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Sample records for adjusted cox regression

  1. Survival analysis of cervical cancer using stratified Cox regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnami, S. W.; Inayati, K. D.; Sari, N. W. Wulan; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the mostly widely cancer cause of the women death in the world including Indonesia. Most cervical cancer patients come to the hospital already in an advanced stadium. As a result, the treatment of cervical cancer becomes more difficult and even can increase the death's risk. One of parameter that can be used to assess successfully of treatment is the probability of survival. This study raises the issue of cervical cancer survival patients at Dr. Soetomo Hospital using stratified Cox regression based on six factors such as age, stadium, treatment initiation, companion disease, complication, and anemia. Stratified Cox model is used because there is one independent variable that does not satisfy the proportional hazards assumption that is stadium. The results of the stratified Cox model show that the complication variable is significant factor which influent survival probability of cervical cancer patient. The obtained hazard ratio is 7.35. It means that cervical cancer patient who has complication is at risk of dying 7.35 times greater than patient who did not has complication. While the adjusted survival curves showed that stadium IV had the lowest probability of survival.

  2. Simultaneous confidence bands for Cox regression from semiparametric random censorship.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shoubhik; Subramanian, Sundarraman

    2016-01-01

    Cox regression is combined with semiparametric random censorship models to construct simultaneous confidence bands (SCBs) for subject-specific survival curves. Simulation results are presented to compare the performance of the proposed SCBs with the SCBs that are based only on standard Cox. The new SCBs provide correct empirical coverage and are more informative. The proposed SCBs are illustrated with two real examples. An extension to handle missing censoring indicators is also outlined.

  3. Simultaneous confidence bands for Cox regression from semiparametric random censorship.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shoubhik; Subramanian, Sundarraman

    2016-01-01

    Cox regression is combined with semiparametric random censorship models to construct simultaneous confidence bands (SCBs) for subject-specific survival curves. Simulation results are presented to compare the performance of the proposed SCBs with the SCBs that are based only on standard Cox. The new SCBs provide correct empirical coverage and are more informative. The proposed SCBs are illustrated with two real examples. An extension to handle missing censoring indicators is also outlined. PMID:25691289

  4. A simple approach to power and sample size calculations in logistic regression and Cox regression models.

    PubMed

    Vaeth, Michael; Skovlund, Eva

    2004-06-15

    For a given regression problem it is possible to identify a suitably defined equivalent two-sample problem such that the power or sample size obtained for the two-sample problem also applies to the regression problem. For a standard linear regression model the equivalent two-sample problem is easily identified, but for generalized linear models and for Cox regression models the situation is more complicated. An approximately equivalent two-sample problem may, however, also be identified here. In particular, we show that for logistic regression and Cox regression models the equivalent two-sample problem is obtained by selecting two equally sized samples for which the parameters differ by a value equal to the slope times twice the standard deviation of the independent variable and further requiring that the overall expected number of events is unchanged. In a simulation study we examine the validity of this approach to power calculations in logistic regression and Cox regression models. Several different covariate distributions are considered for selected values of the overall response probability and a range of alternatives. For the Cox regression model we consider both constant and non-constant hazard rates. The results show that in general the approach is remarkably accurate even in relatively small samples. Some discrepancies are, however, found in small samples with few events and a highly skewed covariate distribution. Comparison with results based on alternative methods for logistic regression models with a single continuous covariate indicates that the proposed method is at least as good as its competitors. The method is easy to implement and therefore provides a simple way to extend the range of problems that can be covered by the usual formulas for power and sample size determination.

  5. Cox regression methods for two-stage randomization designs.

    PubMed

    Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Helterbrand, Jeffrey D

    2007-06-01

    Two-stage randomization designs (TSRD) are becoming increasingly common in oncology and AIDS clinical trials as they make more efficient use of study participants to examine therapeutic regimens. In these designs patients are initially randomized to an induction treatment, followed by randomization to a maintenance treatment conditional on their induction response and consent to further study treatment. Broader acceptance of TSRDs in drug development may hinge on the ability to make appropriate intent-to-treat type inference within this design framework as to whether an experimental induction regimen is better than a standard induction regimen when maintenance treatment is fixed. Recently Lunceford, Davidian, and Tsiatis (2002, Biometrics 58, 48-57) introduced an inverse probability weighting based analytical framework for estimating survival distributions and mean restricted survival times, as well as for comparing treatment policies at landmarks in the TSRD setting. In practice Cox regression is widely used and in this article we extend the analytical framework of Lunceford et al. (2002) to derive a consistent estimator for the log hazard in the Cox model and a robust score test to compare treatment policies. Large sample properties of these methods are derived, illustrated via a simulation study, and applied to a TSRD clinical trial. PMID:17425633

  6. Analyzing Student Learning Outcomes: Usefulness of Logistic and Cox Regression Models. IR Applications, Volume 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chau-Kuang

    2005-01-01

    Logistic and Cox regression methods are practical tools used to model the relationships between certain student learning outcomes and their relevant explanatory variables. The logistic regression model fits an S-shaped curve into a binary outcome with data points of zero and one. The Cox regression model allows investigators to study the duration…

  7. Factors Associated with Methadone Treatment Duration: A Cox Regression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ching-Yi; Chao, En; Lee, Tony Szu-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    This study examined retention rates and associated predictors of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) duration among 128 newly admitted patients in Taiwan. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to obtain demographic and drug use history. Daily records of methadone taken and test results for HIV, HCV, and morphine toxicology were taken from a computerized medical registry. Cox regression analyses were performed to examine factors associated with MMT duration. MMT retention rates were 80.5%, 68.8%, 53.9%, and 41.4% for 3, 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Excluding 38 patients incarcerated during the study period, retention rates were 81.1%, 73.3%, 61.1%, and 48.9% for 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, and 18 months, respectively. No participant seroconverted to HIV and 1 died during the 18-months follow-up. Results showed that being female, imprisonment, a longer distance from house to clinic, having a lower methadone dose after 30 days, being HCV positive, and in the New Taipei city program predicted early patient dropout. The findings suggest favorable MMT outcomes of HIV seroincidence and mortality. Results indicate that the need to minimize travel distance and to provide programs that meet women’s requirements justify expansion of MMT clinics in Taiwan. PMID:25875531

  8. Estimation of treatment effects based on possibly misspecified Cox regression.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Satoshi; Henmi, Masayuki

    2012-10-01

    In randomized clinical trials, a treatment effect on a time-to-event endpoint is often estimated by the Cox proportional hazards model. The maximum partial likelihood estimator does not make sense if the proportional hazard assumption is violated. Xu and O'Quigley (Biostatistics 1:423-439, 2000) proposed an estimating equation, which provides an interpretable estimator for the treatment effect under model misspecification. Namely it provides a consistent estimator for the log-hazard ratio among the treatment groups if the model is correctly specified, and it is interpreted as an average log-hazard ratio over time even if misspecified. However, the method requires the assumption that censoring is independent of treatment group, which is more restricted than that for the maximum partial likelihood estimator and is often violated in practice. In this paper, we propose an alternative estimating equation. Our method provides an estimator of the same property as that of Xu and O'Quigley under the usual assumption for the maximum partial likelihood estimation. We show that our estimator is consistent and asymptotically normal, and derive a consistent estimator of the asymptotic variance. If the proportional hazards assumption holds, the efficiency of the estimator can be improved by applying the covariate adjustment method based on the semiparametric theory proposed by Lu and Tsiatis (Biometrika 95:679-694, 2008). PMID:22527680

  9. Mortality Prediction in ICUs Using A Novel Time-Slicing Cox Regression Method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Chen, Wenlin; Heard, Kevin; Kollef, Marin H.; Bailey, Thomas C.; Cui, Zhicheng; He, Yujie; Lu, Chenyang; Chen, Yixin

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, machine learning and data mining have been increasingly used for clinical prediction in ICUs. However, there is still a huge gap in making full use of the time-series data generated from ICUs. Aiming at filling this gap, we propose a novel approach entitled Time Slicing Cox regression (TS-Cox), which extends the classical Cox regression into a classification method on multi-dimensional time-series. Unlike traditional classifiers such as logistic regression and support vector machines, our model not only incorporates the discriminative features derived from the time-series, but also naturally exploits the temporal orders of these features based on a Cox-like function. Empirical evaluation on MIMIC-II database demonstrates the efficacy of the TS-Cox model. Our TS-Cox model outperforms all other baseline models by a good margin in terms of AUC_PR, sensitivity and PPV, which indicates that TS-Cox may be a promising tool for mortality prediction in ICUs. PMID:26958269

  10. Mortality Prediction in ICUs Using A Novel Time-Slicing Cox Regression Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Chen, Wenlin; Heard, Kevin; Kollef, Marin H; Bailey, Thomas C; Cui, Zhicheng; He, Yujie; Lu, Chenyang; Chen, Yixin

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, machine learning and data mining have been increasingly used for clinical prediction in ICUs. However, there is still a huge gap in making full use of the time-series data generated from ICUs. Aiming at filling this gap, we propose a novel approach entitled Time Slicing Cox regression (TS-Cox), which extends the classical Cox regression into a classification method on multi-dimensional time-series. Unlike traditional classifiers such as logistic regression and support vector machines, our model not only incorporates the discriminative features derived from the time-series, but also naturally exploits the temporal orders of these features based on a Cox-like function. Empirical evaluation on MIMIC-II database demonstrates the efficacy of the TS-Cox model. Our TS-Cox model outperforms all other baseline models by a good margin in terms of AUC_PR, sensitivity and PPV, which indicates that TS-Cox may be a promising tool for mortality prediction in ICUs.

  11. Non-Asymptotic Oracle Inequalities for the High-Dimensional Cox Regression via Lasso

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Shengchun; Nan, Bin

    2013-01-01

    We consider finite sample properties of the regularized high-dimensional Cox regression via lasso. Existing literature focuses on linear models or generalized linear models with Lipschitz loss functions, where the empirical risk functions are the summations of independent and identically distributed (iid) losses. The summands in the negative log partial likelihood function for censored survival data, however, are neither iid nor Lipschitz.We first approximate the negative log partial likelihood function by a sum of iid non-Lipschitz terms, then derive the non-asymptotic oracle inequalities for the lasso penalized Cox regression using pointwise arguments to tackle the difficulties caused by lacking iid Lipschitz losses. PMID:24516328

  12. Cancer Markers Selection Using Network-Based Cox Regression: A Methodological and Computational Practice

    PubMed Central

    Iuliano, Antonella; Occhipinti, Annalisa; Angelini, Claudia; De Feis, Italia; Lió, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    International initiatives such as the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) are collecting multiple datasets at different genome-scales with the aim of identifying novel cancer biomarkers and predicting survival of patients. To analyze such data, several statistical methods have been applied, among them Cox regression models. Although these models provide a good statistical framework to analyze omic data, there is still a lack of studies that illustrate advantages and drawbacks in integrating biological information and selecting groups of biomarkers. In fact, classical Cox regression algorithms focus on the selection of a single biomarker, without taking into account the strong correlation between genes. Even though network-based Cox regression algorithms overcome such drawbacks, such network-based approaches are less widely used within the life science community. In this article, we aim to provide a clear methodological framework on the use of such approaches in order to turn cancer research results into clinical applications. Therefore, we first discuss the rationale and the practical usage of three recently proposed network-based Cox regression algorithms (i.e., Net-Cox, AdaLnet, and fastcox). Then, we show how to combine existing biological knowledge and available data with such algorithms to identify networks of cancer biomarkers and to estimate survival of patients. Finally, we describe in detail a new permutation-based approach to better validate the significance of the selection in terms of cancer gene signatures and pathway/networks identification. We illustrate the proposed methodology by means of both simulations and real case studies. Overall, the aim of our work is two-fold. Firstly, to show how network-based Cox regression models can be used to integrate biological knowledge (e.g., multi-omics data) for the analysis of survival data. Secondly, to provide a clear methodological and computational approach for

  13. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors used for preventing or regressing cancer.

    PubMed

    de Souza Pereira, Ricardo

    2009-06-01

    The current use of antineoplastic drugs in human therapy causes a substancial number of toxic or side effects which consequently lead to a reduction of the amount of drug to be administered, and in some cases to discontinuation of the therapy. A reduction of the amount of drug to be administered or discontinuation of the therapy causes an increase in primary tumour growth and/or the occurrence of tumour metastases. For this reason, the development of new anti-cancer drugs with lower side effects is necessary. This review gives a general idea about the origins of cancer and the importance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in oncogenesis. Evidence from clinical and preclinical studies indicates that COX-2-derived prostaglandins participate in carcinogenesis, inflammation, immune response suppression, apoptosis inhibition, angiogenesis, and tumour cell invasion and metastasis. The recent anti-tumour drugs are based on tests of known selective COX-2 inhibitors and on the drawing and synthesis of new potent derivatives. Maybe, this can be the way to obtain new anti-tumour drugs with very low collateral effects. Selective COX-2 inhibitors are being mixtured with new anti-cancer drugs in order to obtain better results in the regression of cancers. Some natural products are selective COX-2 inhibitors and have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. The relevant patents are discussed.

  14. Network regularised Cox regression and multiplex network models to predict disease comorbidities and survival of cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haoming; Moni, Mohammad Ali; Liò, Pietro

    2015-12-01

    In cancer genomics, gene expression levels provide important molecular signatures for all types of cancer, and this could be very useful for predicting the survival of cancer patients. However, the main challenge of gene expression data analysis is high dimensionality, and microarray is characterised by few number of samples with large number of genes. To overcome this problem, a variety of penalised Cox proportional hazard models have been proposed. We introduce a novel network regularised Cox proportional hazard model and a novel multiplex network model to measure the disease comorbidities and to predict survival of the cancer patient. Our methods are applied to analyse seven microarray cancer gene expression datasets: breast cancer, ovarian cancer, lung cancer, liver cancer, renal cancer and osteosarcoma. Firstly, we applied a principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of original gene expression data. Secondly, we applied a network regularised Cox regression model on the reduced gene expression datasets. By using normalised mutual information method and multiplex network model, we predict the comorbidities for the liver cancer based on the integration of diverse set of omics and clinical data, and we find the diseasome associations (disease-gene association) among different cancers based on the identified common significant genes. Finally, we evaluated the precision of the approach with respect to the accuracy of survival prediction using ROC curves. We report that colon cancer, liver cancer and renal cancer share the CXCL5 gene, and breast cancer, ovarian cancer and renal cancer share the CCND2 gene. Our methods are useful to predict survival of the patient and disease comorbidities more accurately and helpful for improvement of the care of patients with comorbidity. Software in Matlab and R is available on our GitHub page: https://github.com/ssnhcom/NetworkRegularisedCox.git. PMID:26611766

  15. Cox regression with missing covariate data using a modified partial likelihood method.

    PubMed

    Martinussen, Torben; Holst, Klaus K; Scheike, Thomas H

    2016-10-01

    Missing covariate values is a common problem in survival analysis. In this paper we propose a novel method for the Cox regression model that is close to maximum likelihood but avoids the use of the EM-algorithm. It exploits that the observed hazard function is multiplicative in the baseline hazard function with the idea being to profile out this function before carrying out the estimation of the parameter of interest. In this step one uses a Breslow type estimator to estimate the cumulative baseline hazard function. We focus on the situation where the observed covariates are categorical which allows us to calculate estimators without having to assume anything about the distribution of the covariates. We show that the proposed estimator is consistent and asymptotically normal, and derive a consistent estimator of the variance-covariance matrix that does not involve any choice of a perturbation parameter. Moderate sample size performance of the estimators is investigated via simulation and by application to a real data example.

  16. Cox regression with missing covariate data using a modified partial likelihood method.

    PubMed

    Martinussen, Torben; Holst, Klaus K; Scheike, Thomas H

    2016-10-01

    Missing covariate values is a common problem in survival analysis. In this paper we propose a novel method for the Cox regression model that is close to maximum likelihood but avoids the use of the EM-algorithm. It exploits that the observed hazard function is multiplicative in the baseline hazard function with the idea being to profile out this function before carrying out the estimation of the parameter of interest. In this step one uses a Breslow type estimator to estimate the cumulative baseline hazard function. We focus on the situation where the observed covariates are categorical which allows us to calculate estimators without having to assume anything about the distribution of the covariates. We show that the proposed estimator is consistent and asymptotically normal, and derive a consistent estimator of the variance-covariance matrix that does not involve any choice of a perturbation parameter. Moderate sample size performance of the estimators is investigated via simulation and by application to a real data example. PMID:26493471

  17. Survival Prognostic Factors of Male Breast Cancer in Southern Iran: a LASSO-Cox Regression Approach.

    PubMed

    Shahraki, Hadi Raeisi; Salehi, Alireza; Zare, Najaf

    2015-01-01

    We used to LASSO-Cox method for determining prognostic factors of male breast cancer survival and showed the superiority of this method compared to Cox proportional hazard model in low sample size setting. In order to identify and estimate exactly the relative hazard of the most important factors effective for the survival duration of male breast cancer, the LASSO-Cox method has been used. Our data includes the information of male breast cancer patients in Fars province, south of Iran, from 1989 to 2008. Cox proportional hazard and LASSO-Cox models were fitted for 20 classified variables. To reduce the impact of missing data, the multiple imputation method was used 20 times through the Markov chain Mont Carlo method and the results were combined with Rubin's rules. In 50 patients, the age at diagnosis was 59.6 (SD=12.8) years with a minimum of 34 and maximum of 84 years and the mean of survival time was 62 months. Three, 5 and 10 year survival were 92%, 77% and 26%, respectively. Using the LASSO-Cox method led to eliminating 8 low effect variables and also decreased the standard error by 2.5 to 7 times. The relative efficiency of LASSO-Cox method compared with the Cox proportional hazard method was calculated as 22.39. The19 years follow of male breast cancer patients show that the age, having a history of alcohol use, nipple discharge, laterality, histological grade and duration of symptoms were the most important variables that have played an effective role in the patient's survival. In such situations, estimating the coefficients by LASSO-Cox method will be more efficient than the Cox's proportional hazard method. PMID:26434910

  18. Experiments to Determine Whether Recursive Partitioning (CART) or an Artificial Neural Network Overcomes Theoretical Limitations of Cox Proportional Hazards Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattan, Michael W.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Kattan, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    New computationally intensive tools for medical survival analyses include recursive partitioning (also called CART) and artificial neural networks. A challenge that remains is to better understand the behavior of these techniques in effort to know when they will be effective tools. Theoretically they may overcome limitations of the traditional multivariable survival technique, the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Experiments were designed to test whether the new tools would, in practice, overcome these limitations. Two datasets in which theory suggests CART and the neural network should outperform the Cox model were selected. The first was a published leukemia dataset manipulated to have a strong interaction that CART should detect. The second was a published cirrhosis dataset with pronounced nonlinear effects that a neural network should fit. Repeated sampling of 50 training and testing subsets was applied to each technique. The concordance index C was calculated as a measure of predictive accuracy by each technique on the testing dataset. In the interaction dataset, CART outperformed Cox (P less than 0.05) with a C improvement of 0.1 (95% Cl, 0.08 to 0.12). In the nonlinear dataset, the neural network outperformed the Cox model (P less than 0.05), but by a very slight amount (0.015). As predicted by theory, CART and the neural network were able to overcome limitations of the Cox model. Experiments like these are important to increase our understanding of when one of these new techniques will outperform the standard Cox model. Further research is necessary to predict which technique will do best a priori and to assess the magnitude of superiority.

  19. Estimation of adjusted rate differences using additive negative binomial regression.

    PubMed

    Donoghoe, Mark W; Marschner, Ian C

    2016-08-15

    Rate differences are an important effect measure in biostatistics and provide an alternative perspective to rate ratios. When the data are event counts observed during an exposure period, adjusted rate differences may be estimated using an identity-link Poisson generalised linear model, also known as additive Poisson regression. A problem with this approach is that the assumption of equality of mean and variance rarely holds in real data, which often show overdispersion. An additive negative binomial model is the natural alternative to account for this; however, standard model-fitting methods are often unable to cope with the constrained parameter space arising from the non-negativity restrictions of the additive model. In this paper, we propose a novel solution to this problem using a variant of the expectation-conditional maximisation-either algorithm. Our method provides a reliable way to fit an additive negative binomial regression model and also permits flexible generalisations using semi-parametric regression functions. We illustrate the method using a placebo-controlled clinical trial of fenofibrate treatment in patients with type II diabetes, where the outcome is the number of laser therapy courses administered to treat diabetic retinopathy. An R package is available that implements the proposed method. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27073156

  20. A semi-parametric generalization of the Cox proportional hazards regression model: Inference and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Karthik; Ebrahimi, Nader

    2010-01-01

    The assumption of proportional hazards (PH) fundamental to the Cox PH model sometimes may not hold in practice. In this paper, we propose a generalization of the Cox PH model in terms of the cumulative hazard function taking a form similar to the Cox PH model, with the extension that the baseline cumulative hazard function is raised to a power function. Our model allows for interaction between covariates and the baseline hazard and it also includes, for the two sample problem, the case of two Weibull distributions and two extreme value distributions differing in both scale and shape parameters. The partial likelihood approach can not be applied here to estimate the model parameters. We use the full likelihood approach via a cubic B-spline approximation for the baseline hazard to estimate the model parameters. A semi-automatic procedure for knot selection based on Akaike’s Information Criterion is developed. We illustrate the applicability of our approach using real-life data. PMID:21076652

  1. Bootstrap-based methods for estimating standard errors in Cox's regression analyses of clustered event times.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongling; Abrahamowicz, Michal

    2010-03-30

    We propose two bootstrap-based methods to correct the standard errors (SEs) from Cox's model for within-cluster correlation of right-censored event times. The cluster-bootstrap method resamples, with replacement, only the clusters, whereas the two-step bootstrap method resamples (i) the clusters, and (ii) individuals within each selected cluster, with replacement. In simulations, we evaluate both methods and compare them with the existing robust variance estimator and the shared gamma frailty model, which are available in statistical software packages. We simulate clustered event time data, with latent cluster-level random effects, which are ignored in the conventional Cox's model. For cluster-level covariates, both proposed bootstrap methods yield accurate SEs, and type I error rates, and acceptable coverage rates, regardless of the true random effects distribution, and avoid serious variance under-estimation by conventional Cox-based standard errors. However, the two-step bootstrap method over-estimates the variance for individual-level covariates. We also apply the proposed bootstrap methods to obtain confidence bands around flexible estimates of time-dependent effects in a real-life analysis of cluster event times.

  2. Gene identification and survival prediction with Lp Cox regression and novel similarity measure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenqiu; Jiang, Feng

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, Cox's proportional hazards model with Lp penalty method is developed for simultaneous gene selection and survival prediction. Lp penalty shrinks coefficients and produces some coefficients that are exactly zero, and therefore can be used to identify survival related downstream genes. We also define a novel similarity measure to hunt the regulatory genes that their gene expression changes may be low but they are highly correlated with the selected genes. Experimental results with gene expression data demonstrate that the proposed procedures can be used for identifying important gene clusters that are related to time to death due to cancer and for building parsimonious model for predicting the survival of future patients.

  3. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analyses regarding right ventricular septal pacing: Data from Japanese pacemaker cohort.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Akira; Matsue, Yuya; Naruse, Yoshihisa; Kowase, Shinya; Kurosaki, Kenji; Suzuki, Makoto; Matsumura, Akihiko; Nogami, Akihiko; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Hashimoto, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    The presented data were obtained from 982 consecutive patients receiving their first pacemaker implantation with right ventricular (RV) lead placement between January 2008 and December 2013 at two centers in Japan. Patients were divided into RV apical and septal pacing groups. Data of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analysis are presented. Refer to the research article "Implications of right ventricular septal pacing for medium-term prognosis: propensity-matched analysis" (Mizukami et al., in press) [1] for further interpretation and discussion. PMID:27570808

  4. Comparing the importance of prognostic factors in Cox and logistic regression using SAS.

    PubMed

    Heinze, Georg; Schemper, Michael

    2003-06-01

    Two SAS macro programs are presented that evaluate the relative importance of prognostic factors in the proportional hazards regression model and in the logistic regression model. The importance of a prognostic factor is quantified by the proportion of variation in the outcome attributable to this factor. For proportional hazards regression, the program %RELIMPCR uses the recently proposed measure V to calculate the proportion of explained variation (PEV). For the logistic model, the R(2) measure based on squared raw residuals is used by the program %RELIMPLR. Both programs are able to compute marginal and partial PEV, to compare PEVs of factors, of groups of factors, and even to compare PEVs of different models. The programs use a bootstrap resampling scheme to test differences of the PEVs of different factors. Confidence limits for P-values are provided. The programs further allow to base the computation of PEV on models with shrinked or bias-corrected parameter estimates. The SAS macros are freely available at www.akh-wien.ac.at/imc/biometrie/relimp

  5. Assessing Longitudinal Change: Adjustment for Regression to the Mean Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocconi, Louis M.; Ethington, Corinna A.

    2009-01-01

    Pascarella (J Coll Stud Dev 47:508-520, 2006) has called for an increase in use of longitudinal data with pretest-posttest design when studying effects on college students. However, such designs that use multiple measures to document change are vulnerable to an important threat to internal validity, regression to the mean. Herein, we discuss a…

  6. Procedures for adjusting regional regression models of urban-runoff quality using local data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoos, Anne B.; Lizarraga, Joy S.

    1996-01-01

    Statistical operations termed model-adjustment procedures can be used to incorporate local data into existing regression modes to improve the predication of urban-runoff quality. Each procedure is a form of regression analysis in which the local data base is used as a calibration data set; the resulting adjusted regression models can then be used to predict storm-runoff quality at unmonitored sites. Statistical tests of the calibration data set guide selection among proposed procedures.

  7. Examining Non-Linear Associations between Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and All-Cause Mortality Using Segmented Cox Regression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul H

    2016-01-01

    Healthy adults are advised to perform at least 150 min of moderate-intensity physical activity weekly, but this advice is based on studies using self-reports of questionable validity. This study examined the dose-response relationship of accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary behaviors on all-cause mortality using segmented Cox regression to empirically determine the break-points of the dose-response relationship. Data from 7006 adult participants aged 18 or above in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey waves 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 were included in the analysis and linked with death certificate data using a probabilistic matching approach in the National Death Index through December 31, 2011. Physical activity and sedentary behavior were measured using ActiGraph model 7164 accelerometer over the right hip for 7 consecutive days. Each minute with accelerometer count <100; 1952-5724; and ≥5725 were classified as sedentary, moderate-intensity physical activity, and vigorous-intensity physical activity, respectively. Segmented Cox regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of time spent in sedentary behaviors, moderate-intensity physical activity, and vigorous-intensity physical activity and all-cause mortality, adjusted for demographic characteristics, health behaviors, and health conditions. Data were analyzed in 2016. During 47,119 person-year of follow-up, 608 deaths occurred. Each additional hour per day of sedentary behaviors was associated with a HR of 1.15 (95% CI 1.01, 1.31) among participants who spend at least 10.9 h per day on sedentary behaviors, and each additional minute per day spent on moderate-intensity physical activity was associated with a HR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.91, 0.96) among participants with daily moderate-intensity physical activity ≤14.1 min. Associations of moderate physical activity and sedentary behaviors on all-cause mortality were independent of each other. To conclude, evidence from this

  8. Adjustment of regional regression equations for urban storm-runoff quality using at-site data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barks, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    Regional regression equations have been developed to estimate urban storm-runoff loads and mean concentrations using a national data base. Four statistical methods using at-site data to adjust the regional equation predictions were developed to provide better local estimates. The four adjustment procedures are a single-factor adjustment, a regression of the observed data against the predicted values, a regression of the observed values against the predicted values and additional local independent variables, and a weighted combination of a local regression with the regional prediction. Data collected at five representative storm-runoff sites during 22 storms in Little Rock, Arkansas, were used to verify, and, when appropriate, adjust the regional regression equation predictions. Comparison of observed values of stormrunoff loads and mean concentrations to the predicted values from the regional regression equations for nine constituents (chemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, total nitrogen as N, total ammonia plus organic nitrogen as N, total phosphorus as P, dissolved phosphorus as P, total recoverable copper, total recoverable lead, and total recoverable zinc) showed large prediction errors ranging from 63 percent to more than several thousand percent. Prediction errors for 6 of the 18 regional regression equations were less than 100 percent and could be considered reasonable for water-quality prediction equations. The regression adjustment procedure was used to adjust five of the regional equation predictions to improve the predictive accuracy. For seven of the regional equations the observed and the predicted values are not significantly correlated. Thus neither the unadjusted regional equations nor any of the adjustments were appropriate. The mean of the observed values was used as a simple estimator when the regional equation predictions and adjusted predictions were not appropriate.

  9. Empirical extensions of the lasso penalty to reduce the false discovery rate in high-dimensional Cox regression models.

    PubMed

    Ternès, Nils; Rotolo, Federico; Michiels, Stefan

    2016-07-10

    Correct selection of prognostic biomarkers among multiple candidates is becoming increasingly challenging as the dimensionality of biological data becomes higher. Therefore, minimizing the false discovery rate (FDR) is of primary importance, while a low false negative rate (FNR) is a complementary measure. The lasso is a popular selection method in Cox regression, but its results depend heavily on the penalty parameter λ. Usually, λ is chosen using maximum cross-validated log-likelihood (max-cvl). However, this method has often a very high FDR. We review methods for a more conservative choice of λ. We propose an empirical extension of the cvl by adding a penalization term, which trades off between the goodness-of-fit and the parsimony of the model, leading to the selection of fewer biomarkers and, as we show, to the reduction of the FDR without large increase in FNR. We conducted a simulation study considering null and moderately sparse alternative scenarios and compared our approach with the standard lasso and 10 other competitors: Akaike information criterion (AIC), corrected AIC, Bayesian information criterion (BIC), extended BIC, Hannan and Quinn information criterion (HQIC), risk information criterion (RIC), one-standard-error rule, adaptive lasso, stability selection, and percentile lasso. Our extension achieved the best compromise across all the scenarios between a reduction of the FDR and a limited raise of the FNR, followed by the AIC, the RIC, and the adaptive lasso, which performed well in some settings. We illustrate the methods using gene expression data of 523 breast cancer patients. In conclusion, we propose to apply our extension to the lasso whenever a stringent FDR with a limited FNR is targeted. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Using Wherry's Adjusted R Squared and Mallow's C (p) for Model Selection from All Possible Regressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olejnik, Stephen; Mills, Jamie; Keselman, Harvey

    2000-01-01

    Evaluated the use of Mallow's C(p) and Wherry's adjusted R squared (R. Wherry, 1931) statistics to select a final model from a pool of model solutions using computer generated data. Neither statistic identified the underlying regression model any better than, and usually less well than, the stepwise selection method, which itself was poor for…

  11. On the causal interpretation of race in regressions adjusting for confounding and mediating variables.

    PubMed

    VanderWeele, Tyler J; Robinson, Whitney R

    2014-07-01

    We consider several possible interpretations of the "effect of race" when regressions are run with race as an exposure variable, controlling also for various confounding and mediating variables. When adjustment is made for socioeconomic status early in a person's life, we discuss under what contexts the regression coefficients for race can be interpreted as corresponding to the extent to which a racial inequality would remain if various socioeconomic distributions early in life across racial groups could be equalized. When adjustment is also made for adult socioeconomic status, we note how the overall racial inequality can be decomposed into the portion that would be eliminated by equalizing adult socioeconomic status across racial groups and the portion of the inequality that would remain even if adult socioeconomic status across racial groups were equalized. We also discuss a stronger interpretation of the effect of race (stronger in terms of assumptions) involving the joint effects of race-associated physical phenotype (eg, skin color), parental physical phenotype, genetic background, and cultural context when such variables are thought to be hypothetically manipulable and if adequate control for confounding were possible. We discuss some of the challenges with such an interpretation. Further discussion is given as to how the use of selected populations in examining racial disparities can additionally complicate the interpretation of the effects.

  12. On causal interpretation of race in regressions adjusting for confounding and mediating variables

    PubMed Central

    VanderWeele, Tyler J.; Robinson, Whitney R.

    2014-01-01

    We consider several possible interpretations of the “effect of race” when regressions are run with race as an exposure variable, controlling also for various confounding and mediating variables. When adjustment is made for socioeconomic status early in a person’s life, we discuss under what contexts the regression coefficients for race can be interpreted as corresponding to the extent to which a racial inequality would remain if various socioeconomic distributions early in life across racial groups could be equalized. When adjustment is also made for adult socioeconomic status, we note how the overall racial inequality can be decomposed into the portion that would be eliminated by equalizing adult socioeconomic status across racial groups and the portion of the inequality that would remain even if adult socioeconomic status across racial groups were equalized. We also discuss a stronger interpretation of the “effect of race” (stronger in terms of assumptions) involving the joint effects of race-associated physical phenotype (e.g. skin color), parental physical phenotype, genetic background and cultural context when such variables are thought to be hypothetically manipulable and if adequate control for confounding were possible. We discuss some of the challenges with such an interpretation. Further discussion is given as to how the use of selected populations in examining racial disparities can additionally complicate the interpretation of the effects. PMID:24887159

  13. Regularized logistic regression with adjusted adaptive elastic net for gene selection in high dimensional cancer classification.

    PubMed

    Algamal, Zakariya Yahya; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam

    2015-12-01

    Cancer classification and gene selection in high-dimensional data have been popular research topics in genetics and molecular biology. Recently, adaptive regularized logistic regression using the elastic net regularization, which is called the adaptive elastic net, has been successfully applied in high-dimensional cancer classification to tackle both estimating the gene coefficients and performing gene selection simultaneously. The adaptive elastic net originally used elastic net estimates as the initial weight, however, using this weight may not be preferable for certain reasons: First, the elastic net estimator is biased in selecting genes. Second, it does not perform well when the pairwise correlations between variables are not high. Adjusted adaptive regularized logistic regression (AAElastic) is proposed to address these issues and encourage grouping effects simultaneously. The real data results indicate that AAElastic is significantly consistent in selecting genes compared to the other three competitor regularization methods. Additionally, the classification performance of AAElastic is comparable to the adaptive elastic net and better than other regularization methods. Thus, we can conclude that AAElastic is a reliable adaptive regularized logistic regression method in the field of high-dimensional cancer classification.

  14. Estimating the average treatment effects of nutritional label use using subclassification with regression adjustment.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Michael J; Gutman, Roee

    2014-11-28

    Propensity score methods are common for estimating a binary treatment effect when treatment assignment is not randomized. When exposure is measured on an ordinal scale (i.e. low-medium-high), however, propensity score inference requires extensions which have received limited attention. Estimands of possible interest with an ordinal exposure are the average treatment effects between each pair of exposure levels. Using these estimands, it is possible to determine an optimal exposure level. Traditional methods, including dichotomization of the exposure or a series of binary propensity score comparisons across exposure pairs, are generally inadequate for identification of optimal levels. We combine subclassification with regression adjustment to estimate transitive, unbiased average causal effects across an ordered exposure, and apply our method on the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to estimate the effects of nutritional label use on body mass index.

  15. Multiplicative random regression model for heterogeneous variance adjustment in genetic evaluation for milk yield in Simmental.

    PubMed

    Lidauer, M H; Emmerling, R; Mäntysaari, E A

    2008-06-01

    A multiplicative random regression (M-RRM) test-day (TD) model was used to analyse daily milk yields from all available parities of German and Austrian Simmental dairy cattle. The method to account for heterogeneous variance (HV) was based on the multiplicative mixed model approach of Meuwissen. The variance model for the heterogeneity parameters included a fixed region x year x month x parity effect and a random herd x test-month effect with a within-herd first-order autocorrelation between test-months. Acceleration of variance model solutions after each multiplicative model cycle enabled fast convergence of adjustment factors and reduced total computing time significantly. Maximum Likelihood estimation of within-strata residual variances was enhanced by inclusion of approximated information on loss in degrees of freedom due to estimation of location parameters. This improved heterogeneity estimates for very small herds. The multiplicative model was compared with a model that assumed homogeneous variance. Re-estimated genetic variances, based on Mendelian sampling deviations, were homogeneous for the M-RRM TD model but heterogeneous for the homogeneous random regression TD model. Accounting for HV had large effect on cow ranking but moderate effect on bull ranking.

  16. A Comparison of Seven Cox Regression-Based Models to Account for Heterogeneity Across Multiple HIV Treatment Cohorts in Latin America and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Giganti, Mark J.; Luz, Paula M.; Caro-Vega, Yanink; Cesar, Carina; Padgett, Denis; Koenig, Serena; Echevarria, Juan; McGowan, Catherine C.; Shepherd, Bryan E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many studies of HIV/AIDS aggregate data from multiple cohorts to improve power and generalizability. There are several analysis approaches to account for cross-cohort heterogeneity; we assessed how different approaches can impact results from an HIV/AIDS study investigating predictors of mortality. Using data from 13,658 HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy from seven Latin American and Caribbean cohorts, we illustrate the assumptions of seven readily implementable approaches to account for across cohort heterogeneity with Cox proportional hazards models, and we compare hazard ratio estimates across approaches. As a sensitivity analysis, we modify cohort membership to generate specific heterogeneity conditions. Hazard ratio estimates varied slightly between the seven analysis approaches, but differences were not clinically meaningful. Adjusted hazard ratio estimates for the association between AIDS at treatment initiation and death varied from 2.00 to 2.20 across approaches that accounted for heterogeneity; the adjusted hazard ratio was estimated as 1.73 in analyses that ignored across cohort heterogeneity. In sensitivity analyses with more extreme heterogeneity, we noted a slightly greater distinction between approaches. Despite substantial heterogeneity between cohorts, the impact of the specific approach to account for heterogeneity was minimal in our case study. Our results suggest that it is important to account for across cohort heterogeneity in analyses, but that the specific technique for addressing heterogeneity may be less important. Because of their flexibility in accounting for cohort heterogeneity, we prefer stratification or meta-analysis methods, but we encourage investigators to consider their specific study conditions and objectives. PMID:25647087

  17. A Comparison of Seven Cox Regression-Based Models to Account for Heterogeneity Across Multiple HIV Treatment Cohorts in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Giganti, Mark J; Luz, Paula M; Caro-Vega, Yanink; Cesar, Carina; Padgett, Denis; Koenig, Serena; Echevarria, Juan; McGowan, Catherine C; Shepherd, Bryan E

    2015-05-01

    Many studies of HIV/AIDS aggregate data from multiple cohorts to improve power and generalizability. There are several analysis approaches to account for cross-cohort heterogeneity; we assessed how different approaches can impact results from an HIV/AIDS study investigating predictors of mortality. Using data from 13,658 HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy from seven Latin American and Caribbean cohorts, we illustrate the assumptions of seven readily implementable approaches to account for across cohort heterogeneity with Cox proportional hazards models, and we compare hazard ratio estimates across approaches. As a sensitivity analysis, we modify cohort membership to generate specific heterogeneity conditions. Hazard ratio estimates varied slightly between the seven analysis approaches, but differences were not clinically meaningful. Adjusted hazard ratio estimates for the association between AIDS at treatment initiation and death varied from 2.00 to 2.20 across approaches that accounted for heterogeneity; the adjusted hazard ratio was estimated as 1.73 in analyses that ignored across cohort heterogeneity. In sensitivity analyses with more extreme heterogeneity, we noted a slightly greater distinction between approaches. Despite substantial heterogeneity between cohorts, the impact of the specific approach to account for heterogeneity was minimal in our case study. Our results suggest that it is important to account for across cohort heterogeneity in analyses, but that the specific technique for addressing heterogeneity may be less important. Because of their flexibility in accounting for cohort heterogeneity, we prefer stratification or meta-analysis methods, but we encourage investigators to consider their specific study conditions and objectives.

  18. Verification and adjustment of regional regression models for urban storm-runoff quality using data collected in Little Rock, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barks, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Storm-runoff water-quality data were used to verify and, when appropriate, adjust regional regression models previously developed to estimate urban storm- runoff loads and mean concentrations in Little Rock, Arkansas. Data collected at 5 representative sites during 22 storms from June 1992 through January 1994 compose the Little Rock data base. Comparison of observed values (0) of storm-runoff loads and mean concentrations to the predicted values (Pu) from the regional regression models for nine constituents (chemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, total nitrogen, total ammonia plus organic nitrogen as nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved phosphorus, total recoverable copper, total recoverable lead, and total recoverable zinc) shows large prediction errors ranging from 63 to several thousand percent. Prediction errors for six of the regional regression models are less than 100 percent, and can be considered reasonable for water-quality models. Differences between 0 and Pu are due to variability in the Little Rock data base and error in the regional models. Where applicable, a model adjustment procedure (termed MAP-R-P) based upon regression with 0 against Pu was applied to improve predictive accuracy. For 11 of the 18 regional water-quality models, 0 and Pu are significantly correlated, that is much of the variation in 0 is explained by the regional models. Five of these 11 regional models consistently overestimate O; therefore, MAP-R-P can be used to provide a better estimate. For the remaining seven regional models, 0 and Pu are not significanfly correlated, thus neither the unadjusted regional models nor the MAP-R-P is appropriate. A simple estimator, such as the mean of the observed values may be used if the regression models are not appropriate. Standard error of estimate of the adjusted models ranges from 48 to 130 percent. Calibration results may be biased due to the limited data set sizes in the Little Rock data base. The relatively large values of

  19. Adjusting for unmeasured confounding due to either of two crossed factors with a logistic regression model.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Brumback, Babette A; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Morris, J Glenn; Ali, Afsar

    2016-08-15

    Motivated by an investigation of the effect of surface water temperature on the presence of Vibrio cholerae in water samples collected from different fixed surface water monitoring sites in Haiti in different months, we investigated methods to adjust for unmeasured confounding due to either of the two crossed factors site and month. In the process, we extended previous methods that adjust for unmeasured confounding due to one nesting factor (such as site, which nests the water samples from different months) to the case of two crossed factors. First, we developed a conditional pseudolikelihood estimator that eliminates fixed effects for the levels of each of the crossed factors from the estimating equation. Using the theory of U-Statistics for independent but non-identically distributed vectors, we show that our estimator is consistent and asymptotically normal, but that its variance depends on the nuisance parameters and thus cannot be easily estimated. Consequently, we apply our estimator in conjunction with a permutation test, and we investigate use of the pigeonhole bootstrap and the jackknife for constructing confidence intervals. We also incorporate our estimator into a diagnostic test for a logistic mixed model with crossed random effects and no unmeasured confounding. For comparison, we investigate between-within models extended to two crossed factors. These generalized linear mixed models include covariate means for each level of each factor in order to adjust for the unmeasured confounding. We conduct simulation studies, and we apply the methods to the Haitian data. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26892025

  20. Adjustment of regional regression models of urban-runoff quality using data for Chattanooga, Knoxville, and Nashville, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoos, Anne B.; Patel, Anant R.

    1996-01-01

    Model-adjustment procedures were applied to the combined data bases of storm-runoff quality for Chattanooga, Knoxville, and Nashville, Tennessee, to improve predictive accuracy for storm-runoff quality for urban watersheds in these three cities and throughout Middle and East Tennessee. Data for 45 storms at 15 different sites (five sites in each city) constitute the data base. Comparison of observed values of storm-runoff load and event-mean concentration to the predicted values from the regional regression models for 10 constituents shows prediction errors, as large as 806,000 percent. Model-adjustment procedures, which combine the regional model predictions with local data, are applied to improve predictive accuracy. Standard error of estimate after model adjustment ranges from 67 to 322 percent. Calibration results may be biased due to sampling error in the Tennessee data base. The relatively large values of standard error of estimate for some of the constituent models, although representing significant reduction (at least 50 percent) in prediction error compared to estimation with unadjusted regional models, may be unacceptable for some applications. The user may wish to collect additional local data for these constituents and repeat the analysis, or calibrate an independent local regression model.

  1. Simulation study comparing exposure matching with regression adjustment in an observational safety setting with group sequential monitoring.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Kelly G; Cook, Andrea J; Jackson, Lisa A; Nelson, Jennifer C

    2015-03-30

    Sequential methods are well established for randomized clinical trials (RCTs), and their use in observational settings has increased with the development of national vaccine and drug safety surveillance systems that monitor large healthcare databases. Observational safety monitoring requires that sequential testing methods be better equipped to incorporate confounder adjustment and accommodate rare adverse events. New methods designed specifically for observational surveillance include a group sequential likelihood ratio test that uses exposure matching and generalized estimating equations approach that involves regression adjustment. However, little is known about the statistical performance of these methods or how they compare to RCT methods in both observational and rare outcome settings. We conducted a simulation study to determine the type I error, power and time-to-surveillance-end of group sequential likelihood ratio test, generalized estimating equations and RCT methods that construct group sequential Lan-DeMets boundaries using data from a matched (group sequential Lan-DeMets-matching) or unmatched regression (group sequential Lan-DeMets-regression) setting. We also compared the methods using data from a multisite vaccine safety study. All methods had acceptable type I error, but regression methods were more powerful, faster at detecting true safety signals and less prone to implementation difficulties with rare events than exposure matching methods. Method performance also depended on the distribution of information and extent of confounding by site. Our results suggest that choice of sequential method, especially the confounder control strategy, is critical in rare event observational settings. These findings provide guidance for choosing methods in this context and, in particular, suggest caution when conducting exposure matching.

  2. Methods for Adjusting U.S. Geological Survey Rural Regression Peak Discharges in an Urban Setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moglen, Glenn E.; Shivers, Dorianne E.

    2006-01-01

    A study was conducted of 78 U.S. Geological Survey gaged streams that have been subjected to varying degrees of urbanization over the last three decades. Flood-frequency analysis coupled with nonlinear regression techniques were used to generate a set of equations for converting peak discharge estimates determined from rural regression equations to a set of peak discharge estimates that represent known urbanization. Specifically, urban regression equations for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year return periods were calibrated as a function of the corresponding rural peak discharge and the percentage of impervious area in a watershed. The results of this study indicate that two sets of equations, one set based on imperviousness and one set based on population density, performed well. Both sets of equations are dependent on rural peak discharges, a measure of development (average percentage of imperviousness or average population density), and a measure of homogeneity of development within a watershed. Average imperviousness was readily determined by using geographic information system methods and commonly available land-cover data. Similarly, average population density was easily determined from census data. Thus, a key advantage to the equations developed in this study is that they do not require field measurements of watershed characteristics as did the U.S. Geological Survey urban equations developed in an earlier investigation. During this study, the U.S. Geological Survey PeakFQ program was used as an integral tool in the calibration of all equations. The scarcity of historical land-use data, however, made exclusive use of flow records necessary for the 30-year period from 1970 to 2000. Such relatively short-duration streamflow time series required a nonstandard treatment of the historical data function of the PeakFQ program in comparison to published guidelines. Thus, the approach used during this investigation does not fully comply with the

  3. Prognostic factors for metachronous contralateral breast cancer: a comparison of the linear Cox regression model and its artificial neural network extension.

    PubMed

    Mariani, L; Coradini, D; Biganzoli, E; Boracchi, P; Marubini, E; Pilotti, S; Salvadori, B; Silvestrini, R; Veronesi, U; Zucali, R; Rilke, F

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess prognostic factor for metachronous contralateral recurrence of breast cancer (CBC). Two factors were of particular interest, namely estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PgR) receptors assayed with the biochemical method in primary tumor tissue. Information was obtained from a prospective clinical database for 1763 axillary node-negative women who had received curative surgery, mostly of the conservative type, and followed-up for a median of 82 months. The analysis was performed based on both a standard (linear) Cox model and an artificial neural network (ANN) extension of this model proposed by Faraggi and Simon. Furthermore, to assess the prognostic importance of the factors considered, model predictive ability was computed. In agreement with already published studies, the results of our analysis confirmed the prognostic role of age at surgery, histology, and primary tumor site, in that young patients (< or = 45 years) with tumors of lobular histology or located at inner/central mammary quadrants were at greater risk of developing CBC. ER and PgR were also shown to have a prognostic role. Their effect, however, was not simple in relation to the presence of interactions between ER and age, and between PgR and histology. In fact, ER appeared to play a protective role in young patients, whereas the opposite was true in older women. Higher levels of PgR implied a greater hazard of CBC occurrence in infiltrating duct carcinoma or tumors with an associated extensive intraductal component, and a lower hazard in infiltrating lobular carcinoma or other histotypes. In spite of the above findings, the predictive value of both the standard and ANN Cox models was relatively low, thus suggesting an intrinsic limitation of the prognostic variables considered, rather than their suboptimal modeling. Research for better prognostic variables should therefore continue.

  4. Adjustments to de Leva-anthropometric regression data for the changes in body proportions in elderly humans.

    PubMed

    Ho Hoang, Khai-Long; Mombaur, Katja

    2015-10-15

    Dynamic modeling of the human body is an important tool to investigate the fundamentals of the biomechanics of human movement. To model the human body in terms of a multi-body system, it is necessary to know the anthropometric parameters of the body segments. For young healthy subjects, several data sets exist that are widely used in the research community, e.g. the tables provided by de Leva. None such comprehensive anthropometric parameter sets exist for elderly people. It is, however, well known that body proportions change significantly during aging, e.g. due to degenerative effects in the spine, such that parameters for young people cannot be used for realistically simulating the dynamics of elderly people. In this study, regression equations are derived from the inertial parameters, center of mass positions, and body segment lengths provided by de Leva to be adjustable to the changes in proportion of the body parts of male and female humans due to aging. Additional adjustments are made to the reference points of the parameters for the upper body segments as they are chosen in a more practicable way in the context of creating a multi-body model in a chain structure with the pelvis representing the most proximal segment.

  5. Adjustments to de Leva-anthropometric regression data for the changes in body proportions in elderly humans.

    PubMed

    Ho Hoang, Khai-Long; Mombaur, Katja

    2015-10-15

    Dynamic modeling of the human body is an important tool to investigate the fundamentals of the biomechanics of human movement. To model the human body in terms of a multi-body system, it is necessary to know the anthropometric parameters of the body segments. For young healthy subjects, several data sets exist that are widely used in the research community, e.g. the tables provided by de Leva. None such comprehensive anthropometric parameter sets exist for elderly people. It is, however, well known that body proportions change significantly during aging, e.g. due to degenerative effects in the spine, such that parameters for young people cannot be used for realistically simulating the dynamics of elderly people. In this study, regression equations are derived from the inertial parameters, center of mass positions, and body segment lengths provided by de Leva to be adjustable to the changes in proportion of the body parts of male and female humans due to aging. Additional adjustments are made to the reference points of the parameters for the upper body segments as they are chosen in a more practicable way in the context of creating a multi-body model in a chain structure with the pelvis representing the most proximal segment. PMID:26338096

  6. Covariate analysis of survival data: a small-sample study of Cox's model

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.; Tolley, H.D.; Bryson, M.C.; Goldman, A.S.

    1982-09-01

    Cox's proportional-hazards model is frequently used to adjust for covariate effects in survival-data analysis. The small-sample performances of the maximum partial likelihood estimators of the regression parameters in a two-covariate hazard function model are evaluated with respect to bias, variance, and power in hypothesis tests. Previous Monte Carlo work on the two-sample problem is reviewed.

  7. R Squared Shrinkage in Multiple Regression Research: An Empirical Evaluation of Use and Impact of Adjusted Effect Formulae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thatcher, Greg W.; Henson, Robin K.

    This study examined research in training and development to determine effect size reporting practices. It focused on the reporting of corrected effect sizes in research articles using multiple regression analyses. When possible, researchers calculated corrected effect sizes and determine if the associated shrinkage could have impacted researcher…

  8. Small-Sample Adjustments for Tests of Moderators and Model Fit in Robust Variance Estimation in Meta-Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Elizabeth; Pustejovsky, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Randomized experiments are commonly used to evaluate the effectiveness of educational interventions. The goal of the present investigation is to develop small-sample corrections for multiple contrast hypothesis tests (i.e., F-tests) such as the omnibus test of meta-regression fit or a test for equality of three or more levels of a categorical…

  9. Gene-Based Association Analysis for Censored Traits Via Fixed Effect Functional Regressions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruzong; Wang, Yifan; Yan, Qi; Ding, Ying; Weeks, Daniel E; Lu, Zhaohui; Ren, Haobo; Cook, Richard J; Xiong, Momiao; Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Genetic studies of survival outcomes have been proposed and conducted recently, but statistical methods for identifying genetic variants that affect disease progression are rarely developed. Motivated by our ongoing real studies, here we develop Cox proportional hazard models using functional regression (FR) to perform gene-based association analysis of survival traits while adjusting for covariates. The proposed Cox models are fixed effect models where the genetic effects of multiple genetic variants are assumed to be fixed. We introduce likelihood ratio test (LRT) statistics to test for associations between the survival traits and multiple genetic variants in a genetic region. Extensive simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed Cox RF LRT statistics have well-controlled type I error rates. To evaluate power, we compare the Cox FR LRT with the previously developed burden test (BT) in a Cox model and sequence kernel association test (SKAT), which is based on mixed effect Cox models. The Cox FR LRT statistics have higher power than or similar power as Cox SKAT LRT except when 50%/50% causal variants had negative/positive effects and all causal variants are rare. In addition, the Cox FR LRT statistics have higher power than Cox BT LRT. The models and related test statistics can be useful in the whole genome and whole exome association studies. An age-related macular degeneration dataset was analyzed as an example. PMID:26782979

  10. Data for and adjusted regional regression models of volume and quality of urban storm-water runoff in Boise and Garden City, Idaho, 1993-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kjelstrom, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    Previously developed U.S. Geological Survey regional regression models of runoff and 11 chemical constituents were evaluated to assess their suitability for use in urban areas in Boise and Garden City. Data collected in the study area were used to develop adjusted regional models of storm-runoff volumes and mean concentrations and loads of chemical oxygen demand, dissolved and suspended solids, total nitrogen and total ammonia plus organic nitrogen as nitrogen, total and dissolved phosphorus, and total recoverable cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc. Explanatory variables used in these models were drainage area, impervious area, land-use information, and precipitation data. Mean annual runoff volume and loads at the five outfalls were estimated from 904 individual storms during 1976 through 1993. Two methods were used to compute individual storm loads. The first method used adjusted regional models of storm loads and the second used adjusted regional models for mean concentration and runoff volume. For large storms, the first method seemed to produce excessively high loads for some constituents and the second method provided more reliable results for all constituents except suspended solids. The first method provided more reliable results for large storms for suspended solids.

  11. Regression equations for estimation of annual peak-streamflow frequency for undeveloped watersheds in Texas using an L-moment-based, PRESS-minimized, residual-adjusted approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Roussel, Meghan C.

    2009-01-01

    Annual peak-streamflow frequency estimates are needed for flood-plain management; for objective assessment of flood risk; for cost-effective design of dams, levees, and other flood-control structures; and for design of roads, bridges, and culverts. Annual peak-streamflow frequency represents the peak streamflow for nine recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, 250, and 500 years. Common methods for estimation of peak-streamflow frequency for ungaged or unmonitored watersheds are regression equations for each recurrence interval developed for one or more regions; such regional equations are the subject of this report. The method is based on analysis of annual peak-streamflow data from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations (stations). Beginning in 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation and in partnership with Texas Tech University, began a 3-year investigation concerning the development of regional equations to estimate annual peak-streamflow frequency for undeveloped watersheds in Texas. The investigation focuses primarily on 638 stations with 8 or more years of data from undeveloped watersheds and other criteria. The general approach is explicitly limited to the use of L-moment statistics, which are used in conjunction with a technique of multi-linear regression referred to as PRESS minimization. The approach used to develop the regional equations, which was refined during the investigation, is referred to as the 'L-moment-based, PRESS-minimized, residual-adjusted approach'. For the approach, seven unique distributions are fit to the sample L-moments of the data for each of 638 stations and trimmed means of the seven results of the distributions for each recurrence interval are used to define the station specific, peak-streamflow frequency. As a first iteration of regression, nine weighted-least-squares, PRESS-minimized, multi-linear regression equations are computed using the watershed

  12. A regional classification scheme for estimating reference water quality in streams using land-use-adjusted spatial regression-tree analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, D.M.; Saad, D.A.; Heisey, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Various approaches are used to subdivide large areas into regions containing streams that have similar reference or background water quality and that respond similarly to different factors. For many applications, such as establishing reference conditions, it is preferable to use physical characteristics that are not affected by human activities to delineate these regions. However, most approaches, such as ecoregion classifications, rely on land use to delineate regions or have difficulties compensating for the effects of land use. Land use not only directly affects water quality, but it is often correlated with the factors used to define the regions. In this article, we describe modifications to SPARTA (spatial regression-tree analysis), a relatively new approach applied to water-quality and environmental characteristic data to delineate zones with similar factors affecting water quality. In this modified approach, land-use-adjusted (residualized) water quality and environmental characteristics are computed for each site. Regression-tree analysis is applied to the residualized data to determine the most statistically important environmental characteristics describing the distribution of a specific water-quality constituent. Geographic information for small basins throughout the study area is then used to subdivide the area into relatively homogeneous environmental water-quality zones. For each zone, commonly used approaches are subsequently used to define its reference water quality and how its water quality responds to changes in land use. SPARTA is used to delineate zones of similar reference concentrations of total phosphorus and suspended sediment throughout the upper Midwestern part of the United States. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  13. COX-2 chronology

    PubMed Central

    Hawkey, C J

    2005-01-01

    The role of selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors in medical practice has become controversial since evidence emerged that their use is associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction. Selective COX-2 inhibitors were seen as successor to non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, in turn successors to aspirin. The importance of pain relief means that such drugs have always attracted attention. The fact that they work through inhibition of cyclooxygenase, are widespread, and have multiple effects also means that adverse effects that were unanticipated (even though predictable) have always emerged. In this paper I therefore present an historical perspective so that the lessons of the past may be applied to the present. PMID:16227351

  14. Representation of exposures in regression analysis and interpretation of regression coefficients: basic concepts and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Leffondré, Karen; Jager, Kitty J; Boucquemont, Julie; Stel, Vianda S; Heinze, Georg

    2014-10-01

    Regression models are being used to quantify the effect of an exposure on an outcome, while adjusting for potential confounders. While the type of regression model to be used is determined by the nature of the outcome variable, e.g. linear regression has to be applied for continuous outcome variables, all regression models can handle any kind of exposure variables. However, some fundamentals of representation of the exposure in a regression model and also some potential pitfalls have to be kept in mind in order to obtain meaningful interpretation of results. The objective of this educational paper was to illustrate these fundamentals and pitfalls, using various multiple regression models applied to data from a hypothetical cohort of 3000 patients with chronic kidney disease. In particular, we illustrate how to represent different types of exposure variables (binary, categorical with two or more categories and continuous), and how to interpret the regression coefficients in linear, logistic and Cox models. We also discuss the linearity assumption in these models, and show how wrongly assuming linearity may produce biased results and how flexible modelling using spline functions may provide better estimates.

  15. Quality Reporting of Multivariable Regression Models in Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Real, Jordi; Forné, Carles; Roso-Llorach, Albert; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Controlling for confounders is a crucial step in analytical observational studies, and multivariable models are widely used as statistical adjustment techniques. However, the validation of the assumptions of the multivariable regression models (MRMs) should be made clear in scientific reporting. The objective of this study is to review the quality of statistical reporting of the most commonly used MRMs (logistic, linear, and Cox regression) that were applied in analytical observational studies published between 2003 and 2014 by journals indexed in MEDLINE. Review of a representative sample of articles indexed in MEDLINE (n = 428) with observational design and use of MRMs (logistic, linear, and Cox regression). We assessed the quality of reporting about: model assumptions and goodness-of-fit, interactions, sensitivity analysis, crude and adjusted effect estimate, and specification of more than 1 adjusted model. The tests of underlying assumptions or goodness-of-fit of the MRMs used were described in 26.2% (95% CI: 22.0–30.3) of the articles and 18.5% (95% CI: 14.8–22.1) reported the interaction analysis. Reporting of all items assessed was higher in articles published in journals with a higher impact factor. A low percentage of articles indexed in MEDLINE that used multivariable techniques provided information demonstrating rigorous application of the model selected as an adjustment method. Given the importance of these methods to the final results and conclusions of observational studies, greater rigor is required in reporting the use of MRMs in the scientific literature. PMID:27196467

  16. Quantile Regression with Censored Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Guixian

    2009-01-01

    The Cox proportional hazards model and the accelerated failure time model are frequently used in survival data analysis. They are powerful, yet have limitation due to their model assumptions. Quantile regression offers a semiparametric approach to model data with possible heterogeneity. It is particularly powerful for censored responses, where the…

  17. ``Regressed experts'' as a new state in teachers' professional development: lessons from Computer Science teachers' adjustments to substantial changes in the curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, Neomi; Ben-David Kolikant, Yifat; Beeri, Catriel

    2012-09-01

    Due to a program reform in Israel, experienced CS high-school teachers faced the need to master and teach a new programming paradigm. This situation served as an opportunity to explore the relationship between teachers' content knowledge (CK) and their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). This article focuses on three case studies, with emphasis on one of them. Using observations and interviews, we examine how the teachers, we observed taught and what development of their teaching occurred as a result of their teaching experience, if at all. Our findings suggest that this situation creates a new hybrid state of teachers, which we term "regressed experts." These teachers incorporate in their professional practice some elements typical of novices and some typical of experts. We also found that these teachers' experience, although established when teaching a different CK, serve as a leverage to improve their knowledge and understanding of aspects of the new content.

  18. Immunohistochemical and morphometric evaluation of COX-1 and COX-2 in the remodeled lung in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and systemic sclerosis* ,**

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Edwin Roger; Lin, Flavia; Martins, Vanessa; Rangel, Maristela Peres; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in the remodeled lung in systemic sclerosis (SSc) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients, correlating that expression with patient survival. METHODS: We examined open lung biopsy specimens from 24 SSc patients and 30 IPF patients, using normal lung tissue as a control. The histological patterns included fibrotic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) in SSc patients and usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) in IPF patients. We used immunohistochemistry and histomorphometry to evaluate the expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in alveolar septa, vessels, and bronchioles. We then correlated that expression with pulmonary function test results and evaluated its impact on patient survival. RESULTS: The expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in alveolar septa was significantly higher in IPF-UIP and SSc-NSIP lung tissue than in the control tissue. No difference was found between IPF-UIP and SSc-NSIP tissue regarding COX-1 and COX-2 expression. Multivariate analysis based on the Cox regression model showed that the factors associated with a low risk of death were younger age, high DLCO/alveolar volume, IPF, and high COX-1 expression in alveolar septa, whereas those associated with a high risk of death were advanced age, low DLCO/alveolar volume, SSc (with NSIP), and low COX-1 expression in alveolar septa. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that strategies aimed at preventing low COX-1 synthesis will have a greater impact on SSc, whereas those aimed at preventing high COX-2 synthesis will have a greater impact on IPF. However, prospective randomized clinical trials are needed in order to confirm that. PMID:24473763

  19. COX-2 and PPAR-γ confer cannabidiol-induced apoptosis of human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ramer, Robert; Heinemann, Katharina; Merkord, Jutta; Rohde, Helga; Salamon, Achim; Linnebacher, Michael; Hinz, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The antitumorigenic mechanism of cannabidiol is still controversial. This study investigates the role of COX-2 and PPAR-γ in cannabidiol's proapoptotic and tumor-regressive action. In lung cancer cell lines (A549, H460) and primary cells from a patient with lung cancer, cannabidiol elicited decreased viability associated with apoptosis. Apoptotic cell death by cannabidiol was suppressed by NS-398 (COX-2 inhibitor), GW9662 (PPAR-γ antagonist), and siRNA targeting COX-2 and PPAR-γ. Cannabidiol-induced apoptosis was paralleled by upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ mRNA and protein expression with a maximum induction of COX-2 mRNA after 8 hours and continuous increases of PPAR-γ mRNA when compared with vehicle. In response to cannabidiol, tumor cell lines exhibited increased levels of COX-2-dependent prostaglandins (PG) among which PGD(2) and 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) caused a translocation of PPAR-γ to the nucleus and induced a PPAR-γ-dependent apoptotic cell death. Moreover, in A549-xenografted nude mice, cannabidiol caused upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ in tumor tissue and tumor regression that was reversible by GW9662. Together, our data show a novel proapoptotic mechanism of cannabidiol involving initial upregulation of COX-2 and PPAR-γ and a subsequent nuclear translocation of PPAR-γ by COX-2-dependent PGs.

  20. Bayesian random threshold estimation in a Cox proportional hazards cure model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lili; Feng, Dai; Bellile, Emily L; Taylor, Jeremy M G

    2014-02-20

    In this paper, we develop a Bayesian approach to estimate a Cox proportional hazards model that allows a threshold in the regression coefficient, when some fraction of subjects are not susceptible to the event of interest. A data augmentation scheme with latent binary cure indicators is adopted to simplify the Markov chain Monte Carlo implementation. Given the binary cure indicators, the Cox cure model reduces to a standard Cox model and a logistic regression model. Furthermore, the threshold detection problem reverts to a threshold problem in a regular Cox model. The baseline cumulative hazard for the Cox model is formulated non-parametrically using counting processes with a gamma process prior. Simulation studies demonstrate that the method provides accurate point and interval estimates. Application to a data set of oropharynx cancer patients suggests a significant threshold in age at diagnosis such that the effect of gender on disease-specific survival changes after the threshold.

  1. Prognostic models in coronary artery disease: Cox and network approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Antonio; Sicari, Rosa; Cortigiani, Lauro; Carpeggiani, Clara; Picano, Eugenio; Capobianco, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Predictive assessment of the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases is usually provided by computational approaches centred on Cox models. The complex interdependence structure underlying clinical data patterns can limit the performance of Cox analysis and complicate the interpretation of results, thus calling for complementary and integrative methods. Prognostic models are proposed for studying the risk associated with patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing vasodilator stress echocardiography, an established technique for CAD detection and prognostication. In order to complement standard Cox models, network inference is considered a possible solution to quantify the complex relationships between heterogeneous data categories. In particular, a mutual information network is designed to explore the paths linking patient-associated variables to endpoint events, to reveal prognostic factors and to identify the best possible predictors of death. Data from a prospective, multicentre, observational study are available from a previous study, based on 4313 patients (2532 men; 64±11 years) with known (n=1547) or suspected (n=2766) CAD, who underwent high-dose dipyridamole (0.84 mg kg−1 over 6 min) stress echocardiography with coronary flow reserve (CFR) evaluation of left anterior descending (LAD) artery by Doppler. The overall mortality was the only endpoint analysed by Cox models. The estimated connectivity between clinical variables assigns a complementary value to the proposed network approach in relation to the established Cox model, for instance revealing connectivity paths. Depending on the use of multiple metrics, the constraints of regression analysis in measuring the association strength among clinical variables can be relaxed, and identification of communities and prognostic paths can be provided. On the basis of evidence from various model comparisons, we show in this CAD study that there may be characteristic

  2. Prognostic models in coronary artery disease: Cox and network approaches.

    PubMed

    Mora, Antonio; Sicari, Rosa; Cortigiani, Lauro; Carpeggiani, Clara; Picano, Eugenio; Capobianco, Enrico

    2015-02-01

    Predictive assessment of the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases is usually provided by computational approaches centred on Cox models. The complex interdependence structure underlying clinical data patterns can limit the performance of Cox analysis and complicate the interpretation of results, thus calling for complementary and integrative methods. Prognostic models are proposed for studying the risk associated with patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing vasodilator stress echocardiography, an established technique for CAD detection and prognostication. In order to complement standard Cox models, network inference is considered a possible solution to quantify the complex relationships between heterogeneous data categories. In particular, a mutual information network is designed to explore the paths linking patient-associated variables to endpoint events, to reveal prognostic factors and to identify the best possible predictors of death. Data from a prospective, multicentre, observational study are available from a previous study, based on 4313 patients (2532 men; 64±11 years) with known (n=1547) or suspected (n=2766) CAD, who underwent high-dose dipyridamole (0.84 mg kg(-1) over 6 min) stress echocardiography with coronary flow reserve (CFR) evaluation of left anterior descending (LAD) artery by Doppler. The overall mortality was the only endpoint analysed by Cox models. The estimated connectivity between clinical variables assigns a complementary value to the proposed network approach in relation to the established Cox model, for instance revealing connectivity paths. Depending on the use of multiple metrics, the constraints of regression analysis in measuring the association strength among clinical variables can be relaxed, and identification of communities and prognostic paths can be provided. On the basis of evidence from various model comparisons, we show in this CAD study that there may be characteristic

  3. Autistic Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Kozlowski, Alison M.

    2010-01-01

    Autistic regression is one of the many mysteries in the developmental course of autism and pervasive developmental disorders not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). Various definitions of this phenomenon have been used, further clouding the study of the topic. Despite this problem, some efforts at establishing prevalence have been made. The purpose of…

  4. Robust Regression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong; Cabral, Ricardo; De la Torre, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    Discriminative methods (e.g., kernel regression, SVM) have been extensively used to solve problems such as object recognition, image alignment and pose estimation from images. These methods typically map image features ( X) to continuous (e.g., pose) or discrete (e.g., object category) values. A major drawback of existing discriminative methods is that samples are directly projected onto a subspace and hence fail to account for outliers common in realistic training sets due to occlusion, specular reflections or noise. It is important to notice that existing discriminative approaches assume the input variables X to be noise free. Thus, discriminative methods experience significant performance degradation when gross outliers are present. Despite its obvious importance, the problem of robust discriminative learning has been relatively unexplored in computer vision. This paper develops the theory of robust regression (RR) and presents an effective convex approach that uses recent advances on rank minimization. The framework applies to a variety of problems in computer vision including robust linear discriminant analysis, regression with missing data, and multi-label classification. Several synthetic and real examples with applications to head pose estimation from images, image and video classification and facial attribute classification with missing data are used to illustrate the benefits of RR. PMID:26761740

  5. The Cox3p assembly module of yeast cytochrome oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chen-Hsien; McStay, Gavin P.; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Yeast cytochrome oxidase (COX) was previously inferred to assemble from three modules, each containing one of the three mitochondrially encoded subunits and a different subset of the eight nuclear gene products that make up this respiratory complex. Pull-down assays of pulse-labeled mitochondria enabled us to characterize Cox3p subassemblies that behave as COX precursors and contain Cox4p, Cox7p, and Cox13p. Surprisingly, Cox4p is a constituent of two other complexes, one of which was previously proposed to be an intermediate of Cox1p biogenesis. This suggests that Cox4p, which contacts Cox1p and Cox3p in the holoenzyme, can be incorporated into COX by two alternative pathways. In addition to subunits of COX, some Cox3p intermediates contain Rcf1p, a protein associated with the supercomplex that stabilizes the interaction of COX with the bc1 (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase) complex. Finally, our results indicate that although assembly of the Cox1p module is not contingent on the presence of Cox3p, the converse is not true, as none of the Cox3p subassemblies were detected in a mutant blocked in translation of Cox1p. These studies support our proposal that Cox3p and Cox1p are separate assembly modules with unique compositions of ancillary factors and subunits derived from the nuclear genome. PMID:24478450

  6. COX7AR is a Stress-inducible Mitochondrial COX Subunit that Promotes Breast Cancer Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kezhong; Wang, Guohui; Zhang, Xuebao; Hüttemann, Philipp P; Qiu, Yining; Liu, Jenney; Mitchell, Allison; Lee, Icksoo; Zhang, Chao; Lee, Jin-Sook; Pecina, Petr; Wu, Guojun; Yang, Zeng-Quan; Hüttemann, Maik; Grossman, Lawrence I

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, plays a key role in regulating mitochondrial energy production and cell survival. COX subunit VIIa polypeptide 2-like protein (COX7AR) is a novel COX subunit that was recently found to be involved in mitochondrial supercomplex assembly and mitochondrial respiration activity. Here, we report that COX7AR is expressed in high energy-demanding tissues, such as brain, heart, liver, and aggressive forms of human breast cancer cells. Under cellular stress that stimulates energy metabolism, COX7AR is induced and incorporated into the mitochondrial COX complex. Functionally, COX7AR promotes cellular energy production in human mammary epithelial cells. Gain- and loss-of-function analysis demonstrates that COX7AR is required for human breast cancer cells to maintain higher rates of proliferation, clone formation, and invasion. In summary, our study revealed that COX7AR is a stress-inducible mitochondrial COX subunit that facilitates human breast cancer malignancy. These findings have important implications in the understanding and treatment of human breast cancer and the diseases associated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:27550821

  7. COX7AR is a Stress-inducible Mitochondrial COX Subunit that Promotes Breast Cancer Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kezhong; Wang, Guohui; Zhang, Xuebao; Hüttemann, Philipp P.; Qiu, Yining; Liu, Jenney; Mitchell, Allison; Lee, Icksoo; Zhang, Chao; Lee, Jin-sook; Pecina, Petr; Wu, Guojun; Yang, Zeng-quan; Hüttemann, Maik; Grossman, Lawrence I.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, plays a key role in regulating mitochondrial energy production and cell survival. COX subunit VIIa polypeptide 2-like protein (COX7AR) is a novel COX subunit that was recently found to be involved in mitochondrial supercomplex assembly and mitochondrial respiration activity. Here, we report that COX7AR is expressed in high energy-demanding tissues, such as brain, heart, liver, and aggressive forms of human breast cancer cells. Under cellular stress that stimulates energy metabolism, COX7AR is induced and incorporated into the mitochondrial COX complex. Functionally, COX7AR promotes cellular energy production in human mammary epithelial cells. Gain- and loss-of-function analysis demonstrates that COX7AR is required for human breast cancer cells to maintain higher rates of proliferation, clone formation, and invasion. In summary, our study revealed that COX7AR is a stress-inducible mitochondrial COX subunit that facilitates human breast cancer malignancy. These findings have important implications in the understanding and treatment of human breast cancer and the diseases associated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:27550821

  8. Cyclooxygenase (COX) Inhibitors and the Newborn Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Francine G.; Wade, Andrew W.; Lewis, Megan L.; Qi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors (COXI) in influencing the structural development as well as the function of the developing kidney. COXI administered either during pregnancy or after birth can influence kidney development including nephronogenesis, and can decrease renal perfusion and ultrafiltration potentially leading to acute kidney injury in the newborn period. To date, which COX isoform (COX-1 or COX-2) plays a more important role in during fetal development and influences kidney function early in life is not known, though evidence points to a predominant role for COX-2. Clinical implications of the use of COXI in pregnancy and in the newborn infant are also evaluated herein, with specific reference to the potential effects of COXI on nephronogenesis as well as newborn kidney function. PMID:24281306

  9. Viscum album-Mediated COX-2 Inhibition Implicates Destabilization of COX-2 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Chaitrali; Hegde, Pushpa; Friboulet, Alain; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas V.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive use of Viscum album (VA) preparations in the complementary therapy of cancer and in several other human pathologies has led to an increasing number of cellular and molecular approaches to explore the mechanisms of action of VA. We have recently demonstrated that, VA preparations exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect by selectively down-regulating the COX-2-mediated cytokine-induced secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), one of the important molecular signatures of inflammatory reactions. In this study, we observed a significant down-regulation of COX-2 protein expression in VA-treated A549 cells however COX-2 mRNA levels were unaltered. Therefore, we hypothesized that VA induces destabilisation of COX-2 mRNA, thereby depleting the available functional COX-2 mRNA for the protein synthesis and for the subsequent secretion of PGE2. To address this question, we analyzed the molecular degradation of COX-2 protein and its corresponding mRNA in A549 cell line. Using cyclohexamide pulse chase experiment, we demonstrate that, COX-2 protein degradation is not affected by the treatment with VA whereas experiments on transcriptional blockade with actinomycin D, revealed a marked reduction in the half life of COX-2 mRNA due to its rapid degradation in the cells treated with VA compared to that in IL-1β-stimulated cells. These results thus demonstrate that VA-mediated inhibition of PGE2 implicates destabilization of COX-2 mRNA. PMID:25664986

  10. [Structural adjustment, cultural adjustment?].

    PubMed

    Dujardin, B; Dujardin, M; Hermans, I

    2003-12-01

    Over the last two decades, multiple studies have been conducted and many articles published about Structural Adjustment Programmes (SAPs). These studies mainly describe the characteristics of SAPs and analyse their economic consequences as well as their effects upon a variety of sectors: health, education, agriculture and environment. However, very few focus on the sociological and cultural effects of SAPs. Following a summary of SAP's content and characteristics, the paper briefly discusses the historical course of SAPs and the different critiques which have been made. The cultural consequences of SAPs are introduced and are described on four different levels: political, community, familial, and individual. These levels are analysed through examples from the literature and individual testimonies from people in the Southern Hemisphere. The paper concludes that SAPs, alongside economic globalisation processes, are responsible for an acute breakdown of social and cultural structures in societies in the South. It should be a priority, not only to better understand the situation and its determining factors, but also to intervene and act with strategies that support and reinvest in the social and cultural sectors, which is vital in order to allow for individuals and communities in the South to strengthen their autonomy and identify.

  11. Specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rubin, B R

    1999-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are currently among the most widely prescribed drugs worldwide. Their therapeutic benefits and their side effects in the gastrointestinal tract and kidney, as well as in hemostasis, are of great importance in modern medicine. Within the past decade, new insights into how NSAIDs produce both their therapeutic benefits and their serious side effects have been discovered. It is now known that there are two froms of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme that metabolize arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. Drugs that specifically inhibit the COX-2 enzyme were formulated and put into clinical trials during the past 5 years. These drugs are now available to treat patients in the United States. Specific COX-2 inhibitors offer the benefit of being able to treat the pain and inflammation of arthritis with potentially little risk of serious gastrointestinal injury.

  12. Suppression mechanisms of COX assembly defects in yeast and human: Insights into the COX assembly process

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Antoni; Gouget, Karine; Horn, Darryl; Soto, Ileana C.; Fontanesi, Flavia

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotic cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. COX is a multimeric enzyme formed by subunits of dual genetic origin whose assembly is intricate and highly regulated. In addition to the structural subunits, a large number of accessory factors are required to build the holoenzyme. The function of these factors is required in all stages of the assembly process. They are relevant to human health because devastating human disorders have been associated with mutations in nuclear genes encoding conserved COX assembly factors. The study of yeast strains and human cell lines from patients carrying mutations in structural subunits and COX assembly factors has been invaluable to attain the current state of knowledge, even if still fragmentary, of the COX assembly process. After the identification of the genes involved, the isolation and characterization of genetic and metabolic suppressors of COX assembly defects, reviewed here, have become a profitable strategy to gain insight into their functions and the pathways in which they operate. Additionally, they have the potential to provide useful information for devising therapeutic approaches to combat human disorders associated with COX deficiency. PMID:18522805

  13. Regression Calibration with Heteroscedastic Error Variance

    PubMed Central

    Spiegelman, Donna; Logan, Roger; Grove, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The problem of covariate measurement error with heteroscedastic measurement error variance is considered. Standard regression calibration assumes that the measurement error has a homoscedastic measurement error variance. An estimator is proposed to correct regression coefficients for covariate measurement error with heteroscedastic variance. Point and interval estimates are derived. Validation data containing the gold standard must be available. This estimator is a closed-form correction of the uncorrected primary regression coefficients, which may be of logistic or Cox proportional hazards model form, and is closely related to the version of regression calibration developed by Rosner et al. (1990). The primary regression model can include multiple covariates measured without error. The use of these estimators is illustrated in two data sets, one taken from occupational epidemiology (the ACE study) and one taken from nutritional epidemiology (the Nurses’ Health Study). In both cases, although there was evidence of moderate heteroscedasticity, there was little difference in estimation or inference using this new procedure compared to standard regression calibration. It is shown theoretically that unless the relative risk is large or measurement error severe, standard regression calibration approximations will typically be adequate, even with moderate heteroscedasticity in the measurement error model variance. In a detailed simulation study, standard regression calibration performed either as well as or better than the new estimator. When the disease is rare and the errors normally distributed, or when measurement error is moderate, standard regression calibration remains the method of choice. PMID:22848187

  14. Regression: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Regression, another mechanism studied by Sigmund Freud, has had much research, e.g., hypnotic regression, frustration regression, schizophrenic regression, and infra-human-animal regression (often directly related to fixation). Many investigators worked with hypnotic age regression, which has a long history, going back to Russian reflexologists.…

  15. Box-Cox transformation of firm size data in statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting Ting; Takaishi, Tetsuya

    2014-03-01

    Firm size data usually do not show the normality that is often assumed in statistical analysis such as regression analysis. In this study we focus on two firm size data: the number of employees and sale. Those data deviate considerably from a normal distribution. To improve the normality of those data we transform them by the Box-Cox transformation with appropriate parameters. The Box-Cox transformation parameters are determined so that the transformed data best show the kurtosis of a normal distribution. It is found that the two firm size data transformed by the Box-Cox transformation show strong linearity. This indicates that the number of employees and sale have the similar property as a firm size indicator. The Box-Cox parameters obtained for the firm size data are found to be very close to zero. In this case the Box-Cox transformations are approximately a log-transformation. This suggests that the firm size data we used are approximately log-normal distributions.

  16. Anandamide and decidual remodelling: COX-2 oxidative metabolism as a key regulator.

    PubMed

    Almada, M; Piscitelli, F; Fonseca, B M; Di Marzo, V; Correia-da-Silva, G; Teixeira, N

    2015-11-01

    Recently, endocannabinoids have emerged as signalling mediators in reproduction. It is widely accepted that anandamide (AEA) levels must be tightly regulated, and that a disturbance in AEA levels may impact decidual stability and regression. We have previously characterized the endocannabinoid machinery in rat decidual tissue and reported the pro-apoptotic action of AEA on rat decidual cells. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible enzyme that plays a crucial role in early pregnancy, and is also a key modulator in the crosstalk between endocannabinoids and prostaglandins. On the other hand, AEA-oxidative metabolism by COX-2 is not merely a mean to inactivate its action, but it yields the formation of a new class of mediators, named prostaglandin-ethanolamides, or prostamides. In this study we found that AEA-induced apoptosis in decidual cells involves COX-2 metabolic pathway. AEA induced COX-2 expression through p38 MAPK, resulting in the formation of prostamide E2 (PME2). Our findings also suggest that AEA-induced effect is associated with NF-kB activation. Finally, we describe the involvement of PME2 in the induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in rat decidual cells. Altogether, our findings highlight the role of COX-2 as a gatekeeper in the uterine environment and clarify the impact of the deregulation of AEA levels on the decidual remodelling process. PMID:26335727

  17. Application and Interpretation of Hierarchical Multiple Regression.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Younhee; Jung, Mi Jung

    2016-01-01

    The authors reported the association between motivation and self-management behavior of individuals with chronic low back pain after adjusting control variables using hierarchical multiple regression (). This article describes details of the hierarchical regression applying the actual data used in the article by , including how to test assumptions, run the statistical tests, and report the results. PMID:27648796

  18. Golgi-Cox Staining Step by Step

    PubMed Central

    Zaqout, Sami; Kaindl, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Golgi staining remains a key method to study neuronal morphology in vivo. Since most protocols delineating modifications of the original staining method lack details on critical steps, establishing this method in a laboratory can be time-consuming and frustrating. Here, we describe the Golgi-Cox staining in such detail that should turn the staining into an easily feasible method for all scientists working in the neuroscience field. PMID:27065817

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in canine intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, J H; Robertson, J L; Zimmerman, K L; Higgins, M A; Geiger, D A

    2009-09-01

    Meningiomas are the most common canine intracranial tumour. Neurologic disability and death from treatment failure remain problematic despite current surgical and radiotherapeutic treatments for canine intracranial meningiomas. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression has been demonstrated in multiple canine malignancies, and COX-2 inhibitory treatment strategies have been shown to have both preventative and therapeutic effects in spontaneous and experimental models of cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate COX-2 expression in canine intracranial meningiomas. Immunohistochemical and Western blot (WB) analyses showed COX-2 expression in multiple tissues of the normal canine brain, and 87% (21/24) of intracranial meningiomas studied were immunoreactive to COX-2. No significant associations between COX-2 immunoreactivity and tumour grade were identified. Further studies are required to elucidate the physiologic roles of constitutive COX-2 expression in the central nervous system as well as its participation in meningioma tumourigenesis. PMID:19691646

  20. Prolactin (PRL) induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression and prostaglandin (PG) production in hamster Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Matzkin, María Eugenia; Ambao, Verónica; Carino, Mónica Herminia; Rossi, Soledad Paola; González, Lorena; Turyn, Daniel; Campo, Stella; Calandra, Ricardo Saúl; Frungieri, Mónica Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Serum prolactin (PRL) variations play a crucial role in the photoperiodic-induced testicular regression-recrudescence transition in hamsters. We have previously shown that cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins (PGs), is expressed mostly in Leydig cells of reproductively active hamsters with considerable circulating and pituitary levels of PRL. In this study, we describe a stimulatory effect of PRL on COX2/PGs in hamster Leydig cells, which is mediated by IL-1β and prevented by P38-MAPK and JAK2 inhibitors. Furthermore, by preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF), we isolated PRL charge analogues from pituitaries of active [isoelectric points (pI): 5.16, 4.61, and 4.34] and regressed (pI: 5.44) hamsters. More acidic PRL charge analogues strongly induced COX2 expression, while less acidic ones had no effect. Our studies suggest that PRL induces COX2/PGs in hamster Leydig cells through IL-1β and activation of P38-MAPK and JAK2. PRL microheterogeneity detected in active/inactive hamsters may be responsible for the photoperiodic variations of COX2 expression in Leydig cells.

  1. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 affects endothelial progenitor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Colleselli, Daniela; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Mosheimer, Birgit A.; Kaehler, Christian M. . E-mail: C.M.Kaehler@uibk.ac.at

    2006-09-10

    Growing evidence indicates that inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and various types of cancer. Endothelial progenitor cells recruited from the bone marrow have been shown to be involved in the formation of new vessels in malignancies and discussed for being a key point in tumour progression and metastasis. However, until now, nothing is known about an interaction between COX and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Proliferation kinetics, cell cycle distribution and rate of apoptosis were analysed by MTT test and FACS analysis. Further analyses revealed an implication of Akt phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Both COX-1 and COX-2 expression can be found in bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. COX-2 inhibition leads to a significant reduction in proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. COX-2 inhibition leads further to an increased cleavage of caspase-3 protein and inversely to inhibition of Akt activation. Highly proliferating endothelial progenitor cells can be targeted by selective COX-2 inhibition in vitro. These results indicate that upcoming therapy strategies in cancer patients targeting COX-2 may be effective in inhibiting tumour vasculogenesis as well as angiogenic processes.

  2. Recurrent events and the exploding Cox model

    PubMed Central

    Gjessing, Håkon K.; Røysland, Kjetil; Pena, Edsel A.; Aalen, Odd O.

    2014-01-01

    Counting process models have played an important role in survival and event history analysis for more than 30 years. Nevertheless, almost all models that are being used have a very simple structure. Analyzing recurrent events invites the application of more complex models with dynamic covariates. We discuss how to define valid models in such a setting. One has to check carefully that a suggested model is well defined as a stochastic process. We give conditions for this to hold. Some detailed discussion is presented in relation to a Cox type model, where the exponential structure combined with feedback lead to an exploding model. In general, counting process models with dynamic covariates can be formulated to avoid explosions. In particular, models with a linear feedback structure do not explode, making them useful tools in general modeling of recurrent events. PMID:20625827

  3. COX, LOX and platelet aggregation inhibitory properties of Lauraceae neolignans.

    PubMed

    Coy, Ericsson David; Cuca, Luis Enrique; Sefkow, Michael

    2009-12-15

    The anti-inflammatory potential of 26 neolignans (14 of the bicyclooctane-type and 12 of the benzofuran-type), isolated from three Lauraceae species (Pleurothyrium cinereum, Ocotea macrophylla and Nectandra amazonum), was evaluated in vitro through inhibition of COX-1, COX-2, 5-LOX and agonist-induced aggregation of rabbit platelets. Benzofuran neolignans were found to be selective COX-2 inhibitors, whereas bicyclooctane neolignans inhibit selectively the PAF-action as well as COX-1 and 5-LOX. The neolignan 9-nor-7,8-dehydro-isolicarin B 15 and cinerin C 7 were found to be the most potent COX-2 inhibitor and PAF-antagonist, respectively. Nectamazin C 10 exhibited dual 5-LOX/COX-2 inhibition. PMID:19880317

  4. Correlated versus uncorrelated frailty Cox models: A comparison of different estimation procedures.

    PubMed

    Elghafghuf, Adel; Stryhn, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    In many studies in medicine, including clinical trials and epidemiological investigations, data are clustered into groups such as health centers or herds in veterinary medicine. Such data are usually analyzed by hierarchical regression models to account for possible variation between groups. When such variation is large, it is of potential interest to explore whether additionally the effect of a within-group predictor varies between groups. In survival analysis, this may be investigated by including two frailty terms at group level in a Cox proportional hazards model. Several estimation methods have been proposed to estimate this type of frailty Cox models. We review four of these methods, apply them to real data from veterinary medicine, and compare them using a simulation study. PMID:27273127

  5. Unitary Response Regression Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    The dependent variable in a regular linear regression is a numerical variable, and in a logistic regression it is a binary or categorical variable. In these models the dependent variable has varying values. However, there are problems yielding an identity output of a constant value which can also be modelled in a linear or logistic regression with…

  6. NCCS Regression Test Harness

    SciTech Connect

    Tharrington, Arnold N.

    2015-09-09

    The NCCS Regression Test Harness is a software package that provides a framework to perform regression and acceptance testing on NCCS High Performance Computers. The package is written in Python and has only the dependency of a Subversion repository to store the regression tests.

  7. Shaft adjuster

    DOEpatents

    Harry, H.H.

    1988-03-11

    Abstract and method for the adjustment and alignment of shafts in high power devices. A plurality of adjacent rotatable angled cylinders are positioned between a base and the shaft to be aligned which when rotated introduce an axial offset. The apparatus is electrically conductive and constructed of a structurally rigid material. The angled cylinders allow the shaft such as the center conductor in a pulse line machine to be offset in any desired alignment position within the range of the apparatus. 3 figs.

  8. Shaft adjuster

    DOEpatents

    Harry, Herbert H.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method for the adjustment and alignment of shafts in high power devices. A plurality of adjacent rotatable angled cylinders are positioned between a base and the shaft to be aligned which when rotated introduce an axial offset. The apparatus is electrically conductive and constructed of a structurally rigid material. The angled cylinders allow the shaft such as the center conductor in a pulse line machine to be offset in any desired alignment position within the range of the apparatus.

  9. Fully Regressive Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ehrsam, Eric; Kallini, Joseph R.; Lebas, Damien; Modiano, Philippe; Cotten, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Fully regressive melanoma is a phenomenon in which the primary cutaneous melanoma becomes completely replaced by fibrotic components as a result of host immune response. Although 10 to 35 percent of cases of cutaneous melanomas may partially regress, fully regressive melanoma is very rare; only 47 cases have been reported in the literature to date. AH of the cases of fully regressive melanoma reported in the literature were diagnosed in conjunction with metastasis on a patient. The authors describe a case of fully regressive melanoma without any metastases at the time of its diagnosis. Characteristic findings on dermoscopy, as well as the absence of melanoma on final biopsy, confirmed the diagnosis.

  10. Fully Regressive Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ehrsam, Eric; Kallini, Joseph R.; Lebas, Damien; Modiano, Philippe; Cotten, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Fully regressive melanoma is a phenomenon in which the primary cutaneous melanoma becomes completely replaced by fibrotic components as a result of host immune response. Although 10 to 35 percent of cases of cutaneous melanomas may partially regress, fully regressive melanoma is very rare; only 47 cases have been reported in the literature to date. AH of the cases of fully regressive melanoma reported in the literature were diagnosed in conjunction with metastasis on a patient. The authors describe a case of fully regressive melanoma without any metastases at the time of its diagnosis. Characteristic findings on dermoscopy, as well as the absence of melanoma on final biopsy, confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:27672418

  11. EMPIRICAL LIKELIHOOD INFERENCE FOR THE COX MODEL WITH TIME-DEPENDENT COEFFICIENTS VIA LOCAL PARTIAL LIKELIHOOD

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yanqing; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Zhao, Yichuan

    2009-01-01

    The Cox model with time-dependent coefficients has been studied by a number of authors recently. In this paper, we develop empirical likelihood (EL) pointwise confidence regions for the time-dependent regression coefficients via local partial likelihood smoothing. The EL simultaneous confidence bands for a linear combination of the coefficients are also derived based on the strong approximation methods. The empirical likelihood ratio is formulated through the local partial log-likelihood for the regression coefficient functions. Our numerical studies indicate that the EL pointwise/simultaneous confidence regions/bands have satisfactory finite sample performances. Compared with the confidence regions derived directly based on the asymptotic normal distribution of the local constant estimator, the EL confidence regions are overall tighter and can better capture the curvature of the underlying regression coefficient functions. Two data sets, the gastric cancer data and the Mayo Clinic primary biliary cirrhosis data, are analyzed using the proposed method. PMID:19838322

  12. The Heme a Synthase Cox15 Associates with Cytochrome c Oxidase Assembly Intermediates during Cox1 Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bareth, Bettina; Dennerlein, Sven; Mick, David U.; Nikolov, Miroslav; Urlaub, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Cox1, the core subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase, receives two heme a cofactors during assembly of the 13-subunit enzyme complex. However, at which step of the assembly process and how heme is inserted into Cox1 have remained an enigma. Shy1, the yeast SURF1 homolog, has been implicated in heme transfer to Cox1, whereas the heme a synthase, Cox15, catalyzes the final step of heme a synthesis. Here we performed a comprehensive analysis of cytochrome c oxidase assembly intermediates containing Shy1. Our analyses suggest that Cox15 displays a role in cytochrome c oxidase assembly, which is independent of its functions as the heme a synthase. Cox15 forms protein complexes with Shy1 and also associates with Cox1-containing complexes independently of Shy1 function. These findings indicate that Shy1 does not serve as a mobile heme carrier between the heme a synthase and maturing Cox1 but rather cooperates with Cox15 for heme transfer and insertion in early assembly intermediates of cytochrome c oxidase. PMID:23979592

  13. Characterization of the peroxide sensitivity of COX-deficient yeast strains reveals unexpected relationships between COX assembly proteins.

    PubMed

    Veniamin, Simona; Sawatzky, Luanne G; Banting, Graham S; Glerum, D Moira

    2011-10-15

    A number of distinct cuproproteins of the mitochondrial inner membrane are required for the assembly of cytochrome oxidase (COX), thought to function in a "bucket brigade" fashion to provide copper to the Cu(A) and Cu(B) sites. In yeast, the loss of two these proteins, Sco1p and Cox11p, leads to respiratory deficiency and a specific inability to survive exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Using a quantitative assay, we have identified subtle differences in the peroxide-sensitive phenotypes between sco1 and cox11 mutant strains. Interestingly, the peroxide sensitivity of the sco1 null strain can be suppressed by overexpressing either SCO2 or COX11, although overexpression of neither SCO1 nor SCO2 can rescue the cox11 null strain. We also find that overexpression of either CTT1, encoding the cytosolic catalase T, or CTA1, encoding the mitochondrial matrix catalase, suppresses the peroxide sensitivity in both the sco1 and the cox11 null mutants. Direct measurement of peroxide metabolism shows that sco1 and cox11 null strains fail to degrade a significant amount of exogenously provided H(2)O(2). Taken together, our data demonstrate that although Cox11p and Sco1p play distinct roles in COX assembly, they seem to play overlapping or related roles in peroxide metabolism that require further investigation. PMID:21821119

  14. The Effect of Cadmium on COX-1 and COX-2 Gene, Protein Expression, and Enzymatic Activity in THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Olszowski, Tomasz; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Korbecki, Jan; Kurzawski, Mateusz; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cadmium in concentrations relevant to those detected in human serum on cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression at mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels in THP-1 macrophages. Macrophages were incubated with various cadmium chloride (CdCl2) solutions for 48 h at final concentrations of 5 nM, 20 nM, 200 nM, and 2 μM CdCl2. The mRNA expression and protein levels of COXs were analyzed with RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and stable metabolite of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) concentrations in culture media were determined using ELISA method. Our study demonstrates that cadmium at the highest tested concentrations modulates COX-1 and COX-2 at mRNA level in THP-1 macrophages; however, the lower tested cadmium concentrations appear to inhibit COX-1 protein expression. PGE2 and TXB2 production is not altered by all tested Cd concentrations; however, the significant stimulation of PGE2 and TXB2 production is observed when macrophages are exposed to both cadmium and COX-2 selective inhibitor, NS-398. The stimulatory effect of cadmium on COXs at mRNA level is not reflected at protein and enzymatic activity levels, suggesting the existence of some posttranscriptional, translational, and posttranslational events that result in silencing of those genes' expression.

  15. Increased COX-2 expression in epithelial and stromal cells of high mammographic density tissues and in a xenograft model of mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Chew, G L; Huo, C W; Huang, D; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Frazer, H; Hopper, J L; Haviv, I; Henderson, M A; Britt, K; Thompson, E W

    2015-08-01

    Mammographic density (MD) adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest known risk factors for breast cancer. Given the high attributable risk of MD for breast cancer, chemoprevention with a safe and available agent that reduces MD and breast cancer risk would be beneficial. Cox-2 has been implicated in MD-related breast cancer risk, and was increased in stromal cells in high MD tissues in one study. Our study assessed differential Cox-2 expression in epithelial and stromal cells in paired samples of high and low MD human breast tissue, and in a validated xenograft biochamber model of MD. We also examined the effects of endocrine treatment upon Cox-2 expression in high and low MD tissues in the MD xenograft model. Paired high and low MD human breast tissue samples were immunostained for Cox-2, then assessed for differential expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells. High and low MD human breast tissues were separately maintained in biochambers in mice treated with Tamoxifen, oestrogen or placebo implants, then assessed for percentage Cox-2 staining in epithelial and stromal cells. Percentage Cox-2 staining was greater for both epithelial (p = 0.01) and stromal cells (p < 0.0001) of high compared with low MD breast tissues. In high MD biochamber tissues, percentage Cox-2 staining was greater in stromal cells of oestrogen-treated versus placebo-treated tissues (p = 0.05).

  16. Improved Regression Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skrondal, Anders; Kuha, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    The likelihood for generalized linear models with covariate measurement error cannot in general be expressed in closed form, which makes maximum likelihood estimation taxing. A popular alternative is regression calibration which is computationally efficient at the cost of inconsistent estimation. We propose an improved regression calibration…

  17. Prediction in Multiple Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Jason W.

    2000-01-01

    Presents the concept of prediction via multiple regression (MR) and discusses the assumptions underlying multiple regression analyses. Also discusses shrinkage, cross-validation, and double cross-validation of prediction equations and describes how to calculate confidence intervals around individual predictions. (SLD)

  18. Morse–Smale Regression

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Samuel; Rubel, Oliver; Bremer, Peer -Timo; Pascucci, Valerio; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2012-01-19

    This paper introduces a novel partition-based regression approach that incorporates topological information. Partition-based regression typically introduces a quality-of-fit-driven decomposition of the domain. The emphasis in this work is on a topologically meaningful segmentation. Thus, the proposed regression approach is based on a segmentation induced by a discrete approximation of the Morse–Smale complex. This yields a segmentation with partitions corresponding to regions of the function with a single minimum and maximum that are often well approximated by a linear model. This approach yields regression models that are amenable to interpretation and have good predictive capacity. Typically, regression estimates are quantified by their geometrical accuracy. For the proposed regression, an important aspect is the quality of the segmentation itself. Thus, this article introduces a new criterion that measures the topological accuracy of the estimate. The topological accuracy provides a complementary measure to the classical geometrical error measures and is very sensitive to overfitting. The Morse–Smale regression is compared to state-of-the-art approaches in terms of geometry and topology and yields comparable or improved fits in many cases. Finally, a detailed study on climate-simulation data demonstrates the application of the Morse–Smale regression. Supplementary Materials are available online and contain an implementation of the proposed approach in the R package msr, an analysis and simulations on the stability of the Morse–Smale complex approximation, and additional tables for the climate-simulation study.

  19. THE COX-MAZE IV PROCEDURE: PREDICTORS OF LATE RECURRENCE

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Ralph J.; Schwartz, Forrest H.; Bailey, Marci S.; Maniar, Hersh S.; Munfakh, Nabil A.; Moon, Marc R.; Schuessler, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The Cox-Maze III procedure(CMP) achieved high cure rates and became the surgical gold standard for the treatment of atrial fibrillation(AF). Due to its invasiveness, a more simplified ablation-assisted procedure(CMP-IV) has been performed at our institution since January, 2002. The study examined multiple preoperative and perioperative variables to determine predictors of late recurrence. Methods Data were collected prospectively on 282 patients who underwent the CMP-IV from January 2002 through December 2009. Forty-two percent of patients had paroxysmal and 58% had either persistent or long-standing persistent AF. All patients were available for follow-up. Follow-up included ECGs in all patients. Since 2006, 24 hour holter monitoring was obtained in 94% of patients at 3, 6 and 12 months. Data were analyzed by logistic regression analysis at 12 months with 13 preoperative and perioperative variables used as co-variants. Results Sixty-six percent of patients had a concomitant procedure. Following an ablation-assisted CMP, the freedom from AF was 89%, 93%, and 89% at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. The freedom from both AF and antiarrhythmic drugs was 63%, 79%, and 78% at 3, 6, and 12 months. The risk factors for AF recurrence at one year were enlarged left atrial(LA) diameter(p=0.027), failure to isolate the entire posterior left atrium(p=0.022), and early atrial tachyarrhythmias (ATAs)(p=0.010). Conclusions The CMP-IV has a high success rate at one year, even with improved follow-up and stricter definitions of failure. In patients with large LA, there may be a need for more extensive size reduction or expanded lesion sets. PMID:21168019

  20. Modeling age-of-onset: Cox model with latent major gene effects

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Thompson, E.A.

    1994-09-01

    Analysis of age-of-onset is a key factor in the segregation and linkage analysis of complex genetic traits, but is complicated by the censoring of unaffected individuals. Most previous work has used parametric distributional assumptions, but it is hard to characterize the distribution of age-of-onset by a single distribution. Other approaches discretize age-of-onset and use logistic regression to model incidence; this approach does not use the information fully. Frailty models have been used for age-of-oset in the biostatistics literature, but these models do not lend themselves to modeling the correlations due to genetic effects which segregate within a family. Here, we propose use of the Cox model with latent major gene effects; conditional on the major genotypes, Cox`s proportional hazards model is used for age-of-onset for each individual. This is a semiparametric model; we do not specify the baseline hazard function. Likelihood analysis of such models is restricted by the difficulty in evaluating of maximizing the likelihood, especially when data are available for some of the members of an extended pedigree. Markov chain Monte Carlo permits genotypic configurations to be realized from the posterior distributions given a current model and the observed data. Hence methods for likelihood analysis can be developed: Monte Carlo EM is used for estimation of the parameters and their variance-covariance matrix. Markers and observed covariates are easily incorporated into this analysis. We present the model, methods for likelihood analysis and the results of a simulation study. The results are comparable with those based on a Cox model with known genotypic dependence in a pedigree. An early-onset Alzheimer`s pedigree and some breast cancer pedigrees have been used as real data examples. Some possible extensions are also discussed.

  1. Regression problems for magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellaro, S.; Mulargia, F.; Kagan, Y. Y.

    2006-06-01

    Least-squares linear regression is so popular that it is sometimes applied without checking whether its basic requirements are satisfied. In particular, in studying earthquake phenomena, the conditions (a) that the uncertainty on the independent variable is at least one order of magnitude smaller than the one on the dependent variable, (b) that both data and uncertainties are normally distributed and (c) that residuals are constant are at times disregarded. This may easily lead to wrong results. As an alternative to least squares, when the ratio between errors on the independent and the dependent variable can be estimated, orthogonal regression can be applied. We test the performance of orthogonal regression in its general form against Gaussian and non-Gaussian data and error distributions and compare it with standard least-square regression. General orthogonal regression is found to be superior or equal to the standard least squares in all the cases investigated and its use is recommended. We also compare the performance of orthogonal regression versus standard regression when, as often happens in the literature, the ratio between errors on the independent and the dependent variables cannot be estimated and is arbitrarily set to 1. We apply these results to magnitude scale conversion, which is a common problem in seismology, with important implications in seismic hazard evaluation, and analyse it through specific tests. Our analysis concludes that the commonly used standard regression may induce systematic errors in magnitude conversion as high as 0.3-0.4, and, even more importantly, this can introduce apparent catalogue incompleteness, as well as a heavy bias in estimates of the slope of the frequency-magnitude distributions. All this can be avoided by using the general orthogonal regression in magnitude conversions.

  2. Multivariate Regression with Calibration*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han; Wang, Lie; Zhao, Tuo

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method named calibrated multivariate regression (CMR) for fitting high dimensional multivariate regression models. Compared to existing methods, CMR calibrates the regularization for each regression task with respect to its noise level so that it is simultaneously tuning insensitive and achieves an improved finite-sample performance. Computationally, we develop an efficient smoothed proximal gradient algorithm which has a worst-case iteration complexity O(1/ε), where ε is a pre-specified numerical accuracy. Theoretically, we prove that CMR achieves the optimal rate of convergence in parameter estimation. We illustrate the usefulness of CMR by thorough numerical simulations and show that CMR consistently outperforms other high dimensional multivariate regression methods. We also apply CMR on a brain activity prediction problem and find that CMR is as competitive as the handcrafted model created by human experts. PMID:25620861

  3. Metamorphic geodesic regression.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yi; Joshi, Sarang; Sanchez, Mar; Styner, Martin; Niethammer, Marc

    2012-01-01

    We propose a metamorphic geodesic regression approach approximating spatial transformations for image time-series while simultaneously accounting for intensity changes. Such changes occur for example in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the developing brain due to myelination. To simplify computations we propose an approximate metamorphic geodesic regression formulation that only requires pairwise computations of image metamorphoses. The approximated solution is an appropriately weighted average of initial momenta. To obtain initial momenta reliably, we develop a shooting method for image metamorphosis.

  4. Students Speak With Gary Cox, EPIC Project Manager

    NASA Video Gallery

    From NASA’s International Space Station Mission Control Center Gary Cox EPIC Project Manager, participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at South Effingham Middle School...

  5. 32. SCIENTISTS ALLAN COX (SEATED), RICHARD DOELL, AND BRENT DALRYMPLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. SCIENTISTS ALLAN COX (SEATED), RICHARD DOELL, AND BRENT DALRYMPLE AT CONTROL PANEL, ABOUT 1965. - U.S. Geological Survey, Rock Magnetics Laboratory, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, San Mateo County, CA

  6. Relationship of the Topological Distances and Activities between mPGES-1 and COX-2 versus COX-1: Implications of the Different Post-Translational Endoplasmic Reticulum Organizations of COX-1 and COX-2.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Hironari; So, Shui-Ping; Ruan, Ke-He

    2015-06-16

    In vascular inflammation, prostaglandin E2 (PGE₂) is largely biosynthesized by microsomal PGE₂ synthase-1 (mPGES-1), competing with other downstream eicosanoid-synthesizing enzymes, such as PGIS, a synthase of a vascular protector prostacyclin (PGI₂), to isomerize the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-derived prostaglandin H2 (PGH₂). In this study, we found that a majority of the product from the cells co-expressing human COX-2, mPGES-1, and PGIS was PGE₂. We hypothesize that the molecular and cellular mechanisms are related to the post-translational endoplasmic reticulum (ER) arrangement of those enzymes. A set of fusion enzymes, COX-2-linker [10 amino acids (aa)]-PGIS and COX-2-linker (22 amino acids)-PGIS, were created as "The Bioruler", in which the 10 and 22 amino acids are defined linkers with known helical structures and distances (14.4 and 30.8 Å, respectively). Our experiments have shown that the efficiency of PGI₂ biosynthesis was reduced when the separation distance increased from 10 to 22 amino acids. When COX-2-10aa-PGIS (with a 14.4 Å separation) was co-expressed with mPGES-1 on the ER membrane, a major product was PGE₂, but not PGI₂. However, expression of COX-2-10aa-PGIS and mPGES-1 on a separated ER with a distance of ≫30.8 Å reduced the level of PGE₂ production. These data indicated that the mPGES-1 is "complex-likely" colocalized with COX-2 within a distance of 14.4 Å. In addition, the cells co-expressing COX-1-10aa-PGIS and mPGES-1 produced PGI₂ mainly, but not PGE₂. This indicates that mPGES-1 is expressed much farther from COX-1. These findings have led to proposed models showing the different post-translational ER organization between COX-2 and COX-1 with respect to the topological arrangement of the mPGES-1 during vascular inflammation.

  7. Epigenetic deregulation of the COX pathway in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cebola, Inês; Peinado, Miguel A

    2012-10-01

    Inflammation is a major cause of cancer and may condition its progression. The deregulation of the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway is implicated in several pathophysiological processes, including inflammation and cancer. Although, its targeting with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and COX-2 selective inhibitors has been investigated for years with promising results at both preventive and therapeutic levels, undesirable side effects and the limited understanding of the regulation and functionalities of the COX pathway compromise a more extensive application of these drugs. Epigenetics is bringing additional levels of complexity to the understanding of basic biological and pathological processes. The deregulation of signaling and biosynthetic pathways by epigenetic mechanisms may account for new molecular targets in cancer therapeutics. Genes of the COX pathway are seldom mutated in neoplastic cells, but a large proportion of them show aberrant expression in different types of cancer. A growing body of evidence indicates that epigenetic alterations play a critical role in the deregulation of the genes of the COX pathway. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the contribution of epigenetic processes to the deregulation of the COX pathway in cancer, getting insights into how these alterations may be relevant for the clinical management of patients. PMID:22580191

  8. Locoregional Control of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Relation to Automated Early Assessment of Tumor Regression on Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Carsten; Bernchou, Uffe; Bertelsen, Anders; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Large interindividual variations in volume regression of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are observable on standard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) during fractionated radiation therapy. Here, a method for automated assessment of tumor volume regression is presented and its potential use in response adapted personalized radiation therapy is evaluated empirically. Methods and Materials: Automated deformable registration with calculation of the Jacobian determinant was applied to serial CBCT scans in a series of 99 patients with NSCLC. Tumor volume at the end of treatment was estimated on the basis of the first one third and two thirds of the scans. The concordance between estimated and actual relative volume at the end of radiation therapy was quantified by Pearson's correlation coefficient. On the basis of the estimated relative volume, the patients were stratified into 2 groups having volume regressions below or above the population median value. Kaplan-Meier plots of locoregional disease-free rate and overall survival in the 2 groups were used to evaluate the predictive value of tumor regression during treatment. Cox proportional hazards model was used to adjust for other clinical characteristics. Results: Automatic measurement of the tumor regression from standard CBCT images was feasible. Pearson's correlation coefficient between manual and automatic measurement was 0.86 in a sample of 9 patients. Most patients experienced tumor volume regression, and this could be quantified early into the treatment course. Interestingly, patients with pronounced volume regression had worse locoregional tumor control and overall survival. This was significant on patient with non-adenocarcinoma histology. Conclusions: Evaluation of routinely acquired CBCT images during radiation therapy provides biological information on the specific tumor. This could potentially form the basis for personalized response adaptive therapy.

  9. Latent Regression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tarpey, Thaddeus; Petkova, Eva

    2010-07-01

    Finite mixture models have come to play a very prominent role in modelling data. The finite mixture model is predicated on the assumption that distinct latent groups exist in the population. The finite mixture model therefore is based on a categorical latent variable that distinguishes the different groups. Often in practice distinct sub-populations do not actually exist. For example, disease severity (e.g. depression) may vary continuously and therefore, a distinction of diseased and not-diseased may not be based on the existence of distinct sub-populations. Thus, what is needed is a generalization of the finite mixture's discrete latent predictor to a continuous latent predictor. We cast the finite mixture model as a regression model with a latent Bernoulli predictor. A latent regression model is proposed by replacing the discrete Bernoulli predictor by a continuous latent predictor with a beta distribution. Motivation for the latent regression model arises from applications where distinct latent classes do not exist, but instead individuals vary according to a continuous latent variable. The shapes of the beta density are very flexible and can approximate the discrete Bernoulli distribution. Examples and a simulation are provided to illustrate the latent regression model. In particular, the latent regression model is used to model placebo effect among drug treated subjects in a depression study. PMID:20625443

  10. Semiparametric Regression Pursuit.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Wei, Fengrong; Ma, Shuangge

    2012-10-01

    The semiparametric partially linear model allows flexible modeling of covariate effects on the response variable in regression. It combines the flexibility of nonparametric regression and parsimony of linear regression. The most important assumption in the existing methods for the estimation in this model is to assume a priori that it is known which covariates have a linear effect and which do not. However, in applied work, this is rarely known in advance. We consider the problem of estimation in the partially linear models without assuming a priori which covariates have linear effects. We propose a semiparametric regression pursuit method for identifying the covariates with a linear effect. Our proposed method is a penalized regression approach using a group minimax concave penalty. Under suitable conditions we show that the proposed approach is model-pursuit consistent, meaning that it can correctly determine which covariates have a linear effect and which do not with high probability. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated using simulation studies, which support our theoretical results. A real data example is used to illustrated the application of the proposed method. PMID:23559831

  11. Multiple Roles of the Cox20 Chaperone in Assembly of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cytochrome c Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Leah E.; Saracco, Scott A.; Fox, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    The Cox2 subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytochrome c oxidase is synthesized in the mitochondrial matrix as a precursor whose leader peptide is rapidly processed by the inner membrane protease following translocation to the intermembrane space. Processing is chaperoned by Cox20, an integral inner membrane protein whose hydrophilic domains are located in the intermembrane space, and Cox20 remains associated with mature, unassembled Cox2. The Cox2 C-tail domain is exported post-translationally by the highly conserved translocase Cox18 and associated proteins. We have found that Cox20 is required for efficient export of the Cox2 C-tail. Furthermore, Cox20 interacts by co-immune precipitation with Cox18, and this interaction requires the presence of Cox2. We therefore propose that Cox20 binding to Cox2 on the trans side of the inner membrane accelerates dissociation of newly exported Cox2 from the Cox18 translocase, promoting efficient cycling of the translocase. The requirement for Cox20 in cytochrome c oxidase assembly and respiratory growth is partially bypassed by yme1, mgr1 or mgr3 mutations, each of which reduce i-AAA protease activity in the intermembrane space. Thus, Cox20 also appears to stabilize unassembled Cox2 against degradation by the i-AAA protease. Pre-Cox2 leader peptide processing by Imp1 occurs in the absence of Cox20 and i-AAA protease activity, but is greatly reduced in efficiency. Under these conditions some mature Cox2 is assembled into cytochrome c oxidase allowing weak respiratory growth. Thus, the Cox20 chaperone has important roles in leader peptide processing, C-tail export, and stabilization of Cox2. PMID:22095077

  12. [Understanding logistic regression].

    PubMed

    El Sanharawi, M; Naudet, F

    2013-10-01

    Logistic regression is one of the most common multivariate analysis models utilized in epidemiology. It allows the measurement of the association between the occurrence of an event (qualitative dependent variable) and factors susceptible to influence it (explicative variables). The choice of explicative variables that should be included in the logistic regression model is based on prior knowledge of the disease physiopathology and the statistical association between the variable and the event, as measured by the odds ratio. The main steps for the procedure, the conditions of application, and the essential tools for its interpretation are discussed concisely. We also discuss the importance of the choice of variables that must be included and retained in the regression model in order to avoid the omission of important confounding factors. Finally, by way of illustration, we provide an example from the literature, which should help the reader test his or her knowledge.

  13. Human COX20 cooperates with SCO1 and SCO2 to mature COX2 and promote the assembly of cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Bourens, Myriam; Boulet, Aren; Leary, Scot C.; Barrientos, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CIV) deficiency is one of the most common respiratory chain defects in patients presenting with mitochondrial encephalocardiomyopathies. CIV biogenesis is complicated by the dual genetic origin of its structural subunits, and assembly of a functional holoenzyme complex requires a large number of nucleus-encoded assembly factors. In general, the functions of these assembly factors remain poorly understood, and mechanistic investigations of human CIV biogenesis have been limited by the availability of model cell lines. Here, we have used small interference RNA and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology to create knockdown and knockout human cell lines, respectively, to study the function of the CIV assembly factor COX20 (FAM36A). These cell lines exhibit a severe, isolated CIV deficiency due to instability of COX2, a mitochondrion-encoded CIV subunit. Mitochondria lacking COX20 accumulate CIV subassemblies containing COX1 and COX4, similar to those detected in fibroblasts from patients carrying mutations in the COX2 copper chaperones SCO1 and SCO2. These results imply that in the absence of COX20, COX2 is inefficiently incorporated into early CIV subassemblies. Immunoprecipitation assays using a stable COX20 knockout cell line expressing functional COX20-FLAG allowed us to identify an interaction between COX20 and newly synthesized COX2. Additionally, we show that SCO1 and SCO2 act on COX20-bound COX2. We propose that COX20 acts as a chaperone in the early steps of COX2 maturation, stabilizing the newly synthesized protein and presenting COX2 to its metallochaperone module, which in turn facilitates the incorporation of mature COX2 into the CIV assembly line. PMID:24403053

  14. Human COX20 cooperates with SCO1 and SCO2 to mature COX2 and promote the assembly of cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Bourens, Myriam; Boulet, Aren; Leary, Scot C; Barrientos, Antoni

    2014-06-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CIV) deficiency is one of the most common respiratory chain defects in patients presenting with mitochondrial encephalocardiomyopathies. CIV biogenesis is complicated by the dual genetic origin of its structural subunits, and assembly of a functional holoenzyme complex requires a large number of nucleus-encoded assembly factors. In general, the functions of these assembly factors remain poorly understood, and mechanistic investigations of human CIV biogenesis have been limited by the availability of model cell lines. Here, we have used small interference RNA and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology to create knockdown and knockout human cell lines, respectively, to study the function of the CIV assembly factor COX20 (FAM36A). These cell lines exhibit a severe, isolated CIV deficiency due to instability of COX2, a mitochondrion-encoded CIV subunit. Mitochondria lacking COX20 accumulate CIV subassemblies containing COX1 and COX4, similar to those detected in fibroblasts from patients carrying mutations in the COX2 copper chaperones SCO1 and SCO2. These results imply that in the absence of COX20, COX2 is inefficiently incorporated into early CIV subassemblies. Immunoprecipitation assays using a stable COX20 knockout cell line expressing functional COX20-FLAG allowed us to identify an interaction between COX20 and newly synthesized COX2. Additionally, we show that SCO1 and SCO2 act on COX20-bound COX2. We propose that COX20 acts as a chaperone in the early steps of COX2 maturation, stabilizing the newly synthesized protein and presenting COX2 to its metallochaperone module, which in turn facilitates the incorporation of mature COX2 into the CIV assembly line.

  15. Practical Session: Logistic Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    An exercise is proposed to illustrate the logistic regression. One investigates the different risk factors in the apparition of coronary heart disease. It has been proposed in Chapter 5 of the book of D.G. Kleinbaum and M. Klein, "Logistic Regression", Statistics for Biology and Health, Springer Science Business Media, LLC (2010) and also by D. Chessel and A.B. Dufour in Lyon 1 (see Sect. 6 of http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/pdf/tdr341.pdf). This example is based on data given in the file evans.txt coming from http://www.sph.emory.edu/dkleinb/logreg3.htm#data.

  16. Lipid Adjustment for Chemical Exposures: Accounting for Concomitant Variables

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daniel; Longnecker, Matthew P.; Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Some environmental chemical exposures are lipophilic and need to be adjusted by serum lipid levels before data analyses. There are currently various strategies that attempt to account for this problem, but all have their drawbacks. To address such concerns, we propose a new method that uses Box-Cox transformations and a simple Bayesian hierarchical model to adjust for lipophilic chemical exposures. Methods We compared our Box-Cox method to existing methods. We ran simulation studies in which increasing levels of lipid-adjusted chemical exposure did and did not increase the odds of having a disease, and we looked at both single-exposure and multiple-exposures cases. We also analyzed an epidemiology dataset that examined the effects of various chemical exposures on the risk of birth defects. Results Compared with existing methods, our Box-Cox method produced unbiased estimates, good coverage, similar power, and lower type-I error rates. This was the case in both single- and multiple-exposure simulation studies. Results from analysis of the birth-defect data differed from results using existing methods. Conclusion Our Box-Cox method is a novel and intuitive way to account for the lipophilic nature of certain chemical exposures. It addresses some of the problems with existing methods, is easily extendable to multiple exposures, and can be used in any analyses that involve concomitant variables. PMID:24051893

  17. Explorations in Statistics: Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This seventh installment of "Explorations in Statistics" explores regression, a technique that estimates the nature of the relationship between two things for which we may only surmise a mechanistic or predictive connection.…

  18. Modern Regression Discontinuity Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Howard S.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a detailed discussion of the theory and practice of modern regression discontinuity (RD) analysis for estimating the effects of interventions or treatments. Part 1 briefly chronicles the history of RD analysis and summarizes its past applications. Part 2 explains how in theory an RD analysis can identify an average effect of…

  19. Multiple linear regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, T. R.

    1980-01-01

    Program rapidly selects best-suited set of coefficients. User supplies only vectors of independent and dependent data and specifies confidence level required. Program uses stepwise statistical procedure for relating minimal set of variables to set of observations; final regression contains only most statistically significant coefficients. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on NOVA 1200.

  20. Mechanisms of neuroblastoma regression

    PubMed Central

    Brodeur, Garrett M.; Bagatell, Rochelle

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic and biological studies of neuroblastoma have shed light on the dramatic heterogeneity in the clinical behaviour of this disease, which spans from spontaneous regression or differentiation in some patients, to relentless disease progression in others, despite intensive multimodality therapy. This evidence also suggests several possible mechanisms to explain the phenomena of spontaneous regression in neuroblastomas, including neurotrophin deprivation, humoral or cellular immunity, loss of telomerase activity and alterations in epigenetic regulation. A better understanding of the mechanisms of spontaneous regression might help to identify optimal therapeutic approaches for patients with these tumours. Currently, the most druggable mechanism is the delayed activation of developmentally programmed cell death regulated by the tropomyosin receptor kinase A pathway. Indeed, targeted therapy aimed at inhibiting neurotrophin receptors might be used in lieu of conventional chemotherapy or radiation in infants with biologically favourable tumours that require treatment. Alternative approaches consist of breaking immune tolerance to tumour antigens or activating neurotrophin receptor pathways to induce neuronal differentiation. These approaches are likely to be most effective against biologically favourable tumours, but they might also provide insights into treatment of biologically unfavourable tumours. We describe the different mechanisms of spontaneous neuroblastoma regression and the consequent therapeutic approaches. PMID:25331179

  1. Predictive value of APAF-1 and COX-2 expression in pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Shaoyan; Zhang, Tian; Dong, Jun; Cai, Muyan; Wang, Chengtao; Zhang, Huizhong; Zhou, Tongchong; Gao, Yuanhong; Wen, Bixiu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate predictive value of APAF-1 and COX-2 expression in pathologic complete response (pCR) for patients with rectal adenocarcinoma (RAC) who were treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (neo-CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision (TME). Materials and Methods Immunohistochemistry assay was used to detect expression of APAF-1 and COX-2 in paraffin-wax embedded tissues obtained before neo-CRT for patients with RAC. A 5-point tumor-regression grade (TRG) based on the ratio of residual tumor to fibrosis according to Dworak's scoring system was used to assess neo-CRT response. The relationship between expression of APAF-1 and COX-2 genes and pCR was explored. Results pCR (TRG4) was observed in 23 patients (28.0%). pCR were more likely to be achieved for those with APAF-1 over-expression or lower expression of COX-2. pCR rate in patients with combination of high APAF-1 and low COX-2 expression was 56.0%, significantly higher than those with other combination of APAF1 and COX-2 expression. Multivariate analysis showed that over-expression of APAF-1 and suppressed expression of COX-2 were independent predictive factors for pCR. Conclusion Immunohistochemical evaluation of APAF-1 and COX-2 expression on pretreatment specimen may be used to predict pCR to neo-CRT in patients with RAC. The potential of the markers in monitoring pCR patient merits further investigation. PMID:27153549

  2. Isoxazole-Based-Scaffold Inhibitors Targeting Cyclooxygenases (COXs).

    PubMed

    Perrone, Maria Grazia; Vitale, Paola; Panella, Andrea; Ferorelli, Savina; Contino, Marialessandra; Lavecchia, Antonio; Scilimati, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    A new set of cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors endowed with an additional functionality was explored. These new compounds also contained either rhodamine 6G or 6,7-dimethoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline, two moieties typical of efflux pump substrates and inhibitors, respectively. Among all the synthesized compounds, two new COX inhibitors with opposite selectivity were discovered: compound 8 [N-(9-{2-[(4-{2-[3-(5-chlorofuran-2-yl)-4-phenylisoxazol-5-yl]acetamido}butyl)carbamoyl]phenyl-6-(ethylamino)-2,7-dimethyl-3H-xanthen-3-ylidene}ethanaminium chloride] was found to be a selective COX-1 inhibitor, whereas 17 (2-[3,4-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)isoxazol-5-yl]-1-[6,7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2-(1H)-yl]ethanone) was found to be a sub-micromolar selective COX-2 inhibitor. However, both were shown to interact with P-glycoprotein. Docking experiments helped to clarify the molecular aspects of the observed COX selectivity. PMID:27136372

  3. Assessing the prediction accuracy of cure in the Cox proportional hazards cure model: an application to breast cancer data.

    PubMed

    Asano, Junichi; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Hamada, Chikuma

    2014-01-01

    A cure rate model is a survival model incorporating the cure rate with the assumption that the population contains both uncured and cured individuals. It is a powerful statistical tool for prognostic studies, especially in cancer. The cure rate is important for making treatment decisions in clinical practice. The proportional hazards (PH) cure model can predict the cure rate for each patient. This contains a logistic regression component for the cure rate and a Cox regression component to estimate the hazard for uncured patients. A measure for quantifying the predictive accuracy of the cure rate estimated by the Cox PH cure model is required, as there has been a lack of previous research in this area. We used the Cox PH cure model for the breast cancer data; however, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) could not be estimated because many patients were censored. In this study, we used imputation-based AUCs to assess the predictive accuracy of the cure rate from the PH cure model. We examined the precision of these AUCs using simulation studies. The results demonstrated that the imputation-based AUCs were estimable and their biases were negligibly small in many cases, although ordinary AUC could not be estimated. Additionally, we introduced the bias-correction method of imputation-based AUCs and found that the bias-corrected estimate successfully compensated the overestimation in the simulation studies. We also illustrated the estimation of the imputation-based AUCs using breast cancer data.

  4. Molecular characterization of the gene cluster coxMSL encoding the molybdenum-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenase of Oligotropha carboxidovorans.

    PubMed Central

    Schübel, U; Kraut, M; Mörsdorf, G; Meyer, O

    1995-01-01

    The CO dehydrogenase structural genes (cox) and orf4 are clustered in the transcriptional order coxM--> coxS--> coxL--> orf4 on the 128-kb megaplasmid pHCG3 of the carboxidotroph Oligotropha carboxidovorans OM5. Sequence analysis suggested association of molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide with CoxL and of the [2Fe-2S] clusters with CoxS. PMID:7721710

  5. PGE2 production in oral cancer cell lines is COX-2-dependent.

    PubMed

    Husvik, C; Khuu, C; Bryne, M; Halstensen, T S

    2009-02-01

    It has been suggested that epithelial cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) promotes oral carcinogenesis and carcinoma malignancy through increased prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production. Although oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) often express COX-2, they may also produce PGE(2) in a COX-1-dependent manner. We used 6 isolated cell lines to investigate which COX isoforms OSCC may use for PGE(2) production. COX-1 and -2 expression patterns divided the 6 OSCC cell lines into 3 distinct groups: both COX isoforms low, only COX-1 high, or both COX isoforms high. Multicolor immunohistofluorescence staining confirmed the COX-expression profiles in organotypic 3D cultures and the COX-2 dominance in OSCC tumors. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation induced COX-2 (but not COX-1) expression and increased PGE(2) production, which was attenuated by COX-2 (but not COX-1) specific inhibition or siRNA-mediated COX-2 gene knockdown. Thus, PGE(2) production in OSCC cell lines was COX-2-dependent. PMID:19278989

  6. In vitro COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme inhibitory activities of iridoids from Penstemon barbatus, Castilleja tenuiflora, Cresentia alata and Vitex mollis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Cisneros, M Ángeles; Rios, María Yolanda; Aguilar-Guadarrama, A Berenice; Rao, Praveen P N; Aburto-Amar, Rola; Rodríguez-López, Verónica

    2015-10-15

    A group of sixteen iridoids isolated from plants used as anti-inflammatory remedies in Mexican folk medicine were evaluated for their potential to inhibit cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzymes. From these assays, loganic acid (10) was identified as the most promising compound with both COX-1 (36.0 ± 0.6%) and COX-2 (80.8 ± 4.0%) inhibition at 10 μM. Compound 10 shows a better inhibition against the COX-2 enzyme. Other iridoids tested in the present study showed weak or no inhibition against these enzymes. Furthermore, herein are presented key interactions of iridoid 10 with COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes through molecular docking studies. These studies suggest that 10 exhibits anti-inflammatory activity due to COX inhibition.

  7. Ridge Regression Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The introduction of the Global Positioning System (GPS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) necessitates the development of Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) techniques. In order to guarantee a certain level of integrity, a thorough understanding of modern estimation techniques applied to navigational problems is required. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) is derived and analyzed under poor geometry conditions. It was found that the performance of the EKF is difficult to predict, since the EKF is designed for a Gaussian environment. A novel approach is implemented which incorporates ridge regression to explain the behavior of an EKF in the presence of dynamics under poor geometry conditions. The basic principles of ridge regression theory are presented, followed by the derivation of a linearized recursive ridge estimator. Computer simulations are performed to confirm the underlying theory and to provide a comparative analysis of the EKF and the recursive ridge estimator.

  8. Cardiovascular events occur independently of high on-aspirin platelet reactivity and residual COX-1 activity in stable cardiovascular patients.

    PubMed

    Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Miyata, Shigeki; Kada, Akiko; Kawamura, Atsushi; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Furui, Eisuke; Takiuchi, Shin; Taomoto, Katsushi; Kario, Kazuomi; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Saito, Kozue; Nagao, Takehiko; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Hosomi, Naohisa; Tanaka, Keiji; Kaikita, Koichi; Katayama, Yasuo; Abumiya, Takeo; Nakane, Hiroshi; Wada, Hideo; Hattori, Akira; Kimura, Kazumi; Isshiki, Takaaki; Nishikawa, Masakatsu; Yamawaki, Takemori; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Okada, Hiromi; Ogawa, Hisao; Minematsu, Kazuo; Miyata, Toshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have indicated that approximately 25 % of patients treated with aspirin exhibit high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR), which is potentially associated with cardiovascular events (CVEs). However, this association is still controversial, since the mechanisms by which HTPR contributes to CVEs remain unclear and a no standardised definition of HTPR has been established. To determine whether HTPR is associated with CVE recurrence and what type of assay would best predict CVE recurrence, we conducted a multicentre prospective cohort study of 592 stable cardiovascular outpatients treated with aspirin monotherapy for secondary prevention. Their HTPR was determined by arachidonic acid- or collagen-induced aggregation assays using two different agonist concentrations. Residual cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 activity was assessed by measuring serum thromboxane (TX)B2 or urinary 11-dehydro TXB2. Shear-induced platelet thrombus formation was also examined. We followed all patients for two years to evaluate how these seven indexes were related to the recurrence of CVEs (cerebral infarction, transient ischaemic attack, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, revascularisation, other arterial thrombosis, or cardiovascular death). Of 583 patients eligible for the analysis, CVEs occurred in 69 (11.8 %). A Cox regression model identified several classical risk factors associated with CVEs. However, neither HTPR nor high residual COX-1 activity was significantly associated with CVEs, even by applying cut-off values suggested in previous reports or a receiver-operating characteristic analysis. In conclusion, recurrence of CVEs occurred independently of HTPR and residual COX-1 activity. Thus, our findings do not support the use of platelet or COX-1 functional testing for predicting clinical outcomes in stable cardiovascular patients. PMID:27098431

  9. Redox-regulated dynamic interplay between Cox19 and the copper-binding protein Cox11 in the intermembrane space of mitochondria facilitates biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Manuela; Woellhaf, Michael W.; Bohnert, Maria; van der Laan, Martin; Sommer, Frederik; Jung, Martin; Zimmermann, Richard; Schroda, Michael; Herrmann, Johannes M.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the twin Cx9C protein family constitute the largest group of proteins in the intermembrane space (IMS) of mitochondria. Despite their conserved nature and their essential role in the biogenesis of the respiratory chain, the molecular function of twin Cx9C proteins is largely unknown. We performed a SILAC-based quantitative proteomic analysis to identify interaction partners of the conserved twin Cx9C protein Cox19. We found that Cox19 interacts in a dynamic manner with Cox11, a copper transfer protein that facilitates metalation of the Cu(B) center of subunit 1 of cytochrome c oxidase. The interaction with Cox11 is critical for the stable accumulation of Cox19 in mitochondria. Cox19 consists of a helical hairpin structure that forms a hydrophobic surface characterized by two highly conserved tyrosine-leucine dipeptides. These residues are essential for Cox19 function and its specific binding to a cysteine-containing sequence in Cox11. Our observations suggest that an oxidative modification of this cysteine residue of Cox11 stimulates Cox19 binding, pointing to a redox-regulated interplay of Cox19 and Cox11 that is critical for copper transfer in the IMS and thus for biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase. PMID:25926683

  10. Orthogonal Regression: A Teaching Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, James R.

    2012-01-01

    A well-known approach to linear least squares regression is that which involves minimizing the sum of squared orthogonal projections of data points onto the best fit line. This form of regression is known as orthogonal regression, and the linear model that it yields is known as the major axis. A similar method, reduced major axis regression, is…

  11. Phylogenetic relationships among Linguatula serrata isolates from Iran based on 18S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed Ali; Tavassoli, Mousa; Peters, Andrew; Shamsi, Shokoofeh; Hajipour, Naser

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among seven Linguatula serrata (L. serrata) isolates collected from cattle, goats, sheep, dogs and camels in different geographical locations of Iran were investigated using partial 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences. The nucleotide sequences were analysed in order to determine the phylogenetic relationships between the isolates. Higher sequence diversity and intraspecies variation was observed in the cox1 gene compared to 18S rRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 gene placed all L. serrata isolates in a sister clade to L. arctica. The Mantel regression analysis revealed no association between genetic variations and host species or geographical location, perhaps due to the small sample size. However, genetic variations between L. serrata isolates in Iran and those isolated in other parts of the world may exist and could reveal possible evolutionary relationships.

  12. Phylogenetic relationships among Linguatula serrata isolates from Iran based on 18S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed Ali; Tavassoli, Mousa; Peters, Andrew; Shamsi, Shokoofeh; Hajipour, Naser

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among seven Linguatula serrata (L. serrata) isolates collected from cattle, goats, sheep, dogs and camels in different geographical locations of Iran were investigated using partial 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences. The nucleotide sequences were analysed in order to determine the phylogenetic relationships between the isolates. Higher sequence diversity and intraspecies variation was observed in the cox1 gene compared to 18S rRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 gene placed all L. serrata isolates in a sister clade to L. arctica. The Mantel regression analysis revealed no association between genetic variations and host species or geographical location, perhaps due to the small sample size. However, genetic variations between L. serrata isolates in Iran and those isolated in other parts of the world may exist and could reveal possible evolutionary relationships. PMID:27149706

  13. COX-2 inhibitors are contraindicated for treatment of combined injury.

    PubMed

    Jiao, W; Kiang, J G; Cary, L; Elliott, T B; Pellmar, T C; Ledney, G D

    2009-12-01

    Casualties of radiation dispersal devices, nuclear detonation or major ionizing radiation accidents, in addition to radiation exposure, may sustain physical and/or thermal trauma. Radiation exposure plus additional tissue trauma is known as combined injury. There are no definitive therapeutic agents. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inducible enzyme expressed in pathological disorders and radiation injury, plays an important role in inflammation and the production of cytokines and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and could therefore affect the outcome for victims of combined injury. The COX-2 inhibitors celecoxib and meloxicam were evaluated for their therapeutic value against combined injury in mice. In survival studies, the COX-2 inhibitors had no beneficial effect on 30-day survival, wound healing or body weight gain after radiation injury alone or after combined injury. Meloxicam accelerated death in both wounded and combined injury mice. These drugs also induced severe hepatic toxicity, exaggerated inflammatory processes, and did not enhance hematopoietic cell regeneration. This study points to potential contraindications for use of COX-2 inhibitors in patients undergoing therapy for radiation injury and combined injury. PMID:19929415

  14. COX-2-derived endocannabinoid metabolites as novel inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Alhouayek, Mireille; Muccioli, Giulio G

    2014-06-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an enzyme that plays a key role in inflammatory processes. Classically, this enzyme is upregulated in inflammatory situations and is responsible for the generation of prostaglandins (PGs) from arachidonic acid (AA). One lesser-known property of COX-2 is its ability to metabolize the endocannabinoids, N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Endocannabinoid metabolism by COX-2 is not merely a means to terminate their actions. On the contrary, it generates PG analogs, namely PG-glycerol esters (PG-G) for 2-AG and PG-ethanolamides (PG-EA or prostamides) for AEA. Although the formation of these COX-2-derived metabolites of the endocannabinoids has been known for a while, their biological effects remain to be fully elucidated. Recently, several studies have focused on the role of these PG-G or PG-EA in vivo. In this review we take a closer look at the literature concerning these novel bioactive lipids and their role in inflammation. PMID:24684963

  15. On nonsingular potentials of Cox-Thompson inversion scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Palmai, Tamas; Apagyi, Barnabas

    2010-02-15

    We establish a condition for obtaining nonsingular potentials using the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering method with one phase shift. The anomalous singularities of the potentials are avoided by maintaining unique solutions of the underlying Regge-Newton integral equation for the transformation kernel. As a by-product, new inequality sequences of zeros of Bessel functions are discovered.

  16. Structural regression trees

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.

    1996-12-31

    In many real-world domains the task of machine learning algorithms is to learn a theory for predicting numerical values. In particular several standard test domains used in Inductive Logic Programming (ILP) are concerned with predicting numerical values from examples and relational and mostly non-determinate background knowledge. However, so far no ILP algorithm except one can predict numbers and cope with nondeterminate background knowledge. (The only exception is a covering algorithm called FORS.) In this paper we present Structural Regression Trees (SRT), a new algorithm which can be applied to the above class of problems. SRT integrates the statistical method of regression trees into ILP. It constructs a tree containing a literal (an atomic formula or its negation) or a conjunction of literals in each node, and assigns a numerical value to each leaf. SRT provides more comprehensible results than purely statistical methods, and can be applied to a class of problems most other ILP systems cannot handle. Experiments in several real-world domains demonstrate that the approach is competitive with existing methods, indicating that the advantages are not at the expense of predictive accuracy.

  17. In Silico Analysis of the Potential of the Active Compounds Fucoidan and Alginate Derived from Sargassum Sp. as Inhibitors of COX-1 and COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Dewi, Lestari

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX) is an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of one of the mediators of inflammation, the prostaglandins. Inhibition of COX allegedly can improve inflammation-induced pathological conditions. Aim: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential of Sargassum sp. components, Fucoidan and alginate, as COX inhibitors. Material and methods: The study was conducted by means of a computational (in silico) method. It was performed in two main stages, the docking between COX-1 and COX-2 with Fucoidan, alginate and aspirin (for comparison) and the analysis of the amount of interactions formed and the residues directly involved in the process of interaction. Results: Our results showed that both Fucoidan and alginate had an excellent potential as inhibitors of COX-1 and COX-2. Fucoidan had a better potential as an inhibitor of COX than alginate. COX inhibition was expected to provide a more favorable effect on inflammation-related pathological conditions. Conclusion: The active compounds Fucoidan and alginate derived from Sargassum sp. were suspected to possess a good potential as inhibitors of COX-1 and COX-2. PMID:27594740

  18. CSWS-related autistic regression versus autistic regression without CSWS.

    PubMed

    Tuchman, Roberto

    2009-08-01

    Continuous spike-waves during slow-wave sleep (CSWS) and Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) are two clinical epileptic syndromes that are associated with the electroencephalography (EEG) pattern of electrical status epilepticus during slow wave sleep (ESES). Autistic regression occurs in approximately 30% of children with autism and is associated with an epileptiform EEG in approximately 20%. The behavioral phenotypes of CSWS, LKS, and autistic regression overlap. However, the differences in age of regression, degree and type of regression, and frequency of epilepsy and EEG abnormalities suggest that these are distinct phenotypes. CSWS with autistic regression is rare, as is autistic regression associated with ESES. The pathophysiology and as such the treatment implications for children with CSWS and autistic regression are distinct from those with autistic regression without CSWS.

  19. The Arabidopsis COX11 Homolog is Essential for Cytochrome c Oxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Radin, Ivan; Mansilla, Natanael; Rödel, Gerhard; Steinebrunner, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Members of the ubiquitous COX11 (cytochrome c oxidase 11) protein family are involved in copper delivery to the COX complex. In this work, we characterize the Arabidopsis thaliana COX11 homolog (encoded by locus At1g02410). Western blot analyses and confocal microscopy identified Arabidopsis COX11 as an integral mitochondrial protein. Despite sharing high sequence and structural similarities, the Arabidopsis COX11 is not able to functionally replace the Saccharomyces cerevisiae COX11 homolog. Nevertheless, further analysis confirmed the hypothesis that Arabidopsis COX11 is essential for COX activity. Disturbance of COX11 expression through knockdown (KD) or overexpression (OE) affected COX activity. In KD lines, the activity was reduced by ~50%, resulting in root growth inhibition, smaller rosettes and leaf curling. In OE lines, the reduction was less pronounced (~80% of the wild type), still resulting in root growth inhibition. Additionally, pollen germination was impaired in COX11 KD and OE plants. This effect on pollen germination can only partially be attributed to COX deficiency and may indicate a possible auxiliary role of COX11 in ROS metabolism. In agreement with its role in energy production, the COX11 promoter is highly active in cells and tissues with high-energy demand for example shoot and root meristems, or vascular tissues of source and sink organs. In COX11 KD lines, the expression of the plasma-membrane copper transporter COPT2 and of several copper chaperones was altered, indicative of a retrograde signaling pathway pertinent to copper homeostasis. Based on our data, we postulate that COX11 is a mitochondrial chaperone, which plays an important role for plant growth and pollen germination as an essential COX complex assembly factor. PMID:26734017

  20. The Arabidopsis COX11 Homolog is Essential for Cytochrome c Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Radin, Ivan; Mansilla, Natanael; Rödel, Gerhard; Steinebrunner, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Members of the ubiquitous COX11 (cytochrome c oxidase 11) protein family are involved in copper delivery to the COX complex. In this work, we characterize the Arabidopsis thaliana COX11 homolog (encoded by locus At1g02410). Western blot analyses and confocal microscopy identified Arabidopsis COX11 as an integral mitochondrial protein. Despite sharing high sequence and structural similarities, the Arabidopsis COX11 is not able to functionally replace the Saccharomyces cerevisiae COX11 homolog. Nevertheless, further analysis confirmed the hypothesis that Arabidopsis COX11 is essential for COX activity. Disturbance of COX11 expression through knockdown (KD) or overexpression (OE) affected COX activity. In KD lines, the activity was reduced by ~50%, resulting in root growth inhibition, smaller rosettes and leaf curling. In OE lines, the reduction was less pronounced (~80% of the wild type), still resulting in root growth inhibition. Additionally, pollen germination was impaired in COX11 KD and OE plants. This effect on pollen germination can only partially be attributed to COX deficiency and may indicate a possible auxiliary role of COX11 in ROS metabolism. In agreement with its role in energy production, the COX11 promoter is highly active in cells and tissues with high-energy demand for example shoot and root meristems, or vascular tissues of source and sink organs. In COX11 KD lines, the expression of the plasma-membrane copper transporter COPT2 and of several copper chaperones was altered, indicative of a retrograde signaling pathway pertinent to copper homeostasis. Based on our data, we postulate that COX11 is a mitochondrial chaperone, which plays an important role for plant growth and pollen germination as an essential COX complex assembly factor. PMID:26734017

  1. Effect of isolated fractions of Harpagophytum procumbens D.C. (devil's claw) on COX-1, COX-2 activity and nitric oxide production on whole-blood assay.

    PubMed

    Anauate, Maria Cecilia; Torres, Luce Maria; de Mello, Suzana Beatriz Veríssimo

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of isolated fractions of Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw) on cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) activities and NO production using a whole blood assay. The activity of COX-1 was quantified as platelet thromboxane B(2) production in blood clotting and COX-2 as prostaglandin E(2) production in LPS-stimulated whole blood. Total NO(2) (-)/NO(3) (-) concentration was determined by Griess reaction in LPS stimulated blood. Assays were performed by incubation of isolated fractions obtained by flash chromatography monitored with HPLC, TLC and identified by (1)HNMR, containing different amounts of harpagoside with blood from healthy donors. Indomethacin and etoricoxib were the positive controls of COX-1 and COX-2 Inhibition. Data shows that fraction containing the highest concentration of harpagoside inhibited indistinctively COX-1 and COX-2 (37.2 and 29.5% respectively) activity and greatly inhibited NO production (66%). In contrast the fraction including iridoid pool increased COX-2 and did not alter NO and COX-1 activities. The fraction containing cinnamic acid was able to reduce only NO production (67%). Our results demonstrated that the harpagoside fraction is the main responsible for the effect of devils claw on these enzyme activities. However, other components from devil's claw crude extract could antagonize or increase the synthesis of inflammatory mediators. PMID:20812280

  2. Prostanoids in tumor angiogenesis: therapeutic intervention beyond COX-2.

    PubMed

    Salvado, M Dolores; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Redondo, Juan Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Prostanoids regulate angiogenesis in carcinoma and chronic inflammatory disease progression. Although prostanoid biosynthetic enzymes and signaling have been extensively analyzed in inflammation, little is known about how prostanoids mediate tumor-induced angiogenesis. Targeted cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibition in tumor, stromal and endothelial cells is an attractive antiangiogenic strategy; however, the associated cardiovascular side effects have led to the development of a new generation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) acting downstream of COX. These agents target terminal prostanoid synthases and prostanoid receptors, which may also include several peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Here, we discuss the role of prostanoids as modulators of tumor angiogenesis and how prostanoid metabolism reflects complex cell-cell crosstalk that determines tumor growth. Finally, we discuss the potential of new NSAIDs for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent tumor development.

  3. Computing measures of explained variation for logistic regression models.

    PubMed

    Mittlböck, M; Schemper, M

    1999-01-01

    The proportion of explained variation (R2) is frequently used in the general linear model but in logistic regression no standard definition of R2 exists. We present a SAS macro which calculates two R2-measures based on Pearson and on deviance residuals for logistic regression. Also, adjusted versions for both measures are given, which should prevent the inflation of R2 in small samples. PMID:10195643

  4. Some functional limit theorems for compound Cox processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Victor Yu.; Chertok, A. V.; Korchagin, A. Yu.; Kossova, E. V.; Zeifman, Alexander I.

    2016-06-01

    An improved version of the functional limit theorem is proved establishing weak convergence of random walks generated by compound doubly stochastic Poisson processes (compound Cox processes) to Lévy processes in the Skorokhod space under more realistic moment conditions. As corollaries, theorems are proved on convergence of random walks with jumps having finite variances to Lévy processes with variance-mean mixed normal distributions, in particular, to stable Lévy processes.

  5. Association Between COX-2 Polymorphisms and Lung Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Fan, Xinyun; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Yi; Yang, Siyuan; Li, Gaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple relevant risk factors for lung cancer have been reported in different populations, but results of previous studies were not consistent. Therefore, a meta-analysis is necessary to summarize these outcomes and reach a relatively comprehensive conclusion. Material/Methods STATA 12.0 software was used for all statistical of the relationship between COX-2 polymorphisms and lung cancer risk. Inter-study heterogeneity was examined with the Q statistic (significance level at P<0.1). The publication bias among studies in the meta-analysis was analyzed with Begg’s funnel plot and Egger’s test. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was tested in all controls of the studies. Results COX-2 rs20417 polymorphism had a significant association with reduced risk of lung cancer under homozygous and recessive models, and similar results were observed in white and population-based subgroups under 2 and 3 contrasts, respectively. Additionally, rs2066826 polymorphism manifested a strong correlation with increased risk of lung cancer under 5 genetic models. Conclusions In COX-2 gene, rs20417 may have a certain relationship with reduced risk of lung cancer, while rs2066826 may increase the risk of lung cancer. PMID:26624903

  6. Log Gaussian Cox processes and spatially aggregated disease incidence data.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Brown, Patrick; Gesink, Dionne C; Rue, Håvard

    2012-10-01

    This article presents a methodology for modeling aggregated disease incidence data with the spatially continuous log-Gaussian Cox process. Statistical models for spatially aggregated disease incidence data usually assign the same relative risk to all individuals in the same reporting region (census areas or postal regions). A further assumption that the relative risks in two regions are independent given their neighbor's risks (the Markov assumption) makes the commonly used Besag-York-Mollié model computationally simple. The continuous model proposed here uses a data augmentation step to sample from the posterior distribution of the exact locations at each step of an Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm, and models the exact locations with an log-Gaussian Cox process. A simulation study shows the log-Gaussian Cox process model consistently outperforming the Besag-York-Mollié model. The method is illustrated by making inference on the spatial distribution of syphilis risk in North Carolina. The effect of several known social risk factors are estimated, and areas with risk well in excess of that expected given these risk factors are identified.

  7. Determinants of Under-Five Mortality in Rural Empowered Action Group States in India: An Application of Cox Frailty Model

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Kalaivani; Dwivedi, Sada Nand; Pandey, Ravindra Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In India there has been a decline in overall under-five mortality, with some states still showing very high mortality rates. It is argued that there is family clustering in mortality among children aged <5 years. We explored the effects of programmable (proximate) determinants on under-five mortality by accounting for family-level clustering and adjusting for background variables using Cox frailty model in rural Empowered Action Group states (EAG) in India and compared results with standard models. Methods Analysis included 13,785 live births that occurred five years preceding the National Family Health Survey-3 (2005-06). The Cox frailty model and the traditional Cox proportional hazards models were used. Results The Cox frailty model showed that mother’s age at birth, place of delivery, sex of the baby, composite variable of birth order and birth interval, baby size at birth, and breastfeeding were significant determinants of under-five mortality, after adjusting for the familial frailty effect. The hazard ratio was 1.41 (95% CI=1.14−1.75) for children born to mothers aged 12-19 years compared to mothers aged 20-30 years, 1.42 (95% CI=1.12−1.79) for small-sized than average-sized babies at birth, and 102 (95% CI=81−128) for non-breastfed than breastfed babies. Children had significantly lower mortality risks in the richest than poorest wealth quintile. The familial frailty effect was 2.86 in the rural EAG states. The hazard ratios for the determinants in all the three models were similar except the death of a previous child variable in the Cox frailty model, which had the highest R2 and lowest log-likelihood. Conclusions and Public Health Implications While planning for the child survival program in rural EAG states, parental competence which explains the unobserved familial effect needs to be considered along with significant programmable determinants. The frailty models that provide statistically valid estimates of the covariate effects are

  8. Pyrimidine-based fluorescent COX-2 inhibitors: synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Ole; Kaur, Jatinder; Bhardwaj, Atul; Wuest, Frank R

    2016-07-26

    The cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme is overexpressed in a variety of cancers and mediates inflammatory processes that aid the growth and progression of malignancies. Three novel and selective fluorescent COX-2 inhibitors have been designed and synthesized on the basis of previously reported pyrimidine-based COX-2 inhibitors and the 7-nitrobenzofurazan fluorophore. In vitro evaluation of COX-1/COX-2 isozyme inhibition identified N-(2-((7-nitro-benzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)amino)propyl)-4-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-6-(trifluoro-methyl)-pyrimidin-2-amine (6) as a novel potent and selective COX-2 inhibitor (IC50 = 1.8 μM). Lead compound (6) was further evaluated for its ability to selectively visualize COX-2 isozyme in COX-2 expressing human colon cancer cell line HCA-7 using confocal microscopy experiments. PMID:27383140

  9. Wild bootstrap for quantile regression.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xingdong; He, Xuming; Hu, Jianhua

    2011-12-01

    The existing theory of the wild bootstrap has focused on linear estimators. In this note, we broaden its validity by providing a class of weight distributions that is asymptotically valid for quantile regression estimators. As most weight distributions in the literature lead to biased variance estimates for nonlinear estimators of linear regression, we propose a modification of the wild bootstrap that admits a broader class of weight distributions for quantile regression. A simulation study on median regression is carried out to compare various bootstrap methods. With a simple finite-sample correction, the wild bootstrap is shown to account for general forms of heteroscedasticity in a regression model with fixed design points.

  10. COX-2 gene expression in colon cancer tissue related to regulating factors and promoter methylation status

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased cyclooxygenase activity promotes progression of colorectal cancer, but the mechanisms behind COX-2 induction remain elusive. This study was therefore aimed to define external cell signaling and transcription factors relating to high COX-2 expression in colon cancer tissue. Method Tumor and normal colon tissue were collected at primary curative operation in 48 unselected patients. COX-2 expression in tumor and normal colon tissue was quantified including microarray analyses on tumor mRNA accounting for high and low tumor COX-2 expression. Cross hybridization was performed between tumor and normal colon tissue. Methylation status of up-stream COX-2 promoter region was evaluated. Results Tumors with high COX-2 expression displayed large differences in gene expression compared to normal colon. Numerous genes with altered expression appeared in tumors of high COX-2 expression compared to tumors of low COX-2. COX-2 expression in normal colon was increased in patients with tumors of high COX-2 compared to normal colon from patients with tumors of low COX-2. IL1β, IL6 and iNOS transcripts were up-regulated among external cell signaling factors; nine transcription factors (ATF3, C/EBP, c-Fos, Fos-B, JDP2, JunB, c-Maf, NF-κB, TCF4) showed increased expression and 5 (AP-2, CBP, Elk-1, p53, PEA3) were decreased in tumors with high COX-2. The promoter region of COX-2 gene did not show consistent methylation in tumor or normal colon tissue. Conclusions Transcription and external cell signaling factors are altered as covariates to COX-2 expression in colon cancer tissue, but DNA methylation of the COX-2 promoter region was not a significant factor behind COX-2 expression in tumor and normal colon tissue. PMID:21668942

  11. ADJUSTABLE DOUBLE PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Gratian, J.W.; Gratian, A.C.

    1961-08-01

    >A modulator pulse source having adjustable pulse width and adjustable pulse spacing is described. The generator consists of a cross coupled multivibrator having adjustable time constant circuitry in each leg, an adjustable differentiating circuit in the output of each leg, a mixing and rectifying circuit for combining the differentiated pulses and generating in its output a resultant sequence of negative pulses, and a final amplifying circuit for inverting and square-topping the pulses. (AEC)

  12. Expression of gelatinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) and cyclooxygenases (COX-1, COX-2) in some benign salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Lipari, L; Mauro, A; Gallina, S; Tortorici, S; Buscemi, M; Tete, S; Gerbino, A

    2012-01-01

    Salivary gland tumors, most of which are rare benign tumors, represent a histologically heterogenous group with the greatest diversity of morphological and cellular features. The aim of this study is to analyse the expression and possible interactions between gelatinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) and cyclooxygenases (COX-1, COX-2) in some benign salivary gland tumors. We investigated the expression of gelatinases and cyclooxigenases in control salivary gland, Pleomorphic adenoma and Warthin's tumor through immunohistochemistry and Reverse Transcription - Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). We identified the expression of both classes of enzyme in normal samples and in the two types of pathological samples without any quantitative differences. From the present data no significant differences emerge in the expression of these enzymes among the different pathologies examined. Nevertheless, due to the small number of samples included in this study, general statements regarding correlation between the degree of severity of the tumoral pathology and the quantitative expression of these potential tumoral markers can not be made.

  13. Supercomplex-associated Cox26 protein binds to cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Strecker, Valentina; Kadeer, Zibirnisa; Heidler, Juliana; Cruciat, Cristina-Maria; Angerer, Heike; Giese, Heiko; Pfeiffer, Kathy; Stuart, Rosemary A; Wittig, Ilka

    2016-07-01

    Here we identified a hydrophobic 6.4kDa protein, Cox26, as a novel component of yeast mitochondrial supercomplex comprising respiratory complexes III and IV. Multi-dimensional native and denaturing electrophoretic techniques were used to identify proteins interacting with Cox26. The majority of the Cox26 protein was found non-covalently bound to the complex IV moiety of the III-IV supercomplexes. A population of Cox26 was observed to exist in a disulfide bond partnership with the Cox2 subunit of complex IV. No pronounced growth phenotype for Cox26 deficiency was observed, indicating that Cox26 may not play a critical role in the COX enzymology, and we speculate that Cox26 may serve to regulate or support the Cox2 protein. Respiratory supercomplexes are assembled in the absence of the Cox26 protein, however their pattern slightly differs to the wild type III-IV supercomplex appearance. The catalytic activities of complexes III and IV were observed to be normal and respiration was comparable to wild type as long as cells were cultivated under normal growth conditions. Stress conditions, such as elevated temperatures resulted in mild decrease of respiration in non-fermentative media when the Cox26 protein was absent. PMID:27091403

  14. Teaching and hospital production: the use of regression estimates.

    PubMed

    Lehner, L A; Burgess, J F

    1995-01-01

    Medicare's Prospective Payment System pays U.S. teaching hospitals for the indirect costs of medical education based on a regression coefficient in a cost function. In regression studies using health care data, it is common for explanatory variables to be measured imperfectly, yet the potential for measurement error is often ignored. In this paper, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs data is used to examine issues of health care production estimation and the use of regression estimates like the teaching adjustment factor. The findings show that measurement error and persistent multicollinearity confound attempts to have a large degree of confidence in the precise magnitude of parameter estimates.

  15. Evaluating differential effects using regression interactions and regression mixture models

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This paper focuses on understanding regression mixture models, a relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their formulation, and their assumptions are compared using Monte Carlo simulations and real data analysis. The capabilities of regression mixture models are described and specific issues to be addressed when conducting regression mixtures are proposed. The paper aims to clarify the role that regression mixtures can take in the estimation of differential effects and increase awareness of the benefits and potential pitfalls of this approach. Regression mixture models are shown to be a potentially effective exploratory method for finding differential effects when these effects can be defined by a small number of classes of respondents who share a typical relationship between a predictor and an outcome. It is also shown that the comparison between regression mixture models and interactions becomes substantially more complex as the number of classes increases. It is argued that regression interactions are well suited for direct tests of specific hypotheses about differential effects and regression mixtures provide a useful approach for exploring effect heterogeneity given adequate samples and study design. PMID:26556903

  16. The Role of Prostaglandins and COX-Enzymes in Chondrogenic Differentiation of ATDC5 Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Marjolein M. J.; Emans, Pieter J.; Sanen, Kathleen; Surtel, Don A. M.; Cremers, Andy; Ophelders, Daan; van Rhijn, Lodewijk W.; Welting, Tim J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives NSAIDs are used to relieve pain and decrease inflammation by inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-catalyzed prostaglandin (PG) synthesis. PGs are fatty acid mediators involved in cartilage homeostasis, however the action of their synthesizing COX-enzymes in cartilage differentiation is not well understood. In this study we hypothesized that COX-1 and COX-2 have differential roles in chondrogenic differentiation. Methods ATDC5 cells were differentiated in the presence of COX-1 (SC-560, Mofezolac) or COX-2 (NS398, Celecoxib) specific inhibitors. Specificity of the NSAIDs and inhibition of specific prostaglandin levels were determined by EIA. Prostaglandins were added during the differentiation process. Chondrogenic outcome was determined by gene- and protein expression analyses. Results Inhibition of COX-1 prevented Col2a1 and Col10a1 expression. Inhibition of COX-2 resulted in decreased Col10a1 expression, while Col2a1 remained unaffected. To explain this difference expression patterns of both COX-enzymes as well as specific prostaglandin concentrations were determined. Both COX-enzymes are upregulated during late chondrogenic differentiation, whereas only COX-2 is briefly expressed also early in differentiation. PGD2 and PGE2 followed the COX-2 expression pattern, whereas PGF2α and TXA2 levels remained low. Furthermore, COX inhibition resulted in decreased levels of all tested PGs, except for PGD2 and PGF2α in the COX-1 inhibited condition. Addition of PGE2 and PGF2α resulted in increased expression of chondrogenic markers, whereas TXA2 increased expression of hypertrophic markers. Conclusions Our findings point towards a differential role for COX-enzymes and PG-production in chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells. Ongoing research is focusing on further elucidating the functional partition of cyclooxygenases and specific prostaglandin production. PMID:27050768

  17. Hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury in the absence of myeloid cell-derived COX-2 in mice.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Sergio; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kuriyama, Naohisa; Suko, Kathryn; Ishikawa, Tomo-O; Busuttil, Ronald W; Herschman, Harvey R; Coito, Ana J

    2014-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a mediator of hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI). While both global COX-2 deletion and pharmacologic COX-2 inhibition ameliorate liver IRI, the clinical use of COX-2 inhibitors has been linked to increased risks of heart attack and stroke. Therefore, a better understanding of the role of COX-2 in different cell types may lead to improved therapeutic strategies for hepatic IRI. Macrophages of myeloid origin are currently considered to be important sources of the COX-2 in damaged livers. Here, we used a Cox-2flox conditional knockout mouse (COX-2-M/-M) to examine the function of COX-2 expression in myeloid cells during liver IRI. COX-2-M/-M mice and their WT control littermates were subjected to partial liver ischemia followed by reperfusion. COX-2-M/-M macrophages did not express COX-2 upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation and COX-2-M/-M livers showed reduced levels of COX-2 protein post-IRI. Nevertheless, selective deletion of myeloid cell-derived COX-2 failed to ameliorate liver IRI; serum transaminases and histology were comparable in both COX-2-M/-M and WT mice. COX-2-M/-M livers, like WT livers, developed extensive necrosis, vascular congestion, leukocyte infiltration and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression post-reperfusion. In addition, myeloid COX-2 deletion led to a transient increase in IL-6 levels after hepatic reperfusion, when compared to controls. Administration of celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, resulted in significantly improved liver function and histology in both COX-2-M/-M and WT mice post-reperfusion, providing evidence that COX-2-mediated liver IRI is caused by COX-2 derived from a source(s) other than myeloid cells. In conclusion, these results support the view that myeloid COX-2, including myeloid-macrophage COX-2, is not responsible for the hepatic IRI phenotype.

  18. Linear regression in astronomy. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Babu, Gutti J.

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of least-squares linear regression procedures used in observational astronomy, particularly investigations of the cosmic distance scale, are presented and discussed. The classes of linear models considered are (1) unweighted regression lines, with bootstrap and jackknife resampling; (2) regression solutions when measurement error, in one or both variables, dominates the scatter; (3) methods to apply a calibration line to new data; (4) truncated regression models, which apply to flux-limited data sets; and (5) censored regression models, which apply when nondetections are present. For the calibration problem we develop two new procedures: a formula for the intercept offset between two parallel data sets, which propagates slope errors from one regression to the other; and a generalization of the Working-Hotelling confidence bands to nonstandard least-squares lines. They can provide improved error analysis for Faber-Jackson, Tully-Fisher, and similar cosmic distance scale relations.

  19. Quantile regression for climate data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasinghe, Dilhani Shalika

    Quantile regression is a developing statistical tool which is used to explain the relationship between response and predictor variables. This thesis describes two examples of climatology using quantile regression.Our main goal is to estimate derivatives of a conditional mean and/or conditional quantile function. We introduce a method to handle autocorrelation in the framework of quantile regression and used it with the temperature data. Also we explain some properties of the tornado data which is non-normally distributed. Even though quantile regression provides a more comprehensive view, when talking about residuals with the normality and the constant variance assumption, we would prefer least square regression for our temperature analysis. When dealing with the non-normality and non constant variance assumption, quantile regression is a better candidate for the estimation of the derivative.

  20. Risk-adjusted monitoring of survival times

    SciTech Connect

    Sego, Landon H.; Reynolds, Marion R.; Woodall, William H.

    2009-02-26

    We consider the monitoring of clinical outcomes, where each patient has a di®erent risk of death prior to undergoing a health care procedure.We propose a risk-adjusted survival time CUSUM chart (RAST CUSUM) for monitoring clinical outcomes where the primary endpoint is a continuous, time-to-event variable that may be right censored. Risk adjustment is accomplished using accelerated failure time regression models. We compare the average run length performance of the RAST CUSUM chart to the risk-adjusted Bernoulli CUSUM chart, using data from cardiac surgeries to motivate the details of the comparison. The comparisons show that the RAST CUSUM chart is more efficient at detecting a sudden decrease in the odds of death than the risk-adjusted Bernoulli CUSUM chart, especially when the fraction of censored observations is not too high. We also discuss the implementation of a prospective monitoring scheme using the RAST CUSUM chart.

  1. Regular spliceosomal introns are invasive in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: 15 introns in the recently relocated mitochondrial cox2 and cox3 genes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K I; Ohama, T

    2001-01-01

    In the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, cytochrome oxidase subunit 2 (cox2) and 3 (cox3) genes are missing from the mitochondrial genome. We isolated and sequenced a BAC clone that carries the whole cox3 gene and its corresponding cDNA. Almost the entire cox2 gene and its cDNA were also determined. Comparison of the genomic and the corresponding cDNA sequences revealed that the cox3 gene contains as many as nine spliceosomal introns and that cox2 bears six introns. Putative mitochondria targeting signals were predicted at each N terminal of the cox genes. These spliceosomal introns were typical GT-AG-type introns, which are very common not only in Chlamydomonas nuclear genes but also in diverse eukaryotic taxa. We found no particular distinguishing features in the cox introns. Comparative analysis of these genes with the various mitochondrial genes showed that 8 of the 15 introns were interrupting the conserved mature protein coding segments, while the other 7 introns were located in the N-terminal target peptide regions. Phylogenetic analysis of the evolutionary position of C. reinhardtii in Chlorophyta was carried out and the existence of the cox2 and cox3 genes in the mitochondrial genome was superimposed in the tree. This analysis clearly shows that these cox genes were relocated during the evolution of Chlorophyceae. It is apparent that long before the estimated period of relocation of these mitochondrial genes, the cytosol had lost the splicing ability for group II introns. Therefore, at least eight introns located in the mature protein coding region cannot be the direct descendant of group II introns. Here, we conclude that the presence of these introns is due to the invasion of spliceosomal introns, which occurred during the evolution of Chlorophyceae. This finding provides concrete evidence supporting the "intron-late" model, which rests largely on the mobility of spliceosomal introns. PMID:11675593

  2. Evaluating Differential Effects Using Regression Interactions and Regression Mixture Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This article focuses on understanding regression mixture models, which are relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their…

  3. Retro-regression--another important multivariate regression improvement.

    PubMed

    Randić, M

    2001-01-01

    We review the serious problem associated with instabilities of the coefficients of regression equations, referred to as the MRA (multivariate regression analysis) "nightmare of the first kind". This is manifested when in a stepwise regression a descriptor is included or excluded from a regression. The consequence is an unpredictable change of the coefficients of the descriptors that remain in the regression equation. We follow with consideration of an even more serious problem, referred to as the MRA "nightmare of the second kind", arising when optimal descriptors are selected from a large pool of descriptors. This process typically causes at different steps of the stepwise regression a replacement of several previously used descriptors by new ones. We describe a procedure that resolves these difficulties. The approach is illustrated on boiling points of nonanes which are considered (1) by using an ordered connectivity basis; (2) by using an ordering resulting from application of greedy algorithm; and (3) by using an ordering derived from an exhaustive search for optimal descriptors. A novel variant of multiple regression analysis, called retro-regression (RR), is outlined showing how it resolves the ambiguities associated with both "nightmares" of the first and the second kind of MRA. PMID:11410035

  4. Room temperature ferromagnetic (Fe₁-xCox)₃BO₅ nanorods.

    PubMed

    He, Shuli; Zhang, Hongwang; Xing, Hui; Li, Kai; Cui, Hongfei; Yang, Chenguang; Sun, Shouheng; Zeng, Hao

    2014-07-01

    Cobalt-doped ferroferriborate ((Fe1-xCox)3BO5) nanorods (NRs) are synthesized by a one-pot high-temperature organic-solution-phase method. The aspect ratios of the NRs are tuned by the heating rate. These NRs form via anisotropic growth along twin boundaries of the multiply twinned nuclei. Magnetic properties are dramatically modified by Co substitutional doping, changing from antiferromagnetic order at low temperatures to ferromagnetic above room temperature, with a greatly enhanced magnetic ordering temperature. These anisotropic ferromagnetic NRs with a high ordering temperature may provide a new platform for understanding nanomagnetism and for magnetic applications. PMID:24905634

  5. Transfer Learning Based on Logistic Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.; Rottensteiner, F.; Heipke, C.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we address the problem of classification of remote sensing images in the framework of transfer learning with a focus on domain adaptation. The main novel contribution is a method for transductive transfer learning in remote sensing on the basis of logistic regression. Logistic regression is a discriminative probabilistic classifier of low computational complexity, which can deal with multiclass problems. This research area deals with methods that solve problems in which labelled training data sets are assumed to be available only for a source domain, while classification is needed in the target domain with different, yet related characteristics. Classification takes place with a model of weight coefficients for hyperplanes which separate features in the transformed feature space. In term of logistic regression, our domain adaptation method adjusts the model parameters by iterative labelling of the target test data set. These labelled data features are iteratively added to the current training set which, at the beginning, only contains source features and, simultaneously, a number of source features are deleted from the current training set. Experimental results based on a test series with synthetic and real data constitutes a first proof-of-concept of the proposed method.

  6. Cox26 is a novel stoichiometric subunit of the yeast cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, Maria; Wuttke, Jan-Moritz; Römpler, Katharina; Schmidt, Bernhard; Neifer, Klaus; Juris, Lisa; Wissel, Mirjam; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain. The complex accepts electrons from cytochrome c and passes them onto molecular oxygen. This process contributes to energy capture in the form of a membrane potential across the inner membrane. The enzyme complex assembles in a stepwise process from the three mitochondria-encoded core subunits Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, which associate with nuclear-encoded subunits and cofactors. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cytochrome c oxidase associates with the bc1-complex into supercomplexes, allowing efficient energy transduction. Here we report on Cox26 as a protein found in respiratory chain supercomplexes containing cytochrome c oxidase. Our analyses reveal Cox26 as a novel stoichiometric structural subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase. A loss of Cox26 affects cytochrome c oxidase activity and respirasome organization.

  7. Spatial correlation in Bayesian logistic regression with misclassification.

    PubMed

    Bihrmann, Kristine; Toft, Nils; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2014-06-01

    Standard logistic regression assumes that the outcome is measured perfectly. In practice, this is often not the case, which could lead to biased estimates if not accounted for. This study presents Bayesian logistic regression with adjustment for misclassification of the outcome applied to data with spatial correlation. The models assessed include a fixed effects model, an independent random effects model, and models with spatially correlated random effects modelled using conditional autoregressive prior distributions (ICAR and ICAR(ρ)). Performance of these models was evaluated in a simulation study. Parameters were estimated by Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, using slice sampling to improve convergence. The results demonstrated that adjustment for misclassification must be included to produce unbiased regression estimates. With strong correlation the ICAR model performed best. With weak or moderate correlation the ICAR(ρ) performed best. With unknown spatial correlation the recommended model would be the ICAR(ρ), assuming convergence can be obtained. PMID:24889989

  8. Translocation and assembly of mitochondrially coded Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytochrome c oxidase subunit Cox2 by Oxa1 and Yme1 in the absence of Cox18.

    PubMed

    Fiumera, Heather L; Dunham, Maitreya J; Saracco, Scott A; Butler, Christine A; Kelly, Jessica A; Fox, Thomas D

    2009-06-01

    Members of the Oxa1/YidC/Alb3 family of protein translocases are essential for assembly of energy-transducing membrane complexes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Oxa1 and its paralog, Cox18, are required for assembly of Cox2, a mitochondrially encoded subunit of cytochrome c oxidase. Oxa1 is known to be required for cotranslational export of the Cox2 N-terminal domain across the inner mitochondrial membrane, while Cox18 is known to be required for post-translational export of the Cox2 C-tail domain. We find that overexpression of Oxa1 does not compensate for the absence of Cox18 at the level of respiratory growth. However, it does promote some translocation of the Cox2 C-tail domain across the inner membrane and causes increased accumulation of Cox2, which remains unassembled. This result suggests that Cox18 not only translocates the C-tail, but also must deliver it in a distinct state competent for cytochrome oxidase assembly. We identified respiring mutants from a cox18Delta strain overexpressing OXA1, whose respiratory growth requires overexpression of OXA1. The recessive nuclear mutations allow some assembly of Cox2 into cytochrome c oxidase. After failing to identify these mutations by methods based on transformation, we successfully located them to MGR1 and MGR3 by comparative hybridization to whole-genome tiling arrays and microarray-assisted bulk segregant analysis followed by linkage mapping. While Mgr1 and Mgr3 are known to associate with the Yme1 mitochondrial inner membrane i-AAA protease and to participate in membrane protein degradation, their absence does not appear to stabilize Cox2 under these conditions. Instead, Yme1 probably chaperones the folding and/or assembly of Oxa1-exported Cox2 in the absence of Mrg1 or Mgr3, since respiratory growth and cytochrome c oxidase assembly in a cox18 mgr3 double-mutant strain overexpressing OXA1 is YME1 dependent.

  9. Translocation and Assembly of Mitochondrially Coded Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit Cox2 by Oxa1 and Yme1 in the Absence of Cox18

    PubMed Central

    Fiumera, Heather L.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Saracco, Scott A.; Butler, Christine A.; Kelly, Jessica A.; Fox, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the Oxa1/YidC/Alb3 family of protein translocases are essential for assembly of energy-transducing membrane complexes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Oxa1 and its paralog, Cox18, are required for assembly of Cox2, a mitochondrially encoded subunit of cytochrome c oxidase. Oxa1 is known to be required for cotranslational export of the Cox2 N-terminal domain across the inner mitochondrial membrane, while Cox18 is known to be required for post-translational export of the Cox2 C-tail domain. We find that overexpression of Oxa1 does not compensate for the absence of Cox18 at the level of respiratory growth. However, it does promote some translocation of the Cox2 C-tail domain across the inner membrane and causes increased accumulation of Cox2, which remains unassembled. This result suggests that Cox18 not only translocates the C-tail, but also must deliver it in a distinct state competent for cytochrome oxidase assembly. We identified respiring mutants from a cox18Δ strain overexpressing OXA1, whose respiratory growth requires overexpression of OXA1. The recessive nuclear mutations allow some assembly of Cox2 into cytochrome c oxidase. After failing to identify these mutations by methods based on transformation, we successfully located them to MGR1 and MGR3 by comparative hybridization to whole-genome tiling arrays and microarray-assisted bulk segregant analysis followed by linkage mapping. While Mgr1 and Mgr3 are known to associate with the Yme1 mitochondrial inner membrane i-AAA protease and to participate in membrane protein degradation, their absence does not appear to stabilize Cox2 under these conditions. Instead, Yme1 probably chaperones the folding and/or assembly of Oxa1-exported Cox2 in the absence of Mrg1 or Mgr3, since respiratory growth and cytochrome c oxidase assembly in a cox18 mgr3 double-mutant strain overexpressing OXA1 is YME1 dependent. PMID:19307606

  10. Use of Cox's Cure Model to Establish Clinical Determinants of Long-Term Disease-Free Survival in Neoadjuvant-Chemotherapy-Treated Breast Cancer Patients without Pathologic Complete Response.

    PubMed

    Asano, Junichi; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Hamada, Chikuma; Yonemori, Kan; Hirata, Taizo; Shimizu, Chikako; Tamura, Kenji; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    In prognostic studies for breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), the ordinary Cox proportional-hazards (PH) model has been often used to identify prognostic factors for disease-free survival (DFS). This model assumes that all patients eventually experience relapse or death. However, a subset of NAC-treated breast cancer patients never experience these events during long-term follow-up (>10 years) and may be considered clinically "cured." Clinical factors associated with cure have not been studied adequately. Because the ordinary Cox PH model cannot be used to identify such clinical factors, we used the Cox PH cure model, a recently developed statistical method. This model includes both a logistic regression component for the cure rate and a Cox regression component for the hazard for uncured patients. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical factors associated with cure and the variables associated with the time to recurrence or death in NAC-treated breast cancer patients without a pathologic complete response, by using the Cox PH cure model. We found that hormone receptor status, clinical response, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status, histological grade, and the number of lymph node metastases were associated with cure.

  11. Controlling Type I Error Rates in Assessing DIF for Logistic Regression Method Combined with SIBTEST Regression Correction Procedure and DIF-Free-Then-DIF Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Lin; Liu, Tien-Hsiang; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The simultaneous item bias test (SIBTEST) method regression procedure and the differential item functioning (DIF)-free-then-DIF strategy are applied to the logistic regression (LR) method simultaneously in this study. These procedures are used to adjust the effects of matching true score on observed score and to better control the Type I error…

  12. Precision Efficacy Analysis for Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.

    When multiple linear regression is used to develop a prediction model, sample size must be large enough to ensure stable coefficients. If the derivation sample size is inadequate, the model may not predict well for future subjects. The precision efficacy analysis for regression (PEAR) method uses a cross- validity approach to select sample sizes…

  13. Can luteal regression be reversed?

    PubMed Central

    Telleria, Carlos M

    2006-01-01

    The corpus luteum is an endocrine gland whose limited lifespan is hormonally programmed. This debate article summarizes findings of our research group that challenge the principle that the end of function of the corpus luteum or luteal regression, once triggered, cannot be reversed. Overturning luteal regression by pharmacological manipulations may be of critical significance in designing strategies to improve fertility efficacy. PMID:17074090

  14. Logistic Regression: Concept and Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cokluk, Omay

    2010-01-01

    The main focus of logistic regression analysis is classification of individuals in different groups. The aim of the present study is to explain basic concepts and processes of binary logistic regression analysis intended to determine the combination of independent variables which best explain the membership in certain groups called dichotomous…

  15. Wild bootstrap for quantile regression.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xingdong; He, Xuming; Hu, Jianhua

    2011-12-01

    The existing theory of the wild bootstrap has focused on linear estimators. In this note, we broaden its validity by providing a class of weight distributions that is asymptotically valid for quantile regression estimators. As most weight distributions in the literature lead to biased variance estimates for nonlinear estimators of linear regression, we propose a modification of the wild bootstrap that admits a broader class of weight distributions for quantile regression. A simulation study on median regression is carried out to compare various bootstrap methods. With a simple finite-sample correction, the wild bootstrap is shown to account for general forms of heteroscedasticity in a regression model with fixed design points. PMID:23049133

  16. [Regression grading in gastrointestinal tumors].

    PubMed

    Tischoff, I; Tannapfel, A

    2012-02-01

    Preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy is a well-established and essential part of the interdisciplinary treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. Neoadjuvant treatment leads to regressive changes in tumors. To evaluate the histological tumor response different scoring systems describing regressive changes are used and known as tumor regression grading. Tumor regression grading is usually based on the presence of residual vital tumor cells in proportion to the total tumor size. Currently, no nationally or internationally accepted grading systems exist. In general, common guidelines should be used in the pathohistological diagnostics of tumors after neoadjuvant therapy. In particularly, the standard tumor grading will be replaced by tumor regression grading. Furthermore, tumors after neoadjuvant treatment are marked with the prefix "y" in the TNM classification. PMID:22293790

  17. Fungible weights in logistic regression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeff A; Waller, Niels G

    2016-06-01

    In this article we develop methods for assessing parameter sensitivity in logistic regression models. To set the stage for this work, we first review Waller's (2008) equations for computing fungible weights in linear regression. Next, we describe 2 methods for computing fungible weights in logistic regression. To demonstrate the utility of these methods, we compute fungible logistic regression weights using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (2010) Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey, and we illustrate how these alternate weights can be used to evaluate parameter sensitivity. To make our work accessible to the research community, we provide R code (R Core Team, 2015) that will generate both kinds of fungible logistic regression weights. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Lineage-specific fragmentation and nuclear relocation of the mitochondrial cox2 gene in chlorophycean green algae (Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Salinas, Elizabeth; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Li, Zhongkui; Fucíková, Karolina; Brand, Jerry J; Lewis, Louise A; González-Halphen, Diego

    2012-07-01

    In most eukaryotes the subunit 2 of cytochrome c oxidase (COX2) is encoded in intact mitochondrial genes. Some green algae, however, exhibit split cox2 genes (cox2a and cox2b) encoding two polypeptides (COX2A and COX2B) that form a heterodimeric COX2 subunit. Here, we analyzed the distribution of intact and split cox2 gene sequences in 39 phylogenetically diverse green algae in phylum Chlorophyta obtained from databases (28 sequences from 22 taxa) and from new cox2 data generated in this work (23 sequences from 18 taxa). Our results support previous observations based on a smaller number of taxa, indicating that algae in classes Prasinophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Trebouxiophyceae contain orthodox, intact mitochondrial cox2 genes. In contrast, all of the algae in Chlorophyceae that we examined exhibited split cox2 genes, and could be separated into two groups: one that has a mitochondrion-localized cox2a gene and a nucleus-localized cox2b gene ("Scenedesmus-like"), and another that has both cox2a and cox2b genes in the nucleus ("Chlamydomonas-like"). The location of the split cox2a and cox2b genes was inferred using five different criteria: differences in amino acid sequences, codon usage (mitochondrial vs. nuclear), codon preference (third position frequencies), presence of nucleotide sequences encoding mitochondrial targeting sequences and presence of spliceosomal introns. Distinct green algae could be grouped according to the form of cox2 gene they contain: intact or fragmented, mitochondrion- or nucleus-localized, and intron-containing or intron-less. We present a model describing the events that led to mitochondrial cox2 gene fragmentation and the independent and sequential migration of cox2a and cox2b genes to the nucleus in chlorophycean green algae. We also suggest that the distribution of the different forms of the cox2 gene provides important insights into the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of Chlorophyceae.

  19. Genetic analysis of the DNA recognition sequence of the P2 Cox protein.

    PubMed Central

    Cores de Vries, G; Wu, X S; Haggård-Ljungquist, E

    1991-01-01

    The Cox protein of temperate Escherichia coli phage P2 is involved in three important biological processes: (i) excision of the integrated prophage genome (G. Lindahl and M. Sunshine, Virology 49:180-187, 1972), (ii) transcriptional repression of the P2 Pc promoter, which controls the expression of the immunity repressor C and the integrase (S. Saha, E. Haggård-Ljungquist, and K. Nordström, EMBO J. 6:3191-3199, 1987), and (iii) transcriptional activation of the late PII promoter of the unrelated satellite phage P4 (S. Saha, E. Haggård-Ljungquist, and K. Nordström, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:3973-3977, 1989). A comparison of the DNA regions protected by Cox from DNaseI degradation has revealed a presumptive Cox recognition sequence (Saha et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA). The binding region of Cox in the P2 Pc promoter contains three presumptive recognition sequences, "Cox boxes," located in tandem. P2 vir3 and P2 vir24 are virulent deletion mutants unable to plate on Cox-producing strains, most likely because the deletions locate the new early promoters too close to the Cox-binding region (Saha et al., EMBO J.). In this report, spontaneous P2 vir3 and vir24 mutants, no longer sensitive to repression by the Cox protein, have been isolated. These mutants plate with equal efficiency on strains with or without a Cox-producing plasmid, and they have been named cor for cox resistance. Three types are recognized; the four P2 vir3 cor mutants have a 1-base deletion in the first Cox box, while the P2 vir24 cor mutants were of two types; four have a base substitution in the first Cox box, and one has a base substitution in the second Cox box. The effect of the Cox protein on the mutated P2 vir3 and vir24 promoters was analyzed in vivo by using fusions to a promoterless cat (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) gene. The activities of the P2 vir3 and vir24 early promoters, as opposed to the wild-type early Pe promoter, are drastically reduced by the Cox protein, and

  20. Regional Differences in the Neuronal Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the Newborn Pig Brain

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Orsolya; Németh, István; Tóth-Szűki, Valéria; Bari, Ferenc; Domoki, Ferenc

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is the major constitutively expressed COX isoform in the newborn brain. COX-2 derived prostanoids and reactive oxygen species appear to play a major role in the mechanism of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic injury in the newborn piglet, an accepted animal model of the human term neonate. The study aimed to quantitatively determine COX-2 immunopositive neurons in different brain regions in piglets under normoxic conditions (n=15), and 4 hours after 10 min asphyxia (n=11). Asphyxia did not induce significant changes in neuronal COX-2 expression of any studied brain areas. In contrast, there was a marked regional difference in all experimental groups. Thus, significant difference was observed between fronto-parietal and temporo-occipital regions: 59±4% and 67±3% versus 41±2%* and 31±3%* respectively (mean±SEM, data are pooled from all subjects, n=26, *p<0.05, vs. fronto-parietal region). In the hippocampus, COX-2 immunopositivity was rare (highest expression in CA1 region: 14±2%). The studied subcortical areas showed negligible COX-2 staining. Our findings suggest that asphyxia does not significantly alter the pattern of neuronal COX-2 expression in the early reventilation period. Furthermore, based on the striking differences observed in cortical neuronal COX-2 distribution, the contribution of COX-2 mediated neuronal injury after asphyxia may also show region-specific differences. PMID:22829712

  1. iNOS signaling interacts with COX-2 pathway in colonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingting; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-10-01

    COX-2 and iNOS are two major inflammatory mediators implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. Previously, the role of colorectal fibroblasts involved in regulation of COX-2 and iNOS expression was largely ignored. In addition, the combined interaction of COX-2 and iNOS signalings and their significance in the progression of colorectal inflammation and cancer within the fibroblasts have received little investigation. To address those issues, we investigated the role of colonic fibroblasts in the regulation of COX-2 and iNOS gene expression, and explored possible mechanisms of interaction between COX-2 and iNOS signalings using a colonic CCD-18Co fibroblast line and LPS, a potential stimulator of COX-2 and iNOS. Our results clearly demonstrated that LPS activated COX-2 gene expression and enhanced PGE(2) production, stimulated iNOS gene expression and promoted NO production in the fibroblasts. Interestingly, activation of COX-2 signaling by LPS was not involved in activation of iNOS signaling, while activation of iNOS signaling by LPS contributed in part to activation of COX-2 signaling. Further analysis indicated that PKC plays a major role in the activation and interaction of COX-2 and iNOS signalings induced by LPS in the fibroblasts. PMID:22683859

  2. Stretch-induced myoblast proliferation is dependent on the COX2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, Jeffrey S.; Burkholder, Thomas J.; Pavlath, Grace K. . E-mail: gpavlat@emory.edu

    2005-11-01

    Skeletal muscle increases in size due to weight bearing loads or passive stretch. This growth response is dependent in part upon myoblast proliferation. Although skeletal muscles are responsive to mechanical forces, the effect on myoblast proliferation remains unknown. To investigate the effects of mechanical stretch on myoblast proliferation, primary myoblasts isolated from Balb/c mice were subjected to 25% cyclical uniaxial stretch for 5 h at 0.5 Hz. Stretch stimulated myoblast proliferation by 32% and increased cell number by 41% 24 and 48 h after stretch, respectively. COX2 mRNA increased 3.5-fold immediately poststretch. Prostaglandin E2 and F{sub 2{alpha}} increased 2.4- and 1.6-fold 6 h after stretch, respectively. Because COX2 has been implicated in regulating muscle growth and regeneration, we hypothesized that stretched myoblasts may proliferate via a COX2-dependent mechanism. We employed two different models to disrupt COX2 activity: (1) treatment with a COX2-selective drug, and (2) transgenic mice null for COX2. Treating myoblasts with a COX2-specific inhibitor blocked stretch-induced proliferation. Likewise, stretched COX2{sup -/-} myoblasts failed to proliferate compared to controls. However, supplementing stretched, COX2{sup -/-} myoblasts with prostaglandin E2 or fluprostenol increased proliferation. These data suggest that the COX2 pathway is critical for myoblast proliferation in response to stretch.

  3. COX-2 mRNA expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and effect by NSAID.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Li, P; Zhang, S-T; You, H; Jia, J-D; Yu, Z-L

    2008-01-01

    To investigate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA expression in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and the effect of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) on it, in order to explore the mechanism of COX-2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) carcinogenesis and the ability of NSAID to prevent or treat ESCC. Frozen specimens of human ESCC and adjacent normal esophageal squamous epithelium pairs (n = 22) were examined for COX-2 mRNA expression by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). After incubation with aspirin (a non-selective COX inhibitor) or Nimesulide (a selective COX-2 inhibitor), the proliferation status of two human esophageal squamous cancer cell lines, EC-9706 and EC-109, was quantified by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The expression of COX-2 mRNA in these cells was detected by RT-PCR. COX-2 mRNA was expressed in 12 of 22 (54.5%) ESCC tissue samples, but it was undetectable in all the specimens of adjacent normal esophageal squamous epithelium COX-2 mRNA expression. Both aspirin (5-20 mmol/L) and Nimesulide (0.1-0.8 mmol/L) inhibited EC-9706 cell line proliferation and suppressed its COX-2 mRNA expression dose-dependently. However, only aspirin (5-20 mmol/L) could inhibit proliferation in the EC-109 cell line and suppress COX-2 mRNA expression. Nimesulide (0.1-0.8 mmol/L) could neither inhibit EC-109 cell growth nor suppress COX-2 mRNA expression. COX-2 mRNA expression is a frequent phenomenon in human ESCC tissue samples and plays an important role in the carcinogenesis of ESCC. NSAID may be useful in the chemoprevention and therapy of human ESCC and its effects are likely to be mediated by modulating COX-2 activity.

  4. Practical Session: Simple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    Two exercises are proposed to illustrate the simple linear regression. The first one is based on the famous Galton's data set on heredity. We use the lm R command and get coefficients estimates, standard error of the error, R2, residuals …In the second example, devoted to data related to the vapor tension of mercury, we fit a simple linear regression, predict values, and anticipate on multiple linear regression. This pratical session is an excerpt from practical exercises proposed by A. Dalalyan at EPNC (see Exercises 1 and 2 of http://certis.enpc.fr/~dalalyan/Download/TP_ENPC_4.pdf).

  5. Aberrant over-expression of COX-1 intersects multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Fadare, Oluwole; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Son, Deok-Soo; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Shilin; Saskowski, Jeanette; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Daniel, Cristina; Crews, Brenda; Lehmann, Brian D.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Crispens, Marta A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Khabele, Dineo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) is implicated in ovarian cancer. However, patterns of COX expression and function have been unclear and controversial. In this report, patterns of COX-1 and COX-2 gene expression were obtained from RNA-seq data through The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our analysis revealed markedly higher COX-1 mRNA expression than COX-2 in high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOC) and higher COX-1 expression in HGSOC tumors than 10 other tumor types. High expression of COX-1 in HGSOC tumors was confirmed in an independent tissue microarray. In contrast, lower or similar expression of COX-1 compared to COX-2 was observed in endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell tumors. Stable COX-1 knockdown in HGSOC-representative OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells reduced gene expression in multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways. Functional cell viability, clonogenicity, and migration/invasion assays were consistent with transcriptomic changes. These effects were reversed by stable over-expression of COX-1 in SKOV-3 cells. Our results demonstrate a distinct pattern of COX-1 over-expression in HGSOC tumors and strong association of COX-1 with multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in ovarian cancer cells. These findings provide additional insight into the role of COX-1 in human ovarian cancer and support further development of methods to selectively target COX-1 in the management of HGSOC tumors. PMID:25972361

  6. Gaussian estimation for discretely observed Cox-Ingersoll-Ross model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chao; Shu, Huisheng; Liu, Yurong

    2016-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the parameter estimation problem for Cox-Ingersoll-Ross model based on discrete observation. First, a new discretized process is built based on the Euler-Maruyama scheme. Then, the parameter estimators are obtained by employing the maximum likelihood method and the explicit expressions of the error of estimation are given. Subsequently, the consistency property of all parameter estimators are proved by applying the law of large numbers for martingales, Holder's inequality, B-D-G inequality and Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. Finally, a numerical simulation example for estimators and the absolute error between estimators and true values is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the estimation approach used in this paper.

  7. COX-2 inhibitors: a CLASS act or Just VIGORously promoted.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Samir; Shafiq, N; Pandhi, P

    2004-03-23

    Abstract Selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors were developed with the hope of producing lesser gastrointestinal (GI) side effects as compared with the conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Soon after their introduction into the market, the sales of celecoxib and rofecoxib went up considerably. Most of this was attributed to the results of the Celecoxib Long-term Arthritis Safety Study (CLASS) and Vioxx Gastrointestinal Outcome Research (VIGOR) trials. However, several discrepancies were noted in the presentation of the actual trial results submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and those used for the purpose of publication in scientific journals. These issues were discussed subsequently by the way of scientific communications. Moreover, with increasing use of these agents, evidence of their adverse effects is coming to light. The present review aims at discussing the above issues, with emphasis on the results of the CLASS and VIGOR trials.

  8. (R)-Profens Are Substrate-Selective Inhibitors of Endocannabinoid Oxygenation by COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Kelsey C.; Hermanson, Daniel J.; Musee, Joel; Prusakiewicz, Jeffery J.; Scheib, Jami L.; Carter, Bruce D.; Banerjee, Surajit; Oates, J.A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) catalyzes the oxygenation of arachidonic acid and the endocannabinoids, 2-arachidonoylglycerol and arachidonoylethanolamide. Evaluation of a series of COX-2 inhibitors revealed that many weak, competitive inhibitors of arachidonic acid oxygenation are potent inhibitors of endocannabinoid oxygenation. (R)-Enantiomers of ibuprofen, naproxen, and flurbiprofen, which are considered to be inactive as COX-2 inhibitors, are potent “substrate-selective inhibitors” of endocannabinoid oxygenation. Crystal structures of the COX-2-(R)-naproxen and COX-2-(R)-flurbiprofen complexes verified this unexpected binding and defined the orientation of the (R)-enantiomers relative to (S)-enantiomers. (R)-Profens selectively inhibited endocannabinoid oxygenation by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated dorsal root ganglion cells. Substrate-selective inhibition provides novel tools for investigating the role of COX-2 in endocannabinoid oxygenation and a possible explanation for the ability of (R)-profens to maintain endocannabinoid tone in models of neuropathic pain. PMID:22053353

  9. Regional regression of flood characteristics employing historical information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tasker, Gary D.; Stedinger, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Streamflow gauging networks provide hydrologic information for use in estimating the parameters of regional regression models. The regional regression models can be used to estimate flood statistics, such as the 100 yr peak, at ungauged sites as functions of drainage basin characteristics. A recent innovation in regional regression is the use of a generalized least squares (GLS) estimator that accounts for unequal station record lengths and sample cross correlation among the flows. However, this technique does not account for historical flood information. A method is proposed here to adjust this generalized least squares estimator to account for possible information about historical floods available at some stations in a region. The historical information is assumed to be in the form of observations of all peaks above a threshold during a long period outside the systematic record period. A Monte Carlo simulation experiment was performed to compare the GLS estimator adjusted for historical floods with the unadjusted GLS estimator and the ordinary least squares estimator. Results indicate that using the GLS estimator adjusted for historical information significantly improves the regression model. ?? 1987.

  10. Multiple Regression and Its Discontents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel C.; Marsh, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Multiple regression is part of a larger statistical strategy originated by Gauss. The authors raise questions about the theory and suggest some changes that would make room for Mandelbrot and Serendipity.

  11. A Modified Adaptive Lasso for Identifying Interactions in the Cox Model with the Heredity Constraint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Shen, Jincheng; Thall, Peter F

    2014-10-01

    In many biomedical studies, identifying effects of covariate interactions on survival is a major goal. Important examples are treatment-subgroup interactions in clinical trials, and gene-gene or gene-environment interactions in genomic studies. A common problem when implementing a variable selection algorithm in such settings is the requirement that the model must satisfy the strong heredity constraint, wherein an interaction may be included in the model only if the interaction's component variables are included as main effects. We propose a modified Lasso method for the Cox regression model that adaptively selects important single covariates and pairwise interactions while enforcing the strong heredity constraint. The proposed method is based on a modified log partial likelihood including two adaptively weighted penalties, one for main effects and one for interactions. A two-dimensional tuning parameter for the penalties is determined by generalized cross-validation. Asymptotic properties are established, including consistency and rate of convergence, and it is shown that the proposed selection procedure has oracle properties, given proper choice of regularization parameters. Simulations illustrate that the proposed method performs reliably across a range of different scenarios.

  12. Box-Cox Mixed Logit Model for Travel Behavior Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orro, Alfonso; Novales, Margarita; Benitez, Francisco G.

    2010-09-01

    To represent the behavior of travelers when they are deciding how they are going to get to their destination, discrete choice models, based on the random utility theory, have become one of the most widely used tools. The field in which these models were developed was halfway between econometrics and transport engineering, although the latter now constitutes one of their principal areas of application. In the transport field, they have mainly been applied to mode choice, but also to the selection of destination, route, and other important decisions such as the vehicle ownership. In usual practice, the most frequently employed discrete choice models implement a fixed coefficient utility function that is linear in the parameters. The principal aim of this paper is to present the viability of specifying utility functions with random coefficients that are nonlinear in the parameters, in applications of discrete choice models to transport. Nonlinear specifications in the parameters were present in discrete choice theory at its outset, although they have seldom been used in practice until recently. The specification of random coefficients, however, began with the probit and the hedonic models in the 1970s, and, after a period of apparent little practical interest, has burgeoned into a field of intense activity in recent years with the new generation of mixed logit models. In this communication, we present a Box-Cox mixed logit model, original of the authors. It includes the estimation of the Box-Cox exponents in addition to the parameters of the random coefficients distribution. Probability of choose an alternative is an integral that will be calculated by simulation. The estimation of the model is carried out by maximizing the simulated log-likelihood of a sample of observed individual choices between alternatives. The differences between the predictions yielded by models that are inconsistent with real behavior have been studied with simulation experiments.

  13. Regression methods for spatial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakowitz, S. J.; Szidarovszky, F.

    1982-01-01

    The kriging approach, a parametric regression method used by hydrologists and mining engineers, among others also provides an error estimate the integral of the regression function. The kriging method is explored and some of its statistical characteristics are described. The Watson method and theory are extended so that the kriging features are displayed. Theoretical and computational comparisons of the kriging and Watson approaches are offered.

  14. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  15. Basis Selection for Wavelet Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A wavelet basis selection procedure is presented for wavelet regression. Both the basis and the threshold are selected using cross-validation. The method includes the capability of incorporating prior knowledge on the smoothness (or shape of the basis functions) into the basis selection procedure. The results of the method are demonstrated on sampled functions widely used in the wavelet regression literature. The results of the method are contrasted with other published methods.

  16. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Fe2Cr1 - xCoxSi Heusler alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Pu; Qiu, Jin-Jun; Lu, Hui; Ji, Rong; Han, Gu-Chang; Teo, Kie-Leong

    2014-12-01

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) was achieved in annealed Fe2Cr1 - xCoxSi (FCCS) Heusler alloys with different Co compositions x. The Co composition is varied to tune the Fermi level in order to achieve both higher spin polarization and better thermal stability. The PMA is thermally stable up to 400 oC for FCCS with x = 0, 0.3, 0.5 and 350 oC for FCCS with x = 0.7, 0.9, 1. The thickness of FCCS films with PMA ranges from 0.6 to 1.2 nm. The annealing temperature and FCCS thickness are found to greatly affect the PMA. The magnetic anisotropy energy density KU is 2.8  ×  106 erg cm-3 for 0.8 nm Fe2CrSi, and decreases as the Co composition x increases, suggesting that the PMA induced at the FCCS/MgO interface is dominated by the contribution of Fe atoms. There is a trade-off between high spin polarization and strong PMA by adjusting the Co composition.

  17. Exposure to diesel exhaust upregulates COX-2 expression in ApoE knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ni; Tranfield, Erin M.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Kaufman, Joel D.; Rosenfeld, Michael E.; van Eeden, Stephan F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We have shown that diesel exhaust (DE) inhalation caused progression of atherosclerosis; however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. We hypothesize that exposure to DE upregulates cyclooxygenase (COX) expression and activity, which could play a role in DE-induced atherosclerosis. Methods ApoE knockout mice (30-week old) fed with regular chow were exposed to DE (at 200 μg/m3 of particulate matter) or filtered air (control) for 7 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). The protein and mRNA expression of COX-1 and COX-2 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry analysis and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. To examine COX activity, thoracic aortae were mounted in a wire myograph, and phenylephrine (PE)-stimulated vasoconstriction was measured with and without the presence of COX antagonists (indomethacin). COX-2 activity was further assessed by urine 2,3-dinor-6-keto PGF1α level, a major metabolite of prostacyclin I2 (PGI2). Results Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrates that DE exposure enhanced COX-2 expression in both thoracic aorta (p < 0.01) and aortic root (p < 0.03), with no modification of COX-1 expression. The increased COX-2 expression was positively correlated with smooth muscle cell content in aortic lesions (R2 = 0.4081, p < 0.008). The fractional changes of maximal vasoconstriction in the presence of indomethacin was attenuated by 3-fold after DE exposure (p < 0.02). Urine 2,3-dinor-6-keto PGF1α level was 15-fold higher in DE group than the control (p < 0.007). The mRNA expression of COX-2 (p < 0.006) and PGI synthase (p < 0.02), but not COX-1, was significantly augmented after DE exposure. Conclusion We show that DE inhalation enhanced COX-2 expression, which is also associated with phenotypic changes of aortic lesion. PMID:22746401

  18. Population death sequences and Cox processes driven by interacting Feller diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Gang; Clifford, Peter; Feng, Jianfeng

    2002-11-01

    We carry out a complete study on the relationship between Cox processes driven by interacting Feller diffusions and death sequences of immigration-emigration linked population networks. It is first proved that the Cox process driven by a Feller diffusion is equivalent to the death sequence of a birth and death process. The conclusion is then generalized to the case of Cox processes driven by interacting Feller diffusions and death sequences of interacting populations.

  19. COX-2 dependent inflammation increases spinal Fos expression during rodent postoperative ileus

    PubMed Central

    Kreiss, C; Birder, L A; Kiss, S; VanBibber, M M; Bauer, A J

    2003-01-01

    Background and aims: Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and prostaglandins (PGs) participate in the pathogenesis of inflammatory postoperative ileus. We sought to determine whether the emerging neuronal modulator COX-2 plays a significant role in primary afferent activation during postoperative ileus using spinal Fos expression as a marker. Methods: Rats, and COX-2+/+ and COX-2−/− mice underwent simple intestinal manipulation. The effect of intestinal manipulation on Fos immunoreactivity (IR) in the L5-S1 spinal cord, in situ circumference, and postoperative leucocytic infiltrate of the intestinal muscularis was measured. Postoperative PGE2 production was measured in peritoneal lavage fluid. The dependence of these parameters on COX-2 was studied in pharmacological (DFU, Merck- Frosst, selective COX-2 inhibitor) and genetic (COX-2−/− mice) models. Results: Postoperative Fos IR increased 3.7-fold in rats and 2.2-fold in mice. Both muscularis leucocytic infiltrate and the circumference of the muscularis increased significantly in rats and COX-2+/+ mice postoperatively, indicating dilating ileus. Surgical manipulation markedly increased PGE2 levels in the peritoneal cavity. DFU pretreatment and the genetic absence of COX-2−/− prevented dilating ileus, and leucocytic infiltrate was diminished by 40% with DFU and by 54% in COX-2−/− mice. DFU reversed postsurgical intra- abdominal PGE2 levels to normal. Fos IR after intestinal manipulation was attenuated by approximately 50% in DFU treated rats and in COX-2−/− mice. Conclusions: Postoperatively, small bowel manipulation causes a significant and prolonged increase in spinal Fos expression, suggesting prolonged primary afferent activation. COX-2 plays a key role in this response. This activation of primary afferents may subsequently initiate inhibitory motor reflexes to the gut, contributing to postoperative ileus. PMID:12631664

  20. Regression Discontinuity Designs in Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Moscoe, Ellen; Mutevedzi, Portia; Newell, Marie-Louise; Bärnighausen, Till

    2014-01-01

    When patients receive an intervention based on whether they score below or above some threshold value on a continuously measured random variable, the intervention will be randomly assigned for patients close to the threshold. The regression discontinuity design exploits this fact to estimate causal treatment effects. In spite of its recent proliferation in economics, the regression discontinuity design has not been widely adopted in epidemiology. We describe regression discontinuity, its implementation, and the assumptions required for causal inference. We show that regression discontinuity is generalizable to the survival and nonlinear models that are mainstays of epidemiologic analysis. We then present an application of regression discontinuity to the much-debated epidemiologic question of when to start HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy. Using data from a large South African cohort (2007–2011), we estimate the causal effect of early versus deferred treatment eligibility on mortality. Patients whose first CD4 count was just below the 200 cells/μL CD4 count threshold had a 35% lower hazard of death (hazard ratio = 0.65 [95% confidence interval = 0.45–0.94]) than patients presenting with CD4 counts just above the threshold. We close by discussing the strengths and limitations of regression discontinuity designs for epidemiology. PMID:25061922

  1. SLIT ADJUSTMENT CLAMP

    DOEpatents

    McKenzie, K.R.

    1959-07-01

    An electrode support which permits accurate alignment and adjustment of the electrode in a plurality of planes and about a plurality of axes in a calutron is described. The support will align the slits in the electrode with the slits of an ionizing chamber so as to provide for the egress of ions. The support comprises an insulator, a leveling plate carried by the insulator and having diametrically opposed attaching screws screwed to the plate and the insulator and diametrically opposed adjusting screws for bearing against the insulator, and an electrode associated with the plate for adjustment therewith.

  2. Significance of Cox-2 expression in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachkoria, Ketevan; Zhang Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiao-feng.sun@ibk.liu.se

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has reduced local recurrence of rectal cancers, but the result is not satisfactory. Further biologic factors are needed to identify patients for more effective radiotherapy. Our aims were to investigate the relationship of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression to radiotherapy, and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers with or without radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cox-2 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distal normal mucosa (n = 28), in adjacent normal mucosa (n = 107), in primary cancer (n = 138), lymph node metastasis (n = 30), and biopsy (n = 85). The patients participated in a rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Results: Cox-2 expression was increased in primary tumor compared with normal mucosa (p < 0.0001), but there was no significant change between primary tumor and metastasis. Cox-2 positivity was or tended to be related to more p53 and Ki-67 expression, and less apoptosis (p {<=} 0.05). In Cox-2-negative cases of either biopsy (p = 0.01) or surgical samples (p = 0.02), radiotherapy was related to less frequency of local recurrence, but this was not the case in Cox-2-positive cases. Conclusion: Cox-2 expression seemed to be an early event involved in rectal cancer development. Radiotherapy might reduce a rate of local recurrence in the patients with Cox-2 weakly stained tumors, but not in those with Cox-2 strongly stained tumors.

  3. Molecular docking analysis of known flavonoids as duel COX-2 inhibitors in the context of cancer.

    PubMed

    Dash, Raju; Uddin, Mir Muhammad Nasir; Hosen, S M Zahid; Rahim, Zahed Bin; Dinar, Abu Mansur; Kabir, Mohammad Shah Hafez; Sultan, Ramiz Ahmed; Islam, Ashekul; Hossain, Md Kamrul

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) catalyzed synthesis of prostaglandin E2 and it associates with tumor growth, infiltration, and metastasis in preclinical experiments. Known inhibitors against COX-2 exhibit toxicity. Therefore, it is of interest to screen natural compounds like flavanoids against COX-2. Molecular docking using 12 known flavanoids against COX-2 by FlexX and of ArgusLab were performed. All compounds showed a favourable binding energy of >-10 KJ/mol in FlexX and > -8 kcal/mol in ArgusLab. However, this data requires in vitro and in vivo verification for further consideration. PMID:26770028

  4. Molecular docking analysis of known flavonoids as duel COX-2 inhibitors in the context of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Raju; Uddin, Mir Muhammad Nasir; Hosen, S.M. Zahid; Rahim, Zahed Bin; Dinar, Abu Mansur; Kabir, Mohammad Shah Hafez; Sultan, Ramiz Ahmed; Islam, Ashekul; Hossain, Md Kamrul

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) catalyzed synthesis of prostaglandin E2 and it associates with tumor growth, infiltration, and metastasis in preclinical experiments. Known inhibitors against COX-2 exhibit toxicity. Therefore, it is of interest to screen natural compounds like flavanoids against COX-2. Molecular docking using 12 known flavanoids against COX-2 by FlexX and of ArgusLab were performed. All compounds showed a favourable binding energy of >-10 KJ/mol in FlexX and > -8 kcal/mol in ArgusLab. However, this data requires in vitro and in vivo verification for further consideration. PMID:26770028

  5. Alteration of femoral bone morphology and density in COX-2−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Galen; Xie, Chao; Chen, Di; Awad, Hani; Schwarz, Edward M.; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Zhang, Xinping

    2009-01-01

    A role of COX-2 in pathological bone destruction and fracture repair has been established; however, few studies have been conducted to examine the involvement of COX-2 in maintaining bone mineral density and bone micro-architecture. In this study, we examined bone morphology in multiple trabecular and cortical regions within the distal and diaphyseal femur of 4-month-old wild-type and COX-2−/− mice using micro-computed tomography. Our results demonstrated that while COX-2−/− female mice had normal bone geometry and trabecular microarchitecture at 4 months of age, the male knockout mice displayed reduced bone volume fraction within the distal femoral metaphysis. Furthermore, male COX-2−/− mice had a significant reduction in cortical bone mineral density within the central cortical diaphysis and distal epiphysis and metaphysis. Consistent with the observed reduction in cortical mineral density, biomechanical testing via 4-point-bending showed that male COX-2−/− mice had a significant increase in postyield deformation, indicating a ductile bone phenotype in male COX-2−/− mice. In conclusion, our study suggests that genetic ablation of COX-2 may have a sex-related effect on cortical bone homeostasis and COX-2 plays a role in maintaining normal bone micro-architecture and density in mice. PMID:16731065

  6. Selective COX-2 Inhibitors: A Review of Their Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Zarghi, Afshin; Arfaei, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the competitive inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX), the enzyme which mediates the bioconversion of arachidonic acid to inflammatory prostaglandins (PGs). Their use is associated with the side effects such as gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. The therapeutic anti-inflammatory action of NSAIDs is produced by the inhibition of COX-2, while the undesired side effects arise from inhibition of COX-1 activity. Thus, it was though that more selective COX-2 inhibitors would have reduced side effects. Based upon a number of selective COX-2 inhibitors (rofecoxib, celecoxib, valdecoxibetc.) were developed as safer NSAIDs with improved gastric safety profile. However, the recent market removal of some COXIBs such as rofecoxib due to its adverse cardiovascular side effects clearly encourages the researchers to explore and evaluate alternative templates with COX-2 inhibitory activity. Recognition of new avenues for selective COX-2 inhibitors in cancer chemotherapy and neurological diseases such as Parkinson and Alzheimer’s diseases still continues to attract investigations on the development of COX-2 inhibitors. This review highlights the various structural classes of selective COX-2 inhibitors with special emphasis on their structure-activity relationships. PMID:24250402

  7. Structural insight into DNA binding and oligomerization of the multifunctional Cox protein of bacteriophage P2

    PubMed Central

    Berntsson, Ronnie P.-A.; Odegrip, Richard; Sehlén, Wilhelmina; Skaar, Karin; Svensson, Linda M.; Massad, Tariq; Högbom, Martin; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; Stenmark, Pål

    2014-01-01

    The Cox protein from bacteriophage P2 is a small multifunctional DNA-binding protein. It is involved in site-specific recombination leading to P2 prophage excision and functions as a transcriptional repressor of the P2 Pc promoter. Furthermore, it transcriptionally activates the unrelated, defective prophage P4 that depends on phage P2 late gene products for lytic growth. In this article, we have investigated the structural determinants to understand how P2 Cox performs these different functions. We have solved the structure of P2 Cox to 2.4 Å resolution. Interestingly, P2 Cox crystallized in a continuous oligomeric spiral with its DNA-binding helix and wing positioned outwards. The extended C-terminal part of P2 Cox is largely responsible for the oligomerization in the structure. The spacing between the repeating DNA-binding elements along the helical P2 Cox filament is consistent with DNA binding along the filament. Functional analyses of alanine mutants in P2 Cox argue for the importance of key residues for protein function. We here present the first structure from the Cox protein family and, together with previous biochemical observations, propose that P2 Cox achieves its various functions by specific binding of DNA while wrapping the DNA around its helical oligomer. PMID:24259428

  8. Attachment style and adjustment to divorce.

    PubMed

    Yárnoz-Yaben, Sagrario

    2010-05-01

    Divorce is becoming increasingly widespread in Europe. In this study, I present an analysis of the role played by attachment style (secure, dismissing, preoccupied and fearful, plus the dimensions of anxiety and avoidance) in the adaptation to divorce. Participants comprised divorced parents (N = 40) from a medium-sized city in the Basque Country. The results reveal a lower proportion of people with secure attachment in the sample group of divorcees. Attachment style and dependence (emotional and instrumental) are closely related. I have also found associations between measures that showed a poor adjustment to divorce and the preoccupied and fearful attachment styles. Adjustment is related to a dismissing attachment style and to the avoidance dimension. Multiple regression analysis confirmed that secure attachment and the avoidance dimension predict adjustment to divorce and positive affectivity while preoccupied attachment and the anxiety dimension predicted negative affectivity. Implications for research and interventions with divorcees are discussed.

  9. Shrinkage regression-based methods for microarray missing value imputation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Missing values commonly occur in the microarray data, which usually contain more than 5% missing values with up to 90% of genes affected. Inaccurate missing value estimation results in reducing the power of downstream microarray data analyses. Many types of methods have been developed to estimate missing values. Among them, the regression-based methods are very popular and have been shown to perform better than the other types of methods in many testing microarray datasets. Results To further improve the performances of the regression-based methods, we propose shrinkage regression-based methods. Our methods take the advantage of the correlation structure in the microarray data and select similar genes for the target gene by Pearson correlation coefficients. Besides, our methods incorporate the least squares principle, utilize a shrinkage estimation approach to adjust the coefficients of the regression model, and then use the new coefficients to estimate missing values. Simulation results show that the proposed methods provide more accurate missing value estimation in six testing microarray datasets than the existing regression-based methods do. Conclusions Imputation of missing values is a very important aspect of microarray data analyses because most of the downstream analyses require a complete dataset. Therefore, exploring accurate and efficient methods for estimating missing values has become an essential issue. Since our proposed shrinkage regression-based methods can provide accurate missing value estimation, they are competitive alternatives to the existing regression-based methods. PMID:24565159

  10. Background stratified Poisson regression analysis of cohort data

    PubMed Central

    Langholz, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Background stratified Poisson regression is an approach that has been used in the analysis of data derived from a variety of epidemiologically important studies of radiation-exposed populations, including uranium miners, nuclear industry workers, and atomic bomb survivors. We describe a novel approach to fit Poisson regression models that adjust for a set of covariates through background stratification while directly estimating the radiation-disease association of primary interest. The approach makes use of an expression for the Poisson likelihood that treats the coefficients for stratum-specific indicator variables as ‘nuisance’ variables and avoids the need to explicitly estimate the coefficients for these stratum-specific parameters. Log-linear models, as well as other general relative rate models, are accommodated. This approach is illustrated using data from the Life Span Study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors and data from a study of underground uranium miners. The point estimate and confidence interval obtained from this ‘conditional’ regression approach are identical to the values obtained using unconditional Poisson regression with model terms for each background stratum. Moreover, it is shown that the proposed approach allows estimation of background stratified Poisson regression models of non-standard form, such as models that parameterize latency effects, as well as regression models in which the number of strata is large, thereby overcoming the limitations of previously available statistical software for fitting background stratified Poisson regression models. PMID:22193911

  11. Background stratified Poisson regression analysis of cohort data.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David B; Langholz, Bryan

    2012-03-01

    Background stratified Poisson regression is an approach that has been used in the analysis of data derived from a variety of epidemiologically important studies of radiation-exposed populations, including uranium miners, nuclear industry workers, and atomic bomb survivors. We describe a novel approach to fit Poisson regression models that adjust for a set of covariates through background stratification while directly estimating the radiation-disease association of primary interest. The approach makes use of an expression for the Poisson likelihood that treats the coefficients for stratum-specific indicator variables as 'nuisance' variables and avoids the need to explicitly estimate the coefficients for these stratum-specific parameters. Log-linear models, as well as other general relative rate models, are accommodated. This approach is illustrated using data from the Life Span Study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors and data from a study of underground uranium miners. The point estimate and confidence interval obtained from this 'conditional' regression approach are identical to the values obtained using unconditional Poisson regression with model terms for each background stratum. Moreover, it is shown that the proposed approach allows estimation of background stratified Poisson regression models of non-standard form, such as models that parameterize latency effects, as well as regression models in which the number of strata is large, thereby overcoming the limitations of previously available statistical software for fitting background stratified Poisson regression models. PMID:22193911

  12. Incremental learning for ν-Support Vector Regression.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bin; Sheng, Victor S; Wang, Zhijie; Ho, Derek; Osman, Said; Li, Shuo

    2015-07-01

    The ν-Support Vector Regression (ν-SVR) is an effective regression learning algorithm, which has the advantage of using a parameter ν on controlling the number of support vectors and adjusting the width of the tube automatically. However, compared to ν-Support Vector Classification (ν-SVC) (Schölkopf et al., 2000), ν-SVR introduces an additional linear term into its objective function. Thus, directly applying the accurate on-line ν-SVC algorithm (AONSVM) to ν-SVR will not generate an effective initial solution. It is the main challenge to design an incremental ν-SVR learning algorithm. To overcome this challenge, we propose a special procedure called initial adjustments in this paper. This procedure adjusts the weights of ν-SVC based on the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) conditions to prepare an initial solution for the incremental learning. Combining the initial adjustments with the two steps of AONSVM produces an exact and effective incremental ν-SVR learning algorithm (INSVR). Theoretical analysis has proven the existence of the three key inverse matrices, which are the cornerstones of the three steps of INSVR (including the initial adjustments), respectively. The experiments on benchmark datasets demonstrate that INSVR can avoid the infeasible updating paths as far as possible, and successfully converges to the optimal solution. The results also show that INSVR is faster than batch ν-SVR algorithms with both cold and warm starts.

  13. Remotely Adjustable Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouns, H. H.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    Outlet pressure adjusted to match varying loads. Electrohydraulic servo has positioned sleeve in leftmost position, adjusting outlet pressure to maximum value. Sleeve in equilibrium position, with control land covering control port. For lowest pressure setting, sleeve shifted toward right by increased pressure on sleeve shoulder from servovalve. Pump used in aircraft and robots, where hydraulic actuators repeatedly turned on and off, changing pump load frequently and over wide range.

  14. Weighted triangulation adjustment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Walter L.

    1969-01-01

    The variation of coordinates method is employed to perform a weighted least squares adjustment of horizontal survey networks. Geodetic coordinates are required for each fixed and adjustable station. A preliminary inverse geodetic position computation is made for each observed line. Weights associated with each observed equation for direction, azimuth, and distance are applied in the formation of the normal equations in-the least squares adjustment. The number of normal equations that may be solved is twice the number of new stations and less than 150. When the normal equations are solved, shifts are produced at adjustable stations. Previously computed correction factors are applied to the shifts and a most probable geodetic position is found for each adjustable station. Pinal azimuths and distances are computed. These may be written onto magnetic tape for subsequent computation of state plane or grid coordinates. Input consists of punch cards containing project identification, program options, and position and observation information. Results listed include preliminary and final positions, residuals, observation equations, solution of the normal equations showing magnitudes of shifts, and a plot of each adjusted and fixed station. During processing, data sets containing irrecoverable errors are rejected and the type of error is listed. The computer resumes processing of additional data sets.. Other conditions cause warning-errors to be issued, and processing continues with the current data set.

  15. Interpretation of Standardized Regression Coefficients in Multiple Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Jerome D.

    The extent to which standardized regression coefficients (beta values) can be used to determine the importance of a variable in an equation was explored. The beta value and the part correlation coefficient--also called the semi-partial correlation coefficient and reported in squared form as the incremental "r squared"--were compared for variables…

  16. Regressive Evolution in Astyanax Cavefish

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, William R.

    2013-01-01

    A diverse group of animals, including members of most major phyla, have adapted to life in the perpetual darkness of caves. These animals are united by the convergence of two regressive phenotypes, loss of eyes and pigmentation. The mechanisms of regressive evolution are poorly understood. The teleost Astyanax mexicanus is of special significance in studies of regressive evolution in cave animals. This species includes an ancestral surface dwelling form and many con-specific cave-dwelling forms, some of which have evolved their recessive phenotypes independently. Recent advances in Astyanax development and genetics have provided new information about how eyes and pigment are lost during cavefish evolution; namely, they have revealed some of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in trait modification, the number and identity of the underlying genes and mutations, the molecular basis of parallel evolution, and the evolutionary forces driving adaptation to the cave environment. PMID:19640230

  17. Laplace regression with censored data.

    PubMed

    Bottai, Matteo; Zhang, Jiajia

    2010-08-01

    We consider a regression model where the error term is assumed to follow a type of asymmetric Laplace distribution. We explore its use in the estimation of conditional quantiles of a continuous outcome variable given a set of covariates in the presence of random censoring. Censoring may depend on covariates. Estimation of the regression coefficients is carried out by maximizing a non-differentiable likelihood function. In the scenarios considered in a simulation study, the Laplace estimator showed correct coverage and shorter computation time than the alternative methods considered, some of which occasionally failed to converge. We illustrate the use of Laplace regression with an application to survival time in patients with small cell lung cancer.

  18. Survival Data and Regression Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    We start this chapter by introducing some basic elements for the analysis of censored survival data. Then we focus on right censored data and develop two types of regression models. The first one concerns the so-called accelerated failure time models (AFT), which are parametric models where a function of a parameter depends linearly on the covariables. The second one is a semiparametric model, where the covariables enter in a multiplicative form in the expression of the hazard rate function. The main statistical tool for analysing these regression models is the maximum likelihood methodology and, in spite we recall some essential results about the ML theory, we refer to the chapter "Logistic Regression" for a more detailed presentation.

  19. Interquantile Shrinkage in Regression Models

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liewen; Wang, Huixia Judy; Bondell, Howard D.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional analysis using quantile regression typically focuses on fitting the regression model at different quantiles separately. However, in situations where the quantile coefficients share some common feature, joint modeling of multiple quantiles to accommodate the commonality often leads to more efficient estimation. One example of common features is that a predictor may have a constant effect over one region of quantile levels but varying effects in other regions. To automatically perform estimation and detection of the interquantile commonality, we develop two penalization methods. When the quantile slope coefficients indeed do not change across quantile levels, the proposed methods will shrink the slopes towards constant and thus improve the estimation efficiency. We establish the oracle properties of the two proposed penalization methods. Through numerical investigations, we demonstrate that the proposed methods lead to estimations with competitive or higher efficiency than the standard quantile regression estimation in finite samples. Supplemental materials for the article are available online. PMID:24363546

  20. [Is regression of atherosclerosis possible?].

    PubMed

    Thomas, D; Richard, J L; Emmerich, J; Bruckert, E; Delahaye, F

    1992-10-01

    Experimental studies have shown the regression of atherosclerosis in animals given a cholesterol-rich diet and then given a normal diet or hypolipidemic therapy. Despite favourable results of clinical trials of primary prevention modifying the lipid profile, the concept of atherosclerosis regression in man remains very controversial. The methodological approach is difficult: this is based on angiographic data and requires strict standardisation of angiographic views and reliable quantitative techniques of analysis which are available with image processing. Several methodologically acceptable clinical coronary studies have shown not only stabilisation but also regression of atherosclerotic lesions with reductions of about 25% in total cholesterol levels and of about 40% in LDL cholesterol levels. These reductions were obtained either by drugs as in CLAS (Cholesterol Lowering Atherosclerosis Study), FATS (Familial Atherosclerosis Treatment Study) and SCOR (Specialized Center of Research Intervention Trial), by profound modifications in dietary habits as in the Lifestyle Heart Trial, or by surgery (ileo-caecal bypass) as in POSCH (Program On the Surgical Control of the Hyperlipidemias). On the other hand, trials with non-lipid lowering drugs such as the calcium antagonists (INTACT, MHIS) have not shown significant regression of existing atherosclerotic lesions but only a decrease on the number of new lesions. The clinical benefits of these regression studies are difficult to demonstrate given the limited period of observation, relatively small population numbers and the fact that in some cases the subjects were asymptomatic. The decrease in the number of cardiovascular events therefore seems relatively modest and concerns essentially subjects who were symptomatic initially. The clinical repercussion of studies of prevention involving a single lipid factor is probably partially due to the reduction in progression and anatomical regression of the atherosclerotic plaque

  1. Mutations in COX7B cause microphthalmia with linear skin lesions, an unconventional mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Indrieri, Alessia; van Rahden, Vanessa Alexandra; Tiranti, Valeria; Morleo, Manuela; Iaconis, Daniela; Tammaro, Roberta; D'Amato, Ilaria; Conte, Ivan; Maystadt, Isabelle; Demuth, Stephanie; Zvulunov, Alex; Kutsche, Kerstin; Zeviani, Massimo; Franco, Brunella

    2012-11-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin lesions (MLS) is an X-linked dominant male-lethal disorder associated with mutations in holocytochrome c-type synthase (HCCS), which encodes a crucial player of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). Unlike other mitochondrial diseases, MLS is characterized by a well-recognizable neurodevelopmental phenotype. Interestingly, not all clinically diagnosed MLS cases have mutations in HCCS, thus suggesting genetic heterogeneity for this disorder. Among the possible candidates, we analyzed the X-linked COX7B and found deleterious de novo mutations in two simplex cases and a nonsense mutation, which segregates with the disease, in a familial case. COX7B encodes a poorly characterized structural subunit of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the MRC complex IV. We demonstrated that COX7B is indispensable for COX assembly, COX activity, and mitochondrial respiration. Downregulation of the COX7B ortholog (cox7B) in medaka (Oryzias latipes) resulted in microcephaly and microphthalmia that recapitulated the MLS phenotype and demonstrated an essential function of complex IV activity in vertebrate CNS development. Our results indicate an evolutionary conserved role of the MRC complexes III and IV for the proper development of the CNS in vertebrates and uncover a group of mitochondrial diseases hallmarked by a developmental phenotype.

  2. miR-101 inhibits glioma cell invasion via the downregulation of COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunyang; Zheng, Chuanyi; Bai, Enqi; Yang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is the most common type of primary tumor of the central nervous system. The present study aimed to demonstrate the role of miR-101 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the initiation and development of glioma. The expression of miR-101 and COX-2 in normal and malignant human glial cells and tissues was determined by western blotting and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The role of miR-101 on COX-2 expression was evaluated by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. The effects of miR-101 and COX-2 in glioma cell proliferation and invasion was verified by CCK-8 test and Transwell assays, respectively. The present study demonstrated that miR-101 expression was downregulated while COX-2 was upregulated in glioma tissues and cells. Furthermore, transfection of miR-101 significantly downregulated COX-2 expression in both U373 and U87 glioma cells. In addition, further experiments revealed that overexpression of miR-101 resulted in significant inhibition of the in vitro proliferation and migration of glioma cells, and the in vivo growth of established tumors. Direct downregulation of COX-2 by transfection with corresponding small interfering RNA also inhibited the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells. These results indicate that downregulation of miR-101 is involved in the initiation and development of glioma via COX-2 upregulation.

  3. Acceleration of atherogenesis by COX-1-dependent prostanoid formation in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Praticò, D; Tillmann, C; Zhang, Z B; Li, H; FitzGerald, G A

    2001-03-13

    The cyclooxygenase (COX) product, prostacyclin (PGI(2)), inhibits platelet activation and vascular smooth-muscle cell migration and proliferation. Biochemically selective inhibition of COX-2 reduces PGI(2) biosynthesis substantially in humans. Because deletion of the PGI(2) receptor accelerates atherogenesis in the fat-fed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mouse, we wished to determine whether selective inhibition of COX-2 would accelerate atherogenesis in this model. To address this hypothesis, we used dosing with nimesulide, which inhibited COX-2 ex vivo, depressed urinary 2,3 dinor 6-keto PGF(1alpha) by approximately 60% but had no effect on thromboxane formation by platelets, which only express COX-1. By contrast, the isoform nonspecific inhibitor, indomethacin, suppressed platelet function and thromboxane formation ex vivo and in vivo, coincident with effects on PGI(2) biosynthesis indistinguishable from nimesulide. Indomethacin reduced the extent of atherosclerosis by 55 +/- 4%, whereas nimesulide failed to increase the rate of atherogenesis. Despite their divergent effects on atherogenesis, both drugs depressed two indices of systemic inflammation, soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 to a similar but incomplete degree. Neither drug altered serum lipids and the marked increase in vascular expression of COX-2 during atherogenesis. Accelerated progression of atherosclerosis is unlikely during chronic intake of specific COX-2 inhibitors. Furthermore, evidence that COX-1-derived prostanoids contribute to atherogenesis suggests that controlled evaluation of the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or aspirin on plaque progression in humans is timely.

  4. New Insights on COX-2 in Chronic Inflammation Driving Breast Cancer Growth and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Honor J; Saunders, C; Ramsay, R G; Thompson, E W

    2015-12-01

    The medicinal use of aspirin stretches back to ancient times, before it was manufactured in its pure form in the late 19th century. Its accepted mechanistic target, cyclooxygenase (COX), was discovered in the 1970s and since this landmark discovery, the therapeutic application of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has increased dramatically. The most significant benefits of NSAIDs are in conditions involving chronic inflammation (CI). Given the recognized role of CI in cancer development, the use of long-term NSAID treatment in the prevention of cancer is an enticing possibility. COX-2 is a key driver of CI, and here we review COX-2 expression as a predictor of survival in various cancer types, including breast. Obesity and post-partum involution are natural inflammatory states that are associated with increased breast cancer risk. We outline the COX-2 mediated mechanisms contributing to the growth of cancers. We dissect the cellular mechanism of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and how COX-2 may induce this to facilitate tumor progression. Finally we examine the potential regulation of COX-2 by c-Myb, and the possible interplay between c-Myb/COX-2 in proliferation, and hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF1α)/COX-2 in invasive pathways in breast cancer.

  5. The 2′-Trifluoromethyl Analogue of Indomethacin Is a Potent and Selective COX-2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Indomethacin is a potent, time-dependent, nonselective inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2). Deletion of the 2′-methyl group of indomethacin produces a weak, reversible COX inhibitor, leading us to explore functionality at that position. Here, we report that substitution of the 2′-methyl group of indomethacin with trifluoromethyl produces CF3–indomethacin, a tight-binding inhibitor with kinetic properties similar to those of indomethacin and unexpected COX-2 selectivity (IC50 mCOX-2 = 267 nM; IC50 oCOX-1 > 100 μM). Studies with site-directed mutants reveal that COX-2 selectivity results from insertion of the CF3 group into a small hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala-527, Val-349, Ser-530, and Leu-531 and projection of the methoxy group toward a side pocket bordered by Val-523. CF3–indomethacin inhibited COX-2 activity in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells and exhibited in vivo anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model with similar potency to that of indomethacin. PMID:23687559

  6. Glutathione selectively modulates the binding of platinum drugs to human copper chaperone Cox17.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linhong; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Han; Xi, Zhaoyong; Liu, Yangzhong

    2015-12-01

    The copper chaperone Cox17 (cytochrome c oxidase copper chaperone) has been shown to facilitate the delivery of cisplatin to mitochondria, which contributes to the overall cytotoxicity of the drug [Zhao et al. (2014) Chem. Commun. 50: , 2667-2669]. Kinetic data indicate that Cox17 has reactivity similar to glutathione (GSH), the most abundant thiol-rich molecule in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we found that GSH significantly modulates the reaction of platinum complexes with Cox17. GSH enhances the reactivity of three anti-cancer drugs (cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin) to Cox17, but suppresses the reaction of transplatin. Surprisingly, the pre-formed cisplatin-GSH adducts are highly reactive to Cox17; over 90% platinum transfers from GSH to Cox17. On the other hand, transplatin-GSH adducts are inert to Cox17. These different effects are consistent with the drug activity of these platinum complexes. In addition, GSH attenuates the protein aggregation of Cox17 induced by platination. These results indicate that the platinum-protein interactions could be substantially influenced by the cellular environment.

  7. New Insights on COX-2 in Chronic Inflammation Driving Breast Cancer Growth and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Honor J; Saunders, C; Ramsay, R G; Thompson, E W

    2015-12-01

    The medicinal use of aspirin stretches back to ancient times, before it was manufactured in its pure form in the late 19th century. Its accepted mechanistic target, cyclooxygenase (COX), was discovered in the 1970s and since this landmark discovery, the therapeutic application of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has increased dramatically. The most significant benefits of NSAIDs are in conditions involving chronic inflammation (CI). Given the recognized role of CI in cancer development, the use of long-term NSAID treatment in the prevention of cancer is an enticing possibility. COX-2 is a key driver of CI, and here we review COX-2 expression as a predictor of survival in various cancer types, including breast. Obesity and post-partum involution are natural inflammatory states that are associated with increased breast cancer risk. We outline the COX-2 mediated mechanisms contributing to the growth of cancers. We dissect the cellular mechanism of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and how COX-2 may induce this to facilitate tumor progression. Finally we examine the potential regulation of COX-2 by c-Myb, and the possible interplay between c-Myb/COX-2 in proliferation, and hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF1α)/COX-2 in invasive pathways in breast cancer. PMID:26193871

  8. Loss of COX5B inhibits proliferation and promotes senescence via mitochondrial dysfunction in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shui-Ping; Sun, He-Fen; Jiang, Hong-Lin; Li, Liang-Dong; Hu, Xin; Xu, Xiao-En; Jin, Wei

    2015-12-22

    COX5B, a peripheral subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase complex, has previously been reported to maintain the stability of this complex. However, its functions and mechanisms involved in breast cancer progression remain unclear. Here, by performing SILAC assays in breast cancer cell models and detecting COX5B expression in tissues, we found that COX5B expression was elevated in breast cancer. Down-regulation of COX5B in breast cancer cell lines can suppress cell proliferation and induced cell senescence which was accompanied by elevating production of IL-8 and other cytokines. Interestingly, conditioned medium from COX5B knockdown cells could promote breast cancer cell migration. Mechanistic studies reveal that COX5B silence induces an increase in production of ROS, depolarization of MMP and a decrease in ATP. What's more, silence of COX5B leads to metabolic disorders, such as increased glucose uptake and decreased lactate secretion. Collectively, our study shows that loss of COX5B induces mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequently leads to cell growth suppression and cell senescence. Cytokines such as IL-8 secreted by senescent cells may in turn alter the microenvironment which could enhance cell migration. These findings may provide a novel paradigm for the treatment which combined anti-cancer drugs with particular cytokine inhibitors such as IL-8 blockers.

  9. miR-101 inhibits glioma cell invasion via the downregulation of COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunyang; Zheng, Chuanyi; Bai, Enqi; Yang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is the most common type of primary tumor of the central nervous system. The present study aimed to demonstrate the role of miR-101 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the initiation and development of glioma. The expression of miR-101 and COX-2 in normal and malignant human glial cells and tissues was determined by western blotting and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The role of miR-101 on COX-2 expression was evaluated by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. The effects of miR-101 and COX-2 in glioma cell proliferation and invasion was verified by CCK-8 test and Transwell assays, respectively. The present study demonstrated that miR-101 expression was downregulated while COX-2 was upregulated in glioma tissues and cells. Furthermore, transfection of miR-101 significantly downregulated COX-2 expression in both U373 and U87 glioma cells. In addition, further experiments revealed that overexpression of miR-101 resulted in significant inhibition of the in vitro proliferation and migration of glioma cells, and the in vivo growth of established tumors. Direct downregulation of COX-2 by transfection with corresponding small interfering RNA also inhibited the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells. These results indicate that downregulation of miR-101 is involved in the initiation and development of glioma via COX-2 upregulation. PMID:27698824

  10. Urinary arsenic concentration adjustment factors and malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Nermell, Barbro; Lindberg, Anna-Lena; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Berglund, Marika; Persson, Lars Ake; El Arifeen, Shams; Vahter, Marie

    2008-02-01

    This study aims at evaluating the suitability of adjusting urinary concentrations of arsenic, or any other urinary biomarker, for variations in urine dilution by creatinine and specific gravity in a malnourished population. We measured the concentrations of metabolites of inorganic arsenic, creatinine and specific gravity in spot urine samples collected from 1466 individuals, 5-88 years of age, in Matlab, rural Bangladesh, where arsenic-contaminated drinking water and malnutrition are prevalent (about 30% of the adults had body mass index (BMI) below 18.5 kg/m(2)). The urinary concentrations of creatinine were low; on average 0.55 g/L in the adolescents and adults and about 0.35 g/L in the 5-12 years old children. Therefore, adjustment by creatinine gave much higher numerical values for the urinary arsenic concentrations than did the corresponding data expressed as microg/L, adjusted by specific gravity. As evaluated by multiple regression analyses, urinary creatinine, adjusted by specific gravity, was more affected by body size, age, gender and season than was specific gravity. Furthermore, urinary creatinine was found to be significantly associated with urinary arsenic, which further disqualifies the creatinine adjustment. PMID:17900556

  11. Correlation Weights in Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Niels G.; Jones, Jeff A.

    2010-01-01

    A general theory on the use of correlation weights in linear prediction has yet to be proposed. In this paper we take initial steps in developing such a theory by describing the conditions under which correlation weights perform well in population regression models. Using OLS weights as a comparison, we define cases in which the two weighting…

  12. Weighting Regressions by Propensity Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, David A.; Berk, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Regressions can be weighted by propensity scores in order to reduce bias. However, weighting is likely to increase random error in the estimates, and to bias the estimated standard errors downward, even when selection mechanisms are well understood. Moreover, in some cases, weighting will increase the bias in estimated causal parameters. If…

  13. Multiple Regression: A Leisurely Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Larry G.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    Multiple regression is a useful statistical technique when the researcher is considering situations in which variables of interest are theorized to be multiply caused. It may also be useful in those situations in which the researchers is interested in studies of predictability of phenomena of interest. This paper provides an introduction to…

  14. Cactus: An Introduction to Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2008-01-01

    When the author first used "VisiCalc," the author thought it a very useful tool when he had the formulas. But how could he design a spreadsheet if there was no known formula for the quantities he was trying to predict? A few months later, the author relates he learned to use multiple linear regression software and suddenly it all clicked into…

  15. Ridge Regression for Interactive Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory study of the value of ridge regression for interactive models is reported. Assuming that the linear terms in a simple interactive model are centered to eliminate non-essential multicollinearity, a variety of common models, representing both ordinal and disordinal interactions, are shown to have "orientations" that are favorable to…

  16. Logistic regression: a brief primer.

    PubMed

    Stoltzfus, Jill C

    2011-10-01

    Regression techniques are versatile in their application to medical research because they can measure associations, predict outcomes, and control for confounding variable effects. As one such technique, logistic regression is an efficient and powerful way to analyze the effect of a group of independent variables on a binary outcome by quantifying each independent variable's unique contribution. Using components of linear regression reflected in the logit scale, logistic regression iteratively identifies the strongest linear combination of variables with the greatest probability of detecting the observed outcome. Important considerations when conducting logistic regression include selecting independent variables, ensuring that relevant assumptions are met, and choosing an appropriate model building strategy. For independent variable selection, one should be guided by such factors as accepted theory, previous empirical investigations, clinical considerations, and univariate statistical analyses, with acknowledgement of potential confounding variables that should be accounted for. Basic assumptions that must be met for logistic regression include independence of errors, linearity in the logit for continuous variables, absence of multicollinearity, and lack of strongly influential outliers. Additionally, there should be an adequate number of events per independent variable to avoid an overfit model, with commonly recommended minimum "rules of thumb" ranging from 10 to 20 events per covariate. Regarding model building strategies, the three general types are direct/standard, sequential/hierarchical, and stepwise/statistical, with each having a different emphasis and purpose. Before reaching definitive conclusions from the results of any of these methods, one should formally quantify the model's internal validity (i.e., replicability within the same data set) and external validity (i.e., generalizability beyond the current sample). The resulting logistic regression model

  17. Cox-2 inhibitory effects of naturally occurring and modified fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Ringbom, T; Huss, U; Stenholm, A; Flock, S; Skattebøl, L; Perera, P; Bohlin, L

    2001-06-01

    In the search for new cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective inhibitors, the inhibitory effects of naturally occurring fatty acids and some of their structural derivatives on COX-2-catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis were investigated. Among these fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA), alpha-linolenic acid (alpha-LNA), myristic acid, and palmitic acid were isolated from a CH(2)Cl(2) extract of the plant Plantago major by bioassay-guided fractionation. Inhibitory effects of other natural, structurally related fatty acids were also investigated: stearic acid, oleic acid, pentadecanoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Further, the inhibitory effects of these compounds on COX-2- and COX-1-catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis was compared with the inhibition of some synthesized analogues of EPA and DHA with ether or thioether functions. The most potent COX-2-catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis inhibitor was all-(Z)-5-thia-8,11,14,17-eicosatetraenoic acid (2), followed by EPA, DHA, alpha-LNA, LA, (7E,11Z,14Z,17Z)-5-thiaeicosa-7,11,14,17-tetraenoic acid, all-(Z)-3-thia-6,9,12,15-octadecatetraenoic acid, and (5E,9Z,12Z,15Z,18Z)-3-oxaheneicosa-5,9,12,15,18-pentaenoic acid, with IC(50) values ranging from 3.9 to180 microM. The modified compound 2 and alpha-LNA were most selective toward COX-2, with COX-2/COX-1 ratios of 0.2 and 0.1, respectively. This study shows that several of the natural fatty acids as well as all of the semisynthetic thioether-containing fatty acids inhibited COX-2-catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis, where alpha-LNA and compound 2 showed selectivity toward COX-2. PMID:11421736

  18. Regression Verification Using Impact Summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, John; Person, Suzette J.; Rungta, Neha; Thachuk, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Regression verification techniques are used to prove equivalence of syntactically similar programs. Checking equivalence of large programs, however, can be computationally expensive. Existing regression verification techniques rely on abstraction and decomposition techniques to reduce the computational effort of checking equivalence of the entire program. These techniques are sound but not complete. In this work, we propose a novel approach to improve scalability of regression verification by classifying the program behaviors generated during symbolic execution as either impacted or unimpacted. Our technique uses a combination of static analysis and symbolic execution to generate summaries of impacted program behaviors. The impact summaries are then checked for equivalence using an o-the-shelf decision procedure. We prove that our approach is both sound and complete for sequential programs, with respect to the depth bound of symbolic execution. Our evaluation on a set of sequential C artifacts shows that reducing the size of the summaries can help reduce the cost of software equivalence checking. Various reduction, abstraction, and compositional techniques have been developed to help scale software verification techniques to industrial-sized systems. Although such techniques have greatly increased the size and complexity of systems that can be checked, analysis of large software systems remains costly. Regression analysis techniques, e.g., regression testing [16], regression model checking [22], and regression verification [19], restrict the scope of the analysis by leveraging the differences between program versions. These techniques are based on the idea that if code is checked early in development, then subsequent versions can be checked against a prior (checked) version, leveraging the results of the previous analysis to reduce analysis cost of the current version. Regression verification addresses the problem of proving equivalence of closely related program

  19. Bayesian dynamic regression models for interval censored survival data with application to children dental health.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Chen, Ming-Hui; Yan, Jun

    2013-07-01

    Cox models with time-varying coefficients offer great flexibility in capturing the temporal dynamics of covariate effects on event times, which could be hidden from a Cox proportional hazards model. Methodology development for varying coefficient Cox models, however, has been largely limited to right censored data; only limited work on interval censored data has been done. In most existing methods for varying coefficient models, analysts need to specify which covariate coefficients are time-varying and which are not at the time of fitting. We propose a dynamic Cox regression model for interval censored data in a Bayesian framework, where the coefficient curves are piecewise constant but the number of pieces and the jump points are covariate specific and estimated from the data. The model automatically determines the extent to which the temporal dynamics is needed for each covariate, resulting in smoother and more stable curve estimates. The posterior computation is carried out via an efficient reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Inference of each coefficient is based on an average of models with different number of pieces and jump points. A simulation study with three covariates, each with a coefficient of different degree in temporal dynamics, confirmed that the dynamic model is preferred to the existing time-varying model in terms of model comparison criteria through conditional predictive ordinate. When applied to a dental health data of children with age between 7 and 12 years, the dynamic model reveals that the relative risk of emergence of permanent tooth 24 between children with and without an infected primary predecessor is the highest at around age 7.5, and that it gradually reduces to one after age 11. These findings were not seen from the existing studies with Cox proportional hazards models. PMID:23389549

  20. Simple, Internally Adjustable Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    Valve containing simple in-line, adjustable, flow-control orifice made from ordinary plumbing fitting and two allen setscrews. Construction of valve requires only simple drilling, tapping, and grinding. Orifice installed in existing fitting, avoiding changes in rest of plumbing.

  1. Self Adjusting Sunglasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Corning Glass Works' Serengeti Driver sunglasses are unique in that their lenses self-adjust and filter light while suppressing glare. They eliminate more than 99% of the ultraviolet rays in sunlight. The frames are based on the NASA Anthropometric Source Book.

  2. Rural to Urban Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Jane A.

    Personal interviews with 100 former farm operators living in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, were conducted in an attempt to understand the nature of the adjustment process caused by migration from rural to urban surroundings. Requirements for inclusion in the study were that respondents had owned or operated a farm for at least 3 years, had left their…

  3. Self adjusting inclinometer

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    An inclinometer utilizing synchronous demodulation for high resolution and electronic offset adjustment provides a wide dynamic range without any moving components. A device encompassing a tiltmeter and accompanying electronic circuitry provides quasi-leveled tilt sensors that detect highly resolved tilt change without signal saturation.

  4. Inference for survival prediction under the regularized Cox model.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, Jennifer A; Cai, Tianxi

    2016-10-01

    When a moderate number of potential predictors are available and a survival model is fit with regularization to achieve variable selection, providing accurate inference on the predicted survival can be challenging. We investigate inference on the predicted survival estimated after fitting a Cox model under regularization guaranteeing the oracle property. We demonstrate that existing asymptotic formulas for the standard errors of the coefficients tend to underestimate the variability for some coefficients, while typical resampling such as the bootstrap tends to overestimate it; these approaches can both lead to inaccurate variance estimation for predicted survival functions. We propose a two-stage adaptation of a resampling approach that brings the estimated error in line with the truth. In stage 1, we estimate the coefficients in the observed data set and in [Formula: see text] resampled data sets, and allow the resampled coefficient estimates to vote on whether each coefficient should be 0. For those coefficients voted as zero, we set both the point and interval estimates to [Formula: see text] In stage 2, to make inference about coefficients not voted as zero in stage 1, we refit the penalized model in the observed data and in the [Formula: see text] resampled data sets with only variables corresponding to those coefficients. We demonstrate that ensemble voting-based point and interval estimators of the coefficients perform well in finite samples, and prove that the point estimator maintains the oracle property. We extend this approach to derive inference procedures for survival functions and demonstrate that our proposed interval estimation procedures substantially outperform estimators based on asymptotic inference or standard bootstrap. We further illustrate our proposed procedures to predict breast cancer survival in a gene expression study. PMID:27107008

  5. Inference for survival prediction under the regularized Cox model.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, Jennifer A; Cai, Tianxi

    2016-10-01

    When a moderate number of potential predictors are available and a survival model is fit with regularization to achieve variable selection, providing accurate inference on the predicted survival can be challenging. We investigate inference on the predicted survival estimated after fitting a Cox model under regularization guaranteeing the oracle property. We demonstrate that existing asymptotic formulas for the standard errors of the coefficients tend to underestimate the variability for some coefficients, while typical resampling such as the bootstrap tends to overestimate it; these approaches can both lead to inaccurate variance estimation for predicted survival functions. We propose a two-stage adaptation of a resampling approach that brings the estimated error in line with the truth. In stage 1, we estimate the coefficients in the observed data set and in [Formula: see text] resampled data sets, and allow the resampled coefficient estimates to vote on whether each coefficient should be 0. For those coefficients voted as zero, we set both the point and interval estimates to [Formula: see text] In stage 2, to make inference about coefficients not voted as zero in stage 1, we refit the penalized model in the observed data and in the [Formula: see text] resampled data sets with only variables corresponding to those coefficients. We demonstrate that ensemble voting-based point and interval estimators of the coefficients perform well in finite samples, and prove that the point estimator maintains the oracle property. We extend this approach to derive inference procedures for survival functions and demonstrate that our proposed interval estimation procedures substantially outperform estimators based on asymptotic inference or standard bootstrap. We further illustrate our proposed procedures to predict breast cancer survival in a gene expression study.

  6. 3D Regression Heat Map Analysis of Population Study Data.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Paul; Lawonn, Kai; Glaßer, Sylvia; Niemann, Uli; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Preim, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies comprise heterogeneous data about a subject group to define disease-specific risk factors. These data contain information (features) about a subject's lifestyle, medical status as well as medical image data. Statistical regression analysis is used to evaluate these features and to identify feature combinations indicating a disease (the target feature). We propose an analysis approach of epidemiological data sets by incorporating all features in an exhaustive regression-based analysis. This approach combines all independent features w.r.t. a target feature. It provides a visualization that reveals insights into the data by highlighting relationships. The 3D Regression Heat Map, a novel 3D visual encoding, acts as an overview of the whole data set. It shows all combinations of two to three independent features with a specific target disease. Slicing through the 3D Regression Heat Map allows for the detailed analysis of the underlying relationships. Expert knowledge about disease-specific hypotheses can be included into the analysis by adjusting the regression model formulas. Furthermore, the influences of features can be assessed using a difference view comparing different calculation results. We applied our 3D Regression Heat Map method to a hepatic steatosis data set to reproduce results from a data mining-driven analysis. A qualitative analysis was conducted on a breast density data set. We were able to derive new hypotheses about relations between breast density and breast lesions with breast cancer. With the 3D Regression Heat Map, we present a visual overview of epidemiological data that allows for the first time an interactive regression-based analysis of large feature sets with respect to a disease. PMID:26529689

  7. 3D Regression Heat Map Analysis of Population Study Data.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Paul; Lawonn, Kai; Glaßer, Sylvia; Niemann, Uli; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Preim, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies comprise heterogeneous data about a subject group to define disease-specific risk factors. These data contain information (features) about a subject's lifestyle, medical status as well as medical image data. Statistical regression analysis is used to evaluate these features and to identify feature combinations indicating a disease (the target feature). We propose an analysis approach of epidemiological data sets by incorporating all features in an exhaustive regression-based analysis. This approach combines all independent features w.r.t. a target feature. It provides a visualization that reveals insights into the data by highlighting relationships. The 3D Regression Heat Map, a novel 3D visual encoding, acts as an overview of the whole data set. It shows all combinations of two to three independent features with a specific target disease. Slicing through the 3D Regression Heat Map allows for the detailed analysis of the underlying relationships. Expert knowledge about disease-specific hypotheses can be included into the analysis by adjusting the regression model formulas. Furthermore, the influences of features can be assessed using a difference view comparing different calculation results. We applied our 3D Regression Heat Map method to a hepatic steatosis data set to reproduce results from a data mining-driven analysis. A qualitative analysis was conducted on a breast density data set. We were able to derive new hypotheses about relations between breast density and breast lesions with breast cancer. With the 3D Regression Heat Map, we present a visual overview of epidemiological data that allows for the first time an interactive regression-based analysis of large feature sets with respect to a disease.

  8. The inflammatory effect of infection with Hymenolepis diminuta via the increased expression and activity of COX-1 and COX-2 in the rat jejunum and colon.

    PubMed

    Kosik-Bogacka, D I; Baranowska-Bosiacka, I; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, A; Lanocha-Arendarczyk, N; Gutowska, I; Korbecki, J; Namięta, H; Rotter, I

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Hymenolepis diminuta may affect the expression and activity of cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), resulting in the altered levels of their main products - prostaglandins (PGE2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2). The study used the same experimental model as in our previous studies in which we had observed changes in the transepithelial ion transport, tight junctions and in the indicators of oxidative stress, in both small and large intestines of rats infected with H. diminuta. In this paper, we investigated not only the site of immediate presence of the tapeworm (jejunum), but also a distant site (colon). Inflammation related to H. diminuta infection is associated with the increased expression and activation of cyclooxygenase (COX), enzyme responsible for the synthesis of PGE2 and TXB2, local hormones contributing to the enhanced inflammatory reaction in the jejunum and colon in the infected rats. The increased COX expression and activity is probably caused by the increased levels of free radicals and the weakening of the host's antioxidant defense induced by the presence of the parasite. Our immunohistochemical analysis showed that H. diminuta infection affected not only the intensity of the immunodetection of COX but also the enzyme protein localization within intestinal epithelial cells - from the entire cytoplasm to apical/basal regions of cells, or even to the nucleus. PMID:27466058

  9. Quantile Regression With Measurement Error

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ying; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Regression quantiles can be substantially biased when the covariates are measured with error. In this paper we propose a new method that produces consistent linear quantile estimation in the presence of covariate measurement error. The method corrects the measurement error induced bias by constructing joint estimating equations that simultaneously hold for all the quantile levels. An iterative EM-type estimation algorithm to obtain the solutions to such joint estimation equations is provided. The finite sample performance of the proposed method is investigated in a simulation study, and compared to the standard regression calibration approach. Finally, we apply our methodology to part of the National Collaborative Perinatal Project growth data, a longitudinal study with an unusual measurement error structure. PMID:20305802

  10. Precision and Recall for Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torgo, Luis; Ribeiro, Rita

    Cost sensitive prediction is a key task in many real world applications. Most existing research in this area deals with classification problems. This paper addresses a related regression problem: the prediction of rare extreme values of a continuous variable. These values are often regarded as outliers and removed from posterior analysis. However, for many applications (e.g. in finance, meteorology, biology, etc.) these are the key values that we want to accurately predict. Any learning method obtains models by optimizing some preference criteria. In this paper we propose new evaluation criteria that are more adequate for these applications. We describe a generalization for regression of the concepts of precision and recall often used in classification. Using these new evaluation metrics we are able to focus the evaluation of predictive models on the cases that really matter for these applications. Our experiments indicate the advantages of the use of these new measures when comparing predictive models in the context of our target applications.

  11. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  12. Citral, a component of lemongrass oil, activates PPARα and γ and suppresses COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Katsukawa, Michiko; Nakata, Rieko; Takizawa, Yoshie; Hori, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Saori; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2010-11-01

    Lemongrass is a widely used herb as a food flavoring, as a perfume, and for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory purposes; however, the molecular mechanisms of these effects have not been elucidated. Previously, we identified carvacrol from the essential oil of thyme as a suppressor of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, a key enzyme for prostaglandin synthesis, and also an activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), a molecular target for "lifestyle-related" diseases. In this study, we evaluated the essential oil of lemongrass using our established assays for COX-2 and PPARs. We found that COX-2 promoter activity was suppressed by lemongrass oil in cell-based transfection assays, and we identified citral as a major component in the suppression of COX-2 expression and as an activator of PPARα and γ. PPARγ-dependent suppression of COX-2 promoter activity was observed in response to citral treatment. In human macrophage-like U937 cells, citral suppressed both LPS-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, dose-dependently. Moreover, citral induced the mRNA expression of the PPARα-responsive carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 gene and the PPARγ-responsive fatty acid binding protein 4 gene, suggesting that citral activates PPARα and γ, and regulates COX-2 expression. These results are important for understanding the anti-inflammatory and anti-lifestyle-related disease properties of lemongrass.

  13. Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, activates PPARalpha and gamma and suppresses COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Mariko; Nakata, Rieko; Katsukawa, Michiko; Hori, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Saori; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis, plays a key role in inflammation and circulatory homeostasis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily and are involved in the control of COX-2 expression, and vice versa. Here, we show that COX-2 promoter activity was suppressed by essential oils derived from thyme, clove, rose, eucalyptus, fennel, and bergamot in cell-based transfection assays using bovine arterial endothelial cells. Moreover, from thyme oil, we identified carvacrol as a major component of the suppressor of COX-2 expression and an activator of PPARalpha and gamma. PPARgamma-dependent suppression of COX-2 promoter activity was observed in response to carvacrol treatment. In human macrophage-like U937 cells, carvacrol suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting that carvacrol regulates COX-2 expression through its agonistic effect on PPARgamma. These results may be important in understanding the antiinflammatory and antilifestyle-related disease properties of carvacrol. PMID:19578162

  14. Cox-2 levels in canine mammary tumors, including inflammatory mammary carcinoma: clinicopathological features and prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Felisbina Luisa; Perez-Alenza, Maria Dolores; Silvan, Gema; Peña, Laura; Lopes, Carlos; Illera, Juan Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (Cox-2) plays an important role in mammary carcinogenesis, nevertheless, its role in canine mammary tumors, and particularly in inflammatory mammary carcinoma (IMC), is unknown. Tumor Cox-2 levels were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay, in post-surgical tumor homogenates of 129 mammary tumors (62 dysplasias and benign tumors, 57 malignant non-IMC and 10 IMC) from 57 female dogs. The highest Cox-2 values were detected in the IMC group. In non-IMC malignant tumors, high values of Cox-2 were related to skin ulceration (p < 0.001) and tumor size (p < 0.001). The follow-up study revealed that high Cox-2 levels were related with recurrence (p = 0.002), metastases (p < 0.001), disease-free survival (p < 0.001) and overall survival (p < 0.001). This study demonstrates an association between intra-tumor Cox-2 levels and poor prognosis. The high levels found in IMC cases could indicate a special role of Cox-2 in the inflammatory phenotype and open the possibility of additional new therapeutic approaches in this special type of mammary cancer in humans and dogs.

  15. Case-mix adjustment for evaluation of mortality in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Gerald T; Quinton, Hebe B; Kahn, Richard; Robichaud, Priscilla; Maddock, Joanne; Lever, Thomas; Detzer, Mark; Brooks, John G

    2002-02-01

    Comparison of patient mortality rates in cystic fibrosis (CF) obtained from different institutions requires the use of case-mix adjustment methods to account for baseline differences in patient and disease characteristics. There is no current professional consensus on the use of case-mix adjustment methods for use in comparing mortality rates in CF. Characteristics used for this case-mix adjustment should include those that are different across institutions and are associated with patient survival. They should not include characteristics of disease severity that may be a consequence of effectiveness of treatment. The goal of these analyses was to identify a set of these characteristics of patients or disease that would be useful for case-mix adjustment of CF mortality rates. Data from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry and from the United States Census of the Population (1990) were used in these analyses. Kaplan-Meier techniques, the log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to estimate survivorship, calculate hazard ratios (HR), 95% confidence intervals (CI(95%)), and to conduct tests of statistical significance. The data set included all 30,469 CF patients seen at CF Care Centers from 1982-1998. There were 5,906 deaths during 508,721 person-years of follow-up. In multivariate analyses, female gender (HR 1.30, CI(95%) (1.16, 1,47), P < 0.001), nonwhite race (HR 1.48, CI(95%) (1.07, 2.04), P = 0.018), Hispanic ethnicity (HR 1.85, CI(95%) (1.42, 2.43), P < 0.001), and symptomatic presentation (respiratory, gastrointestinal, respiratory and gastrointestinal, meconium ileus, and other symptomatic presentations; HRs 1.38-1.83; P values, 0.028 to < 0.001) were associated with higher risk of death. The homozygous Delta F508 genotype (HR 1.36, CI(95%) (1.19, 1.55), P < 0.001) and neither mutation being Delta F508 (HR 1.40, CI(95%) (1.15, 1.71), P = 0.001) were also associated with higher risk of death. Patients diagnosed after 36 months

  16. HGF/MET signaling promotes glioma growth via up-regulation of Cox-2 expression and PGE2 production

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Haiyan; Liu, Xing; Du, Wenzong; Li, Yongli; Zhang, Junhe; Chen, Lingchao; Jiang, Chuanlu

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase2 (Cox-2) is well known for glioma growth through up-regulation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. MET, a hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor, is also frequently high expressed in glioma, which promotes glioma growth and invasion. Here, we demonstrate that HGF/MET signaling can promote PGE2 production in glioma cells via Cox-2 up-regulation. RNA inhibition of MET suggested that MET signaling is essential for Cox-2 up-regulation. Moreover, HGF could enhance Cox-2 expression and PGE2 release. Knockdown of Cox-2 inhibited growth-promoting effects of HGF, suggesting that HGF/MET functioned via Cox-2/PGE2 pathway. Therefore, our work reveals a critical relationship of Cox-2/PGE2 and HGF/MET signaling in promoting glioma cells proliferation. Further, targeting MET and Cox-2 may represent an attractive target therapy for glioma. PMID:26097553

  17. Illustrated techniques for performing the Cox-Maze IV procedure through a right mini-thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Jason O.; Saint, Lindsey L.; Leidenfrost, Jeremy E.

    2014-01-01

    The Cox-Maze IV procedure has replaced the “cut-and-sew” technique of the original Cox-Maze operation with lines of ablation created using bipolar radiofrequency (RF) and cryothermal energy devices. In select patients, this procedure can be performed through a right mini-thoracotomy. This illustrated review is the first to detail the complete steps of the Cox-Maze IV procedure performed through a right mini-thoracotomy with careful attention paid to operative anatomy and advice. Pre- and post-operative management and outcomes are also discussed. This should be a practical guide for the practicing cardiac surgeon. PMID:24516807

  18. Cyclooxygenases in human and mouse skin and cultured human keratinocytes: association of COX-2 expression with human keratinocyte differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.; Rakhlin, N.; Habib, A.; Maclouf, J.; Goldyne, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Epidermal expression of the two isoforms of the prostaglandin H-generating cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) was evaluated both by immunohistochemistry performed on human and mouse skin biopsy sections and by Western blotting of protein extracts from cultured human neonatal foreskin keratinocytes. In normal human skin, COX-1 immunostaining is observed throughout the epidermis whereas COX-2 immunostaining increases in the more differentiated, suprabasilar keratinocytes. Basal cell carcinomas express little if any COX-1 or COX-2 immunostaining whereas both isozymes are strongly expressed in squamous cell carcinomas deriving from a more differentiated layer of the epidermis. In human keratinocyte cultures, raising the extracellular calcium concentration, a recognized stimulus for keratinocyte differentiation, leads to an increased expression of both COX-2 protein and mRNA; expression of COX-1 protein, however, shows no significant alteration in response to calcium. Because of a recent report that failed to show COX-2 in normal mouse epidermis, we also looked for COX-1 and COX-2 immunostaining in sections of normal and acetone-treated mouse skin. In agreement with a previous report, some COX-1, but no COX-2, immunostaining is seen in normal murine epidermis. However, following acetone treatment, there is a marked increase in COX-1 expression as well as the appearance of significant COX-2 immunostaining in the basal layer. These data suggest that in human epidermis as well as in human keratinocyte cultures, the expression of COX-2 occurs as a part of normal keratinocyte differentiation whereas in murine epidermis, its constitutive expression is absent, but inducible as previously published.

  19. Precision adjustable stage

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Silva, Leonard L.

    1988-01-01

    An improved mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A stage center block is mounted on each of two opposite sides by a pair of spaced ball bearing tracks which provide stability as well as simplicity. The use of the spaced ball bearing pairs in conjunction with an adjustment screw which also provides support eliminates extraneous stabilization components and permits maximization of the area of the center block laser transmission hole.

  20. Adjustable vane windmills

    SciTech Connect

    Ducker, W.L.

    1982-09-14

    A system of rotatably and pivotally mounted radially extended bent supports for radially extending windmill rotor vanes in combination with axially movable radially extended control struts connected to the vanes with semi-automatic and automatic torque and other sensing and servo units provide automatic adjustment of the windmill vanes relative to their axes of rotation to produce mechanical output at constant torque or at constant speed or electrical quantities dependent thereon.

  1. Adjustable vane windmills

    SciTech Connect

    Ducker, W.L.

    1980-01-15

    A system of rotatably and pivotally mounted radially extended bent supports for radially extending windmill rotor vanes in combination with axially movable radially extended control struts connected to the vanes with semi-automatic and automatic torque and other sensing and servo units provide automatic adjustment of the windmill vanes relative to their axes of rotation to produce mechanical output at constant torque or at constant speed or electrical quantities dependent thereon.

  2. Adjustable vane windmills

    SciTech Connect

    Ducker, W.L.

    1982-09-07

    A system of rotatably and pivotally mounted radially extended bent supports for radially extending windmill rotor vanes in combination with axially movable radially extended control struts connected to the vanes with semi-automatic and automatic torque and other sensing and servo units provide automatic adjustment of the windmill vanes relative to their axes of rotation to produce mechanical output at constant torque or at constant speed or electrical quantities dependent thereon.

  3. Adjustable Autonomy Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schrenkenghost, Debra K.

    2001-01-01

    The Adjustable Autonomy Testbed (AAT) is a simulation-based testbed located in the Intelligent Systems Laboratory in the Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division at NASA Johnson Space Center. The purpose of the testbed is to support evaluation and validation of prototypes of adjustable autonomous agent software for control and fault management for complex systems. The AA T project has developed prototype adjustable autonomous agent software and human interfaces for cooperative fault management. This software builds on current autonomous agent technology by altering the architecture, components and interfaces for effective teamwork between autonomous systems and human experts. Autonomous agents include a planner, flexible executive, low level control and deductive model-based fault isolation. Adjustable autonomy is intended to increase the flexibility and effectiveness of fault management with an autonomous system. The test domain for this work is control of advanced life support systems for habitats for planetary exploration. The CONFIG hybrid discrete event simulation environment provides flexible and dynamically reconfigurable models of the behavior of components and fluids in the life support systems. Both discrete event and continuous (discrete time) simulation are supported, and flows and pressures are computed globally. This provides fast dynamic simulations of interacting hardware systems in closed loops that can be reconfigured during operations scenarios, producing complex cascading effects of operations and failures. Current object-oriented model libraries support modeling of fluid systems, and models have been developed of physico-chemical and biological subsystems for processing advanced life support gases. In FY01, water recovery system models will be developed.

  4. Psychosocial adjustment to ALS: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Matuz, Tamara; Birbaumer, Niels; Hautzinger, Martin; Kübler, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    For the current study the Lazarian stress-coping theory and the appendant model of psychosocial adjustment to chronic illness and disabilities (Pakenham, 1999) has shaped the foundation for identifying determinants of adjustment to ALS. We aimed to investigate the evolution of psychosocial adjustment to ALS and to determine its long-term predictors. A longitudinal study design with four measurement time points was therefore, used to assess patients' quality of life, depression, and stress-coping model related aspects, such as illness characteristics, social support, cognitive appraisals, and coping strategies during a period of 2 years. Regression analyses revealed that 55% of the variance of severity of depressive symptoms and 47% of the variance in quality of life at T2 was accounted for by all the T1 predictor variables taken together. On the level of individual contributions, protective buffering, and appraisal of own coping potential accounted for a significant percentage in the variance in severity of depressive symptoms, whereas problem management coping strategies explained variance in quality of life scores. Illness characteristics at T2 did not explain any variance of both adjustment outcomes. Overall, the pattern of the longitudinal results indicated stable depressive symptoms and quality of life indices reflecting a successful adjustment to the disease across four measurement time points during a period of about two years. Empirical evidence is provided for the predictive value of social support, cognitive appraisals, and coping strategies, but not illness parameters such as severity and duration for adaptation to ALS. The current study contributes to a better conceptualization of adjustment, allowing us to provide evidence-based support beyond medical and physical intervention for people with ALS. PMID:26441696

  5. Adolescent suicide attempts and adult adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Brière, Frédéric N.; Rohde, Paul; Seeley, John R.; Klein, Daniel; Lewinsohn, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adolescent suicide attempts are disproportionally prevalent and frequently of low severity, raising questions regarding their long-term prognostic implications. In this study, we examined whether adolescent attempts were associated with impairments related to suicidality, psychopathology, and psychosocial functioning in adulthood (objective 1) and whether these impairments were better accounted for by concurrent adolescent confounders (objective 2). Method 816 adolescents were assessed using interviews and questionnaires at four time points from adolescence to adulthood. We examined whether lifetime suicide attempts in adolescence (by T2, mean age 17) predicted adult outcomes (by T4, mean age 30) using linear and logistic regressions in unadjusted models (objective 1) and adjusting for sociodemographic background, adolescent psychopathology, and family risk factors (objective 2). Results In unadjusted analyses, adolescent suicide attempts predicted poorer adjustment on all outcomes, except those related to social role status. After adjustment, adolescent attempts remained predictive of axis I and II psychopathology (anxiety disorder, antisocial and borderline personality disorder symptoms), global and social adjustment, risky sex, and psychiatric treatment utilization. However, adolescent attempts no longer predicted most adult outcomes, notably suicide attempts and major depressive disorder. Secondary analyses indicated that associations did not differ by sex and attempt characteristics (intent, lethality, recurrence). Conclusions Adolescent suicide attempters are at high risk of protracted and wide-ranging impairments, regardless of the characteristics of their attempt. Although attempts specifically predict (and possibly influence) several outcomes, results suggest that most impairments reflect the confounding contributions of other individual and family problems or vulnerabilites in adolescent attempters. PMID:25421360

  6. PSHREG: a SAS macro for proportional and nonproportional subdistribution hazards regression.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Maria; Plischke, Max; Leffondré, Karen; Heinze, Georg

    2015-02-01

    We present a new SAS macro %pshreg that can be used to fit a proportional subdistribution hazards model for survival data subject to competing risks. Our macro first modifies the input data set appropriately and then applies SAS's standard Cox regression procedure, PROC PHREG, using weights and counting-process style of specifying survival times to the modified data set. The modified data set can also be used to estimate cumulative incidence curves for the event of interest. The application of PROC PHREG has several advantages, e.g., it directly enables the user to apply the Firth correction, which has been proposed as a solution to the problem of undefined (infinite) maximum likelihood estimates in Cox regression, frequently encountered in small sample analyses. Deviation from proportional subdistribution hazards can be detected by both inspecting Schoenfeld-type residuals and testing correlation of these residuals with time, or by including interactions of covariates with functions of time. We illustrate application of these extended methods for competing risk regression using our macro, which is freely available at: http://cemsiis.meduniwien.ac.at/en/kb/science-research/software/statistical-software/pshreg, by means of analysis of a real chronic kidney disease study. We discuss differences in features and capabilities of %pshreg and the recent (January 2014) SAS PROC PHREG implementation of proportional subdistribution hazards modelling.

  7. Regression analysis of cytopathological data

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, A.S.; McLarty, J.W.; Fortson, N.; Anderson, K.

    1982-12-01

    Epithelial cells from the human body are frequently labelled according to one of several ordered levels of abnormality, ranging from normal to malignant. The label of the most abnormal cell in a specimen determines the score for the specimen. This paper presents a model for the regression of specimen scores against continuous and discrete variables, as in host exposure to carcinogens. Application to data and tests for adequacy of model fit are illustrated using sputum specimens obtained from a cohort of former asbestos workers.

  8. The Impact of Financial Sophistication on Adjustable Rate Mortgage Ownership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hyrum; Finke, Michael S.; Huston, Sandra J.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of a financial sophistication scale on adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) borrowing is explored. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis using recent data from the Survey of Consumer Finances reveal that ARM borrowing is driven by both the least and most financially sophisticated households but for different reasons. Less…

  9. Effects of Relational Authenticity on Adjustment to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, A. Stephen; Holman, Rachel L.; Lancaster, Chloe; Gotay, Stephanie G.

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the association between relational health and student adjustment to college. Data were collected from 138 undergraduate students completing their 1st semester at a large university in the mid-southern United States. Regression analysis indicated that higher levels of relational authenticity were a predictor of success during…

  10. Mediating Effects of Relationships with Mentors on College Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, A. Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between student adjustment to college and relational health with peers, mentors, and the community. Data were collected from 80 undergraduate students completing their first semester of course work at a large university in the mid-South. A series of simultaneous multiple regression analyses indicated that…

  11. Celebration of the contributions of Art Cox to stellar pulsation interpretations

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J.I.

    1997-10-02

    A roughly chronological account is given of Arthur N. Coxs published work of 1953-1996 in, mostly, stellar pulsation theory, with a digression into stellar opacity. When possible, his work is placed in the context of the contemporary efforts.

  12. COX-2 expression induced by diesel particles involves chromatin modification and degradation of HDAC1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the inflammatory response induced by physiologic and stress stimuli. Exposure to diesel exhaust particulate matter (DEP) has been shown to induce pulmonary inflammation and exacerbate asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary dis...

  13. The expression of COX-2 in VEGF-treated endothelial cells is mediated through protein tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Akarasereenont, Pravit C; Techatraisak, Kitirat; Thaworn, Athiwat; Chotewuttakorn, Sirikul

    2002-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX), existing as the COX-1 and COX-2 isoforms, converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2, which is then further metabolized to various prostaglandins. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been shown to play important roles in inflammation and is upregulated by the prostaglandin E series through COX-2 in several cell types. Here, we have investigated the effects of VEGF on the COX isoform expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The signalling mechanism of the COX isoform expressed in endothelial cells activated with VEGF will be also investigated using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, and protein kinase C inhibitor, staurosporine. The activity of COX-2 was assessed by measuring the production of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha in the presence of exogenous arachidonic acids (10 microM, 10 min) by enzyme immunoassay. The expression of COX isoform protein was detected by immunoblot using specific antibodies. Untreated HUVEC contained no COX-2 protein. In HUVEC treated with VEGF (0.01-50 ng/ml), COX-2 protein, but not COX-1, and COX activity were increased in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the increased COX-2 protein and activity in response to VEGF (10 ng/ml) was inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein (0.05-5 microg/ml), but not by the protein kinase C inhibitor, staurosporine (0.1-10 ng/ml). Thus, the induction of COX-2 by VEGF in endothelial cells was mediated through protein tyrosine kinase, and the uses of specific COX-2 inhibitors in these conditions, in which VEGF was involved, might have a role. PMID:11926591

  14. Multiatlas Segmentation as Nonparametric Regression

    PubMed Central

    Awate, Suyash P.; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel theoretical framework to model and analyze the statistical characteristics of a wide range of segmentation methods that incorporate a database of label maps or atlases; such methods are termed as label fusion or multiatlas segmentation. We model these multiatlas segmentation problems as nonparametric regression problems in the high-dimensional space of image patches. We analyze the nonparametric estimator’s convergence behavior that characterizes expected segmentation error as a function of the size of the multiatlas database. We show that this error has an analytic form involving several parameters that are fundamental to the specific segmentation problem (determined by the chosen anatomical structure, imaging modality, registration algorithm, and label-fusion algorithm). We describe how to estimate these parameters and show that several human anatomical structures exhibit the trends modeled analytically. We use these parameter estimates to optimize the regression estimator. We show that the expected error for large database sizes is well predicted by models learned on small databases. Thus, a few expert segmentations can help predict the database sizes required to keep the expected error below a specified tolerance level. Such cost-benefit analysis is crucial for deploying clinical multiatlas segmentation systems. PMID:24802528

  15. Variable Selection in ROC Regression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Regression models are introduced into the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to accommodate effects of covariates, such as genes. If many covariates are available, the variable selection issue arises. The traditional induced methodology separately models outcomes of diseased and nondiseased groups; thus, separate application of variable selections to two models will bring barriers in interpretation, due to differences in selected models. Furthermore, in the ROC regression, the accuracy of area under the curve (AUC) should be the focus instead of aiming at the consistency of model selection or the good prediction performance. In this paper, we obtain one single objective function with the group SCAD to select grouped variables, which adapts to popular criteria of model selection, and propose a two-stage framework to apply the focused information criterion (FIC). Some asymptotic properties of the proposed methods are derived. Simulation studies show that the grouped variable selection is superior to separate model selections. Furthermore, the FIC improves the accuracy of the estimated AUC compared with other criteria. PMID:24312135

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in high-risk premalignant oral lesions.

    PubMed

    Sudbø, Jon; Ristimäki, Ari; Sondresen, Jan Erik; Kildal, Wanja; Boysen, Morten; Koppang, Hanna S; Reith, Albrecht; Risberg, Björn; Nesland, Jahn M; Bryne, Magne

    2003-07-01

    Emerging data indicate a link between genetic instability and up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). To see if individuals at high risk of oral cancer are candidates for treatment with selective COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs), levels of COX-2 expression in healthy, premalignant and cancerous oral mucosa were compared with the occurrence of DNA ploidy status as a genetic risk marker of oral cancer. COX-2 gene product was evaluated immunohistochemically in 30 healthy persons, in 22 patients with dysplastic lesions without previous or concomitant carcinomas, and in 29 patients with oral carcinomas. The immunohistochemical findings were verified by western blotting. COX-2 expression was correlated to DNA content as a genetic risk marker of oral cancer. COX-2 was up-regulated from healthy to premalignant to cancerous oral mucosa. Thus, COX-2 expression was found in 1 case of healthy oral mucosa (3%). All specimens from healthy mucosa had a normal DNA content. In patients with premalignancies. In 29 patients with oral carcinomas, cyclooxygenase-2 expression was observed in 26 (88%), and aneuploidy was observed in 25 cases (94%, P=0.04). Notably, of 22 patients with dysplastic lesions, COX-2 was exclusively expressed in a subgroup of nine patients (41%) identified to be at high risk of cancer by the aberrant DNA content of their lesions. Seven of these patients were followed for 5 years or more. An oral carcinoma developed in six of them (85%; P=0.02). These findings emphasize the need to determine whether coxibs can reduce the risk of oral cancer in patients with high-risk precancerous lesions. PMID:12747975

  17. Inhibition of FAAH, TRPV1, and COX2 by NSAID-serotonin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Rose, Tyler M; Reilly, Christopher A; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Brewster, Clinton; Brewster, Chelsea

    2014-12-15

    Serotonin was linked by amidation to the carboxylic acid groups of a series of structurally diverse NSAIDs. The resulting NSAID-serotonin conjugates were tested in vitro for their ability to inhibit FAAH, TRPV1, and COX2. Ibuprofen-5-HT and Flurbiprofen-5-HT inhibited all three targets with approximately the same potency as N-arachidonoyl serotonin (AA-5-HT), while Fenoprofen-5-HT and Naproxen-5-HT showed activity as dual inhibitors of TRPV1 and COX2.

  18. Inhibition of FAAH, TRPV1, and COX2 by NSAID-Serotonin Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Tyler M.; Reilly, Christopher A.; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E.; Brewster, Clinton; Brewster, Chelsea

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin was linked by amidation to the carboxylic acid groups of a series of structurally diverse NSAIDs. The resulting NSAID-serotonin conjugates were tested in vitro for their ability to inhibit FAAH, TRPV1, and COX2. Ibuprofen-5-HT and Flurbiprofen-5-HT inhibited all three targets with approximately the same potency as N-arachidonoyl serotonin (AA-5-HT), while Fenoprofen-5-HT and Naproxen-5-HT showed activity as dual inhibitors of TRPV1 and COX2. PMID:25467164

  19. Human fecal water inhibits COX-2 in colonic HT-29 cells: role of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Pernilla C; Huss, Ulrika; Jenner, Andrew; Halliwell, Barry; Bohlin, Lars; Rafter, Joseph J

    2005-10-01

    The inducible enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays a major role in the regulation of inflammation and possibly in the development of colon cancer. The aim of the present study was to screen for COX-2 inhibitors in samples of fecal water (the aqueous phase of feces) and investigate whether phenolic compounds are responsible for any observed effects on COX-2. Volunteers (n = 20) were recruited and asked to supply a 24-h stool sample. Fecal water samples were prepared and analyzed by GC-MS for their content of phenolic compounds. These samples were also evaluated for their effects on COX-2 protein levels (Western blot) and prostaglandin (PG)E2 production in tumor necrosis-alpha-stimulated HT-29 cells and pure enzymatic activity in a COX-2-catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis in vitro assay. The major phenolic compounds identified were phenylpropionic acid, phenylacetic acid, cinnamic acid, and benzoic acid derivatives. Of 13 fecal water samples analyzed, 12 significantly decreased PGE2 production (range 5.4-39.7% inhibition, P-value < 0.05) compared with control cells and 13 of 14 samples analyzed decreased COX-2 protein levels in HT-29 cells (19-63% inhibition). Of the 20 fecal water samples, 2 also weakly inhibited enzymatic activity of purified COX-2 (22-24% inhibition). Three compounds identified in fecal water, 3-phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, and 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionic acid, decreased the protein level at 250 micromol/L (15-62% inhibition). This study shows for the first time that human fecal water contains components that can affect both the COX-2 protein level and enzymatic activity. PMID:16177193

  20. Axinelline A, a new COX-2 inhibitor from Streptomyces axinellae SCSIO02208.

    PubMed

    Ai, Wen; Lin, Xiu-Ping; Tu, Zhengchao; Tian, Xin-Peng; Lu, Xin; Mangaladoss, Fredimoses; Zhong, Zhi-Long; Liu, Yonghong

    2014-01-01

    Axinelline A, a new cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, was isolated from Streptomyces axinellae SCSIO02208. The structures of compounds 1-9 were determined by analysing the NMR and MS data. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined by using optical rotation and comparing with the reported data. Compound 1 exhibited COX-2 inhibitory activity, the IC50 value being 2.8 μM.

  1. DPPC regulates COX-2 expression in monocytes via phosphorylation of CREB

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.H.K. Tonks, A.J.; Jones, K.P.; Ahluwalia, M.K.; Thomas, A.W.; Tonks, A.; Jackson, S.K.

    2008-05-23

    The major phospholipid in pulmonary surfactant dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) has been shown to modulate inflammatory responses. Using human monocytes, this study demonstrates that DPPC significantly increased PGE{sub 2} (P < 0.05) production by 2.5-fold when compared to untreated monocyte controls. Mechanistically, this effect was concomitant with an increase in COX-2 expression which was abrogated in the presence of a COX-2 inhibitor. The regulation of COX-2 expression was independent of NF-{kappa}B activity. Further, DPPC increased the phosphorylation of the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB; an important nuclear transcription factor important in regulating COX-2 expression). In addition, we also show that changing the fatty acid groups of PC (e.g. using L-{alpha}-phosphatidylcholine {beta}-arachidonoyl-{gamma}-palmitoyl (PAPC)) has a profound effect on the regulation of COX-2 expression and CREB activation. This study provides new evidence for the anti-inflammatory activity of DPPC and that this activity is at least in part mediated via CREB activation of COX-2.

  2. Estrogen protects the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury via COX-2-derived PGI2.

    PubMed

    Booth, Erin Anne; Flint, RaShonda Renee; Lucas, Kathryn Louise; Knittel, Andrea Kathleen; Lucchesi, Benedict R

    2008-09-01

    There is an accumulating body of data to suggest that estrogen mediates its cardioprotective effects via cyclooxygenase activation and synthesis of prostaglandins (PG), specifically PGI2. We hypothesized that inhibition of COX-2 would prevent estrogen's cardioprotective effects after myocardial ischemia-reperfusion. Acute treatment with 17beta-estradiol (E2; 20 microg/rabbit) increased COX-2 protein expression and activity in the myocardium. To determine the effects of COX-2 inhibition on infarct size after E2 treatment, New Zealand white rabbits were anesthetized and administered the COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide (5 mg/kg) or vehicle intravenously 30 minutes before an intravenous injection of E2. Thirty minutes after estrogen treatment, the coronary artery was occluded for 30 minutes followed by 4 hours of reperfusion. E2 significantly decreased infarct size as a percent of area at risk when compared to vehicle (18.9 +/- 3.1 versus 47.0 +/- 4.1; P < 0.001). Pretreatment with nimesulide nullified the infarct size sparing effect of E2 (55.8 +/- 5.6). Treatment with the PGI2 receptor antagonist RO3244794 also abolished the protective effects of E2 (45.3 +/- 4.5). The results indicate that estrogen protects the myocardium from ischemia-reperfusion injury through increased production of COX-2-derived PGI2. The data indicate that selective COX-2 inhibitors might counteract the potential cytoprotective effects of estrogen in premenopausal or postmenopausal women.

  3. Simultaneous targeting of 5-LOX-COX and EGFR blocks progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chinthalapally V.; Janakiram, Naveena B.; Madka, Venkateshwar; Devarkonda, Vishal; Brewer, Misty; Biddick, Laura; Lightfoot, Stan; Steele, Vernon E.; Mohammed, Altaf

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGRF) are over-expressed in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis, we show significant increase in COX-2, 5-LOX, and EGFR expression during PDAC progression. Targeting complementary pathways will achieve better treatment efficacy than a single agent high-dose strategy that could increase risk of side effects and tumor resistance. To target COX-2, 5-LOX, and EGFR simultaneously, we tested effects of licofelone (dual 5-LOX-COX inhibitor), and gefitinib (EGFR inhibitor), individually and in combination, on pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) and their progression to PDAC using genetically engineered mice. Individually, licofelone (L) and gefitinib (G) significantly inhibited incidence of PDAC in male (72% L, 90% G, p < 0.0001) and female (90% L, 85% G, p < 0.0001) mice. The combination drug treatment produced complete inhibition of PDAC in both genders. Pancreata of mice receiving combination treatment showed significantly fewer Dclk1-positive cancer stem-like cells, inhibition of COX-2, 5-LOX, PCNA, EGFR and β-catenin expression (p < 0.05–0.0002), increased p21 expression. Significant changes in tumor immune responses and desmoplastic reaction was observed by NGS analysis in combination treatment (p < 0.05). In summary, early simultaneous targeting of 5-LOX-COX- and EGFR pathways may provide additive inhibitory effects leading to complete suppression of PDAC. PMID:26429877

  4. Translocation of Mitochondrially Synthesized Cox2 Domains from the Matrix to the Intermembrane Space▿

    PubMed Central

    Fiumera, Heather L.; Broadley, Sarah A.; Fox, Thomas D.

    2007-01-01

    The N-terminal and C-terminal domains of mitochondrially synthesized cytochrome c oxidase subunit II, Cox2, are translocated through the inner membrane to the intermembrane space (IMS). We investigated the distinct mechanisms of N-tail and C-tail export by analysis of epitope-tagged Cox2 variants encoded in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DNA. Both the N and C termini of a truncated protein lacking the Cox2 C-terminal domain were translocated to the IMS via a pathway dependent upon the conserved translocase Oxa1. The topology of this Cox2 variant, accumulated at steady state, was largely but not completely unaffected in mutants lacking proteins required for export of the C-tail domain, Cox18 and Mss2. C-tail export was blocked by truncation of the last 40 residues from the C-tail domain, indicating that sequence and/or structural features of this domain are required for its translocation. Mss2, a peripheral protein bound to the inner surface of the inner membrane, coimmunoprecipitated with full-length newly synthesized Cox2, whose leader peptide had already been cleaved in the IMS. Our data suggest that the C-tail domain is recognized posttranslationally by a specialized translocation apparatus after the N-tail has been translocated by Oxa1. PMID:17452441

  5. COX-Independent Mechanisms of Cancer Chemoprevention by Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gurpinar, Evrim; Grizzle, William E.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX-2 is responsible for the chemopreventive efficacy of these agents. However, the precise mechanisms by which NSAIDs exert their antiproliferative effects are still a matter of debate. Numerous other studies have shown that NSAIDs can act through COX-independent mechanisms. This review provides a detailed description of the major COX-independent molecular targets of NSAIDs and discusses how these targets may be involved in their anticancer effects. Toxicities resulting from COX inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis preclude the long-term use of NSAIDs for cancer chemoprevention. Furthermore, chemopreventive efficacy is incomplete and treatment often leads to the development of resistance. Identification of alternative NSAID targets and elucidation of the biochemical processes by which they inhibit tumor growth could lead to the development of safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:23875171

  6. Substrate-selective COX-2 inhibition decreases anxiety via endocannabinoid activation

    PubMed Central

    Hermanson, Daniel J.; Hartley, Nolan D.; Gamble-George, Joyonna; Brown, Naoko; Shonesy, Brian C.; Kingsley, Phillip J.; Colbran, Roger J.; Reese, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Augmentation of endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) signaling represents an emerging approach to the treatment of affective disorders. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) oxygenates arachidonic acid to form prostaglandins, but also inactivates eCBs in vitro. However, the viability of COX-2 as a therapeutic target for in vivo eCB augmentation has not been explored. Here we utilized medicinal chemistry and in vivo analytical and behavioral pharmacological approaches to demonstrate a key role for COX-2 in the regulation of endocannabinoid (eCB) levels in vivo. A novel pharmacological strategy involving “substrate-selective” inhibition of COX-2 was used to augment eCB signaling without affecting related non-eCB lipids or prostaglandin synthesis. Behaviorally, substrate-selective inhibition of COX-2reducedanxiety-like behaviors in mice via increasede CB signaling. These data elucidate a key role for COX-2 in the regulation of eCB signaling and suggest substrate-selective pharmacology represents a viable approach for eCB augmentation with broad therapeutic potential. PMID:23912944

  7. Δ9-THC-caused synaptic and memory impairments are mediated through COX-2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongwei; Tang, Ya-ping; Sun, Hao; Song, Yunping; Chen, Chu

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Marijuana has been used for thousands of years as a treatment for medical conditions. However, untoward side effects limit its medical value. Here we show that synaptic and cognitive impairments following repeated exposure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) are associated with the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inducible enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostanoids, in the brain. COX-2 induction by Δ9-THC is mediated via CB1 receptor-coupled G-protein βγ subunits. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of COX-2 blocks down-regulation and internalization of glutamate receptor subunits and alterations of the dendritic spine density of hippocampal neurons induced by repeated Δ9-THC exposures. Ablation of COX-2 also eliminates Δ9-THC-impaired hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity, spatial, and fear memories. Importantly, the beneficial effects of decreasing β-amyloid plaques and neurodegeneration by Δ9-THC in Alzheimer’s disease animals are retained in the presence of COX-2 inhibition. These results suggest that the applicability of medical marijuana would be broadened by concurrent inhibition of COX-2. PMID:24267894

  8. Subsea adjustable choke valves

    SciTech Connect

    Cyvas, M.K. )

    1989-08-01

    With emphasis on deepwater wells and marginal offshore fields growing, the search for reliable subsea production systems has become a high priority. A reliable subsea adjustable choke is essential to the realization of such a system, and recent advances are producing the degree of reliability required. Technological developments have been primarily in (1) trim material (including polycrystalline diamond), (2) trim configuration, (3) computer programs for trim sizing, (4) component materials, and (5) diver/remote-operated-vehicle (ROV) interfaces. These five facets are overviewed and progress to date is reported. A 15- to 20-year service life for adjustable subsea chokes is now a reality. Another factor vital to efficient use of these technological developments is to involve the choke manufacturer and ROV/diver personnel in initial system conceptualization. In this manner, maximum benefit can be derived from the latest technology. Major areas of development still required and under way are listed, and the paper closes with a tabulation of successful subsea choke installations in recent years.

  9. Biochemical and pharmacological profile of a tetrasubstituted furanone as a highly selective COX-2 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Riendeau, D; Percival, M D; Boyce, S; Brideau, C; Charleson, S; Cromlish, W; Ethier, D; Evans, J; Falgueyret, J -P; Ford-Hutchinson, A W; Gordon, R; Greig, G; Gresser, M; Guay, J; Kargman, S; Léger, S; Mancini, J A; O'Neill, G; Ouellet, M; Rodger, I W; Thérien, M; Wang, Z; Webb, J K; Wong, E; Xu, L; Young, R N; Zamboni, R; Prasit, P; Chan, C -C

    1997-01-01

    DFU (5,5-dimethyl-3-(3-fluorophenyl)-4-(4-methylsulphonyl)phenyl-2(5H)-furanone) was identified as a novel orally active and highly selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor.In CHO cells stably transfected with human COX isozymes, DFU inhibited the arachidonic acid-dependent production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) with at least a 1,000 fold selectivity for COX-2 (IC50=41±14 nM) over COX-1 (IC50>50 μM). Indomethacin was a potent inhibitor of both COX-1 (IC50=18±3 nM) and COX-2 (IC50=26±6 nM) under the same assay conditions. The large increase in selectivity of DFU over indomethacin was also observed in COX-1 mediated production of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) by Ca2+ ionophore-challenged human platelets (IC50>50 μM and 4.1±1.7 nM, respectively).DFU caused a time-dependent inhibition of purified recombinant human COX-2 with a Ki value of 140±68 μM for the initial reversible binding to enzyme and a k2 value of 0.11±0.06 s−1 for the first order rate constant for formation of a tightly bound enzyme-inhibitor complex. Comparable values of 62±26 μM and 0.06±0.01 s−1, respectively, were obtained for indomethacin. The enzyme-inhibitor complex was found to have a 1 : 1 stoichiometry and to dissociate only very slowly (t1/2=1–3 h) with recovery of intact inhibitor and active enzyme. The time-dependent inhibition by DFU was decreased by co-incubation with arachidonic acid under non-turnover conditions, consistent with reversible competitive inhibition at the COX active site.Inhibition of purified recombinant human COX-1 by DFU was very weak and observed only at low concentrations of substrate (IC50=63±5 μM at 0.1 μM arachidonic acid). In contrast to COX-2, inhibition was time-independent and rapidly reversible. These data are consistent with a reversible competitive inhibition of COX-1.DFU inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PGE2 production (COX-2) in a human whole blood assay with a potency (IC50=0.28±0.04 μM) similar

  10. Practical Session: Multiple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    Three exercises are proposed to illustrate the simple linear regression. In the first one investigates the influence of several factors on atmospheric pollution. It has been proposed by D. Chessel and A.B. Dufour in Lyon 1 (see Sect. 6 of http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/pdf/tdr33.pdf) and is based on data coming from 20 cities of U.S. Exercise 2 is an introduction to model selection whereas Exercise 3 provides a first example of analysis of variance. Exercises 2 and 3 have been proposed by A. Dalalyan at ENPC (see Exercises 2 and 3 of http://certis.enpc.fr/~dalalyan/Download/TP_ENPC_5.pdf).

  11. Mechanisms by Which 17β-Estradiol (E2) Suppress Neuronal cox-2 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Winfred; Bhave, Shreyas; Uht, Rosalie M.

    2016-01-01

    E2 attenuates inflammatory responses by suppressing expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Given that inflammation is increasingly being associated with neurodegenerative and psychiatric processes, we sought to elucidate mechanisms by which E2 down-regulates a component of an inflammatory response, cyclooxygenase– 2 (COX-2) expression. Although inflammatory processes in the brain are usually associated with microglia and astrocytes, we found that the COX-2 gene (cox-2) was expressed in a neuronal context, specifically in an amygdalar cell line (AR-5). Given that COX-2 has been reported to be in neurons in the brain, and that the amygdala is a site involved in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric processes, we investigated mechanisms by which E2 could down-regulate cox-2 expression in the AR-5 line. These cells express estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ), and as shown here cox-2. At the level of RNA, E2 and the ERβ selective ligand diarylpropionitrile (DPN) both attenuated gene expression, whereas the ERα selective ligand propyl pyrazole triol (PPT) had no effect. Neither ligand increased ERβ at the cox-2 promoter. Rather, DPN decreased promoter occupancy of NF-κB p65 and histone 4 (H4) acetylation. Treatment with the non-specific HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) counteracted DPN’s repressive effects on cox-2 expression. In keeping with the TSA effect, E2 and DPN increased histone deacetylase one (HDAC1) and switch-independent 3A (Sin3A) promoter occupancy. Lastly, even though E2 increased CpG methylation, DPN did not. Taken together, the pharmacological data indicate that ERβ contributes to neuronal cox-2 expression, as measured by RNA levels. Furthermore, ER ligands lead to increased recruitment of HDAC1, Sin3A and a concomitant reduction of p65 occupancy and Ac-H4 levels. None of the events, however, are associated with a significant recruitment of ERβ at the promoter. Thus, ERβ directs recruitment to the cox-2 promoter, but does so in

  12. Mechanisms by Which 17β-Estradiol (E2) Suppress Neuronal cox-2 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Winfred; Bhave, Shreyas; Uht, Rosalie M

    2016-01-01

    E2 attenuates inflammatory responses by suppressing expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Given that inflammation is increasingly being associated with neurodegenerative and psychiatric processes, we sought to elucidate mechanisms by which E2 down-regulates a component of an inflammatory response, cyclooxygenase- 2 (COX-2) expression. Although inflammatory processes in the brain are usually associated with microglia and astrocytes, we found that the COX-2 gene (cox-2) was expressed in a neuronal context, specifically in an amygdalar cell line (AR-5). Given that COX-2 has been reported to be in neurons in the brain, and that the amygdala is a site involved in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric processes, we investigated mechanisms by which E2 could down-regulate cox-2 expression in the AR-5 line. These cells express estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ), and as shown here cox-2. At the level of RNA, E2 and the ERβ selective ligand diarylpropionitrile (DPN) both attenuated gene expression, whereas the ERα selective ligand propyl pyrazole triol (PPT) had no effect. Neither ligand increased ERβ at the cox-2 promoter. Rather, DPN decreased promoter occupancy of NF-κB p65 and histone 4 (H4) acetylation. Treatment with the non-specific HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) counteracted DPN's repressive effects on cox-2 expression. In keeping with the TSA effect, E2 and DPN increased histone deacetylase one (HDAC1) and switch-independent 3A (Sin3A) promoter occupancy. Lastly, even though E2 increased CpG methylation, DPN did not. Taken together, the pharmacological data indicate that ERβ contributes to neuronal cox-2 expression, as measured by RNA levels. Furthermore, ER ligands lead to increased recruitment of HDAC1, Sin3A and a concomitant reduction of p65 occupancy and Ac-H4 levels. None of the events, however, are associated with a significant recruitment of ERβ at the promoter. Thus, ERβ directs recruitment to the cox-2 promoter, but does so in the

  13. Adolescent Mothers' Adjustment to Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Valerie Jarvis; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined adolescent mothers' adjustment to parenting, self-esteem, social support, and perceptions of baby. Subjects (n=52) responded to questionnaires at two time periods approximately six months apart. Mothers with higher self-esteem at Time 1 had better adjustment at Time 2. Adjustment was predicted by Time 2 variables; contact with baby's…

  14. Prescription channeling of COX-2 inhibitors and traditional nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Moride, Yola; Ducruet, Thierry; Boivin, Jean-François; Moore, Nicholas; Perreault, Sylvie; Zhao, Sean

    2005-01-01

    This pharmacoepidemiologic study was conducted to determine whether risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding influenced the prescription of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors and traditional nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) at the time when COX-2 inhibitors were first included in the formulary of reimbursed medications. A population-based case-control study was conducted in which the prevalence of risk factors and the medical histories of patients prescribed COX-2 inhibitors and traditional nonselective NSAIDs were compared. The study population consisted of a random sample of members of the Quebec drug plan (age 18 years or older) who received at least one dispensation of celecoxib (n = 42,422; cases), rofecoxib (n = 25,674; cases), or traditional nonselective NSAIDs (n = 12,418; controls) during the year 2000. All study data were obtained from the Quebec health care databases. Adjusting for income level, Chronic Disease Score, prior use of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid, acetaminophen, antidepressants, benzodiazepines, prescriber specialty, and time period, the following factors were significantly associated with the prescription of COX-2 inhibitors: age 75 years or older (odds ratio [OR] 4.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.95-4.51), age 55-74 years (OR 3.23, 95% CI 3.06-3.40), female sex (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.45-1.58), prior diagnosis of gastropathy (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.08-1.36) and prior dispensation of gastroprotective agents (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.47-1.67). Patients who received a traditional nonselective NSAID recently were more likely to switch to a coxib, especially first-time users (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.93-2.43). Associations were significantly greater for celecoxib than rofecoxib for age, chronic NSAID use, and last NSAID use between 1 and 3 months before the index date. At the time of introduction of COX-2 inhibitors into the formulary, prescription channeling could confound risk comparisons across products. PMID:15743481

  15. Impact of Medicaid Prior Authorization Requirement for COX-2 Inhibitor Drugs in Nebraska

    PubMed Central

    Siracuse, Mark V; Vuchetich, Phillip J

    2008-01-01

    Objective Determine the impact of a Prior Authorization Requirement (PAR) program on Medicaid pharmacy expenditures and utilization. Data Source Prescription claims for Nebraska Medicaid recipients who received a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory (NSAID) drug, or other pain relievers between July 2001 and June 2003. Study Design and Data Collection/Extraction This was a retrospective cross-sectional study with a 12-month pre-PAR implementation period and a 12-month post-PAR implementation period. Pharmacy transactions for COX-2 inhibitors, NSAIDs, other pain relievers, and gastroprotectants were identified by their National Drug Code (NDC) in a Microsoft SQL query. The PAR was designed to approve COX-2 inhibitor use only for recipients at high risk of GI side effects while restricting access to those patients at low to moderate risk of GI side effects. Principal Findings One year following implementation of the PAR, overall expenditures on COX-2 inhibitors for Nebraska Medicaid dropped 50 percent. The overall impact on pharmacy expenditures, including NSAIDs, pain relief medications, and gastroprotectants when necessary to relieve gastrointestinal (GI) side effects, for those recipients who switched from a COX-2 inhibitor to an NSAID or other pain relievers was a decline of approximately 35 percent. Conclusion and Implications for State Policy PAR for COX-2 inhibitors successfully reduced Medicaid prescription expenditures. Recipients at high risk for GI side effects appropriately received COX-2 inhibitors. Recipients at low to moderate risk for GI side effects who were switched to NSAIDs or other pain relievers had lower overall prescription expenditures. Further research is needed to determine the impact of PAR on overall health outcomes and costs. In this study, rather than take a “one size fits all” approach to prescription drug cost-saving strategies, Medicaid policy makers understood that patient variation

  16. Different role of COX-2 and angiogenesis in canine inflammatory and non-inflammatory mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Mónica; Sánchez-Archidona, Ana Rodríguez; Sardón, David; Díez, Lucía; Martín-Ruiz, Asunción; Caceres, Sara; Sassi, Francesco; Dolores Pérez-Alenza, M; Illera, Juan C; Dunner, Susana; Peña, Laura

    2013-08-01

    Human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) are the most aggressive and fatal types of mammary cancer, and both have a very poor prognosis and low survival rate. Human IBC is characterised by exacerbated angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and lymphangiotropism. Lymphangiotropism is also characteristic of IMC, but microvascular density (MVD) and lymphangiogenesis have not been previously studied in canine IMC. In this study immunohistochemical expression of several angiogenesis-related factors (cyclooxygenase [COX]-2, vascular endothelial growth factors A and D [VEGF-A, VEGF-D], and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 [VEGFR-3]), MVD, lymphatic proliferation index (LPI), and Ki-67 tumour proliferation index (PI) were studied in 21 canine IMC samples, 20 canine high-grade malignant non-IMC mammary tumours (MMTs), and four normal mammary gland samples (NMGs). All mammary neoplasms were histologically categorised as grade III. COX-2 values were also analysed by RT-PCR in seven IMCs, six MMTs and four NMGs. The expressions of COX-2, VEGF-A, and VEGF-D were significantly higher in IMC, MVD and LPI tumours, but not PI. In MMTs, COX-2 immunoexpression was significantly associated with VEGF-A, while in IMCs COX-2 was associated with VEGF-D (lymphangiogenic factor), its receptor VEGFR-3, and LPI. These results suggested that lymphangiogenic pathway stimulation isa specific role of COX-2 in IMC angiogenesis, which justifies the use of COX-2-based targeted palliative therapies in dogs. The exacerbated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis and the increased expression of angiogenesis-related factors further support canine IMC as a natural model for the study of human IBC. PMID:23489848

  17. Clinical significance of COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF expressions in endometrial cancer tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaoping; Hui, Yuzuo; Lin, Li; Wu, Yu; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Peishu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical significance of COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF expressions in endometrial cancer tissues. Methods: One hundred and eight tissue samples from the patients with endometrial cancer enrolled in our hospital from August 2011 to July 2014 were selected, including 60 normal tissue samples (normal group), 60 neoplastic tissue samples (neoplastic group) and 60 cancer tissue samples (cancer group). All the samples were subjected to immunohistochemical assay to detect the expressions of COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF. The clinical data were also investigated for correlation analysis. Results: The positive rates of COX-2 in normal group, neoplastic group and cancer groups were 3.3%, 21.7% and 55.0% respectively. The positive rates of GLUT-1 in normal group, neoplastic group and cancer groups were 3.3%, 25.0% and 70.0% respectively. The positive rates of VEGF in normal group, neoplastic group and cancer groups were 1.7%, 23.3% and 63.3% respectively. With increasing stage of such cancer, decreasing degree of differentiation and lymphatic metastasis, the positive expression rates of COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF proteins were raised significantly (P<0.05). Spearman’s correlation analysis showed that the expressions of COX-2 and GLUT-1 (r=0.207, P<0.05), COX-2 and VEGF (r=0.243, P<0.05), as well as GLUT-1 and VEGF (r=0.758, P<0.05) were positively correlated. Conclusion: COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF were highly prominent in endometrial cancer, especially in the patients with low degree of differentiation, late stage and metastasis. They functioned synergistically in the onset and progression of this cancer. PMID:26101475

  18. Pulmonary Vein Isolation and Cox-Maze Procedure Only Partially Denervate the Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Lall, Shelly C.; Foyil, Kelley V.; Sakamoto, Shun-Ichiro; Voeller, Rochus K.; Boineau, John P.; Damiano, Ralph J.; Schuessler, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The effects of ablation lines on myocardial innervation and response to autonomic stimuli are unclear. This study examined the effects of radiofrequency ablation on atrial autonomic innervation comparing pulmonary vein isolation and the biatrial Cox-Maze. METHODS In twelve acute canines, right and left vagosympathetic trunks and right and left stellate ganglia were isolated. Each nerve was stimulated prior to bipolar ablations, after pulmonary vein isolation, and after Cox-Maze. Nadolol (n=6) and atropine (n=6) were given to block sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, respectively. Changes in heart rate and atrioventricular interval were compared. Changes in QRST area relative to an isoelectric baseline (index of local innervation) were calculated. RESULTS Sympathetic stimulation of each nerve and parasympathetic stimulation of the vagosympathetic trunks caused significant changes in heart rate and atrioventricular interval. After pulmonary vein isolation, the effect of 33% of the nerves on heart rate changes were eliminated. The Cox-Maze procedure eliminated right stellate sympathetic effects on heart rate. Fifty percent of the nerves caused heart rate changes after the Cox-Maze. There was no significant effect of either lesion set on atrioventricular interval changes. Stimulation of 50% of nerves after pulmonary vein isolation produced local area changes significantly different from control. After Cox-Maze, a different 50% of nerves produced local changes different from pulmonary vein isolation. CONCLUSIONS Surgical ablation procedures disrupted innervation affecting heart rate, but not atrioventricular interval. Autonomic innervation affecting the atria was changed by pulmonary vein isolation and additionally by Cox-Maze. Residual autonomic effects were present even after the complete Cox-Maze. PMID:18374777

  19. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D.; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Yu, James Y. H.; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E.; Crews, Brenda C.; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2013-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel 18F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional 18F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an 18F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The 18F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging and

  20. Different role of COX-2 and angiogenesis in canine inflammatory and non-inflammatory mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Mónica; Sánchez-Archidona, Ana Rodríguez; Sardón, David; Díez, Lucía; Martín-Ruiz, Asunción; Caceres, Sara; Sassi, Francesco; Dolores Pérez-Alenza, M; Illera, Juan C; Dunner, Susana; Peña, Laura

    2013-08-01

    Human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) are the most aggressive and fatal types of mammary cancer, and both have a very poor prognosis and low survival rate. Human IBC is characterised by exacerbated angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and lymphangiotropism. Lymphangiotropism is also characteristic of IMC, but microvascular density (MVD) and lymphangiogenesis have not been previously studied in canine IMC. In this study immunohistochemical expression of several angiogenesis-related factors (cyclooxygenase [COX]-2, vascular endothelial growth factors A and D [VEGF-A, VEGF-D], and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 [VEGFR-3]), MVD, lymphatic proliferation index (LPI), and Ki-67 tumour proliferation index (PI) were studied in 21 canine IMC samples, 20 canine high-grade malignant non-IMC mammary tumours (MMTs), and four normal mammary gland samples (NMGs). All mammary neoplasms were histologically categorised as grade III. COX-2 values were also analysed by RT-PCR in seven IMCs, six MMTs and four NMGs. The expressions of COX-2, VEGF-A, and VEGF-D were significantly higher in IMC, MVD and LPI tumours, but not PI. In MMTs, COX-2 immunoexpression was significantly associated with VEGF-A, while in IMCs COX-2 was associated with VEGF-D (lymphangiogenic factor), its receptor VEGFR-3, and LPI. These results suggested that lymphangiogenic pathway stimulation isa specific role of COX-2 in IMC angiogenesis, which justifies the use of COX-2-based targeted palliative therapies in dogs. The exacerbated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis and the increased expression of angiogenesis-related factors further support canine IMC as a natural model for the study of human IBC.

  1. Semiparametric regression during 2003–2007*

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, David; Wand, M.P.; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Semiparametric regression is a fusion between parametric regression and nonparametric regression that integrates low-rank penalized splines, mixed model and hierarchical Bayesian methodology – thus allowing more streamlined handling of longitudinal and spatial correlation. We review progress in the field over the five-year period between 2003 and 2007. We find semiparametric regression to be a vibrant field with substantial involvement and activity, continual enhancement and widespread application. PMID:20305800

  2. Developmental Regression in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Sally J.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of developmental regression in autism is one of the more puzzling features of this disorder. Although several studies have documented the validity of parental reports of regression using home videos, accumulating data suggest that most children who demonstrate regression also demonstrated previous, subtle, developmental differences.…

  3. Building Regression Models: The Importance of Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Points out reasons for using graphical methods to teach simple and multiple regression analysis. Argues that a graphically oriented approach has considerable pedagogic advantages in the exposition of simple and multiple regression. Shows that graphical methods may play a central role in the process of building regression models. (Author/LS)

  4. Regression Analysis by Example. 5th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterjee, Samprit; Hadi, Ali S.

    2012-01-01

    Regression analysis is a conceptually simple method for investigating relationships among variables. Carrying out a successful application of regression analysis, however, requires a balance of theoretical results, empirical rules, and subjective judgment. "Regression Analysis by Example, Fifth Edition" has been expanded and thoroughly…

  5. Bayesian Unimodal Density Regression for Causal Inference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabatsos, George; Walker, Stephen G.

    2011-01-01

    Karabatsos and Walker (2011) introduced a new Bayesian nonparametric (BNP) regression model. Through analyses of real and simulated data, they showed that the BNP regression model outperforms other parametric and nonparametric regression models of common use, in terms of predictive accuracy of the outcome (dependent) variable. The other,…

  6. Standards for Standardized Logistic Regression Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Standardized coefficients in logistic regression analysis have the same utility as standardized coefficients in linear regression analysis. Although there has been no consensus on the best way to construct standardized logistic regression coefficients, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest a single best approach to the construction of a…

  7. Streamflow forecasting using functional regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masselot, Pierre; Dabo-Niang, Sophie; Chebana, Fateh; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2016-07-01

    Streamflow, as a natural phenomenon, is continuous in time and so are the meteorological variables which influence its variability. In practice, it can be of interest to forecast the whole flow curve instead of points (daily or hourly). To this end, this paper introduces the functional linear models and adapts it to hydrological forecasting. More precisely, functional linear models are regression models based on curves instead of single values. They allow to consider the whole process instead of a limited number of time points or features. We apply these models to analyse the flow volume and the whole streamflow curve during a given period by using precipitations curves. The functional model is shown to lead to encouraging results. The potential of functional linear models to detect special features that would have been hard to see otherwise is pointed out. The functional model is also compared to the artificial neural network approach and the advantages and disadvantages of both models are discussed. Finally, future research directions involving the functional model in hydrology are presented.

  8. Estimating equivalence with quantile regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cade, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    Equivalence testing and corresponding confidence interval estimates are used to provide more enlightened statistical statements about parameter estimates by relating them to intervals of effect sizes deemed to be of scientific or practical importance rather than just to an effect size of zero. Equivalence tests and confidence interval estimates are based on a null hypothesis that a parameter estimate is either outside (inequivalence hypothesis) or inside (equivalence hypothesis) an equivalence region, depending on the question of interest and assignment of risk. The former approach, often referred to as bioequivalence testing, is often used in regulatory settings because it reverses the burden of proof compared to a standard test of significance, following a precautionary principle for environmental protection. Unfortunately, many applications of equivalence testing focus on establishing average equivalence by estimating differences in means of distributions that do not have homogeneous variances. I discuss how to compare equivalence across quantiles of distributions using confidence intervals on quantile regression estimates that detect differences in heterogeneous distributions missed by focusing on means. I used one-tailed confidence intervals based on inequivalence hypotheses in a two-group treatment-control design for estimating bioequivalence of arsenic concentrations in soils at an old ammunition testing site and bioequivalence of vegetation biomass at a reclaimed mining site. Two-tailed confidence intervals based both on inequivalence and equivalence hypotheses were used to examine quantile equivalence for negligible trends over time for a continuous exponential model of amphibian abundance. ?? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Insulin resistance: regression and clustering.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangho; Assimes, Themistocles L; Quertermous, Thomas; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Hwu, Chii-Min; Rajaratnam, Bala; Olshen, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we try to define insulin resistance (IR) precisely for a group of Chinese women. Our definition deliberately does not depend upon body mass index (BMI) or age, although in other studies, with particular random effects models quite different from models used here, BMI accounts for a large part of the variability in IR. We accomplish our goal through application of Gauss mixture vector quantization (GMVQ), a technique for clustering that was developed for application to lossy data compression. Defining data come from measurements that play major roles in medical practice. A precise statement of what the data are is in Section 1. Their family structures are described in detail. They concern levels of lipids and the results of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We apply GMVQ to residuals obtained from regressions of outcomes of an OGTT and lipids on functions of age and BMI that are inferred from the data. A bootstrap procedure developed for our family data supplemented by insights from other approaches leads us to believe that two clusters are appropriate for defining IR precisely. One cluster consists of women who are IR, and the other of women who seem not to be. Genes and other features are used to predict cluster membership. We argue that prediction with "main effects" is not satisfactory, but prediction that includes interactions may be. PMID:24887437

  10. In vitro import and assembly of the nucleus-encoded mitochondrial subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase (Cox3).

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Rubalcava-Gracia, Diana; González-Halphen, Diego

    2014-11-01

    The cox3 gene, encoding subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase (Cox3) is in mitochondrial genomes except in chlorophycean algae, where it is localized in the nucleus. Therefore, algae like Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Polytomella sp. and Volvox carteri, synthesize the Cox3 polypeptide in the cytosol, import it into mitochondria, and integrate it into the cytochrome c oxidase complex. In this work, we followed the in vitro internalization of the Cox3 precursor by isolated, import-competent mitochondria of Polytomella sp. In this colorless alga, the precursor Cox3 protein is synthesized with a long, cleavable, N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) of 98 residues. In an import time course, a transient Cox3 intermediate was identified, suggesting that the long MTS is processed more than once. The first processing step is sensitive to the metalo-protease inhibitor 1,10-ortophenantroline, suggesting that it is probably carried out by the matrix-located Mitochondrial Processing Protease. Cox3 is readily imported through an energy-dependent import pathway and integrated into the inner mitochondrial membrane, becoming resistant to carbonate extraction. Furthermore, the imported Cox3 protein was assembled into cytochrome c oxidase, as judged by the presence of a labeled band co-migrating with complex IV in Blue Native Electrophoresis. A model for the biogenesis of Cox3 in chlorophycean algae is proposed. This is the first time that the in vitro mitochondrial import of a cytosol-synthesized Cox3 subunit is described. PMID:24561572

  11. Cyclopamine and jervine induce COX-2 overexpression in human erythroleukemia cells but only cyclopamine has a pro-apoptotic effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezali, Lamia; Leger, David Yannick; Limami, Youness; Cook-Moreau, Jeanne; Beneytout, Jean-Louis; Liagre, Bertrand

    2013-04-15

    Erythroleukemia is generally associated with a very poor response and survival to current available therapeutic agents. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been described to play a crucial role in the proliferation and differentiation of leukemia cells, this enzyme seems to play an important role in chemoresistance in different cancer types. Previously, we demonstrated that diosgenin, a plant steroid, induced apoptosis in HEL cells with concomitant COX-2 overexpression. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of cyclopamine and jervine, two steroidal alkaloids with similar structures, on HEL and TF1a human erythroleukemia cell lines and, for the first time, their effect on COX-2 expression. Cyclopamine, but not jervine, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in these cells. Both compounds induced COX-2 overexpression which was responsible for apoptosis resistance. In jervine-treated cells, COX-2 overexpression was NF-κB dependent. Inhibition of NF-κB reduced COX-2 overexpression and induced apoptosis. In addition, cyclopamine induced apoptosis and COX-2 overexpression via PKC activation. Inhibition of the PKC pathway reduced both apoptosis and COX-2 overexpression in both cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the p38/COX-2 pathway was involved in resistance to cyclopamine-induced apoptosis since p38 inhibition reduced COX-2 overexpression and increased apoptosis in both cell lines. - Highlights: ► Cyclopamine alone but not jervine induces apoptosis in human erythroleukemia cells. ► Cyclopamine and jervine induce COX-2 overexpression. ► COX-2 overexpression is implicated in resistance to cyclopamine-induced apoptosis. ► Apoptotic potential of jervine is restrained by NF-κB pathway activation. ► PKC is involved in cyclopamine-induced apoptosis and COX-2 overexpression.

  12. Patient-specific meta-analysis for risk assessment using multivariate proportional hazards regression

    PubMed Central

    Crager, Michael R.; Tang, Gong

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method for assessing an individual patient’s risk of a future clinical event using clinical trial or cohort data and Cox proportional hazards regression, combining the information from several studies using meta-analysis techniques. The method combines patient-specific estimates of the log cumulative hazard across studies, weighting by the relative precision of the estimates, using either fixed- or random-effects meta-analysis calculations. Risk assessment can be done for any future patient using a few key summary statistics determined once and for all from each study. Generalizations of the method to logistic regression and linear models are immediate. We evaluate the methods using simulation studies and illustrate their application using real data. PMID:26664111

  13. Psychosocial Predictors of Adjustment among First Year College of Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salami, Samuel O.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of psychological and social factors to the prediction of adjustment to college. A total of 250 first year students from colleges of education in Kwara State, Nigeria, completed measures of self-esteem, emotional intelligence, stress, social support and adjustment. Regression analyses…

  14. Influence of Parenting Styles on the Adjustment and Academic Achievement of Traditional College Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickman, Gregory P.; Bartholomae, Suzanne; McKenry, Patrick C.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the relationship between parenting styles and academic achievement and adjustment of traditional college freshmen (N=101). Multiple regression models indicate that authoritative parenting style was positively related to student's academic adjustment. Self-esteem was significantly predictive of social, personal-emotional, goal…

  15. The Impact of Statistically Adjusting for Rater Effects on Conditional Standard Errors of Performance Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Mark R.; Harik, Polina; Clauser, Brian E.

    2011-01-01

    Prior research indicates that the overall reliability of performance ratings can be improved by using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to adjust for rater effects. The present investigation extends previous work by evaluating the impact of OLS adjustment on standard errors of measurement ("SEM") at specific score levels. In addition, a…

  16. STIM1 overexpression promotes colorectal cancer progression, cell motility and COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-Y; Sun, J; Huang, M-Y; Wang, Y-S; Hou, M-F; Sun, Y; He, H; Krishna, N; Chiu, S-J; Lin, S; Yang, S; Chang, W-C

    2015-08-13

    Tumor metastasis is the major cause of death among cancer patients, with >90% of cancer-related death attributable to the spreading of metastatic cells to secondary organs. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is the predominant Ca(2+) entry mechanism in most cancer cells, and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) sensor for store-operated channels. Here we reported that the STIM1 was overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. STIM1 overexpression in CRC was significantly associated with tumor size, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis status and serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen. Furthermore, ectopic expression of STIM1 promoted CRC cell motility, while depletion of STIM1 with short hairpin RNA inhibited CRC cell migration. Our data further suggested that STIM1 promoted CRC cell migration through increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Importantly, ectopically expressed COX-2 or exogenous PGE2 were able to rescue migration defect in STIM1 knockdown CRC cells, and inhibition of COX-2 with ibuprofen and indomethacin abrogated STIM1-mediated CRC cell motility. In short, our data provided clinicopathological significance for STIM1 and SOCE in CRC progression, and implicated a role for COX-2 in STIM1-mediated CRC metastasis. Our studies also suggested a new approach to inhibit STIM1-mediated metastasis with COX-2 inhibitors.

  17. Ca2+ stimulates COX-2 expression through calcium-sensing receptor in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Sachie; Kubota, Yasutaka; Satoh, Shinji; Ito, Shinich; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Ashizuka, Megumi; Shirasuna, Kanemitsu

    2006-12-29

    Fibroblasts isolated from jaw cysts expressed calcium-sensing receptor (CasR). In the fibroblasts elevated extracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](o)) increased fluo-3 fluorescence intensity, and the production of inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate and active protein kinase C. Phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 attenuated the Ca(2+)-induced increase in fluo-3 fluorescence intensity. Elevated [Ca(2+)](o) enhanced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA and protein, and the secretion of prostaglandin E(2) in the fibroblasts. CasR activator neomycin also increased the expression of COX-2 mRNA, and U-73122 attenuated the Ca(2+)-induced expression of COX-2 mRNA. Elevated [Ca(2+)](o)-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and U-73122 inhibited the Ca(2+)-induced phosphorylation. The inhibitors for each kinase, PD98059, SB203580, and SP600125, attenuated the Ca(2+)-induced expression of COX-2 mRNA. These results suggest that in jaw cyst fibroblasts elevated extracellular Ca(2+) may enhance COX-2 expression via the activation of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK through CasR.

  18. Oms1 associates with cytochrome c oxidase assembly intermediates to stabilize newly synthesized Cox1

    PubMed Central

    Bareth, Bettina; Nikolov, Miroslav; Lorenzi, Isotta; Hildenbeutel, Markus; Mick, David U.; Helbig, Christin; Urlaub, Henning; Ott, Martin; Rehling, Peter; Dennerlein, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase assembles in the inner membrane from subunits of dual genetic origin. The assembly process of the enzyme is initiated by membrane insertion of the mitochondria-encoded Cox1 subunit. During complex maturation, transient assembly intermediates, consisting of structural subunits and specialized chaperone-like assembly factors, are formed. In addition, cofactors such as heme and copper have to be inserted into the nascent complex. To regulate the assembly process, the availability of Cox1 is under control of a regulatory feedback cycle in which translation of COX1 mRNA is stalled when assembly intermediates of Cox1 accumulate through inactivation of the translational activator Mss51. Here we isolate a cytochrome c oxidase assembly intermediate in preparatory scale from coa1Δ mutant cells, using Mss51 as bait. We demonstrate that at this stage of assembly, the complex has not yet incorporated the heme a cofactors. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we define the protein composition of the assembly intermediate and unexpectedly identify the putative methyltransferase Oms1 as a constituent. Our analyses show that Oms1 participates in cytochrome c oxidase assembly by stabilizing newly synthesized Cox1. PMID:27030670

  19. Decidual Cox2 inhibition improves fetal and maternal outcomes in a preeclampsia-like mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Sones, Jenny L.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Woods, Ashley K.; Bartos, Amanda; Heyward, Christa Y.; Lob, Heinrich E.; Isroff, Catherine E.; Butler, Scott D.; Shapiro, Stephanie E.; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Davisson, Robin L.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a disorder of pregnancy that manifests as late gestational maternal hypertension and proteinuria and can be life-threatening to both the mother and baby. It is believed that abnormal placentation is responsible for the cascade of events leading to the maternal syndrome. Embryo implantation is critical to establishing a healthy pregnancy. Defective implantation can cause adverse “ripple effects,” leading to abnormal decidualization and placentation, retarded fetal development, and poor pregnancy outcomes, such as PE and fetal growth restriction. The precise mechanism(s) of implantation defects that lead to PE remain elusive. BPH/5 mice, which spontaneously develop the cardinal features of PE, show peri-implantation defects including upregulation of Cox2 and IL-15 at the maternal-fetal interface. This was associated with decreased decidual natural killer (dNK) cells, which have important roles in establishing placental perfusion. Interestingly, a single administration of a Cox2 inhibitor (celecoxib) during decidualization restrained Cox2 and IL-15 expression, restored dNK cell numbers, improved fetal growth, and attenuated late gestational hypertension in BPH/5 female mice. This study provides evidence that decidual overexpression of Cox2 and IL-15 may trigger the adverse pregnancy outcomes reflected in the preeclamptic syndrome, underscoring the idea that Cox2 inhibitor treatment is an effective strategy for the prevention of PE-associated fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. PMID:27159542

  20. The Molecular Basis for Dual Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH)/Cyclooxygenase (COX) Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Giulia; Favia, Angelo D.; Convertino, Marino

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The design of multitarget‐directed ligands is a promising strategy for discovering innovative drugs. Here, we report a mechanistic study that clarifies key aspects of the dual inhibition of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes by a new multitarget‐directed ligand named ARN2508 (2‐[3‐fluoro‐4‐[3‐(hexylcarbamoyloxy)phenyl]phenyl]propanoic acid). This potent dual inhibitor combines, in a single scaffold, the pharmacophoric elements often needed to block FAAH and COX, that is, a carbamate moiety and the 2‐arylpropionic acid functionality, respectively. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ARN2508 uses a noncovalent mechanism of inhibition to block COXs, while inhibiting FAAH via the acetylation of the catalytic Ser241, in line with previous experimental evidence for covalent FAAH inhibition. This study proposes the molecular basis for the dual FAAH/COX inhibition by this novel hybrid scaffold, stimulating further experimental studies and offering new insights for the rational design of novel anti‐inflammatory agents that simultaneously act on FAAH and COX. PMID:26593700

  1. Role of COX-2 in cough reflex sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin in patients with sinobronchial syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sinobronchial syndrome is a cause of chronic productive cough. Inflammatory mediators are involved in the pathophysiology of chronic productive cough. Accumulating evidences indicate that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, one of the inducible isoforms of COX, is a key element in the pathophysiological process of a number of inflammatory disorders. However, little is known about the role of COX-2 in chronic productive cough in patients with sinobronchial syndrome known as neutrophilic bronchial inflammation. Methods The effect of etodolac, a potent COX-2 inhibitor, on cough response to inhaled capsaicin was examined in 15 patients with sinobronchial syndrome in a randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over study. Capsaicin cough threshold, defined as the lowest concentration of capsaicin eliciting five or more coughs, was measured as an index of airway cough reflex sensitivity. Results The cough threshold was significantly (p < 0.03) increased after two-week treatment with etodolac (200 mg twice a day orally) compared with placebo [37.5 (GSEM 1.3) vs. 27.2 (GSEM 1.3) μM]. Conclusions These findings indicate that COX-2 may be a possible modulator augmenting airway cough reflex sensitivity in patients with sinobronchial syndrome. PMID:20696045

  2. In vivo correction of COX deficiency by activation of the AMPK/PGC-1α axis.

    PubMed

    Viscomi, Carlo; Bottani, Emanuela; Civiletto, Gabriele; Cerutti, Raffaele; Moggio, Maurizio; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Schon, Eric A; Lamperti, Costanza; Zeviani, Massimo

    2011-07-01

    Increased mitochondrial biogenesis by activation of PPAR- or AMPK/PGC-1α-dependent homeostatic pathways has been proposed as a treatment for mitochondrial disease. We tested this hypothesis on three recombinant mouse models characterized by defective cytochrome c-oxidase (COX) activity: a knockout (KO) mouse for Surf1, a knockout/knockin mouse for Sco2, and a muscle-restricted KO mouse for Cox15. First, we demonstrated that double-recombinant animals overexpressing PGC-1α in skeletal muscle on a Surf1 KO background showed robust induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and increase of mitochondrial respiratory chain activities, including COX. No such effect was obtained by treating both Surf1(-/-) and Cox15(-/-) mice with the pan-PPAR agonist bezafibrate, which instead showed adverse effects in either model. Contrariwise, treatment with the AMPK agonist AICAR led to partial correction of COX deficiency in all three models, and, importantly, significant motor improvement up to normal in the Sco2(KO/KI) mouse. These results open new perspectives for therapy of mitochondrial disease. PMID:21723506

  3. In -silico molecular docking analysis of prodigiosin and cycloprodigiosin as COX-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Pabba Shiva; Vani, Kompally; Prasad, Metuku Ram; Samatha, Burra; Bindu, Nidadavolu Shesha Venkata Sathya Siva Surya Laxmi Hima; Charya, Maringanti Alaha Singara; Reddy Shetty, Prakasham

    2013-12-01

    Prodigiosin and cycloprodigiosin are tripyrrole red pigmented compounds with medical importance for their anticancer property. In the present investigation, molecular docking studies were performed for both prodigiosin and cycloprodigiosins to evaluate the in- silico anti-inflammatory activity against Cycloxigenase-2 (COX-2) protein as model compound and the data compared with rofecoxib and celcoxid. Cycloprodigiosin showed higher initial potential, initial RMS gradient and potential energy values compared to prodigiosin. Analysis of COX-2 protein and ligand binding revealed that cyclprodigiosin interacted with COX-2 protein amino acid residues of Tyr(324), Phe(487) and Arg(89) while prodigiosin interaction was observed with two amino acids i.e. Leu(321) and Tyr(324). The computational ligand binding interaction suggested > 45% higher fitness score value for prodigiosin to that of cycloprodigiosin with COX-2 protein while the standard compounds rofecoxib and celecoxid revealed fitness score of 44 and 62, respectively. The prodigiosin ligand revealed the best fitness score compared with the standard drug rofecoxib suggesting the prodigiosin could be effective as the potential inhibitor compound against COX-2 protein and can be evaluated as anti-inflammatory drug molecule using clinical trials.

  4. Fully Regressive Melanoma: A Case Without Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ehrsam, Eric; Kallini, Joseph R; Lebas, Damien; Khachemoune, Amor; Modiano, Philippe; Cotten, Hervé

    2016-08-01

    Fully regressive melanoma is a phenomenon in which the primary cutaneous melanoma becomes completely replaced by fibrotic components as a result of host immune response. Although 10 to 35 percent of cases of cutaneous melanomas may partially regress, fully regressive melanoma is very rare; only 47 cases have been reported in the literature to date. AH of the cases of fully regressive melanoma reported in the literature were diagnosed in conjunction with metastasis on a patient. The authors describe a case of fully regressive melanoma without any metastases at the time of its diagnosis. Characteristic findings on dermoscopy, as well as the absence of melanoma on final biopsy, confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:27672418

  5. Dual evaluation of some novel 2-amino-substituted coumarinylthiazoles as anti-inflammatory-antimicrobial agents and their docking studies with COX-1/COX-2 active sites.

    PubMed

    Chandak, Navneet; Kumar, Pawan; Kaushik, Pawan; Varshney, Parul; Sharma, Chetan; Kaushik, Dhirender; Jain, Sudha; Aneja, Kamal R; Sharma, Pawan K

    2014-08-01

    Synthesis of total eighteen 2-amino-substituted 4-coumarinylthiazoles including sixteen new compounds (3a-o and 5b) bearing the benzenesulfonamide moiety is described in the present report. All the synthesized target compounds were examined for their in vivo anti-inflammatory (AI) activity and in vitro antimicrobial activity. Results revealed that six compounds (3 d, 3 f, 3 g, 3 h, 3 j and 3 n) exhibited pronounced anti-inflammatory activity comparable to the standard drug indomethacin. AI results were further confirmed by the docking studies of the most active (3n) and the least active compound (3a) with COX-1 and COX-2 active sites. In addition, most of the compounds exhibited moderate antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria as well as fungal yeast, S. cervisiae. Comparison between 3 and 5 indicated that incorporation of additional substituted pyrazole nucleus into the scaffold significantly enhanced AI activity. PMID:23777557

  6. Delay Adjusted Incidence Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  7. Developmental regression in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Al Backer, Nouf Backer

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of developmental regression in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most puzzling phenomena of this disorder. A little is known about the nature and mechanism of developmental regression in ASD. About one-third of young children with ASD lose some skills during the preschool period, usually speech, but sometimes also nonverbal communication, social or play skills are also affected. There is a lot of evidence suggesting that most children who demonstrate regression also had previous, subtle, developmental differences. It is difficult to predict the prognosis of autistic children with developmental regression. It seems that the earlier development of social, language, and attachment behaviors followed by regression does not predict the later recovery of skills or better developmental outcomes. The underlying mechanisms that lead to regression in autism are unknown. The role of subclinical epilepsy in the developmental regression of children with autism remains unclear. PMID:27493417

  8. Combined therapy with COX-2 inhibitor and 20-HETE inhibitor reduces colon tumor growth and the adverse effects of ischemic stroke associated with COX-2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Hoda, Md Nasrul; Zheng, Xuan; Li, Weiguo; Luo, Pengcheng; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Seki, Tsugio; Ergul, Adviye

    2014-01-01

    20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), Cyp4a-derived eicosanoid, is a lipid mediator that promotes tumor growth, as well as causing detrimental effects in cerebral circulation. We determined whether concurrent inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 20-HETE affects colon tumor growth and ischemic stroke outcomes. The expression of Cyp4a and COXs and production of 20-HETE and PGE2 were determined in murine colon carcinoma (MC38) cells. We then examined the effects of combined treatment with rofecoxib, a potent COX-2 inhibitor, and HET0016, a potent Cyp4a inhibitor, on the growth and proliferation of MC38 cells. Subsequently, we tested the effects of HET0016 plus rofecoxib in MC38 tumor and ischemic stroke models. Cyp4a and COXs are highly expressed in MC38 cells. Respectively, HET0016 and rofecoxib inhibited 20-HETE and PGE2 formation in MC38 cells. Moreover, rofecoxib combined with HET0016 had greater inhibitory effects on the growth and proliferation of MC38 cells than did rofecoxib alone. Importantly, rofecoxib combined with HET0016 provided greater inhibition on tumor growth than did rofecoxib alone in MC38 tumor-bearing mice. Prolonged treatment with rofecoxib selectively induced circulating 20-HETE levels and caused cerebrovascular damage after ischemic stroke, whereas therapy with rofecoxib and HET0016 attenuated 20-HETE levels and reduced rofecoxib-induced cerebrovascular damage and stroke outcomes during anti-tumor therapy. Thus these results demonstrate that combination therapy with rofecoxib and HET0016 provides a new treatment of colon tumor, which can not only enhance the anti-tumor efficacy of rofecoxib, but also reduce rofecoxib-induced cerebrovascular damage and stroke outcomes. PMID:24990856

  9. Racial identity and reflected appraisals as influences on Asian Americans' racial adjustment.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, A N; Helms, J E

    2001-08-01

    J. E. Helms's (1990) racial identity psychodiagnostic model was used to examine the contribution of racial identity schemas and reflected appraisals to the development of healthy racial adjustment of Asian American university students (N = 188). Racial adjustment was operationally defined as collective self-esteem and awareness of anti-Asian racism. Multiple regression analyses suggested that racial identity schemas and reflected appraisals were significantly predictive of Asian Americans' racial adjustment. Implications for counseling and future research are discussed.

  10. The respiratory chain supercomplex organization is independent of COX7a2l isoforms.

    PubMed

    Mourier, Arnaud; Matic, Stanka; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Milenkovic, Dusanka

    2014-12-01

    The organization of individual respiratory chain complexes into supercomplexes or respirasomes has attracted great interest because of the implications for cellular energy conversion. Recently, it was reported that commonly used mouse strains harbor a short COX7a2l (SCAFI) gene isoform that supposedly precludes the formation of complex IV-containing supercomplexes. This claim potentially has serious implications for numerous mouse studies addressing important topics in metabolism, including adaptation to space flights. Using several complementary experimental approaches, we show that mice with the short COX7a2l isoform have normal biogenesis and steady-state levels of complex IV-containing supercomplexes and consequently have normal respiratory chain function. Furthermore, we use a mouse knockout of Lrpprc and show that loss of complex IV compromises respirasome formation. We conclude that the presence of the short COX7a2l isoform in the commonly used C57BL/6 mouse strains does not prevent their use in metabolism research.

  11. Cox's chair: 'a moral and a medical mean in the treatment of maniacs'.

    PubMed

    Wade, Nicholas J; Norrsell, U; Presly, A

    2005-03-01

    Two hundred years ago Joseph Cox published his book on the treatment of insanity. His novel technique was rotating the body in a specially designed chair. Initially modest and later extravagant claims were made for the therapeutic benefit of 'Cox's chair'. It was widely adopted in Europe in the first decades of the nineteenth century, but lost favour thereafter. Its benefits have proved to be scientific rather than medical because it was adopted by students of the senses to investigate vertigo; a century later it re-emerged as the Bárány chair for the clinical assessment of vestibular function. The legacy of Cox's chair, and its related treatment of swinging, are to be found in funfairs throughout the world.

  12. Dietary glycerol for quail: association between productive performance and COX III mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Silva, S C C; Gasparino, E; Batista, E; Tanamati, F; Vesco, A P D; Lala, B; de Oliveira, D P

    2016-01-01

    This study was carry out to evaluate mRNA expression of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase III in the Pectoralis superficialis muscle of 28-day-old quails fed diets containing 0, 8, and 12% glycerol. Total RNA was extracted (N = 10) and cDNA was amplified using specifics primers for qRT-PCR. Feed efficiency and feed intake were evaluated. COX III mRNA expression in breast muscle was higher in the group fed with 12% glycerol (0.863 AU); no differences were observed in the expression of this gene between the muscle of animals fed diets without glycerol (0.357 AU) and 8% glycerol (0.415 AU). Quails that showed greater COX III mRNA expression also showed the lowest feed efficiency. These results show that there is a difference in COX III mRNA expression in breast muscle of 28-day-old quail fed diets different concentrations of glycerol. PMID:27323091

  13. Substrate-selective COX-2 inhibition as a novel strategy for therapeutic endocannabinoid augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Hermanson, Daniel J.; Gamble-George, Joyonna C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Patel, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacologic augmentation of endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) signaling is an emerging therapeutic approach for the treatment of a broad range of pathophysiological conditions. Thus far, pharmacological approaches have focused on inhibition of canonical eCB inactivation pathways, fatty acid amide hydrolase for anandamide and monoacylglycerol lipase for 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Here we review experimental evidence that cyclooxygenase-2-mediated eCB oxygenation represents a third mechanism for terminating eCB action at cannabinoid receptors. We describe the development, molecular mechanisms, and in vivo validation of “substrate-selective” COX-2 inhibitors that prevent eCB inactivation by COX-2 without affecting the prostaglandin generation from arachidonic acid. Lastly, we review recent data on the potential therapeutic applications of substrate-selective COX-2 inhibitors with a focus on neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24845457

  14. The first characterization of free radicals formed from cellular COX-catalyzed peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yan; Xu, Yi; Law, Benedict; Qian, Steven Y

    2013-04-01

    Through free radical-mediated peroxidation, cyclooxygenase (COX) can metabolize dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA) and arachidonic acid (AA) to form well-known bioactive metabolites, namely, the 1-series of prostaglandins (PGs1) and the 2-series of prostaglandins (PGs2), respectively. Unlike PGs2, which are generally viewed as proinflammatory and procarcinogenic PGs, PGs1 may possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. Previous studies using ovine COX along with spin trapping and the LC/ESR/MS technique have shown that certain exclusive free radicals are generated from different free radical reactions in DGLA and AA peroxidation. However, it has been unclear whether the differences were associated with the contrasting bioactivity of DGLA vs AA. The aim of this study was to refine the LC/MS and spin trapping technique to make it possible for the association between free radicals and cancer cell growth to be directly tested. Using a colon cancer cell line, HCA-7 colony 29, and LC/MS along with a solid-phase extraction, we were able to characterize the reduced forms of radical adducts (hydroxylamines) as the free radicals generated from cellular COX-catalyzed peroxidation. For the first time, free radicals formed in the COX-catalyzed peroxidation of AA vs DGLA and their association with cancer cell growth were assessed (cell proliferation via MTS and cell cycle distribution via propidium iodide staining) in the same experimental setting. The exclusive free radicals formed from the COX-catalyzed peroxidation of AA and DGLA were shown to be correlated with the cell growth response. Our results indicate that free radicals generated from the distinct radical reactions in COX-catalyzed peroxidation may represent the novel metabolites of AA and DGLA that correspond to their contrasting bioactivity.

  15. Timosaponin AIII inhibits melanoma cell migration by suppressing COX-2 and in vivo tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Mo; Im, A-Rang; Kim, Seung Hyung; Hyun, Jin Won; Chae, Sungwook

    2016-02-01

    Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin disease, due in large part to its propensity to metastasize. We examined the effects of timosaponin AIII, a compound isolated from Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bunge, on melanoma cancer cell migration and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using B16-F10 and WM-115 melanoma cells lines. Overexpression of COX-2, its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and PGE2 receptors (EP2 and EP4) promoted cell migration in vitro. Exposure to timosaponin AIII resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, which was associated with reduced levels of COX-2, PGE2, and PGE2 receptors. Transient transfection of COX-2 siRNA also inhibited cell migration. Exposure to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbal-13-acetate enhanced cell migration, whereas timosaponin AIII inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbal-13-acetate-induced cell migration and reduced basal levels of EP2 and EP4. Moreover, timosaponin AIII inhibited activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), an upstream regulator of COX-2 in B16-F10 cells. Consistent with our in vitro findings, in vivo studies showed that timosaponin AIII treatment significantly reduced the total number of metastatic nodules in the mouse lung and improved histological alterations in B16-F10-injected C57BL/6 mice. In addition, C57BL/6 mice treated with timosaponin AIII showed reduced expression of COX-2 and NF-κB in the lung. Together, these results indicate that timosaponin AIII has the capacity to inhibit melanoma cell migration, an essential step in the process of metastasis, by inhibiting expression of COX-2, NF-κB, PGE2, and PGE2 receptors.

  16. Signal Transduction Pathway Analysis in Desmoid-type Fibromatosis: TGFβ, COX2 and Sex Steroid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mignemi, Nicholas A.; Itani, Doha M.; Fasig, John H.; Keedy, Vicki L.; Hande, Kenneth R.; Whited, Brent W.; Homlar, Kelly C.; Correa, Hernan; Coffin, Cheryl M.; Black, Jennifer O.; Yi, Yajun; Halpern, Jennifer L.; Holt, Ginger E.; Schwartz, Herbert S.; Schoenecker, Jonathan G.; Cates, Justin M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite reports of sex steroid receptor and COX2 expression in desmoid-type fibromatosis, responses to single agent therapy with anti-estrogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are unpredictable. Perhaps combination pharmacotherapy might be more effective in desmoid tumors that co-express these targets. Clearly, a further understanding of the signaling pathways deregulated in desmoid tumors is essential for development of targeted molecular therapy. Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are important regulators of fibroblast proliferation and matrix deposition, but little is known about the TGFβ superfamily in fibromatosis. A tissue microarray representing 27 desmoid tumors was constructed; 14 samples of healing scar and 6 samples of normal fibrous tissue were included for comparison. Expression of selected receptors and activated downstream transcription factors of TGFβ family signaling pathways, β-catenin, sex steroid hormone receptors and COX2 were assessed by immunohistochemistry; patterns of co-expression were explored via correlational statistical analyses. In addition to β-catenin, immunoreactivity for phosphorylated SMAD2/3 (indicative of active TGFβ signaling) and COX2 was significantly increased in desmoid tumors compared to healing scar and quiescent fibrous tissue. Low levels of phosphorylated SMAD1/5/8 were detected in only a minority of cases. TGFβ receptor type 1 and androgen receptor were expressed in both desmoid tumors and scar, but not in fibrous tissue. Estrogen receptor-β was present in all cases studied. TGFβ signaling appears to be activated in desmoid-type fibromatosis and phosphorylated SMAD2/3 and COX2 immunoreactivity may be of diagnostic utility in these tumors. Given the frequency of androgen receptor, estrogen receptor-β and COX2 co-expression in desmoid tumors, further assessment of the efficacy of combination pharmacotherapy using hormonal agonists/antagonists together

  17. COX-2 dependent regulation of mechanotransduction in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, A-Rum; Stasinopoulos, Ioannis; Kim, Jae Hun; Yong, Hwan Mee; Kilic, Onur; Wirtz, Denis; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; An, Steven S

    2015-01-01

    The ability of living cells to exert physical forces upon their surrounding is a necessary prerequisite for diverse biological processes, such as local cellular migrations in wound healing to metastatic-invasion of cancer. How forces are coopted in metastasis has remained unclear, however, because the mechanical interplay between cancer cells and the various stromal components has not been experimentally accessible. Current dogma implicates inflammation in these mechanical processes. Using Fourier transform traction microscopy, we measured the force-generating capacity of human breast cancer cells occupying a spectrum of invasiveness as well as basal and inducible COX-2 expression (MCF-7COX-2. Both COX-2-silenced and COX-2-expressing cells expressed EP2 and EP4 receptors, but not EP1 and EP3. Exogenous addition of PGE2 increased cell tractions and stiffened the underlying cytoskeletal network. To our knowledge this is the first report linking the expression of COX-2 with mechanotransduction of human breast cancer cells, and the regulation of COX-2-PGE2-EP signaling with physical properties of the tumor microenvironment. Drug treatments aimed at reducing this mechanical interplay may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25701047

  18. COX-2 blockade suppresses gliomagenesis by inhibiting myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Mitsugu; Kohanbash, Gary; Fellows-Mayle, Wendy; Hamilton, Ronald L; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Decker, Stacy A; Ohlfest, John R; Okada, Hideho

    2011-04-01

    Epidemiologic studies have highlighted associations between the regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and reduced glioma risks in humans. Most NSAIDs function as COX-2 inhibitors that prevent production of prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂). Because PGE₂ induces expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), we hypothesized that COX-2 blockade would suppress gliomagenesis by inhibiting MDSC development and accumulation in the tumor microenvironment (TME). In mouse models of glioma, treatment with the COX-2 inhibitors acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or celecoxib inhibited systemic PGE₂ production and delayed glioma development. ASA treatment also reduced the MDSC-attracting chemokine CCL2 (C-C motif ligand 2) in the TME along with numbers of CD11b(+)Ly6G(hi)Ly6C(lo) granulocytic MDSCs in both the bone marrow and the TME. In support of this evidence that COX-2 blockade blocked systemic development of MDSCs and their CCL2-mediated accumulation in the TME, there were defects in these processes in glioma-bearing Cox2-deficient and Ccl2-deficient mice. Conversely, these mice or ASA-treated wild-type mice displayed enhanced expression of CXCL10 (C-X-C motif chemokine 10) and infiltration of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in the TME, consistent with a relief of MDSC-mediated immunosuppression. Antibody-mediated depletion of MDSCs delayed glioma growth in association with an increase in CXCL10 and CTLs in the TME, underscoring a critical role for MDSCs in glioma development. Finally, Cxcl10-deficient mice exhibited reduced CTL infiltration of tumors, establishing that CXCL10 limited this pathway of immunosuppression. Taken together, our findings show that the COX-2 pathway promotes gliomagenesis by directly supporting systemic development of MDSCs and their accumulation in the TME, where they limit CTL infiltration. PMID:21324923

  19. Effects of prostaglandins and COX-inhibiting drugs on skeletal muscle adaptations to exercise

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sophia Z.

    2013-01-01

    It has been ∼40 yr since the discovery that PGs are produced by exercising skeletal muscle and since the discovery that inhibition of PG synthesis is the mechanism of action of what are now known as cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibiting drugs. Since that time, it has been established that PGs are made during and after aerobic and resistance exercise and have a potent paracrine and autocrine effect on muscle metabolism. Consequently, it has also been determined that orally consumed doses of COX inhibitors can profoundly influence muscle PG synthesis, muscle protein metabolism, and numerous other cellular processes that regulate muscle adaptations to exercise loading. Although data from acute human exercise studies, as well as animal and cell-culture data, would predict that regular consumption of a COX inhibitor during exercise training would dampen the typical muscle adaptations, the chronic data do not support this conjecture. From the studies in young and older individuals, lasting from 1.5 to 4 mo, no interfering effects of COX inhibitors on muscle adaptations to resistance-exercise training have been noted. In fact, in older individuals, a substantial enhancement of muscle mass and strength has been observed. The collective findings of the PG/COX-pathway regulation of skeletal muscle responses and adaptations to exercise are compelling. Considering the discoveries in other areas of COX regulation of health and disease, there is certainly an interesting future of investigation in this re-emerging area, especially as it pertains to older individuals and the condition of sarcopenia, as well as exercise training and performance of individuals of all ages. PMID:23539318

  20. Time series regression model for infectious disease and weather.

    PubMed

    Imai, Chisato; Armstrong, Ben; Chalabi, Zaid; Mangtani, Punam; Hashizume, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    Time series regression has been developed and long used to evaluate the short-term associations of air pollution and weather with mortality or morbidity of non-infectious diseases. The application of the regression approaches from this tradition to infectious diseases, however, is less well explored and raises some new issues. We discuss and present potential solutions for five issues often arising in such analyses: changes in immune population, strong autocorrelations, a wide range of plausible lag structures and association patterns, seasonality adjustments, and large overdispersion. The potential approaches are illustrated with datasets of cholera cases and rainfall from Bangladesh and influenza and temperature in Tokyo. Though this article focuses on the application of the traditional time series regression to infectious diseases and weather factors, we also briefly introduce alternative approaches, including mathematical modeling, wavelet analysis, and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models. Modifications proposed to standard time series regression practice include using sums of past cases as proxies for the immune population, and using the logarithm of lagged disease counts to control autocorrelation due to true contagion, both of which are motivated from "susceptible-infectious-recovered" (SIR) models. The complexity of lag structures and association patterns can often be informed by biological mechanisms and explored by using distributed lag non-linear models. For overdispersed models, alternative distribution models such as quasi-Poisson and negative binomial should be considered. Time series regression can be used to investigate dependence of infectious diseases on weather, but may need modifying to allow for features specific to this context.

  1. A comparison of the newer COX-2 drugs and older nonnarcotic oral analgesics.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A

    2000-09-01

    The newer COX-2 drugs are safer analgesics than the older NSAIDs. At the usual dose used in osteoarthritis, they have less analgesic effect than the older NSAIDs. The non-narcotic analgesics such as acetaminophen, salicylate, NSAIDs, and the newer COX-2 drugs seem to have distinctly different mechanisms of action. In limited clinical trials, some of these drugs in combination give additive analgesia. Consideration should be given to using these drugs in combination, after suitable clinical trials, to enhance the efficacy of this category of analgesics.

  2. Global structure in spatiotemporal chaos of the Matthews-Cox equations.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Tanaka, Dan

    2007-08-01

    We find that an amplitude death state and a spatiotemporally chaotic state coexist spontaneously in the Matthews-Cox equations and this coexistence is robust. Although the entire system is far from equilibrium, the domain wall between the two states is stabilized by a negative-feedback effect due to a conservation law. This is analogous to the phase separation in conserved systems that exhibit spinodal decompositions. We observe similar phenomena also in the Nikolaevskii equation, from which the Matthews-Cox equations were derived. A Galilean invariance of the former equation corresponds to the conservation law of the latter equations.

  3. Cox report and the US-China arms control technical exchange program

    SciTech Connect

    Di Capua, M S

    1999-09-01

    The ACE program furthered the national security interests of the US by promoting technical approaches to the implementation and verification of arms control treaties that the international community embraces. The Cox Committee report suggests that uncontrolled interactions were taking place between US and Chinese nuclear weapons scientists in the course of the ACE program. On the contrary, elaborate controls were in place at the very beginning and remained in place to control the interactions and protect US national security information. The ACE program payoff to national security was just beginning and its suspension, resulting from the Cox reports allegations, is a setback to US-China progress on arms control.

  4. COX-2 Induces Breast Cancer Stem Cells via EP4/PI3K/AKT/NOTCH/WNT Axis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Mousumi; Xin, Xiping; Liu, Ling; Tutunea-Fatan, Elena; Rodriguez-Torres, Mauricio; Vincent, Krista; Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Hess, David; Lala, Peeyush K

    2016-09-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (SLC) resist conventional therapies, necessitating searches for SLC-specific targets. We established that cyclo-oxygenase(COX)-2 expression promotes human breast cancer progression by activation of the prostaglandin(PG)E-2 receptor EP4. Present study revealed that COX-2 induces SLCs by EP4-mediated NOTCH/WNT signaling. Ectopic COX-2 over-expression in MCF-7 and SKBR-3 cell lines resulted in: increased migration/invasion/proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), elevated SLCs (spheroid formation), increased ALDH activity and colocalization of COX-2 and SLC markers (ALDH1A, CD44, β-Catenin, NANOG, OCT3/4, SOX-2) in spheroids. These changes were reversed with COX-2-inhibitor or EP4-antagonist (EP4A), indicating dependence on COX-2/EP4 activities. COX-2 over-expression or EP4-agonist treatments of COX-2-low cells caused up-regulation of NOTCH/WNT genes, blocked with PI3K/AKT inhibitors. NOTCH/WNT inhibitors also blocked COX-2/EP4 induced SLC induction. Microarray analysis showed up-regulation of numerous SLC-regulatory and EMT-associated genes. MCF-7-COX-2 cells showed increased mammary tumorigenicity and spontaneous multiorgan metastases in NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγ-null mice for successive generations with limiting cell inocula. These tumors showed up-regulation of VEGF-A/C/D, Vimentin and phospho-AKT, down-regulation of E-Cadherin and enrichment of SLC marker positive and spheroid forming cells. MCF-7-COX-2 cells also showed increased lung colonization in NOD/SCID/GUSB-null mice, an effect reversed with EP4-knockdown or EP4A treatment of the MCF-7-COX-2 cells. COX-2/EP4/ALDH1A mRNA expression in human breast cancer tissues were highly correlated with one other, more marked in progressive stage of disease. In situ immunostaining of human breast tumor tissues revealed co-localization of SLC markers with COX-2, supporting COX-2 inducing SLCs. High COX-2/EP4 mRNA expression was linked with reduced survival. Thus, EP4 represents a novel SLC

  5. The brown and brite adipocyte marker Cox7a1 is not required for non-shivering thermogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Stefanie F.; Fromme, Tobias; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Hüttemann, Maik; Klingenspor, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The cytochrome c oxidase subunit isoform Cox7a1 is highly abundant in skeletal muscle and heart and influences enzyme activity in these tissues characterised by high oxidative capacity. We identified Cox7a1, well-known as brown adipocyte marker gene, as a cold-responsive protein of brown adipose tissue. We hypothesised a mechanistic relationship between cytochrome c oxidase activity and Cox7a1 protein levels affecting the oxidative capacity of brown adipose tissue and thus non-shivering thermogenesis. We subjected wildtype and Cox7a1 knockout mice to different temperature regimens and tested characteristics of brown adipose tissue activation. Cytochrome c oxidase activity, uncoupling protein 1 expression and maximal norepinephrine-induced heat production were gradually increased during cold-acclimation, but unaffected by Cox7a1 knockout. Moreover, the abundance of uncoupling protein 1 competent brite cells in white adipose tissue was not influenced by presence or absence of Cox7a1. Skin temperature in the interscapular region of neonates was lower in uncoupling protein 1 knockout pups employed as a positive control, but not in Cox7a1 knockout pups. Body mass gain and glucose tolerance did not differ between wildtype and Cox7a1 knockout mice fed with high fat or control diet. We conclude that brown adipose tissue function in mice does not require the presence of Cox7a1. PMID:26635001

  6. Sp1 and COX2 expression is positively correlated with a poor prognosis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ting; Zhuo, Meng; Zhou, Yangyang; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yi; Jiao, Feng; Wang, Liwei

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitor, can inhibit angiogenesis and metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) via the suppression of specificity protein 1 (Sp1). In this study, we investigated the prognostic value of Sp1 and COX2 in 88 PDAC patients. Our study showed there was a positive correlation between Sp1 and COX2 expression (P=0.001) by using the Spearman's rank test. Pearson Chi-square test revealed that Sp1 and COX2 expression were positively associated with lymph node metastasis (P<0.05, both). In addition, the Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with Sp1- or COX2-positive expression exhibited poorer overall survival (OS) than those with Sp1- or COX2-negative expression (P<0.05, all). Most importantly, Sp1- and COX2-negative patients had the best OS (P=0.01). In multivariate analysis, Sp1 expression (P=0.03), COX2 expression (P=0.04), and nuclear grade (P=0.009) were found to be independent predictors for OS. Moreover, we confirmed that Sp1 could upregulate the expression of COX2 in PDAC cell lines by western blot analysis, and both are of important prognostic value in PDAC. PMID:27057636

  7. Life Events, Sibling Warmth, and Youths' Adjustment.

    PubMed

    Waite, Evelyn B; Shanahan, Lilly; Calkins, Susan D; Keane, Susan P; O'Brien, Marion

    2011-10-01

    Sibling warmth has been identified as a protective factor from life events, but stressor-support match-mismatch and social domains perspectives suggest that sibling warmth may not efficiently protect youths from all types of life events. We tested whether sibling warmth moderated the association between each of family-wide, youths' personal, and siblings' personal life events and both depressive symptoms and risk-taking behaviors. Participants were 187 youths aged 9-18 (M = 11.80 years old, SD = 2.05). Multiple regression models revealed that sibling warmth was a protective factor from depressive symptoms for family-wide events, but not for youths' personal and siblings' personal life events. Findings highlight the importance of contextualizing protective functions of sibling warmth by taking into account the domains of stressors and adjustment. PMID:22241934

  8. LRGS: Linear Regression by Gibbs Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, Adam B.

    2016-02-01

    LRGS (Linear Regression by Gibbs Sampling) implements a Gibbs sampler to solve the problem of multivariate linear regression with uncertainties in all measured quantities and intrinsic scatter. LRGS extends an algorithm by Kelly (2007) that used Gibbs sampling for performing linear regression in fairly general cases in two ways: generalizing the procedure for multiple response variables, and modeling the prior distribution of covariates using a Dirichlet process.

  9. Quantile regression applied to spectral distance decay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocchini, D.; Cade, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    Remotely sensed imagery has long been recognized as a powerful support for characterizing and estimating biodiversity. Spectral distance among sites has proven to be a powerful approach for detecting species composition variability. Regression analysis of species similarity versus spectral distance allows us to quantitatively estimate the amount of turnover in species composition with respect to spectral and ecological variability. In classical regression analysis, the residual sum of squares is minimized for the mean of the dependent variable distribution. However, many ecological data sets are characterized by a high number of zeroes that add noise to the regression model. Quantile regressions can be used to evaluate trend in the upper quantiles rather than a mean trend across the whole distribution of the dependent variable. In this letter, we used ordinary least squares (OLS) and quantile regressions to estimate the decay of species similarity versus spectral distance. The achieved decay rates were statistically nonzero (p < 0.01), considering both OLS and quantile regressions. Nonetheless, the OLS regression estimate of the mean decay rate was only half the decay rate indicated by the upper quantiles. Moreover, the intercept value, representing the similarity reached when the spectral distance approaches zero, was very low compared with the intercepts of the upper quantiles, which detected high species similarity when habitats are more similar. In this letter, we demonstrated the power of using quantile regressions applied to spectral distance decay to reveal species diversity patterns otherwise lost or underestimated by OLS regression. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  10. Process modeling with the regression network.

    PubMed

    van der Walt, T; Barnard, E; van Deventer, J

    1995-01-01

    A new connectionist network topology called the regression network is proposed. The structural and underlying mathematical features of the regression network are investigated. Emphasis is placed on the intricacies of the optimization process for the regression network and some measures to alleviate these difficulties of optimization are proposed and investigated. The ability of the regression network algorithm to perform either nonparametric or parametric optimization, as well as a combination of both, is also highlighted. It is further shown how the regression network can be used to model systems which are poorly understood on the basis of sparse data. A semi-empirical regression network model is developed for a metallurgical processing operation (a hydrocyclone classifier) by building mechanistic knowledge into the connectionist structure of the regression network model. Poorly understood aspects of the process are provided for by use of nonparametric regions within the structure of the semi-empirical connectionist model. The performance of the regression network model is compared to the corresponding generalization performance results obtained by some other nonparametric regression techniques.

  11. Hybrid fuzzy regression with trapezoidal fuzzy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaghnia, T.; Danesh, S.; Maleki, A.

    2011-12-01

    In this regard, this research deals with a method for hybrid fuzzy least-squares regression. The extension of symmetric triangular fuzzy coefficients to asymmetric trapezoidal fuzzy coefficients is considered as an effective measure for removing unnecessary fuzziness of the linear fuzzy model. First, trapezoidal fuzzy variable is applied to derive a bivariate regression model. In the following, normal equations are formulated to solve the four parts of hybrid regression coefficients. Also the model is extended to multiple regression analysis. Eventually, method is compared with Y-H.O. chang's model.

  12. [From clinical judgment to linear regression model.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Cruz, Lino; Pérez, Marcela; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Talavera, Juan O

    2013-01-01

    When we think about mathematical models, such as linear regression model, we think that these terms are only used by those engaged in research, a notion that is far from the truth. Legendre described the first mathematical model in 1805, and Galton introduced the formal term in 1886. Linear regression is one of the most commonly used regression models in clinical practice. It is useful to predict or show the relationship between two or more variables as long as the dependent variable is quantitative and has normal distribution. Stated in another way, the regression is used to predict a measure based on the knowledge of at least one other variable. Linear regression has as it's first objective to determine the slope or inclination of the regression line: Y = a + bx, where "a" is the intercept or regression constant and it is equivalent to "Y" value when "X" equals 0 and "b" (also called slope) indicates the increase or decrease that occurs when the variable "x" increases or decreases in one unit. In the regression line, "b" is called regression coefficient. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) indicates the importance of independent variables in the outcome.

  13. Geodesic least squares regression on information manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Verdoolaege, Geert

    2014-12-05

    We present a novel regression method targeted at situations with significant uncertainty on both the dependent and independent variables or with non-Gaussian distribution models. Unlike the classic regression model, the conditional distribution of the response variable suggested by the data need not be the same as the modeled distribution. Instead they are matched by minimizing the Rao geodesic distance between them. This yields a more flexible regression method that is less constrained by the assumptions imposed through the regression model. As an example, we demonstrate the improved resistance of our method against some flawed model assumptions and we apply this to scaling laws in magnetic confinement fusion.

  14. Mood Adjustment via Mass Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knobloch, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Proposes and experimentally tests mood adjustment approach, complementing mood management theory. Discusses how results regarding self-exposure across time show that patterns of popular music listening among a group of undergraduate students differ with initial mood and anticipation, lending support to mood adjustment hypotheses. Describes how…

  15. Spousal Adjustment to Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziglar, Elisa J.

    This paper reviews the literature on the stresses and coping strategies of spouses of patients with myocardial infarction (MI). It attempts to identify specific problem areas of adjustment for the spouse and to explore the effects of spousal adjustment on patient recovery. Chapter one provides an overview of the importance in examining the…

  16. Data correction for seven activity trackers based on regression models.

    PubMed

    Andalibi, Vafa; Honko, Harri; Christophe, Francois; Viik, Jari

    2015-08-01

    Using an activity tracker for measuring activity-related parameters, e.g. steps and energy expenditure (EE), can be very helpful in assisting a person's fitness improvement. Unlike the measuring of number of steps, an accurate EE estimation requires additional personal information as well as accurate velocity of movement, which is hard to achieve due to inaccuracy of sensors. In this paper, we have evaluated regression-based models to improve the precision for both steps and EE estimation. For this purpose, data of seven activity trackers and two reference devices was collected from 20 young adult volunteers wearing all devices at once in three different tests, namely 60-minute office work, 6-hour overall activity and 60-minute walking. Reference data is used to create regression models for each device and relative percentage errors of adjusted values are then statistically compared to that of original values. The effectiveness of regression models are determined based on the result of a statistical test. During a walking period, EE measurement was improved in all devices. The step measurement was also improved in five of them. The results show that improvement of EE estimation is possible only with low-cost implementation of fitting model over the collected data e.g. in the app or in corresponding service back-end. PMID:26736578

  17. Normalization Ridge Regression in Practice I: Comparisons Between Ordinary Least Squares, Ridge Regression and Normalization Ridge Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulcock, J. W.

    The problem of model estimation when the data are collinear was examined. Though the ridge regression (RR) outperforms ordinary least squares (OLS) regression in the presence of acute multicollinearity, it is not a problem free technique for reducing the variance of the estimates. It is a stochastic procedure when it should be nonstochastic and it…

  18. Parental Divorce and Children's Adjustment.

    PubMed

    Lansford, Jennifer E

    2009-03-01

    This article reviews the research literature on links between parental divorce and children's short-term and long-term adjustment. First, I consider evidence regarding how divorce relates to children's externalizing behaviors, internalizing problems, academic achievement, and social relationships. Second, I examine timing of the divorce, demographic characteristics, children's adjustment prior to the divorce, and stigmatization as moderators of the links between divorce and children's adjustment. Third, I examine income, interparental conflict, parenting, and parents well-being as mediators of relations between divorce and children's adjustment. Fourth, I note the caveats and limitations of the research literature. Finally, I consider notable policies related to grounds for divorce, child support, and child custody in light of how they might affect children s adjustment to their parents divorce.

  19. Elevated COX2 expression and PGE2 production by downregulation of RXRα in senescent macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huimin; Ma, Feng; Hu, Xiaona; Jin, Ting; Xiong, Chuhui; Teng, Xiaochun

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Downregulation of RXRα in senescent macrophage. •RXRα suppresses NF-κB activity and COX2 expression. •Increased PGE2 production due to downregulation of RXRα. -- Abstract: Increased systemic level of inflammatory cytokines leads to numerous age-related diseases. In senescent macrophages, elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production contributes to the suppression of T cell function with aging, which increases the susceptibility to infections. However, the regulation of these inflammatory cytokines and PGE2 with aging still remains unclear. We have verified that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and PGE2 production are higher in LPS-stimulated macrophages from old mice than that from young mice. Downregulation of RXRα, a nuclear receptor that can suppress NF-κB activity, mediates the elevation of COX2 expression and PGE2 production in senescent macrophages. We also have found less induction of ABCA1 and ABCG1 by RXRα agonist in senescent macrophages, which partially accounts for high risk of atherosclerosis in aged population. Systemic treatment with RXRα antagonist HX531 in young mice increases COX2, TNF-α, and IL-6 expression in splenocytes. Our study not only has outlined a mechanism of elevated NF-κB activity and PGE2 production in senescent macrophages, but also provides RXRα as a potential therapeutic target for treating the age-related diseases.

  20. Systematic revision of the mealybug genus Delottococcus Cox & Ben-Dov (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A systematic revision of the mealybug genus Delottococcus Cox & Ben-Dov is presented. Nine species are treated, including D. millari which is described as new. The 8 previously described species are: Delottococcus aberiae (De Lotto), D. confusus (De Lotto), D. elisabethae (Brain), D. euphorbiae (E...

  1. Isoorientin, a Selective Inhibitor of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) from the Tubers of Pueraria tuberosa.

    PubMed

    Sumalatha, Manne; Munikishore, Rachakunta; Rammohan, Aluru; Gunasekar, Duvvuru; Kumar, Kotha Anil; Reddy, Kakularam Kumar; Azad, Rajaram; Reddanna, Pallu; Bodo, Bernard

    2015-10-01

    Bioassay-guided fraction of the methanol extract of the roots of Pueraria tuberose DC yielded puerarin, an isoflavone C-glycoside (PT-1), isoorientin, a flavone C-glycoside (PT-2) and mangiferin, a xanthone C-glycoside (PT-3). The extracts and the isolated compounds were screened for potent anti-inflammatory components inhibiting the cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), the target enzymes of inflammation, by employing spectroscopic/polorographic methods. Among these, isoorientin was found to be a potent inhibitor of COX-2with an IC50 value of 39 μM. Docking studies were carried out to understand the interactions of isorientin (PT-2) with COX-2.The structures of the isolates were determined by mass spectrometry and 2D-NMR techniques including HSQC, HMBC, NOESY and 1H-1H COSY experiments. Although isoorientin and mangiferin have been reported from several plant sources, this is the first report of their isolation from a Pueraria species. PMID:26669106

  2. Antinociceptive Effects of Prim-O-Glucosylcimifugin in Inflammatory Nociception via Reducing Spinal COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liu-Qing; Li, Yu; Li, Yuan-Yan; Xu, Shi-hao; Yang, Zong-Yong; Lin, Zheng; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We measured anti-nociceptive activity of prim-o-glucosylcimifugin (POG), a molecule from Saposhnikovia divaricate (Turcz) Schischk. Anti-nociceptive or anti-inflammatory effects of POG on a formalin-induced tonic nociceptive response and a complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) inoculation-induced rat arthritis pain model were studied. Single subcutaneous injections of POG produced potent anti-nociception in both models that was comparable to indomethacin analgesia. Anti-nociceptive activity of POG was dose-dependent, maximally reducing pain 56.6% with an ED50 of 1.6 mg. Rats given POG over time did not develop tolerance. POG also time-dependently reduced serum TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 in arthritic rats and both POG and indomethacin reduced spinal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Like indomethacin which inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity, POG dose-dependently decreased spinal COX-2 content in arthritic rats. Additionally, POG, and its metabolite cimifugin, downregulated COX-2 expression in vitro. Thus, POG produced potent anti-nociception by downregulating spinal COX-2 expression. PMID:27257008

  3. Current approaches to prevent NSAID-induced gastropathy – COX selectivity and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jan C; Domschke, Wolfram; Pohle, Thorsten

    2004-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is still an important medical and socio-economic problem – despite recent pharmaceutical advances. To prevent NSAID-induced gastropathy, three strategies are followed in clinical routine: (i) coprescription of a gastroprotective drug, (ii) use of selective COX-2 inhibitors, and (iii) eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Proton pump inhibitors are the comedication of choice as they effectively reduce gastrointestinal adverse events of NSAIDs and are safe even in long-term use. Co-medication with vitamin C has only been little studied in the prevention of NSAID-induced gastropathy. Apart from scavenging free radicals it is able to induce haeme-oxgenase 1 in gastric cells, a protective enzyme with antioxidant and vasodilative properties. Final results of the celecoxib outcome study (CLASS study) attenuated the initial enthusiasm about the GI safety of selective COX-2 inhibitors, especially in patients concomitantly taking aspirin for cardiovascular prophylaxis. Helicobacter pylori increases the risk for ulcers particularly in NSAID-naive patients and therefore eradication is recommended prior to long-term NSAID therapy at least in patients at high risk. New classes of COX-inhibitors are currently evaluated in clinical studies with very promising results: NSAIDs combined with a nitric oxide releasing moiety (NO-NSAID) and dual inhibitors of COX and 5-LOX. These drugs offer extended anti-inflammatory potency while sparing gastric mucosa. PMID:15563357

  4. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation.

  5. ZN2+ INDUCES COX-2 EXPRESSION THROUGH DOWNREGULATION OF LIPID PHOSPHATASE PTEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zn2+ Induces COX-2 Expression through Downregulation of Lipid Phosphatase PTEN
    Weidong Wu*, James M. Samet, Philip A. Bromberg*?, Young E. Whang?, and Lee M. Graves* ?
    *CEMALB, ?Department of Medicine, and ?Department of Pharmacology, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC27599; Human Studie...

  6. Targeting NOX, INOS and COX-2 in inflammatory cells: chemoprevention using food phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2007-12-01

    Biological, biochemical and physical stimuli activate inflammatory leukocytes, such as macrophages, resulting in induction and synthesis of proinflammatory proteins and enzymes, together with free radicals, as innate immune responses. On the other hand, chronic and dysregulated activation of some inducible enzymes, including NADPH oxidase (NOX), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, have been shown to play pivotal roles in the development of certain inflammatory diseases such as oncogenesis. While the use of synthetic agents, especially those targeting molecules, is an attractive and reasonable approach to prevent carcinogenesis, it should be noted that traditional herbs and spices also exist along with their active constituents, which have been demonstrated to disrupt inflammatory signal transduction pathways. In this mini-review, the molecular mechanisms of activation or induction of NOX, iNOS and COX-2, as well as some food phytochemicals with marked potential to regulate those key inflammatory molecules, are highlighted. For example, 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, which occurs in the rhizomes of the subtropical Zingiberaceae plant, has been shown to attenuate NOX-derived superoxide generation in macrophages, as well as lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide and prostaglandin E(2) production through the suppression of iNOS and COX-2 synthesis, respectively. Notably, this phytochemical has exhibited a wide range of cancer prevention activities in several rodent models of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. Herein, the cancer preventive potentials of several food phytochemicals targeting the induction of NOX, iNOS and COX-2 are described.

  7. Triptolide inhibits COX-2 expression by regulating mRNA stability in TNF-{alpha}-treated A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Shuang; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Huang, Xin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Xiao; Li, Han; Zhang, Luyong

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression and the half-life of COX-2 mRNA is decreased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HuR protein shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm is inhibited by triptolide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited 3 Prime -UTR fluorescence reporter gene activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COX-2 mRNA binding to HuR is decreased by triptolide in pull-down experiments. -- Abstract: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression is frequently associated with human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and involved in tumor proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and resistance to apoptosis. In the present study, the effects of triptolide on COX-2 expression in A549 cells were investigated and triptolide was found to inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 expression. In our further studies, it was found that triptolide decreased the half-life of COX-2 mRNA dramatically and that it inhibited 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) fluorescence reporter gene activity. Meanwhile, triptolide inhibited the HuR shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm. After triptolide treatment, decreased COX-2 mRNA in pull-down experiments with anti-HuR antibodies was observed, indicating that the decreased cytoplasmic HuR is responsible for the decreased COX-2 mRNA. Taken together, our results provided evidence for the first time that triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression by COX-2 mRNA stability modulation and post-transcriptional regulation. These results provide a novel mechanism of action for triptolide which may be important in the treatment of lung cancer.

  8. COX-2-Derived PGE2 Promotes Injury-induced Vascular Neointimal Hyperplasia through the EP3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zou, Fangfang; Tang, Juan; Zhang, Qianqian; Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Qingsong; Shen, Yujun; Xiong, Lixia; Breyer, Richard; Lararus, Michael; Funk, Colin D.; Yu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation are the hallmarks of restenosis pathogenesis after angioplasty. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostaglandin (PG)E2 is implicated in the vascular remodeling response to injury. However, its precise molecular role remains unknown. Objective This study investigates the impact of COX-2-derived PGE2 on neointima formation after injury. Methods and Results Vascular remodeling was induced by wire-injury in femoral arteries of mice. Both neointima formation and the restenosis ratio were diminished in COX-2 KO mice as compared to controls, whereas these parameters were enhanced in COX-1>COX-2 mice where COX-1 is governed by COX-2 regulatory elements. PG profile analysis revealed that the reduced PGE2 by COX-2 deficiency, but not PGI2, could be rescued by COX-1 replacement, indicating COX-2-derived PGE2 enhanced neointima formation. Through multiple approaches, the EP3 receptor was identified to mediate the VSMC migration response to various stimuli. Disruption of EP3 impaired VSMC polarity for directional migration by depressing small GTPase activity and retarded vascular neointimal hyperplasia while overexpression of EP3α and EP3β aggravated neointima formation. Inhibition or deletion of EP3α/β, a Gαs protein-coupled receptor, activated thecAMP/PKA pathway and depressed activation of RhoA in VSMCs. PGE2 could stimulate PI3K/Akt/GSK3β signaling in VSMCs through Gβγ subunits upon EP3α/β activation. Abolition of EP3 suppressed PI3K signaling and reduced GTPase activity in VSMCs, and altered cell polarity and directional migration. Conclusions COX-2-derived PGE2 facilitated the neointimal hyperplasia response to injury through EP3α/β-mediated cAMP/PKA and PI3K pathways, indicating EP3 inhibition maybe a promising therapeutic strategy for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. PMID:23595951

  9. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yingting; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  10. The effects of celecoxib, a COX-2 selective inhibitor, on acute inflammation induced in irradiated rats.

    PubMed

    Khayyal, M T; El-Ghazaly, Mona A; El-Hazek, R M; Nada, A S

    2009-10-01

    The potential value of selective and non-selective COX-2 inhibitors in preventing some of the biochemical changes induced by ionizing radiation was studied in rats exposed to carrageenan-induced paw edema and 6-day-old air pouch models. The animals were exposed to different exposure levels of gamma-radiation, namely either to single doses of 2 and 7.5 Gy or a fractionated dose level of 7.5 Gy delivered as 0.5 Gy twice weekly for 7.5 weeks. The inflammatory response produced by carrageenan in irradiated rats was markedly higher than that induced in non-irradiated animals, and depended on the extent of irradiation. Celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, in doses of 3, 5, 10, and 15 mg/kg was effective in reducing paw edema in irradiated and non-irradiated rats in a dose-dependent manner as well as diclofenac (3 mg/kg), a non-selective COX inhibitor. Irradiation of animals before the induction of the air pouch by an acute dose of 2 Gy led to a significant increase in leukocytic count, as well as in the level of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), LTB(4), PGE(2) (as an index of COX-2 activity), TXB(2) (as an index of COX-1 activity), and the plasma level of MDA. This increase in level of these parameters was more marked than that observed in the non-irradiated animals subjected to the inflammagen. The blood GSH level was not affected by the dose of irradiation used, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was suppressed. In many respects, celecoxib (5 mg/kg) was as potent as diclofenac in decreasing the elevated levels of IL-6, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, LTB(4), PGE(2), but lacked any significant effect on TXB(2) level. Since it is mostly selective for COX-2 with a rare effect on COX-1 enzyme, both drugs at the selected dose levels showed no effect on level of MDA, GSH, and SOD activity.

  11. Adjustment versus no adjustment when using adjustable sutures in strabismus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liebermann, Laura; Hatt, Sarah R.; Leske, David A.; Holmes, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare long-term postoperative outcomes when performing an adjustment to achieve a desired immediate postoperative alignment versus simply tying off at the desired immediate postoperative alignment when using adjustable sutures for strabismus surgery. Methods We retrospectively identified 89 consecutive patients who underwent a reoperation for horizontal strabismus using adjustable sutures and also had a 6-week and 1-year outcome examination. In each case, the intent of the surgeon was to tie off and only to adjust if the patient was not within the intended immediate postoperative range. Postoperative success was predefined based on angle of misalignment and diplopia at distance and near. Results Of the 89 patients, 53 (60%) were adjusted and 36 (40%) were tied off. Success rates were similar between patients who were simply tied off immediately after surgery and those who were adjusted. At 6 weeks, the success rate was 64% for the nonadjusted group versus 81% for the adjusted group (P = 0.09; difference of 17%; 95% CI, −2% to 36%). At 1 year, the success rate was 67% for the nonadjusted group versus 77% for the adjusted group (P = 0.3; difference of 11%; 95% CI, −8% to 30%). Conclusions Performing an adjustment to obtain a desired immediate postoperative alignment did not yield inferior long-term outcomes to those obtained by tying off to obtain that initial alignment. If patients were who were outside the desired immediate postoperative range had not been not adjusted, it is possible that their long-term outcomes would have been worse, therefore, overall, an adjustable approach may be superior to a nonadjustable approach. PMID:23415035

  12. Comparison of Cox's and relative survival models when estimating the effects of prognostic factors on disease-specific mortality: a simulation study under proportional excess hazards.

    PubMed

    Le Teuff, Gwenaël; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Bolard, Philippe; Quantin, Catherine

    2005-12-30

    In many prognostic studies focusing on mortality of persons affected by a particular disease, the cause of death of individual patients is not recorded. In such situations, the conventional survival analytical methods, such as the Cox's proportional hazards regression model, do not allow to discriminate the effects of prognostic factors on disease-specific mortality from their effects on all-causes mortality. In the last decade, the relative survival approach has been proposed to deal with the analyses involving population-based cancer registries, where the problem of missing information on the cause of death is very common. However, some questions regarding the ability of the relative survival methods to accurately discriminate between the two sources of mortality remain open. In order to systematically assess the performance of the relative survival model proposed by Esteve et al., and to quantify its potential advantages over the Cox's model analyses, we carried out a series of simulation experiments, based on the population-based colon cancer registry in the French region of Burgundy. Simulations showed a systematic bias induced by the 'crude' conventional Cox's model analyses when individual causes of death are unknown. In simulations where only about 10 per cent of patients died of causes other than colon cancer, the Cox's model over-estimated the effects of male gender and oldest age category by about 17 and 13 per cent, respectively, with the coverage rate of the 95 per cent CI for the latter estimate as low as 65 per cent. In contrast, the effect of higher cancer stages was under-estimated by 8-28 per cent. In contrast to crude survival, relative survival model largely reduced such problems and handled well even such challenging tasks as separating the opposite effects of the same variable on cancer-related versus other-causes mortality. Specifically, in all the cases discussed above, the relative bias in the estimates from the Esteve et al.'s model was

  13. Risk-adjusted monitoring of survival times.

    PubMed

    Sego, Landon H; Reynolds, Marion R; Woodall, William H

    2009-04-30

    We consider the monitoring of surgical outcomes, where each patient has a different risk of post-operative mortality due to risk factors that exist prior to the surgery. We propose a risk-adjusted (RA) survival time CUSUM chart (RAST CUSUM) for monitoring a continuous, time-to-event variable that may be right-censored. Risk adjustment is accomplished using accelerated failure time regression models. We compare the average run length performance of the RAST CUSUM chart with the RA Bernoulli CUSUM chart using data from cardiac surgeries to motivate the details of the comparison. The comparisons show that the RAST CUSUM chart is more efficient at detecting a sudden increase in the odds of mortality than the RA Bernoulli CUSUM chart, especially when the fraction of censored observations is relatively low or when a small increase in the odds of mortality occurs. We also discuss the impact of the amount of training data used to estimate chart parameters as well as the implementation of the RAST CUSUM chart during prospective monitoring.

  14. Fitts' Law in early postural adjustments.

    PubMed

    Bertucco, M; Cesari, P; Latash, M L

    2013-02-12

    We tested a hypothesis that the classical relation between movement time and index of difficulty (ID) in quick pointing action (Fitts' Law) reflects processes at the level of motor planning. Healthy subjects stood on a force platform and performed quick and accurate hand movements into targets of different size located at two distances. The movements were associated with early postural adjustments that are assumed to reflect motor planning processes. The short distance did not require trunk rotation, while the long distance did. As a result, movements over the long distance were associated with substantial Coriolis forces. Movement kinematics and contact forces and moments recorded by the platform were studied. Movement time scaled with ID for both movements. However, the data could not be fitted with a single regression: Movements over the long distance had a larger intercept corresponding to movement times about 140 ms longer than movements over the shorter distance. The magnitude of postural adjustments prior to movement initiation scaled with ID for both short and long distances. Our results provide strong support for the hypothesis that Fitts' Law emerges at the level of motor planning, not at the level of corrections of ongoing movements. They show that, during natural movements, changes in movement distance may lead to changes in the relation between movement time and ID, for example when the contribution of different body segments to the movement varies and when the action of Coriolis force may require an additional correction of the movement trajectory. PMID:23211560

  15. Fitts’ Law in Early Postural Adjustments

    PubMed Central

    Bertucco, M.; Cesari, P.; Latash, M.L

    2012-01-01

    We tested a hypothesis that the classical relation between movement time and index of difficulty (ID) in quick pointing action (Fitts’ Law) reflects processes at the level of motor planning. Healthy subjects stood on a force platform and performed quick and accurate hand movements into targets of different size located at two distances. The movements were associated with early postural adjustments that are assumed to reflect motor planning processes. The short distance did not require trunk rotation, while the long distance did. As a result, movements over the long distance were associated with substantiual Coriolis forces. Movement kinematics and contact forces and moments recorded by the platform were studied. Movement time scaled with ID for both movements. However, the data could not be fitted with a single regression: Movements over the long distance had a larger intercept corresponding to movement times about 140 ms longer than movements over the shorter distance. The magnitude of postural adjustments prior to movement initiation scaled with ID for both short and long distances. Our results provide strong support for the hypothesis that Fitts’ Law emerges at the level of motor planning, not at the level of corrections of ongoing movements. They show that, during natural movements, changes in movement distance may lead to changes in the relation between movement time and ID, for example when the contribution of different body segments to the movement varies and when the action of Coriolis force may require an additional correction of the movement trajectory. PMID:23211560

  16. COX-2 rs20417 polymorphism is associated with stroke and white matter disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Filho, Jamary; Ornellas, Ana C.P.; Zhang, Cathy R.; Oliveira, Luciana M.B.; Araújo-Santos, Théo; Borges, Valeria M.; Ventura, Laís M.G.B.; Reis, Francisco J. F. B.; Aras, Roque; Fernandes, André M.; Rosand, Jonathan; Greenberg, Steven M.; Furie, Karen L.; Rost, Natalia S.

    2015-01-01

    Goals To investigate the effect of COX-2 polymorphism and its product, prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2), on stroke risk in an endemic area for Chagas disease. In a separate cohort, to investigate the effect of COX-2 polymorphisms on the total burden of cerebral white matter disease. Methods Cases were outpatients with ischemic stroke; controls were stroke-free subjects from two outpatient clinics (heart failure and caregivers of a movement disorders clinic). We extracted DNA from total blood to investigate the rs20417 COX-2 polymorphism. Serologic tests (ELISA) were performed to confirm T. cruzi infection and to quantify PGE2 levels. In the Boston cohort, white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHv) was quantified on the admission brain MRIs of subjects with ischemic stroke, who also donated DNA for the COX-2 gene region analysis. Findings We studied 44 patients with stroke and 96 controls (46 with heart failure and 50 caregivers) in the Brazilian cohort; and 788 stroke patients (302 cardioembolic, 486 non-cardioembolic) in the Boston cohort. In the Brazilian cohort, rs20417 polymorphism was associated with both stroke (p=5x10−6) and decreased PGE2 levels (p=4x10−5); similarly, Chagas was associated with stroke (p=4x10−3) and decreased PGE2 levels (p=7x10−3). In the Boston cohort, rs20417 polymorphism was associated with increased WMHv among non-cardioembolic (p=0.037), but not among cardioembolic stroke patients. Conclusions Variation in COX-2 gene is associated with both symptomatic and silent brain cerebrovascular disease. This candidate gene region should be tested in population-based samples. PMID:25957909

  17. Hyaluronic acid is radioprotective in the intestine through a TLR4 and COX-2-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Terrence E; Foster, Lynne; Stenson, William F

    2012-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium is sensitive to radiation injury. Damage to the intestinal epithelium is dose limiting in radiation therapy of abdominal cancers. There is a need for agents that can be given before radiation therapy to protect the intestinal epithelium. C57BL6 mice were subjected to 12 Gy of total body radiation. Some mice received intraperitoneal hyaluronic acid (HA) before radiation. Mice were killed 6 h after radiation to assess radiation-induced apoptosis in the intestine; other mice were killed at 84 h to assess crypt survival. Total body radiation (12 Gy) resulted in increased expression of HA synthases and HA in the intestine and increased plasma HA (5-fold). Intraperitoneal injection of HA (30 mg/kg) before radiation resulted in a 1.8-fold increase in intestinal crypt survival and a decrease in radiation-induced apoptosis. The radioprotective effects of HA were not seen in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)- or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-deficient mice. Intraperitoneal injection of HA induced a 1.5-fold increase in intestinal COX-2 expression, a 1.5-fold increase in intestinal PGE₂, and the migration of COX-2-expressing mesenchymal stem cells from the lamina propria in the villi to the lamina propria near the crypt. We conclude that 1) radiation induces increased HA expression through inducing HA synthases, 2) intraperitoneal HA given before radiation reduces radiation-induced apoptosis and increases crypt survival, and 3) these radioprotective effects are mediated through TLR4, COX-2, and the migration of COX-2-expressing mesenchymal stem cells.

  18. Artesunate inhibits the growth and induces apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by downregulating COX-2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Luo, He-Sheng; Li, Ming; Tan, Shi-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate, a derivative of artemisinin isolated from Artemisia annua L., has been traditionally used to treat malaria, and artesunate has demonstrated cytotoxic effects against a variety of cancer cells. However, there is little available information about the antitumor effects of artesunate on human gastric cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of artesunate on human gastric cancer cells and whether its antitumor effect is associated with reduction in COX-2 expression. The effects of artesunate on the growth and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells were investigated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, flow cytometric analysis of annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining, rhodamine 123 staining, and Western blot analysis. Results indicate that artesunate exhibits antiproliferative effects and apoptosis-inducing activities. Artesunate markedly inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner and induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells a dose-dependent manner, which was associated with a reduction in COX-2 expression. Treatment with the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib, or transient transfection of gastric cancer cells with COX-2 siRNA, also inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the treatment with artesunate promoted the expression of proapoptotic factor Bax and suppressed the expression of antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2. In addition, caspase-3 and caspase-9 were activated, and artesunate induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting that the apoptosis is mediated by mitochondrial pathways. These results demonstrate that artesunate has an effect on anti-gastric cancer cells. One of the antitumor mechanisms of artesunate may be that its inhibition of COX-2 led to reduced proliferation and induction of apoptosis, connected with mitochondrial dysfunction. Artesunate might be a potential therapeutic

  19. COX-1 (PTGS1) and COX-2 (PTGS2) polymorphisms, NSAID interactions, and risk of colon and rectal cancer in two independent populations

    PubMed Central

    Makar, Karen W; Poole, Elizabeth M; Resler, Alexa J; Seufert, Brenna; Curtin, Karen; Kleinstein, Sarah E; Duggan, David; Kulmacz, Richard J; Hsu, Li; Whitton, John; Carlson, Christopher S; Rimorin, Christine F; Caan, Bette J; Baron, John A; Potter, John D; Slattery, Martha L; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) target the prostaglandin H synthase enzymes, cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2, and reduce colorectal cancer risk. Genetic variation in the genes encoding these enzymes may be associated with changes in colon and rectal cancer risk and in NSAID efficacy. Methods We genotyped candidate polymorphisms and tagSNPs in PTGS1 (COX-1) and PTGS2 (COX-2) in a population-based case-control study (Diet, Activity and Lifestyle Study, DALS) of colon cancer (n=1470 cases/1837 controls) and rectal cancer (n=583/775), and independently among cases and controls from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR; colon n= 959/1535, rectal n= 505/839). Results In PTGS2, a functional polymorphism (−765G>C; rs20417) was associated with a 2-fold increased rectal cancer risk (p=0.05) in the DALS study. This association replicated with a significant nearly 5-fold increased risk of rectal cancer in the CCFR study (ORCC vs GG=4.88; 95%CI=1.54–15.45; ORGC vs GG=1.36; 95%CI: 0.95–1.94). Genotype-NSAID interactions were observed in the DALS study for PTGS1 and rectal cancer risk, and for PTGS2 and colon cancer risk, but were no longer significant after correcting for multiple comparisons and did not replicate in the CCFR. No significant associations between PTGS1 polymorphisms and colon or rectal cancer risk were observed. Conclusions These findings suggest that polymorphisms in PTGS2 may be associated with rectal cancer risk and impact the protective effects of NSAIDs. PMID:24022467

  20. Suppression Situations in Multiple Linear Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes alternative expressions for the two most prevailing definitions of suppression without resorting to the standardized regression modeling. The formulation provides a simple basis for the examination of their relationship. For the two-predictor regression, the author demonstrates that the previous results in the literature are…

  1. Deriving the Regression Equation without Using Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.; Gordon, Florence S.

    2004-01-01

    Probably the one "new" mathematical topic that is most responsible for modernizing courses in college algebra and precalculus over the last few years is the idea of fitting a function to a set of data in the sense of a least squares fit. Whether it be simple linear regression or nonlinear regression, this topic opens the door to applying the…

  2. A Practical Guide to Regression Discontinuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Robin; Zhu, Pei; Somers, Marie-Andrée; Bloom, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Regression discontinuity (RD) analysis is a rigorous nonexperimental approach that can be used to estimate program impacts in situations in which candidates are selected for treatment based on whether their value for a numeric rating exceeds a designated threshold or cut-point. Over the last two decades, the regression discontinuity approach has…

  3. Dealing with Outliers: Robust, Resistant Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasser, Leslie

    2007-01-01

    Least-squares linear regression is the best of statistics and it is the worst of statistics. The reasons for this paradoxical claim, arising from possible inapplicability of the method and the excessive influence of "outliers", are discussed and substitute regression methods based on median selection, which is both robust and resistant, are…

  4. Cross-Validation, Shrinkage, and Multiple Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynes, Kevin

    One aspect of multiple regression--the shrinkage of the multiple correlation coefficient on cross-validation is reviewed. The paper consists of four sections. In section one, the distinction between a fixed and a random multiple regression model is made explicit. In section two, the cross-validation paradigm and an explanation for the occurrence…

  5. Regression Analysis: Legal Applications in Institutional Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frizell, Julie A.; Shippen, Benjamin S., Jr.; Luna, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews multiple regression analysis, describes how its results should be interpreted, and instructs institutional researchers on how to conduct such analyses using an example focused on faculty pay equity between men and women. The use of multiple regression analysis will be presented as a method with which to compare salaries of…

  6. A Simulation Investigation of Principal Component Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, David E.

    Regression analysis is one of the more common analytic tools used by researchers. However, multicollinearity between the predictor variables can cause problems in using the results of regression analyses. Problems associated with multicollinearity include entanglement of relative influences of variables due to reduced precision of estimation,…

  7. Incremental Net Effects in Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, Stan; Conklin, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A regular problem in regression analysis is estimating the comparative importance of the predictors in the model. This work considers the 'net effects', or shares of the predictors in the coefficient of the multiple determination, which is a widely used characteristic of the quality of a regression model. Estimation of the net effects can be a…

  8. Illustration of Regression towards the Means

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Govindaraju, K.; Haslett, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a procedure for generating a sequence of data sets which will yield exactly the same fitted simple linear regression equation y = a + bx. Unless rescaled, the generated data sets will have progressively smaller variability for the two variables, and the associated response and covariate will "regress" towards their…

  9. Regression Analysis and the Sociological Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Maio, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Regression analysis is an important aspect of most introductory statistics courses in sociology but is often presented in contexts divorced from the central concerns that bring students into the discipline. Consequently, we present five lesson ideas that emerge from a regression analysis of income inequality and mortality in the USA and Canada.

  10. Three-Dimensional Modeling in Linear Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, James D.

    Linear regression examines the relationship between one or more independent (predictor) variables and a dependent variable. By using a particular formula, regression determines the weights needed to minimize the error term for a given set of predictors. With one predictor variable, the relationship between the predictor and the dependent variable…

  11. Abnormal COX2 Protein Expression May Be Correlated with Poor Prognosis in Oral Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Ming; Liu, Jie; Liu, Hong-Bo; Ye, Ming; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background. The prognostic significance of COX2 for survival of patients with oral cancer remains controversial. Thus, the meta-analysis was performed in order to identify COX2 expression impact on prognosis of oral cancer. Method. Relevant literatures were searched using the following electronic databases without any language restrictions: Web of Science, the Cochrane Library Database, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and CBM. Version 12.0 STATA software (Stata Corporation, College Station, Texas, USA) was used for the current meta-analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs) with their corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were also calculated to clarify the correlation between COX2 expression and prognosis of oral cancer. Results. Final analysis of 979 oral cancer patients from 12 clinical cohort studies was performed. The meta-analysis results show that COX2 expression in cancer tissues was significantly higher than those in normal and benign tissues (all P < 0.05). Combined HR of COX2 suggests that positive COX2 expression has a shorter overall survival (OS) than those of negative COX2 expression (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The meta-analysis study shows that elevated COX2 expression may be associated with the pathogenesis of oral cancer and with a worse prognosis in oral cancer patients. PMID:25028647

  12. DNA compaction by the bacteriophage protein Cox studied on the single DNA molecule level using nanofluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Frykholm, Karolin; Berntsson, Ronnie Per-Arne; Claesson, Magnus; de Battice, Laura; Odegrip, Richard; Stenmark, Pål; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-09-01

    The Cox protein from bacteriophage P2 forms oligomeric filaments and it has been proposed that DNA can be wound up around these filaments, similar to how histones condense DNA. We here use fluorescence microscopy to study single DNA-Cox complexes in nanofluidic channels and compare how the Cox homologs from phages P2 and WΦ affect DNA. By measuring the extension of nanoconfined DNA in absence and presence of Cox we show that the protein compacts DNA and that the binding is highly cooperative, in agreement with the model of a Cox filament around which DNA is wrapped. Furthermore, comparing microscopy images for the wild-type P2 Cox protein and two mutants allows us to discriminate between compaction due to filament formation and compaction by monomeric Cox. P2 and WΦ Cox have similar effects on the physical properties of DNA and the subtle, but significant, differences in DNA binding are due to differences in binding affinity rather than binding mode. The presented work highlights the use of single DNA molecule studies to confirm structural predictions from X-ray crystallography. It also shows how a small protein by oligomerization can have great impact on the organization of DNA and thereby fulfill multiple regulatory functions.

  13. Angiotensin-(1-7)-Induced Plasticity Changes in the Lateral Amygdala Are Mediated by COX-2 and NO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Doris

    2007-01-01

    It is known from studies outside the brain that upon binding to its receptor, angiotensin-(1-7) elicits the release of prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO). Cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandins. Since there are no data available so far on the role of COX-2 in the amygdala, in a first step we…

  14. Novel Allelic Variants in the Canine Cyclooxgenase-2 (Cox-2) Promoter Are Associated with Renal Dysplasia in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, Mary H.; Bell, Jerold S.; Rothman, Debby A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal dysplasia (RD) in dogs is a complex disease with a highly variable phenotype and mode of inheritance that does not follow a simple Mendelian pattern. Cox-2 (Cyclooxgenase-2) deficient mice have renal abnormalities and a pathology that has striking similarities to RD in dogs suggesting to us that mutations in the Cox-2 gene could be the cause of RD in dogs. Our data supports this hypothesis. Sequencing of the canine Cox-2 gene was done from clinically affected and normal dogs. Although no changes were detected in the Cox-2 coding region, small insertions and deletions of GC boxes just upstream of the ATG translation start site were found. These sequences are putative SP1 transcription factor binding sites that may represent important cis-acting DNA regulatory elements that govern the expression of Cox-2. A pedigree study of a family of Lhasa apsos revealed an important statistical correlation of these mutant alleles with the disease. We examined an additional 22 clinical cases from various breeds. Regardless of the breed or severity of disease, all of these had one or two copies of the Cox-2 allelic variants. We suggest that the unusual inheritance pattern of RD is due to these alleles, either by changing the pattern of expression of Cox-2 or making Cox-2 levels susceptible to influences of other genes or environmental factors that play an unknown but important role in the development of RD in dogs. PMID:21346820

  15. COX-2 is involved in ET-1-induced hypertrophy of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes: role of NFATc3.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Gao, Si; Ye, Jiantao; Feng, Xiaojun; Cai, Yi; Liu, Zhiping; Lu, Jing; Li, Qin; Huang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Shaorui; Liu, Peiqing

    2014-02-15

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a critical molecule that involved in heart failure. It has been proved that ET-1 stimulation results in cardiac hypertrophy both in vitro and in vivo, but the mechanisms underlying remain largely unknown. In this study, we reported that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) might be an important mediator of hypertrophic responses to ET-1 stimulation. In the cultured rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, ET-1 significantly upregulated the expression and activity of COX-2, which was accompanied by increase in cell surface area and BNP mRNA level. In contrast, ET-1-dependent cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was abolished by COX-2 selective inhibitors, NS-398 and celecoxib, or by COX-2 RNA interference, but the inhibitory effects could be diminished by pretreatment with PGE2. Furthermore, cyclosporin A (CsA) and knockdown of nuclear factor of activated T-cells c3 (NFATc3) inhibited the expression of COX-2 induced by ET-1, and NFATc3 could also bound to the -GGAAA- sequence in the promoter region of rat COX-2 gene, indicating that calcineurin/NFATc3 signaling participated in the transcriptional regulation of COX-2 following ET-1 treatment. These findings provided further insight into the roles of ET-1 in cardiac hypertrophy and suggested a potential therapeutic strategy against cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting COX-2.

  16. DNA compaction by the bacteriophage protein Cox studied on the single DNA molecule level using nanofluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Frykholm, Karolin; Berntsson, Ronnie Per-Arne; Claesson, Magnus; de Battice, Laura; Odegrip, Richard; Stenmark, Pål; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-09-01

    The Cox protein from bacteriophage P2 forms oligomeric filaments and it has been proposed that DNA can be wound up around these filaments, similar to how histones condense DNA. We here use fluorescence microscopy to study single DNA-Cox complexes in nanofluidic channels and compare how the Cox homologs from phages P2 and WΦ affect DNA. By measuring the extension of nanoconfined DNA in absence and presence of Cox we show that the protein compacts DNA and that the binding is highly cooperative, in agreement with the model of a Cox filament around which DNA is wrapped. Furthermore, comparing microscopy images for the wild-type P2 Cox protein and two mutants allows us to discriminate between compaction due to filament formation and compaction by monomeric Cox. P2 and WΦ Cox have similar effects on the physical properties of DNA and the subtle, but significant, differences in DNA binding are due to differences in binding affinity rather than binding mode. The presented work highlights the use of single DNA molecule studies to confirm structural predictions from X-ray crystallography. It also shows how a small protein by oligomerization can have great impact on the organization of DNA and thereby fulfill multiple regulatory functions. PMID:27131370

  17. DNA compaction by the bacteriophage protein Cox studied on the single DNA molecule level using nanofluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Frykholm, Karolin; Berntsson, Ronnie Per-Arne; Claesson, Magnus; de Battice, Laura; Odegrip, Richard; Stenmark, Pål; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The Cox protein from bacteriophage P2 forms oligomeric filaments and it has been proposed that DNA can be wound up around these filaments, similar to how histones condense DNA. We here use fluorescence microscopy to study single DNA–Cox complexes in nanofluidic channels and compare how the Cox homologs from phages P2 and WΦ affect DNA. By measuring the extension of nanoconfined DNA in absence and presence of Cox we show that the protein compacts DNA and that the binding is highly cooperative, in agreement with the model of a Cox filament around which DNA is wrapped. Furthermore, comparing microscopy images for the wild-type P2 Cox protein and two mutants allows us to discriminate between compaction due to filament formation and compaction by monomeric Cox. P2 and WΦ Cox have similar effects on the physical properties of DNA and the subtle, but significant, differences in DNA binding are due to differences in binding affinity rather than binding mode. The presented work highlights the use of single DNA molecule studies to confirm structural predictions from X-ray crystallography. It also shows how a small protein by oligomerization can have great impact on the organization of DNA and thereby fulfill multiple regulatory functions. PMID:27131370

  18. Nodule Regression in Adults With Nodular Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Wan; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan-Sup; Han, Hye Seung

    2015-01-01

    Background Nodular gastritis (NG) is associated with the presence of Helicobacter pylori infection, but there are controversies on nodule regression in adults. The aim of this study was to analyze the factors that are related to the nodule regression in adults diagnosed as NG. Methods Adult population who were diagnosed as NG with H. pylori infection during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) at our center were included. Changes in the size and location of the nodules, status of H. pylori infection, upper gastrointestinal (UGI) symptom, EGD and pathology findings were analyzed between the initial and follow-up tests. Results Of the 117 NG patients, 66.7% (12/18) of the eradicated NG patients showed nodule regression after H. pylori eradication, whereas 9.9% (9/99) of the non-eradicated NG patients showed spontaneous nodule regression without H. pylori eradication (P < 0.001). Nodule regression was more frequent in NG patients with antral nodule location (P = 0.010), small-sized nodules (P = 0.029), H. pylori eradication (P < 0.001), UGI symptom (P = 0.007), and a long-term follow-up period (P = 0.030). On the logistic regression analysis, nodule regression was inversely correlated with the persistent H. pylori infection on the follow-up test (odds ratio (OR): 0.020, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.003 - 0.137, P < 0.001) and short-term follow-up period < 30.5 months (OR: 0.140, 95% CI: 0.028 - 0.700, P = 0.017). Conclusions In adults with NG, H. pylori eradication is the most significant factor associated with nodule regression. Long-term follow-up period is also correlated with nodule regression, but is less significant than H. pylori eradication. Our findings suggest that H. pylori eradication should be considered to promote nodule regression in NG patients with H. pylori infection.

  19. Climate variations and salmonellosis transmission in Adelaide, South Australia: a comparison between regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Bi, Peng; Hiller, Janet

    2008-01-01

    This is the first study to identify appropriate regression models for the association between climate variation and salmonellosis transmission. A comparison between different regression models was conducted using surveillance data in Adelaide, South Australia. By using notified salmonellosis cases and climatic variables from the Adelaide metropolitan area over the period 1990-2003, four regression methods were examined: standard Poisson regression, autoregressive adjusted Poisson regression, multiple linear regression, and a seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model. Notified salmonellosis cases in 2004 were used to test the forecasting ability of the four models. Parameter estimation, goodness-of-fit and forecasting ability of the four regression models were compared. Temperatures occurring 2 weeks prior to cases were positively associated with cases of salmonellosis. Rainfall was also inversely related to the number of cases. The comparison of the goodness-of-fit and forecasting ability suggest that the SARIMA model is better than the other three regression models. Temperature and rainfall may be used as climatic predictors of salmonellosis cases in regions with climatic characteristics similar to those of Adelaide. The SARIMA model could, thus, be adopted to quantify the relationship between climate variations and salmonellosis transmission.

  20. Life adjustment correlates of physical self-concepts.

    PubMed

    Sonstroem, R J; Potts, S A

    1996-05-01

    This research tested relationships between physical self-concepts and contemporary measures of life adjustment. University students (119 females, 126 males) completed the Physical Self-Perception Profile assessing self-concepts of sport competence, physical condition, attractive body, strength, and general physical self-worth. Multiple regression found significant associations (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001) in hypothesized directions between physical self-concepts and positive affect, negative affect, depression, and health complaints in 17 of 20 analyses. Thirteen of these relationships remained significant when controlling for the Bonferroni effect. Hierarchical multiple regression examined the unique contribution of physical self-perceptions in predicting each adjustment variable after accounting for the effects of global self-esteem and two measures of social desirability. Physical self-concepts significantly improved associations with life adjustment (P < 0.05 to P < 0.05) in three of the eight analyses across gender and approached significance in three others. These data demonstrate that self-perceptions of physical competence in college students are essentially related to life adjustment, independent of the effects of social desirability and global self-esteem. These links are mainly with perceptions of sport competence in males and with perceptions of physical condition, attractive body, and general physical self-worth in both males and females. PMID:9148094

  1. Exploring Mexican American adolescent romantic relationship profiles and adjustment.

    PubMed

    Moosmann, Danyel A V; Roosa, Mark W

    2015-08-01

    Although Mexican Americans are the largest ethnic minority group in the nation, knowledge is limited regarding this population's adolescent romantic relationships. This study explored whether 12th grade Mexican Americans' (N = 218; 54% female) romantic relationship characteristics, cultural values, and gender created unique latent classes and if so, whether they were linked to adjustment. Latent class analyses suggested three profiles including, relatively speaking, higher, satisfactory, and lower quality romantic relationships. Regression analyses indicated these profiles had distinct associations with adjustment. Specifically, adolescents with higher and satisfactory quality romantic relationships reported greater future family expectations, higher self-esteem, and fewer externalizing symptoms than those with lower quality romantic relationships. Similarly, adolescents with higher quality romantic relationships reported greater academic self-efficacy and fewer sexual partners than those with lower quality romantic relationships. Overall, results suggested higher quality romantic relationships were most optimal for adjustment. Future research directions and implications are discussed. PMID:26141198

  2. Integrating Risk Adjustment and Enrollee Premiums in Health Plan Payment

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Thomas G.; Glazer, Jacob; Newhouse, Joseph P.; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Shi, Julie; Sinaiko, Anna D.; Zuvekas, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    In two important health policy contexts – private plans in Medicare and the new state-run “Exchanges” created as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) – plan payments come from two sources: risk-adjusted payments from a Regulator and premiums charged to individual enrollees. This paper derives principles for integrating risk-adjusted payments and premium policy in individual health insurance markets based on fitting total plan payments to health plan costs per person as closely as possible. A least squares regression including both health status and variables used in premiums reveals the weights a Regulator should put on risk adjusters when markets determine premiums. We apply the methods to an Exchange-eligible population drawn from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). PMID:24308878

  3. The cytosol-synthesized subunit II (Cox2) precursor with the point mutation W56R is correctly processed in yeast mitochondria to rescue cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Torres, Valentín; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; García-Villegas, Rodolfo; Pérez-Martínez, Xochitl; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González-Halphen, Diego

    2012-12-01

    Deletion of the yeast mitochondrial gene COX2 encoding subunit 2 (Cox2) of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) results in loss of respiration (Δcox2 strain). Supekova et al. (2010) [1] transformed a Δcox2 strain with a vector expressing Cox2 with a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) and the point mutation W56R (Cox2(W56R)), restoring respiratory growth. Here, the CcO carrying the allotopically-expressed Cox2(W56R) was characterized. Yeast mitochondria from the wild-type (WT) and the Δcox2+Cox2(W56R) strains were subjected to Blue Native electrophoresis. In-gel activity of CcO and spectroscopic quantitation of cytochromes revealed that only 60% of CcO is present in the complemented strain, and that less CcO is found associated in supercomplexes as compared to WT. CcOs from the WT and the mutant exhibited similar subunit composition, although activity was 20-25% lower in the enzyme containing Cox2(W56R) than in the one with Cox2(WT). Tandem mass spectrometry confirmed that W(56) was substituted by R(56) in Cox2(W56R). In addition, Cox2(W56R) exhibited the same N-terminus than Cox2(WT), indicating that the MTS of Oxa1 and the leader sequence of 15 residues were removed from Cox2(W56R) during maturation. Thus, Cox2(W56R) is identical to Cox2(WT) except for the point mutation W56R. Mitochondrial Cox1 synthesis is strongly reduced in Δcox2 mutants, but the Cox2(W56R) complemented strain led to full restoration of Cox1 synthesis. We conclude that the cytosol-synthesized Cox2(W56R) follows a rate-limiting process of import, maturation or assembly that yields lower steady-state levels of CcO. Still, the allotopically-expressed Cox2(W56R) restores CcO activity and allows mitochondrial Cox1 synthesis to advance at WT levels.

  4. Increased dietary sodium induces COX2 expression by activating NFκB in renal medullary interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    He, Wenjuan; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Min; Davis, Linda S; Blackwell, Timothy S; Yull, Fiona; Breyer, Matthew D; Hao, Chuan-Ming

    2014-02-01

    High salt diet induces renal medullary cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression. Selective blockade of renal medullary COX2 activity in rats causes salt-sensitive hypertension, suggesting a role for renal medullary COX2 in maintaining systemic sodium balance. The present study characterized the cellular location of COX2 induction in the kidney of mice following high salt diet and examined the role of NFκB in mediating this COX2 induction in response to increased dietary salt. High salt diet (8 % NaCl) for 3 days markedly increased renal medullary COX2 expression in C57Bl/6 J mice. Co-immunofluorescence using a COX2 antibody and antibodies against aquaporin-2, ClC-K, aquaporin-1, and CD31 showed that high salt diet-induced COX2 was selectively expressed in renal medullary interstitial cells. By using NFκB reporter transgenic mice, we observed a sevenfold increase of luciferase activity in the renal medulla of the NFκB-luciferase reporter mice following high salt diet, and a robust induction of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression mainly in renal medullary interstitial cells of the NFκB-EGFP reporter mice following high salt diet. Treating high salt diet-fed C57Bl/6 J mice with selective IκB kinase inhibitor IMD-0354 (8 mg/kg bw) substantially suppressed COX2 induction in renal medulla, and also significantly reduced urinary prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). These data therefore suggest that renal medullary interstitial cell NFκB plays an important role in mediating renal medullary COX2 expression and promoting renal PGE2 synthesis in response to increased dietary sodium.

  5. Celecoxib Treatment Alters p53 and MDM2 Expression via COX-2 Crosstalk in A549 Cells.

    PubMed

    Gharghabi, Mehdi; Rezaei, Farhang; Mir Mohammadrezaei, Fereshteh; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of the lung cancer. It is known that COX-2 negatively regulates the activity of a number of tumor suppressors, including p53. Consequently, inhibition of COX-2 signaling is anticipated to be a promising approach to stabilize p53 functionality. In this regard, we investigated the effect of COX-2 signaling blockade on p53 and COX-2expression in A549 cells. Cell viability was assessed using MTT and protein expression was measured using Western Blot assay. Results revealed that Celecoxib dose-dependently induced growth inhibition within 24 h. However, prolonged exposure to the drug up to 48 h led to increase cell viability compared to the corresponding control. Western blot analysis demonstrated that Celecoxib could augment p53 expression within 24 h, independently of COX-2 inhibition. In contrast, Celecoxib treatment not only returned p53 to the control level, but also strikingly induced COX-2 expression within 48 h. Of further relevance, Celecoxib exposure could significantly result in MDM2 elevation at 48 h. These findings represent p53 as a molecular target being interconnected with COX-2 signaling axis upon Celecoxib treatment. Moreover, our data point toward the possibility that Celecoxib treatment may not be a proper therapeutic strategy in lung cancer cells owing to its potential role in the activation of oncogenes, including COX-2 and MDM2 which seemingly confers a chemoresistance circumstance to the cell. Consequently, these results underscore intensive preclinical assessment prior to applying COX-2 inhibitors in the treatment of lung tumors. PMID:27642319

  6. Adjustable Induction-Heating Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Rod; Bartolotta, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Improved design for induction-heating work coil facilitates optimization of heating in different metal specimens. Three segments adjusted independently to obtain desired distribution of temperature. Reduces time needed to achieve required temperature profiles.

  7. Time-adjusted variable resistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Timing mechanism was developed effecting extremely precisioned highly resistant fixed resistor. Switches shunt all or portion of resistor; effective resistance is varied over time interval by adjusting switch closure rate.

  8. 78 FR 62712 - Rate Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... noticing a recent Postal Service filing seeking postal rate adjustments based on exigent circumstances...,'' is ``premised on the recent recession as an exigent event.'' Id. at 1, 2. In Order No. 1059,...

  9. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  10. To adjust or not to adjust for baseline when analyzing repeated binary responses? The case of complete data when treatment comparison at study end is of interest.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Honghua; Kulkarni, Pandurang M; Mallinckrodt, Craig H; Shurzinske, Linda; Molenberghs, Geert; Lipkovich, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of adjusting for baseline covariates are not as straightforward with repeated binary responses as with continuous response variables. Therefore, in this study, we compared different methods for analyzing repeated binary data through simulations when the outcome at the study endpoint is of interest. Methods compared included chi-square, Fisher's exact test, covariate adjusted/unadjusted logistic regression (Adj.logit/Unadj.logit), covariate adjusted/unadjusted generalized estimating equations (Adj.GEE/Unadj.GEE), covariate adjusted/unadjusted generalized linear mixed model (Adj.GLMM/Unadj.GLMM). All these methods preserved the type I error close to the nominal level. Covariate adjusted methods improved power compared with the unadjusted methods because of the increased treatment effect estimates, especially when the correlation between the baseline and outcome was strong, even though there was an apparent increase in standard errors. Results of the Chi-squared test were identical to those for the unadjusted logistic regression. Fisher's exact test was the most conservative test regarding the type I error rate and also with the lowest power. Without missing data, there was no gain in using a repeated measures approach over a simple logistic regression at the final time point. Analysis of results from five phase III diabetes trials of the same compound was consistent with the simulation findings. Therefore, covariate adjusted analysis is recommended for repeated binary data when the study endpoint is of interest. PMID:25866149

  11. Involvement of COX-2 in nickel elution from a wire implanted subcutaneously in mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Taiki; Kishimoto, Yu; Asakawa, Sanki; Mizuno, Natsumi; Hiratsuka, Masahiro; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2016-07-01

    Many types of medical alloys include nickel (Ni), and the elution of Ni ions from these materials causes toxicities and inflammation. We have previously reported that inflammation enhances Ni elution, although the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. In this study, we investigated how inflammatory responses enhanced Ni elution in a wire-implantation mouse model. Subcutaneous implantation of Ni wire induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) mRNA in the surrounding tissues. Immunostaining analysis showed that cells expressing COX-2 were mainly fibroblast-like cells 8h after implantation of a Ni wire, but were mainly infiltrated leukocytes at 24h. NiCl2 induced the expression of COX-2 mRNA in primary fibroblasts, neutrophils, RAW 264 cells, and THP-1 cells, indicating that Ni ions can induce COX-2 expression in various types of cells. The elution of Ni ions from the implanted Ni wire at 8h was reduced by dexamethasone (Dex), indomethacin (Ind), or celecoxib (Cel) treatment. Ni wire implantation induced an increase in mRNA levels for anaerobic glycolytic pathway components glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), hexokinase 2 (HK2), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), and monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4); the expression of these genes was also inhibited by Dex, Ind, and Cel. In primary fibroblasts, the expression of these mRNAs and the production of lactate were induced by NiCl2 and further potentiated by PGE2. Furthermore, Ni wire-induced infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes was significantly reduced by Dex, Ind, or Cel. Depletion of neutrophils with a specific antibody caused reduction of both leukocyte infiltration and Ni elution. These results indicate that Ni ions eluted from wire induced COX-2 expression, which further promoted elution of Ni ions by increasing lactate production and leukocyte infiltration. Since COX inhibitors and Dex reduced the elution of Ni ions, these drugs may be

  12. A comparison of regression and regression-kriging for soil characterization using remote sensing imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In precision agriculture regression has been used widely to quality the relationship between soil attributes and other environmental variables. However, spatial correlation existing in soil samples usually makes the regression model suboptimal. In this study, a regression-kriging method was attemp...

  13. Modelling of filariasis in East Java with Poisson regression and generalized Poisson regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnah

    2016-04-01

    Poisson regression has been used if the response variable is count data that based on the Poisson distribution. The Poisson distribution assumed equal dispersion. In fact, a situation where count data are over dispersion or under dispersion so that Poisson regression inappropriate because it may underestimate the standard errors and overstate the significance of the regression parameters, and consequently, giving misleading inference about the regression parameters. This paper suggests the generalized Poisson regression model to handling over dispersion and under dispersion on the Poisson regression model. The Poisson regression model and generalized Poisson regression model will be applied the number of filariasis cases in East Java. Based regression Poisson model the factors influence of filariasis are the percentage of families who don't behave clean and healthy living and the percentage of families who don't have a healthy house. The Poisson regression model occurs over dispersion so that we using generalized Poisson regression. The best generalized Poisson regression model showing the factor influence of filariasis is percentage of families who don't have healthy house. Interpretation of result the model is each additional 1 percentage of families who don't have healthy house will add 1 people filariasis patient.

  14. Regression of altitude-produced cardiac hypertrophy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sizemore, D. A.; Mcintyre, T. W.; Van Liere, E. J.; Wilson , M. F.

    1973-01-01

    The rate of regression of cardiac hypertrophy with time has been determined in adult male albino rats. The hypertrophy was induced by intermittent exposure to simulated high altitude. The percentage hypertrophy was much greater (46%) in the right ventricle than in the left (16%). The regression could be adequately fitted to a single exponential function with a half-time of 6.73 plus or minus 0.71 days (90% CI). There was no significant difference in the rates of regression for the two ventricles.

  15. Adjustment of directly measured adipose tissue volume in infants

    PubMed Central

    Gale, C; Santhakumaran, S; Wells, J C K; Modi, N

    2014-01-01

    Background: Direct measurement of adipose tissue (AT) using magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used to characterise infant body composition. Optimal techniques for adjusting direct measures of infant AT remain to be determined. Objectives: To explore the relationships between body size and direct measures of total and regional AT, the relationship between AT depots representing the metabolic load of adiposity and to determine optimal methods of adjusting adiposity in early life. Design: Analysis of regional AT volume (ATV) measured using magnetic resonance imaging in longitudinal and cross-sectional studies. Subjects: Healthy term infants; 244 in the first month (1–31 days), 72 in early infancy (42–91 days). Methods: The statistical validity of commonly used indices adjusting adiposity for body size was examined. Valid indices, defined as mathematical independence of the index from its denominator, to adjust ATV for body size and metabolic load of adiposity were determined using log-log regression analysis. Results: Indices commonly used to adjust ATV are significantly correlated with body size. Most regional AT depots are optimally adjusted using the index ATV/(height)3 in the first month and ATV/(height)2 in early infancy. Using these indices, height accounts for<2% of the variation in the index for almost all AT depots. Internal abdominal (IA) ATV was optimally adjusted for subcutaneous abdominal (SCA) ATV by calculating IA/SCA0.6. Conclusions: Statistically optimal indices for adjusting directly measured ATV for body size are ATV/height3 in the neonatal period and ATV/height2 in early infancy. The ratio IA/SCA ATV remains significantly correlated with SCA in both the neonatal period and early infancy; the index IA/SCA0.6 is statistically optimal at both of these ages. PMID:24662695

  16. Multiple comparisons for survival data with propensity score adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hong; Lu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the practical problem in clinical and observational studies where multiple treatment or prognostic groups are compared and the observed survival data are subject to right censoring. Two possible formulations of multiple comparisons are suggested. Multiple Comparisons with a Control (MCC) compare every other group to a control group with respect to survival outcomes, for determining which groups are associated with lower risk than the control. Multiple Comparisons with the Best (MCB) compare each group to the truly minimum risk group and identify the groups that are either with the minimum risk or the practically minimum risk. To make a causal statement, potential confounding effects need to be adjusted in the comparisons. Propensity score based adjustment is popular in causal inference and can effectively reduce the confounding bias. Based on a propensity-score-stratified Cox proportional hazards model, the approaches of MCC test and MCB simultaneous confidence intervals for general linear models with normal error outcome are extended to survival outcome. This paper specifies the assumptions for causal inference on survival outcomes within a potential outcome framework, develops testing procedures for multiple comparisons and provides simultaneous confidence intervals. The proposed methods are applied to two real data sets from cancer studies for illustration, and a simulation study is also presented. PMID:25663729

  17. REGRESSION ESTIMATES FOR TOPOLOGICAL-HYDROGRAPH INPUT.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, Michael R.; Guertin, D. Phillip; Troutman, Brent M.

    1988-01-01

    Physiographic, hydrologic, and rainfall data from 18 small drainage basins in semiarid, central Wyoming were used to calibrate topological, unit-hydrograph models for celerity, the average rate of travel of a flood wave through the basin. The data set consisted of basin characteristics and hydrologic data for the 18 basins and rainfall data for 68 storms. Calibrated values of celerity and peak discharges subsequently were regressed as a function of the basin characteristics and excess rainfall volume. Predicted values obtained in this way can be used as input for estimating hydrographs in ungaged basins. The regression models included ordinary least-squares and seemingly unrelated regression. This latter regression model jointly estimated the celerity and peak discharge.

  18. TWSVR: Regression via Twin Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Khemchandani, Reshma; Goyal, Keshav; Chandra, Suresh

    2016-02-01

    Taking motivation from Twin Support Vector Machine (TWSVM) formulation, Peng (2010) attempted to propose Twin Support Vector Regression (TSVR) where the regressor is obtained via solving a pair of quadratic programming problems (QPPs). In this paper we argue that TSVR formulation is not in the true spirit of TWSVM. Further, taking motivation from Bi and Bennett (2003), we propose an alternative approach to find a formulation for Twin Support Vector Regression (TWSVR) which is in the true spirit of TWSVM. We show that our proposed TWSVR can be derived from TWSVM for an appropriately constructed classification problem. To check the efficacy of our proposed TWSVR we compare its performance with TSVR and classical Support Vector Regression(SVR) on various regression datasets.

  19. TWSVR: Regression via Twin Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Khemchandani, Reshma; Goyal, Keshav; Chandra, Suresh

    2016-02-01

    Taking motivation from Twin Support Vector Machine (TWSVM) formulation, Peng (2010) attempted to propose Twin Support Vector Regression (TSVR) where the regressor is obtained via solving a pair of quadratic programming problems (QPPs). In this paper we argue that TSVR formulation is not in the true spirit of TWSVM. Further, taking motivation from Bi and Bennett (2003), we propose an alternative approach to find a formulation for Twin Support Vector Regression (TWSVR) which is in the true spirit of TWSVM. We show that our proposed TWSVR can be derived from TWSVM for an appropriately constructed classification problem. To check the efficacy of our proposed TWSVR we compare its performance with TSVR and classical Support Vector Regression(SVR) on various regression datasets. PMID:26624223

  20. Some Simple Computational Formulas for Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Lewis R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Short-cut formulas are presented for direct computation of the beta weights, the standard errors of the beta weights, and the multiple correlation coefficient for multiple regression problems involving three independent variables and one dependent variable. (Author)

  1. The measurement of radon working levels at a mineral separation pilot plant in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hamid Khan, M A; Chowdhury, M S

    2003-10-01

    Beach Sand Exploitation Centre at Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, produces commercial grade concentrations of magnetite, ilmenite, zircon, etc., from the high-grade accumulations available along the beach and foredune of Cox's Bazar. Solid state nuclear track detectors (CR-39 foils) were used to determine indoor radon concentration of radioactive mineral sands and the technologically enhanced radiation level inside the pilot plant of the Centre. It is found that the concentrations at processed mineral stock areas are high, and the maximum concentration was found to be 2,103 +/- 331 Bq m(-3) (0.23 +/- 0.03 WL). The indoor concentration of radon and its decay products in the raw sand stock area and at other locations was in the range of 116 +/- 27 Bq m(-3) (0.03 +/- 0.003 WL) to 2,042 +/- 233 Bq m(-3) (0.22 +/- 0.03 WL).

  2. O-desmethylquinine as a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors using AutoDock Vina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damayanti, Sophi; Mahardhika, Andhika Bintang; Ibrahim, Slamet; Chong, Wei Lim; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Tjahjono, Daryono Hadi

    2014-10-01

    Computational approach was employed to evaluate the biological activity of novel cyclooxygenase-2 COX-2 inhibitor, O-desmethylquinine, in comparison to quinine as common inhibitor which can also be used an agent of antipyretic, antimalaria, analgesic and antiinflamation. The molecular models of the compound were constructed and optimized with the density function theory with at the B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) level using Gaussian 09 program. Molecular docking studies of the compounds were done to obtain the COX-2 complex structures and their binding energies were analyzed using the AutoDock Vina. The results of docking of the two ligands were comparable and cannot be differentiated from the energy scoring function with AutoDock Vina.

  3. Aerobic oxidation of hydroxymethylfurfural and furfural by using heterogeneous Cox Oy -N@C catalysts.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jin; Song, Hai-Jie; Cui, Min-Shu; Du, Yi-Ping; Fu, Yao

    2014-12-01

    2,5-Furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) is considered to be a promising replacement for terephthalic acid since they share similar structures and properties. In contrast to FDCA, 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid methyl (FDCAM) has properties that allow it to be easily purified. In this work, we reported an oxidative esterification of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural to prepare corresponding esters over Cox Oy -N@C catalysts using O2 as benign oxidant. High yield and selectivity of FDCAM and methyl 2-furoate were obtained under optimized conditions. Factors which influenced the product distribution were examined thoroughly. The Cox Oy -N@C catalysts were recycled five times and no significant loss of activity was detected. Characterization of the catalysts could explain such phenomena. Using XPS and TGA, we made a thorough investigation of the effects of ligand and pyrolysis temperature on catalyst activity.

  4. Relaxing the independent censoring assumption in the Cox proportional hazards model using multiple imputation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Dan; White, Ian R; Seaman, Shaun; Evans, Hannah; Baisley, Kathy; Carpenter, James

    2014-11-30

    The Cox proportional hazards model is frequently used in medical statistics. The standard methods for fitting this model rely on the assumption of independent censoring. Although this is sometimes plausible, we often wish to explore how robust our inferences are as this untestable assumption is relaxed. We describe how this can be carried out in a way that makes the assumptions accessible to all those involved in a research project. Estimation proceeds via multiple imputation, where censored failure times are imputed under user-specified departures from independent censoring. A novel aspect of our method is the use of bootstrapping to generate proper imputations from the Cox model. We illustrate our approach using data from an HIV-prevention trial and discuss how it can be readily adapted and applied in other settings. PMID:25060703

  5. A comparison of confounding adjustment methods with an application to early life determinants of childhood obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Ken; Gillman, Matthew W.

    2014-01-01

    We implemented 6 confounding adjustment methods: 1) covariate-adjusted regression, 2) propensity score (PS) regression, 3) PS stratification, 4) PS matching with two calipers, 5) inverse-probability-weighting, and 6) doubly-robust estimation to examine the associations between the BMI z-score at 3 years and two separate dichotomous exposure measures: exclusive breastfeeding versus formula only (N = 437) and cesarean section versus vaginal delivery (N = 1236). Data were drawn from a prospective pre-birth cohort study, Project Viva. The goal is to demonstrate the necessity and usefulness, and approaches for multiple confounding adjustment methods to analyze observational data. Unadjusted (univariate) and covariate-adjusted linear regression associations of breastfeeding with BMI z-score were −0.33 (95% CI −0.53, −0.13) and −0.24 (−0.46, −0.02), respectively. The other approaches resulted in smaller N (204 to 276) because of poor overlap of covariates, but CIs were of similar width except for inverse-probability-weighting (75% wider) and PS matching with a wider caliper (76% wider). Point estimates ranged widely, however, from −0.01 to −0.38. For cesarean section, because of better covariate overlap, the covariate-adjusted regression estimate (0.20) was remarkably robust to all adjustment methods, and the widths of the 95% CIs differed less than in the breastfeeding example. Choice of covariate adjustment method can matter. Lack of overlap in covariate structure between exposed and unexposed participants in observational studies can lead to erroneous covariate-adjusted estimates and confidence intervals. We recommend inspecting covariate overlap and using multiple confounding adjustment methods. Similar results bring reassurance. Contradictory results suggest issues with either the data or the analytic method. PMID:25171142

  6. 7 CFR 251.7 - Formula adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Formula adjustments. 251.7 Section 251.7 Agriculture... GENERAL REGULATIONS AND POLICIES-FOOD DISTRIBUTION THE EMERGENCY FOOD ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 251.7 Formula adjustments. Formula adjustments. (a) Commodity adjustments. The Department will make annual adjustments...

  7. 12 CFR 1209.80 - Inflation adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inflation adjustments. 1209.80 Section 1209.80... PROCEDURE Civil Money Penalty Inflation Adjustments § 1209.80 Inflation adjustments. The maximum amount of... thereafter adjusted in accordance with the Inflation Adjustment Act, on a recurring four-year cycle, is...

  8. 12 CFR 1209.80 - Inflation adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inflation adjustments. 1209.80 Section 1209.80... PROCEDURE Civil Money Penalty Inflation Adjustments § 1209.80 Inflation adjustments. The maximum amount of... thereafter adjusted in accordance with the Inflation Adjustment Act, on a recurring four-year cycle, is...

  9. 12 CFR 1209.80 - Inflation adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inflation adjustments. 1209.80 Section 1209.80... PROCEDURE Civil Money Penalty Inflation Adjustments § 1209.80 Inflation adjustments. The maximum amount of... thereafter adjusted in accordance with the Inflation Adjustment Act, on a recurring four-year cycle, is...

  10. The Geometry of Enhancement in Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Niels G.

    2011-01-01

    In linear multiple regression, "enhancement" is said to occur when R[superscript 2] = b[prime]r greater than r[prime]r, where b is a p x 1 vector of standardized regression coefficients and r is a p x 1 vector of correlations between a criterion y and a set of standardized regressors, x. When p = 1 then b [is congruent to] r and enhancement cannot…

  11. There is No Quantum Regression Theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, G.W.; OConnell, R.F.

    1996-07-01

    The Onsager regression hypothesis states that the regression of fluctuations is governed by macroscopic equations describing the approach to equilibrium. It is here asserted that this hypothesis fails in the quantum case. This is shown first by explicit calculation for the example of quantum Brownian motion of an oscillator and then in general from the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is asserted that the correct generalization of the Onsager hypothesis is the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Effects of COX inhibition on experimental pain and hyperalgesia during and after remifentanil infusion in humans.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Harald; Raeder, Johan; Draegni, Tomas; Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Schmelz, Martin; Stubhaug, Audun

    2011-06-01

    Opioids may enhance pain sensitivity resulting in opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Activation of spinal cyclooxygenase may play a role in the development of OIH. The aim of this study was to demonstrate remifentanil-induced postinfusion hyperalgesia in an electrical pain and a cold pain model, and to investigate whether COX-2 (parecoxib) or COX-1 (ketorolac) inhibition could prevent hyperalgesia after remifentanil infusion. Sixteen healthy males were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. Each subject went through 4 sessions: control, remifentanil, parecoxib+remifentanil, and ketorolac+remifentanil. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation induced acute pain and areas of pinprick hyperalgesia. The areas of pinprick hyperalgesia were assessed before, during, and after a 30-minute infusion of either remifentanil or saline. The cold-pressor test (CPT) was performed before, at the end of, and 1 hour after the infusions. The subjects received a bolus of either saline, 40 mg parecoxib, or 30 mg ketorolac intravenously after the first CPT. The areas of pinprick hyperalgesia and CPT pain after the end of remifentanil infusion increased significantly compared to control (P < 0.001 and P = 0.005, respectively). Pretreatment with parecoxib or ketorolac reduced the postinfusion area of pinprick hyperalgesia (P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively), compared to the remifentanil group. Parecoxib reduced the area significantly more than ketorolac (P = 0.009). In the CPT, pretreatment with parecoxib or ketorolac did not prevent postinfusion hyperalgesia. These results demonstrated OIH in both models, and may suggest that COX-2 inhibition is more important than COX-1 inhibition in reducing hyperalgesia. Remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia was demonstrated for both electrically induced pain and cold-pressor pain. Both parecoxib and ketorolac prevented hyperalgesia in the electrical model, parecoxib to a larger extent.

  13. COxSwAIN: Compressive Sensing for Advanced Imaging and Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurwitz, Richard; Pulley, Marina; LaFerney, Nathan; Munoz, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The COxSwAIN project focuses on building an image and video compression scheme that can be implemented in a small or low-power satellite. To do this, we used Compressive Sensing, where the compression is performed by matrix multiplications on the satellite and reconstructed on the ground. Our paper explains our methodology and demonstrates the results of the scheme, being able to achieve high quality image compression that is robust to noise and corruption.

  14. Effects of flavocoxid, a dual inhibitor of COX and 5-lipoxygenase enzymes, on benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Altavilla, D; Minutoli, L; Polito, F; Irrera, N; Arena, S; Magno, C; Rinaldi, M; Burnett, BP; Squadrito, F; Bitto, A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inflammation plays a key role in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Eicosanoids derived from the COX and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) pathways are elevated in the enlarging prostate. Flavocoxid is a novel flavonoid–based ‘dual inhibitor’ of the COX and 5-LOX enzymes. This study evaluated the effects of flavocoxid in experimental BPH. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Rats were treated daily with testosterone propionate (3 mg·kg−1 s.c.) or its vehicle for 14 days to induce BPH. Animals receiving testosterone were randomized to receive vehicle (1 mL·kg−1, i.p.) or flavocoxid (20 mg·kg−1, i.p.) for 14 days. Histological changes, eicosanoid content and mRNA and protein levels for apoptosis-related proteins and growth factors were assayed in prostate tissue. The effects of flavocoxid were also tested on human prostate carcinoma PC3 cells. KEY RESULTS Flavocoxid reduced prostate weight and hyperplasia, blunted inducible expression of COX-2 and 5-LOX as well as the increased production of PGE2 and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), enhanced pro-apoptotic Bax and caspase-9 and decreased the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 mRNA. Flavocoxid also reduced EGF and VEGF expression. In PC3 cells, flavocoxid stimulated apoptosis and inhibited growth factor expression. Flavocoxid-mediated induction of apoptosis was inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, in PC3 cells, suggesting an essential role of caspases in flavocoxid-mediated apoptosis during prostatic growth. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Our results show that a ‘dual inhibitor’ of the COX and 5-LOX enzymes, such as flavocoxid, might represent a rational approach to reduce BPH through modulation of eicosanoid production and a caspase-induced apoptotic mechanism. PMID:22471974

  15. Apoptosis Inducing Effect of Plumbagin on Colonic Cancer Cells Depends on Expression of COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniya, Bharathi Raja; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Mohammed Sadullah, Sakeena Sadullah; Davis, Nimitha; Baddi Reddi Subhadara, Lakshmi; Halagowder, Devaraj; Sivasitambaram, Niranjali Devaraj

    2011-01-01

    Plumbagin, a quinonoid found in the plants of the Plumbaginaceae, possesses medicinal properties. In this study we investigated the anti-proliferative and apoptotic activity of plumbagin by using two human colonic cancer cell lines, HT29 and HCT15. IC50 of Plumbagin for HCT15 and HT29 cells (22.5 µM and 62.5 µM, respectively) were significantly different. To study the response of cancer cells during treatment strategies, cells were treated with two different concentrations, 15 µM, 30 µM for HCT15 and 50 µM, 75 µM for HT29 cells. Though activation of NFκB, Caspases-3, elevated levels of TNF-α, cytosolic Cytochrome C were seen in both HCT15 cells HT29 treated with plumbagin, aberrant apoptosis with decreased level of pEGFR, pAkt, pGsk-3β, PCNA and Cyclin D1was observed only in 15 µM and 30 µM plumbagin treated HCT15 and 75 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells. This suggests that plumbagin induces apoptosis in both HCT15 cells and HT29 treated, whereas, proliferation was inhibited only in 15 µM and 30 µM plumbagin treated HCT15 and 75 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells, but not in 50 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells. Expression of COX-2 was decreased in 75 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells when compared to 50 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells, whereas HCT15 cells lack COX. Hence the observed resistance to induction of apoptosis in 50 µM plumbagin treated HT29 cells are attributed to the expression of COX-2. In conclusion, plumbagin induces apoptosis in colonic cancer cells through TNF-α mediated pathway depending on expression of COX-2 expression. PMID:21559086

  16. Risk Adjustment and the Assessment of Disparities in Dialysis Mortality Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kalbfleisch, John; Wolfe, Robert; Bell, Sarah; Sun, Rena; Messana, Joseph; Shearon, Tempie; Ashby, Valarie; Padilla, Robin; Zhang, Min; Turenne, Marc; Pearson, Jeffrey; Dahlerus, Claudia; Li, Yi

    2015-11-01

    Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) reported by Medicare compare mortality at individual dialysis facilities with the national average, and are currently adjusted for race. However, whether the adjustment for race obscures or clarifies disparities in quality of care for minority groups is unknown. Cox model-based SMRs were computed with and without adjustment for patient race for 5920 facilities in the United States during 2010. The study population included virtually all patients treated with dialysis during this period. Without race adjustment, facilities with higher proportions of black patients had better survival outcomes; facilities with the highest percentage of black patients (top 10%) had overall mortality rates approximately 7% lower than expected. After adjusting for within-facility racial differences, facilities with higher proportions of black patients had poorer survival outcomes among black and non-black patients; facilities with the highest percentage of black patients (top 10%) had mortality rates approximately 6% worse than expected. In conclusion, accounting for within-facility racial differences in the computation of SMR helps to clarify disparities in quality of health care among patients with ESRD. The adjustment that accommodates within-facility comparisons is key, because it could also clarify relationships between patient characteristics and health care provider outcomes in other settings.

  17. Synthesizing regression results: a factored likelihood method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Jia; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2013-06-01

    Regression methods are widely used by researchers in many fields, yet methods for synthesizing regression results are scarce. This study proposes using a factored likelihood method, originally developed to handle missing data, to appropriately synthesize regression models involving different predictors. This method uses the correlations reported in the regression studies to calculate synthesized standardized slopes. It uses available correlations to estimate missing ones through a series of regressions, allowing us to synthesize correlations among variables as if each included study contained all the same variables. Great accuracy and stability of this method under fixed-effects models were found through Monte Carlo simulation. An example was provided to demonstrate the steps for calculating the synthesized slopes through sweep operators. By rearranging the predictors in the included regression models or omitting a relatively small number of correlations from those models, we can easily apply the factored likelihood method to many situations involving synthesis of linear models. Limitations and other possible methods for synthesizing more complicated models are discussed. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26053653

  18. Post-processing through linear regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Schaeybroeck, B.; Vannitsem, S.

    2011-03-01

    Various post-processing techniques are compared for both deterministic and ensemble forecasts, all based on linear regression between forecast data and observations. In order to evaluate the quality of the regression methods, three criteria are proposed, related to the effective correction of forecast error, the optimal variability of the corrected forecast and multicollinearity. The regression schemes under consideration include the ordinary least-square (OLS) method, a new time-dependent Tikhonov regularization (TDTR) method, the total least-square method, a new geometric-mean regression (GM), a recently introduced error-in-variables (EVMOS) method and, finally, a "best member" OLS method. The advantages and drawbacks of each method are clarified. These techniques are applied in the context of the 63 Lorenz system, whose model version is affected by both initial condition and model errors. For short forecast lead times, the number and choice of predictors plays an important role. Contrarily to the other techniques, GM degrades when the number of predictors increases. At intermediate lead times, linear regression is unable to provide corrections to the forecast and can sometimes degrade the performance (GM and the best member OLS with noise). At long lead times the regression schemes (EVMOS, TDTR) which yield the correct variability and the largest correlation between ensemble error and spread, should be preferred.

  19. mTORC1-mediated downregulation of COX2 restrains tumor growth caused by TSC2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongwu; Jin, Fuquan; Jiang, Keguo; Ji, Shuang; Wang, Li; Ni, Zhaofei; Chen, Xianguo; Hu, Zhongdong; Zhang, Hongbing; Liu, Yehai; Qin, Yide; Zha, Xiaojun

    2016-05-10

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), caused by loss-of-function mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 gene, is characterized by benign tumor formation in multiple organs. Hyperactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is the primary alteration underlying TSC tumors. By analyzing Tsc2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and rat uterine leiomyoma-derived Tsc2-null ELT3 cells, we detected evidence for the involvement of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) as a downstream target of mTORC1 in the development of TSC tumors. We showed that loss of TSC2 led to decreased COX2 expression through activation of an mTORC1/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. Overexpression of COX2 promoted proliferation and tumoral growth of Tsc2-null cells. COX2 knockdown inhibited the proliferation of the control cells. COX2 enhanced Tsc2-null cell growth through upregulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6). In addition, rapamycin in combination with celecoxib, a COX2 inhibitor, strongly inhibited Tsc2-deficient cell growth. We conclude that downregulation of COX2 exerts a protective effect against hyperactivated mTORC1-mediated tumorigenesis caused by the loss of TSC2, and the combination of rapamycin and celecoxib may be an effective new approach to treating TSC.

  20. Intratumoral expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a negative prognostic marker for patients with cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kuźbicki, Łukasz; Lange, Dariusz; Stanek-Widera, Agata; Chwirot, Barbara W

    2016-10-01

    Because of the well-known heterogeneity of melanomas, prognosis of the disease is often difficult to assess even for lesions classified in similar stages. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of COX-2 as a melanoma prognostic marker and to establish an optimum algorithm for analysis of COX-2 expression levels in lesions of interest. Expression of COX-2 was detected immunohistochemically in standard sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 85 primary melanomas, 36 lymph node metastases, and five skin metastases including 39 cases of paired primary and metastatic lesions obtained from the same patient. Enhanced expression of COX-2 in primary melanomas is an indicator of poorer prognosis. A significant correlation was found between high expression of COX-2 in primary lesions and shorter survival. The enhancement of COX-2 expression is also positively correlated with other prognostic factors such as tumor thickness and infiltration level, ulceration, high mitotic index, more invasive histologic type, vertical growth phase, and lymph node metastasis. On the whole, the results suggest that intratumoral expression of COX-2 is a strong negative prognostic marker for patients with melanoma. Moreover, our work shows that a simple and objective immunohistochemical scoring algorithm involving the determination of only a percentage fraction of positively stained cells is sufficient to obtain the prognostic information.

  1. Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, activates PPARα and γ and suppresses COX-2 expression[S

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Mariko; Nakata, Rieko; Katsukawa, Michiko; Hori, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Saori; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis, plays a key role in inflammation and circulatory homeostasis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily and are involved in the control of COX-2 expression, and vice versa. Here, we show that COX-2 promoter activity was suppressed by essential oils derived from thyme, clove, rose, eucalyptus, fennel, and bergamot in cell-based transfection assays using bovine arterial endothelial cells. Moreover, from thyme oil, we identified carvacrol as a major component of the suppressor of COX-2 expression and an activator of PPARα and γ. PPARγ-dependent suppression of COX-2 promoter activity was observed in response to carvacrol treatment. In human macrophage-like U937 cells, carvacrol suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting that carvacrol regulates COX-2 expression through its agonistic effect on PPARγ. These results may be important in understanding the antiinflammatory and antilifestyle-related disease properties of carvacrol. PMID:19578162

  2. Differential effect of DDT, DDE, and DDD on COX-2 expression in the human trophoblast derived HTR-8/SVneo cells.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Lopez, Pablo; Diaz-Cueto, Laura; Olivares, Aleida; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Fabian

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis-(chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT), 1,1-bis-(chlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroethene (DDE), and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(chlorophenyl)ethane (DDD) isomers on COX-2 expression in a human trophoblast-derived cell line. Cultured HTR-8/SVneo trophoblast cells were exposed to DDT isomers and its metabolites for 24 h, and COX-2 mRNA and protein expression were assessed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and ELISA. Prostaglandin E₂ production was also measured by ELISA. Both COX-2 mRNA and protein were detected under control (unexposed) conditions in the HTR-8/SVneo cell line. COX-2 protein expression and prostaglandin E₂ production but not COX-2 mRNA levels increased only after DDE and DDD isomers exposure. It is concluded that DDE and DDD exposure induce the expression of COX-2 protein, leading to increased prostaglandin E2 production. Interestingly, the regulation of COX-2 by these organochlorines pesticides appears to be at the translational level.

  3. Monitoring of Fasciola Species Contamination in Water Dropwort by cox1 Mitochondrial and ITS-2 rDNA Sequencing Analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, In-Wook; Kim, Hwang-Yong; Quan, Juan-Hua; Ryu, Jae-Gee; Sun, Rubing; Lee, Young-Ha

    2015-10-01

    Fascioliasis, a food-borne trematode zoonosis, is a disease primarily in cattle and sheep and occasionally in humans. Water dropwort (Oenanthe javanica), an aquatic perennial herb, is a common second intermediate host of Fasciola, and the fresh stems and leaves are widely used as a seasoning in the Korean diet. However, no information regarding Fasciola species contamination in water dropwort is available. Here, we collected 500 samples of water dropwort in 3 areas in Korea during February and March 2015, and the water dropwort contamination of Fasciola species was monitored by DNA sequencing analysis of the Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica specific mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2). Among the 500 samples assessed, the presence of F. hepatica cox1 and 1TS-2 markers were detected in 2 samples, and F. hepatica contamination was confirmed by sequencing analysis. The nucleotide sequences of cox1 PCR products from the 2 F. hepatica-contaminated samples were 96.5% identical to the F. hepatica cox1 sequences in GenBank, whereas F. gigantica cox1 sequences were 46.8% similar with the sequence detected from the cox1 positive samples. However, F. gigantica cox1 and ITS-2 markers were not detected by PCR in the 500 samples of water dropwort. Collectively, in this survey of the water dropwort contamination with Fasciola species, very low prevalence of F. hepatica contamination was detected in the samples.

  4. COX-2 gene promoter DNA methylation status in eutopic and ectopic endometrium of Egyptian women with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Zidan, Haidy E; Rezk, Noha A; Alnemr, Amr Abd Almohsen; Abd El Ghany, Amany M

    2015-11-01

    The pathophysiology of COX-2 expression in endometriosis is a matter of debate. The aim was to investigate the role of DNA methylation of the NF-IL6 site within the promoter of COX-2 gene in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. The endometrial tissues (ectopic and eutopic) were collected from 60 women with endometriosis and 30 women without endometriosis (control group). The methylation status of COX-2 was examined by methylation-specific PCR. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was performed to measure COX-2 mRNA levels in endometrial tissues. We found significantly higher levels of COX-2 in ectopic endometriotic tissue compared with eutopic tissue. Also, we found that the frequencies of methylation status of the NF-IL6 site within the COX-2 promoter in the eutopic and ectopic endometrial tissues of endometriosis groups were significantly decreased in comparison to controls (P=0.002, P=0.000 respectively). Our study demonstrated that DNA hypomethylation of the NF-IL6 site within the promoter of COX-2 gene could be a key mechanism for its elevated expression in the eutopic and ectopic tissues of endometriosis.

  5. LincRNA-Cox2 Promotes Late Inflammatory Gene Transcription in Macrophages through Modulating SWI/SNF-Mediated Chromatin Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guoku; Gong, Ai-Yu; Wang, Yang; Ma, Shibin; Chen, Xiqiang; Chen, Jing; Su, Chun-Jen; Shibata, Annemarie; Strauss-Soukup, Juliane K; Drescher, Kristen M; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2016-03-15

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are long noncoding transcripts (>200 nt) from the intergenic regions of annotated protein-coding genes. One of the most highly induced lincRNAs in macrophages upon TLR ligation is lincRNA-Cox2, which was recently shown to mediate the activation and repression of distinct classes of immune genes in innate immune cells. We report that lincRNA-Cox2, located at chromosome 1 proximal to the PG-endoperoxide synthase 2 (Ptgs2/Cox2) gene, is an early-primary inflammatory gene controlled by NF-κB signaling in murine macrophages. Functionally, lincRNA-Cox2 is required for the transcription of NF-κB-regulated late-primary inflammatory response genes stimulated by bacterial LPS. Specifically, lincRNA-Cox2 is assembled into the switch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI/SNF) complex in cells after LPS stimulation. This resulting lincRNA-Cox2/SWI/SNF complex can modulate the assembly of NF-κB subunits to the SWI/SNF complex, and ultimately, SWI/SNF-associated chromatin remodeling and transactivation of the late-primary inflammatory-response genes in macrophages in response to microbial challenge. Therefore, our data indicate a new regulatory role for NF-κB-induced lincRNA-Cox2 as a coactivator of NF-κB for the transcription of late-primary response genes in innate immune cells through modulation of epigenetic chromatin remodeling.

  6. mTORC1-mediated downregulation of COX2 restrains tumor growth caused by TSC2 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Shuang; Wang, Li; Ni, Zhaofei; Chen, Xianguo; Hu, Zhongdong; Zhang, Hongbing; Liu, Yehai; Qin, Yide; Zha, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), caused by loss-of-function mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 gene, is characterized by benign tumor formation in multiple organs. Hyperactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is the primary alteration underlying TSC tumors. By analyzing Tsc2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and rat uterine leiomyoma-derived Tsc2-null ELT3 cells, we detected evidence for the involvement of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) as a downstream target of mTORC1 in the development of TSC tumors. We showed that loss of TSC2 led to decreased COX2 expression through activation of an mTORC1/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. Overexpression of COX2 promoted proliferation and tumoral growth of Tsc2-null cells. COX2 knockdown inhibited the proliferation of the control cells. COX2 enhanced Tsc2-null cell growth through upregulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6). In addition, rapamycin in combination with celecoxib, a COX2 inhibitor, strongly inhibited Tsc2-deficient cell growth. We conclude that downregulation of COX2 exerts a protective effect against hyperactivated mTORC1-mediated tumorigenesis caused by the loss of TSC2, and the combination of rapamycin and celecoxib may be an effective new approach to treating TSC. PMID:27078846

  7. Monitoring of Fasciola Species Contamination in Water Dropwort by cox1 Mitochondrial and ITS-2 rDNA Sequencing Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, In-Wook; Kim, Hwang-Yong; Quan, Juan-Hua; Ryu, Jae-Gee; Sun, Rubing; Lee, Young-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Fascioliasis, a food-borne trematode zoonosis, is a disease primarily in cattle and sheep and occasionally in humans. Water dropwort (Oenanthe javanica), an aquatic perennial herb, is a common second intermediate host of Fasciola, and the fresh stems and leaves are widely used as a seasoning in the Korean diet. However, no information regarding Fasciola species contamination in water dropwort is available. Here, we collected 500 samples of water dropwort in 3 areas in Korea during February and March 2015, and the water dropwort contamination of Fasciola species was monitored by DNA sequencing analysis of the Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica specific mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2). Among the 500 samples assessed, the presence of F. hepatica cox1 and 1TS-2 markers were detected in 2 samples, and F. hepatica contamination was confirmed by sequencing analysis. The nucleotide sequences of cox1 PCR products from the 2 F. hepatica-contaminated samples were 96.5% identical to the F. hepatica cox1 sequences in GenBank, whereas F. gigantica cox1 sequences were 46.8% similar with the sequence detected from the cox1 positive samples. However, F. gigantica cox1 and ITS-2 markers were not detected by PCR in the 500 samples of water dropwort. Collectively, in this survey of the water dropwort contamination with Fasciola species, very low prevalence of F. hepatica contamination was detected in the samples. PMID:26537044

  8. Zeranol induces COX-2 expression through TRPC-3 activation in the placental cells JEG-3.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Leung, Lai K

    2016-09-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Channels (TRPs) are commonly expressed in the reproductive tissues in human. Many female reproductive processes have been associated with these TRPs. The mycotoxin zeranol or α-zearalanol is derived from fungi in the Fusarium family. Limited exposure to zeranol appears to be safe. In North America, farmers are using synthetic zeranol to promote growth in livestock. As the health risks of exposure to residual zeranol have not been determined, this practice is disallowed in the European Community. In the present study the cellular calcium levels were elevated in JEG-3 cells treated with zeranol at or above 10nM. Subsequent study indicated that expressions of TRP channels were induced. In response to the calcium flow, ERK, P38 and PKCβ were activated and COX-2 expression was increased. Specific TRP inhibitors were employed to establish the connection between the ion channel activity and COX-2 expression, and TRPC-3 appeared to be the triggering mechanism. Since the involvement of COX-2 is implicated in placental development and parturition, exposure to this mycotoxin poses a potential threat to pregnant women. PMID:27224899

  9. COX-2 polymorphisms -765G→C and -1195A→G and hepatocellular carcinoma risk.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Aml F; Karam, Rehab A; Abd El Rahman, Tamer M; Elsawy, Wael H

    2014-06-15

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and considered to play a role in hepatic carcinogenesis. Our aim was to examine the associations between polymorphisms in COX-2 -765G→C and -1195A→G and risk of HCC. We conducted a case-control study including 120 patients with HCC and 130 age- and gender-matched controls. Genotypes of the COX-2 polymorphisms -765G→C and -1195A→G were determined by polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism. No significant difference was observed in the genotype distribution of the -765G→C polymorphism between patients and controls. The -1195AA genotype was associated with an increased risk of developing HCC (OR, 2.5; 95%CI, 1.18-5.37). The A allele was present significantly more often in HCC patients (OR 1.5; 95%CI, 1.05-2.14). In conclusion, our results demonstrated that the -1195AA genotype and A allele have an important role in HCC risk in Egyptian patients.

  10. CoxFey@C Composites with Tunable Atomic Ratios for Excellent Electromagnetic Absorption Properties

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hualiang; Ji, Guangbin; Zhang, Haiqian; Li, Meng; Zuo, Zhongzheng; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Baoshan; Tang, Dongming; Du, Youwei

    2015-01-01

    The shell on the nano-magnetic absorber can prevent oxidation, which is very important for its practical utilization. Generally, the nonmagnetic shell will decrease the integral magnetic loss and thus weaken the electromagnetic absorption. However, maintaining the original absorption properties of the magnetic core is a major challenge. Here, we designed novel and facile CoxFey@C composites by reducing CoxFe3−xO4@phenolic resin (x = 1, 0.5 and 0.25). High saturation magnetization value (Ms) of CoxFey particle, as a core, shows the interesting magnetic loss ability. Meanwhile, the carbon shell may increase the integral dielectric loss. The resulting composite shows excellent electromagnetic absorption properties. For example, at a coating thickness of 2 mm, the RLmin value can reach to −23 dB with an effective frequency range of 7 GHz (11–18 GHz). The mechanisms of the improved microwave absorption properties are discussed. PMID:26659124

  11. Effects of COX inhibition and LPS on Formalin Induced Pain in the Infant Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Deirtra; Chai, Christina; Barr, Gordon A.

    2014-01-01

    In the adult, immune and neural processes jointly modulate pain. During development, both are in transition and little is known about the role that the immune system plays in pain processing in infants and children. The objective of this study was to determine if inhibition or augmentation of the immune system would alter pain processing in the infant rat, as it does in the adult. In Experiment 1, rat pups aged 3, 10 or 21 (PN3, PN10, PN21) days of age were pre-treated with NS398 (selective COX-2 inhibitor) or SC560 (selective COX-1 inhibitor) and tested in the intraplantar formalin test to assess effects of COX inhibition on nociception. Neither drug had an effect on the behavioral response at PN3 or PN10 pups but both drugs attenuated nociceptive scores in PN21 pups. cFos expression in the spinal cord likewise was reduced only at PN21. In Experiment 2, pups were injected with LPS prior to the formalin test at PN3 and PN21. LPS increased the nociceptive response more robustly at PN21 than at PN3, while increasing cytokine mRNA equally at both ages. The augmentation of pain responding at PN21 was largely during the late stages of the formalin test, as reported in the adult. These data support previous findings demonstrating late maturing immune modulation of nociceptive behaviors. PMID:25205468

  12. The Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization Is Independent of COX7a2l Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Mourier, Arnaud; Matic, Stanka; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Milenkovic, Dusanka

    2014-01-01

    Summary The organization of individual respiratory chain complexes into supercomplexes or respirasomes has attracted great interest because of the implications for cellular energy conversion. Recently, it was reported that commonly used mouse strains harbor a short COX7a2l (SCAFI) gene isoform that supposedly precludes the formation of complex IV-containing supercomplexes. This claim potentially has serious implications for numerous mouse studies addressing important topics in metabolism, including adaptation to space flights. Using several complementary experimental approaches, we show that mice with the short COX7a2l isoform have normal biogenesis and steady-state levels of complex IV-containing supercomplexes and consequently have normal respiratory chain function. Furthermore, we use a mouse knockout of Lrpprc and show that loss of complex IV compromises respirasome formation. We conclude that the presence of the short COX7a2l isoform in the commonly used C57BL/6 mouse strains does not prevent their use in metabolism research. PMID:25470551

  13. CoxFey@C Composites with Tunable Atomic Ratios for Excellent Electromagnetic Absorption Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Hualiang; Ji, Guangbin; Zhang, Haiqian; Li, Meng; Zuo, Zhongzheng; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Baoshan; Tang, Dongming; Du, Youwei

    2015-12-01

    The shell on the nano-magnetic absorber can prevent oxidation, which is very important for its practical utilization. Generally, the nonmagnetic shell will decrease the integral magnetic loss and thus weaken the electromagnetic absorption. However, maintaining the original absorption properties of the magnetic core is a major challenge. Here, we designed novel and facile CoxFey@C composites by reducing CoxFe3-xO4@phenolic resin (x = 1, 0.5 and 0.25). High saturation magnetization value (Ms) of CoxFey particle, as a core, shows the interesting magnetic loss ability. Meanwhile, the carbon shell may increase the integral dielectric loss. The resulting composite shows excellent electromagnetic absorption properties. For example, at a coating thickness of 2 mm, the RLmin value can reach to -23 dB with an effective frequency range of 7 GHz (11-18 GHz). The mechanisms of the improved microwave absorption properties are discussed.

  14. Imidazolineoxyl N-oxide induces COX-2 in endothelial cells: role of free radicals.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Mercedes; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose; Rodriguez, Cristina; Siguero, Laura; Seriola, Cristina; Romero, Jose-Maria; Vila, Luis

    2012-01-01

    cPTIO (2-[4-carboxyphenyl]-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) exerts beneficial actions on systemic inflammatory response. Besides its nitric oxide (NO) scavenging properties cPTIO could exert beneficial effects through modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. We studied the effect of cPTIO on the biosynthesis of vasoactive prostaglandins (PG) by endothelial cells. Human cord umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with cPTIO, and expression of cycloxygenase (COX) isoenzymes in terms of mRNA and protein was determined by real-time-PCR and immunoblotting. Release of PGE2 (as index of untransformed PGH2 release) and 6-oxo-PGF1alpha (PGI2 stable metabolite) was determined by enzyme-immunoassay. cPTIO significantly increases the release of untransformed PGH2 associated to the induction of COX-2 expression. Experiments with NO-synthase inhibitors and radical scavengers showed that induction of COX-2 by cPTIO was mediated by free radical species, likely caused by the mobilization of NO from cellular stores. Finally, using specific signal-transduction inhibitors we show the involvement of Src/PI3-K/PKC pathway. Additional effects other than a direct NO scavenging activity may confer therapeutic advantages to cPTIO as compared with NO-synthase inhibitors for the treatment of systemic inflammation-associated vascular hyporeactivity. PMID:22652668

  15. Cox Proportional Hazards Models for Modeling the Time to Onset of Decompression Sickness in Hypobaric Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Laura A.; Chhikara, Raj S.; Conkin, Johnny

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we fit Cox proportional hazards models to a subset of data from the Hypobaric Decompression Sickness Databank. The data bank contains records on the time to decompression sickness (DCS) and venous gas emboli (VGE) for over 130,000 person-exposures to high altitude in chamber tests. The subset we use contains 1,321 records, with 87% censoring, and has the most recent experimental tests on DCS made available from Johnson Space Center. We build on previous analyses of this data set by considering more expanded models and more detailed model assessments specific to the Cox model. Our model - which is stratified on the quartiles of the final ambient pressure at altitude - includes the final ambient pressure at altitude as a nonlinear continuous predictor, the computed tissue partial pressure of nitrogen at altitude, and whether exercise was done at altitude. We conduct various assessments of our model, many of which are recently developed in the statistical literature, and conclude where the model needs improvement. We consider the addition of frailties to the stratified Cox model, but found that no significant gain was attained above a model that does not include frailties. Finally, we validate some of the models that we fit.

  16. Comparing Smoothing Techniques for Fitting the Nonlinear Effect of Covariate in Cox Models

    PubMed Central

    Roshani, Daem; Ghaderi, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Cox model is a popular model in survival analysis, which assumes linearity of the covariate on the log hazard function, While continuous covariates can affect the hazard through more complicated nonlinear functional forms and therefore, Cox models with continuous covariates are prone to misspecification due to not fitting the correct functional form for continuous covariates. In this study, a smooth nonlinear covariate effect would be approximated by different spline functions. Material and Methods: We applied three flexible nonparametric smoothing techniques for nonlinear covariate effect in the Cox models: penalized splines, restricted cubic splines and natural splines. Akaike information criterion (AIC) and degrees of freedom were used to smoothing parameter selection in penalized splines model. The ability of nonparametric methods was evaluated to recover the true functional form of linear, quadratic and nonlinear functions, using different simulated sample sizes. Data analysis was carried out using R 2.11.0 software and significant levels were considered 0.05. Results: Based on AIC, the penalized spline method had consistently lower mean square error compared to others to selection of smoothed parameter. The same result was obtained with real data. Conclusion: Penalized spline smoothing method, with AIC to smoothing parameter selection, was more accurate in evaluate of relation between covariate and log hazard function than other methods. PMID:27041809

  17. Antitumor effects of celecoxib in COX-2 expressing and non-expressing canine melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyoung-won; Coh, Ye-rin; Rebhun, Robert B.; Ahn, Jin-ok; Han, Sei-Myung; Lee, Hee-woo; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a potential target for chemoprevention and cancer therapy. Celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, inhibits cell growth of various types of human cancer including malignant melanoma. In dogs, oral malignant melanoma represents the most common oral tumor and is often a fatal disease. Therefore, there is a desperate need to develop additional therapeutic strategies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticancer effects of celecoxib on canine malignant melanoma cell lines that express varying levels of COX-2. Celecoxib induced a significant anti-proliferative effect in both LMeC and CMeC-1 cells. In the CMeC cells, treatment of 50 µM celecoxib caused an increase in cells in the G0/G1 and a decreased proportion of cells in G-2 phase. In the LMeC cells, 50 µM of celecoxib led to an increase in the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase and a significant activation of caspase-3 when compared to CMeC-1 cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that celecoxib exhibits antitumor effects on canine melanoma LMeC and CMeC-1 cells by induction of G1-S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our data suggest that celecoxib might be effective as a chemotherapeutic agent against canine malignant melanoma. PMID:24656746

  18. [Tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with treatment with selective Cox-2 inhibitors, celecoxib and rofecoxib].

    PubMed

    Ortiz, M; Mon, C; Fernández, M J; Sánchez, R; Mampaso, F; Alvarez Ude, F

    2005-01-01

    The nephrotoxic effect of nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory drugs (NSAIDS) has been widely described. The main benefit of the Cox-2 inhibitors in relation to the NSAIDS is the production of a very similar analgesic effect, but with fewer gastrointestinal side effects. However, their effects on renal function are little known as yet and their long-term safety is still pending definition. The use of selective Cox-2 inhibitors as anti-inflamatory analgesic is becoming more and more common in our environment. We report two cases of tubulointersticial nephritis confirmed by renal biopsy, associated with administration of the two Cox-2 inhibitors currently available on the market, celecoxib and rofecoxib. In both cases, we were talking about elderly women, with deterioration of the general condition and acute renal failure. In the former case, renal biopsy showed an acute tubulo-intersticial nephritis (TIN) so highly "variegated" in its histologic expression. In the second case, was associated with strong indications of chronicity. Treatment with steroid was initiated in both patients and improvement of renal function was observed.

  19. Identification and characterization of carprofen as a multi-target FAAH/COX inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Favia, Angelo D.; Habrant, Damien; Scarpelli, Rita; Migliore, Marco; Albani, Clara; Bertozzi, Sine Mandrup; Dionisi, Mauro; Tarozzo, Glauco; Piomelli, Daniele; Cavalli, Andrea; De Vivo, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Pain and inflammation are major therapeutic areas for drug discovery. Current drugs for these pathologies have limited efficacy, however, and often cause a number of unwanted side effects. In the present study, we identify the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug, carprofen, as a multi-target-directed ligand that simultaneously inhibits cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), COX-2 and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Additionally, we synthesized and tested several racemic derivatives of carprofen, sharing this multi-target activity. This may result in improved analgesic efficacy and reduced side effects (Naidu, et al (2009) J Pharmacol Exp Ther 329, 48-56; Fowler, C.J. et al. (2012) J Enzym Inhib Med Chem Jan 6; Sasso, et al (2012) Pharmacol Res 65, 553). The new compounds are among the most potent multi-target FAAH/COXs inhibitors reported so far in the literature, and thus may represent promising starting points for the discovery of new analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23043222

  20. Antioxidative effects of cinnamomi cortex: A potential role of iNOS and COX-II

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jin-Won; Kim, Jeong-Jun; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cinnamomi cortex has wide varieties of pharmacological actions such as anti-inflammatory action, anti-platelet aggregation, and improving blood circulation. In this study, we tested to determine whether the Cinnamomi cortex extract has antioxidant activities. Materials and Methods: Antioxidative actions were explored by measuring free radical scavenging activity, NO levels, and reducing power. The mechanism of antioxidative action of Cinnamomi cortex was determined by measuring iNOS and COX-II expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated Raw cells. Results: Seventy percent methanolic extract of Cinnamomi cortex exerted significant 1,1-diphenyl--2--picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals and NO scavenging activities in a dose-dependent manner. More strikingly, the Cinnamomi cortex extract exerted dramatic reducing power activity (13-fold over control). Production of iNOS induced by LPS was significantly inhibited by the Cinnamomi cortex extract, suggesting that it inhibits NO production by suppressing iNOS expression. Additionally, COX-2 induced by LPS was dramatically inhibited by the Cinnamomi cortex extract. Conclusion: These results suggest that 70% methanolic extract of Cinnamomi cortex exerts significant antioxidant activity via inhibiting iNOS and COX-II induction. PMID:22262934

  1. PET radiotracer [18F]-P6 selectively targeting COX-1 as a novel biomarker in ovarian cancer: Preliminary investigation

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Jashim; Vitale, Paola; Panella, Andrea; Crews, Brenda C.; Daniel, Cristina K.; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Nickels, Mike; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Manning, H. Charles; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Scilimati, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), but not COX-2, is expressed at high levels in the early stages of human epithelial ovarian cancer where it seems to play a key role in cancer onset and progression. As a consequence, COX-1 is an ideal biomarker for early ovarian cancer detection. A series of novel fluorinated COX-1-targeted imaging agents derived from P6 was developed by using a highly selective COX-1 inhibitor as a lead compound. Among these new compounds, designed by structural modification of P6, 3-(5-chlorofuran-2-yl)-5-(fluoromethyl)-4-phenylisoxazole ([18/19F]-P6) is the most promising derivative [IC50 = 2.0 μM (purified oCOX-1) and 1.37 μM (hOVCAR-3 cell COX-1)]. Its tosylate precursor was also prepared and, a method for radio[18F]chemistry was developed and optimized. The radiochemistry was carried out using a carrier-free K18F/Kryptofix 2.2.2 complex, that afforded [18F]-P6 in good radio-chemical yield (18%) and high purity (>95%). In vivo PET/CT imaging data showed that the radiotracer [18F]-P6 was selectively taken up by COX-1-expressing ovarian carcinoma (OVCAR 3) tumor xenografts as compared with the normal leg muscle. Our results suggest that [18F]-P6 might be an useful radiotracer in preclinical and clinical settings for in vivo PET-CT imaging of tissues that express elevated levels of COX-1. PMID:24832612

  2. LY294002 inhibits glucocorticoid-induced COX-2 gene expression in cardiomyocytes through a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Haipeng; Xu Beibei; Sheveleva, Elena; Chen, Qin M.

    2008-10-01

    Glucocorticoids induce COX-2 expression in rat cardiomyocytes. While investigating whether phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) plays a role in corticosterone (CT)-induced COX-2, we found that LY294002 (LY29) but not wortmannin (WM) attenuates CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p85 subunit of PI3K failed to inhibit CT from inducing COX-2 expression. CT did not activate PI3K/AKT signaling pathway whereas LY29 and WM decreased the activity of PI3K. LY303511 (LY30), a structural analogue and a negative control for PI3K inhibitory activity of LY29, also suppressed COX-2 induction. These data suggest PI3K-independent mechanisms in regulating CT-induced COX-2 expression. LY29 and LY30 do not inhibit glucocorticoid receptor transactivity. Both compounds have been reported to inhibit Casein Kinase 2 activity and modulate potassium and calcium levels independent of PI3K, while LY29 has been reported to inhibit mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), and DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK). Inhibitor of Casein Kinase 2 (CK2), mTOR or DNA-PK failed to prevent CT from inducing COX-2 expression. Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a potassium channel blocker, and nimodipine, a calcium channel blocker, both attenuated CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. CT was found to increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, which can be inhibited by LY29, TEA or nimodipine. These data suggest a possible role of calcium instead of PI3K in CT-induced COX-2 expression in cardiomyocytes.

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mediates arsenite inhibition of UVB-induced cellular apoptosis in mouse epidermal Cl41 cells.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Z; Ouyang, W; Li, J; Costa, M; Huang, C

    2012-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is an environmental human carcinogen, and has been shown to act as a co-carcinogen with solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation in mouse skin tumor induction even at low concentrations. However, the precise mechanism of its co-carcinogenic action is largely unknown. Apoptosis plays an essential role as a protective mechanism against neoplastic development in the organism by eliminating genetically damaged cells. Thus, suppression of apoptosis is thought to contribute to carcinogenesis. It is known that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) can promote carcinogenesis by inhibiting cell apoptosis under stress conditions; and our current studies investigated the potential contribution of COX-2 to the inhibitory effect of arsenite in UV-induced cell apoptosis in mouse epidermal Cl41 cells. We found that treatment of cells with low concentration (5 μM) arsenite attenuated cellular apoptosis upon UVB radiation accompanied with a coinductive effect on COX-2 expression and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) transactivation. Our results also showed that the COX-2 induction by arsenite and UVB depended on an NFκB pathway because COX-2 co-induction could be attenuated in either p65-deficient or p50-deficient cells. Moreover, UVB-induced cell apoptosis could be dramatically reduced by the introduction of exogenous COX-2 expression, whereas the inhibitory effect of arsenite on UVB-induced cell apoptosis could be impaired in COX-2 knockdown C141 cells. Our results indicated that COX-2 mediated the anti-apoptotic effect of arsenite in UVB radiation through an NFκB-dependent pathway. Given the importance of apoptosis evasion during carcinogenesis, we anticipated that COX-2 induction might be at least partially responsible for the co-carcinogenic effect of arsenite on UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis.

  4. The Pet309 pentatricopeptide repeat motifs mediate efficient binding to the mitochondrial COX1 transcript in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zamudio-Ochoa, Angélica; Camacho-Villasana, Yolanda; García-Guerrero, Aldo E; Pérez-Martínez, Xochitl

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial synthesis of Cox1, the largest subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase complex, is controlled by Mss51 and Pet309, two mRNA-specific translational activators that act via the COX1 mRNA 5′-UTR through an unknown mechanism. Pet309 belongs to the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family, which is involved in RNA metabolism in mitochondria and chloroplasts, and its sequence predicts at least 12 PPR motifs in the central portion of the protein. Deletion of these motifs selectively disrupted translation but not accumulation of the COX1 mRNA. We used RNA coimmunoprecipitation assays to show that Pet309 interacts with the COX1 mRNA in vivo and that this association is present before processing of the COX1 mRNA from the ATP8/6 polycistronic mRNA. This association was not affected by deletion of 8 of the PPR motifs but was undetectable after deletion of the entire 12-PPR region. However, interaction of the Pet309 protein lacking 12 PPR motifs with the COX1 mRNA was detected after overexpression of the mutated form of the protein, suggesting that deletion of this region decreased the binding affinity for the COX1 mRNA without abolishing it entirely. Moreover, binding of Pet309 to the COX1 mRNA was affected by deletion of Mss51. This work demonstrates an in vivo physical interaction between a yeast mitochondrial translational activator and its target mRNA and shows the cooperativity of the PPR domains of Pet309 in interaction with the COX1 mRNA. PMID:25181249

  5. Basal Bone Phenotype and Increased Anabolic Responses to Intermittent Parathyroid Hormone in Healthy Male COX-2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Manshan; Choudhary, Shilpa; Voznesensky, Olga; Gao, Qi; Adams, Douglas; Diaz-Doran, Vilmaris; Wu, Qian; Goltzman, David; Raisz, Lawrence G.; Pilbeam, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) knockout (KO) mice in inbred strains can have renal dysfunction with secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPTH), making direct effects of COX-2 KO on bone difficult to assess. COX-2 KO mice in an outbred CD-1 background did not have renal dysfunction but still had two-fold elevated PTH compared to wild type (WT) mice. Compared to WT mice, KO mice had increased serum markers of bone turnover, decreased femoral bone mineral density (BMD) and cortical bone thickness, but no differences in trabecular bone volume by μCT or dynamic histomorphometry. Because PTH is a potent inducer of COX-2 and prostaglandin (PG) production, we examined effects of COX-2 KO on bone responses after three weeks of intermittent PTH. Intermittent PTH increased femoral BMD and cortical bone area more in KO mice than in WT mice and increased trabecular bone volume in the distal femur in both WT and KO mice. Although not statistically significant, PTH-stimulated increases in trabecular bone tended to be greater in KO mice than in WT mice. PTH increased serum markers of bone formation and resorption more in KO than in WT mice but increased the ratio of osteoblastic surface to osteoclastic surface only in KO mice. PTH also increased femoral mineral apposition rates and bone formation rates in KO mice more than in WT mice. Acute mRNA responses to PTH of genes that might mediate some anabolic and catabolic effects of PTH tended to be greater in KO than WT mice. We conclude that (1) the basal bone phenotype in male COX-2 KO mice might reflect HPTH, COX-2 deficiency or both, and (2) increased responses to intermittent PTH in COX-2 KO mice, despite the presence of chronic HPTH, suggest that absence of COX-2 increased sensitivity to PTH. It is possible that manipulation of endogenous PGs could have important clinical implications for anabolic therapy with PTH. PMID:20471507

  6. Poisson Regression Analysis of Illness and Injury Surveillance Data

    SciTech Connect

    Frome E.L., Watkins J.P., Ellis E.D.

    2012-12-12

    The Department of Energy (DOE) uses illness and injury surveillance to monitor morbidity and assess the overall health of the work force. Data collected from each participating site include health events and a roster file with demographic information. The source data files are maintained in a relational data base, and are used to obtain stratified tables of health event counts and person time at risk that serve as the starting point for Poisson regression analysis. The explanatory variables that define these tables are age, gender, occupational group, and time. Typical response variables of interest are the number of absences due to illness or injury, i.e., the response variable is a count. Poisson regression methods are used to describe the effect of the explanatory variables on the health event rates using a log-linear main effects model. Results of fitting the main effects model are summarized in a tabular and graphical form and interpretation of model parameters is provided. An analysis of deviance table is used to evaluate the importance of each of the explanatory variables on the event rate of interest and to determine if interaction terms should be considered in the analysis. Although Poisson regression methods are widely used in the analysis of count data, there are situations in which over-dispersion occurs. This could be due to lack-of-fit of the regression model, extra-Poisson variation, or both. A score test statistic and regression diagnostics are used to identify over-dispersion. A quasi-likelihood method of moments procedure is used to evaluate and adjust for extra-Poisson variation when necessary. Two examples are presented using respiratory disease absence rates at two DOE sites to illustrate the methods and interpretation of the results. In the first example the Poisson main effects model is adequate. In the second example the score test indicates considerable over-dispersion and a more detailed analysis attributes the over-dispersion to extra

  7. Time course for tail regression during metamorphosis of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Matsunobu, Shohei; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2015-09-01

    In most ascidians, the tadpole-like swimming larvae dramatically change their body-plans during metamorphosis and develop into sessile adults. The mechanisms of ascidian metamorphosis have been researched and debated for many years. Until now information on the detailed time course of the initiation and completion of each metamorphic event has not been described. One dramatic and important event in ascidian metamorphosis is tail regression, in which ascidian larvae lose their tails to adjust themselves to sessile life. In the present study, we measured the time associated with tail regression in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Larvae are thought to acquire competency for each metamorphic event in certain developmental periods. We show that the timing with which the competence for tail regression is acquired is determined by the time since hatching, and this timing is not affected by the timing of post-hatching events such as adhesion. Because larvae need to adhere to substrates with their papillae to induce tail regression, we measured the duration for which larvae need to remain adhered in order to initiate tail regression and the time needed for the tail to regress. Larvae acquire the ability to adhere to substrates before they acquire tail regression competence. We found that when larvae adhered before they acquired tail regression competence, they were able to remember the experience of adhesion until they acquired the ability to undergo tail regression. The time course of the events associated with tail regression provides a valuable reference, upon which the cellular and molecular mechanisms of ascidian metamorphosis can be elucidated.

  8. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling☆

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P.N.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5 mM at 24 h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential. PMID:26319435

  9. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P N; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5mM at 24h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential.

  10. Reconstruction of missing daily streamflow data using dynamic regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tencaliec, Patricia; Favre, Anne-Catherine; Prieur, Clémentine; Mathevet, Thibault

    2015-12-01

    River discharge is one of the most important quantities in hydrology. It provides fundamental records for water resources management and climate change monitoring. Even very short data-gaps in this information can cause extremely different analysis outputs. Therefore, reconstructing missing data of incomplete data sets is an important step regarding the performance of the environmental models, engineering, and research applications, thus it presents a great challenge. The objective of this paper is to introduce an effective technique for reconstructing missing daily discharge data when one has access to only daily streamflow data. The proposed procedure uses a combination of regression and autoregressive integrated moving average models (ARIMA) called dynamic regression model. This model uses the linear relationship between neighbor and correlated stations and then adjusts the residual term by fitting an ARIMA structure. Application of the model to eight daily streamflow data for the Durance river watershed showed that the model yields reliable estimates for the missing data in the time series. Simulation studies were also conducted to evaluate the performance of the procedure.

  11. Enhanced expression of cyclo-oxygenase isoenzyme 2 (COX-2) in asthmatic airways and its cellular distribution in aspirin-sensitive asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, A.; Pfister, R.; Christie, P. E.; Lane, S. J.; Nasser, S. M.; Schmitz-Schumann, M.; Lee, T. H.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are two isoforms of cyclo-oxygenase (COX), namely COX- 1 and COX-2. COX-1 is constitutively expressed in most tissues and in blood platelets. The metabolites derived from COX-1 are probably involved in cellular housekeeping functions. COX-2 is expressed only following cellular activation by inflammatory stimuli and is thought to be involved in inflammation. METHODS: The expression of COX-1 and COX-2 isoenzymes has been studied in the bronchial mucosa of 10 normal and 18 asthmatic subjects, 11 of whom had aspirin-sensitive asthma (ASA) and seven had non-aspirin-sensitive asthma (NASA) RESULTS: There was a significant fourfold and 14-fold increase, respectively, in the epithelial and submucosal cellular expression of COX-2, but not of COX- 1, in asthmatic patients. There was no significant difference in the total number of cells staining for either COX-1 or COX-2 between subjects with ASA and NASA, but the number and percentage of mast cells that expressed COX-2 was significantly increased sixfold and twofold, respectively, in individuals with ASA. There was a mean fourfold increase in the percentage of COX-2 expressing cells that were mast cells in subjects with ASA and the number of eosinophils expressing COX- 2 was increased 2.5-fold in these subjects. CONCLUSION: COX-2-derived metabolites may play an essential part in the inflammatory processes present in asthmatic airways and development of drugs targeted at this isoenzyme may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of asthma. Mast cells and eosinophils may also have a central role in the pathology of aspirin-sensitive asthma. 


 PMID:9487340

  12. MCCB warm adjustment testing concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdei, Z.; Horgos, M.; Grib, A.; Preradović, D. M.; Rodic, V.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation in to operating of thermal protection device behavior from an MCCB (Molded Case Circuit Breaker). One of the main functions of the circuit breaker is to assure protection for the circuits where mounted in for possible overloads of the circuit. The tripping mechanism for the overload protection is based on a bimetal movement during a specific time frame. This movement needs to be controlled and as a solution to control this movement we choose the warm adjustment concept. This concept is meant to improve process capability control and final output. The warm adjustment device design will create a unique adjustment of the bimetal position for each individual breaker, determined when the testing current will flow thru a phase which needs to trip in a certain amount of time. This time is predetermined due to scientific calculation for all standard types of amperages and complies with the IEC 60497 standard requirements.

  13. Social Support, Self-Esteem, and Stress as Predictors of Adjustment to University among First-Year Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Laura J.; Reid, Graham J.; Shupak, Naomi; Cribbie, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The current study examined the joint effects of stress, social support, and self-esteem on adjustment to university. First-year undergraduate students (N = 115) were assessed during the first semester and again 10 weeks later, during the second semester of the academic year. Multiple regressions predicting adjustment to university from perceived…

  14. Effects of COX-2 inhibition on spinal nociception: the role of endocannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Staniaszek, LE; Norris, LM; Kendall, DA; Barrett, DA; Chapman, V

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Recent studies suggest that the effects of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition are mediated by cannabinoid receptor activation. However, some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase, which regulates levels of some endocannabinoids. Whether COX-2 directly regulates levels of endocannabinoids in vivo is unclear. Here, the effect of the COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide, which does not inhibit fatty acid amide hydrolase, on spinal nociceptive processing was determined. Effects of nimesulide on tissue levels of endocannabinoids and related compounds were measured and the role of cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors was determined. Experimental approach: Effects of spinal and peripheral administration of nimesulide (1–100 µg per 50 µL) on mechanically evoked responses of rat dorsal horn neurones were measured, and the contribution of the CB1 receptor was determined with the antagonist AM251 (N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(-4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide), in anaesthetized rats. Effects of nimesulide on spinal levels of endocannabinoids and related compounds were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Key results: Spinal, but not peripheral, injection of nimesulide (1–100 µg per 50 µL) significantly reduced mechanically evoked responses of dorsal horn neurones. Inhibitory effects of spinal nimesulide were blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (1 µg per 50 µL), but spinal levels of endocannabinoids were not elevated. Indeed, both anandamide and N-oleoylethanolamide (OEA) were significantly decreased by nimesulide. Conclusions and implications: Although the inhibitory effects of COX-2 blockade on spinal neuronal responses by nimesulide were dependent on CB1 receptors, we did not detect a concomitant elevation in anandamide or 2-AG. Further understanding of the complexities of endocannabinoid catabolism by multiple enzymes is essential to

  15. Within-herd heritability estimated with daughter-parent regression for yield and somatic cell score.

    PubMed

    Dechow, C D; Norman, H D

    2007-01-01

    Estimates of heritability within herd (h(WH)(2) ) that were generated with daughter-dam regression, daughter-sire regression, and REML were compared, and effects of adjusting lactation records for within-herd heritability on genetic evaluations were evaluated. Holstein records for milk, fat, and protein yields and somatic cell score (SCS) from the USDA national database represented herds in the US Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, and West. Four data subsets (457 to 499 herds) were randomly selected, and a large-herd subset included the 15 largest herds from the West and 10 largest herds from other regions. Subset heritabilities for yield and SCS were estimated assuming a regression model that included fixed covariates for effects of dam yield or SCS, sire predicted transmitting ability (PTA) for yield or SCS, herd-year-season of calving, and age within parity. Dam records and sire PTA were nested within herd as random covariates to generate within-herd heritability estimates that were regressed toward mean h(WH)(2) for the random subset. Heritabilities were estimated with REML using sire models (REML(SIRE)), sire-maternal grandsire models (REML(MGS)), and animal models (REML(ANIM)) for each herd individually in the large-herd subset. Phenotypic variance for each herd was estimated from herd residual variance after adjusting for effects of year-season and age within parity. Deviations from herd-year-season mean were standardized to constant genetic variance across herds, and records were weighted according to estimated error variance to accommodate h(WH)(2) when estimating breeding values. Mean h(WH)(2) tended to be higher with daughter-dam regression (0.35 for milk yield) than with daughter-sire regression (0.24 for milk yield). Heritability estimates varied widely across herds (0.04 to 0.67 for milk yield estimated with daughter-dam regression), and h(WH)(2) deviated from subset means more for large herds than for small herds. Correlation with REML(ANIM) h(WH)(2

  16. Convective adjustment in baroclinic atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    1986-01-01

    Local convection in planetary atmospheres is generally considered to result from the action of gravity on small regions of anomalous density. That in rotating baroclinic fluids the total potential energy for small scale convection contains a centrifugal as well as a gravitational contribution is shown. Convective adjustment in such an atmosphere results in the establishment of near adiabatic lapse rates of temperature along suitably defined surfaces of constant angular momentum, rather than in the vertical. This leads in general to sub-adiabatic vertical lapse rates. That such an adjustment actually occurs in the earth's atmosphere is shown by example and the magnitude of the effect for several other planetary atmospheres is estimated.

  17. Risk Adjustment for Medicare Total Knee Arthroplasty Bundled Payments.

    PubMed

    Clement, R Carter; Derman, Peter B; Kheir, Michael M; Soo, Adrianne E; Flynn, David N; Levin, L Scott; Fleisher, Lee

    2016-09-01

    The use of bundled payments is growing because of their potential to align providers and hospitals on the goal of cost reduction. However, such gain sharing could incentivize providers to "cherry-pick" more profitable patients. Risk adjustment can prevent this unintended consequence, yet most bundling programs include minimal adjustment techniques. This study was conducted to determine how bundled payments for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) should be adjusted for risk. The authors collected financial data for all Medicare patients (age≥65 years) undergoing primary unilateral TKA at an academic center over a period of 2 years (n=941). Multivariate regression was performed to assess the effect of patient factors on the costs of acute inpatient care, including unplanned 30-day readmissions. This analysis mirrors a bundling model used in the Medicare Bundled Payments for Care Improvement initiative. Increased age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, and the presence of a Medicare Major Complications/Comorbid Conditions (MCC) modifier (typically representing major complications) were associated with increased costs (regression coefficients, $57 per year; $729 per ASA class beyond I; and $3122 for patients meeting MCC criteria; P=.003, P=.001, and P<.001, respectively). Differences in costs were not associated with body mass index, sex, or race. If the results are generalizable, Medicare bundled payments for TKA encompassing acute inpatient care should be adjusted upward by the stated amounts for older patients, those with elevated ASA class, and patients meeting MCC criteria. This is likely an underestimate for many bundling models, including the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement program, incorporating varying degrees of postacute care. Failure to adjust for factors that affect costs may create adverse incentives, creating barriers to care for certain patient populations. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):e911-e916.]. PMID:27359282

  18. Can Quiet Standing Posture Predict Compensatory Postural Adjustment?

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Gabriel Bueno Lahóz; Siqueira, Cássio Marinho; Caffaro, Renê Rogieri; Fu, Carolina; Tanaka, Clarice

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to analyze whether quiet standing posture is related to compensatory postural adjustment. INTRODUCTION The latest data in clinical practice suggests that static posture may play a significant role in musculoskeletal function, even in dynamic activities. However, no evidence exists regarding whether static posture during quiet standing is related to postural adjustment. METHODS Twenty healthy participants standing on a movable surface underwent unexpected, standardized backward and forward postural perturbations while kinematic data were acquired; ankle, knee, pelvis and trunk positions were then calculated. An initial and a final video frame representing quiet standing posture and the end of the postural perturbation were selected in such a way that postural adjustments had occurred between these frames. The positions of the body segments were calculated in these initial and final frames, together with the displacement of body segments during postural adjustments between the initial and final frames. The relationship between the positions of body segments in the initial and final frames and their displacements over this time period was analyzed using multiple regressions with a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. RESULTS We failed to identify a relationship between the position of the body segments in the initial and final frames and the associated displacement of the body segments. DISCUSSION The motion pattern during compensatory postural adjustment is not related to quiet standing posture or to the final posture of compensatory postural adjustment. This fact should be considered when treating balance disturbances and musculoskeletal abnormalities. CONCLUSION Static posture cannot predict how body segments will behave during compensatory postural adjustment. PMID:19690665

  19. An empirical evaluation of spatial regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaolu; Asami, Yasushi; Chung, Chang-Jo F.

    2006-10-01

    Conventional statistical methods are often ineffective to evaluate spatial regression models. One reason is that spatial regression models usually have more parameters or smaller sample sizes than a simple model, so their degree of freedom is reduced. Thus, it is often unlikely to evaluate them based on traditional tests. Another reason, which is theoretically associated with statistical methods, is that statistical criteria are crucially dependent on such assumptions as normality, independence, and homogeneity. This may create problems because the assumptions are open for testing. In view of these problems, this paper proposes an alternative empirical evaluation method. To illustrate the idea, a few hedonic regression models for a house and land price data set are evaluated, including a simple, ordinary linear regression model and three spatial models. Their performance as to how well the price of the house and land can be predicted is examined. With a cross-validation technique, the prices at each sample point are predicted with a model estimated with the samples excluding the one being concerned. Then, empirical criteria are established whereby the predicted prices are compared with the real, observed prices. The proposed method provides an objective guidance for the selection of a suitable model specification for a data set. Moreover, the method is seen as an alternative way to test the significance of the spatial relationships being concerned in spatial regression models.

  20. Response-adaptive regression for longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Müller, Hans-Georg

    2011-09-01

    We propose a response-adaptive model for functional linear regression, which is adapted to sparsely sampled longitudinal responses. Our method aims at predicting response trajectories and models the regression relationship by directly conditioning the sparse and irregular observations of the response on the predictor, which can be of scalar, vector, or functional type. This obliterates the need to model the response trajectories, a task that is challenging for sparse longitudinal data and was previously required for functional regression implementations for longitudinal data. The proposed approach turns out to be superior compared to previous functional regression approaches in terms of prediction error. It encompasses a variety of regression settings that are relevant for the functional modeling of longitudinal data in the life sciences. The improved prediction of response trajectories with the proposed response-adaptive approach is illustrated for a longitudinal study of Kiwi weight growth and by an analysis of the dynamic relationship between viral load and CD4 cell counts observed in AIDS clinical trials. PMID:21133880

  1. Mental chronometry with simple linear regression.

    PubMed

    Chen, J Y

    1997-10-01

    Typically, mental chronometry is performed by means of introducing an independent variable postulated to affect selectively some stage of a presumed multistage process. However, the effect could be a global one that spreads proportionally over all stages of the process. Currently, there is no method to test this possibility although simple linear regression might serve the purpose. In the present study, the regression approach was tested with tasks (memory scanning and mental rotation) that involved a selective effect and with a task (word superiority effect) that involved a global effect, by the dominant theories. The results indicate (1) the manipulation of the size of a memory set or of angular disparity affects the intercept of the regression function that relates the times for memory scanning with different set sizes or for mental rotation with different angular disparities and (2) the manipulation of context affects the slope of the regression function that relates the times for detecting a target character under word and nonword conditions. These ratify the regression approach as a useful method for doing mental chronometry. PMID:9347535

  2. Hierarchical regression for analyses of multiple outcomes.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David B; Hamra, Ghassan B; MacLehose, Richard F; Cole, Stephen R; Chu, Haitao

    2015-09-01

    In cohort mortality studies, there often is interest in associations between an exposure of primary interest and mortality due to a range of different causes. A standard approach to such analyses involves fitting a separate regression model for each type of outcome. However, the statistical precision of some estimated associations may be poor because of sparse data. In this paper, we describe a hierarchical regression model for estimation of parameters describing outcome-specific relative rate functions and associated credible intervals. The proposed model uses background stratification to provide flexible control for the outcome-specific associations of potential confounders, and it employs a hierarchical "shrinkage" approach to stabilize estimates of an exposure's associations with mortality due to different causes of death. The approach is illustrated in analyses of cancer mortality in 2 cohorts: a cohort of dioxin-exposed US chemical workers and a cohort of radiation-exposed Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Compared with standard regression estimates of associations, hierarchical regression yielded estimates with improved precision that tended to have less extreme values. The hierarchical regression approach also allowed the fitting of models with effect-measure modification. The proposed hierarchical approach can yield estimates of association that are more precise than conventional estimates when one wishes to estimate associations with multiple outcomes. PMID:26232395

  3. MULTILINEAR TENSOR REGRESSION FOR LONGITUDINAL RELATIONAL DATA

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental aspect of relational data, such as from a social network, is the possibility of dependence among the relations. In particular, the relations between members of one pair of nodes may have an effect on the relations between members of another pair. This article develops a type of regression model to estimate such effects in the context of longitudinal and multivariate relational data, or other data that can be represented in the form of a tensor. The model is based on a general multilinear tensor regression model, a special case of which is a tensor autoregression model in which the tensor of relations at one time point are parsimoniously regressed on relations from previous time points. This is done via a separable, or Kronecker-structured, regression parameter along with a separable covariance model. In the context of an analysis of longitudinal multivariate relational data, it is shown how the multilinear tensor regression model can represent patterns that often appear in relational and network data, such as reciprocity and transitivity. PMID:27458495

  4. Adjustable-Angle Drill Block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Adjustable angular drill block accurately transfers hole patterns from mating surfaces not normal to each other. Block applicable to transfer of nonperpendicular holes in mating contoured assemblies in aircraft industry. Also useful in general manufacturing to transfer mating installation holes to irregular and angular surfaces.

  5. Economic Pressures and Family Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haccoun, Dorothy Markiewicz; Ledingham, Jane E.

    The relationships between economic stress on the family and child and parental adjustment were examined for a sample of 199 girls and boys in grades one, four, and seven. These associations were examined separately for families in which both parents were present and in which mothers only were at home. Economic stress was associated with boys'…

  6. Cyclical DNA Methylation and Histone Changes Are Induced by LPS to Activate COX-2 in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brancaccio, Mariarita; Coretti, Lorena; Florio, Ermanno; Pezone, Antonio; Calabrò, Viola; Falco, Geppino; Keller, Simona; Lembo, Francesca; Avvedimento, Vittorio Enrico; Chiariotti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces release of inflammatory mediators both in immune and epithelial cells. We investigated whether changes of epigenetic marks, including selected histone modification and DNA methylation, may drive or accompany the activation of COX-2 gene in HT-29 human intestinal epithelial cells upon exposure to LPS. Here we describe cyclical histone acetylation (H3), methylation (H3K4, H3K9, H3K27) and DNA methylation changes occurring at COX-2 gene promoter overtime after LPS stimulation. Histone K27 methylation changes are carried out by the H3 demethylase JMJD3 and are essential for COX-2 induction by LPS. The changes of the histone code are associated with cyclical methylation signatures at the promoter and gene body of COX-2 gene. PMID:27253528

  7. Development of Antioxidant COX-2 Inhibitors as Radioprotective Agents for Radiation Therapy—A Hypothesis-Driven Review

    PubMed Central

    Laube, Markus; Kniess, Torsten; Pietzsch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) evolved to be a primary treatment modality for cancer patients. Unfortunately, the cure or relief of symptoms is still accompanied by radiation-induced side effects with severe acute and late pathophysiological consequences. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are potentially useful in this regard because radioprotection of normal tissue and/or radiosensitizing effects on tumor tissue have been described for several compounds of this structurally diverse class. This review aims to substantiate the hypothesis that antioxidant COX-2 inhibitors are promising radioprotectants because of intercepting radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in normal tissue, especially the vascular system. For this, literature reporting on COX inhibitors exerting radioprotective and/or radiosensitizing action as well as on antioxidant COX inhibitors will be reviewed comprehensively with the aim to find cross-points of both and, by that, stimulate further research in the field of radioprotective agents. PMID:27104573

  8. Uncertainty quantification in DIC with Kriging regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dezhi; DiazDelaO, F. A.; Wang, Weizhuo; Lin, Xiaoshan; Patterson, Eann A.; Mottershead, John E.

    2016-03-01

    A Kriging regression model is developed as a post-processing technique for the treatment of measurement uncertainty in classical subset-based Digital Image Correlation (DIC). Regression is achieved by regularising the sample-point correlation matrix using a local, subset-based, assessment of the measurement error with assumed statistical normality and based on the Sum of Squared Differences (SSD) criterion. This leads to a Kriging-regression model in the form of a Gaussian process representing uncertainty on the Kriging estimate of the measured displacement field. The method is demonstrated using numerical and experimental examples. Kriging estimates of displacement fields are shown to be in excellent agreement with 'true' values for the numerical cases and in the experimental example uncertainty quantification is carried out using the Gaussian random process that forms part of the Kriging model. The root mean square error (RMSE) on the estimated displacements is produced and standard deviations on local strain estimates are determined.

  9. A tutorial on Bayesian Normal linear regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klauenberg, Katy; Wübbeler, Gerd; Mickan, Bodo; Harris, Peter; Elster, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    Regression is a common task in metrology and often applied to calibrate instruments, evaluate inter-laboratory comparisons or determine fundamental constants, for example. Yet, a regression model cannot be uniquely formulated as a measurement function, and consequently the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) and its supplements are not applicable directly. Bayesian inference, however, is well suited to regression tasks, and has the advantage of accounting for additional a priori information, which typically robustifies analyses. Furthermore, it is anticipated that future revisions of the GUM shall also embrace the Bayesian view. Guidance on Bayesian inference for regression tasks is largely lacking in metrology. For linear regression models with Gaussian measurement errors this tutorial gives explicit guidance. Divided into three steps, the tutorial first illustrates how a priori knowledge, which is available from previous experiments, can be translated into prior distributions from a specific class. These prior distributions have the advantage of yielding analytical, closed form results, thus avoiding the need to apply numerical methods such as Markov Chain Monte Carlo. Secondly, formulas for the posterior results are given, explained and illustrated, and software implementations are provided. In the third step, Bayesian tools are used to assess the assumptions behind the suggested approach. These three steps (prior elicitation, posterior calculation, and robustness to prior uncertainty and model adequacy) are critical to Bayesian inference. The general guidance given here for Normal linear regression tasks is accompanied by a simple, but real-world, metrological example. The calibration of a flow device serves as a running example and illustrates the three steps. It is shown that prior knowledge from previous calibrations of the same sonic nozzle enables robust predictions even for extrapolations.

  10. MLREG, stepwise multiple linear regression program

    SciTech Connect

    Carder, J.H.

    1981-09-01

    This program is written in FORTRAN for an IBM computer and performs multiple linear regressions according to a stepwise procedure. The program transforms and combines old variables into new variables, prints input and transformed data, sums, raw sums or squares, residual sum of squares, means and standard deviations, correlation coefficients, regression results at each step, ANOVA at each step, and predicted response results at each step. This package contains an EXEC used to execute the program,sample input data and output listing, source listing, documentation, and card decks containing the EXEC sample input, and FORTRAN source.

  11. Salience Assignment for Multiple-Instance Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Lane, Terran

    2007-01-01

    We present a Multiple-Instance Learning (MIL) algorithm for determining the salience of each item in each bag with respect to the bag's real-valued label. We use an alternating-projections constrained optimization approach to simultaneously learn a regression model and estimate all salience values. We evaluate this algorithm on a significant real-world problem, crop yield modeling, and demonstrate that it provides more extensive, intuitive, and stable salience models than Primary-Instance Regression, which selects a single relevant item from each bag.

  12. Spontaneous regression of a conjunctival naevus.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Shreya; Leyland, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Conjunctival naevi are one of the most common lesions affecting the conjunctiva. While benign in the vast majority of cases, the risk of malignant transformation necessitates regular follow-up. They are well known to increase in size; however, we present the first photo-documented case of spontaneous regression of conjunctival naevus. In most cases, surgical excision is performed due to the clinician's concerns over malignancy. However, a substantial proportion of patients request excision. Highlighting the potential for regression of the lesion is important to ensure patients make an informed decision when contemplating such surgery. PMID:27581234

  13. Removing Malmquist bias from linear regressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verter, Frances

    1993-01-01

    Malmquist bias is present in all astronomical surveys where sources are observed above an apparent brightness threshold. Those sources which can be detected at progressively larger distances are progressively more limited to the intrinsically luminous portion of the true distribution. This bias does not distort any of the measurements, but distorts the sample composition. We have developed the first treatment to correct for Malmquist bias in linear regressions of astronomical data. A demonstration of the corrected linear regression that is computed in four steps is presented.

  14. Multicollinearity in cross-sectional regressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauridsen, Jørgen; Mur, Jesùs

    2006-10-01

    The paper examines robustness of results from cross-sectional regression paying attention to the impact of multicollinearity. It is well known that the reliability of estimators (least-squares or maximum-likelihood) gets worse as the linear relationships between the regressors become more acute. We resolve the discussion in a spatial context, looking closely into the behaviour shown, under several unfavourable conditions, by the most outstanding misspecification tests when collinear variables are added to the regression. A Monte Carlo simulation is performed. The conclusions point to the fact that these statistics react in different ways to the problems posed.

  15. Spontaneous hypnotic age regression: case report.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, D; Rosenfeld, A

    1984-12-01

    Age regression--reliving the past as though it were occurring in the present, with age appropriate vocabulary, mental content, and affect--can occur with instruction in highly hypnotizable individuals, but has rarely been reported to occur spontaneously, especially as a primary symptom. The psychiatric presentation and treatment of a 16-year-old girl with spontaneous age regressions accessible and controllable with hypnosis and psychotherapy are described. Areas of overlap and divergence between this patient's symptoms and those found in patients with hysterical fugue and multiple personality syndrome are also discussed.

  16. COX-2 is involved in vascular oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction of renal interlobar arteries from obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Mercedes; Sánchez, Ana; Pilar Martínez, María; Benedito, Sara; López-Oliva, Maria-Elvira; García-Sacristán, Albino; Hernández, Medardo; Prieto, Dolores

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is related to vascular dysfunction through inflammation and oxidative stress and it has been identified as a risk factor for chronic renal disease. In the present study, we assessed the specific relationships among reactive oxygen species (ROS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and endothelial dysfunction in renal interlobar arteries from a genetic model of obesity/insulin resistance, the obese Zucker rats (OZR). Relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh) were significantly reduced in renal arteries from OZR compared to their counterpart, the lean Zucker rat (LZR), suggesting endothelial dysfunction. Blockade of COX with indomethacin and with the selective blocker of COX-2 restored the relaxations to ACh in obese rats. Selective blockade of the TXA2/PGH2 (TP) receptor enhanced ACh relaxations only in OZR, while inhibition of the prostacyclin (PGI2) receptor (IP) enhanced basal tone and inhibited ACh vasodilator responses only in LZR. Basal production of superoxide was increased in arteries of OZR and involved NADPH and xanthine oxidase activation and NOS uncoupling. Under conditions of NOS blockade, ACh induced vasoconstriction and increased ROS generation that were augmented in arteries from OZR and blunted by COX-2 inhibition and by the ROS scavenger tempol. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) evoked both endothelium- and vascular smooth muscle (VSM)-dependent contractions, as well as ROS generation that was reduced by COX-2 inhibition. In addition, COX-2 expression was enhanced in both VSM and endothelium of renal arteries from OZR. These results suggest that increased COX-2-dependent vasoconstriction contributes to renal endothelial dysfunction through enhanced (ROS) generation in obesity. COX-2 activity is in turn upregulated by ROS.

  17. Modulation of IgE-dependent COX-2 gene expression by reactive oxygen species in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Vega, Antonio; Chacón, Pedro; Alba, Gonzalo; El Bekay, Rajaa; Martín-Nieto, José; Sobrino, Francisco

    2006-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key enzyme in prostaglandin (PG) synthesis. Up-regulation of its COX-2 isoform is responsible for the increased PG release, taking place under inflammatory conditions, and also, is thought to be involved in allergic and inflammatory diseases. In the present work, we demonstrate that COX-2 expression becomes highly induced by anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies and by antigens in human neutrophils from allergic patients. This induction was detected at mRNA and protein levels and was accompanied by a concomitant PGE(2) and thromboxane A(2) release. We also show evidence that inhibitors of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, such as 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulphonyl fluoride and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyaceto-phenone, completely cancelled anti-IgE-induced COX-2 protein up-regulation, suggesting that this process is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from NADPH oxidase activity. Moreover, the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and also, the transcription factor, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, are involved in the up-regulation of COX-2 expression, as specific chemical inhibitors of these two kinases, such as SB203580 and PD098059, and of the NF-kappaB pathway, such as N(alpha)-benzyloxycarbonyl-l-leucyl-l-leucyl-l-leucinal, abolished IgE-dependent COX-2 induction. Evidence is also presented, using Fe(2)(+)/Cu(2)(+) ions, that hydroxyl radicals generated from hydrogen peroxide through Fenton reactions could constitute candidate modulators able to directly trigger anti-IgE-elicited COX-2 expression through MAPK and NF-kappaB pathways. Present results underscore a new role for ROS as second messengers in the modulation of COX-2 expression by human neutrophils in allergic conditions.

  18. Analysis of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX1) gene reveals the unique evolution of the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yao-Dong; Pang, Hui-Zhong; Li, De-Sheng; Ling, Shan-Shan; Lan, Dan; Wang, Ye; Zhu, Yun; Li, Di-Yan; Wei, Rong-Ping; Zhang, He-Min; Wang, Cheng-Dong

    2016-11-01

    As the rate-limiting enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cytochrome c oxidase (COX) plays a crucial role in biological metabolism. "Living fossil" giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is well-known for its special bamboo diet. In an effort to explore functional variation of COX1 in the energy metabolism behind giant panda's low-energy bamboo diet, we looked at genetic variation of COX1 gene in giant panda, and tested for its selection effect. In 1545 base pairs of the gene from 15 samples, 9 positions were variable and 1 mutation leaded to an amino acid sequence change. COX1 gene produces six haplotypes, nucleotide (pi), haplotype diversity (Hd). In addition, the average number of nucleotide differences (k) is 0.001629±0.001036, 0.8083±0.0694 and 2.517, respectively. Also, dN/dS ratio is significantly below 1. These results indicated that giant panda had a low population genetic diversity, and an obvious purifying selection of the COX1 gene which reduces synthesis of ATP determines giant panda's low-energy bamboo diet. Phylogenetic trees based on the COX1 gene were constructed to demonstrate that giant panda is the sister group of other Ursidae.

  19. Analysis of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX1) gene reveals the unique evolution of the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yao-Dong; Pang, Hui-Zhong; Li, De-Sheng; Ling, Shan-Shan; Lan, Dan; Wang, Ye; Zhu, Yun; Li, Di-Yan; Wei, Rong-Ping; Zhang, He-Min; Wang, Cheng-Dong

    2016-11-01

    As the rate-limiting enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cytochrome c oxidase (COX) plays a crucial role in biological metabolism. "Living fossil" giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is well-known for its special bamboo diet. In an effort to explore functional variation of COX1 in the energy metabolism behind giant panda's low-energy bamboo diet, we looked at genetic variation of COX1 gene in giant panda, and tested for its selection effect. In 1545 base pairs of the gene from 15 samples, 9 positions were variable and 1 mutation leaded to an amino acid sequence change. COX1 gene produces six haplotypes, nucleotide (pi), haplotype diversity (Hd). In addition, the average number of nucleotide differences (k) is 0.001629±0.001036, 0.8083±0.0694 and 2.517, respectively. Also, dN/dS ratio is significantly below 1. These results indicated that giant panda had a low population genetic diversity, and an obvious purifying selection of the COX1 gene which reduces synthesis of ATP determines giant panda's low-energy bamboo diet. Phylogenetic trees based on the COX1 gene were constructed to demonstrate that giant panda is the sister group of other Ursidae. PMID:27421668

  20. UVB-induced COX-2 expression requires histone H3 phosphorylation at Ser10 and Ser28

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Young-Sam; Kim, Hong-Gyum; Bode, Ann M.; Surh, Young-Joon; Dong, Zigang

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible enzyme that contributes to the generation of chronic inflammation in response to chemical carcinogens and environmental stresses, including ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. Although post-translational histone modifications are believed to play an important role in modulating transcriptional regulation of UVB-induced COX-2, the underlying biochemical mechanisms are completely unknown. Here, we show that UVB activates the p38 MAPK/MSK1 kinase cascade to phosphorylate histone H3 at Ser10 and Ser28, contributing to UVB-induced COX-2 expression. UVB has no effect on the global trimethylation level of histone H3 (H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3). We observed that selected mammalian 14-3-3 proteins bind to UVB-induced phosphorylated histone H3 (Ser10 and Ser28). In particular, 14-3-3ε is critical for recruiting MSK1 and Cdk9 to the chromatin and subsequently phosphorylating the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II in the cox-2 promoter. We propose that histone H3 phosphorylation at Ser10 and Ser28 serve as critical switches to promote cox-2 gene expression by facilitating the recruitment of MSK1 and Cdk9 to the cox-2 promoter, thereby promoting RNA polymerase II phosphorylation. PMID:22391560