experimental results under several lubrication regimes.

  12. Experimental and computational evaluation of rolling bearing steel durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohál, L.; Vaculka, M.

    2017-02-01

    Rolling element bearings are widely-used machine components and their failure can result in damage to the whole machine. A bearing failure can be caused by many factors. In most cases it is damage on the raceway surface as a result of rolling contact fatigue (RCF). This article describes the fatigue analysis consists of determining service-life of a roller bearing using a stress-strain analysis with finite element method and subsequent numeric calculation using software fe-safe with application of multiaxial fatigue criterion. These theoretical results are compared to the experiments carried out on AXMAT test-rig with more accurate defect detection using acoustic emission method. Numerical service-life calculation can be applied as tool for fatigue life prediction of full scale bearing with sufficient correlation with experimental results.

  13. A self-lubricating bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An improved bearing structure is described which includes a permanently magnetized porous body filled with an interstitial magnetic lubricant for extending the operational life of self-lubricating bearings. The bearing structure is characterized by a permanently magnetized retainer formed of a porous material and filled with an interstitial magnetic lubricant, whereby the pores serve as lubricant reservoirs from which the lubricant continuously is delivered to a film disposed between contiguous bearing surfaces.

  14. Rotorcraft Transmission Noise Path Model, Including Distributed Fluid Film Bearing Impedance Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.; Hanford, Amanda D.; Shepherd, Micah R.; Campbell, Robert L.; Smith, Edward C.

    2010-01-01

    A computational approach for simulating the effects of rolling element and journal bearings on the vibration and sound transmission through gearboxes has been demonstrated. The approach, using ARL/Penn State s CHAMP methodology, uses Component Mode Synthesis of housing and shafting modes computed using Finite Element (FE) models to allow for rapid adjustment of bearing impedances in gearbox models. The approach has been demonstrated on NASA GRC s test gearbox with three different bearing configurations: in the first condition, traditional rolling element (ball and roller) bearings were installed, and in the second and third conditions, the traditional bearings were replaced with journal and wave bearings (wave bearings are journal bearings with a multi-lobed wave pattern on the bearing surface). A methodology for computing the stiffnesses and damping in journal and wave bearings has been presented, and demonstrated for the journal and wave bearings used in the NASA GRC test gearbox. The FE model of the gearbox, along with the rolling element bearing coupling impedances, was analyzed to compute dynamic transfer functions between forces applied to the meshing gears and accelerations on the gearbox housing, including several locations near the bearings. A Boundary Element (BE) acoustic model was used to compute the sound radiated by the gearbox. Measurements of the Gear Mesh Frequency (GMF) tones were made by NASA GRC at several operational speeds for the rolling element and journal bearing gearbox configurations. Both the measurements and the CHAMP numerical model indicate that the journal bearings reduce vibration and noise for the second harmonic of the gear meshing tones, but show no clear benefit to using journal bearings to reduce the amplitudes of the fundamental gear meshing tones. Also, the numerical model shows that the gearbox vibrations and radiated sound are similar for journal and wave bearing configurations.

  15. Effect of Internal Clearance on Load Distribution and Life of Radially Loaded Ball and Roller Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of internal clearance on radially loaded deepgroove ball and cylindrical roller bearing load distribution and fatigue life was determined for four clearance groups defined in the bearing standards. The analysis was extended to negative clearance (interference) conditions to produce a curve of life factor versus internal clearance. Rolling-element loads can be optimized and bearing life maximized for a small negative operating clearance. Life declines gradually with positive clearance and rapidly with increasing negative clearance. Relationships were found between bearing life and internal clearance as a function of ball or roller diameter, adjusted for load. Results are presented as life factors for radially loaded bearings independent of bearing size or applied load. In addition, a modified Stribeck Equation is presented that relates the maximum rolling-element load to internal bearing clearance.

  16. Comparison of rotational speeds and torque properties between air-bearing and ball-bearing air-turbine handpieces.

    PubMed

    Taira, M; Wakasa, K; Yamaki, M; Matsui, A

    1989-06-01

    We examined the effects of air pressure on the free-running speed of air-bearing and torque-type ball-bearing air-turbine handpieces. The air pressure for the former should be kept at a certain high level to maintain the stable super-thin air-bearing film and to provide the quasi-constant speed of around 420,000 to 480,000 rpm. On the other hand, the air pressure for the latter could be adjusted to provide some varieties of speeds, ranging from about 150,000 to 320,000 rpm. Subsequently, to compare torque properties and cutting effectiveness between these two handpieces, weight-load cutting tests were conducted, using a glass-ceramic workpiece and a commercial diamond point. It was confirmed that the air-bearing handpiece had the lower torque power but exhibited better cutting effectiveness, compared with its counterpart.

  17. Performance of solid lubricated ball bearings at high-temperatures in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Katsumi; Suzuki, Mineo; Nishimura, Makoto; Hasegawa, Masaji; Moriyama, Minoru

    1994-07-01

    Ball bearings which can operate at high temperatures in a vacuum will be required with advances in technology. Among the issues for the operation of ball bearings at high temperatures, solid lubricants and bearing materials are crucial. The aim of this study was to develop ball bearings for use at high temperatures in a vacuum. The tested bearings were 20-mm bore-sized angular contact ball bearings. Three combinations of bearing materials were tested: M-50 bearings, hybrid bearings with M-50 races and Si3N4 balls, and Si3N4 bearings. M-50 bearings were lubricated with a silver film. Hybrid and ceramic bearings were lubricated with a pre-coated sputtered MoS2 film and a self-lubricating hot-pressed composite retainer. Tests were carried out at temperatures up to 500 C and a rotational speed of 600 rpm under an axial load of 50 N in a vacuum. Excellent performance at 500 C in a vacuum was obtained for Si3N4 bearings. Frictional torque was low and stable for more than 5x10(exp 7) revolutions. After the tests, the bearings were in very good condition with a small amount of wear. Hybrid bearings also showed very good performance at 350 C in a vacuum. M-50 steel bearings were operated without failure at 350 C in a vacuum, although frictional torque was rather high and unstable. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation revealed the existence of a film on the ball surface transferred from the composite retainer for both hybrid and ceramic bearings.

  18. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing assembly (10) has an intermediate rotatable section (33) having an outer cylindrical member (30) coaxially suspended by a torsion wire (72) around an axially polarized cylindrical magnet (32). Axial alignment between the pole faces (40-43) of the intermediate section (33) and end surfaces (50-53) of opposed end bells (20, 22) provides a path of least reluctance across intervening air gaps (60-63) for the magnetic flux emanating from magnet (32). Radial dislocation increases the reluctance and creates a radial restoring force. Substitution of radially polarized magnets 107 fixed to a magnetically permeable cylinder (32') and insertion of pairs of armature coil windings (109-112) between the cylinder pair (33') provides an integral magnetic bearing and torsion motor (100) able to provide arcuately limited rotational drive.

  19. Passive magnetic bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  20. Rotating plug bearing and seal

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1977-01-01

    A bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing.

  1. Mixed Lubrication Simulation of Hydrostatic Spherical Bearings for Hydraulic Piston Pumps and Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, Toshiharu

    Mixed and fluid film lubrication characteristics of hydrostatic spherical bearings for swash-plate-type axial piston pumps and motors are studied theoretically under non-steady-state conditions. The basic equations incorporating interference and contact of surface roughness are derived fundamentally through combination of the GW and PC models. Furthermore, a programming code that is applicable to the caulked-socket-type and open-socket-type bearings is developed. Effects of caulking, operating conditions, and the bearing dimension on the motion of the sphere and tribological performance of the bearings are examined. Salient conclusions are the following: The sphere's eccentricity increases in the low supply pressure period. The time-lag of the load change engenders greater motion of the sphere. Caulking of the bearing socket suppresses the sphere's motion. The bearing stiffness increases and power loss decreases for smaller recess angles. Minimum power loss is given under the condition that the bearing socket radius nearly equals the equivalent load radius.

  2. Development of the High Efficiency Reciprocating Compressor by Clarification of Loss Generation in Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Masaru; Kitsunai, Yoko; Inagaki, Ko

    An analytical model for mixed lubrication in bearings of reciprocating compressors for refrigerators has been developed and a new bearing which could decrease its friction losses by 20% has been designed. Because friction losses, which are generated in the journal and thrust bearing of our reciprocating compressor, are estimated to be one-third or more of all losses, it is an essential issue to decrease bearing losses to design more efficient compressors. The developed analytical model can calculate the shaft posture which changes during its rotation. Based on this posture, losses due to oil viscosity and solid contact at both the thrust and journal bearing are specified. By using this model, how and how much friction loss is generated in each bearing is clarified. A specific approach to decrease bearing losses is clarified and the validity of the developed model is confirmed by the experiment. By using the model, improvement of performance of our compressor by 2.5% has been achieved.

  3. Capping risk adjustment?

    PubMed

    Eugster, Patrick; Sennhauser, Michèle; Zweifel, Peter

    2010-07-01

    When premiums are community-rated, risk adjustment (RA) serves to mitigate competitive insurers' incentive to select favorable risks. However, unless fully prospective, it also undermines their incentives for efficiency. By capping its volume, one may try to counteract this tendency, exposing insurers to some financial risk. This in term runs counter the quest to refine the RA formula, which would increase RA volume. Specifically, the adjuster, "Hospitalization or living in a nursing home during the previous year" will be added in Switzerland starting 2012. This paper investigates how to minimize the opportunity cost of capping RA in terms of increased incentives for risk selection.

  4. Contact Us about Asbestos

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    How to contact EPA for more information on asbestos, including state and regional contacts, EPA’s Asbestos Abatement/Management Ombudsman and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Assistance Information Service (TSCA Hotline).

  5. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Halloween Hazard: The Hidden Dangers of Buying Decorative Contact Lenses Without a Prescription Sep. 26, 2013 It ... the truth." Real People, Real Problems with Colored Contact Lenses Julian: Teenager Blinded In One Eye By ...

  6. Foil Bearing Starting Considerations and Requirements for Rotorcraft Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Foil gas bearings under development for rotorcraft-sized, hot core engine applications have been susceptible to damage from the slow acceleration and rates typically encountered during the pre-ignition stage in conventional engines. Recent laboratory failures have been assumed to be directly linked to operating foil bearings below their lift-off speed while following conventional startup procedures for the engines. In each instance, the continuous sliding contact between the foils and shaft was believed to thermally overload the bearing and cause the engines to fail. These failures highlight the need to characterize required acceleration rates and minimum operating speeds for these applications. In this report, startup experiments were conducted with a large, rotorcraft engine sized foil bearing under moderate load and acceleration rates to identify the proper start procedures needed to avoid bearing failure. The results showed that a bearing under a 39.4 kPa static load can withstand a modest acceleration rate of 500 rpm/s and excessive loitering below the bearing lift-off speed provided an adequate solid lubricant is present.

  7. Magnetic translator bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockney, Richard L. (Inventor); Downer, James R. (Inventor); Eisenhaure, David B. (Inventor); Hawkey, Timothy J. (Inventor); Johnson, Bruce G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic bearing system for enabling translational motion includes a carriage and a shaft for movably supporting the carriage; a first magnetic bearing fixed to one of the carriage and shaft and slidably received in a first channel of the other of the carriage and shaft. The first channel is generally U shaped with two side walls and a back wall. The magnetic bearing includes a pair of spaced magnetic pole pieces, each pole piece having a pair of electromagnetic coils mounted on poles on opposite ends of the pole piece proximate the side walls, and a third electromagnetic coil mounted on a pole of the pole piece proximate the backwall; a motion sensor for sensing translational motion along two axes and rotationally about three axes of the carriage and shaft relative to each other; and a correction circuit responsive to the sensor for generating a correction signal to drive the coils to compensate for any misalignment sensed between the carriage and the shaft.

  8. The series hybrid bearing - A new high speed bearing concept.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Fleming, D. P.; Parker, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    The series-hybrid bearing couples a fluid-film bearing with a rolling-element bearing such that the rolling-element bearing inner race runs at a fraction of shaft speed. A series-hybrid bearing was analyzed and experiments were run at thrust loads from 100 to 300 lb and speeds from 4000 to 30,000 rpm. Agreement between theoretical and experimental speed sharing was good. The lowest speed ratio (ratio of ball bearing inner-race speed to shaft speed) obtained was 0.67. This corresponds to an approximate reduction in DN value of 1/3. For a ball bearing in a 3 million DN application, fatigue life would theoretically be improved by a factor as great as 8.

  9. Contact Lenses on Submarines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    NAVAL SUBMARINE MEDICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY SUBMARINE BASE, GROTON, CONN. REPORT NUMBER 1048 CONTACT LENSES ON SUBMARINES... CONTACT LENSES ON SUBMARINES by James F. Socks, CDR, MSC, USN NAVAL SUBMARINE MEDICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY REPORT NUMBER 1048 NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH...DRSCHLAB Approved for public release; distribution unlimited SUMMARY PAGE PROBLEM To determine the feasibility of wearing contact lenses aboard

  10. Glasses and Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Glasses and Contact Lenses KidsHealth > For Kids > Glasses and Contact Lenses Print A A A What's in this ... together the way they should. But eyeglasses or contact lenses, also called corrective lenses, can help most ...

  11. Evolution and use of combined mechanical and thermal codes for cryogenic turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cody, Joe C.; Marty, David E.; Moore, James D.

    1988-01-01

    Shaft bearing system analysis codes were developed, improved, and used to investigate Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Liquid Oxygen (LOX) turbopump bearing problems, and to support the Marshall Space Flight Center Bearing and Seal Materials Test (BSMT) program. Thermal network modeling uses the SINDA thermal code, and the modeling of bearing quasi-dynamic characteristics uses the SHABERTH bearing/shaft code. These codes are solved concurrently for a bearing/shaft system using software developed for this purpose. Simulation of the SSME LOX turbopump turbine and pump end bearings and the MSFC BSMT operating in liquid nitrogen (LN sub 2) and LOX was done. The thermal network models include the bearing components, bearing carriers, shaft, housing, frictional heat, and viscous fluid energy. A cage model was included to account for heat generation between the cage and rolling elements. Since most bearing surfaces operate at temperatures well above the coolant saturation temperature, and move at high speed relative to the coolant, forced convection boiling is the dominant mechanism for heat removal. Improved modeling of forced convection film boiling was incorporated to take into account the local vapor generation at the high temperature surfaces. Rearing preloads in the pump and tester are provided by preload springs. As bearing operating clearances and contact angles change due to thermal effects and loading, the bearing preload changes with these varying conditions. These characteristics were modeled and are included in the overall system models. Results from these models indicate an operational limit which, if exceeded, predicts a thermal excursion.

  12. [Use of rigid gas permeable contact lenses].

    PubMed

    Habela, M

    1992-01-01

    By application of contact lenses destined for a extended wearing, for preservation of a normal structure and metabolism of the cornea a considerable permeability of the contact lens for oxygen is necessary (Dk/L 75-80). The actually most popular in the world soft contact lenses have no such parameters. The application of rigid lenses produced from materials of high permeability for oxygen enables the extended wearing without substantial disturbances of the corneal metabolism. The paper presents a new generation of fluoro-silicone acrylates used for the production of contact lenses permeable for oxygen. Discussed are the problems connected with the adjusting of these lenses, their tolerance and influence on the corneal metabolism.

  13. The bear that never was

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, T.S.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Herrero, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    From campfire stories to sensational books detailing gory attacks, Alaska's bears have long been maligned as deadly marauders capable of acquiring a taste for human flesh. Tall tales make for good storytelling but force bad reputations on the bears. When myth is compared to fact, the three North American's leading bear experts show that Alaska's three bear species are not the huge, unpredictable monsters they often are made out to be. Here, Smith, Amstrup, and Herrero examine the conventional wisdom people often hear regarding bears in the Great Land.

  14. Bearing for liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, Robert J.; Wasko, John; Pennell, William E.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid metal pump bearing support comprises a series of tangentially oriented spokes that connect the bearing cylinder to the pump internals structure. The spokes may be arranged in a plurality of planes extending from the bearing cylinder to the pump internals with the spokes in one plane being arranged alternately with those in the next plane. The bearing support structure provides the pump with sufficient lateral support for the bearing structure together with the capability of accommodating differential thermal expansion without adversely affecting pump performance.

  15. Designing the brawny gas bearing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of a graphic technique for matching specific groove parameters to operating conditions in order to optimize the load carrying capacity of a herringbone-grooved bearing. Details are given on the optimization of the film thickness ratio, the groove width ratio, the groove angle, and the groove length ratio to obtain a maximum radial load capacity. The effect of the dimensionless bearing number on optimal groove configuration parameters is shown in diagrams. Curves are also plotted to compare the capacities of a herringbone-grooved bearing and a plain bearing, showing the former has a higher load capacity than the latter when the dimensionless bearing number is large.

  16. Hybrid Bearing Prognostic Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Certo, Joseph M.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Dimofte, Florin

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a new Hybrid Bearing Prognostic Test Rig to evaluate the performance of sensors and algorithms in predicting failures of rolling element bearings for aeronautics and space applications. The failure progression of both conventional and hybrid (ceramic rolling elements, metal races) bearings can be tested from fault initiation to total failure. The effects of different lubricants on bearing life can also be evaluated. Test conditions monitored and recorded during the test include load, oil temperature, vibration, and oil debris. New diagnostic research instrumentation will also be evaluated for hybrid bearing damage detection. This paper summarizes the capabilities of this new test rig.

  17. Self Adjusting Sunglasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Corning Glass Works' Serengeti Driver sunglasses are unique in that their lenses self-adjust and filter light while suppressing glare. They eliminate more than 99% of the ultraviolet rays in sunlight. The frames are based on the NASA Anthropometric Source Book.

  18. Self adjusting inclinometer

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    An inclinometer utilizing synchronous demodulation for high resolution and electronic offset adjustment provides a wide dynamic range without any moving components. A device encompassing a tiltmeter and accompanying electronic circuitry provides quasi-leveled tilt sensors that detect highly resolved tilt change without signal saturation.

  19. Rolling Contact Fatigue of Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Wang, W.; Wang, Y.; Hadfield, M.; Kanematsu, W.; Kirkland, Timothy Philip; Jadaan, Osama M.

    2006-09-01

    High hardness, low coefficient of thermal expansion and high temperature capability are properties also suited to rolling element materials. Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) has been found to have a good combination of properties suitable for these applications. However, much is still not known about rolling contact fatigue (RCF) behavior, which is fundamental information to assess the lifetime of the material. Additionally, there are several test techniques that are employed internationally whose measured RCF performances are often irreconcilable. Due to the lack of such information, some concern for the reliability of ceramic bearings still remains. This report surveys a variety of topics pertaining to RCF. Surface defects (cracks) in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and their propagation during RCF are discussed. Five methods to measure RCF are then briefly overviewed. Spalling, delamination, and rolling contact wear are discussed. Lastly, methods to destructively (e.g., C-sphere flexure strength testing) and non-destructively identify potential RCF-limiting flaws in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls are described.

  20. Bearing construction for refrigeration compresssor

    DOEpatents

    Middleton, Marc G.; Nelson, Richard T.

    1988-01-01

    A hermetic refrigeration compressor has a cylinder block and a crankshaft rotatable about a vertical axis to reciprocate a piston in a cylinder on the cylinder block. A separate bearing housing is secured to the central portion of the cylinder block and extends vertically along the crankshaft, where it carries a pair of roller bearings to journal the crankshaft. The crankshaft has a radially extending flange which is journaled by a thrust-type roller bearing above the bearing housing to absorb the vertical forces on the crankshaft so that all three of the roller bearings are between the crankshaft and the bearing housing to maintain and control the close tolerances required by such bearings.

  1. Contact lens in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Varsha M; Mandathara, Preeji S; Dumpati, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL), hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the English language with the keywords keratoconus and various contact lenses such as Rose k lens, RGP lens, hybrid lens, scleral lens and PBCL. PMID:23925325

  2. Effect of Bearing Cleaning on Long Term Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, Tim; Thom, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    For many years chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) based solvents, such as CFC-113 and 1,1,1, trichloroethane (TCA), were used as bearing cleaning solvents for space mechanism bearings. The 1995 ban on the production of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) such as CFCs caused a change requiring the use of ODC-free cleaners for precision bearing cleaning. With this change the question arises; what effect if any do these new cleaners have on long term bearing life? The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect. A one year test using 60 small electrical motors (two bearings per motor) was conducted in a high vacuum environment (2.0 x 10(exp -6) torr) at a temperature of 90 C. Prior to testing the bearings were cleaned with one of four cleaners. These cleaners included two aqueous based cleaners, a CFC based cleaner and supercritical carbon dioxide. Three space compatible greases were tested. After testing, the mass of each lubricated bearing was measured both pre and post test. Along with mass loss measurements a profilometer trace of each bearing was taken to measure post test wear of the bearings. In addition, the bearings were visually examined and analyzed using an optical microscope.

  3. Generated spiral bevel gears: Optimal machine-tool settings and tooth contact analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Tsung, W. J.; Coy, J. J.; Heine, C.

    1985-01-01

    Geometry and kinematic errors were studied for Gleason generated spiral bevel gears. A new method was devised for choosing optimal machine settings. These settings provide zero kinematic errors and an improved bearing contact. The kinematic errors are a major source of noise and vibration in spiral bevel gears. The improved bearing contact gives improved conditions for lubrication. A computer program for tooth contact analysis was developed, and thereby the new generation process was confirmed. The new process is governed by the requirement that during the generation process there is directional constancy of the common normal of the contacting surfaces for generator and generated surfaces of pinion and gear.

  4. Generated spiral bevel gears - Optimal machine-tool settings and tooth contact analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Tsung, W.-J.; Coy, J. J.; Heine, C.

    1985-01-01

    Geometry and kinematic errors were studied for Gleason generated spiral bevel gears. A new method was devised for choosing optimal machine settings. These settings provide zero kinematic errors and an improved bearing contact. The kinematic errors are a major source of noise and vibration in spiral bevel gears. The improved bearing contact gives improved conditions for lubrication. A computer program for tooth contact analysis was developed, and thereby the new generation process was confirmed. The new process is governed by the requirement that during the generation process there is directional constancy of the common normal of the contacting surfaces for generator and generated surfaces of pinion and gear.

  5. A method to determine dynamic loads on spur gear teeth and on bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedmar, L.; Andersson, A.

    2003-11-01

    A method is described which can be used to calculate dynamic gear tooth force and bearing forces. The model includes elastic bearings. The gear mesh stiffness and the path of contact are determined using the deformations of the gears and the bearings. This gives contact outside the plane-of-action and a time-varying working pressure angle. In a numerical example it is found that the only important vibration mode for the gear contact is the one where the gear tooth deformation is dominant. The bearing force variation, however, will be much more affected by the other vibration modes. The influence of the friction force is also studied. The friction has no dynamic influence on the gear contact force or on the bearing force in the gear mesh line-of-action direction. On the other hand, the changing of sliding directions in the pitch point is a source for critical oscillations of the bearings in the gear tooth frictional direction. These bearing force oscillations in the frictional direction appear unaffected by the dynamic response along the gear mesh line-of-action direction.

  6. Sequentially flooding and oil-bearing formation with a surfactant and hot aqueous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, D.C.

    1991-05-14

    This patent describes a process for recovering oil from an oil-wet fractured subterranean oil-bearing formation having an ambient formation temperature and penetrated by at least two wells from the surface which are in fluid communication with the formation. It comprises: injecting a first slug; contacting a face; injecting a second slug; and contacting the face.

  7. Effects of bearing offset and flexibility on the mesh force distribution of spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    For straight or spiral bevel gears of nominal spherical involute design, the resultant total force vector transmitted by the gear mesh, in the absence of friction, lies in the plane of tooth contact. This force vector can be characterized by three scalar components, two orthogonal force components lying in the plane of contact and the resultant moment taken about the nominal center of the zone of contact. Equations for these three generalized force components are derived. The equations are expressed in terms of tooth pair/gear body stiffnesses, bearing/bearing support flexibility influence coefficients, the shaft input torque, deviations of the tooth running surfaces from perfect spherical involute surfaces, and bearing centerline offsets from the positions occupied by the base cone axes of the perfect involute bevel gear counterparts to the actual gears under consideration. Inertial forces arising from transverse and axial vibrations of the gear bodies are assumed to be negligible in comparison with the bearing support reaction forces.

  8. Effect of speed and load on ultra-high-speed ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, E. N.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Signer, H.

    1975-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the effects of speed and load on the operation of 120-mm bore angular-contact ball bearings at speeds to 25,000 rpm and thrust loads to 22,240 newtons (5000 lb). Bearing temperature and power consumption increased with increases in load and/or speed. The effect of load on temperature and power consumption was small relative to the speed effect. Actual measurements of bearing operating contact angle were in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Skidding occurred in the bearing in various amounts, generally increasing with speed at given load. The highest amount of skidding, 6 percent, occurred at the highest speed, 25,000 rpm. No visible damage to the bearing surfaces occurred due to the skidding.

  9. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Oxygen Turbopump Technology. Final Report, Volume 1. Design, Fabrication, and Hydrostatic Bearing Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    cc c 58 uju CD C:> ɘ CDC L.) C) 0 crc> 01 2Li L-1 c-.l0 I CD C.- 2.5,Detail Design, cont. assembly error . The most sensitive area for contact is the...exit ports sealed. All transducers sensed within their typi- cal error tolerance at the low pressures being used in the initial tests. Chilldown tests...exterior temp. at turbine TIPO OF (0.25,0) bearing IPmp bearing exit tenperature TPBEC OF PBEI Pmp bearing exit temperature TPBEC OF PBE2 SPump bearing

  10. Fatigue life of high-speed ball bearings with silicon nitride balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    Evaluation of hot-pressed silicon nitride as a rolling-element bearing material. Two grades of hot-pressed silicon nitride balls were tested under rolling contact conditions in a five-ball fatigue tester. A digital computer program was used to predict the dynamic performance characteristics and fatigue life of high-speed ball bearings with silicon nitride balls relative to that with bearings containing steel balls. The results obtained include the finding that fatigue spalls on silicon nitride balls are similar in appearance to those obtained with typical bearing steels.

  11. Gold-bearing skarns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theodore, Ted G.; Orris, Greta J.; Hammerstrom, Jane M.; Bliss, James D.

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, a significant proportion of the mining industry's interest has been centered on discovery of gold deposits; this includes discovery of additional deposits where gold occurs in skarn, such as at Fortitude, Nevada, and at Red Dome, Australia. Under the classification of Au-bearing skarns, we have modeled these and similar gold-rich deposits that have a gold grade of at least 1 g/t and exhibit distinctive skarn mineralogy. Two subtypes, Au-skarns and byproduct Au-skarns, can be recognized on the basis of gold, silver, and base-metal grades, although many other geological factors apparently are still undistinguishable largely because of a lack of detailed studies of the Au-skarns. Median grades and tonnage for 40 Au-skarn deposits are 8.6 g/t Au, 5.0 g/t Ag, and 213,000 t. Median grades and tonnage for 50 byproduct and Au-skarn deposits are 3.7 g/t Au, 37 g/t Ag, and 330,000 t. Gold-bearing skarns are generally calcic exoskarns associated with intense retrograde hydrosilicate alteration. These skarns may contain economic amounts of numerous other commodities (Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn, As, Bi, W, Sb, Co, Cd, and S) as well as gold and silver. Most Au-bearing skarns are found in Paleozoic and Cenozoic orogenic-belt and island-arc settings and are associated with felsic to intermediate intrusive rocks of Paleozoic to Tertiary age. Native gold, electru, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, sphalerite, galena, bismuth minerals, and magnetite or hematite are the most common opaque minerals. Gangue minerals typically include garnet (andradite-grossular), pyroxene (diopside-hedenbergite), wollastonite, chlorite, epidote, quartz, actinolite-tremolite, and (or) calcite.

  12. Numerical analysis of human dental occlusal contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, F. S.; Las Casas, E. B.; Godoy, G. C. D.; Meireles, A. B.

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain real contact areas, forces, and pressures acting on human dental enamel as a function of the nominal pressure during dental occlusal contact. The described development consisted of three steps: characterization of the surface roughness by 3D contact profilometry test, finite element analysis of micro responses for each pair of main asperities in contact, and homogenization of macro responses using an assumed probability density function. The inelastic deformation of enamel was considered, adjusting the stress-strain relationship of sound enamel to that obtained from instrumented indentation tests conducted with spherical tip. A mechanical part of the static friction coefficient was estimated as the ratio between tangential and normal components of the overall resistive force, resulting in μd = 0.057. Less than 1% of contact pairs reached the yield stress of enamel, indicating that the occlusal contact is essentially elastic. The micro-models indicated an average hardness of 6.25GPa, and the homogenized result for macroscopic interface was around 9GPa. Further refinements of the methodology and verification using experimental data can provide a better understanding of processes related to contact, friction and wear of human tooth enamel.

  13. Retrieval analysis of alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearing couples

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearings have been in use in total hip replacement (THR) for more than 40 years, with excellent long-term survivorship. Although there have been several simulator studies describing the performance of these joints, there have only been a few retrieval analyses. The aim of this study was to investigate the wear patterns, the surface properties, and friction and lubrication regimes of explanted first-generation alumina bearings. Materials and methods We studied 9 explanted CoC bearings from Autophor THRs that were revised for aseptic loosening after a mean of 16 (range 7–19) years. The 3D surface roughness profiles of the femoral heads and acetabular cups (Srms, Sa, and Ssk) were measured to determine the microscopic wear. The bearings were imaged using an atomic-force microscope in contact mode, to produce a topographical map of the surfaces of the femoral heads. Friction tests were performed on the bearing couples to determine the lubrication regime under which they were operating during the walking cycle. The diametral clearances were also measured. Results 3 femoral heads showed stripe wear and the remaining 6 bearings showed minimal wear. The femoral heads with stripe wear had significantly higher surface roughness than the minimally worn bearings (0.645 vs. 0.289, p = 0.04). High diametral clearances, higher than expected friction, and mixed/boundary lubrication regimes prevailed in these retrieved bearings. Interpretation Despite the less than ideal tribological factors, these first-generation CoC bearings still showed minimal wear in the long term compared to previous retrieval analyses. PMID:24650021

  14. Development of hybrid bearing system with thrust superconducting magnetic bearing and radial active electromagnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolsky, R.; Pereira, A. S.; de Andrade, R.; David, D. F. B.; Santisteban, J. A.; Stephan, R. M.; Ripper, A.; Gawalek, W.; Habisreuther, T.; Strasser, T.

    A superconducting/electromagnetic hybrid bearing system is currently under development and test. This system consists of a thrust superconducting magnetic bearing and a double radial active electromagnetic bearing/motor devices. The thrust bearing has been designed using NdFeB permanent magnets levitating on a set of superconducting monoliths of YBCO, prepared by top seeded melt texturing technique, which supports the weight of the rotor. The bearing/motor devices were conceived as 4-pole 2-phase induction machine using stator windings for delivering torque and radial positioning simultaneously. Using this superconducting axial bearing and the active bearings for the rotor radial positioning, a fully levitating vertical-shaft inductive machine has been tested. The tests were successful in reaching a controlled levitation up to 6,300 rpm.

  15. Life of concentrated contacts in the mixed-ehd and boundary-film regimes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCool, J.I.

    1989-08-01

    This analytical and experimental program investigates the influence of surface finish, material and lubricant on rolling contact bearings operating in the low or marginal lubricant film regime. The investigation includes failure analysis of field failures encountered with Helicopter mast support and planetary gear transmission bearings, computer analysis of the above two bearing applications using SKF computer programs SHABERTH and PLANETSYS and testing of specimens made of M50 and 9310 steel using a geared roller tester at NAPC.

  16. Aerospace applications of magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hockney, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have traditionally been considered for use in aerospace applications only where performance advantages have been the primary, if not only, consideration. Conventional wisdom has been that magnetic bearings have certain performance advantages which must be traded off against increased weight, volume, electric power consumption, and system complexity. These perceptions have hampered the use of magnetic bearings in many aerospace applications because weight, volume, and power are almost always primary considerations. This paper will review progress on several active aerospace magnetic bearings programs at SatCon Technology Corporation. The magnetic bearing programs at SatCon cover a broad spectrum of applications including: a magnetically-suspended spacecraft integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS), a magnetically-suspended momentum wheel, magnetic bearings for the gas generator rotor of a turboshaft engine, a vibration-attenuating magnetic bearing system for an airborne telescope, and magnetic bearings for the compressor of a space-rated heat pump system. The emphasis of these programs is to develop magnetic bearing technologies to the point where magnetic bearings can be truly useful, reliable, and well tested components for the aerospace community.

  17. Aerospace applications of magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hockney, Richard

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic bearings have traditionally been considered for use in aerospace applications only where performance advantages have been the primary, if not only, consideration. Conventional wisdom has been that magnetic bearings have certain performance advantages which must be traded off against increased weight, volume, electric power consumption, and system complexity. These perceptions have hampered the use of magnetic bearings in many aerospace applications because weight, volume, and power are almost always primary considerations. This paper will review progress on several active aerospace magnetic bearings programs at SatCon Technology Corporation. The magnetic bearing programs at SatCon cover a broad spectrum of applications including: a magnetically-suspended spacecraft integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS), a magnetically-suspended momentum wheel, magnetic bearings for the gas generator rotor of a turboshaft engine, a vibration-attenuating magnetic bearing system for an airborne telescope, and magnetic bearings for the compressor of a space-rated heat pump system. The emphasis of these programs is to develop magnetic bearing technologies to the point where magnetic bearings can be truly useful, reliable, and well tested components for the aerospace community.

  18. Experimental ball bearing dynamics study. [by high speed photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signer, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    A photographic method was employed to record the kinematic performance of rolling elements in turbo machinery ball bearings. The 110 mm split inner ring test bearings had nominal contact angles of 26 deg and 34 deg. High speed films were taken at inner ring speeds of 4,000, 8,000 and 12,000 rpm and at thrust loads of 4,448 N and 22,240 N (1,000 and 5,000 lbs). The films were measured and this data reduced to obtain separator speed, ball speed and ball spin axis orientation.

  19. The ball bearing as a rheological test device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, E.

    1984-01-01

    An angular-contact ball bearing provides an easily obtainable, precise mechanical system for rheological tests on thin films under high pressure. The test conditions are by definition similar to those found in practice. Accessible independent variables include size, pressure, bulk temperature, roughness, adsorbed surfactant, fluid type, fluid quantity, fluid supply rate, film thickness, entrainment velocity, transit time, and combined strain. Easily measured or inferred variables include slip, changes in film thickness with time (transients), strain rate, lubricant elastic modulus (thin film, high pressure), tractive force, lubricant chemical degradation rate, and lubricant degradation product. Methods for setting and obtaining these quantities in a bearing are discussed, together with experimental limitations on them.

  20. [Immunology of contact allergy].

    PubMed

    Martin, S F

    2011-10-01

    Contact allergy is a skin disease that is caused by the reaction of the immune system to low molecular weight chemicals. A hallmark of contact allergens is their chemical reactivity, which is not exhibited by toxic irritants. Covalent binding of contact allergens to or complex formation with proteins is essential for the activation of the immune system. As a consequence antigenic epitopes are formed, which are recognized by contact allergen-specific T cells. The generation of effector and memory T cells causes the high antigen specificity and the repeated antigen-specific skin reaction of contact allergy. New findings reveal that the less specific reaction of the innate immune system to contact allergens closely resembles the reaction to an infection. Therefore, contact allergy can be viewed as an immunologic misunderstanding since the skin contact with chemical allergens is interpreted as an infection. The growing understanding of the molecular and cellular pathologic mechanisms of contact allergy can aid the development of specific therapies and of in vitro alternatives to animal testing for the identification of contact allergens.

  1. Adjustable Autonomy Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schrenkenghost, Debra K.

    2001-01-01

    The Adjustable Autonomy Testbed (AAT) is a simulation-based testbed located in the Intelligent Systems Laboratory in the Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division at NASA Johnson Space Center. The purpose of the testbed is to support evaluation and validation of prototypes of adjustable autonomous agent software for control and fault management for complex systems. The AA T project has developed prototype adjustable autonomous agent software and human interfaces for cooperative fault management. This software builds on current autonomous agent technology by altering the architecture, components and interfaces for effective teamwork between autonomous systems and human experts. Autonomous agents include a planner, flexible executive, low level control and deductive model-based fault isolation. Adjustable autonomy is intended to increase the flexibility and effectiveness of fault management with an autonomous system. The test domain for this work is control of advanced life support systems for habitats for planetary exploration. The CONFIG hybrid discrete event simulation environment provides flexible and dynamically reconfigurable models of the behavior of components and fluids in the life support systems. Both discrete event and continuous (discrete time) simulation are supported, and flows and pressures are computed globally. This provides fast dynamic simulations of interacting hardware systems in closed loops that can be reconfigured during operations scenarios, producing complex cascading effects of operations and failures. Current object-oriented model libraries support modeling of fluid systems, and models have been developed of physico-chemical and biological subsystems for processing advanced life support gases. In FY01, water recovery system models will be developed.

  2. High speed cylindrical roller bearing analysis, SKF computer program CYBEAN. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.

    1978-01-01

    The CYBEAN (Cylindrical Bearing Analysis) was created to detail radially loaded, aligned and misaligned cylindrical roller bearing performance under a variety of operating conditions. Emphasis was placed on detailing the effects of high speed, preload and system thermal coupling. Roller tilt, skew, radial, circumferential and axial displacement as well as flange contact were considered. Variable housing and flexible out-of-round outer ring geometries, and both steady state and time transient temperature calculations were enabled. The complete range of elastohydrodynamic contact considerations, employing full and partial film conditions were treated in the computation of raceway and flange contacts. Input and output architectures containing guidelines for use and a sample execution are detailed.

  3. Rolling contact fatigue of low hardness steel for slewing ring application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Jason A.

    This thesis discusses the rolling contact fatigue of steel utilized in anti-friction bearings, also referred to as slewing bearings. These slewing bearings are utilized in cranes, excavators, wind turbines and other similar applications. Five materials composed of two different material types were tested. The two material types were high carbon steel and medium carbon alloy steel. The test specimens were processed from forged rolled rings. Two machines were evaluated a ZF-RCF and 3-Ball test machine. The evaluation was to determine which machine can best simulate the application in which the slewing bearing is utilized. Initially, each specimen will be pretested to determine the appropriate testing direction from within the forged rolled rings. Pretesting is needed in order to establish consistent failure modes between samples. The primary goal of the test is to understand the life differences and failure modes between high carbon steel and medium carbon alloy steel. The high carbon steel ring was cut into two sections, one of which was stress relieved and the other was quenched and tempered. The medium carbon alloy steel was cut into three sections, all of which were quenched and tempered to different hardness levels. The test program was dynamically adjusted based upon the previous sample's life and load. An S-N curve was then established from the 5 materials tested at two target loads. The samples were run until the first sign of a crack was detected by an eddy current. At the completion of the rolling contact test, select sample's microstructure was evaluated for crack initiation location. The selected samples were divided into four groups which represent different maximum shear stress levels. These samples displayed indications of material deformation in which the high carbon steel experienced an increased amount of cold work when compared to medium carbon alloy steel. The life of the high carbon steel was nearly equivalent to the expected life of the medium

  4. Reduction in bearing size due to superconductors in magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Dantam K.; Lewis, Paul; Dill, James F.

    1991-01-01

    A design concept that reduces the size of magnetic bearings is assessed. The small size will enable magnetic bearings to fit into limited available bearing volume of cryogenic machinery. The design concept, called SUPERC, uses (high Tc) superconductors or high-purity aluminum conductors in windings instead of copper. The relatively high-current density of these conductors reduces the slot radial thickness for windings, which reduces the size of the bearings. MTI developed a sizing program called SUPERC that translates the high-current density of these conductors into smaller sized bearings. This program was used to size a superconducting bearing to carry a 500 lb. load. The sizes of magnetic bearings needed by various design concepts are as follows: SUPERC design concept = 3.75 in.; magnet-bias design concept = 5.25 in.; and all electromagnet design concept = 7.0 in. These results indicate that the SUPERC design concept can significantly reduce the size of the bearing. This reduction, in turn, reduces the weight and yields a lighter bearing. Since the superconductors have inherently near-zero resistance, they are also expected to save power needed for operation considerably.

  5. Effect of Bearing Cleaning on Long Term Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, Timothy Raymond; Thom, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    For many years chlorofluorocarbon (CFC ) based solvents, such as Freon and 1,1,1, Trichloroethane (TCA), were used as bearing cleaning solvents for space mechanisms. The 1995 ban on the production of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC) such as CFCs caused a change to new ODC-free cleaners for the precision bearing cleaning. With this change the question arises what effect if any do these new cleaners have on long term bearing life. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect. A one year test using 60 small electrical motors (two bearings per motor) was conducted in a high vacuum environment (2.0* 10(exp -6) torr) at a temperature of 90C. Prior to testing the bearings were cleaned with one of four cleaners. These cleaners included two aqueous based cleaners, a CFC based cleaner and supercritical carbon dioxide. Three space compatible greases were tested. After testing the mass of each lubricated bearing was measured both pre and post test. Along with mass loss measurements a profilometer trace of each bearing was taken to measure post test wear of the bearings. In addition the bearings were visually examined and analyzed using an optical microscope.

  6. Analysis of an arched outer-race ball bearing considering centrifugal forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A Newton-Raphson method of iteration was used in evaluating the radial and axial projection of the distance between the ball center and the outer raceway groove curvature center (V and W). Fatigue life evaluations were made. The similar analysis of a conventional bearing can be directly obtained from the arched bearing analysis by simply letting the amount of arching be zero (g = 0) and not considering equations related to the unloaded half of the outer race. The analysis was applied to a 150-mm angular contact ball bearing. Results for life, contact loads, and angles are shown for a conventional bearing (g = 0) and two arched bearings (g = 0.127 mm (0.005 in.), and 0.254 mm (0.010 in.)). The results indicate that an arched bearing is highly desirable for high speed applications. In particular, for a DN value of 3 million (20,000 rpm) and an applied axial load of 4448 N (1000 lb), an arched bearing shows an improvement in life of 306 percent over that of a conventional bearing. At 4.2 million DN (28,000 rpm), the corresponding improvement is 340 percent. It was also found for low speeds, the arched bearing does not offer the advantages that it does for high speed applications.

  7. Performance of ball bearings operated at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C in vacuum{copyright}

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Katsumi; Suzuki, Mineo; Nishimura, Makoto

    1995-09-01

    Ball bearing tests were carried out at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C and a rotational speed of 600 rpm under an axial load of 50 N in vacuum. Tested bearings were 20 mm bore-sized angular contact ball bearings. Three combinations of bearing materials were tested: M-50 bearings, hybrid bearings with M-50 races and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls, and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} bearings. M-50 bearings were lubricated with a silver film. Hybrid and ceramic bearings were lubricated with a pre-coated sputtered MoS{sub 2} film and a self-lubricating hot-pressed composite retainer. Excellent performance at 500{degrees}C in vacuum was obtained for Si{sub 3}Ni{sub 4} bearings. Frictional torque was low and stable for more than 5 x 10{sup 7} revolutions. The bearings after the test were in very good condition with a small amount of wear. Hybrid bearings also showed very good performance at 350{degrees}C in vacuum. M-50 steel bearings were feasible for use at 350{degrees} in vacuum, although frictional torque was rather high and unstable. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis and scanning electronic microscopic (SEM) observation revealed existence of a film on the ball surface transferred from the composite retainer for both hybrid and ceramic bearings. 7 refs., 19 figs., 5 figs.

  8. [Periorbital contact eczema].

    PubMed

    Worm, M; Sterry, W

    2005-11-01

    Periorbital contact eczema is most commonly the result of an allergic contact dermatitis whereas other eczematous skin diseases like atopic eczema or seborrheic eczema occur less frequently. Also, other diseases like autoimmune disorders or rosacea need to be considered. Allergic contact dermatitis is a T-cell-mediated immunological response towards ubiquitous contact allergens. Activated T-cells migrate through the vessels into the skin and produce several inflammatory mediators. Epicutaneous patch testing is an important tool for the diagnosis of contact allergy whereby the allergens are analysed in terms of their ability to induce eczematous skin reaction. Until now the short-term use of corticosteroids are is employed for the treatment of allergic contact eczema. Modern substances with an optimal therapeutic index should rather be used.

  9. Rolling Bearing Life Prediction-Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E V; Poplawski, J. V.; Miller, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons were made between the life prediction formulas of Lundberg and Palmgren, Ioannides and Harris, and Zaretsky and full-scale ball and roller bearing life data. The effect of Weibull slope on bearing life prediction was determined. Life factors are proposed to adjust the respective life formulas to the normalized statistical life distribution of each bearing type. The Lundberg-Palmgren method resulted in the most conservative life predictions compared to Ioannides and Harris, and Zaretsky methods which produced statistically similar results. Roller profile can have significant effects on bearing life prediction results. Roller edge loading can reduce life by as much as 98 percent. The resultant predicted life not only depends on the life equation used but on the Weibull slope assumed, the least variation occurring with the Zaretsky equation. The load-life exponent p of 10/3 used in the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Bearing Manufacturers Association (ABMA)/International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards is inconsistent with the majority roller bearings designed and used today.

  10. Contact angle hysteresis explained.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2006-07-04

    A view of contact angle hysteresis from the perspectives of the three-phase contact line and of the kinetics of contact line motion is given. Arguments are made that advancing and receding are discrete events that have different activation energies. That hysteresis can be quantified as an activation energy by the changes in interfacial area is argued. That this is an appropriate way of viewing hysteresis is demonstrated with examples.

  11. Soft contact lenses

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, R. L.; VanLeeuwen, Wm. N.

    1972-01-01

    A series of 55 patients were fitted with a new type of hydrophilic soft contact lens. These were found more comfortable than hard contact lenses and they had a protective and pain-relieving action in cases of chronic corneal disease. Vision was not as good as with hard contact lenses and a greater potential danger of infection was found. They are preferred by many patients despite the noticeable thick edge and the difficulty of obtaining an identical replacement. PMID:5042887

  12. Control of epidemics via social partnership adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Mao, Shanjun; Wang, Jiazeng; Zhou, Da

    2016-12-01

    Epidemic control is of great importance for human society. Adjusting interacting partners is an effective individualized control strategy. Intuitively, it is done either by shortening the interaction time between susceptible and infected individuals or by increasing the opportunities for contact between susceptible individuals. Here, we provide a comparative study on these two control strategies by establishing an epidemic model with nonuniform stochastic interactions. It seems that the two strategies should be similar, since shortening the interaction time between susceptible and infected individuals somehow increases the chances for contact between susceptible individuals. However, analytical results indicate that the effectiveness of the former strategy sensitively depends on the infectious intensity and the combinations of different interaction rates, whereas the latter one is quite robust and efficient. Simulations are shown to verify our analytical predictions. Our work may shed light on the strategic choice of disease control.

  13. Robust and intelligent bearing estimation

    DOEpatents

    Claassen, John P.

    2000-01-01

    A method of bearing estimation comprising quadrature digital filtering of event observations, constructing a plurality of observation matrices each centered on a time-frequency interval, determining for each observation matrix a parameter such as degree of polarization, linearity of particle motion, degree of dyadicy, or signal-to-noise ratio, choosing observation matrices most likely to produce a set of best available bearing estimates, and estimating a bearing for each observation matrix of the chosen set.

  14. Prototype testing of magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, David P.; Jayaraman, Chaitanya P.; Frommer, David A.; Kirk, James A.; Anand, Davinder K.

    1987-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of the performance of a magnetic bearing assembly for flywheel energy storage applications are discussed. The experimental set up for determining the passive radial stiffness, active radial stiffness, and curent force sensitivity of the coils follows the method developed by Frommer (1986). Magnetic bearings design should preclude saturation and current limiting in the desired operating range, so that the system will be linear. A larger linear range will lead to a more stable magnetic bearing.

  15. Optical contact micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Steven D.

    2014-08-19

    Certain examples provide optical contact micrometers and methods of use. An example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable lenses to receive an object and immobilize the object in a position. The example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable mirrors positioned with respect to the pair of lenses to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses. The example optical contact micrometer includes a microscope to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses via the mirrors; and an interferometer to obtain one or more measurements of the object.

  16. Colors and contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Foti, Caterina; Romita, Paolo; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of skin diseases relies on several clinical signs, among which color is of paramount importance. In this review, we consider certain clinical presentations of both eczematous and noneczematous contact dermatitis in which color plays a peculiar role orientating toward the right diagnosis. The conditions that will be discussed include specific clinical-morphologic subtypes of eczematous contact dermatitis, primary melanocytic, and nonmelanocytic contact hyperchromia, black dermographism, contact chemical leukoderma, and others. Based on the physical, chemical, and biologic factors underlying a healthy skin color, the various skin shades drawing a disease picture are thoroughly debated, stressing their etiopathogenic origins and histopathologic aspects.

  17. Adjustable expandable cryogenic piston and ring

    DOEpatents

    Mazur, Peter O.; Pallaver, Carl B.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of a reciprocating expansion engine for cryogenic refrigeration is improved by changing the pistons and rings so that the piston can be operated from outside the engine to vary the groove in which the piston ring is located. This causes the ring, which is of a flexible material, to be squeezed so that its contact with the wall is subject to external control. This control may be made manually or it may be made automatically in response to instruments that sense the amount of blow-by of the cryogenic fluid and adjust for an optimum blow-by.

  18. Series-hybrid bearing - An approach to extending bearing fatigue life at high speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Coe, H. H.; Fleming, D. P.; Parker, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fluid film bearing of hybrid device consists of orifice compensated annular thrust bearing and self-acting journal bearing. In series hybrid bearing, both ball bearing and annular thrust bearing carry full system thrust load, but two bearings share speed. Operation of system is stable and automatically fail-safe.

  19. Evaluation of shuttle turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrane, K. F.; Kannel, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Because the high pressure turbopumps used on the space shuttle main engine (SSME) are high speed machines and rotor dynamics analysis of these units is very complicated, it was considered necessary to verify calculated turbomachinery shaft bearing loads by analysis of ball bearing load tracks. This report presents the methods used and the results of load track analysis on one set of bearings removed from a high pressure liquid oxygen turbopump which had been subjected to SSME static firing tests. This type of analysis was found useful in determining bearing operating conditions and for verifying rotor dynamics computer models.

  20. Mounting arrangement for the drive system of an air-bearing spindle on a machine tool

    DOEpatents

    Lunsford, J.S.; Crisp, D.W.; Petrowski, P.L.

    1987-12-07

    The present invention is directed to a mounting arrangement for the drive system of an air-bearing spindle utilized on a machine tool such as a lathe. The mounting arrangement of the present invention comprises a housing which is secured to the casing of the air bearing in such a manner that the housing position can be selectively adjusted to provide alignment of the air-bearing drive shaft supported by the housing and the air-bearing spindle. Once this alignment is achieved the air between spindle and the drive arrangement is maintained in permanent alignment so as to overcome misalignment problems encountered in the operation of the machine tool between the air-bearing spindle and the shaft utilized for driving the air-bearing spindle.

  1. Adjustable Reeds For Weaving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Local characteristics of fabrics varied to suit special applications. Adjustable reed machinery proposed for use in weaving fabrics in various net shapes, widths, yarn spacings, and yarn angles. Locations of edges of fabric and configuration of warp and filling yarns varied along fabric to obtain specified properties. In machinery, reed wires mounted in groups on sliders, mounted on lengthwise rails in reed frame. Mechanisms incorporated to move sliders lengthwise, parallel to warp yarns, by sliding them along rails; move sliders crosswise by translating reed frame rails perpendicular to warp yarns; and crosswise by spreading reed rails within group. Profile of reed wires in group on each slider changed.

  2. Performance of Simple Gas Foil Thrust Bearings in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Foil bearings are self-acting hydrodynamics devices used to support high speed rotating machinery. The advantages that they offer to process fluid lubricated machines include: high rotational speed capability, no auxiliary lubrication system, non-contacting high speed operation, and improved damping as compared to rigid hydrodynamic bearings. NASA has had a sporadic research program in this technology for almost 6 decades. Advances in the technology and understanding of foil journal bearings have enabled several new commercial products in recent years. These products include oil-free turbochargers for both heavy trucks and automobiles, high speed electric motors, microturbines for distributed power generation, and turbojet engines. However, the foil thrust bearing has not received a complimentary level of research and therefore has become the weak link of oil-free turbomachinery. In an effort to both provide machine designers with basic performance parameters and to elucidate the underlying physics of foil thrust bearings, NASA Glenn Research Center has completed an effort to experimentally measure the performance of simple gas foil thrust bearing in air. The database includes simple bump foil supported thrust bearings with full geometry and manufacturing techniques available to the user. Test conditions consist of air at ambient pressure and temperatures up to 500 C and rotational speeds to 55,000 rpm. A complete set of axial load, frictional torque, and rotational speed is presented for two different compliant sub-structures and inter-pad gaps. Data obtained from commercially available foil thrust bearings both with and without active cooling is presented for comparison. A significant observation made possible by this data set is the speed-load capacity characteristic of foil thrust bearings. Whereas for the foil journal bearing the load capacity increases linearly with rotational speed, the foil thrust bearing operates in the hydrodynamic high speed limit. In

  3. Bearing-bypass loading in composite joints - Testing and stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, John H., Jr.; Naik, Rajiv A.

    1989-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical study of bearing and bypass loading on single-fastener specimens of a 16-ply, quasi-isotropic T300/5208 graphite/epoxy laminate with a centrally located hole is reported. The specimens were loaded in either tension or compression, and onset damage, ultimate strengths, and corresponding failure modes were determined. The tension data showed the expected linear interaction for combined bearing-bypass loading with damage developing in the net-section tension mode. However, the bearing-onset strengths showed an unexpected interaction of the bearing and compressive bypass loads in which the latter reduced the bearing-onset strength. A linear finite element analysis showed that bearing-bypass loading had a marked influence on the bolt-hole contact which in turn had a significant effect on local stresses.

  4. The polar bear phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Maw, P.K. ); Lane, M.T.

    1990-02-01

    Results from measuring the thermal profile of polar bear pelts, reflectiveness of the pelts, and total thermal conversion data lead to the conclusion that the pelts from an ultra-efficient thermal diode for solar-thermal conversion. The transfer of the thermal energy from the surface of the fur to the skin where it is absorbed cannot be thermal, and therefore must be radiative. This process must have an efficiency of better than 90:0090 percent to account for measured values. The radiative transfer process is not known at present. To understand it, a detailed knowledge of the microscopic parameters of the pelts must be obtained. This is the current thrust of the polar solar research. If the process can be understood and synthesized,it will provide a major breakthrough in the area of solar-thermal energy conversion.

  5. Controlling device for a fuel-quantity adjusting member of a fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Eheim, F.; Hofer, G.; Konrath, K.; Straubel, M.

    1987-11-03

    This patent describes a controlling device for a fuel-quantity adjustment element of a fuel injection pump including an adjusting lever pivotable around a shaft. The adjusting lever is coupled with a fuel-quantity adjusting element, a drag lever pivotable around the shaft of the adjusting lever. The drag lever communicates with the adjusting lever by way of a coupling element. An adjustable governor spring assembly is arranged to act on the drag lever, a stop for stopping the drag lever, further including a device for generating rpm-dependent force transmittable to the drag lever by means of an actuating element thereof and counter to the governor spring assembly, whereby the drag lever and the adjusting lever are coupled for movement together at least at the end of each relative movement effected by the actuating element. The actuating element acts directly upon the drag lever and the adjusting lever during deflection by way of a predetermined relative adjustment distance between the drag lever and the adjusting lever for adjustment by the actuating element, at least one spring arranged between the adjusting lever and a fixed support. At least one spring acts on the adjusting lever to force the adjusting lever into contact with an adjustable stop which is adjustable in dependence from the operating parameters of the combustion engine.

  6. Resilient and Corrosion-Proof Rolling Element Bearings Made from Superelastic Ni-Ti Alloys for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical components (bearings, gears, mechanisms) typically utilize hardened construction materials to minimize wear and attain long life. In such components, loaded contact points (e.g., meshing gear teeth, bearing balls-raceway contacts) experience high contact stresses. The combination of high hardness and high elastic modulus often leads to damaging contact stress and denting, particularly during transient overload events such as shock impacts that occur during the launching of space vehicles or the landing of aircraft. In this webinar, Dr. DellaCorte will introduce the results of a research project that employs a superelastic alloy, Ni-Ti for rolling element bearing applications. Bearings and components made from such alloys can alleviate many problems encountered in advanced aerospace applications and may solve many terrestrial applications as well

  7. Run-in finishing and tribological performance evaluation of ceramic bearings. Final report, 1 September 1991--31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Wedeven, L.D.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to assist in the development of ceramic bearing technology, particularly hybrid bearings. The focus was to address major obstacles to the implementation and use of hybrid bearings. The two areas addressed were cost reduction and qualification of hybrid bearings systems. The effort was divided into three task areas: (1) The development of run-in finishing procedures to address cost reduction by finishing Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} rolling elements and the steel race ways of bearing in-situ; (2) Chemical conditioning of surfaces to improve the tribological performance of hybrid contacts under boundary lubrication conditions; (3) Assessment of tribological attributes of a hybrid contact under conditions relevant to bearing operation.

  8. High-Temperature, High-Load-Capacity Radial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenza, Andrew; Montague, Gerald; Kascak, Albert; Palazzolo, Alan; Jansen, Ralph; Jansen, Mark; Ebihara, Ben

    2005-01-01

    A radial heteropolar magnetic bearing capable of operating at a temperature as high as 1,000 F (=540 C) has been developed. This is a prototype of bearings for use in gas turbine engines operating at temperatures and speeds much higher than can be withstood by lubricated rolling-element bearings. It is possible to increase the maximum allowable operating temperatures and speeds of rolling-element bearings by use of cooling-air systems, sophisticated lubrication systems, and rotor-vibration- damping systems that are subsystems of the lubrication systems, but such systems and subsystems are troublesome. In contrast, a properly designed radial magnetic bearing can suspend a rotor without contact, and, hence, without need for lubrication or for cooling. Moreover, a magnetic bearing eliminates the need for a separate damping system, inasmuch as a damping function is typically an integral part of the design of the control system of a magnetic bearing. The present high-temperature radial heteropolar magnetic bearing has a unique combination of four features that contribute to its suitability for the intended application: 1. The wires in its electromagnet coils are covered with an insulating material that does not undergo dielectric breakdown at high temperature and is pliable enough to enable the winding of the wires to small radii. 2. The processes used in winding and potting of the coils yields a packing factor close to 0.7 . a relatively high value that helps in maximizing the magnetic fields generated by the coils for a given supplied current. These processes also make the coils structurally robust. 3. The electromagnets are of a modular C-core design that enables replacement of components and semiautomated winding of coils. 4. The stator is mounted in such a manner as to provide stable support under radial and axial thermal expansion and under a load as large as 1,000 lb (.4.4 kN).

  9. Factor XII Contact Activation.

    PubMed

    Naudin, Clément; Burillo, Elena; Blankenberg, Stefan; Butler, Lynn; Renné, Thomas

    2017-03-27

    Contact activation is the surface-induced conversion of factor XII (FXII) zymogen to the serine protease FXIIa. Blood-circulating FXII binds to negatively charged surfaces and this contact to surfaces triggers a conformational change in the zymogen inducing autoactivation. Several surfaces that have the capacity for initiating FXII contact activation have been identified, including misfolded protein aggregates, collagen, nucleic acids, and platelet and microbial polyphosphate. Activated FXII initiates the proinflammatory kallikrein-kinin system and the intrinsic coagulation pathway, leading to formation of bradykinin and thrombin, respectively. FXII contact activation is well characterized in vitro and provides the mechanistic basis for the diagnostic clotting assay, activated partial thromboplastin time. However, only in the past decade has the critical role of FXII contact activation in pathological thrombosis been appreciated. While defective FXII contact activation provides thromboprotection, excess activation underlies the swelling disorder hereditary angioedema type III. This review provides an overview of the molecular basis of FXII contact activation and FXII contact activation-associated disease states.

  10. Continuously adjustable Pulfrich spectacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Ken; Karpf, Ron

    2011-03-01

    A number of Pulfrich 3-D movies and TV shows have been produced, but the standard implementation has inherent drawbacks. The movie and TV industries have correctly concluded that the standard Pulfrich 3-D implementation is not a useful 3-D technique. Continuously Adjustable Pulfrich Spectacles (CAPS) is a new implementation of the Pulfrich effect that allows any scene containing movement in a standard 2-D movie, which are most scenes, to be optionally viewed in 3-D using inexpensive viewing specs. Recent scientific results in the fields of human perception, optoelectronics, video compression and video format conversion are translated into a new implementation of Pulfrich 3- D. CAPS uses these results to continuously adjust to the movie so that the viewing spectacles always conform to the optical density that optimizes the Pulfrich stereoscopic illusion. CAPS instantly provides 3-D immersion to any moving scene in any 2-D movie. Without the glasses, the movie will appear as a normal 2-D image. CAPS work on any viewing device, and with any distribution medium. CAPS is appropriate for viewing Internet streamed movies in 3-D.

  11. Noneczematous Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Caterina; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Irritant or allergic contact dermatitis usually presents as an eczematous process, clinically characterized by erythematoedematovesicous lesions with intense itching in the acute phase. Such manifestations become erythematous-scaly as the condition progresses to the subacute phase and papular-hyperkeratotic in the chronic phase. Not infrequently, however, contact dermatitis presents with noneczematous features. The reasons underlying this clinical polymorphism lie in the different noxae and contact modalities, as well as in the individual susceptibility and the various targeted cutaneous structures. The most represented forms of non-eczematous contact dermatitis include the erythema multiforme-like, the purpuric, the lichenoid, and the pigmented kinds. These clinical entities must obviously be discerned from the corresponding “pure” dermatitis, which are not associated with contact with exogenous agents. PMID:24109520

  12. Effect of Roller Geometry on Roller Bearing Load-Life Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Cylindrical roller bearings typically employ roller profile modification to equalize load distribution, minimize stress concentration at roller ends and allow for a small amount of misalignment. The 1947 Lundberg-Palmgren analysis reported an inverse fourth power relation between load and life for roller bearings with line contact. In 1952, Lundberg and Palmgren changed their load-life exponent to 10/3 for roller bearings, assuming mixed line and point contact. The effect of roller-crown profile was reanalyzed in this paper to determine the actual load-life relation for modified roller profiles. For uncrowned rollers (line contact), the load-life exponent is p = 4, in agreement with the 1947 Lundberg-Palmgren value but crowning reduces the value of the exponent, p. The lives of modern roller bearings made from vacuum-processed steels significantly exceed those predicted by the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The Zaretsky rolling-element bearing life model of 1996 produces a load-life exponent of p = 5 for flat rollers, which is more consistent with test data. For the Zaretsky model with fully crowned rollers p = 4.3. For an aerospace profile and chamfered rollers, p = 4.6. Using the 1952 Lundberg-Palmgren value p = 10/3, the value incorporated in ANSI/ABMA and ISO bearing standards, can create significant life calculation errors for roller bearings.

  13. 10 CFR 903.11 - Advance announcement of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... announcement may be through direct contact with customers, at public meetings, by press release, by newspaper... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advance announcement of rate adjustment. 903.11 Section 903.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation...

  14. 10 CFR 903.11 - Advance announcement of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... announcement may be through direct contact with customers, at public meetings, by press release, by newspaper... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advance announcement of rate adjustment. 903.11 Section 903.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation...

  15. Cultural Orientations, Daily Activities, and Adjustment in Mexican American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Susan M.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Cansler, Emily

    2009-01-01

    The links between youth's daily activities and adjustment and the role of cultural practices and values in these links were studied in 469 youth from 237 Mexican American families. In home interviews, data on mothers', fathers', and two adolescent-age siblings' cultural practices (language use, social contacts) and values (for familism, for…

  16. Effects of synthetic industrial fluids on ball bearing performance

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, F.R.; Zielinski, J.

    1982-06-01

    A series of laboratory tests was conducted using rolling contact bearings to compare the lubricating properties of a specially formulated synthetic lubricant based on diester to those of a specific mineral oil currently in service in petrochemical plant equipment. Two synthetic lubricants and two mineral oils of varying viscosities were experimentally compared. The test results indicated that the synthetic lubricant, having a viscosity of 32 m/sup 2//s (32 cSt) at a temperature of 313K, offered longterm contact surface protection equivalent to that of the base line mineral oil which has a viscosity of 68 m/sup 2//s, without reducing bearing service life below the theoretically predicted levels. The same good wear protection could not be achieved with a reduced viscosity mineral oil. The use of the lower viscosity synthetic lubricating fluid could provide projected energy savings of $75,000 per year when elements of a total petrochemical complex are considered.

  17. Effect on interference fits on roller bearing fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the effects of inner-ring speed and press fits on roller bearing fatigue life. The effects of the resultant hoop and radial stresses on the principal stresses were considered. The maximum shear stresses below the Hertzian contact were determined for different conditions of inner-ring speed and load, and were applied to a conventional roller bearing life analysis. The effect of mean stress was determined using Goodman diagram approach. Hoop stresses caused by press fits and centrifugal force can reduce bearing life by as much as 90 percent. Use of a Goodman diagram predicts life reductions of 20 to 30 percent. The depth of the maximum shear stress remains virtually unchanged.

  18. High Temperature Superconducting Bearings for Lunar Telescope Mounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Mark; BuiMa, Ki; Cooley, Rodger; Mackey, Daniel; Meng, Ruling; Chu, Ching Wu; Chu, Wei Kan; Chen, Peter C.; Wilson, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    A telescope to be installed on the lunar surface in the near future must work in a cold and dusty vacuum environment for long periods without on site human maintenance. To track stars, the drive mechanism must be capable of exceedingly fine steps and repeatability. Further, the use of lightweight telescopes for obvious economic benefits burdens the requirement for stable support and rotation. Conventional contact bearings and gear drives have numerous failure modes under such a restrictive and harsh environment. However, hybrid superconducting magnetic bearings (HSMB) fit in naturally. These bearings are stable, light, passive, and essentially frictionless, allowing high precision electronic positioning control. By passive levitation, the HSMB does not wear out and requires neither maintenance nor power. A prototype illustrating the feasibility of this application is presented.

  19. Surface Analysis of Bearings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-31

    1600 1800 ENERGY, EV WORN REGION Mo Lii J- ! Fe Mo 0 S 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 ENERGY, EV Figure 5. AES spectra from the raceway...contact scar, are presented. The C data show at least two principal peaks of interest, one near 285 eV associ- ated with hydrocarbon species and one near...289 eV , indicating C bonded to the more highly electronegative 0 atoms in the carboxylate group of the naphthenate chain. One method of tracking the

  20. The centering and leveling adjustment and control technology for the ultra-precision turntable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yanrong; Wang, Yun; Wang, Longxiao; Zhao, Weirui

    2015-08-01

    In order to realize the centering and leveling adjustment in large aperture spherical and aspheric surface shape measurement, by combining with the aerostatic bearing rotary shaft, working platform, high performance servo motor, photoelectric encoder, the micro displacement actuator of XYZ axis, sensor and Renishaw circular grating ,a set of fast and ultra-precision centering and leveling adjustment system is developed .The system is based on large range of air lubrication technology for high precision aerostatic bearing turntable, using the principle of three point supporting method, and the driving of tens nanometer resolution are provided by a piezoelectric micro displacement actuator. To realize the automatical centering and leveling adjustment in the large aperture spherical and aspheric surface shape measurement system, a software control program is designed with VC++. Through experimental test: centering adjusting operation can eventually converges to 0.5μm, leveling adjusting operation can eventually converges to 0.2 ", the time of adjusting can be less than 120 s. The experimental results shows that, compared with the previous system, the structure of the developed measurement and control system is more simple, more flexible, it can meet the demands of high precision, high resolution, large adjusting range, no friction, easy to drive, and high bearing stiffness etc in eccentric adjusting operation of optical precision measurement well.

  1. Spherical-Bearing Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Computer program SPHERBEAN, developed to predict thermomechanical performance characteristics of double-row spherical roller bearings over wide range of operating conditions. Analysis allows six degrees of freedom for each roller and three for each half of an optionally split cage. Program capabilities provide sufficient generality to allow detailed simulation of both high-speed and conventional bearing operation.

  2. Axial-Centrifugal Compressor Program, Evaluation of Ausformed Bearings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-01

    10 10 10 LIFE - MILLIONS OF STRESS CYCLES Figure 1. fcifect of Ausforming on Rolling Contact Fatigue Life of AISI M-50 (Reference 11) 14 1400...desired subsurface initiated fatigue of a properly lubricated high -speed bearing. Also observed was significant wear in the ball pockets of...8217.ine damage Surface fatigue Suspended - No damage Suspended - High torque Suspended - High torque Rig C/0, suspended Rig C/0, outer race

  3. A study on the noise characteristics of polymer ball bearings under various lubrication conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinç, S. K.; Temiz, V.; Kamburoǧlu, E.

    2013-12-01

    Polymer bearings are generally praised by the manufacturers for running silently. However such statements never go beyond qualitative assumptions. Therefore, studying polymer ball bearing noise would have been meaningful solely on the perspective of silent running machinery. On the other hand, the service life of a polymer ball bearing is unpredictable and there's no preventive maintenance practice that provides data regarding the condition of a polymer ball bearing. In this study, we assume that an investigation of their noise characteristics could also reveal clues concerning their performances. The main objective of this study is to determine the noise characteristics of polymer ball bearings lubricated with different lubricant greases of varying viscosity grades through experimental means. Sound pressure level measurements of SKF brand polymer bearings with polypropylene rings, polypropylene cage and glass balls were made with a 1/2 inch microphone in 1/3-octave bands, at frequencies up to 12.5 kHz, under various radial loads and rotational speeds. The bearings were mounted on a shaft driven by an AC motor with stepless speed control, adjustable between 0 - 1400 rpm. The ball bearings were running inside an acoustic chamber designed for the insulation of environmental noise and the noise of the motor at target frequencies. The resulting sound pressure level spectra were evaluated and the effects of the lubrication conditions on the noise of the ball bearing and possible diagnostic insight that could be gained through studying bearing noise characteristics were discussed.

  4. Space Station alpha joint bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everman, Michael R.; Jones, P. Alan; Spencer, Porter A.

    1987-01-01

    Perhaps the most critical structural system aboard the Space Station is the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint which helps align the power generation system with the sun. The joint must provide structural support and controlled rotation to the outboard transverse booms as well as power and data transfer across the joint. The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint is composed of two transition sections and an integral, large diameter bearing. Alpha joint bearing design presents a particularly interesting problem because of its large size and need for high reliability, stiffness, and on orbit maintability. The discrete roller bearing developed is a novel refinement to cam follower technology. It offers thermal compensation and ease of on-orbit maintenance that are not found in conventional rolling element bearings. How the bearing design evolved is summarized. Driving requirements are reviewed, alternative concepts assessed, and the selected design is described.

  5. Geophagy by yellowstone grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, D.J.; Green, G.I.; Swalley, R.

    1999-01-01

    We documented 12 sites in the Yellowstone ecosystem where grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) had purposefully consumed soil (an activity known as geophagy). We also documented soil in numerous grizzly bear feces. Geophagy primarily occurred at sites barren of vegetation where surficial geology had been modified by geothermal activity. There was no evidence of ungulate use at most sites. Purposeful consumption of soil by bears peaked first from March to May and again from August to October, synchronous with peaks in consumption of ungulate meat and mushrooms. Geophageous soils were distinguished from ungulate mineral licks and soils in general by exceptionally high concentrations of potassium (K) and high concentrations of magnesium (Mg) and sulphur (S). Our results do not support the hypotheses that bears were consuming soil to detoxify secondary compounds in grazed foliage, as postulated for primates, or to supplement dietary sodium, as known for ungulates. Our results suggest that grizzly bears could have been consuming soil as an anti-diarrheal.

  6. Nonlinear control of magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradeep, A. K.; Gurumoorthy, R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present a variety of nonlinear controllers for the magnetic bearing that ensure both stability and robustness. We utilize techniques of discontinuous control to design novel control laws for the magnetic bearing. We present in particular sliding mode controllers, time optimal controllers, winding algorithm based controllers, nested switching controllers, fractional controllers, and synchronous switching controllers for the magnetic bearing. We show existence of solutions to systems governed by discontinuous control laws, and prove stability and robustness of the chosen control laws in a rigorous setting. We design sliding mode observers for the magnetic bearing and prove the convergence of the state estimates to their true values. We present simulation results of the performance of the magnetic bearing subject to the aforementioned control laws, and conclude with comments on design.

  7. Frictional Characteristics of Thrust Bearing in Scroll Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hajime; Itoh, Takahide; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    This paper presents frictional characteristics of thrust bearing in scroll compressor focusing on the behavior of sliding portion which affects the generation of oil film. The coefficient of friction and tilt angle of sliding portion in the thrust bearing are obtained through both elemental friction test and cylinder pressure measurement of actual scroll compressor. Both tests showed that the coefficient of friction in low contact pressure rose with increase of tilt angle of sliding portion. The value of contact pressure which the coefficient of friction turns into increase was in agreement of the value which tilt angle become to increase. Numerical analysis using mixed lubrication theory was also performed. Analytical result indicated the same characteristics as the experiments, and the correlation between the coefficient of friction and the behavior of sliding portion was confirmed. Based on the experimental and the analytical results obtained here, the optimization of thrust bearing for commercial scroll compressor was applied. 2% improvement of total efficiency in rated condition was archived by optimization of thrust bearing.

  8. Basic Expeditionary Airfield Resources (BEAR) Mission Brief

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-02

    FL BEAR Holloman AFB, NM Kadena, JP McAlester, OK Diego Garcia Saipan Munitions Storage Location General WRM Storage Location Capabilities • BEAR...Global BEAR Management MSgt Pedro Ramos , Supt, Global BEAR E i t & S (2G MSgt) (Vacant), Global BEAR Systems and Readiness Management (2G MSgt

  9. Allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Becker, Detlef

    2013-07-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a frequent inflammatory skin disease. The suspected diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms, a plausible contact to allergens and a suitable history of dermatitis. Differential diagnoses should be considered only after careful exclusion of any causal contact sensitization. Hence, careful diagnosis by patch testing is of great importance. Modifications of the standardized test procedure are the strip patch test and the repeated open application test. The interpretation of the SLS (sodium lauryl sulfate) patch test as well as testing with the patients' own products and working materials are potential sources of error. Accurate patch test reading is affected in particular by the experience and individual factors of the examiner. Therefore, a high degree of standardization and continuous quality control is necessary and may be supported by use of an online patch test reading course made available by the German Contact Dermatitis Research Group. A critical relevance assessment of allergic patch test reactions helps to avoid relapses and the consideration of differential diagnoses. Any allergic test reaction should be documented in an allergy ID card including the INCI name, if appropriate. The diagnostics of allergic contact dermatitis is endangered by a seriously reduced financing of patch testing by the German statutory health insurances. Restrictive regulations by the German Drug Law block the approval of new contact allergens for routine patch testing. Beside the consistent avoidance of allergen contact, temporary use of systemic and topical corticosteroids is the therapy of first choice.

  10. Optimal design of the hydrodynamic multi-arc bearing in a centrifugal blood pump for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kazuya; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the present study is to establish an optimal design of the multi-arc hydrodynamic bearing in a centrifugal blood pump for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level. The multi-arc bearing was designed to fulfill the required specifications: (i) ensuring the uniform bearing stiffness for various bearing angles; (ii) ensuring a higher bearing stiffness than the centrifugal force to prevent impeller whirl; and (iii) adjusting the bearing clearance as much as possible to reduce hemolysis. First, a numerical analysis was performed to optimize three design parameters of the multi-arc bearing: number of arcs N, bearing clearance C, and groove depth H. To validate the accuracy of the numerical analysis, the impeller trajectories for six pump models were measured. Finally, an in vitro hemolysis test was conducted to evaluate the hemolytic property of the multi-arc bearing. As a result of the numerical analysis, the optimal parameter combination was determined as follows: N=4, C=100 μm, and H ≥ 100 μm. In the measurements of the impeller trajectory, the optimal parameter combination was found to be as follows: N=4, C=90 μm, and H=100 μm. This result demonstrated the high reliability of the numerical analysis. In the hemolysis test, the parameter combination that achieved the smallest hemolysis was obtained as follows: N=4, C=90 μm, and H=100 μm. In conclusion, the multi-arc bearing could be optimized for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level.

  11. Mechanically fastened composite laminates subjected to combined bearing-bypass and shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madenci, Erdogan

    1993-01-01

    Bolts and rivets provide a means of load transfer in the construction of aircraft. However, they give rise to stress concentrations and are often the source and location of static and fatigue failures. Furthermore, fastener holes are prone to cracks during take-off and landing. These cracks present the most common origin of structural failures in aircraft. Therefore, accurate determination of the contact stresses associated with such loaded holes in mechanically fastened joints is essential to reliable strength evaluation and failure prediction. As the laminate is subjected to loading, the contact region, whose extent is not known, develops between the fastener and the hole boundary through this contact region, which consists of slip and no-slip zones due to friction. The presence of the unknown contact stress distribution over the contact region between the pin and the composite laminate, material anisotropy, friction between the pin and the laminate, pin-hole clearance, combined bearing-bypass and shear loading, and finite geometry of the laminate result in a complex non-linear problem. In the case of bearing-bypass loading in compression, this non-linear problem is further complicated by the presence of dual contact regions. Previous research concerning the analysis of mechanical joints subjected to combined bearing-bypass and shear loading is non-existent. In the case of bearing-bypass loading only, except for the study conducted by Naik and Crews (1991), others employed the concept of superposition which is not valid for this non-linear problem. Naik and Crews applied a linear finite element analysis with conditions along the pin-hole contact region specified as displacement constraint equations. The major shortcoming of this method is that the variation of the contract region as a function of the applied load should be known a priori. Also, their analysis is limited to symmetric geometry and material systems, and frictionless boundary conditions. Since the

  12. Operating characteristics of 120-millimeter-bore ball bearings at 3 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.; Bamberger, E. N.; Signer, H.

    1974-01-01

    A parametric study was performed with split inner-race 120-mm-bore angular-contact ball bearings at a speed of 25,000 rpm (3 million DN) at initial contact angles of 20 deg and 24 deg. Provisions were made for outer- and inner-race cooling and for injection of lubricant into the bearing through a number of radial holes in the split inner-race of the bearing. Oil flow and coolant rate to the bearing was controlled and varied for a total up to approximately 3.2 gal/min. Bearing temperature was found to decrease as the total lubricant flow to the bearing increased. However, at intermediate flow rates temperature began to increase with increasing flow. Power consumption increased with increasing flow rate. Bearing operating temperature, differences in temperatures between the inner and outer races, and bearing power consumption can be tuned to any desirable operating requirement. Cage speed increased by not more than 2 percent with increasing oil flow to the inner race.

  13. Estimating the impacts of oil spills on polar bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durner, George M.; Amstrup, Steven C.; McDonald, Trent L.

    2000-01-01

    The polar bear is the apical predator and universal symbol of the Arctic. They occur throughout the Arctic marine environment wherever sea ice is prevalent. In the southern Beaufort Sea, polar bears are most common within the area of the outer continental shelf, where the hunt for seals along persistent leads and openings in the ice. Polar bears are a significant cultural and subsistence component of the lifestyles of indigenous people. They may also be one of the most important indicators of the health of the Arctic marine environment. Polar bears have a late age of maturation, a long inter0brth period, and small liter sizes. These life history features make polar bear populations susceptible to natural and human perturbations.Petroleum exploration and extraction have been in progress along the coast of northern Alaska for more than 25 years. Until recently, most activity has taken place on the mainland or at sites connected to the shore by a causeway. In 1999, BP Exploration-Alaska began constructing the first artificial production island designed to transport oil through sub-seafloor pipelines. Other similar projects have been proposed to begin in the next several years.The proximity of oil exploration and development to principal polar bear habitats raises concerns, and with the advent of true off-shore development projects, these concerns are compounded. Contact with oil and other industrial chemicals by polar bears, through grooming, consumption of tainted food, or direct consumption of chemicals, may be lethal. The active ice where polar bears hunt is also where spilled oil may be expected to concentrate during spring break-up and autumn freeze-up. Because of this, we could expect that an oil spill in the waters and ice of the continental shelf would have profound effects on polar bears. Assessments of the effects of spills, however, have not been done. This report described a promising method for estimating the effects of oil spills on polar bears in the

  14. Implantable centrifugal pump with hybrid magnetic bearings.

    PubMed

    Bearnson, G B; Olsen, D B; Khanwilkar, P S; Long, J W; Sinnott, M; Kumar, A; Allaire, P E; Baloh, M; Decker, J

    1998-01-01

    Test methods and results of in vitro assessment of a centrifugal pump with a magnetically suspended impeller are provided. In vitro blood tests have been completed with a resulting normalized milligram index of hemolysis (NmIH) of 12.4 +/- 4.1, indicating that hemolysis is not a problem. Hydraulic characterization of the system with water has shown that a nominal pumping condition of 6 L/min at 100 mmHg was met at 2,200 rpm. Maximum clinically usable cardiac output is predicted be 10 L/min. The magnetic bearing supported impeller did not contact the housing and was shown to be stable under a variety of pumping conditions. The driving motor efficiency is 75% at the nominal condition. Finally, a description of the clinical version of the pump under development is provided.

  15. Telescopic vision contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Eric J.; Beer, R. Dirk; Arianpour, Ashkan; Ford, Joseph E.

    2011-03-01

    We present the concept, optical design, and first proof of principle experimental results for a telescopic contact lens intended to become a visual aid for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), providing magnification to the user without surgery or external head-mounted optics. Our contact lens optical system can provide a combination of telescopic and non-magnified vision through two independent optical paths through the contact lens. The magnified optical path incorporates a telescopic arrangement of positive and negative annular concentric reflectors to achieve 2.8x - 3x magnification on the eye, while light passing through a central clear aperture provides unmagnified vision.

  16. Optical contacting of quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    The strength of the bond between optically contacted quartz surfaces was investigated. The Gravity Probe-B (GP-B) experiment to test the theories of general relativity requires extremely precise measurements. The quartz components of the instruments to make these measurements must be held together in a very stable unit. Optical contacting is suggested as a possible method of joining these components. The fundamental forces involved in optical contacting are reviewed and relates calculations of these forces to the results obtained in experiments.

  17. Effects of bearing cleaning and lube environment on bearing performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Peter C.

    1995-01-01

    Running torque data of SR6 ball bearings are presented for different temperatures and speeds. The data are discussed in contrast to generally used torque prediction models and point out the need to obtain empirical data in critical applications. Also, the effects of changing bearing washing techniques from old, universally used CFC-based systems to CFC-free aqueous/alkaline solutions are discussed. Data on wettability, torque and lubricant life using SR3 ball bearings are presented. In general, performance is improved using the new aqueous washing techniques.

  18. Contact areas of the tibiotalar joint.

    PubMed

    Windisch, Gunther; Odehnal, Boris; Reimann, Reinhold; Anderhuber, Friedrich; Stachel, Hellmuth

    2007-11-01

    The contact areas between the articular surfaces of the talus and tibia are essential for understanding the mobility of the ankle joint. The purpose of our study was to reveal the contact area among the superior articular surface of the trochlea tali (target surface T) and the inferior articular surface of the tibia (query surface Q) under non-weight-bearing conditions in plantar flexion and dorsiflexion. Twenty cadaveric foot specimens were dissected and scanned by a three-dimensional (3D) laser scanner to obtain data point sets. These point sets were triangulated and a registration procedure performed to avoid any intersection of the two joint surfaces. For all points of the query surface Q, the closest distance to T was measured. In 11 of the 20 ankle joints, the contact area was larger in plantar flexion, in 5 it was nearly of equal size, and in 4 the two surfaces were found in a better congruence in dorsiflexion. The two articular surfaces can be in point or line contact and cause different motions while T is gliding on Q, so the original geometry of ligaments must be carefully reconstructed after injury or during total ankle replacement.

  19. Magnetic Bearings at Draper Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondoleon, Anthony S.; Kelleher, William P.; Possel, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic bearings, unlike traditional mechanical bearings, consist of a series of components mated together to form a stabilized system. The correct design of the actuator and sensor will provide a cost effective device with low power requirements. The proper choice of a control system utilizes the variables necessary to control the system in an efficient manner. The specific application will determine the optimum design of the magnetic bearing system including the touch down bearing. Draper for the past 30 years has been a leader in all these fields. This paper summarizes the results carried out at Draper in the field of magnetic bearing development. A 3-D radial magnetic bearing is detailed in this paper. Data obtained from recently completed projects using this design are included. One project was a high radial load (1000 pound) application. The second was a high speed (35,000 rpm), low loss flywheel application. The development of a low loss axial magnetic bearing is also included in this paper.

  20. Occupational Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis accounts for 90% of all cases of work-related cutaneous disorders. It can be divided into irritant contact dermatitis, which occurs in 80% of cases, and allergic contact dermatitis. In most cases, both types will present as eczematous lesions on exposed parts of the body, notably the hands. Accurate diagnosis relies on meticulous history taking, thorough physical examination, careful reading of Material Safety Data Sheets to distinguish between irritants and allergens, and comprehensive patch testing to confirm or rule out allergic sensitization. This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of occupational contact dermatitis and provides diagnostic guidelines and a rational approach to management of these often frustrating cases. PMID:20525126

  1. SAM Technical Contacts

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These technical contacts are available to help with questions regarding method deviations, modifications, sample problems or interferences, quality control requirements, the use of alternative methods, or the need to address analytes or sample types.

  2. Fragrance allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Judy; Zug, Kathryn A

    2014-01-01

    Fragrances are a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis in Europe and in North America. They can affect individuals at any age and elicit a spectrum of reactions from contact urticaria to systemic contact dermatitis. Growing recognition of the widespread use of fragrances in modern society has fueled attempts to prevent sensitization through improved allergen identification, labeling, and consumer education. This review provides an overview and update on fragrance allergy. Part 1 discusses the epidemiology and evaluation of suspected fragrance allergy. Part 2 reviews screening methods, emerging fragrance allergens, and management of patients with fragrance contact allergy. This review concludes by examining recent legislation on fragrances and suggesting potential additions to screening series to help prevent and detect fragrance allergy.

  3. Application of computational fluid dynamics on cavitation in journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Marco; Schmidt, Marcus; Reinke, Peter; Nobis, Matthias; Redlich, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    Journal bearings are applied in internal combustion engines due to their favourable wearing quality and operating characteristics. Under certain operating conditions damage of the journal bearing can occur caused by cavitation. The cavitation reduces the load capacity and leads to material erosion. Experimental investigations of cavitating flows in dimension of real journal bearing are difficult to realize or almost impossible caused by the small gap and transient flow conditions. Therefore numerical simulation is a very helpful engineering tool to research the cavitation behaviour. The CFD-Code OpenFOAM is used to analyse the flow field inside the bearing. The numerical cavitation model based on a bubble dynamic approach and requires necessary initial parameter for the calculation, such as nuclei bubble diameter, the number of nuclei and two empirical constants. The first part of this paper shows the influence of these parameters on the solution. For the adjustment of the parameters an experiment of Jakobsson et.al. [1] was used to validate the numerical flow model. The parameters have been varied according to the method Design of Experiments (DoE). With a defined model equation the parameters determined, to identify the parameter for CFD-calculations in comparison to the experimental values. The second part of the paper presents investigations on different geometrical changes in the bearing geometry. The effect of these geometrical changes on cavitation was compared with experimental results from Wollfarth [2] and Garner et.al. [3].

  4. Hybrid Hydrostatic/Transient Roller Bearing Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justak, John F.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed bearing assembly for shaft of high-speed turbopump includes both hydrostatic and rolling-element bearings. Rolling-element bearing unloaded at high speed by centrifugal expansion of outer race and transient retainer.

  5. Contact air abrasion.

    PubMed

    Porth, R

    1999-05-01

    The advantages of contact air abrasion techniques are readily apparent. The first, of course, is the greatly increased ease of use. Working with contact also tends to speed the learning curve by giving the process a more natural dental feel. In addition, as one becomes familiar with working with a dust stream, the potential for misdirecting the air flow is decreased. The future use of air abrasion for deep decay removal will make this the treatment of choice for the next millennium.

  6. Contact dermatitis complicating pinnaplasty.

    PubMed

    Singh-Ranger, G; Britto, J A; Sommerlad, B C

    2001-04-01

    Proflavine allergy is uncommon, occurring in approximately 6% of patients attending contact dermatitis clinics. Proflavine wool is used by many surgeons in the UK as a dressing that can be moulded to conform to the contours of a corrected prominent ear. It may have bacteriostatic properties. We present a case where contact dermatitis in response to proflavine developed after pinnaplasty. This caused diagnostic confusion, a lengthened hospital stay and an unsightly hypertrophic scar.

  7. The impact of contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finney, B.

    1986-10-01

    Scenarios of the impact on human society of radio contact with an extraterrestrial civilization are presented. Some believe that contact with advanced extraterrestrials would quickly devastate the human spirit, while others believe that these super-intelligent beings would show the inhabitants of the earth how to live in peace. It is proposed that the possible existence of extraterrestrial civilizations and the development of means of studying and communicating with them need to be considered.

  8. ELECTRIC CONTACT MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Grear, J.W. Jr.

    1959-03-10

    A switch adapted to maintain electrical connections under conditions of vibration or acceleration is described. According to the invention, thc switch includes a rotatable arm carrying a conductive bar arranged to close against two contacts spaced in the same plane. The firm and continuous engagement of the conductive bar with the contacts is acheived by utilizeing a spring located betwenn the vbar and athe a rem frzme and slidable mounting the bar in channel between two arms suspendef from the arm frame.

  9. Lettuce contact allergy.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Evy; Andersen, Klaus E

    2016-02-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and its varieties are important vegetable crops worldwide. They are also well-known, rarely reported, causes of contact allergy. As lettuce allergens and extracts are not commercially available, the allergy may be underdiagnosed. The aims of this article are to present new data on lettuce contact allergy and review the literature. Lettuce is weakly allergenic, and occupational cases are mainly reported. Using aimed patch testing in Compositae-allergic patients, two recent Danish studies showed prevalence rates of positive lettuce reactions of 11% and 22%. The majority of cases are non-occupational, and may partly be caused by cross-reactivity. The sesquiterpene lactone mix seems to be a poor screening agent for lettuce contact allergy, as the prevalence of positive reactions is significantly higher in non-occupationally sensitized patients. Because of the easy degradability of lettuce allergens, it is recommended to patch test with freshly cut lettuce stem and supplement this with Compositae mix. As contact urticaria and protein contact dermatitis may present as dermatitis, it is important to perform prick-to-prick tests, and possibly scratch patch tests as well. Any person who is occupationally exposed to lettuce for longer periods, especially atopics, amateur gardeners, and persons keeping lettuce-eating pets, is potentially at risk of developing lettuce contact allergy.

  10. Bears, Big and Little. Young Discovery Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeffer, Pierre

    This book is written for children 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume describes: (1) the eight species of bears, including black bear, brown bear, grizzly bear, spectacled bear, sun bear, sloth bear, polar bear, and giant panda; (2) geographical habitats of bears; (3)…

  11. Lubrication of 35-millimeter-bore ball bearings of several designs to 2.5 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted with 35mm bore, angular contact ball bearings with either a single or double outer and guided cage. The bearings were either lubricated by oil jets or employed inner ring lubrication. Outer ring cooling was added in selected tests. Lubricant flow to the bearing ranged from 300 to 1900 cc/min. All bearings were successfully run at speeds to 2.5 million DN. Increasing the lubricant flow decreased bearing ring temperatures but increased bearing power lines. The power loss and race temperatures of a jet lubricated with double outer land guided cage were always higher than those of the single land guided design at similar test conditions. The lowest bearing operating temperatures were achieved when inner ring lubrication and outer ring cooling were combined. It is found that cage slip of a double outer land guided cage is approximately twice that of a single outer land guided cage.

  12. Effect of cage design on characteristics of high-speed-jet-lubricated 35-millimeter-bore ball bearing. [turbojet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, F. T.; Pinel, S. I.; Signer, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted with a 35 mm bore angular contact ball bearing with a double outer land guided cage. Provisions were made for jet lubrication and outer-ring cooling of the bearing. Test conditions included a combined thrust and radial load at nominal shaft speeds of 48,000 rpm, and an oil-in temperature of 394 K (250 F). Successful operation of the test bearing was accomplished up to 2.5 million DN. Test results were compared with those obtained with similar bearing having a single outer land guided cage. Higher temperatures were generated with the double outer land guided cage bearing, and bearing power loss and cage slip were greater. Cooling the outer ring resulted in a decrease in overall bearing operating temperature.

  13. Friction and wear behaviour of self lubricating bearing liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Russell

    The thesis describes a numerical model for evaluating the variation of friction and wear of a self lubricating bearing liner over its useful wear life. Self-lubricating bearings have been in widespread use since the mid-1950s, particularly in the aerospace industry where they have the advantage of being low maintenance components. They are commonly used in relatively low speed, reciprocating applications such as control surface actuators, and usually consist of a spherical bearing with the inner and outer elements separated by a composite textile resin-bonded liner. A finite element model has been developed to predict the local stiffness of a particular liner at different states of wear. Results obtained using the model were used to predict the overall friction coefficient as it evolves due to wear, which is a novel approach. Experimental testing was performed on a bespoke flat-on-flat wear test rig with a reciprocating motion to validate the results of the friction model.. These tests were carried out on a commercially-available bearing liner, predominantly at a high contact pressure and an average sliding speed of 0.2 ms-1. Good agreement between predicted and experimentally measured wear was obtained when appropriate coefficients of friction were used in the friction model, and when the reciprocating sliding distance was above a critical value. A numerical wear model was also developed to predict the trend of backlash development in real bearing geometries using a novel approach. Results from the wear model were validated against full-scale bearing tests carried out elsewhere by the sponsoring company. Good agreement was obtained between the model predictions and the experimental results for the first 80% of the bearing wear life, and explanations for the discrepancy during the last 20% of the wear life have been proposed..

  14. Delay Adjusted Incidence

    Cancer.gov

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  15. Nonlinear Hydrostatic Adjustment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannon, Peter R.

    1996-12-01

    The final equilibrium state of Lamb's hydrostatic adjustment problem is found for finite amplitude heating. Lamb's problem consists of the response of a compressible atmosphere to an instantaneous, horizontally homogeneous heating. Results are presented for both isothermal and nonisothermal atmospheres.As in the linear problem, the fluid displacements are confined to the heated layer and to the region aloft with no displacement of the fluid below the heating. The region above the heating is displaced uniformly upward for heating and downward for cooling. The amplitudes of the displacements are larger for cooling than for warming.Examination of the energetics reveals that the fraction of the heat deposited into the acoustic modes increases linearly with the amplitude of the heating. This fraction is typically small (e.g., 0.06% for a uniform warming of 1 K) and is essentially independent of the lapse rate of the base-state atmosphere. In contrast a fixed fraction of the available energy generated by the heating goes into the acoustic modes. This fraction (e.g., 12% for a standard tropospheric lapse rate) agrees with the linear result and increases with increasing stability of the base-state atmosphere.The compressible results are compared to solutions using various forms of the soundproof equations. None of the soundproof equations predict the finite amplitude solutions accurately. However, in the small amplitude limit, only the equations for deep convection advanced by Dutton and Fichtl predict the thermodynamic state variables accurately for a nonisothermal base-state atmosphere.

  16. The in-vacuo torque performance of dry-lubricated ball bearings at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, S. G.; Roberts, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of dry-lubricated, angular contact ball bearings in vacuum at a temperature of 20 degrees K has been investigated, and is compared with the in-vacuo performance at room temperatures. Bearings were lubricated using dry-lubricant techniques which have been previously established for space applications involving operations at or near room temperature. Comparative tests were undertaken using three lubricants: molybdenum disulphide, lead, and PTFE. Results obtained using the three lubricants are presented.

  17. Performance of An Adjustable Strength Permanent Magnet Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, S.C.; DeHart, T.E.; Kangas, K.W.; Spencer, C.M.; Volk, J.T.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    An adjustable strength permanent magnet quadrupole suitable for use in Next Linear Collider has been built and tested. The pole length is 42cm, aperture diameter 13mm, peak pole tip strength 1.03Tesla and peak integrated gradient * length (GL) is 68.7 Tesla. This paper describes measurements of strength, magnetic CL and field quality made using an air bearing rotating coil system. The magnetic CL stability during -20% strength adjustment proposed for beam based alignment was < 0.2 microns. Strength hysteresis was negligible. Thermal expansion of quadrupole and measurement parts caused a repeatable and easily compensated change in the vertical magnetic CL. Calibration procedures as well as CL measurements made over a wider tuning range of 100% to 20% in strength useful for a wide range of applications will be described. The impact of eddy currents in the steel poles on the magnetic field during strength adjustments will be reported.

  18. The contact caveat: negative contact predicts increased prejudice more than positive contact predicts reduced prejudice.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Fiona Kate; Paolini, Stefania; Pedersen, Anne; Hornsey, Matthew J; Radke, Helena R M; Harwood, Jake; Rubin, Mark; Sibley, Chris G

    2012-12-01

    Contact researchers have largely overlooked the potential for negative intergroup contact to increase prejudice. In Study 1, we tested the interaction between contact quantity and valence on prejudice toward Black Australians (n = 1,476), Muslim Australians (n = 173), and asylum seekers (n = 293). In all cases, the association between contact quantity and prejudice was moderated by its valence, with negative contact emerging as a stronger and more consistent predictor than positive contact. In Study 2, White Americans (n = 441) indicated how much positive and negative contact they had with Black Americans on separate measures. Although both quantity of positive and negative contact predicted racism and avoidance, negative contact was the stronger predictor. Furthermore, negative (but not positive) contact independently predicted suspicion about Barack Obama's birthplace. These results extend the contact hypothesis by issuing an important caveat: Negative contact may be more strongly associated with increased racism and discrimination than positive contact is with its reduction.

  19. A Passive Magnetic Bearing Flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebert, Mark; Ebihara, Ben; Jansen, Ralph; Fusaro, Robert L.; Morales, Wilfredo; Kascak, Albert; Kenny, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A 100 percent passive magnetic bearing flywheel rig employing no active control components was designed, constructed, and tested. The suspension clothe rotor was provided by two sets of radial permanent magnetic bearings operating in the repulsive mode. The axial support was provided by jewel bearings on both ends of the rotor. The rig was successfully operated to speeds of 5500 rpm, which is 65 percent above the first critical speed of 3336 rpm. Operation was not continued beyond this point because of the excessive noise generated by the air impeller and because of inadequate containment in case of failure. Radial and axial stiffnesses of the permanent magnetic bearings were experimentally measured and then compared to finite element results. The natural damping of the rotor was measured and a damping coefficient was calculated.

  20. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Mulcahy, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  1. Gas bearing operates in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Bearing has restrictions to reduce air leaks and is connected to external pumpout facility which removes exhausted air. Token amount of air which is lost to vacuum is easily removed by conventional vacuum pump.

  2. Optimizing journal bearing bit performance

    SciTech Connect

    Moerbe, O.E.; Evans, W.

    1986-10-01

    This article explains that continuous progress in the field of rock bit technology has produced many new designs and improved features in the tri-cone rock bits used today. Much of the research and advancements have centered around journal bearing systems, seals and lubricants leading to greatly extended bearing life. These improved bearing systems, incorporated into both tooth and insert-type bits, have not only increased the effective life of a rock bit, but have also allowed greater energy levels to be applied. This, in turn, has allowed for higher rates of penetration and lower costs per foot of hole drilled. Continuous improvements in journal bearing bits allowing them to run longer and harder have required similar advancements to be made in cutting structures. In tooth bit designs, these improvements have been basically limited to the areas of gauge protection and to application of hardfacing materials.

  3. Flex bearing UUEC, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapper, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    This volume, Volume 2, of this Flex Bearing UUEC Final Report documents findings and data pertaining to Team B's tasks. Team B was organized as one of two sub-teams of the Unplanned/Unintended Event or Condition (UUEC) board established per InterOffice Memorandum (IOM) A100-FY93-072. Team A determined the cause of the unacceptable unbonds (referred to as 'heat-affect' unbonds), including the initial, light rust film, in the FSM #3 flex bearing was overheating of the Forward End Ring (FER) during cure, specifically in zone 8 of the mold. Team A's findings are documented in Volume 1 of this report. Team B developed flight rationale for existing bearings, based on absence or presence of an unpropitious unbond condition like that in FSM #3's flex bearing.

  4. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  5. ATM CMG bearing failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The cause or causes for the failure of ATM CMG S/N 5 (Skylab 1) and the anomalies associated with ATM CMG S/N 6 (Skylab 2) were investigated. Skylab telemetry data were reviewed and presented in the form of parameter distributions. The theory that the problems were caused by marginal bearing lubrication was studied along with the effects of orbital conditions on lubricants. Bearing tests were performed to investigate the effect of lubricant or lack of lubricant in the ATM CMG bearings and the dispersion and migration of the lubricant. The vacuum and weightless conditions of space were simulated in the bearing tests. Analysis of the results of the tests conducted points to inadequate lubrication as the predominant factor causing the failure of ATM CMG S/N 5 (Skylab 1) and the anomalies associated with ATM CMG S/N 6 (Skylab 2).

  6. Myrmecophagy by Yellowstone grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    I used data collected during a study of radio-marked grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) in the Yellowstone region from 1977 to 1992 to investigate myrmecophagy by this population. Although generally not an important source of energy for the bears (averaging 8 mm long) nested in logs over small ants (6 mm long) nested under stones. Optimal conditions for consumption of ants occurred on the warmest sites with ample substrate suitable for ant nests. For ants in mounds, this occurred at low elevations at non-forested sites. For ants in logs, this occurred at low elevations or on southerly aspects where there was abundant, large-diameter, well-decomposed woody debris under an open forest canopy. Grizzly bears selected moderately decomposed logs 4a??5 dm in diameter at midpoint. Ants will likely become a more important food for Yellowstone's grizzly bears as currently important foods decline, owing to disease and warming of the regional climate.

  7. Apparatus for a compact adjustable passive compliant mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Salisbury, Curt Michael

    2015-03-17

    Various technologies described herein pertain to an adjustable compliance apparatus. The adjustable compliance apparatus includes a shaft, a sleeve element, and a torsion spring. The sleeve element includes a bore there through, where the shaft is positioned through the bore of the sleeve element. Further, the torsion spring includes a plurality of coils, where the shaft is positioned through the plurality of coils. Moreover, the sleeve element is slidable in an axial direction along the shaft between the torsion spring and the shaft. Accordingly, compliance of the adjustable compliance apparatus is adjustable based on a number of the plurality of coils in contact with the sleeve element as positioned along the shaft within the torsion spring.

  8. On Calculation Methods and Results for Straight Cylindrical Roller Bearing Deflection, Stiffness, and Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess some calculation methods for quantifying the relationships of bearing geometry, material properties, load, deflection, stiffness, and stress. The scope of the work was limited to two-dimensional modeling of straight cylindrical roller bearings. Preparations for studies of dynamic response of bearings with damaged surfaces motivated this work. Studies were selected to exercise and build confidence in the numerical tools. Three calculation methods were used in this work. Two of the methods were numerical solutions of the Hertz contact approach. The third method used was a combined finite element surface integral method. Example calculations were done for a single roller loaded between an inner and outer raceway for code verification. Next, a bearing with 13 rollers and all-steel construction was used as an example to do additional code verification, including an assessment of the leading order of accuracy of the finite element and surface integral method. Results from that study show that the method is at least first-order accurate. Those results also show that the contact grid refinement has a more significant influence on precision as compared to the finite element grid refinement. To explore the influence of material properties, the 13-roller bearing was modeled as made from Nitinol 60, a material with very different properties from steel and showing some potential for bearing applications. The codes were exercised to compare contact areas and stress levels for steel and Nitinol 60 bearings operating at equivalent power density. As a step toward modeling the dynamic response of bearings having surface damage, static analyses were completed to simulate a bearing with a spall or similar damage.

  9. Focusing on Contact Lens Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Focusing on Contact Lens Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... substantial consumer injury. Back to top Types of Contact Lenses General categories Soft contact lenses. These are ...

  10. Lateral dampers for thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibner, D. H.; Szafir, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of lateral damping schemes for thrust bearings was examined, ranking their applicability to various engine classes, selecting the best concept for each engine class and performing an in-depth evaluation. Five major engine classes were considered: large transport, military, small general aviation, turboshaft, and non-manrated. Damper concepts developed for evaluation were: curved beam, constrained and unconstrained elastomer, hybrid boost bearing, hydraulic thrust piston, conical squeeze film, and rolling element thrust face.

  11. Polyurethane retainers for ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation of a new ball bearing retainer material is reported. A special composite polyurethane foam ball retainer has been developed that has virtually zero wear, is chemically inert to hydrocarbon lubricants, and stores up to 60 times as much lubricant per unit volume as the most commonly used retainer material, cotton phenolic. This new retainer concept shows promise of years of ball bearing operation without reoiling, based on life testing in high vacuum.

  12. Simplified installation of thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sensenbaugh, N. D.

    1980-01-01

    Special handling sleeve, key to method of installing thrust bearings, was developed for assembling bearings on shaft of low-pressure oxygen turbo-pump. Method eliminates cooling and vacuum-drying steps which saves time, while also eliminating possibility of corrosion formation. Procedure saves energy because it requires no liquid nitrogen for cooling shaft and no natural gas or electric power for operating vacuum oven.

  13. Design analysis and performance assessment of hybrid magnetic bearings for a rotary centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhaohui; Jahanmir, Said; Heshmat, Hooshang; Hunsberger, Andrew Z; Walton, James F

    2009-01-01

    A hybrid magnetic bearing system was designed for a rotary centrifugal blood pump being developed to provide long-term circulatory support for heart failure patients. This design consists of two compact bearings to suspend the rotor in five degrees-of-freedom with single axis active control. Permanent magnets are used to provide passive radial support and electromagnets to maintain axial stability of the rotor. Characteristics of the passive radial and active thrust magnetic bearing system were evaluated by the electromagnetic finite element analysis. A proportional-integral-derivative controller with force balance algorithm was implemented for closed loop control of the magnetic thrust bearing. The control position is continuously adjusted based on the electrical energy in the bearing coils, and thus passive magnetic forces carry static thrust loads to minimize the bearing current. Performance of the magnetic bearing system with associated control algorithm was evaluated at different operating conditions. The bearing current was significantly reduced with the force balance control method and the power consumption was below 0.5 W under various thrust loads. The bearing parameters predicted by the analysis were validated by the experimental data.

  14. Evaluation of erythrocyte flow at a bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support. In the blood pump, a spiral groove bearing was adopted for a thrust bearing. In the spiral groove bearing, separation of erythrocytes and plasma by plasma skimming has been postulated to occur. However, it is not clarified that plasma skimming occurs in a spiral groove bearing. The purpose of this study is to verify whether plasma skimming occurs in the spiral groove bearing of a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. For evaluation of plasma skimming in the spiral groove bearing, an impeller levitation performance test using a laser focus displacement meter and a microscopic visualization test of erythrocyte flow using a high-speed microscope were conducted. Bovine blood diluted with autologous plasma to adjust hematocrit to 1.0% was used as a working fluid. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the spiral groove bearing was estimated using image analysis. As a result, hematocrits on the ridge region with gaps of 45 μm, 31 μm, and 25 μm were calculated as 1.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively. Maximum skimming efficiency in this study was calculated as 70% with a gap of 25 μm. We confirmed that separation of erythrocyte and plasma occurred in the spiral groove bearing with decrease in bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

  15. A hydrodynamically suspended, magnetically sealed mechanically noncontact axial flow blood pump: design of a hydrodynamic bearing.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Kido, Kazuyuki; Yano, Tetsuya; Sakota, Daisuke; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Sekine, Kazumitsu; OKamoto, Eiji

    2007-03-01

    To overcome the drive shaft seal and bearing problem in rotary blood pumps, a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless direct current (DC) motor were employed in an axial flow pump. This enabled contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear. The axial flow pump consisted of a brushless DC motor, an impeller, and a guide vane. The motor rotor was directly connected to the impeller by a motor shaft. A hydrodynamic bearing was installed on the motor shaft. The motor and the hydrodynamic bearing were housed in a cylindrical casing and were waterproofed by a magnetic fluid seal, a mechanically noncontact seal. Impeller shaft displacement was measured using a laser sensor. Axial and radial displacements of the shaft were only a few micrometers for motor speed up to 8500 rpm. The shaft did not make contact with the bearing housing. A flow of 5 L/min was obtained at 8000 rpm at a pressure difference of 100 mm Hg. In conclusion, the axial flow blood pump consisting of a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless DC motor provided contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear.

  16. Detailed study of oxidation/wear mechanism in lox turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, T. J.; Mccarty, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Wear of 440C angular contact ball bearings of the phase 2 high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) has been studied by means of various advanced nondestructive techniques (NDT) and modeled with reference to all known material, design, and operation variables. Three modes dominating the wear scenario were found to be the adhesive/sheer peeling (ASP), oxidation, and abrasion. Bearing wear was modeled in terms of the three modes. Lacking a comprehensive theory of rolling contact wear to date, each mode is modeled after well-established theories of sliding wear, while sliding velocity and distance are related to microsliding in ball-to-ring contacts. Microsliding, stress, temperature, and other contact variables are evaluated with analytical software packages of SHABERTH(TM)/SINDA(TM) and ADORE(TM). Empirical constants for the models are derived from NIST experiments by applying the models to the NIST wear data. The bearing wear model so established precisely predicts quite well the average ball wear rate for the HPOTP bearings. The wear rate has been statistically determined for the entire population of flight and development bearings based on Rocketdyne records to date. Numerous illustrations are given.

  17. Detailed study of oxidation/wear mechanism in lox turbopump bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, T. J.; McCarty, J. P.

    1993-12-01

    Wear of 440C angular contact ball bearings of the phase 2 high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) has been studied by means of various advanced nondestructive techniques (NDT) and modeled with reference to all known material, design, and operation variables. Three modes dominating the wear scenario were found to be the adhesive/sheer peeling (ASP), oxidation, and abrasion. Bearing wear was modeled in terms of the three modes. Lacking a comprehensive theory of rolling contact wear to date, each mode is modeled after well-established theories of sliding wear, while sliding velocity and distance are related to microsliding in ball-to-ring contacts. Microsliding, stress, temperature, and other contact variables are evaluated with analytical software packages of SHABERTH(TM)/SINDA(TM) and ADORE(TM). Empirical constants for the models are derived from NIST experiments by applying the models to the NIST wear data. The bearing wear model so established precisely predicts quite well the average ball wear rate for the HPOTP bearings. The wear rate has been statistically determined for the entire population of flight and development bearings based on Rocketdyne records to date. Numerous illustrations are given.

  18. SSME Long-life Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, M. F.; Murphy, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings for LH2 and LO2 service in turbopumps were studied as a means of improving speed and life capabilities. Four hybrid bearing configurations were designed with emphasis on achieving maximum stiffness and damping. Parallel load bearings were tested at steady-state and transient conditions with LH2 (externally fed) and LN2 (internally fed). The hydrostatic elements were tested with Freon 113 for empirical determination of dynamic characteristics. Tests using an eccentric journal for loading showed the externally and internally fed hydrostatic bearings to have significant separated coefficients of direct stiffness and damping. For the internally fed bearing, the strongly speed-dependent cross-coupling stiffness arising from fluid swirl, along with significant cross-coupling damping, resulted in low net effective stiffness and damping. The test method used can produce separated coefficients with a sufficiently elliptic journal orbit; otherwise, only net effective coefficients combining direct and cross-coupling terms can be determined. Testing with nonsynchronous excitation is recommended to avoid this restriction. Investigation of hard materials, including ceramics, is recommended as a means of eliminating the need for the rolling bearing for startup and shutdown support. The testing was performed in 1984 (LH2), 1985 (LN2) and 1985-86 (Freon).

  19. Electronic Communications Technologies and the Transition to College: Links to Parent-Child Attachment and Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarigiani, Pamela A.; Trumbell, Jill M.; Camarena, Phame M.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic communications technologies (ECTs) help college students and parents remain in contact. Because recent reports have emphasized a link between ECTs, helicopter parenting, and autonomy issues, this study focused on the significance of contact patterns for attachment and student adjustment. First-semester college students (199 female, 81…

  20. Testing and Lubrication for Single Race Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1998-03-04

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for single race bearing applications and one hybrid-material single race bearings were evaluated and compared against single race bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in stronglink mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, bearings lubricated with titanium carbide (TiC) on the balls, bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and bearings lubricated with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. The bearings were maintained in a preloaded state in bearing cartridges during cycling and vibration tests. Bearings with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings lubricated with Vydax and were the best performing candidate. All candidates were suitable for low preload applications. Bearings with TiC coated balls and bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers performed well at high preloads, though not as well as bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposition of MoS{sub 2}. Bearings with silicon nitride balls were not suitable for high preload applications.

  1. Contact to cat or dog, allergies and parental education.

    PubMed

    Apfelbacher, Christian Joachim; Ollert, Markus; Ring, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Krämer, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    Whether or not associations between animal contact and allergy/atopy are homogeneous across social strata has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to estimate the association between animal contact (cat, dog) and allergy/atopy in 6-yr-old school beginners, stratified by parental educational level. A total of 30794, 6-yr old children participated in cross-sectional studies between 1991 and 2000 in Germany. Allergic sensitization to common aeroallergens and symptoms and diagnoses of atopic diseases (asthma, eczema, hay fever) were the dependent variables. Contact with dog/cat were the independent variables. Logistic regression was used to adjust for confounding. Analyses were stratified for parental education. Prevalences of hay fever, eczema, specific sensitization to pollen and house dust mite increased, while the prevalence of contact to cat and dog decreased with parental educational level. Globally significant positive associations between cat contact and sensitization to cat (interaction significant) and between dog contact and wheezing remained significant in the highest and medium/highest educational strata respectively. A globally significant inverse association between cat contact and hay fever remained significant in the highest educational stratum only. The inverse association of contact to dog with eczema was globally significant, but not in the strata. When estimating the associations between animal contact and allergy/atopy in children, effect modification by social status should be considered. Cat contact seems to increase the odds of sensitization to cat only in children whose parents have a high level of education.

  2. A dynamic model to predict the occurrence of skidding in wind-turbine bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sharad; Hunt, Hugh

    2011-07-01

    Despite use of the best in current design practices, high-speed shaft (HSS) bearings, in a wind-turbine gearbox, continue to exhibit a high rate of premature failure. As HSS bearings operate under low loads and high speeds, these bearings are prone to skidding. However, most of the existing methods for analyzing skidding are quasi-static in nature and cannot be used to study dynamic operating conditions. This paper proposes a dynamic model, which includes gyroscopic and centrifugal effects, to study the skidding characteristics of angular-contact ball-bearings. Traction forces between rolling-elements and raceways are obtained using elastohydrodynamic (EHD) lubrication theory. Underlying gross-sliding mechanisms for pure axial loads, and combined radial and axial loads are also studied. The proposed model will enable engineers to improve bearing reliability at the design stage, by estimating the amount of skidding.

  3. Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) LOX turbopump pump-end bearing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A simulation of the shaft/bearing system of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Liquid Oxygen turbopump was developed. The simulation model allows the thermal and mechanical characteristics to interact as a realistic simulation of the bearing operating characteristics. The model accounts for single and two phase coolant conditions, and includes the heat generation from bearing friction and fluid stirring. Using the simulation model, parametric analyses were performed on the 45 mm pump-end bearings to investigate the sensitivity of bearing characteristics to contact friction, axial preload, coolant flow rate, coolant inlet temperature and quality, heat transfer coefficients, outer race clearance and misalignment, and the effects of thermally isolating the outer race from the isolator.

  4. Method of forming fluorine-bearing diamond layer on substrates, including tool substrates

    DOEpatents

    Chang, R. P. H.; Grannen, Kevin J.

    2002-01-01

    A method of forming a fluorine-bearing diamond layer on non-diamond substrates, especially on tool substrates comprising a metal matrix and hard particles, such as tungsten carbide particles, in the metal matrix. The substrate and a fluorine-bearing plasma or other gas are then contacted under temperature and pressure conditions effective to nucleate fluorine-bearing diamond on the substrate. A tool insert substrate is treated prior to the diamond nucleation and growth operation by etching both the metal matrix and the hard particles using suitable etchants.

  5. 77 FR 70423 - Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC and Black Bear Development Holdings, LLC and Black Bear SO, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC and Black Bear Development Holdings, LLC and Black Bear SO, LLC; Notice of Application for Partial Transfer of Licenses, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On October 25, 2012, Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC, sole licensee (transferor)...

  6. The effect of weight-bearing exercise and non-weight-bearing exercise on gait in rats with sciatic nerve crush injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Hwangbo, Gak; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to access the effect of weight bearing exercise (treadmill exercise) and non-weight-bearing exercise (swimming exercise) on gait in the recovery process after a sciatic nerve crush injury. [Subjects and Methods] Rats were randomly divided into a swimming group (n=3) with non-weight-bearing exercise after a sciatic nerve crush and a treadmill group (n=3) with weight bearing exercise after a sciatic nerve crush. Dartfish is a program that can analyze and interpret motion through video images. The knee lateral epicondyle, lateral malleolus, and metatarsophalangeal joint of the fifth toe were marked by black dots before recording. [Results] There were significant differences in TOK (knee angle toe off) and ICK (knee angle at initial contact) in the swimming group and in TOK, ICA (ankle angle at initial contact), and ICK in the treadmill group. In comparison between groups, there were significant differences in TOA (ankle angle in toe off) and ICA at the 7th day. [Conclusion] There was no difference between weight bearing and non-weight-bearing exercise in sciatic nerve damage, and both exercises accelerated the recovery process in this study. PMID:25995583

  7. Allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Alikhan, Ali; Maibach, Howard I

    2014-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is one of the most important dermatologic disorders worldwide - it can cause significant morbidity and decreased quality of life, as well as having major economic implications and loss of vocational productivity. Patch testing is the most important discovery in allergic contact dermatitis and the best diagnostic modality to date; the thin-layer rapid- use epicutaneous (TRUE) test is a more recent patch test development which has improved the convenience and feasibility of the test. The future of allergic contact dermatitis is bright as we continue to learn more about the science of the disorder, as well as ways to improve diagnosis and patient care. Furthermore, it is important to remember, in this global age, that cooperation between health care providers worldwide is essential.

  8. Shoe allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Matthys, Erin; Zahir, Amir; Ehrlich, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Foot dermatitis is a widespread condition, affecting men and women of all ages. Because of the location, this condition may present as a debilitating problem to those who have it. Allergic contact dermatitis involving the feet is frequently due to shoes or socks. The allergens that cause shoe dermatitis can be found in any constituent of footwear, including rubber, adhesives, leather, dyes, metals, and medicaments. The goal of treatment is to identify and minimize contact with the offending allergen(s). The lack of product information released from shoe manufacturers and the continually changing trends in footwear present a challenge in treating this condition. The aim of this study is to review the current literature on allergic contact shoe dermatitis; clinical presentation, allergens, patch testing, and management will be discussed. PubMed and MEDLINE databases were used for the search, with a focus on literature updates from the last 15 years.

  9. Acrylate Systemic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Maxwell B; Pratt, Melanie D

    2015-01-01

    Acrylates, the 2012 American Contact Dermatitis Society allergen of the year, are found in a range of products including the absorbent materials within feminine hygiene pads. When fully polymerized, acrylates are nonimmunogenic; however, if not completely cured, the monomers can be potent allergens.A 28-year-old woman is presented, who had her teeth varnished with Isodan (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France) containing HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) with no initial reaction. Approximately 1 month later, the patient developed a genital dermatitis secondary to her feminine hygiene pads. The initial reaction resolved, but 5 months later, the patient developed a systemic contact dermatitis after receiving a second varnishing.The patient was dramatically patch test positive to many acrylates. This case demonstrates a reaction to likely unpolymerized acrylates within a feminine hygiene pad, as well as broad cross-reactivity or cosensitivity to acrylates, and possibly a systemic contact dermatitis with systemic re-exposure to unpolymerized acrylates.

  10. Influence of unbalance levels on nonlinear dynamics of a rotor-backup rolling bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Cesar A.; Santos, Ilmar F.; Weber, Hans I.

    2017-04-01

    Rotor drops in magnetic bearing and unbalance in rotors have been objective of study for many years. The combination of these two well-known phenomena led to an interesting chaotic response, when the rotor touches the inner race of the back-up bearing. The present work explores the nonlinear rotor backup bearing dynamics both theoretically and experimentally using a fully instrumented test rig, where the position of shaft, its angular velocity and the contact forces between the shaft and the backup bearing are sampled at 25 kHz. The test rig is built by a removable passive magnetic bearing, which allows for simulation of magnetic bearing failure (loss of carrying capacity and rotor fall). The rotor is studied numerically as well as experimentally. A theoretical approach is given beforehand and supplies the basis of the study. Finally the presented results are commented on the point of view of nonlinear dynamics applied to the practical use. The theoretical and numerical analyses are shown through orbit plots, phase plans, Poincaré maps, force response in time and double sided spectrum. The latter is important to characterize the condition at different levels of unbalance between forward and backward whirl. Our preliminary results indicate that for smaller amount of unbalance the rotor swings at the bottom of the bearing, the more the unbalance increases, other dynamical behavior occur and some can be extremely harmful, since the rotor can be lifted from the contact state and return, starting to impact innumerable times without reaching a steady state.

  11. Spa contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Yankura, Jessica A; Marks, James G; Anderson, Bryan E; Adams, David R

    2008-01-01

    Potassium monopersulfate (MPS) is widely used in spa and pool "shock" treatments, yet contact dermatitis associated with MPS has been rarely reported. A patient presented with a generalized scattered dermatitis from the neck down that worsened after spa use. Patch testing elicited a ++ reaction to ammonium persulfate. Contact with ammonium persulfate was ruled out; however, MPS, which can cross-react with ammonium persulfate, was found to be the active ingredient in the patient's spa shock treatments. The dermatitis cleared after the patient switched to a hydrogen peroxide-based shock treatment.

  12. Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kostner, Lisa; Anzengruber, Florian; Guillod, Caroline; Recher, Mike; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Navarini, Alexander A

    2017-02-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a common skin disease caused by a T cell-mediated immune reaction to usually innocuous allergens. ACD can have grave medical and socioeconomic consequences. ACD and irritant contact dermatitis often occur together. A detailed history and clinical examination are crucial and guide patch testing, which is the gold standard to diagnose ACD. T-cell clones persisting in the skin may explain the tendency of ACD to relapse even after years of allergen avoidance. Traditional treatments for ACD are topical steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, phototherapy, retinoids (including the recent alitretinoin), and immunosuppressants. Targeted therapies are lacking.

  13. Local Synthesis and Tooth Contact Analysis of Face-Milled Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Zhang, Yi

    1991-01-01

    Computerized simulation of meshing and bearing contact for spiral bevel gears and hypoid gears is a significant achievement that could substantially improve the technology and the quality of the gears. An approach to the synthesis of face-milled spiral bevel gears and their tooth contact analysis is presented. The proposed approach is based on the following ideas: application of the principle of local synthesis that provides optimal conditions of meshing and contact at the mean contact point, M, and in the neighborhood of M; and application of relations between principle directions and curvatures for surfaces being in line contact or in point contact. The developed local synthesis of gears provides the following: (1) the required gear ratio at M; (2) a localized bearing contact with the desired direction of the tangent to the contact path on gear tooth surface and the desired length of the major axis of contact ellipse at M; (3) a predesigned parabolic function of a controlled level for transmission errors which enables absorption of linear functions of transmission errors caused by misalignment and reduces the level of vibrations. The proposed approach does not require either the tilt of the head-cutter for the process of generation or modified roll for the pinion generation. Improved conditions of meshing and contact of the gears can be achieved without the above mentioned parameters. A computer program for determination of basic machine-tool settings and tooth contact analysis for the designed gears is presented. The approach is illustrated with a numerical example.

  14. Predictors of sociocultural adjustment among sojourning Malaysian students in Britain.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren

    2009-08-01

    The process of cross-cultural migration may be particularly difficult for students travelling overseas for further or higher education, especially where qualitative differences exist between the home and host nations. The present study examined the sociocultural adjustment of sojourning Malaysian students in Britain. Eighty-one Malay and 110 Chinese students enrolled in various courses answered a self-report questionnaire that examined various aspects of sociocultural adjustment. A series of one-way analyses of variance showed that Malay participants experienced poorer sociocultural adjustment in comparison with their Chinese counterparts. They were also less likely than Chinese students to have contact with co-nationals and host nationals, more likely to perceive their actual experience in Britain as worse than they had expected, and more likely to perceive greater cultural distance and greater discrimination. The results of regression analyses showed that, for Malay participants, perceived discrimination accounted for the greatest proportion of variance in sociocultural adjustment (73%), followed by English language proficiency (10%) and contact with host nationals (4%). For Chinese participants, English language proficiency was the strongest predictor of sociocultural adjustment (54%), followed by expectations of life in Britain (18%) and contact with host nationals (3%). By contrast, participants' sex, age, and length of residence failed to emerge as significant predictors for either ethnic group. Possible explanations for this pattern of findings are discussed, including the effects of Islamophobia on Malay-Muslims in Britain, possible socioeconomic differences between Malay and Chinese students, and personality differences between the two ethnic groups. The results are further discussed in relation to practical steps that can be taken to improve the sociocultural adjustment of sojourning students in Britain.

  15. Rolling-contact deformation of MgO single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrane, K. F.; Glaeser, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Magnesium oxide single crystals were used as a model bearing material and deformed by rolling contact with a steel ball 0.64 cm in diameter. A dependence of depth of slip on rolling velocity which persisted with increasing numbers of rolling-contact cycles was discovered. The track width, track hardness and dislocation interactions as observed by transmission electron microscopy all increased in a consistent manner with increasing cycles. The rolling-contact state of stress produces a high density of dislocations in a localized zone. Dislocation interaction in this zone produces cleavage-type cracks after a large number of rolling-contact cycles. The orientation of the crystal influences the character of dislocation accumulation.

  16. Evolution of the low contact stress (LCS) complete knee system.

    PubMed

    Crossett, Larry

    2006-09-01

    The low contact stress knee design was one of the first designs to become widely available and popular for total knee arthroplasty. The low contact stress knee was initially designed to address wear due to high contact stresses seen in fixed-bearing designs. Today, nearly 30 years after its introduction, the technology behind the knee remains just as relevant. Many of the original innovations in early low contact stress knee systems are still in use today. New innovations, like a new instrument set and the advent of computer-assisted surgery, have added to the success of the technology. The history of this innovative design is discussed with special consideration given to the specific design principals that have improved the basic design over the past three decades.

  17. Running on uneven ground: leg adjustments to altered ground level.

    PubMed

    Müller, Roy; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2010-08-01

    In locomotion, humans have to deal with changes in ground level like pavement or stairs. When they encounter uneven ground with changes in terrain height, they reduce their angle of attack and leg stiffness on a step. This strategy was found for the single step upward movement. However, are these adjustments the result of a general strategy? In our study we focused on leg adjustments while running up and down, implying permanent adaptation to a new track level. To investigate this, we measured ten healthy participants as they ran along a runway with 10 cm increased and 10 cm lowered steps. We found that ground reaction force, leg length, leg stiffness, and angle of attack were adjusted to the direction of the vertical disturbance (up or down) but also to its length. When running upwards, leg stiffness decreased by about 20.4% on the single step and by about 9.3% on the permanently elevated track step. In addition to that - when running downwards - leg stiffness decreased in preparation for the downward step by about 18.8%. We also observed that the angle of attack diminished on elevated contact from 61 degrees to 59 degrees, and increased on lowered contact from 61 degrees to 65 degrees. The adjustment of leg stiffness seemed to be actively achieved, whereas the angle of attack appeared to be passively adjusted, consistent with a running model that includes leg retraction in late swing phase.

  18. Bear reintroduction: Lessons and challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Joseph D.; Huber, Djuro; Servheen, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    Reintroduction is defined as an attempt to establish a species in an area that was once part of its historical range, but from which it has been extirpated or become extinct. Historically, one of the most successful programs was the reintroduction of 254 American black bears (Ursus americanus) from Minnesota to the Interior Highlands of Arkansas in the 1960s; that population has grown to >2,500 today. More recent efforts have involved fewer but better monitored animals and have sometimes employed techniques to improve site fidelity and survival. In Pennsylvania, for example, pregnant female American black bears were successfully translocated from winter dens, the premise being that the adult females would be less likely to return because of the presence of young cubs. That winter-release technique was compared to summer trapping and release in Tennessee; winter releases resulted in greater survival and reduced post-release movements. Homing has not been a problem for small numbers of brown bears (Ursus arctos) reintroduced to the Cabinet-Yaak ecosystem in Montana and Idaho and to the mountains of Austria and France. Reintroduction success appears to be correlated with translocation distance and is greater for subadults and females. As with any small population, reintroduced bear populations are susceptible to environmental variation and stochastic demographic and genetic processes. Although managers have focused on these biological barriers, sociopolitical impediments to bear reintroduction are more difficult to overcome. Poor public acceptance and understanding of bears are the main reasons some reintroduction programs have been derailed. Consequently, the public should be involved in the reintroduction process from the outset; overcoming negative public perceptions about bear reintroduction will be our greatest challenge.

  19. Journal gas bearing for curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, J. W.

    1969-01-01

    Optimizing bearing length and permissible axis curvature alleviates distortion of film gap of gas lubricated journal bearing in deployment mechanisms. Required bearing length is divided into two shorter bearings interconnected by links which allow satisfactory conformity with the bent, load-carrying member.

  20. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  1. 36 CFR 13.1236 - Bear orientation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bear orientation. 13.1236... Developed Area § 13.1236 Bear orientation. All persons visiting the BCDA must receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation. Failure to receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation is prohibited....

  2. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  3. 36 CFR 13.1236 - Bear orientation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bear orientation. 13.1236... Developed Area § 13.1236 Bear orientation. All persons visiting the BCDA must receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation. Failure to receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation is prohibited....

  4. 36 CFR 13.1236 - Bear orientation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bear orientation. 13.1236... Developed Area § 13.1236 Bear orientation. All persons visiting the BCDA must receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation. Failure to receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation is prohibited....

  5. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  6. 36 CFR 13.1236 - Bear orientation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bear orientation. 13.1236... Developed Area § 13.1236 Bear orientation. All persons visiting the BCDA must receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation. Failure to receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation is prohibited....

  7. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  8. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  9. 36 CFR 13.1236 - Bear orientation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bear orientation. 13.1236... Developed Area § 13.1236 Bear orientation. All persons visiting the BCDA must receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation. Failure to receive an NPS-approved Bear Orientation is prohibited....

  10. Spousal Adjustment to Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziglar, Elisa J.

    This paper reviews the literature on the stresses and coping strategies of spouses of patients with myocardial infarction (MI). It attempts to identify specific problem areas of adjustment for the spouse and to explore the effects of spousal adjustment on patient recovery. Chapter one provides an overview of the importance in examining the…

  11. SHABERTH - ANALYSIS OF A SHAFT BEARING SYSTEM (CRAY VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.

    1994-01-01

    The SHABERTH computer program was developed to predict operating characteristics of bearings in a multibearing load support system. Lubricated and non-lubricated bearings can be modeled. SHABERTH calculates the loads, torques, temperatures, and fatigue life for ball and/or roller bearings on a single shaft. The program also allows for an analysis of the system reaction to the termination of lubricant supply to the bearings and other lubricated mechanical elements. SHABERTH has proven to be a valuable tool in the design and analysis of shaft bearing systems. The SHABERTH program is structured with four nested calculation schemes. The thermal scheme performs steady state and transient temperature calculations which predict system temperatures for a given operating state. The bearing dimensional equilibrium scheme uses the bearing temperatures, predicted by the temperature mapping subprograms, and the rolling element raceway load distribution, predicted by the bearing subprogram, to calculate bearing diametral clearance for a given operating state. The shaft-bearing system load equilibrium scheme calculates bearing inner ring positions relative to the respective outer rings such that the external loading applied to the shaft is brought into equilibrium by the rolling element loads which develop at each bearing inner ring for a given operating state. The bearing rolling element and cage load equilibrium scheme calculates the rolling element and cage equilibrium positions and rotational speeds based on the relative inner-outer ring positions, inertia effects, and friction conditions. The ball bearing subprograms in the current SHABERTH program have several model enhancements over similar programs. These enhancements include an elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness model that accounts for thermal heating in the contact area and lubricant film starvation; a new model for traction combined with an asperity load sharing model; a model for the hydrodynamic rolling and

  12. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    1982-01-01

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  13. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, J.R.

    1982-05-04

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion. 3 figs.

  14. Have Confidence in Contact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Richard J.; Turner, Rhiannon N.

    2010-01-01

    In an article in the May-June 2009 "American Psychologist," we discussed a new approach to reducing prejudice and encouraging more positive intergroup relations (Crisp & Turner, 2009). We named the approach imagined intergroup contact and defined it as "the mental simulation of a social interaction with a member or members of an outgroup category"…

  15. Compact contacting device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acharya, Arun (Inventor); Gottzmann, Christian F. (Inventor); Lockett, Michael J. (Inventor); Schneider, James S. (Inventor); Victor, Richard A. (Inventor); Zawierucha, Robert (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus comprising a rotatable mass of structured packing for mass or heat transfer between two contacting fluids of different densities wherein the packing mass is made up of corrugated sheets of involute shape relative to the axis of the packing mass and form a logarithmic spiral curved counter to the direction of rotation.

  16. Contact: Releasing the news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  17. Disproportionate Minority Contact.

    PubMed

    Fix, Rebecca L; Cyperski, Melissa A; Burkhart, Barry R

    2017-04-01

    The overrepresentation of racial/ethnic minorities within the criminal justice system relative to their population percentage, a phenomenon termed disproportionate minority contact, has been examined within general adult and adolescent offender populations; yet few studies have tested whether this phenomenon extends to juvenile sexual offenders (JSOs). In addition, few studies have examined whether offender race/ethnicity influences registration and notification requirements, which JSOs are subject to in some U.S. states. The present study assessed for disproportionate minority contact among general delinquent offenders and JSOs, meaning it aimed to test whether the criminal justice system treats those accused of sexual and non-sexual offenses differently by racial/ethnic group. Furthermore, racial/ethnic group differences in risk, legal classification, and sexual offending were examined for JSOs. Results indicated disproportionate minority contact was present among juveniles with non-sexual offenses and JSOs in Alabama. In addition, offense category and risk scores differed between African American and European American JSOs. Finally, registration classifications were predicted by offending characteristics, but not race/ethnicity. Implications and future directions regarding disproportionate minority contact among JSOs and social and legal policy affecting JSOs are discussed.

  18. Thermal Contact Conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The performance of cryogenic instruments is often a function of their operating temperature. Thus, designers of cryogenic instruments often are required to predict the operating temperature of each instrument they design. This requires accurate thermal models of cryogenic components which include the properties of the materials and assembly techniques used. When components are bolted or otherwise pressed together, a knowledge of the thermal performance of such joints are also needed. In some cases, the temperature drop across these joints represents a significant fraction of the total temperature difference between the instrument and its cooler. While extensive databases exist on the thermal properties of bulk materials, similar databases for pressed contacts do not. This has often lead to instrument designs that avoid pressed contacts or to the over-design of such joints at unnecessary expense. Although many people have made measurements of contact conductances at cryogenic temperatures, this data is often very narrow in scope and even more often it has not been published in an easily retrievable fashion, if published at all. This paper presents a summary of the limited pressed contact data available in the literature.

  19. Cryogenic Magnetic Bearing Test Facility (CMBTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Cryogenic Magnetic Bearing Test Facility (CMBTF) was designed and built to evaluate compact, lightweight magnetic bearings for use in the SSME's (space shuttle main engine) liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen turbopumps. State of the art and tradeoff studies were conducted which indicated that a hybrid permanent magnet bias homopolar magnetic bearing design would be smaller, lighter, and much more efficient than conventional industrial bearings. A test bearing of this type was designed for the test rig for use at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (-320 F). The bearing was fabricated from state-of-the-art materials and incorporated into the CMBTF. Testing at room temperature was accomplished at Avcon's facility. These preliminary tests indicated that this magnetic bearing is a feasible alternative to older bearing technologies. Analyses showed that the hybrid magnetic bearing is one-third the weight, considerably smaller, and uses less power than previous generations of magnetic bearings.

  20. Measuring Micro-Friction Torque in MEMS Gas Bearings.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xudong; Liu, Huan

    2016-05-18

    An in situ measurement of micro-friction torque in MEMS gas bearings, which has been a challenging research topic for years, is realized by a system designed in this paper. In the system, a high accuracy micro-force sensor and an electronically-driven table are designed, fabricated and utilized. With appropriate installation of the sensor and bearings on the table, the engine rotor can be driven to rotate with the sensor using a silicon lever beam. One end of the beam is fixed to the shaft of the gas bearing, while the other end is free and in contact with the sensor probe tip. When the sensor begins to rotate with the table, the beam is pushed by the sensor probe to rotate in the same direction. For the beam, the friction torque from the gas bearing is balanced by the torque induced by pushing force from the sensor probe. Thus, the friction torque can be calculated as a product of the pushing force measured by the sensor and the lever arm, which is defined as the distance from the sensor probe tip to the centerline of the bearing. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this system, with a sensitivity of 1.285 mV/μN·m in a range of 0 to 11.76 μN·m when the lever arm is 20 mm long. The measuring range can be modified by varying the length of the lever arm. Thus, this system has wide potential applications in measuring the micro-friction torque of gas bearings in rotating MEMS machines.