Science.gov

Sample records for adjusted death rates

  1. QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates* for Top Five Causes of Cancer Death,(†) by Race/Hispanic Ethnicity - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-09-16

    In 2014, the top five causes of cancer deaths for the total population were lung, colorectal, female breast, pancreatic, and prostate cancer. The non-Hispanic black population had the highest age-adjusted death rates for each of these five cancers, followed by non-Hispanic white and Hispanic groups. The age-adjusted death rate for lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death in all groups, was 42.1 per 100,000 standard population for the total population, 45.4 for non-Hispanic white, 45.7 for non-Hispanic black, and 18.3 for Hispanic populations.

  2. Comparison of hurricane exposure methods and associations with county fetal death rates, adjusting for environmental quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse effects of hurricanes are increasing as coastal populations grow and events become more severe. Hurricane exposure during pregnancy can influence fetal death rates through mechanisms related to healthcare, infrastructure disruption, nutrition, and injury. Estimation of hu...

  3. QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates* for Females Aged 15-44 Years, by the Five Leading Causes of Death(†) - United States, 1999 and 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The age-adjusted death rate for females aged 15-44 years was 5% lower in 2014 (82.1 per 100,000 population) than in 1999 (86.5). Among the five leading causes of death, the age-adjusted rates of three were lower in 2014 than in 1999: cancer (from 19.6 to 15.3, a 22% decline), heart disease (8.9 to 8.2, an 8% decline), and homicide (4.2 to 2.8, a 33% decline). The age-adjusted death rates for two of the five causes were higher in 2014 than in 1999: unintentional injuries (from 17.0 to 20.1, an 18% increase) and suicide (4.8 to 6.5, a 35% increase). Unintentional injuries replaced cancer as the leading cause of death in this demographic group.

  4. QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates* for Males Aged 15-44 Years, by the Five Leading Causes of Death(†) - United States, 1999 and 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-08-12

    The age-adjusted death rate for males aged 15-44 years was 10% lower in 2014 (156.6 per 100,000 population) than in 1999 (174.1). Among the five leading causes of death, the age-adjusted rates for three were lower in 2014 than in 1999: cancer (from 17.1 to 12.8; 25% decline), heart disease (20.1 to 17.0; 15% decline), and homicide (15.7 to 13.8; 12% decline). The age-adjusted death rates for two of the five causes were higher in 2014 than in 1999: suicide (20.1 to 22.5; 12% increase), and unintentional injuries (from 48.7 to 51.0; 5% increase).

  5. Adolescent Adjustment Before and After HIV-Related Parental Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Weiss, Robert; Alber, Susan; Lester, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    The impact of HIV-related parental death on 414 adolescents was examined over a period of 6 years. The adjustment of bereaved adolescents was compared over 4 time periods relative to parental death and was also compared with the adjustment of nonbereaved adolescents. Bereaved adolescents had significantly more emotional distress, negative life…

  6. Death rate variation in US subpopulations.

    PubMed Central

    Kindig, David A.; Seplaki, Christopher L.; Libby, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To account for variations in death rates in population subgroups of the USA. METHODS: Factors associated with age-adjusted death rates in 366 metropolitan and non- metropolitan areas of the United States were examined for 1990-92. The rates ranged from 690 to 1108 per 100 000 population (mean = 885 +/- 78 per 100 000). FINDINGS: Least squares regression analysis explained 71% of this variance. Factors with the strongest independent positive association were ethnicity (African-American), less than a high school education, high Medicare expenditures, and location in western or southern regions. Factors with the strongest independent negative associations were employment in agriculture and forestry, ethnicity (Hispanic) and per capita income. CONCLUSION: Additional research at the individual level is needed to determine if these associations are causal, since some of the factors with the strongest associations, such as education, have long latency periods. PMID:11884968

  7. Standardization of age-adjusted mortality rates

    SciTech Connect

    Selvin, S.; Sacks, S.T.; Merrill, D.W.

    1980-02-01

    Because age is a significant variable in the occurrence and frequency of human disease, any comparison of disease or mortality rates, to be useful, must be age-specific or age-adjusted. Age-specific comparisons are not always appropriate or possible, however. A common method of eliminating the influence of age in comparing mortality rates from one community to another is to employ statistical methods of age-adjustment. While a variety of methods will accomplish this task, most are weighted averages of the age-specific rates. Two widely used adjustment procedures are direct and indirect age-adjustment.

  8. Does religiosity help Muslims adjust to death?: a research note.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Samir; Siddique, Mohammad Zakaria

    2008-01-01

    Death is the end of life. But Muslims believe death is an event between two lives, not an absolute cessation of life. Thus religiosity may influence Muslims differently about death. To explore the impact of religious perception, thus religiosity, a cross-sectional, descriptive, analytic and correlational study was conducted on 150 Muslims. Self-declared healthy Muslims equally from both sexes (N = 150, Age range--20 to 50 years, Minimum education--Bachelor) were selected by stratified sampling and randomly under each stratum. Subjects, divided in five levels of religiosity, were assessed and scored for the presence of maladjustment symptoms and stage of adjustment with death. ANOVA and correlation coefficient was applied on the sets of data collected. All statistical tests were done at the level of 95% confidence (P < 0.05). Final results were higher than the table values used for ANOVA and correlation coefficient yielded P values of < 0.05, < 0.01, and < 0.001. Religiosity as a criterion of Muslims influenced the quality of adjustment with death positively. So we hypothesized that religiosity may help Muslims adjust to death.

  9. 39 CFR 3010.28 - Maximum size of unused rate adjustment authority rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum size of unused rate adjustment authority... REGULATION OF RATES FOR MARKET DOMINANT PRODUCTS Rules for Applying the Price Cap § 3010.28 Maximum size of... of rate adjustments for any class in any 12-month period may not exceed the applicable...

  10. 39 CFR 3010.28 - Maximum size of unused rate adjustment authority rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maximum size of unused rate adjustment authority... REGULATION OF RATES FOR MARKET DOMINANT PRODUCTS Rules for Applying the Price Cap § 3010.28 Maximum size of... of rate adjustments for any class in any 12-month period may not exceed the applicable...

  11. 39 CFR 3010.28 - Maximum size of unused rate adjustment authority rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maximum size of unused rate adjustment authority... REGULATION OF RATES FOR MARKET DOMINANT PRODUCTS Rules for Applying the Price Cap § 3010.28 Maximum size of... of rate adjustments for any class in any 12-month period may not exceed the applicable...

  12. 76 FR 7883 - Postal Service Rate Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... as a functionally equivalent agreement under the Inbound Multi-Service Agreements with Foreign Postal... Service of Type 2 Rate Adjustment, and Notice of Filing Functionally Equivalent Agreement, January 31... Foreign Postal Operators 1 product and two functionally equivalent agreements, Strategic...

  13. Risk adjustment for a children's capitation rate.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, J P; Sloss, E M; Manning, W G; Keeler, E B

    1993-01-01

    Few capitation arrangements vary premiums by a child's health characteristics, yielding an incentive to discriminate against children with predictably high expenditures from chronic diseases. In this article, we explore risk adjusters for the 35 percent of the variance in annual out-patient expenditure we find to be potentially predictable. Demographic factors such as age and gender only explain 5 percent of such variance; health status measures explain 25 percent, prior use and health status measures together explain 65 to 70 percent. The profit from risk selection falls less than proportionately with improved ability to adjust for risk. Partial capitation rates may be necessary to mitigate skimming and dumping.

  14. Adjustable flow rate controller for polymer solutions

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Kenneth M.

    1981-01-01

    An adjustable device for controlling the flow rate of polymer solutions which results in only little shearing of the polymer molecules, said device comprising an inlet manifold, an outlet manifold, a plurality of tubes capable of providing communication between said inlet and outlet manifolds, said tubes each having an internal diameter that is smaller than that of the inlet manifold and large enough to insure that viscosity of the polymer solution passing through each said tube will not be reduced more than about 25 percent, and a valve associated with each tube, said valve being capable of opening or closing communication in that tube between the inlet and outlet manifolds, each said valve when fully open having a diameter that is substantially at least as great as that of the tube with which it is associated.

  15. Cancer death rates in US congressional districts.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Rebecca L; Sahar, Liora; Portier, Kenneth M; Ward, Elizabeth M; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the cancer burden is important for informing and advocating cancer prevention and control. Mortality data are readily available for states and counties, but not for congressional districts, from which representatives are elected and which may be more influential in compelling legislation and policy. The authors calculated average annual cancer death rates during 2002 to 2011 for each of the 435 congressional districts using mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics and population estimates from the US Census Bureau. Age-standardized death rates were mapped for all sites combined and separately for cancers of the lung and bronchus, colorectum, breast, and prostate by race/ethnicity and sex. Overall cancer death rates vary by almost 2-fold and are generally lowest in Mountain states and highest in Appalachia and areas of the South. The distribution is similar for lung and colorectal cancers, with the lowest rates consistently noted in districts in Utah. However, for breast and prostate cancers, while the highest rates are again scattered throughout the South, the geographic pattern is less clear and the lowest rates are in Hawaii and southern Texas and Florida. Within-state heterogeneity is limited, particularly for men, with the exceptions of Texas, Georgia, and Florida. Patterns also vary by race/ethnicity. For example, the highest prostate cancer death rates are in the West and north central United States among non-Hispanic whites, but in the deep South among African Americans. Hispanics have the lowest rates except for colorectal cancer in Wyoming, eastern Colorado, and northern New Mexico. These data can facilitate cancer control and stimulate conversation about the relationship between cancer and policies that influence access to health care and the prevalence of behavioral and environmental risk factors.

  16. Lung cancer death rates fall, helping drive decrease in overall cancer death rates

    Cancer.gov

    The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, covering the period 1975–2010, showed death rates for lung cancer, which accounts for more than one in four cancer deaths, dropping at a faster pace than in previous years.

  17. Associations between Periodontal Microbiota and Death Rates

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chung-Jung; Chang, Min-Lee; Taylor, Allen

    2016-01-01

    It is conceived that specific combinations of periodontal bacteria are associated with risk for the various forms of periodontitis. We hypothesized that such specificity is also related to human cause-specific death rates. We tested this hypothesis in a representative sample of the US population followed for a mean duration of 11 years and found that two specific patterns of 21 serum antibodies against periodontal bacteria were significantly associated with increased all-cause and/or diabetes-related mortalities. These data suggested that specific combinations of periodontal bacteria, even without inducing clinically significant periodontitis, may have a significant impact on human cause-specific death rates. Our findings implied that increased disease and mortality risk could be transmittable via the transfer of oral microbiota, and that developing personalized strategies and maintaining healthy oral microbiota beyond protection against periodontitis would be important to manage the risk. PMID:27748442

  18. 5 CFR 9701.322 - Setting and adjusting rate ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Setting and adjusting rate ranges. 9701... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Setting and Adjusting Rate Ranges § 9701.322 Setting and adjusting rate ranges. (a) Within its sole and exclusive discretion, DHS...

  19. 5 CFR 9701.322 - Setting and adjusting rate ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Setting and adjusting rate ranges. 9701... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Setting and Adjusting Rate Ranges § 9701.322 Setting and adjusting rate ranges. (a) Within its sole and exclusive discretion, DHS...

  20. 5 CFR 9701.322 - Setting and adjusting rate ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Setting and adjusting rate ranges. 9701... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Setting and Adjusting Rate Ranges § 9701.322 Setting and adjusting rate ranges. (a) Within its sole and exclusive discretion, DHS...

  1. 5 CFR 9901.322 - Setting and adjusting rate ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Setting and adjusting rate ranges. 9901... Increases § 9901.322 Setting and adjusting rate ranges. (a) Subject to § 9901.105, the Secretary may set and... factors. (b) The Secretary may determine the effective date of newly set or adjusted band rate...

  2. 5 CFR 880.207 - Adjustment of accounts after finding of death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adjustment of accounts after finding of death. 880.207 Section 880.207 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... Procedures § 880.207 Adjustment of accounts after finding of death. After a missing annuitant is...

  3. 5 CFR 880.207 - Adjustment of accounts after finding of death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adjustment of accounts after finding of death. 880.207 Section 880.207 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... Procedures § 880.207 Adjustment of accounts after finding of death. After a missing annuitant is...

  4. 5 CFR 880.207 - Adjustment of accounts after finding of death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adjustment of accounts after finding of death. 880.207 Section 880.207 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... Procedures § 880.207 Adjustment of accounts after finding of death. After a missing annuitant is...

  5. 5 CFR 880.207 - Adjustment of accounts after finding of death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Procedures § 880.207 Adjustment of accounts after finding of death. After a missing annuitant is determined... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adjustment of accounts after finding of death. 880.207 Section 880.207 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED)...

  6. 5 CFR 880.207 - Adjustment of accounts after finding of death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Procedures § 880.207 Adjustment of accounts after finding of death. After a missing annuitant is determined... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adjustment of accounts after finding of death. 880.207 Section 880.207 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED)...

  7. 7 CFR 4287.112 - Interest rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... variable rates to reduce the borrower's interest rate only when the variable rate has a ceiling which is less than or equal to the original fixed rate. (2) Variable rates can be changed to a fixed rate which is at or below the current variable rate. (3) The interest rates, after adjustments, must comply...

  8. 7 CFR 4287.112 - Interest rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... variable rates to reduce the borrower's interest rate only when the variable rate has a ceiling which is less than or equal to the original fixed rate. (2) Variable rates can be changed to a fixed rate which is at or below the current variable rate. (3) The interest rates, after adjustments, must comply...

  9. 5 CFR 9901.322 - Setting and adjusting rate ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Setting and adjusting rate ranges. 9901... NATIONAL SECURITY PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) Pay and Pay Administration Rate Ranges and General Salary Increases § 9901.322 Setting and adjusting rate ranges. (a) Subject to § 9901.105, the Secretary may set...

  10. 10 CFR 903.11 - Advance announcement of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advance announcement of rate adjustment. 903.11 Section 903.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska, Southeastern, Southwestern,...

  11. 10 CFR 903.11 - Advance announcement of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advance announcement of rate adjustment. 903.11 Section 903.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska, Southeastern, Southwestern,...

  12. 10 CFR 903.11 - Advance announcement of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advance announcement of rate adjustment. 903.11 Section 903.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska, Southeastern, Southwestern,...

  13. 10 CFR 436.22 - Adjusted internal rate of return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Methodology and Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.22 Adjusted internal rate of return. The adjusted internal rate of return is the overall rate of return on an energy or water conservation measure... yearly net savings in energy or water and non-fuel or non-water operation and maintenance...

  14. 10 CFR 436.22 - Adjusted internal rate of return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Methodology and Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.22 Adjusted internal rate of return. The adjusted internal rate of return is the overall rate of return on an energy or water conservation measure... yearly net savings in energy or water and non-fuel or non-water operation and maintenance...

  15. Higher Death Rate Among Youth With First Episode Psychosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Releases News Release Thursday, April 6, 2017 Higher death rate among youth with first episode psychosis NIH- ... experiencing first episode psychosis have a much higher death rate than previously thought. Researchers analyzed data on ...

  16. Rates of Early Deaths Rise for Whites, Drop for Blacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163236.html Rates of Early Deaths Rise for Whites, Drop for Blacks Drug overdoses, ... 2017 WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Premature death rates in the United States have fallen for ...

  17. Early Parental Adjustment and Bereavement after Childhood Cancer Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Maru; O'connor, Kathleen; D'Agostino, Norma Mammone; Spencer, Lynlee; Nicholas, David; Jovcevska, Vesna; Tallet, Susan; Schneiderman, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This study comprehensively explored parental bereavement and adjustment at 6 months post-loss due to childhood cancer. Interviews were conducted with 18 mothers and 13 fathers. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed based on qualitative methodology. A model describing early parental bereavement and adaptation emerged with 3 domains:…

  18. 5 CFR 536.305 - Adjusting an employee's retained rate when a pay schedule is adjusted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... conversion under § 536.303(b) or any other simultaneous pay action. The retained rate adjustment under... new retained rate must be determined under the geographic conversion rule in § 536.303(b). (4... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adjusting an employee's retained...

  19. 5 CFR 9701.322 - Setting and adjusting rate ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Setting and adjusting rate ranges. 9701.322 Section 9701.322 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Setting and Adjusting Rate...

  20. 5 CFR 9701.322 - Setting and adjusting rate ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Setting and adjusting rate ranges. 9701.322 Section 9701.322 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Setting and Adjusting Rate...

  1. Reducing the Teen Death Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Life continues to hold considerable risk for adolescents in the United States. In 2006, the teen death rate stood at 64 deaths per 100,000 teens (13,739 teens) (KIDS COUNT Data Center, 2009). Although it has declined by 4 percent since 2000, the rate of teen death in this country remains substantially higher than in many peer nations, based…

  2. Colon Cancer Rates, Deaths Drop in Americans Over 50

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163856.html Colon Cancer Rates, Deaths Drop in Americans Over 50 Report suggests higher ... over 50 fell 32 percent since 2000, while deaths from the disease fell by 34 percent. Those ...

  3. Reducing the Child Death Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In the 20th century's final decades, advances in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases sharply reduced the child death rate. Despite this progress, the child death rate in the U.S. remains higher than in many other wealthy nations. The under-five mortality rate in the U.S. is almost three times higher than that of Iceland and Sweden…

  4. Trends in age-adjusted coronary heart disease mortality rates in Slovakia between 1993 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Psota, Marek; Pekarciková, Jarmila; O'Mullane, Monica; Rusnák, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and especially coronary heart disease (CHD) are the main causes of death in the Slovak Republic (SR). The aim of this study is to explore trends in age-adjusted coronary heart disease mortality rates in the whole Slovak population and in the population of working age between the years 1993 and 2009. A related indicator - potential years of life lost (PYLL) due to CHD--was calculated in the same period for males and females. Crude CHD mortality rates were age-adjusted using European standard population. The joinpoint Poisson regression was performed in order to find out the annual percentage change in trends. The age-adjusted CHD mortality rates decreased in the Slovak population and also in the population of working age. The change was significant only within the working-age sub-group. We found that partial diagnoses (myocardial infarction and chronic ischaemic heart disease) developed in the mirror-like manner. PYLL per 100,000 decreased during the observed period and the decline was more prominent in males. For further research we recommend to focus on several other issues, namely, to examine the validity of cause of death codes, to examine the development of mortality rates in selected age groups, to find out the cause of differential development of mortality rates in the Slovak Republic in comparison with the Czech Republic and Poland, and to explain the causes of decrease of the age-adjusted CHD mortality rates in younger age groups in Slovakia.

  5. 10 CFR 903.11 - Advance announcement of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... announcement may be through direct contact with customers, at public meetings, by press release, by newspaper... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advance announcement of rate adjustment. 903.11 Section 903.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation...

  6. 10 CFR 903.11 - Advance announcement of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... announcement may be through direct contact with customers, at public meetings, by press release, by newspaper... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advance announcement of rate adjustment. 903.11 Section 903.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation...

  7. 10 CFR 436.22 - Adjusted internal rate of return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... adjusted internal rate of return is the overall rate of return on an energy or water conservation measure... attributable to the proposed energy or water conservation measure. The denominator of the ratio is the present... proposed energy or water conservation measure....

  8. 10 CFR 436.22 - Adjusted internal rate of return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... adjusted internal rate of return is the overall rate of return on an energy or water conservation measure... attributable to the proposed energy or water conservation measure. The denominator of the ratio is the present... proposed energy or water conservation measure....

  9. 75 FR 455 - Adjustment of Cable Statutory License Royalty Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... United States Code, grants a statutory copyright license to cable television systems for the... Doc No: E9-30825] LIBRARY OF CONGRESS Copyright Royalty Board [Docket No. 2010-1 CRB Cable Rate] Adjustment of Cable Statutory License Royalty Rates AGENCY: Copyright Royalty Board, Library of...

  10. 18 CFR 154.403 - Periodic rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... adjustments. 154.403 Section 154.403 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Limited Rate... computations supporting the allocation, segregated into reservation and usage amounts, where appropriate....

  11. 18 CFR 154.403 - Periodic rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... adjustments. 154.403 Section 154.403 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Limited Rate... computations supporting the allocation, segregated into reservation and usage amounts, where appropriate....

  12. 18 CFR 154.403 - Periodic rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... adjustments. 154.403 Section 154.403 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT RATE SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Limited Rate... computations supporting the allocation, segregated into reservation and usage amounts, where appropriate....

  13. Parametric estimation of quality adjusted lifetime (QAL) distribution in progressive illness--death model.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Biswabrata; Dewanji, Anup

    2009-07-10

    In this work, we consider the parametric estimation of quality adjusted lifetime (QAL) distribution in progressive illness-death models. The main idea of this paper is to derive the theoretical distribution of QAL for the progressive illness-death models, under parametric models for the sojourn time distributions in different states, and then replace the model parameters by their estimates obtained by standard techniques of survival analysis. The method of estimation of the model parameters is also described. A data set of IBCSG Trial V has been analyzed for illustration. Extension to more general illness-death models is also discussed.

  14. 5 CFR 838.923 - Cost-of-living adjustment before the death of a retiree.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cost-of-living adjustment before the death of a retiree. 838.923 Section 838.923 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Terminology...

  15. Relation of Total and Cardiovascular Death Rates to Climate System, Temperature, Barometric Pressure, and Respiratory Infection.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Bryan G; Qualls, Clifford; Kloner, Robert A; Laskey, Warren K

    2015-10-15

    A distinct seasonal pattern in total and cardiovascular death rates has been reported. The factors contributing to this pattern have not been fully explored. Seven locations (average total population 71,354,000) were selected where data were available including relatively warm, cold, and moderate temperatures. Over the period 2004 to 2009, there were 2,526,123 all-cause deaths, 838,264 circulatory deaths, 255,273 coronary heart disease deaths, and 135,801 ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) deaths. We used time series and multivariate regression modeling to explore the association between death rates and climatic factors (temperature, dew point, precipitation, barometric pressure), influenza levels, air pollution levels, hours of daylight, and day of week. Average seasonal patterns for all-cause and cardiovascular deaths were very similar across the 7 locations despite differences in climate. After adjusting for multiple covariates and potential confounders, there was a 0.49% increase in all-cause death rate for every 1°C decrease. In general, all-cause, circulatory, coronary heart disease and STEMI death rates increased linearly with decreasing temperatures. The temperature effect varied by location, including temperature's linear slope, cubic fit, positional shift on the temperature axis, and the presence of circulatory death increases in locally hot temperatures. The variable effect of temperature by location suggests that people acclimatize to local temperature cycles. All-cause and circulatory death rates also demonstrated sizable associations with influenza levels, dew point temperature, and barometric pressure. A greater understanding of how climate, temperature, and barometric pressure influence cardiovascular responses would enhance our understanding of circulatory and STEMI deaths.

  16. Preventable trauma death rate in Daegu, South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sungbae; Lee, Suk Hee; Ryoo, Hyun Wook; Kim, Jong Kun; Ahn, Jae Yun; Kim, Sung Jin; Jeon, Jae Cheon; Lee, Kyung Woo; Sung, Ae Jin; Kim, Yun Jeong; Lee, Dae Ro; Do, Byung Soo; Park, Sin Ryul; Lee, Jin-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the preventable death rate in Daegu, South Korea, and assessed affecting factors and preventable factors in order to improve the treatment of regional trauma patients. Methods All traumatic deaths between January 2012 and December 2012 in 5 hospitals in Daegu were analyzed by panel review, which were classified into preventable and non-preventable deaths. We determined the factors affecting trauma deaths and the preventable factors during trauma care. Results There were overall 358 traumatic deaths during the study period. Two hundred thirty four patients were selected for the final analysis after excluding cases of death on arrival, delayed death, and unknown causes. The number of preventable death was 59 (25.2%), which was significantly associated with mode of arrival, presence of head injury, date, and time of injury. A multivariate analysis revealed that preventable death was more likely when patients were secondly transferred from another hospital, visited hospital during non-office hour, and did not have head injuries. The panel discovered 145 preventable factors, which showed that majority of factors occurred in emergency departments (49.0%), and were related with system process (76.6%). Conclusion The preventable trauma death rate in Daegu was high, and mostly process-related. PMID:27752603

  17. The Impact of Financial Sophistication on Adjustable Rate Mortgage Ownership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hyrum; Finke, Michael S.; Huston, Sandra J.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of a financial sophistication scale on adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) borrowing is explored. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis using recent data from the Survey of Consumer Finances reveal that ARM borrowing is driven by both the least and most financially sophisticated households but for different reasons. Less…

  18. 78 FR 649 - Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-03

    ... Public Law 112-175, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Statutory Pay Systems. The rates of basic pay or salaries of the statutory pay systems (as defined in 5 U.S.C. 5302(1)), as adjusted under 5 U.S... See Food Safety and Inspection Service See Rural Utilities Service NOTICES Agency...

  19. A gigawatt level repetitive rate adjustable magnetic pulse compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song; Gao, Jing-Ming; Yang, Han-Wu; Qian, Bao-Liang; Li, Ze-Xin

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a gigawatt level repetitive rate adjustable magnetic pulse compressor is investigated both numerically and experimentally. The device has advantages of high power level, high repetitive rate achievability, and long lifetime reliability. Importantly, dominate parameters including the saturation time, the peak voltage, and even the compression ratio can be potentially adjusted continuously and reliably, which significantly expands the applicable area of the device and generators based on it. Specifically, a two-stage adjustable magnetic pulse compressor, utilized for charging the pulse forming network of a high power pulse generator, is designed with different compression ratios of 25 and 18 through an optimized design process. Equivalent circuit analysis shows that the modification of compression ratio can be achieved by just changing the turn number of the winding. At the same time, increasing inductance of the grounded inductor will decrease the peak voltage and delay the charging process. Based on these analyses, an adjustable compressor was built and studied experimentally in both the single shot mode and repetitive rate mode. Pulses with peak voltage of 60 kV and energy per pulse of 360 J were obtained in the experiment. The rise times of the pulses were compressed from 25 μs to 1 μs and from 18 μs to 1 μs, respectively, at repetitive rate of 20 Hz with good repeatability. Experimental results show reasonable agreement with analyses.

  20. Age-adjusted Labor Force Participation Rates, 1960-2045.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szafran, Robert F.

    2002-01-01

    A proposed new age-adjusted measure for calculating labor force participation rate eliminates the effect of changes in the age distribution. According to the new criterion, increases in women's labor force participation from 1960-2000 would have been even greater of shifts in the age distribution had not occurred. (Contains 12 references.) (JOW)

  1. 18 CFR 154.403 - Periodic rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Where the costs, revenues, rates, quantities, indices, load factors, percentages, or other numbers used... filing. (vi) Where a number is derived from another number by applying a load factor, percentage, or other adjusting factor not referenced in paragraph (d)(1)(i) of this section, include workpapers and...

  2. 18 CFR 154.403 - Periodic rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Where the costs, revenues, rates, quantities, indices, load factors, percentages, or other numbers used... filing. (vi) Where a number is derived from another number by applying a load factor, percentage, or other adjusting factor not referenced in paragraph (d)(1)(i) of this section, include workpapers and...

  3. 24 CFR 203.49 - Eligibility of adjustable rate mortgages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... most recent figure available before the date of mortgage loan origination. The current index figure shall be the most recent index figure available 30 days before the date of each interest rate adjustment... houses in federally impacted areas), 203.45 (graduated payment mortgages), or 203.47 (growing...

  4. 24 CFR 203.49 - Eligibility of adjustable rate mortgages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... most recent figure available before the date of mortgage loan origination. The current index figure shall be the most recent index figure available 30 days before the date of each interest rate adjustment... houses in federally impacted areas), 203.45 (graduated payment mortgages), or 203.47 (growing...

  5. 24 CFR 203.49 - Eligibility of adjustable rate mortgages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... most recent figure available before the date of mortgage loan origination. The current index figure shall be the most recent index figure available 30 days before the date of each interest rate adjustment... houses in federally impacted areas), 203.45 (graduated payment mortgages), or 203.47 (growing...

  6. 24 CFR 203.49 - Eligibility of adjustable rate mortgages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... most recent figure available before the date of mortgage loan origination. The current index figure shall be the most recent index figure available 30 days before the date of each interest rate adjustment... houses in federally impacted areas), 203.45 (graduated payment mortgages), or 203.47 (growing...

  7. 24 CFR 203.49 - Eligibility of adjustable rate mortgages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... most recent figure available before the date of mortgage loan origination. The current index figure shall be the most recent index figure available 30 days before the date of each interest rate adjustment... houses in federally impacted areas), 203.45 (graduated payment mortgages), or 203.47 (growing...

  8. Premature death rates diverge in the United States

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI press release on a study that shows premature death rates have declined in the United States among Hispanics, blacks, and Asian/Pacific Islanders but increased among whites and American Indian/Alaska Natives.

  9. Premature singleton versus a twin or triplet infant death: parental adjustment studied through a personal interview.

    PubMed

    Netzer, D; Arad, I

    1999-12-01

    Parental adjustment following the death of a premature singleton or multiple birth infant has hitherto been studied by mailed questionnaires or telephone survey. In the present study, using an in-depth personal interview, grief reactions and adjustment patterns of nine families who lost a singleton premature infant ('Single Group') were compared with those of nine families who lost one of a premature multiple birth cohort ('Multiple Group'). The interview was conducted 1-4 years after the death of the infant and evaluated specific areas or 'scales' of life adjustment, including individual feelings, relationship between husband and wife, and functioning at home and at work. There was no significant difference between the paternal and maternal level of adjustment of the two groups in any of the studied scales. A positive correlation was found between maternal and paternal grief reaction of the same family in the scales of individual feelings (r = 0.65), relationships between husband and wife (r = 0.70), and functioning at home (r = 0.57). Comparing the father's scale with the mother's scale revealed a significant difference only in the area of 'individual feelings'. The gestational age, maternal bonding during hospitalisation of the infant and the parental attendance at the event of death were significantly associated with the process of parental adjustment. The results of this study support previous reports of similar parental reactions following the demise of a premature singleton or multiple birth infant. Since societal environment may not recognise the need for consolation of these families, care, compassion, and sensitivity should be encouraged in dealing with these parents at the time of their infant' death, and for a long time thereafter.

  10. Estimation of death rates in US states with small subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Voulgaraki, Anastasia; Wei, Rong; Kedem, Benjamin

    2015-05-20

    In US states with small subpopulations, the observed mortality rates are often zero, particularly among young ages. Because in life tables, death rates are reported mostly on a log scale, zero mortality rates are problematic. To overcome the observed zero death rates problem, appropriate probability models are used. Using these models, observed zero mortality rates are replaced by the corresponding expected values. This enables logarithmic transformations and, in some cases, the fitting of the eight-parameter Heligman-Pollard model to produce mortality estimates for ages 0-130 years, a procedure illustrated in terms of mortality data from several states.

  11. Statistical observations on death-rates and causes of death in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chai Bin

    1955-01-01

    In this paper the author analyses the death-rates and causes of death for Korea during the period 1938-42 according to main groups of diseases, certain specific diseases, age-groups, and seasonal distribution. He finds that the mortality curves by age and by sex do not differ markedly from the typical curves. The relative importance of main groups of diseases is, however, unusual; the most important groups are, in that order, diseases of the digestive system, diseases of the respiratory system, diseases of the nervous system and sense organs, and infective and parasitic diseases. Taking racial and regional differences into account, he attributes this fact to a low standard of hygiene and sanitation in Korea. While it is difficult to compute the death-rate for infants in Korea with complete accuracy, it may be said that the main causes of death during the first year of life there are pneumonia, meningitis, diarrhoea and enteritis, and measles. Calculated on the basis of the available statistics, tuberculosis mortality in Korea is unexpectedly lower than that in other Asiatic countries, the death-rate from all forms of this disease fluctuating between 1 and 10 per 10 000 population. There is, however, reason to believe that this is due to under-reporting as a result of incorrect diagnoses. Although each disease has its peculiar seasonal distribution, the general death-rate in Korea is highest in March and lowest in November. PMID:13260883

  12. 5 CFR 9701.323 - Eligibility for pay increase associated with a rate range adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... with a rate range adjustment. 9701.323 Section 9701.323 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Adjusting Rate Ranges § 9701.323 Eligibility for pay increase associated with a rate range adjustment. (a) When a band rate range is adjusted under § 9701.322, employees covered by that band are eligible for...

  13. 5 CFR 9701.323 - Eligibility for pay increase associated with a rate range adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... with a rate range adjustment. 9701.323 Section 9701.323 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Adjusting Rate Ranges § 9701.323 Eligibility for pay increase associated with a rate range adjustment. (a) When a band rate range is adjusted under § 9701.322, employees covered by that band are eligible for...

  14. 5 CFR 9701.323 - Eligibility for pay increase associated with a rate range adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... with a rate range adjustment. 9701.323 Section 9701.323 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Adjusting Rate Ranges § 9701.323 Eligibility for pay increase associated with a rate range adjustment. (a) When a band rate range is adjusted under § 9701.322, employees covered by that band are eligible for...

  15. 25 CFR 175.12 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for adjustments due to changes in the cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.12 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except...

  16. 25 CFR 175.12 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for adjustments due to changes in the cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.12 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except...

  17. 25 CFR 175.12 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for adjustments due to changes in the cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.12 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except...

  18. 25 CFR 175.12 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for adjustments due to changes in the cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.12 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except...

  19. 25 CFR 175.12 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for adjustments due to changes in the cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except for... INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.12 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates except...

  20. 39 CFR 3010.14 - Contents of notice of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DOMINANT PRODUCTS Rules for Rate Adjustments for Rates of General Applicability (Type 1-A and 1-B Rate... costs; (7) A discussion that demonstrates how the planned rate adjustments are designed to help...

  1. The Parkinson's disease death rate: carbidopa and vitamin B6.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The only indication for carbidopa and benserazide is the management of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa)-induced nausea. Both drugs irreversibly bind to and permanently deactivate pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), the active form of vitamin B6, and PLP-dependent enzymes. PLP is required for the function of over 300 enzymes and proteins. Virtually every major system in the body is impacted directly or indirectly by PLP. The administration of carbidopa and benserazide potentially induces a nutritional catastrophe. During the first 15 years of prescribing L-dopa, a decreasing Parkinson's disease death rate was observed. Then, in 1976, 1 year after US Food and Drug Administration approved the original L-dopa/carbidopa combination drug, the Parkinson's disease death rate started increasing. This trend has continued to the present, for 38 years and counting. The previous literature documents this increasing death rate, but no hypothesis has been offered concerning this trend. Carbidopa is postulated to contribute to the increasing Parkinson's disease death rate and to the classification of Parkinson's as a progressive neurodegenerative disease. It may contribute to L-dopa tachyphylaxis.

  2. Report to the Nation shows cancer death rates dropping

    Cancer.gov

    The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975–2009, shows that overall cancer death rates continued to decline in the United States among both men and women, among all major racial and ethnic groups, and for all of the most common cancer s

  3. RATE-ADJUSTMENT ALGORITHM FOR AGGREGATE TCP CONGESTION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    P. TINNAKORNSRISUPHAP, ET AL

    2000-09-01

    The TCP congestion-control mechanism is an algorithm designed to probe the available bandwidth of the network path that TCP packets traverse. However, it is well-known that the TCP congestion-control mechanism does not perform well on networks with a large bandwidth-delay product due to the slow dynamics in adapting its congestion window, especially for short-lived flows. One promising solution to the problem is to aggregate and share the path information among TCP connections that traverse the same bottleneck path, i.e., Aggregate TCP. However, this paper shows via a queueing analysis of a generalized processor-sharing (GPS) queue with regularly-varying service time that a simple aggregation of local TCP connections together into a single aggregate TCP connection can result in a severe performance degradation. To prevent such a degradation, we introduce a rate-adjustment algorithm. Our simulation confirms that by utilizing our rate-adjustment algorithm on aggregate TCP, connections which would normally receive poor service achieve significant performance improvements without penalizing connections which already receive good service.

  4. 39 CFR 3010.28 - Maximum size of Type 1-B rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum size of Type 1-B rate adjustments. 3010.28... DOMINANT PRODUCTS Rules for Determining the Maximum Rate Adjustment § 3010.28 Maximum size of Type 1-B rate... used to make a Type 1-B rate adjustment for any class in any 12-month period may not exceed...

  5. Peer- and Self-Rated Correlates of a Teacher-Rated Typology of Child Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, William A., Jr.; Lease, A. Michele; Kamphaus, Randy W.

    2007-01-01

    External correlates of a teacher-rated typology of child adjustment developed using the Behavior Assessment System for Children were examined. Participants included 377 elementary school children recruited from 26 classrooms in the southeastern United States. Multivariate analyses of variance and planned comparisons were used to determine whether…

  6. 76 FR 26324 - Order Making Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Adjustments to Section 31 Fee Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... adjustments to the fee rates applicable under Sections 31(b) and (c) of the Exchange Act shall take effect on... circumstances, to make a mid-year adjustment to the fee rates under Sections 31(b) and (c) of the Exchange Act... national securities exchange to pay the Commission a fee at a rate, as adjusted by our order pursuant...

  7. Rates and Correlates of Undetermined Deaths among African Americans: Results from the National Violent Death Reporting System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huguet, Nathalie; Kaplan, Mark S.; McFarland, Bentson H.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the factors associated with undetermined death classifications among African Americans. In this study, the rates of undetermined deaths were assessed, the prevalence of missing information was estimated, and whether the circumstances preceding death differ by race were examined. Data were derived from the 2005-2008 National…

  8. 37 CFR 255.3 - Adjustment of royalty rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... further adjustment pursuant to paragraphs (i) through (m) of this section. (i) For every phonorecord made... thereof, whichever amount is larger, subject to further adjustment pursuant to paragraphs (l) through (m...) through (m) of this section. (b) For every phonorecord made and distributed on or after July 1, 1984,...

  9. 43 CFR 38.3 - Administration of adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Administration of adjusted rates of pay. 38.3 Section 38.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.3 Administration of adjusted rates of pay. (a) An employee...

  10. 43 CFR 38.3 - Administration of adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administration of adjusted rates of pay. 38.3 Section 38.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.3 Administration of adjusted rates of pay. (a) An employee...

  11. 43 CFR 38.3 - Administration of adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Administration of adjusted rates of pay. 38.3 Section 38.3 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.3 Administration of adjusted rates of pay. (a) An employee...

  12. 42 CFR 422.308 - Adjustments to capitation rates, benchmarks, bids, and payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adjustments to capitation rates, benchmarks, bids... Payments to Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.308 Adjustments to capitation rates, benchmarks, bids...) Data collection. To adjust for health status, CMS applies a risk factor based on data obtained...

  13. 42 CFR 422.308 - Adjustments to capitation rates, benchmarks, bids, and payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adjustments to capitation rates, benchmarks, bids... Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.308 Adjustments to capitation rates, benchmarks, bids, and payments... the determination of actuarial equivalence. (2) Risk adjustment: Health status—(i) Data collection....

  14. Estimating division and death rates from CFSE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Rob J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2005-12-01

    The division tracking dye, carboxyfluorescin diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) is currently the most informative labeling technique for characterizing the division history of cells in the immune system. Gett and Hodgkin (Nat. Immunol. 1 (2000) 239-244) have proposed to normalize CFSE data by the 2-fold expansion that is associated with each division, and have argued that the mean of the normalized data increases linearly with time, t, with a slope reflecting the division rate p. We develop a number of mathematical models for the clonal expansion of quiescent cells after stimulation and show, within the context of these models, under which conditions this approach is valid. We compare three means of the distribution of cells over the CFSE profile at time t: the mean, [mu](t), the mean of the normalized distribution, [mu]2(t), and the mean of the normalized distribution excluding nondivided cells, .In the simplest models, which deal with homogeneous populations of cells with constant division and death rates, the normalized frequency distribution of the cells over the respective division numbers is a Poisson distribution with mean [mu]2(t)=pt, where p is the division rate. The fact that in the data these distributions seem Gaussian is therefore insufficient to establish that the times at which cells are recruited into the first division have a Gaussian variation because the Poisson distribution approaches the Gaussian distribution for large pt. Excluding nondivided cells complicates the data analysis because , and only approaches a slope p after an initial transient.In models where the first division of the quiescent cells takes longer than later divisions, all three means have an initial transient before they approach an asymptotic regime, which is the expected [mu](t)=2pt and . Such a transient markedly complicates the data analysis. After the same initial transients, the normalized cell numbers tend to decrease at a rate e-dt, where d is the death rate

  15. 25 CFR 166.408 - Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted periodically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA... LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Grazing Rental Rates, Payments, and Late Payment Collections Rental Rate Determination and Adjustment § 166.408 Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted...

  16. 25 CFR 166.408 - Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted periodically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA... LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Grazing Rental Rates, Payments, and Late Payment Collections Rental Rate Determination and Adjustment § 166.408 Is the grazing rental rate established by the BIA adjusted...

  17. 5 CFR 535.105 - Setting and adjusting rates of basic pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Setting and adjusting rates of basic pay... REGULATIONS CRITICAL POSITION PAY AUTHORITY § 535.105 Setting and adjusting rates of basic pay. (a) The rate... head of an agency may set pay initially at any amount up to the rate of pay for level II or level I...

  18. 37 CFR 255.3 - Adjustment of royalty rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... fraction thereof, whichever amount is larger, subject to further adjustment pursuant to paragraphs (b....85 cent per minute of playing time or fraction thereof, whichever amount is larger, subject to... embodied in the phonorecord shall be either 5.0 cents, or 0.95 cent per minute of playing time or...

  19. Demonization of Divorce: Prevalence Rates and Links to Postdivorce Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumrei, Elizabeth J.; Mahoney, Annette; Pargament, Kenneth I.

    2011-01-01

    The meaning-making process can be crucial to individuals as they adjust to their divorce. Demonization is a negative coping response (also known as spiritual struggle) that involves appraising someone or something as related to demonic forces. Individuals may cognitively frame a divorce as the work of Satan in order to understand suffering while…

  20. Temporal changes in liver cancer incidence rates in Japan: accounting for death certificate inaccuracies and improving diagnostic techniques.

    PubMed

    Sharp, G B; Cologne, J B; Fukuhara, T; Itakura, H; Yamamoto, M; Tokuoka, S

    2001-09-01

    Primary liver cancer (PLC) rates have risen dramatically during the past few decades in some regions, particularly in Japan, where PLC is now the third major cause of cancer death. PLC is one of the most difficult tumors to diagnose correctly, because (i) the liver is a frequent site of cancer metastasis and (ii) death from PLC is often attributed to cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis. Also, because the disease is often rapidly fatal, a large proportion of liver cancer cases are identified based on death certificates alone without confirmation by clinical records. Thus, worldwide differences in published incidence rates for this disease reflect regional or national differences in both the accuracy of death certificates and the sensitivity of diagnostic methods. By comparing death certificate causes of death with those based on pathology review, we were able to adjust 1958--1994 incidence rates for a large Japanese cohort for these errors. Although the death certificate false-positive error rate declined, the false-negative error rate remained high throughout the study. The introduction of improved liver cancer diagnostic methods in Japan in the early 1980s was associated with a sharp increase in PLC incidence. We conclude that errors in death certificate causes of death and changes in liver cancer diagnostic techniques have had an important impact on the reported incidence of this disease. Taking these factors into account, rates of hepatocellular carcinoma rose between 2.4- and 4.3-fold in our Japanese cohort from 1960 to 1985, peaked about 1993 and declined thereafter. Incidence rates of cholangiocarcinoma remained stable through 1987.

  1. Trends and Geographic Patterns in Drug-Poisoning Death Rates in the U.S., 1999–2009

    PubMed Central

    Rossen, Lauren M.; Khan, Diba; Warner, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug poisoning mortality has increased substantially in the U.S. over the past 3 decades. Previous studies have described state-level variation and urban–rural differences in drug-poisoning deaths, but variation at the county level has largely not been explored in part because crude county-level death rates are often highly unstable. Purpose The goal of the study was to use small-area estimation techniques to produce stable county-level estimates of age-adjusted death rates (AADR) associated with drug poisoning for the U.S., 1999–2009, in order to examine geographic and temporal variation. Methods Population-based observational study using data on 304,087 drug-poisoning deaths in the U.S. from the 1999–2009 National Vital Statistics Multiple Cause of Death Files (analyzed in 2012). Because of the zero-inflated and right-skewed distribution of drug-poisoning death rates, a two-stage modeling procedure was used in which the first stage modeled the probability of observing a death for a given county and year, and the second stage modeled the log-transformed drug-poisoning death rate given that a death occurred. Empirical Bayes estimates of county-level drug-poisoning death rates were mapped to explore temporal and geographic variation. Results Only 3% of counties had drug-poisoning AADRs greater than ten per 100,000 per year in 1999–2000, compared to 54% in 2008–2009. Drug-poisoning AADRs grew by 394% in rural areas compared to 279% for large central metropolitan counties, but the highest drug-poisoning AADRs were observed in central metropolitan areas from 1999 to 2009. Conclusions There was substantial geographic variation in drug-poisoning mortality across the U.S. PMID:24237925

  2. Rates and correlates of undetermined deaths among African Americans: results from the National Violent Death Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Nathalie; Kaplan, Mark S; McFarland, Bentson H

    2012-04-01

    Little is known about the factors associated with undetermined death classifications among African Americans. In this study, the rates of undetermined deaths were assessed, the prevalence of missing information was estimated, and whether the circumstances preceding death differ by race were examined. Data were derived from the 2005-2008 National Violent Death Reporting System. African Americans had higher prevalence of missing information than Whites. African Americans classified as undetermined deaths were more likely to be older, women, never married/single, to have had a blood alcohol content at or above the legal limit, and to have had a substance abuse problem. The results suggest that racial differences in the preponderance and the type of evidence surrounding the death may affect death classification.

  3. 12 CFR 747.1001 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate... civil money penalties by the rate of inflation. (a) NCUA is required by the Federal Civil Penalties... adjust the maximum amount of each civil money penalty within its jurisdiction by the rate of...

  4. 10 CFR 903.17 - Informal public meetings for minor rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Informal public meetings for minor rate adjustments. 903.17 Section 903.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska,...

  5. 10 CFR 903.17 - Informal public meetings for minor rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Informal public meetings for minor rate adjustments. 903.17 Section 903.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska,...

  6. 10 CFR 903.17 - Informal public meetings for minor rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Informal public meetings for minor rate adjustments. 903.17 Section 903.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska,...

  7. 10 CFR 903.17 - Informal public meetings for minor rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Informal public meetings for minor rate adjustments. 903.17 Section 903.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska,...

  8. 77 FR 13663 - Order Making Fiscal Year 2012 Mid-Year Adjustments to Transaction Fee Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... take effect on April 1 of the fiscal year in which such rate applies. Therefore, the exchanges and the... Exchange Act requires the Commission to annually adjust the fee rates applicable under Sections 31(b) and... adjusting the fee rates applicable under Sections 31(b) and (c) of the Exchange Act. Specifically,...

  9. Using National Inpatient Death Rates as a Benchmark to Identify Hospitals with Inaccurate Cause of Death Reporting - Missouri, 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Jennifer; Jahanpour, Ehsan; Angell, Brian; Ward, Craig; Hunter, Andy; Baysinger, Cherri; Turabelidze, George

    2017-01-13

    Reporting causes of death accurately is essential to public health and hospital-based programs; however, some U.S. studies have identified substantial inaccuracies in cause of death reporting. Using CDC's national inpatient hospital death rates as a benchmark, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) analyzed inpatient death rates reported by hospitals with high inpatient death rates in St. Louis and Kansas City metro areas. Among the selected hospitals with high inpatient death rates, 45.8% of death certificates indicated an underlying cause of death that was inconsistent with CDC's Guidelines for Death Certificate completion. Selected hospitals with high inpatient death rates were more likely to overreport heart disease and renal disease, and underreport cancer as an underlying cause of death. Based on these findings, the Missouri DHSS initiated a new web-based training module for death certificate completion based on the CDC guidelines in an effort to improve accuracy in cause of death reporting.

  10. Standardization of Rates To Adjust for Differences in Enrollment Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hom, Willard

    Community colleges must often analyze and report rates for outcomes, such as transfer to four-year colleges. A single, summary rate may be an invalid measure of its achievement in the transfer goal if the summary rate ignores the real difference in enrollment composition at different institutions. California's community colleges embody a very…

  11. Heart Disease Death Rates in Low Versus High Land Elevation Counties in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Hart, John

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on land elevation and cancer death rates in the U.S. revealed lower cancer death rates in higher elevations. The present study further tests the possible effect of land elevation on a diffident health outcome, namely, heart disease death rates. U.S. counties not overlapping in their land elevations according to their lowest and highest elevation points were identified. Using an ecological design, heart disease death rates for two races (black and white) corresponding to lower elevation counties were compared to heart disease death rates in higher land elevation counties using the two-sample t-test and effect size statistics. Death rates in higher land elevation counties for both races were lower compared to the death rates in lower land elevation counties (p < 0.001) with large effect sizes (of > 0.70). Since this is an observational study, no causal inference is claimed, and further research is indicated to verify these findings.

  12. 78 FR 80451 - Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... Pay Systems. The rates of basic pay or salaries of the statutory pay systems (as defined in 5 U.S.C... hereto and made a part hereof. Sec. 3. Certain Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Salaries. The rates of basic pay or salaries for the following offices and positions are set forth on the...

  13. 7 CFR 1421.102 - Adjustment of basic loan rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-MARKETING ASSISTANCE LOANS AND LOAN DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS FOR 2008 THROUGH 2012 Marketing Assistance Loans... county marketing assistance loan rate. (2) For farm-stored commodities where the test weight discounts... schedule of discounts, the marketing assistance loan rate shall be reduced to 20 percent of the county...

  14. Measurement of generation-dependent proliferation rates and death rates during mouse erythroid progenitor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Akbarian, Vahe; Wang, Weijia; Audet, Julie

    2012-05-01

    Herein, we describe an experimental and computational approach to perform quantitative carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) cell-division tracking in cultures of primary colony-forming unit-erythroid (CFU-E) cells, a hematopoietic progenitor cell type, which is an important target for the treatment of blood disorders and for the manufacture of red blood cells. CFSE labeling of CFU-Es isolated from mouse fetal livers was performed to examine the effects of stem cell factor (SCF) and erythropoietin (EPO) in culture. We used a dynamic model of proliferation based on the Smith-Martin representation of the cell cycle to extract proliferation rates and death rates from CFSE time-series. However, we found that to accurately represent the cell population dynamics in differentiation cultures of CFU-Es, it was necessary to develop a model with generation-specific rate parameters. The generation-specific rates of proliferation and death were extracted for six generations (G(0) -G(5) ) and they revealed that, although SCF alone or EPO alone supported similar total cell outputs in culture, stimulation with EPO resulted in significantly higher proliferation rates from G(2) to G(5) and higher death rates in G(2) , G(3) , and G(5) compared with SCF. In addition, proliferation rates tended to increase from G(1) to G(5) in cultures supplemented with EPO and EPO + SCF, while they remained lower and more constant across generations with SCF. The results are consistent with the notion that SCF promotes CFU-E self-renewal while EPO promotes CFU-E differentiation in culture.

  15. A statistical test for the equality of differently adjusted incidence rate ratios.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kurt; Pischon, Tobias; Schulz, Mandy; Schulze, Matthias B; Ray, Jennifer; Boeing, Heiner

    2008-03-01

    An incidence rate ratio (IRR) is a meaningful effect measure in epidemiology if it is adjusted for all important confounders. For evaluation of the impact of adjustment, adjusted IRRs should be compared with crude IRRs. The aim of this methodological study was to present a statistical approach for testing the equality of adjusted and crude IRRs and to derive a confidence interval for the ratio of the two IRRs. The method can be extended to compare two differently adjusted IRRs and, thus, to evaluate the effect of additional adjustment. The method runs immediately on existing software. To illustrate the application of this approach, the authors studied adjusted IRRs for two risk factors of type 2 diabetes using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam Study from 2005. The statistical method described may be helpful as an additional tool for analyzing epidemiologic cohort data and for interpreting results obtained from Cox regression models with adjustment for different covariates.

  16. 5 CFR 9901.312 - Maximum rates of base salary and adjusted salary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum rates of base salary and adjusted salary. 9901.312 Section 9901.312 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HUMAN RESOURCES....312 Maximum rates of base salary and adjusted salary. (a) Subject to § 9901.105, the Secretary...

  17. 5 CFR 9901.312 - Maximum rates of base salary and adjusted salary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maximum rates of base salary and adjusted salary. 9901.312 Section 9901.312 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HUMAN RESOURCES....312 Maximum rates of base salary and adjusted salary. (a) Subject to § 9901.105, the Secretary...

  18. Heart Rate Change When Standing Up Might Predict Older Adult's Death Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Change When Standing Up Might Predict Older Adult's Death Risk People with slower heart rate recovery had ... they stand up might reveal their risk of death over the next several years, a new study ...

  19. Cause-specific premature death from ambient PM2.5 exposure in India: Estimate adjusted for baseline mortality.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sourangsu; Dey, Sagnik

    2016-05-01

    In India, more than a billion population is at risk of exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration exceeding World Health Organization air quality guideline, posing a serious threat to health. Cause-specific premature death from ambient PM2.5 exposure is poorly known for India. Here we develop a non-linear power law (NLP) function to estimate the relative risk associated with ambient PM2.5 exposure using satellite-based PM2.5 concentration (2001-2010) that is bias-corrected against coincident direct measurements. We show that estimate of annual premature death in India is lower by 14.7% (19.2%) using NLP (integrated exposure risk function, IER) for assumption of uniform baseline mortality across India (as considered in the global burden of disease study) relative to the estimate obtained by adjusting for state-specific baseline mortality using GDP as a proxy. 486,100 (811,000) annual premature death in India is estimated using NLP (IER) risk functions after baseline mortality adjustment. 54.5% of premature death estimated using NLP risk function is attributed to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 24.0% to ischemic heart disease (IHD), 18.5% to stroke and the remaining 3.0% to lung cancer (LC). 44,900 (5900-173,300) less premature death is expected annually, if India achieves its present annual air quality target of 40μgm(-3). Our results identify the worst affected districts in terms of ambient PM2.5 exposure and resulting annual premature death and call for initiation of long-term measures through a systematic framework of pollution and health data archive.

  20. Prospective prediction of college adjustment using self- and informant-rated personality traits.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, John E; Puher, Meredith A; Cross, Nicole A

    2012-01-01

    Studies that relate normal personality traits to students' adjustment to college have relied heavily on self-rating methods, concurrent designs, and academic performance indicators as criteria. We conducted a prospective study of high school seniors with a follow-up assessment made near the end of their freshman year of college. Self-ratings of personality traits and college adjustment were obtained from 90 students using the revised NEO personality inventory (NEO PI-R; Costa & McCrae, 1992) and the student adaptation to college questionnaire (SACQ; Baker & Siryk, 1989 ). Ratings of personality were also obtained from parents (n = 66) and same-sex peers from the college setting (n = 78) using the NEO five-factor inventory (NEO-FFI; Costa & McCrae, 1992 ). SACQ academic adjustment was correlated with conscientiousness ratings by all three sources and with openness ratings by parents and peers. SACQ Social Adjustment was correlated with self-ratings of neuroticism and peer ratings of extraversion. SACQ personal-emotional adjustment was correlated with self-ratings and parent ratings of neuroticism. Ratings by parents and peers showed significant incremental validity over self-ratings in the prediction of certain trait-adjustment relationships.

  1. Preventable and Potentially Preventable Traumatic Death Rates in Neurosurgery Department: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Mahnjeong; Kim, Byung Chul; Choi, Seonuoo; Cho, Won Ho

    2016-01-01

    Objective Preventable and potentially preventable traumatic death rates is a method to evaluate the preventability of the traumatic deaths in emergency medical department. To evaluate the preventability of the traumatic deaths in patients who were admitted to neurosurgery department, we performed this study. Methods A retrospective review identified 52 patients who admitted to neurosurgery department with severe traumatic brain injuries between 2013 and 2014. Based on radiologic and clinical state at emergency room, each preventability of death was estimated by professional panel discussion. And the final death rates were calculated. Results The preventable and potentially preventable traumatic death rates was 19.2% in this study. This result is lower than that of the research of 2012, Korean preventable and potentially preventable traumatic death rates. The rate of preventable and potentially preventable traumatic death of operation group is lower than that of conservative treatment group. Also, we confirmed that direct transfer and the time to operation are important to reduce the preventability. Conclusion We report the preventable and potentially preventable traumatic death rates of our institute for evaluation of preventability in severe traumatic brain injuries during the last 2 years. For decrease of preventable death, we suggest that continuous survey of the death rate of traumatic brain injury patients is required. PMID:27857910

  2. Reliability of Urinary Excretion Rate Adjustment in Measurements of Hippuric Acid in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Nicolli, Annamaria; Chiara, Federica; Gambalunga, Alberto; Carrieri, Mariella; Bartolucci, Giovanni Battista; Trevisan, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The urinary excretion rate is calculated based on short-term, defined time sample collections with a known sample mass, and this measurement can be used to remove the variability in urine concentrations due to urine dilution. Adjustment to the urinary excretion rate of hippuric acid was evaluated in 31 healthy volunteers (14 males and 17 females). Urine was collected as short-term or spot samples and tested for specific gravity, creatinine and hippuric acid. Hippuric acid values were unadjusted or adjusted to measurements of specific gravity, creatinine or urinary excretion rate. Hippuric acid levels were partially independent of urinary volume and urinary flow rate, in contrast to specific gravity and creatinine, which were both highly dependent on the hippuric acid level. Accordingly, hippuric acid was independent on urinary specific gravity and creatinine excretion. Unadjusted and adjusted values for specific gravity or creatinine were generally closely correlated, especially in spot samples. Values adjusted to the urinary excretion rate appeared well correlated to those unadjusted and adjusted to specific gravity or creatinine values. Thus, adjustment of crude hippuric acid values to the urinary excretion rate is a valid procedure but is difficult to apply in the field of occupational medicine and does not improve the information derived from values determined in spot urine samples, either unadjusted or adjusted to specific gravity and creatinine. PMID:25019265

  3. 5 CFR 9701.334 - Setting and adjusting locality and special rate supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Setting and adjusting locality and...) Within its sole and exclusive discretion, DHS may, after coordination with OPM, set and adjust locality and special rate supplements. In determining the amounts of the supplements, DHS and OPM may...

  4. 5 CFR 9701.334 - Setting and adjusting locality and special rate supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Setting and adjusting locality and...) Within its sole and exclusive discretion, DHS may, after coordination with OPM, set and adjust locality and special rate supplements. In determining the amounts of the supplements, DHS and OPM may...

  5. 43 CFR 38.2 - Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay. 38.2 Section 38.2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.2 Computation of hourly, daily,...

  6. 43 CFR 38.2 - Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay. 38.2 Section 38.2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.2 Computation of hourly, daily,...

  7. 43 CFR 38.2 - Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay. 38.2 Section 38.2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.2 Computation of hourly, daily,...

  8. 43 CFR 38.2 - Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay. 38.2 Section 38.2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.2 Computation of hourly, daily,...

  9. 43 CFR 38.2 - Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Computation of hourly, daily, weekly, and biweekly adjusted rates of pay. 38.2 Section 38.2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PAY OF U.S. PARK POLICE-INTERIM GEOGRAPHIC ADJUSTMENTS § 38.2 Computation of hourly, daily,...

  10. 78 FR 71501 - Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License Royalty Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 386 Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License... Copyright Royalty Judges announce a cost of living adjustment (COLA) of 1% in the royalty rates satellite....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The satellite carrier compulsory license establishes a...

  11. U.S. Cancer Death Rates Continue to Fall

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer death. Similarly, the report found that for black women those same figures fell from 20 percent in 1998 to 13 percent by 2014. As to why, the study authors suggested that ... percentage of black Americans who remain uninsured plummeted from 21 percent ...

  12. 76 FR 590 - Adjustment or Determination of Compulsory License Rates for Making and Distributing Phonorecords

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... Copyright Royalty Board Adjustment or Determination of Compulsory License Rates for Making and Distributing Phonorecords AGENCY: Copyright Royalty Board, Library of Congress. ACTION: Notice announcing commencement of proceeding with request for Petitions to Participate. SUMMARY: The Copyright Royalty Judges are...

  13. 5 CFR 535.105 - Setting and adjusting rates of basic pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS CRITICAL POSITION PAY AUTHORITY § 535.105 Setting and adjusting rates of basic pay. (a) The rate of basic pay for a critical position may not be less than the rate of basic pay, including any... be payable for the position. (b) If critical position pay authority is granted for a position,...

  14. 39 CFR 3010.12 - Contents of notice of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., including all relevant CPI-U values, are listed with citations to the original sources. (2) A schedule... input values, including current rates, new rates, and billing determinants, are listed with citations to... citations to the original sources. If new unused rate adjustment authority will be generated for a class...

  15. 39 CFR 3010.14 - Contents of notice of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... relevant CPI-U values are listed with citations to the original sources; (2) A schedule showing unused rate... including current rates, new rates, and billing determinants are listed with citations to the original... adjustment calculated as required by § 3010.26. All calculations are to be shown with citations to...

  16. 39 CFR 3010.14 - Contents of notice of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... relevant CPI-U values are listed with citations to the original sources; (2) A schedule showing unused rate... including current rates, new rates, and billing determinants are listed with citations to the original... adjustment calculated as required by § 3010.26. All calculations are to be shown with citations to...

  17. 39 CFR 3010.14 - Contents of notice of rate adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... relevant CPI-U values are listed with citations to the original sources; (2) A schedule showing unused rate... including current rates, new rates, and billing determinants are listed with citations to the original... adjustment calculated as required by § 3010.26. All calculations are to be shown with citations to...

  18. Drug use and pulmonary death rates in increasingly symptomatic asthma patients in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Meier, C. R.; Jick, H.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is concern about an increase in deaths from respiratory causes in asthma patients using long acting beta agonists. According to the guidelines of the British Thoracic Society, long acting beta agonists, ipratropium bromide, and theophylline should be used to treat patients with increasing asthma severity who are already receiving treatment with short acting beta agonists and inhaled steroids. A study was therefore undertaken to compare the characteristics and short term respiratory mortality rates in first time users of one of these three drugs. METHODS: An open cohort study with a nested case-control analysis was performed on the UK based General Practice Research Database (GPRD). First time users of either salmeterol (n = 8386), ipratropium bromide (n = 4305), or theophylline (n = 4228) between 1 January 1992 and 30 April 1995 were identified and followed for 16 weeks. Drug usage patterns, predictors for respiratory mortality, and the number of deaths at 16 weeks in the three drug groups were compared. RESULTS: The three asthma drugs were most often prescribed to patients with severe asthma. Age, a concomitant diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or emphysema, number of asthma drug prescriptions, number of visits to the general practitioner, and whether or not the patient had been admitted to hospital due to the respiratory disease in the 12 months prior to the start of the new drug therapy were strong predictors for asthma mortality. After adjusting for several risk factors, the relative risk estimates of a respiratory death for ipratropium bromide and theophylline users compared with salmeterol users were 1.8 (95% CI 0.4 to 9.6) and 3.0 (95% CI 0.4 to 22.4), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In the UK population studied, salmeterol, ipratropium bromide and theophylline are regularly used to treat patients with asthma of increasing severity. Salmeterol use was not associated with an increase in short term mortality compared with

  19. Risk of Death Influences Regional Variation in Intensive Care Unit Admission Rates among the Elderly in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rationale The extent to which geographic variability in ICU admission across the United States is driven by patients with lower risk of death is unknown. Objectives To determine whether patients at low to moderate risk of death contribute to geographic variation in ICU admission. Methods Retrospective cohort of hospitalizations among Medicare beneficiaries (age > 64 years) admitted for ten common medical and surgical diagnoses (2004 to 2009). We examined population-adjusted rates of ICU admission per 100 hospitalizations in 304 health referral regions (HRR), and estimated the relative risk of ICU admission across strata of regional ICU and risk of death, adjusted for patient and regional characteristics. Measurement and Main Results ICU admission rates varied nearly two-fold across HRR quartiles (quartile 1 to 4: 13.6, 17.3, 20.0, and 25.2 per 100 hospitalizations, respectively). Observed mortality for patients in regions (quartile 4) with the greatest ICU use was 17% compared to 21% in regions with lowest ICU use (quartile 1) (p<0.001). After adjusting for patient and regional characteristics, including regional differences in ICU, skilled nursing, and long-term acute care bed capacity, individuals’ risk of death modified the relationship between regional ICU use and an individual’s risk of ICU admission (p for interaction<0.001). Region was least important in predicting ICU admission among patients with high (quartile 4) risk of death (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.22–1.31, for high versus low ICU use regions), and most important for patients with moderate (quartile 2; RR 1.63, 95% CI 1.53–1.72, quartile 3; RR 1.56 95% CI 1.47–1.65) and low (quartile 1) risk of death (RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.59). Conclusions There is wide variation in in ICU use by geography, independent of ICU beds and physician supply, for patients with low and moderate risks of death. PMID:27898697

  20. 48 CFR 52.222-31 - Construction Wage Rate Requirements-Price Adjustment (Percentage Method).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Construction Wage Rate... CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.222-31 Construction Wage Rate Requirements—Price Adjustment (Percentage Method). As prescribed in 22.407(f), insert the following clause: Construction Wage...

  1. 3 CFR 13561 - Executive Order 13561 of December 22, 2010. Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Executive Order 13561 of December 22, 2010. Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay 13561 Order 13561 Presidential Documents Executive Orders Executive Order... Executive Service. The ranges of rates of basic pay for senior executives in the Senior Executive...

  2. 10 CFR 903.17 - Informal public meetings for minor rate adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....17 Section 903.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY POWER AND TRANSMISSION RATES Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska, Southeastern, Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations § 903.17 Informal public meetings for minor...

  3. 43 CFR 38.3 - Administration of adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Retirement deductions and benefits; (2) Life insurance premiums and benefits; (3) Premium pay; (4) Severance... rate of pay begins on the effective date of the change in official duty station. (d) An adjusted rate... first day of the first pay period beginning on or after the date on which a change in the definition...

  4. 43 CFR 38.3 - Administration of adjusted rates of pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Retirement deductions and benefits; (2) Life insurance premiums and benefits; (3) Premium pay; (4) Severance... rate of pay begins on the effective date of the change in official duty station. (d) An adjusted rate... first day of the first pay period beginning on or after the date on which a change in the definition...

  5. Deaths Rates in Public Hospitals of Eastern Cape Province of South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Buso, DL; Longo-Mbenza, B; Bovet, P; van den Borne, B; Okwe, A Nge; Mzingelwa, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: South Africa (SA) is experiencing a rapid epidemiologic transition as a consequence of political, economic and social changes. In this study we described, based on hospital data, the mortality patterns of Non communicable Diseases (NCD), Communicable Diseases (CD), the NCD/CD ratios, and the trends of deaths. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of all deaths occurring in several public hospitals in the Eastern Cape Province of SA between 2002 and 2006. Causes of deaths were coded according to the ICD 10 Edition. Results: A total of 107380 admissions responded to the inclusion criteria between 2002 and 2006. The crude death rate was 4.3% (n=4566) with a mean age of 46±21 years and a sex ratio of 3.1 men (n=3453): 1 woman (n=1113). Out of all deaths, there were 62.9% NCD (n=2872) vs. 37.1% CD (n=1694) with NCD/CD ratio of 1.7. The ratio NCD/CD deaths in men was 1.3 (n=1951/1502) vs. NCD/CD deaths in women of 1.9 (n=735/378). The peak of deaths was observed in winter season. The majority of NCD deaths were at age of 30–64 years, whereas the highest rate of CD deaths was at age< 30 years. The trend of deaths including the majority of NCD, increased from 2002 to 2006. There was a tendency of increase in tuberculosis deaths, but a tendency of decrease in HIV/AIDS deaths was from 2002 to 2006. Conclusion: Non-communicable diseases are the leading causes of deaths in rural Eastern Cape province of SA facing Post-epidemiologic transition stages. We recommend overarching priority actions for the response to the Non-communicable Diseases: policy change, prevention, treatment, international cooperation, research, monitoring, accountability, and re-orientation of health systems. PMID:23641386

  6. Rate of false conviction of criminal defendants who are sentenced to death

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Samuel R.; O’Brien, Barbara; Hu, Chen; Kennedy, Edward H.

    2014-01-01

    The rate of erroneous conviction of innocent criminal defendants is often described as not merely unknown but unknowable. There is no systematic method to determine the accuracy of a criminal conviction; if there were, these errors would not occur in the first place. As a result, very few false convictions are ever discovered, and those that are discovered are not representative of the group as a whole. In the United States, however, a high proportion of false convictions that do come to light and produce exonerations are concentrated among the tiny minority of cases in which defendants are sentenced to death. This makes it possible to use data on death row exonerations to estimate the overall rate of false conviction among death sentences. The high rate of exoneration among death-sentenced defendants appears to be driven by the threat of execution, but most death-sentenced defendants are removed from death row and resentenced to life imprisonment, after which the likelihood of exoneration drops sharply. We use survival analysis to model this effect, and estimate that if all death-sentenced defendants remained under sentence of death indefinitely, at least 4.1% would be exonerated. We conclude that this is a conservative estimate of the proportion of false conviction among death sentences in the United States. PMID:24778209

  7. Rate of false conviction of criminal defendants who are sentenced to death.

    PubMed

    Gross, Samuel R; O'Brien, Barbara; Hu, Chen; Kennedy, Edward H

    2014-05-20

    The rate of erroneous conviction of innocent criminal defendants is often described as not merely unknown but unknowable. There is no systematic method to determine the accuracy of a criminal conviction; if there were, these errors would not occur in the first place. As a result, very few false convictions are ever discovered, and those that are discovered are not representative of the group as a whole. In the United States, however, a high proportion of false convictions that do come to light and produce exonerations are concentrated among the tiny minority of cases in which defendants are sentenced to death. This makes it possible to use data on death row exonerations to estimate the overall rate of false conviction among death sentences. The high rate of exoneration among death-sentenced defendants appears to be driven by the threat of execution, but most death-sentenced defendants are removed from death row and resentenced to life imprisonment, after which the likelihood of exoneration drops sharply. We use survival analysis to model this effect, and estimate that if all death-sentenced defendants remained under sentence of death indefinitely, at least 4.1% would be exonerated. We conclude that this is a conservative estimate of the proportion of false conviction among death sentences in the United States.

  8. High death rate in mice treated topically with diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Lerche, Catharina M; Philipsen, Peter A; Poulsen, Thomas; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2011-04-01

    Recently, 3% diclofenacnatrium gel (diclofenac) was introduced for the treatment of actinic keratoses. Data on photocarcinogenesis of topical diclofenac are limited, and we wished to investigate whether topical diclofenac can accelerate photocarcinogenesis using simulated solar radiation (SSR). Diclofenac was applied topically on the backs of hairless, female, C3.Cg/TifBomTac immunocompetent mice three times weekly followed by ultraviolet radiation (2, 3, or 4 Standard Erythema Dose) until death. There was a significant difference in survival between diclofenac-treated groups and control groups (P<0.0001). Physical examination of the diclofenac-treated mice showed peptic ulcers, oesophageal ulcers and gastrointestinal bleeding. To be sure that these side effects were not caused by topical absorption without oral ingestion, one group of mice was wearing Elizabethan collars and was single housed. Nevertheless, these mice also had gastrointestinal side effects. We terminated the experiment after 151 days when only a few mice remained in the diclofenac-treated groups and most had symptoms of discomfort and weight loss. No tumors developed as a result of the early termination.

  9. Association Between Air Temperature and Cancer Death Rates in Florida: An Ecological Study.

    PubMed

    Hart, John

    2015-01-01

    Proponents of global warming predict adverse events due to a slight warming of the planet in the last 100 years. This ecological study tests one of the possible arguments that might support the global warming theory - that it may increase cancer death rates. Thus, average daily air temperature is compared to cancer death rates at the county level in a U.S. state, while controlling for variables of smoking, race, and land elevation. The study revealed that lower cancer death rates were associated with warmer temperatures. Further study is indicated to verify these findings.

  10. 12 CFR 622.61 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended. 622.61... civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment... is adjusted in accordance with the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990,...

  11. 12 CFR 622.61 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended. 622.61... civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment... is adjusted in accordance with the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990,...

  12. Use of age-adjusted rates of suicide in time series studies in Israel.

    PubMed

    Bridges, F Stephen; Tankersley, William B

    2009-01-01

    Durkheim's modified theory of suicide was examined to explore how consistent it was in predicting Israeli rates of suicide from 1965 to 1997 when using age-adjusted rates rather than crude ones. In this time-series study, Israeli male and female rates of suicide increased and decreased, respectively, between 1965 and 1997. Conforming to Durkheim's modified theory, the Israeli male rate of suicide was lower in years when rates of marriage and birth are higher, while rates of suicide are higher in years when rates of divorce are higher, the opposite to that of Israeli women. The corrected regression coefficients suggest that the Israeli female rate of suicide remained lower in years when rate of divorce is higher, again the opposite suggested by Durkheim's modified theory. These results may indicate that divorce affects the mental health of Israeli women as suggested by their lower rate of suicide. Perhaps the "multiple roles held by Israeli females creates suicidogenic stress" and divorce provides some sense of stress relief, mentally speaking. The results were not as consistent with predictions suggested by Durkheim's modified theory of suicide as were rates from the United States for the same period nor were they consistent with rates based on "crude" suicide data. Thus, using age-adjusted rates of suicide had an influence on the prediction of the Israeli rate of suicide during this period.

  13. Low heart rate variability is a risk factor for sudden cardiac death in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Ito, Chikako; Sasaki, Hideo; Yamane, Kiminori; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association between sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart rate variability (HRV) in subjects with and without type 2 diabetes and to determine whether low HRV can predict SCD in type 2 diabetes. Subjects were 8917 consecutively examined persons (3089 diabetic, and 5828 nondiabetic subjects) aged 35-69 years who underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) together with electrocardiography (ECG). HRV was calculated from the 12-lead ECG as the coefficient of variance for 100 R-R intervals (CV(R-R)). During a median observation period of 5.2 years, SCD occurred in 56 subjects (33 diabetic, and 23 nondiabetic). Among diabetic subjects, mortality from SCD tended to be higher in subjects with a low CV(R-R) (P=0.004). After adjustment for age, gender, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), BMI, ischemic ECG change, and smoking history, relative risk (RR) of SCD was 2.07 (95% CI 1.02-4.17) in diabetic subjects with a CV(R-R) <2.2% compared with those with a CV(R-R) > or =2.2%. Diabetic subjects with a CV(R-R) <2.2% had significantly higher cumulative mortality from SCD than those with a CV(R-R) > or =2.2% (P=0.007). In type 2 diabetes, a low CV(R-R) carried an increased risk of SCD.

  14. Effects of Selected Hydrazines on the Early Death Rates of Enterobacter cloacae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Early Death Rates of Enterobacter cloacae S. A. London, C. R. Mantel, J. D. Robinson, and S. Luking Toxic Hazards Division, Air Force Aerospace Medical...A. enumerate cell death rate at low culture concentrations. C.3 MATERIALS AID 1ETHODS The organism used in this study - Enterobacter cloacae strain D...response to "transfer shock" than exposed cells. The effects of hydrazines on the duration of the lag phase of growth of E. cloacae str D-31 provide a

  15. ADJUSTABLE OUTPUT RATE CHEMICAL FEEDING EQUIPMENT FOR SWIMMING POOLS. NATIONAL SANITATION FOUNDATION STANDARD NUMBER 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    THE SCOPE OF THIS STANDARD COVERS ADJUSTABLE OUTPUT RATE CHEMICAL FEEDERS, WHETHER USED FOR SOLUTIONS, SLURRIES OR SOLIDS. IT ALSO INCLUDES AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT SUCH AS PUMPS, STRAINERS, TUBING CONNECTIONS, TANKS, INJECTION FITTINGS AND OTHER REQUIRED COMPONENTS. THE FEEDERS DESCRIBED ARE INTENDED TO BE DESIGNED AND USED SPECIFICALLY FOR CHEMICAL…

  16. Age-Adjustment and Related Epidemiology Rates in Education and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, John D.; Kruckman, Laurence; George, Joyce

    2006-01-01

    A quick review of introductory textbooks reveals that while gerontology authors and instructors introduce some aspect of demography and epidemiology data, there is limited focus on age adjustment or other important epidemiology rates. The goal of this paper is to reintroduce a variety of basic epidemiology strategies such as incidence, prevalence,…

  17. 3 CFR 13635 - Executive Order 13635 of December 27, 2012. Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... pay or salaries of the statutory pay systems (as defined in 5 U.S.C. 5302(1)), as adjusted under 5 U.S.... 3. Certain Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Salaries. The rates of basic pay or salaries for the... superseded as of the effective dates specified in section 7 of this order.Barack ObamaThe White...

  18. 42 CFR 417.594 - Computation of adjusted community rate (ACR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Computation of adjusted community rate (ACR). 417.594 Section 417.594 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS,...

  19. 78 FR 25515 - Order Making Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Adjustments to Transaction Fee Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... COMMISSION Order Making Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Adjustments to Transaction Fee Rates I. Background Section 31... forecast ADS of 1.0178 x $252,666,501,426 = $257,167,513,594. Multiply this figure by the 20 trading days... figure by the 22 trading days in April 2013 to obtain a total dollar volume forecast of...

  20. 78 FR 52694 - Price Cap Rules for Certain Postal Rate Adjustments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... Postal Service's Annual Compliance Report. Id. Valpak's concerns stem from the Postal Service's reporting... appear below the signature of this order. Section 3010.1 defines the terms ``annual limitation... rate adjustment authority may only be applied after applying the annual limitation. Section...

  1. An international comparison of the effect of policy shifts to organ donation following cardiocirculatory death (DCD) on donation rates after brain death (DBD) and transplantation rates.

    PubMed

    Bendorf, Aric; Kelly, Patrick J; Kerridge, Ian H; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Myerson, Brian; Stewart, Cameron; Pussell, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    During the past decade an increasing number of countries have adopted policies that emphasize donation after cardiocirculatory death (DCD) in an attempt to address the widening gap between the demand for transplantable organs and the availability of organs from donation after brain death (DBD) donors. In order to examine how these policy shifts have affected overall deceased organ donor (DD) and DBD rates, we analyzed deceased donation rates from 82 countries from 2000-2010. On average, overall DD, DBD and DCD rates have increased over time, with the proportion of DCD increasing 0.3% per year (p = 0.01). Countries with higher DCD rates have, on average, lower DBD rates. For every one-per million population (pmp) increase in the DCD rate, the average DBD rate decreased by 1.02 pmp (95% CI: 0.73, 1.32; p<0.0001). We also found that the number of organs transplanted per donor was significantly lower in DCD when compared to DBD donors with 1.51 less transplants per DCD compared to DBD (95% CI: 1.23, 1.79; p<0.001). Whilst the results do not infer a causal relationship between increased DCD and decreased DBD rates, the significant correlation between higher DCD and lower DBD rates coupled with the reduced number of organs transplanted per DCD donor suggests that a national policy focus on DCD may lead to an overall reduction in the number of transplants performed.

  2. 38 CFR 3.22 - DIC benefits for survivors of certain veterans rated totally disabled at time of death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... disabled at time of death. (a) Even though a veteran died of non-service-connected causes, VA will pay death benefits to the surviving spouse or children in the same manner as if the veteran's death were... survivors of certain veterans rated totally disabled at time of death. 3.22 Section 3.22 Pensions,...

  3. 38 CFR 3.22 - DIC benefits for survivors of certain veterans rated totally disabled at time of death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... disabled at time of death. (a) Even though a veteran died of non-service-connected causes, VA will pay death benefits to the surviving spouse or children in the same manner as if the veteran's death were... survivors of certain veterans rated totally disabled at time of death. 3.22 Section 3.22 Pensions,...

  4. Report to the nation finds continuing declines in cancer death rates

    Cancer.gov

    Death rates from all cancers combined for men, women, and children continued to decline in the United States between 2004 and 2008, according to the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2008. The overall rate of new cancer diagnoses,

  5. Economics of Life and Death: Mortality and Survival Rates for African-Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Char, S. V.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the correlates of premature death, infant mortality rates, and associated costs for African Americans using census and other government data. There is unimpeachable evidence to confirm the inferior health and survival rates of African Americans at all age intervals. (SLD)

  6. 25 CFR 175.13 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost of purchased power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.13 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost...

  7. 25 CFR 175.13 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost of purchased power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.13 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost...

  8. 25 CFR 175.13 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost of purchased power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.13 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost...

  9. 25 CFR 175.13 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost of purchased power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.13 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost...

  10. 25 CFR 175.13 - Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost of purchased power...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES Service Fees, Electric Power Rates and Revenues § 175.13 Procedures for adjusting electric power rates to reflect changes in the cost...

  11. 75 FR 24757 - Order Making Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Adjustments to the Fee Rates Applicable Under Section 6(b...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... the fee rates under Sections 31(b) and (c) of the Exchange Act in fiscal years 2002 through 2011. II... 14(g)(5) of the Exchange Act require the Commission to adjust the fee rates under Sections 13(e) and... adjustment to the fee rates under Sections 13(e) and 14(g) of the Exchange Act. \\7\\ The annual...

  12. Trend and forecasting rate of cancer deaths at a public university hospital using univariate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A.; Hassan, Noor I.

    2013-09-01

    Cancer is one of the principal causes of death in Malaysia. This study was performed to determine the pattern of rate of cancer deaths at a public hospital in Malaysia over an 11 year period from year 2001 to 2011, to determine the best fitted model of forecasting the rate of cancer deaths using Univariate Modeling and to forecast the rates for the next two years (2012 to 2013). The medical records of the death of patients with cancer admitted at this Hospital over 11 year's period were reviewed, with a total of 663 cases. The cancers were classified according to 10th Revision International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Data collected include socio-demographic background of patients such as registration number, age, gender, ethnicity, ward and diagnosis. Data entry and analysis was accomplished using SPSS 19.0 and Minitab 16.0. The five Univariate Models used were Naïve with Trend Model, Average Percent Change Model (ACPM), Single Exponential Smoothing, Double Exponential Smoothing and Holt's Method. The overall 11 years rate of cancer deaths showed that at this hospital, Malay patients have the highest percentage (88.10%) compared to other ethnic groups with males (51.30%) higher than females. Lung and breast cancer have the most number of cancer deaths among gender. About 29.60% of the patients who died due to cancer were aged 61 years old and above. The best Univariate Model used for forecasting the rate of cancer deaths is Single Exponential Smoothing Technique with alpha of 0.10. The forecast for the rate of cancer deaths shows a horizontally or flat value. The forecasted mortality trend remains at 6.84% from January 2012 to December 2013. All the government and private sectors and non-governmental organizations need to highlight issues on cancer especially lung and breast cancers to the public through campaigns using mass media, media electronics, posters and pamphlets in the attempt to decrease the rate of cancer deaths in Malaysia.

  13. Falling Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria Death Rate among Adults despite Rising Incidence, Sabah, Malaysia, 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Rajahram, Giri S; Barber, Bridget E; William, Timothy; Grigg, Matthew J; Menon, Jayaram; Yeo, Tsin W; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Deaths from Plasmodium knowlesi malaria have been linked to delayed parenteral treatment. In Malaysia, early intravenous artesunate is now recommended for all severe malaria cases. We describe P. knowlesi fatalities in Sabah, Malaysia, during 2012-2014 and report species-specific fatality rates based on 2010-2014 case notifications. Sixteen malaria-associated deaths (caused by PCR-confirmed P. knowlesi [7], P. falciparum [7], and P. vivax [1] and microscopy-diagnosed "P. malariae" [1]) were reported during 2012-2014. Six patients with severe P. knowlesi malaria received intravenous artesunate at hospital admission. For persons ≥15 years of age, overall fatality rates during 2010-2014 were 3.4, 4.2, and 1.0 deaths/1,000 P. knowlesi, P. falciparum, and P. vivax notifications, respectively; P. knowlesi-associated fatality rates fell from 9.2 to 1.6 deaths/1,000 notifications. No P. knowlesi-associated deaths occurred among children, despite 373 notified cases. Although P. knowlesi malaria incidence is rising, the notification-fatality rate has decreased, likely due to improved use of intravenous artesunate.

  14. Influence of changing travel patterns on child death rates from injury: trend analysis.

    PubMed Central

    DiGuiseppi, C.; Roberts, I.; Li, L.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine trends in child mortality from unintentional injury between 1985 and 1992 and to find how changes in modes of travel contributed to these trends. DESIGN: Poisson regression modelling using data from death certificates, censuses, and national travel surveys. SETTING: England and Wales. SUBJECTS: Resident children aged 0-14. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Deaths from unintentional injury and poisoning. RESULTS: Child deaths from injury declined by 34% (95% confidence interval 28% to 40%) per 100,000 population between 1985 and 1992. Substantial decreases in each of the leading causes of death from injury contributed to this overall decline. On average, children walked and cycled less distance and travelled substantially more miles by car in 1992 compared with 1985. Deaths from road traffic accidents declined for pedestrians by 24% per mile walked and for cyclists by 20% per mile cycled, substantially less than the declines per 100,000 population of 37% and 38% respectively. In contrast, deaths of occupants of motor vehicles declined by 42% per mile travelled by car compared with a 21% decline per 100,000 population. CONCLUSIONS: If trends in child mortality from injury continue the government's target to reduce the rate by 33% by the year 2005 will be achieved. A substantial proportion of the decline in pedestrian traffic and pedal cycling deaths, however, seems to have been achieved at the expense of children's walking and cycling activities. Changes in travel patterns may exact a considerable price in terms of future health problems. PMID:9116546

  15. 20 CFR 10.411 - What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases? (a) Compensation for death may not exceed the... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases? 10.411 Section 10.411 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION...

  16. 20 CFR 10.411 - What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases? (a) Compensation for death may not exceed the... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases? 10.411 Section 10.411 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION...

  17. 20 CFR 10.411 - What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases? (a) Compensation for death may not exceed the... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases? 10.411 Section 10.411 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION...

  18. 20 CFR 10.411 - What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases? (a) Compensation for death may not exceed the... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases? 10.411 Section 10.411 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION...

  19. 20 CFR 10.411 - What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases? (a) Compensation for death may not exceed the... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in death cases? 10.411 Section 10.411 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION...

  20. A predator-prey model with generic birth and death rates for the predator.

    PubMed

    Terry, Alan J

    2014-02-01

    We propose and study a predator-prey model in which the predator has a Holling type II functional response and generic per capita birth and death rates. Given that prey consumption provides the energy for predator activity, and that the predator functional response represents the prey consumption rate per predator, we assume that the per capita birth and death rates for the predator are, respectively, increasing and decreasing functions of the predator functional response. These functions are monotonic, but not necessarily strictly monotonic, for all values of the argument. In particular, we allow the possibility that the predator birth rate is zero for all sufficiently small values of the predator functional response, reflecting the idea that a certain level of energy intake is needed before a predator can reproduce. Our analysis reveals that the model exhibits the behaviours typically found in predator-prey models - extinction of the predator population, convergence to a periodic orbit, or convergence to a co-existence fixed point. For a specific example, in which the predator birth and death rates are constant for all sufficiently small or large values of the predator functional response, we corroborate our analysis with numerical simulations. In the unlikely case where these birth and death rates equal the same constant for all sufficiently large values of the predator functional response, the model is capable of structurally unstable behaviour, with a small change in the initial conditions leading to a more pronounced change in the long-term dynamics.

  1. High rates of death and hospitalization follow bone fracture among hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Tentori, Francesca; McCullough, Keith; Kilpatrick, Ryan D; Bradbury, Brian D; Robinson, Bruce M; Kerr, Peter G; Pisoni, Ronald L

    2014-01-01

    Altered bone structure and function contribute to the high rates of fractures in dialysis patients compared to the general population. Fracture events may increase the risk of subsequent adverse clinical outcomes. Here we assessed the incidence of post-fracture morbidity and mortality in an international cohort of 34,579 in-center hemodialysis patients in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS). We estimated country-specific rates of fractures requiring a hospital admission and associated length of stay in the hospital. Incidence rates of death and of a composite event of death/rehospitalization were estimated for 1 year after fracture. Overall, 3% of participants experienced a fracture. Fracture incidence varied across countries, from 12 events/1000 patient-years (PY) in Japan to 45/1000 PY in Belgium. In all countries, fracture rates were higher in the hemodialysis group compared to those reported for the general population. Median length of stay ranged from 7 to 37 days in the United States and Japan, respectively. In most countries, postfracture mortality rates exceeded 500/1000 PY and death/rehospitalization rates exceeded 1500/1000 PY. Fracture patients had higher unadjusted rates of death (3.7-fold) and death/rehospitalization (4.0-fold) compared to the overall DOPPS population. Mortality and hospitalization rates were highest in the first month after the fracture and declined thereafter. Thus, the high frequency of fractures and increased adverse outcomes following a fracture pose a significant health burden for dialysis patients. Fracture prevention strategies should be identified and applied broadly in nephrology practices.

  2. EFFECT OF AIR-POLLUTION CONTROL ON DEATH RATES IN DUBLIN, IRELAND: AN INTERVENTION STUDY. (R827353C006)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background Particulate air pollution episodes have been associated with increased daily death. However, there is little direct evidence that diminished particulate air pollution concentrations would lead to reductions in death rates. We assessed the effect of ...

  3. Thermal Death Kinetics of Conogethes Punctiferalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) as Influenced by Heating Rate and Life Stage.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lixia; Du, Yanli; Johnson, Judy A; Wang, Shaojin

    2015-10-01

    Thermal death kinetics of Conogethes punctiferalis (Guenée) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) at different life stages, heating rate, and temperature is essential for developing postharvest treatments to control pests in chestnuts. Using a heating block system (HBS), the most heat-tolerant life stage of C. punctiferalis and the effects of heating rate (0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, and 10°C/min) on insect mortality were determined. The thermal death kinetic data of fifth-instar C. punctiferalis were obtained at temperatures between 44 and 50°C at a heating rate of 5°C/min. The results showed that the relative heat tolerance of C. punctiferalis was found to be fifth instars>pupae> third instars> eggs. To avoid the enhanced thermal tolerance of C. punctiferalis at low heating rates (0.1 or 0.5°C/min), a high heating rate of 5°C/min was selected to simulate the fast radio frequency heating in chestnuts and further determine the thermal death kinetic data. Thermal death curves of C. punctiferalis followed a 0th-order kinetic reaction model. The minimum exposure time to achieve 100% mortality was 55, 12, 6, and 3 min at 44, 46, 48, and 50°C, respectively. The activation energy for controlling C. punctiferalis was 482.15 kJ/mol with the z value of 4.09°C obtained from the thermal death-time curve. The information provided by thermal death kinetics for C. punctiferalis is useful in developing effective postharvest thermal treatment protocols for disinfesting chestnuts.

  4. Contrast material injection protocol with the flow rate adjusted to the heart rate for dual source CT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaomei; Chen, Wenping; Li, Mei; Xu, Yi; Xu, Hai; Zhu, Yinsu; Wang, Dehang; Tang, Lijun

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the effect on coronary arterial attenuations of contrast material flow rate adjusted to a patient's heart rate during dual source CT coronary angiography (DSCT-CCTA). A total of 296 consecutive patients (mean age: 58.7 years) undergoing DSCT-CCTA without previous coronary stent placement, bypass surgery, congenital or valvular heart disease were included. The image acquisition protocol was standardized (120 kV, 380 mAs) and retrospective electrocardiograph (ECG) gating was used. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups [flow rate: G1: dosage/16, G2: dosage/(scan time +8), G3: fixed flow rate]. The groups were compared with respect to the attenuations of the ascending aorta (AA) above coronary ostia, the left main coronary artery (LM), the proximal right coronary artery (RCA), the left anterior descending artery (LAD), the left circumflex artery (LCX), and the contrast to noise ratio of the LM (LM(CNR)) and the proximal RCA (RCA(CNR)). Correlations between heart rate and attenuation of the coronary arteries were evaluated in three groups with linear regression. There was no significant difference in the three groups among the mean attenuations of AA (P = 0.141), LM (P = 0.068), RCA (P = 0.284), LM(CNR) (P = 0.598) and RCA(CNR) (P = 0.546). The attenuations of the LAD and the LCX in group 1 were slightly higher than those in group 2 and 3 (P < 0.05). In group 1, the attenuations of the AA (P < 0.01), LM (P < 0.01), RCA (P < 0.01), LAD (P = 0.02) and LCX (P < 0.01) decreased, respectively, with an increasing heart rate. A similar finding was detected in group 3 (AA: P < 0.01, LM: P < 0.01, RCA: P < 0.01, LAD: P < 0.01 and LCX: P < 0.01). In contrast, the attenuations of the AA (P = 0.55), LM (P = 0.27), RCA (P = 0.77), LAD (P = 0.22) and LCX (P = 0.74) had no significant correlation with heart rate in group 2. In all three groups, LM(CNR) (P = 0.77, 0.69 and 0.73 respectively) and RCA(CNR) (P = 0.75, 0.39 and 0.61 respectively) had no

  5. 77 FR 73456 - Update to the TR-12 Fuel Related Rate Adjustment Policy (SDDC Fuel Surcharge Policy)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Department of the Army Update to the TR-12 Fuel Related Rate Adjustment Policy (SDDC Fuel Surcharge Policy...: Reference: TR-12 Fuel Related Rate Adjustment Policy. Background: The following FRA policy applies to... increases in diesel fuel prices. Miscellaneous: A copy of the TR-12 FRA Policy can be accessed via the...

  6. Convergent Validity of the IPAT Children's Personality Questionnaire and Teacher's Ratings of the Adjustment of Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lessing, Elise E.; Barbera, Linda

    1974-01-01

    The IPAT Children's Personality Questionnaire was administered to two samples of white American school children. Both samples were divided into well-adjusted and maladjusted subgroups on the basis of teacher ratings. The CPQ Neuroticism score and the teacher ratings of adjustment status yielded biserial correlations of 0.12 and 0.22. (Author)

  7. Convergent Validity of the IPAT Children's Personality Questionnaire and Teachers' Ratings of the Adjustment of Elementary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lessing, Elise E.; And Others

    The IPAT Children's Personality Questionnaire was administered to two samples of white, middle-class, suburban school children. Both samples were divided into well-adjusted and maladjusted subgroups on the basis of teacher ratings. The CPQ Neuroticism score and the teacher ratings of adjustment status yielded biserial correlations of .12 and .22,…

  8. Capture-recapture-adjusted prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes are related to social deprivation.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A A; Beeching, N J; Gill, G V; Bellis, M A

    1999-12-01

    We examined the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and social deprivation in one urban district in Liverpool from October 1995 to September 1996 inclusive. This area has a stable Caucasian population of 176, 682. Lists were made of all known diabetics attending six different medical points of contact during the year, and were condensed and aggregated to eliminate duplicates. From postcode data, each patient was assigned to residence in one of the 14 electoral wards in the district, for which demographic structure and standardized measures of social deprivation were known (Townsend index). The crude period prevalences of type 1 and type 2 diabetes were estimated for each ward. Crude prevalence data were then corrected by applying capture-recapture (CR) techniques to the different patient datasets to allow for undercount. The crude period prevalence (95%CI) of diabetes was 1.5% (1.4-1.5%), or 2585/176, 682. The mean age of people with diabetes was not significantly different between electoral wards. The crude period prevalence of type 2 diabetes within individual wards ranged from 0.4% (0.3-0.6%) in the least deprived area to 4.1% (3.6-4.6%) in the most deprived area. The corresponding range of CR-adjusted period prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes was from 3.2% (2.8-3.6%) to 6.7% (6.1-7.4%), and there was strong correlation between both crude and CR-adjusted prevalence and social deprivation in each ward (r=0.76, p<0.001 for crude; and r=0. 49, p<0.005 for CR-adjusted prevalence). There was no correlation between the crude or CR-adjusted period prevalence rates of type 1 diabetes and Townsend index (r=0.14, p=NS). This strong correlation between the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and social deprivation has important implications for the planning of health-care delivery.

  9. 78 FR 36231 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA-Disclosure of Adjustable Rate Mortgages...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... Mortgages (ARMs) Rates AGENCY: Office of Single Family Program Development, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joanne Kuzma, Director, Office of Single Family Program Development... adjustable- rate mortgage ARM consistent with the disclosure requirements applicable to variable...

  10. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Adjustment Proceeding (WP-07) : Administrator's Final Record of Decision.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-07-01

    This Record of Decision (ROD) contains the decisions of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), based on the record compiled in this rate proceeding, with respect to the adoption of power rates for the three-year rate period commencing October 1, 2006, through September 30, 2009. This ''2007 Wholesale Power Rate Adjustment Proceeding'' is designed to establish replacement rate schedules and General Rate Schedule Provisions (GRSPs) for those that expire on September 30, 2006. This power rate case also establishes the General Transfer Agreement (GTA) Delivery Charge for the period of October 1, 2007, through September 30, 2009. BPA's Power Subscription Strategy and Record of Decision (Subscription Strategy), as well as other Agency processes, provide much of the policy context for this rate case and are described in Section 2. This ROD follows a full evidentiary hearing and briefing, including an Oral Argument before the BPA Administrator. Sections 3 through 18, including any appendices or attachments, present the issues raised by parties in this proceeding, the parties positions, BPA staff positions on the issues, BPA's evaluations of the positions, and the Administrator's decisions. Parties had the opportunity to file briefs on exceptions to the Draft ROD, before issuance of this Final Record of Decision.

  11. [Estimation of mortality from census survival rates and consequent estimates of birth and death rates: 1975-1980 in Korea case].

    PubMed

    Kwon, H Y; Kim, K S

    1982-07-01

    The rate of natural increase in population between the census in 1975 and 1980 is calculated with total population by sex. An abridged life table, based on the Coale and Demeny life table model, is used. The number of deaths from this life table is calculated by using age specific death rate. According to this number, each crude death rate for both sexes is calculated. The crude birth rate calculation is the difference between the rate of natural increase in population and the crude death rate. Each computed rate is as follows: natural increase rate: 1.98% (male), 1.83% (female), 1.91% (total); crude death rate: .547% (male), .546% (female), .547% (total); crude birth rate: 2.535% (male), 2.340% (female), 2.448% (total). In evaluating the crude death rate and crude birth rate result, the crude death rate is lower than expected. Crude death rate from the whole country fertility survey taken in 1974 is 7/1000 people. According to the whole country fertility survey data taken in 1976, the infant mortality rate in 1974 and 1975 are at 26% and 27.5% respectively, which is considered low. This low death rate in recent times is due to the decrease in the infant mortality rate and the decrease in death of the aged population. Calculated crude birth rate is 25.6/1000 persons for males, and 24/1000 for females. After the whole country fertility survey conducted in 1976, the crude birth rate is estimated at 24/1000 persons and crude birth rate in 1980 was estimated at 23.4 persons. Results are in line with the calculations of the Third Social Economic Development 5-year plan which was drafted by working staff in the population sector including the population professionals in the Bureau of Statistics of the Economic Planning Board.

  12. Radial and tangential gravity rates from GRACE in areas of glacial isostatic adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Kurtenbach, Enrico; Kusche, Jürgen; Vermeersen, Bert

    2011-11-01

    In areas dominated by Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA), the free-air gravity anomaly rate can be converted to uplift rate to good approximation by using a simple spectral relation. We provide quantitative comparisons between gravity rates derived from monthly gravity field solutions (GFZ Potsdam, CSR Texas, IGG Bonn) from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission with uplift rates measured by GPS in these areas. The band-limited gravity data from the GRACE satellite mission can be brought to very good agreement with the point data from GPS by using scaling factors derived from a GIA model (the root-mean-square of differences is 0.55 mm yr-1 for a maximum uplift rate signal of 10 mm yr-1). The root-mean-square of the differences between GRACE derived uplift rates and GPS derived uplift rates decreases with increasing GRACE time period to a level below the uncertainty that is expected from GRACE observations, GPS measurements and the conversion from gravity rate to uplift rate. With the current length of time-series (more than 8 yr) applying filters and a hydrology correction to the GRACE data does not reduce the root-mean-square of differences significantly. The smallest root-mean-square was obtained with the GFZ solution in Fennoscandia and with the CSR solution in North America. With radial gravity rates in excellent agreement with GPS uplift rates, more information on the GIA process can be extracted from GRACE gravity field solutions in the form of tangential gravity rates, which are equivalent to a rate of change in the deflection of the vertical scaled by the magnitude of gravity rate vector. Tangential gravity rates derived from GRACE point towards the centre of the previously glaciated area, and are largest in a location close to the centre of the former ice sheet. Forward modelling showed that present day tangential gravity rates have maximum sensitivity between the centre and edge of the former ice sheet, while radial gravity

  13. Adjustable high-repetition-rate pulse trains in a passively-mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si Fodil, Rachid; Amrani, Foued; Yang, Changxi; Kellou, Abdelhamid; Grelu, Ph.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally investigate multipulse regimes obtained within a passively-mode-locked fiber laser that includes a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer. By adjusting the time delay imbalance of the MZ, ultrashort pulse trains at multi-GHz repetition rates are generated. We compare the observed dynamics with high-harmonic mode locking, and show that the multi-GHz pulse trains display an inherent instability, which has been overlooked. By using a recirculation loop containing the MZ, we demonstrate a significant improvement of the pulse train stability.

  14. What is being done about Delaware's high cancer death rate? (1988 through June 1997).

    PubMed

    Frelick, R W

    1997-12-01

    After more than ten years of studies of Delaware's high cancer death rates by Delaware's Division of Public Health, few of the recommendations to reduce the excessive number of cancer deaths have been understood or adopted. Although rural Sussex County's cancer death rate is higher than the other two counties (except for lung cancer), and Delaware has only a few more cancers per population than the national average, industrial toxins commonly continue to be blamed for the State's high cancer mortality rate. People are still not persuaded that over the long run, cancer deaths would be cut by adopting healthy life styles to: 1. Reduce exposures to tobacco (by far the most significant intervention), 2. Stick to low fat, high fiber diets, 3. Have regular screening for cancers with appropriate tests 4. Seek medical attention for early symptoms of cancer. This review is seeking to emphasize the importance of implementing the repeated recommendations to reduce cancer mortality in Delaware without asking for another study, and to stress that health behavior education at home and in the schools is a cost effective way to initiate the adoption of healthy life styles to reduce the risk of getting cancer and dying from it. Efforts in the schools should be continued by extending health promotion activities to workplaces, doctors' offices, and to the general public with a focus on senior citizens. Universal access to health care will be needed especially for the poorly educated with limited fiscal resources who are most at risk. Delaware needs action, not more studies, to reduce its high cancer death rate.

  15. Race Adjustment for Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate Is Not Always Necessary

    PubMed Central

    Zanocco, Juliana A.; Nishida, Sonia K.; Passos, Michelle Tiveron; Pereira, Amélia Rodrigues; Silva, Marcelo S.; Pereira, Aparecido B.; Kirsztajn, Gianna Mastroianni

    2012-01-01

    Background Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is very important in clinical practice, although it is not adequately tested in different populations. We aimed at establishing the best eGFR formulas for a Brazilian population with emphasis on the need for race correction. Methods We evaluated 202 individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and 42 without previously known renal lesions that were additionally screened by urinalysis. Serum creatinine and plasma clearance of iohexol were measured in all cases. GFR was estimated by the Mayo Clinic, abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) formulas, and creatinine clearance was estimated by the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) formula. Plasma clearance of iohexol was used as the gold standard for GFR determination and for the development of a Brazilian formula (BreGFR). Results Measured and estimated GFR were compared in 244 individuals, 57% female, with a mean age of 41 years (range 18–82). Estimates of intraclass correlation coefficients among the plasma clearance of iohexol and eGFR formulas were all significant (p < 0.001) and corresponded to the following scores: CG 0.730; obesity-adjusted CG 0.789; Mayo Clinic 0.804; MDRD 0.848; MDRD1 (without race adjustment) 0.846; CKD-EPI 0.869; CKD-EPI1 (without race adjustment) 0.876, and BreGFR 0.844. Conclusions All cited eGFR formulas showed a good correlation with the plasma clearance of iohexol in the healthy and diseased conditions. The formulas that best detected reduced eGFR were the BreGFR, CKD-EPI, and CKD-EPI1 formulas. Notably, the race correction included in the MDRD and CKD-EPI formulas was not necessary for this population, as it did not contribute to more accurate results. PMID:23243414

  16. Effects of selected hydrazines on the early death rates of Enterobacter cloacae

    SciTech Connect

    London, S.A.; Mantel, C.R.; Robinson, J.D.; Luking, S.

    1983-09-01

    The toxicity of hydrazine and several of its methylated derivatives has been studied in a variety of biological systems. The measurements used in these studies were concerned with growth kinetics, i.e., time and concentration parameters describing the growth cycle of bacteria. This method provided useful information but was not sufficiently sensitive at the extremes of cell culture density. Since the major indication of intoxication at the test concentrations used (10 ppm hydrazine (HZ); 20 ppm monomethylhydrazine (MMH); and 50 ppm 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH)) was an extension of the lag period, a possible mechanism of action is a random or selective killing of inoculum cells. Since experiments based on turbidimetric data can not address this aspect, the authors studied the early death rate kinetics of hydrazine-exposed cultures using a standard viable cell counting procedure as a more reliable quantitative method to enumerate cell death rate at low culture concentrations.

  17. 20 CFR 10.410 - Who is entitled to compensation in case of death, and what are the rates of compensation payable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... death, and what are the rates of compensation payable in death cases? 10.410 Section 10.410 Employees... Related Benefits Compensation for Death § 10.410 Who is entitled to compensation in case of death, and what are the rates of compensation payable in death cases? (a) If there is no child entitled...

  18. 20 CFR 10.410 - Who is entitled to compensation in case of death, and what are the rates of compensation payable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... death, and what are the rates of compensation payable in death cases? 10.410 Section 10.410 Employees... Related Benefits Compensation for Death § 10.410 Who is entitled to compensation in case of death, and what are the rates of compensation payable in death cases? (a) Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 8133, benefits...

  19. Modelling the rate of change in a longitudinal study with missing data, adjusting for contact attempts.

    PubMed

    Akacha, Mouna; Hutton, Jane L

    2011-05-10

    The Collaborative Ankle Support Trial (CAST) is a longitudinal trial of treatments for severe ankle sprains in which interest lies in the rate of improvement, the effectiveness of reminders and potentially informative missingness. A model is proposed for continuous longitudinal data with non-ignorable or informative missingness, taking into account the nature of attempts made to contact initial non-responders. The model combines a non-linear mixed model for the outcome model with logistic regression models for the reminder processes. A sensitivity analysis is used to contrast this model with the traditional selection model, where we adjust for missingness by modelling the missingness process. The conclusions that recovery is slower, and less satisfactory with age and more rapid with below knee cast than with a tubular bandage do not alter materially across all models investigated. The results also suggest that phone calls are most effective in retrieving questionnaires.

  20. Contextual, Ecological and Organizational Variations in Risk-Adjusted COPD and Asthma Hospitalization Rates of Rural Medicare Beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Wan, Thomas T H; Lin, Yi-Ling; Ortiz, Judith

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine what factors contributing to the variability in chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) and asthma hospitalization rates when the influence of patient characteristics is being simultaneously considered by applying a risk adjustment method. A longitudinal analysis of COPD and asthma hospitalization of rural Medicare beneficiaries in 427 rural health clinics (RHCs) was conducted utilizing administrative data and inpatient and outpatient claims from Region 4. The repeated measures of risk-adjusted COPD and asthma admission rate were analyzed by growth curve modeling. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) method was used to identify the relevance of selected predictors in accounting for the variability in risk-adjusted admission rates for COPD and asthma. Both adjusted and unadjusted rates of COPD admission showed a slight decline from 2010 to 2013. The growth curve modeling showed the annual rates of change were gradually accentuated through time. GEE revealed that a moderate amount of variance (marginal R(2) = 0.66) in the risk-adjusted hospital admission rates for COPD and asthma was accounted for by contextual, ecological, and organizational variables. The contextual, ecological, and organizational factors are those associated with RHCs, not hospitals. We cannot infer how the variability in hospital practices in RHC service areas may have contributed to the disparities in admissions. Identification of RHCs with substantially higher rates than an average rate can portray the need for further enhancement of needed ambulatory or primary care services for the specific groups of RHCs. Because the risk-adjusted rates of hospitalization do not very by classification of rural area, future research should address the variation in a specific COPD and asthma condition of RHC patients. Risk-adjusted admission rates for COPD and asthma are influenced by the synergism of multiple contextual, ecological, and organizational factors

  1. Control of transportation death rates by varying road microstructure using segmental pavers

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, K.

    1995-06-01

    It is known that redesign of older roads to limit the mean and top speeds along them can prevent crashes and save lives. In many parts of the world, a standard part of this redesign for lower speeds consists of repaving with segmental pavers, particularly concrete pavers. Yet no controlled experimentation has been done to establish the relationship between paver texture, speed and crash, injury and mortality rates. Two possible experiments are proposed. It is further proposed that governments in English-speaking North America cannot await the results of such experiments to begin redesigning older roads to lower their death rates.

  2. 48 CFR 52.222-30 - Construction Wage Rate Requirements-Price Adjustment (None or Separately Specified Method).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Construction Wage Rate... PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.222-30 Construction Wage Rate Requirements... clause: Construction Wage Rate Requirements—Price Adjustment (None or Separately Specified Method)...

  3. A Distributed Transmission Rate Adjustment Algorithm in Heterogeneous CSMA/CA Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuanglong; Low, Kay Soon; Gunawan, Erry

    2015-01-01

    Distributed transmission rate tuning is important for a wide variety of IEEE 802.15.4 network applications such as industrial network control systems. Such systems often require each node to sustain certain throughput demand in order to guarantee the system performance. It is thus essential to determine a proper transmission rate that can meet the application requirement and compensate for network imperfections (e.g., packet loss). Such a tuning in a heterogeneous network is difficult due to the lack of modeling techniques that can deal with the heterogeneity of the network as well as the network traffic changes. In this paper, a distributed transmission rate tuning algorithm in a heterogeneous IEEE 802.15.4 CSMA/CA network is proposed. Each node uses the results of clear channel assessment (CCA) to estimate the busy channel probability. Then a mathematical framework is developed to estimate the on-going heterogeneous traffics using the busy channel probability at runtime. Finally a distributed algorithm is derived to tune the transmission rate of each node to accurately meet the throughput requirement. The algorithm does not require modifications on IEEE 802.15.4 MAC layer and it has been experimentally implemented and extensively tested using TelosB nodes with the TinyOS protocol stack. The results reveal that the algorithm is accurate and can satisfy the throughput demand. Compared with existing techniques, the algorithm is fully distributed and thus does not require any central coordination. With this property, it is able to adapt to traffic changes and re-adjust the transmission rate to the desired level, which cannot be achieved using the traditional modeling techniques. PMID:25822140

  4. 12 CFR 747.1001 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990 (Pub. L. 101-410, 104 Stat. 890, as amended (28 U.S.C. 2461 note)) to... of inflation. 747.1001 Section 747.1001 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties § 747.1001 Adjustment...

  5. Dynamic Adjustments in Channel Width in Response to a Forced Diversion: Gower Gulch, Death Valley National Park, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, N. P.; Kammer, L. L.

    2007-12-01

    We study the 1941 diversion of Furnace Creek Wash (drainage area 439 km2) into Gower Gulch (5.8 km2) as an experiment in the transient response of channel geometry to a large change in water and sediment discharge. We measure sequential changes in valley width using a time series of aerial photographs (1948-1995), airborne laser elevation data from 2005, and a field survey. We find that response of the system varies depending on the pre-diversion channel morphology and geology. In two steep knickzone segments, narrowing, knickpoint retreat, and bedrock incision dominates-- a detachment-limited response. In the relatively low-gradient main part of Gower Gulch, fine-grained, soft sedimentary rocks underlie the channel, and widening dominates as the large, coarse post-diversion sediment load covers the channel bed. The response in this section is transport limited, with only modest incision and adjustments in gradient. Two different processes appear to cause the channel to widen. (1) In many reaches, the stream is attacking the valley walls, as evidenced by fresh plucking and scour marks. This probably occurs because the bed in the middle of the channel is alluviated and protected, which minimizes the opportunity for vertical incision. (2) Some reaches have experienced aggradation, which widens the valley by filling it in. This occurs in places where storage space exists (splay deposits in small tributary mouths, fill terraces in the wide valleys at larger tributary mouths) or in reaches upstream of constrictions. Over long periods, the lowering rate of Gower Gulch probably depends on knickpoint retreat, but the present-day response of this non-steady-state system is a hybrid of incision and narrowing in detachment-limited reaches and widening in transport-limited reaches. This system demonstrates the importance of initial conditions and evolving channel geometry in setting the transient response of rivers.

  6. A not so happy day after all: excess death rates on birthdays in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Peña, Pablo A

    2015-02-01

    This study estimates average excess death rates on and around birthdays, and explores differences between birthdays falling on weekends and birthdays falling on weekdays. Using records from the U.S. Social Security Administration for 25 million people who died during the period from 1998 to 2011, average excess death rates are estimated controlling for seasonality of births and deaths. The average excess death rate on birthdays is 6.7% (p < 0.0001). No evidence is found of dips in average excess death rates in a ±10 day neighborhood around birthdays that could offset the spikes on birthdays. Significant differences are found between age groups and between weekend and weekday birthdays. Younger people have greater average excess death rates on birthdays, reaching up to 25.4% (p < 0.0001) for ages 20-29. Younger people also show the largest differences between average excess death rates on weekend birthdays and weekday birthdays, reaching up to 64.5 percentage points (p = 0.0063) for ages 1-9. Over the 13-year period analyzed, the estimated excess deaths on birthdays are 4590.

  7. Sudden infant death syndrome in Canada: trends in rates and risk factors, 1985-1998.

    PubMed

    Rusen, I D; Liu, Shiliang; Sauve, Reg; Joseph, K S; Kramer, Michael S

    2004-01-01

    In Canada, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remains the leading cause of postneonatal death. However, SIDS rates have been declining in many countries, including Canada. This decline has been largely attributed to recommendations to avoid placing infants to sleep in the prone position. We examined the postneonatal rate of mortality due to SIDS and to other causes in relation to the initial risk reduction campaign. The postneonatal mortality rate due to SIDS decreased from 0.97 to 0.54 per 1,000 neonatal survivors between 1985-1989 and 1994-1998 (relative risk [RR] = 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-0.62). The rate of postneonatal mortality due to other causes also decreased during the same period, though to a smaller extent, from 1.19 to 0.86 (RR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.66-0.78). With the exception of seasonality, established risk factors for SIDS remained essentially unchanged between the two time periods. The observed reduction in postneonatal SIDS is consistent with a positive impact of the initial recommendations regarding risk reduction. However, the lack of reliable risk factor data limits the extent to which the decline can be attributed directly to the campaign.

  8. Forced Migration and Mortality in the Very Long Term: Did Perestroika Affect Death Rates Also in Finland?

    PubMed Central

    SAARELA, JAN; FINNÄS, FJALAR

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we analyze mortality rates of Finns born in areas that were ceded to the Soviet Union after World War II and from which the entire population was evacuated. These internally displaced persons are observed during the period 1971–2004 and compared with people born in the same region but on the adjacent side of the new border. We find that in the 1970s and 1980s, the forced migrants had mortality rates that were on par with those of people in the comparison group. In the late 1980s, the mortality risk of internally displaced men increased by 20% in relation to the expected time trend. This deviation, which manifests particularly in cardiovascular mortality, coincides with perestroika and the demise of the Soviet Union, which were events that resulted in an intense debate in civil society about restitution of the ceded areas. Because state actors were reluctant to engage, the debate declined after some few years, and after the mid-1990s, the death risk again approached the long-term trend. Our findings indicate that when internally displaced persons must adjust to situations for which appropriate coping behaviors are unknown, psychosocial stress might arise several decades after their evacuation. PMID:19771945

  9. 39 CFR 3010.13 - Proceedings for Type 1-A and Type 1-B rate adjustment filings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... rate adjustments are found consistent with applicable law by the Commission, they may take effect... with applicable law by the Commission, the Postal Service will submit an amended notice of rate... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proceedings for Type 1-A and Type 1-B...

  10. 76 FR 63538 - Adjustment of Appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for the 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... 6 Adjustment of Appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for the 2011... sets forth the revised appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for the... dairy product import licenses permanently surrendered by licensees or revoked by the Licensing...

  11. 75 FR 53565 - Adjustment of Appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for the 2010...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... 6 Adjustment of Appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for the 2010... sets forth the revised appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for the... dairy product import licenses permanently surrendered by licensees or revoked by the Licensing...

  12. 78 FR 46491 - Adjustment of Appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for the 2013...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... 7 CFR Part 6 Adjustment of Appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for...: This document sets forth the revised appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing... for certain dairy product import licenses permanently surrendered by licensees or revoked by...

  13. 77 FR 51681 - Adjustment of Appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for the 2012...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... 7 CFR Part 6 Adjustment of Appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for...: This document sets forth the revised appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing... for certain dairy product import licenses permanently surrendered by licensees or revoked by...

  14. Adjusting to death: the effects of mortality salience and self-esteem on psychological well-being, growth motivation, and maladaptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Clay; Ostafin, Brian; Juhl, Jacob; Sedikides, Constantine; Cathey, Christie; Liao, Jiangqun

    2010-12-01

    This research builds on terror management theory to examine the relationships among self-esteem, death cognition, and psychological adjustment. Self-esteem was measured (Studies 1-2, 4-8) or manipulated (Study 3), and thoughts of death were manipulated (Studies 1-3, 5-8) or measured (Study 4). Subsequently, satisfaction with life (Study 1), subjective vitality (Study 2), meaning in life (Studies 3-5), positive and negative affect (Studies 1, 4, 5), exploration (Study 6), state anxiety (Study 7), and social avoidance (Study 8) were assessed. Death-related cognition (a) decreased satisfaction with life, subjective vitality, meaning in life, and exploration; (b) increased negative affect and state anxiety; and (c) exacerbated social avoidance for individuals with low self-esteem but not for those with high self-esteem. These effects occurred only when death thoughts were outside of focal attention. Parallel effects were found in American (Studies 1-4, 6-8) and Chinese (Study 5) samples.

  15. Rate of change in kidney function and the risk of death: the case for incorporating the rate of kidney function decline into the CKD staging system.

    PubMed

    Al-Aly, Ziyad; Cepeda, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk of death. A wave of recent studies used longitudinal data to examine the effect of the rate of decline of kidney function on the risk of death. The results from these studies show that there is an independent and graded association between the rate of kidney function decline and the risk of death. There is a need to incorporate the rate of decline in the definition of CKD. This redefinition of CKD will transform a static definition into a dynamic one that more accurately describes the disease state in an individual patient.

  16. Use of GRACE determined secular gravity rates for glacial isostatic adjustment studies in North-America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Wu, Patrick; Sideris, Michael G.; Shum, C. K.

    2008-10-01

    Monthly geopotential spherical harmonic coefficients from the GRACE satellite mission are used to determine their usefulness and limitations for studying glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) in North-America. Secular gravity rates are estimated by unweighted least-squares estimation using release 4 coefficients from August 2002 to August 2007 provided by the Center for Space Research (CSR), University of Texas. Smoothing is required to suppress short wavelength noise, in addition to filtering to diminish geographically correlated errors, as shown in previous studies. Optimal cut-off degrees and orders are determined for the destriping filter to maximize the signal to noise ratio. The halfwidth of the Gaussian filter is shown to significantly affect the sensitivity of the GRACE data (with respect to upper mantle viscosity and ice loading history). Therefore, the halfwidth should be selected based on the desired sensitivity. It is shown that increase in water storage in an area south west of Hudson Bay, from the summer of 2003 to the summer of 2006, contributes up to half of the maximum estimated gravity rate. Hydrology models differ in the predictions of the secular change in water storage, therefore even 4-year trend estimates are influenced by the uncertainty in water storage changes. Land ice melting in Greenland and Alaska has a non-negligible contribution, up to one-fourth of the maximum gravity rate. The estimated secular gravity rate shows two distinct peaks that can possibly be due to two domes in the former Pleistocene ice cover: west and south east of Hudson Bay. With a limited number of models, a better fit is obtained with models that use the ICE-3G model compared to the ICE-5G model. However, the uncertainty in interannual variations in hydrology models is too large to constrain the ice loading history with the current data span. For future work in which GRACE will be used to constrain ice loading history and the Earth's radial viscosity profile, it is

  17. Adjusted and unadjusted energy usage rates both determine body fat and plasma leptin in male Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J A; Rahman, S; Saint-Preux, S; Owen, D R; Boozer, C N

    1999-10-01

    Previous studies of the relationship between plasma leptin and energy usage have yielded contradictory findings. The present study was therefore conducted to clearly distinguish and measure the energy usage rate and the energy usage rate adjusted for a surrogate of metabolically active tissue mass. We investigated the simultaneous relationships between these two measures of energy usage, leptin, and body fat in 21-month-old adult male Fischer 344 rats on three different long-term dietary regimens: (1) continuous ad libitum feeding (Ad-lib); (2) ad libitum feeding until early adulthood, and then continuous 60% caloric restriction (CR); and (3) ad libitum feeding until early adulthood, then 60% caloric restriction until 16 months, and then ad libitum feeding for 5 months (CR/Ad-lib). Two versions of the daily usage rate were measured: daily dietary caloric intake (DCI), and daily energy expenditure (EE) based on indirect calorimetry. Two versions of the metabolically active tissue mass were also measured: fat-free mass (FFM), and the sum of the weight of the heart, brain, liver, and kidneys. Energy usage rates were adjusted for these measures of metabolically active tissue mass to yield measures of the energy metabolic rate. Correlation, regression, and path analyses showed that both the energy usage rate and adjusted energy usage rate played important independent roles in determining body fat and plasma leptin, but only after multivariate techniques were used to account for the simultaneous interactions between variables. Increases in the energy usage rate were associated with increases in body fat and the adjusted energy usage rate. Increases in the adjusted energy usage rate were associated with decreases in body fat and plasma leptin. These findings suggest that differences in subjects adjusted energy usage rate could explain some of the apparently contradictory findings concerning the relationship between energy usage and plasma leptin in previously published

  18. Effect of marital status on death rates. Part 2: Transient mortality spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Peter; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2016-05-01

    We examine what happens in a population when it experiences an abrupt change in surrounding conditions. Several cases of such "abrupt transitions" for both physical and living social systems are analyzed from which it can be seen that all share a common pattern. First, a steep rising death rate followed by a much slower relaxation process during which the death rate decreases as a power law. This leads us to propose a general principle which can be summarized as follows: "Any abrupt change in living conditions generates a mortality spike which acts as a kind of selection process". This we term the Transient Shock conjecture. It provides a qualitative model which leads to testable predictions. For example, marriage certainly brings about a major change in personal and social conditions and according to our conjecture one would expect a mortality spike in the months following marriage. At first sight this may seem an unlikely proposition but we demonstrate (by three different methods) that even here the existence of mortality spikes is supported by solid empirical evidence.

  19. Correlation between heart rate variability and pulmonary function adjusted by confounding factors in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Bianchim, M S; Sperandio, E F; Martinhão, G S; Matheus, A C; Lauria, V T; da Silva, R P; Spadari, R C; Gagliardi, A R T; Arantes, R L; Romiti, M; Dourado, V Z

    2016-03-01

    The autonomic nervous system maintains homeostasis, which is the state of balance in the body. That balance can be determined simply and noninvasively by evaluating heart rate variability (HRV). However, independently of autonomic control of the heart, HRV can be influenced by other factors, such as respiratory parameters. Little is known about the relationship between HRV and spirometric indices. In this study, our objective was to determine whether HRV correlates with spirometric indices in adults without cardiopulmonary disease, considering the main confounders (e.g., smoking and physical inactivity). In a sample of 119 asymptomatic adults (age 20-80 years), we evaluated forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). We evaluated resting HRV indices within a 5-min window in the middle of a 10-min recording period, thereafter analyzing time and frequency domains. To evaluate daily physical activity, we instructed participants to use a triaxial accelerometer for 7 days. Physical inactivity was defined as <150 min/week of moderate to intense physical activity. We found that FVC and FEV1, respectively, correlated significantly with the following aspects of the RR interval: standard deviation of the RR intervals (r =0.31 and 0.35), low-frequency component (r =0.38 and 0.40), and Poincaré plot SD2 (r =0.34 and 0.36). Multivariate regression analysis, adjusted for age, sex, smoking, physical inactivity, and cardiovascular risk, identified the SD2 and dyslipidemia as independent predictors of FVC and FEV1 (R2=0.125 and 0.180, respectively, for both). We conclude that pulmonary function is influenced by autonomic control of cardiovascular function, independently of the main confounders.

  20. Fetal death and reduced birth rates associated with exposure to lead-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This ecologic study notes that fetal death rates (FDR) during the Washington DC drinking water "lead crisis" (2000-2004) peaked in 2001 when water lead levels (WLLs) were highest, and were minimized in 2004 after public health interventions were implemented to protect pregnant women. Changes in the DC FDR vs neighboring Baltimore City were correlated to DC WLL (R(2) = 0.72). Birth rates in DC also increased versus Baltimore City and versus the United States in 2004-2006, when consumers were protected from high WLLs. The increased births in DC neighborhoods comparing 2004 versus 2001 was correlated to the incidence of lead pipes (R(2) = 0.60). DC birth rates from 1999 to 2007 correlated with proxies for maternal blood lead including the geometric mean blood lead in DC children (R(2) = 0.68) and the incidence of lead poisoning in children under age 1.3 years (R(2) = 0.64). After public health protections were removed in 2006, DC FDR spiked in 2007-2009 versus 2004-2006 (p < 0.05), in a manner consistent with high WLL health risks to consumers arising from partial lead service line replacements, and DC FDR dropped to historically low levels in 2010-2011 after consumers were protected and the PSLR program was terminated. Re-evaluation of a historic construction-related miscarriage cluster in the USA Today Building (1987-1988), demonstrates that high WLLs from disturbed plumbing were a possible cause. Overall results are consistent with prior research linking increased lead exposure to higher incidence of miscarriages and fetal death, even at blood lead elevations (≈5 μg/dL) once considered relatively low.

  1. Soil bacterial and fungal community dynamics in relation to Panax notoginseng death rate in a continuous cropping system

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Linlin; Xu, Jiang; Feng, Guangquan; Li, Xiwen; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Notoginseng (Panax notoginseng), a valuable herbal medicine, has high death rates in continuous cropping systems. Variation in the soil microbial community is considered the primary cause of notoginseng mortality, although the taxa responsible for crop failure remains unidentified. This study used high-throughput sequencing methods to characterize changes in the microbial community and screen microbial taxa related to the death rate. Fungal diversity significantly decreased in soils cropped with notoginseng for three years. The death rate and the fungal diversity were significantly negatively correlated, suggesting that fungal diversity might be a potential bioindicator of soil health. Positive correlation coefficients revealed that Burkholderiales, Syntrophobacteraceae, Myrmecridium, Phaeosphaeria, Fusarium, and Phoma were better adapted to colonization of diseased plants. The relative abundance of Fusarium oxysporum (R = 0.841, P < 0.05) and Phaeosphaeria rousseliana (R = 0.830, P < 0.05) were positively associated with the death rate. F. oxysporum was a pathogen of notoginseng root-rot that caused seedling death. Negative correlation coefficients indicated that Thermogemmatisporaceae, Actinosynnemataceae, Hydnodontaceae, Herpotrichiellaceae, and Coniosporium might be antagonists of pathogens, and the relative abundance of Coniosporium perforans was negatively correlated with the death rate. Our findings provide a dynamic overview of the microbial community and present a clear scope for screening beneficial microbes and pathogens of notoginseng. PMID:27549984

  2. 17 CFR Appendix B to Part 4 - Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return B Appendix B to Part 4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS Pt. 4, App....

  3. 17 CFR Appendix B to Part 4 - Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return B Appendix B to Part 4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS Pt. 4, App....

  4. 17 CFR Appendix B to Part 4 - Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return B Appendix B to Part 4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS Pt. 4, App....

  5. 17 CFR Appendix B to Part 4 - Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return B Appendix B to Part 4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS Pt. 4, App....

  6. 17 CFR Appendix B to Part 4 - Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adjustments for Additions and Withdrawals in the Computation of Rate of Return B Appendix B to Part 4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS Pt. 4, App....

  7. Measuring water accumulation rates using GRACE data in areas experiencing glacial isostatic adjustment: The Nelson River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, A.; Huang, J.; Kamp, G.; Henton, J.; Mazzotti, S.; James, T. S.; Courtier, N.; Barr, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite-derived total water storage can be obscured by glacial isostatic adjustment. In order to solve this problem for the Nelson River drainage basin in Canada, a gravity rate map from 110 months (June 2002 to October 2011) of GRACE gravity data was corrected for glacial isostatic adjustment using an independent gravity rate map derived from updated GPS vertical velocities. The GPS-based map was converted to equivalent gravity rate using a transfer function developed from GPS and absolute-g data at colocated sites. The corrected GRACE gravity rate map revealed a major positive anomaly within the drainage basin, which was independently shown by hydrological data to be due to changes in water storage. The anomaly represents a cumulative increase at its center of about 340 mm of water, reflecting a progression from extreme drought to extremely wet conditions.

  8. Management Strategies Aiming to Improve Horse Welfare Reduce Embryonic Death Rates in Mares.

    PubMed

    Malschitzky, E; Pimentel, A M; Garbade, P; Jobim, Mim; Gregory, R M; Mattos, R C

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the effect of management strategies aiming to improve animal well-being on pregnancy and embryonic death (ED) rates. Breeding records of a cohort of 1206 Thoroughbred mares brought to a stallion station facility, to be bred with the stallions housed there, were evaluated during ten breeding seasons. Mares were blocked according to management strategies in two groups: Stress and Relax. Strategies used to improve animal well-being (Relax group) were as follows: stopping the teasing routine, reducing or eliminating stall confinement, reducing the number of mares per group and maintaining herd stability during the breeding season. In barren mares, the pregnancy rate was higher in the Relax group (91.8%) when compared to the observed in Stress group (84.7%). However, no difference in pregnancy rates were observed (Stress = 85.2% vs. Relax = 86.2) in foaling mares. ED rate was higher in barren and foaling mares of the Stress group mares (25.5% and 26.8%, respectively) compared with the Relax group (16.1% and 14.7%, respectively). No significant differences were observed on foal heat pregnancy rate between groups; yet, the embryo loss on foal heat was significant reduced in Relax mares (Relax = 8.7% vs Stress = 24.5%). In conclusion, management strategies aimed to reduce social stress can reduce early pregnancy losses and the average cycles per pregnancy, improving reproductive performance in mares.

  9. A direct algorithm for convective adjustment of the vertical temperature profile for an arbitrary critical lapse rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akmaev, Rashid A.

    1991-01-01

    An efficient direct algorithm of convective adjustment for an arbitrary critical value of the vertical temperature lapse rate gamma is proposed. The algorithm provides an exact and unique solution of a standard convective adjustment problem for models with temperature specified either on nonuniformly spaced levels or for layers of different thicknesses in pressure, sigma, or other vertical coordinate related to pressure. The algorithm may be recommended for use either directly in atmospheric models not explicitly including a hydrologic cycle with prescribed gamma, or as a part of more complicated parameterizations of moist convection, where gamma may be calculated depending on relative humidity.

  10. 42 CFR 422.308 - Adjustments to capitation rates, benchmarks, bids, and payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... specialized MA plans for special needs individuals. (i) Application of payment rules. For plan year 2011 and... plan described in this paragraph is a fully integrated dual-eligible special needs plan, as defined at.... (6) Improvements to risk adjustment for special needs individuals with chronic health...

  11. 76 FR 74703 - Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License Royalty Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 386 Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License... by satellite carriers under the satellite carrier compulsory license of the Copyright Act. The COLA.... Telephone: (202) 707-7658. Email: crb@loc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The satellite carrier...

  12. 77 FR 70373 - Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License Royalty Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 386 Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License... by satellite carriers under the satellite carrier compulsory license of the Copyright Act. The COLA.... Telephone: (202) 707-7658. Email: crb@loc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The satellite carrier...

  13. 75 FR 75624 - Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License Royalty Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 386 Cost of Living Adjustment to Satellite Carrier Compulsory License... by satellite carriers under the satellite carrier compulsory license of the Copyright Act. The COLA... INFORMATION: The satellite carrier compulsory license establishes a statutory copyright licensing scheme...

  14. Long-term survival rates of gravity-assisted, adjustable differential pressure valves in infants with hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Gebert, Anna-Felicitas; Schulz, Matthias; Schwarz, Karin; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The use of adjustable differential pressure valves with gravity-assisted units in shunt therapy of children with hydrocephalus was reported to be feasible and promising as a way to avoid chronic overdrainage. In this single-center study, the authors' experiences in infants, who have higher rates of shunt complications, are presented. METHODS All data were collected from a cohort of infants (93 patients [37 girls and 56 boys], less than 1 year of age [mean age 4.1 ± 3.1 months]) who received their first adjustable pressure hydrocephalus shunt as either a primary or secondary implant between May 2007 and April 2012. Rates of valve and shunt failure were recorded for a total of 85 months until the end of the observation period in May 2014. RESULTS During a follow-up of 54.2 ± 15.9 months (range 26-85 months), the Kaplan-Meier rate of shunt survival was 69.2% at 1 year and 34.1% at 85 months; the Kaplan-Meier rate of valve survival was 77.8% at 1 year and 56% at 85 months. Survival rates of the shunt were significantly inferior if the patients had previous shunt surgery. During follow-up, 44 valves were exchanged in cases of infection (n = 19), occlusion (n = 14), dysfunction of the adjustment unit (n = 10), or to change the gravitational unit (n = 1). CONCLUSIONS Although a higher shunt complication rate is observed in infant populations compared with older children, reasonable survival rates demonstrate the feasibility of using this sophisticated valve technology. The gravitational unit of this valve is well tolerated and its adjustability offers the flexible application of opening pressure in an unpredictable cohort of patients. This may adequately address overdrainage-related complications from early in treatment.

  15. Greater Heart Rate Responses to Acute Stress Are Associated with Better Post-Error Adjustment in Special Police Cadets

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhuxi; Yuan, Yi; Buchanan, Tony W.; Zhang, Kan; Zhang, Liang; Wu, Jianhui

    2016-01-01

    High-stress jobs require both appropriate physiological regulation and behavioral adjustment to meet the demands of emergencies. Here, we investigated the relationship between the autonomic stress response and behavioral adjustment after errors in special police cadets. Sixty-eight healthy male special police cadets were randomly assigned to perform a first-time walk on an aerial rope bridge to induce stress responses or a walk on a cushion on the ground serving as a control condition. Subsequently, the participants completed a Go/No-go task to assess behavioral adjustment after false alarm responses. Heart rate measurements and subjective reports confirmed that stress responses were successfully elicited by the aerial rope bridge task in the stress group. In addition, greater heart rate increases during the rope bridge task were positively correlated with post-error slowing and had a trend of negative correlation with post-error miss rate increase in the subsequent Go/No-go task. These results suggested that stronger autonomic stress responses are related to better post-error adjustment under acute stress in this highly selected population and demonstrate that, under certain conditions, individuals with high-stress jobs might show cognitive benefits from a stronger physiological stress response. PMID:27428280

  16. Economic correlates of violent death rates in forty countries, 1962–2008: A cross-typological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bandy X.; Marotta, Phillip L.; Blay-Tofey, Morkeh; Wang, Winnie; de Bourmont, Shalila

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Our goal was to identify if there might be advantages to combining two major public health concerns, i.e., homicides and suicides, in an analysis with well-established macro-level economic determinants, i.e., unemployment and inequality. Methods Mortality data, unemployment statistics, and inequality measures were obtained for 40 countries for the years 1962–2008. Rates of combined homicide and suicide, ratio of suicide to combined violent death, and ratio between homicide and suicide were graphed and analyzed. A fixed effects regression model was then performed for unemployment rates and Gini coefficients on homicide, suicide, and combined death rates. Results For a majority of nation states, suicide comprised a substantial proportion (mean 75.51%; range 0–99%) of the combined rate of homicide and suicide. When combined, a small but significant relationship emerged between logged Gini coefficient and combined death rates (0.0066, p < 0.05), suggesting that the combined rate improves the ability to detect a significant relationship when compared to either rate measurement alone. Results were duplicated by age group, whereby combining death rates into a single measure improved statistical power, provided that the association was strong. Conclusions Violent deaths, when combined, were associated with an increase in unemployment and an increase in Gini coefficient, creating a more robust variable. As the effects of macro-level factors (e.g., social and economic policies) on violent death rates in a population are shown to be more significant than those of micro-level influences (e.g., individual characteristics), these associations may be useful to discover. An expansion of socioeconomic variables and the inclusion of other forms of violence in future research could help elucidate long-term trends. PMID:26028985

  17. Diseases and Causes of Death in European Bats: Dynamics in Disease Susceptibility and Infection Rates

    PubMed Central

    Mühldorfer, Kristin; Speck, Stephanie; Kurth, Andreas; Lesnik, René; Freuling, Conrad; Müller, Thomas; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Wibbelt, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    Background Bats receive increasing attention in infectious disease studies, because of their well recognized status as reservoir species for various infectious agents. This is even more important, as bats with their capability of long distance dispersal and complex social structures are unique in the way microbes could be spread by these mammalian species. Nevertheless, infection studies in bats are predominantly limited to the identification of specific pathogens presenting a potential health threat to humans. But the impact of infectious agents on the individual host and their importance on bat mortality is largely unknown and has been neglected in most studies published to date. Methodology/Principal Findings Between 2002 and 2009, 486 deceased bats of 19 European species (family Vespertilionidae) were collected in different geographic regions in Germany. Most animals represented individual cases that have been incidentally found close to roosting sites or near human habitation in urban and urban-like environments. The bat carcasses were subjected to a post-mortem examination and investigated histo-pathologically, bacteriologically and virologically. Trauma and disease represented the most important causes of death in these bats. Comparative analysis of pathological findings and microbiological results show that microbial agents indeed have an impact on bats succumbing to infectious diseases, with fatal bacterial, viral and parasitic infections found in at least 12% of the bats investigated. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate the importance of diseases and infectious agents as cause of death in European bat species. The clear seasonal and individual variations in disease prevalence and infection rates indicate that maternity colonies are more susceptible to infectious agents, underlining the possible important role of host physiology, immunity and roosting behavior as risk factors for infection of bats. PMID:22216354

  18. An age adjustment of very young children of India, 1981 and reappraisal of fertility and mortality rates--A model approach.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, B K

    1986-01-01

    Several approaches were made by actuaries and demographers to correct and smooth the Indian age distribution with special emphasis on population in age group 0-4 at different points of time. The present analysis conceives the life table stationary population (using the West Model) as 'reference standard'. 2 parameters were estimated from a regression equation using the proportion of population in age groups 5-14 and 60-plus as independent variables and that in 0-4 as the dependent variable. The corrected census proportions in age group 0-4 obtained from the regression model under certain assumptions for the 14 major states and India seem to be consistent and to have slightly lower values than those of the 1971 adjusted data. Moreover, unadjusted and adjusted proportions in 5-14 and 60 plus do not show any significant difference between the predicted values. Using the corrected population aged 0-4 years, the average annual birth and death rates during the 5 year period preceeding the 1981 census have been estimated for those 14 states and India as well. The estimated birth rates so obtained were further adjusted using an appropriate factor from the West Model and Indian life table survival ratios. The final estimates seem to be consistent, except for a few, and to have slightly higher values than those of earlier estimates. As the present analysis is based on a 5% sample and confined to only 14 states, it is proposed to study the same for all the states and India in greater detail using full count data on age distribution and actul life tables as and when available.

  19. Prediction of road traffic death rate using neural networks optimised by genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Seyed Ali; Jahandideh, Sepideh; Jahandideh, Mina; Asadabadi, Ebrahim Barzegari

    2015-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are realised as a main cause of public health problems at global, regional and national levels. Therefore, prediction of road traffic death rate will be helpful in its management. Based on this fact, we used an artificial neural network model optimised through Genetic algorithm to predict mortality. In this study, a five-fold cross-validation procedure on a data set containing total of 178 countries was used to verify the performance of models. The best-fit model was selected according to the root mean square errors (RMSE). Genetic algorithm, as a powerful model which has not been introduced in prediction of mortality to this extent in previous studies, showed high performance. The lowest RMSE obtained was 0.0808. Such satisfactory results could be attributed to the use of Genetic algorithm as a powerful optimiser which selects the best input feature set to be fed into the neural networks. Seven factors have been known as the most effective factors on the road traffic mortality rate by high accuracy. The gained results displayed that our model is very promising and may play a useful role in developing a better method for assessing the influence of road traffic mortality risk factors.

  20. Raised Speed Limits, Speed Spillover, Case-Fatality Rates, and Road Deaths in Israel: A 5-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Elihu D.; Barach, Paul; Friedman, Lee; Krikler, Samuel; Israeli, Abraham

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the 5-year, nationwide impact on road deaths of the raise in the speed limit (November 1, 1993) on 3 major interurban highways in Israel from 90 to 100 kph. Methods. We compared before–after trends in deaths as well as case fatality—an outcome independent of exposure (defined as vehicle-kilometers traveled). Results. After the raise, speeds rose by 4.5%–9.1%. Over 5 years, there was a sustained increase in deaths (15%) and case fatality rates (38%) on all interurban roads. Corresponding increases in deaths (13%) and case fatality (24%) on urban roads indicated “speed spillover.” Conclusions. Immediate increases in case fatality predicted and tracked the sustained increase in deaths from increased speeds of impact. Newtonian fourth power models predicted the effects of “small” increases in speed on large rises in case fatality rates. Countermeasures and congestion reduced the impact on deaths and case-fatality rates by more than half. PMID:15054007

  1. Adjusting for temporal change in trophic position results in reduced rates of contaminant decline.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Craig E; Weseloh, D V Chip

    2006-09-15

    The development of ecological tracers to track the flow of energy and nutrients through food webs has provided new insights into the factors that are important in regulating diet composition in wildlife. The Great Lakes Herring Gull Monitoring Program has provided information regarding temporal trends in levels of bioaccumulative contaminants since the early 1970s. In recent years, data from this program have also been generated to examine ecological changes in the Great Lakes. Because the contaminants that are evaluated as part of this program biomagnify, food is the primary determinant of contaminant concentrations in the eggs that are analyzed annually. Fluctuations in diet composition could affect the interpretation of temporal trends by affecting exposure to contaminants. Retrospective analyses involving ecological tracers, i.e., stable nitrogen isotopes and fatty acids, have shown temporal change in the diets of Great Lakes herring gulls at some monitoring colonies. These dietary differences have led to temporal variation in the trophic position of herring gulls. Given that higher trophic level organisms incur greater exposure to biomagnifying contaminants, it is necessary to adjust for these temporal changes in trophic position to get an accurate indication of how contaminant burdens are changing within the Great Lakes ecosystem. Here, we outline a method to adjust for temporal changes in indicator species trophic position and discuss how these adjustments affect the interpretation of contaminant temporal trend monitoring data.

  2. Short-term heat stress exposure limits based on wet bulb globe temperature adjusted for clothing and metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Thomas E; Ashley, Candi D

    2009-10-01

    Most heat stress exposure assessments based on wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) consider the environmental conditions, metabolic demands, and clothing requirements, and the exposure limit is for extended work periods (e.g., a typical workday). The U.S. Navy physiological heat exposure limit (PHEL) curves and rational models of heat stress also consider time as a job risk factor so that there is a limiting time for exposures above a conventional WBGT exposure limit. The PHEL charts have not been examined for different clothing and the rational models require personal computers. The current study examined the role of clothing in short-term (time limited) exposures and proposed a relationship between a Safe Exposure Time and WBGT adjusted for clothing and metabolic rate. Twelve participants worked at a metabolic rate of 380 W in three clothing ensembles [clothing adjustment factors]: (1) work clothes (0 degrees C-WBGT), (2) NexGen microporous coveralls (2.5 degrees C-WBGT), and (2) vapor-barrier coveralls (6.5 degrees C-WBGT) at five levels of heat stress (approximately at the clothing adjusted TLV plus 7.0, 8.0, 9.5, 11.5 and 15.0 degrees C-WBGT). The combinations of metabolic rate, clothing, and environment were selected in anticipation that the participants would reach a physiological limit in less than 120 min. WBGT-based clothing adjustment factors were used to account for different clothing ensembles, and no differences were found for ensemble, which meant that the clothing adjustment factor can be used in WBGT-based time limited exposures. An equation was proposed to recommend a Safe Exposure Time for exposures under 120 min. The recommended times were longer than the PHEL times or times from a rational model of heat stress.

  3. Mandatory Provider Review And Pain Clinic Laws Reduce The Amounts Of Opioids Prescribed And Overdose Death Rates.

    PubMed

    Dowell, Deborah; Zhang, Kun; Noonan, Rita K; Hockenberry, Jason M

    2016-10-01

    To address the opioid overdose epidemic in the United States, states have implemented policies to reduce inappropriate opioid prescribing. These policies could affect the coincident heroin overdose epidemic by either driving the substitution of heroin for opioids or reducing simultaneous use of both substances. We used IMS Health's National Prescription Audit and government mortality data to examine the effect of these policies on opioid prescribing and on prescription opioid and heroin overdose death rates in the United States during 2006-13. The analysis revealed that combined implementation of mandated provider review of state-run prescription drug monitoring program data and pain clinic laws reduced opioid amounts prescribed by 8 percent and prescription opioid overdose death rates by 12 percent. We also observed relatively large but statistically insignificant reductions in heroin overdose death rates after implementation of these policies. This combination of policies was effective, but broader approaches to address these coincident epidemics are needed.

  4. Percentage of body recovered and its effect on identification rates and cause and manner of death determination.

    PubMed

    Komar, Debra A; Potter, Wendy E

    2007-05-01

    Anthropologists frequently encounter cases in which only partial human remains are recovered. This study reports how the percentage of the body recovered affects identification (ID) rates and cause and manner of death determination. A total of 773 cases involving anthropology consults were drawn from the New Mexico medical examiner's office (1974-2006). Results indicate a significant correlation between body percent recovered and ID rates, which ranged from 89% for complete bodies to 56% when less than half the body was present. Similar patterns were evident in cause/manner determination, which were the highest (83% and 79%, respectively) in complete bodies but declined to 40% when less than half the body was found. The absence of a skull also negatively impacted ID and ruling rates. Findings are compared with general autopsy ID rates (94-96%) and cause/manner determination rates (96-99%) as well as prior published rates for individual casework and mass death events.

  5. 75 FR 78690 - Fiscal Year (FY) 2012-2013 Proposed Transmission Rate Adjustments Public Hearing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ...-Point (PTP) service. Network Integration Transmission (NT-12) rate--The NT rate applies to customers taking network integration service under the Open Access Transmission Tariff (OATT) and allows customers... rate that applies to customers taking point-to-point service on BPA's network facilities under the...

  6. Paris Prospective Study III: a study of novel heart rate parameters, baroreflex sensitivity and risk of sudden death.

    PubMed

    Empana, Jean-Philippe; Bean, Kathy; Guibout, Catherine; Thomas, Frédérique; Bingham, Annie; Pannier, Bruno; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Jouven, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Resting heart rate has been related to the risk of cardiovascular disease and sudden death in several large prospective studies. To investigate prospectively the association of novel heart rate parameters and of carotid artery stiffness with sudden death and other cardiovascular disease. The Paris Prospective Study III (PPS3) is a new, ongoing French prospective study. From June 2008 to December 2011, 10,000 men and women aged 50-75 years who will have a preventive medical check-up at the Centre d'Investigations Préventives et Cliniques in Paris (France), will be enrolled in the study, after signing an informed consent. In addition to the general health examination, each subject's heart rhythm will be recorded during the course of the health check-up (approximately 2(1/2) h) and an echo-tracking of the right carotid bulb will be performed by trained technicians. A bio bank and DNA bank will be established for further biomarker and genetic analyses. The occurrence of cardiovascular disease including acute coronary syndrome, stroke, peripheral artery disease and sudden death, and of mortality, of the participants will be followed up during 20 years. With an estimated mean annual rate of sudden death of 0.1% and its increasing incidence rate with age, between 250 and 300 sudden deaths are expected. This unique study should provide new insights into the regulation of heart rate and blood pressure and should enable to identify novel heart rate parameters that are associated with sudden death.

  7. 75 FR 7580 - Proposed Rate Adjustment for Kerr-Philpott System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... and approved Rate Schedules VA-1-A, VA-2-A, VA-3-A, VA-4-A, CP&L-1-A, CP&L-2-A, CP&L-3-A, CP&L-4-A, AP... arrangement with the Government and for providing a transmission arrangement. Rate Schedule CP&L-1-B Available... Carolinas). Rate Schedule CP&L-2-B Available to public bodies and cooperatives in North Carolina to...

  8. Dynamic adjustments in channel width in response to a forced diversion: Gower Gulch, Death Valley National Park, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Noah P.; Kammer, Lisa L.

    2008-02-01

    We studied the 1941 diversion of Furnace Creek Wash (drainagearea 439 km2) into Gower Gulch (5.8 km2) as an experiment inthe transient response of a channel to a large change in waterand sediment discharge. We measured sequential changes in valleywidth using a time series of aerial photographs (1948-1995),airborne laser elevation data from 2005, and a field survey.We found that the response of the system varied depending onthe prediversion channel morphology and bedrock geology. Intwo steep knickzone segments, narrowing, knickpoint retreatand bedrock incision dominated, indicating a detachment-limitedresponse. In the relatively low-gradient main part of GowerGulch, widening dominated as the coarse postdiversion sedimentload covered the channel bed. This transport-limited part ofthe system has undergone only modest incision and adjustmentsin gradient. Over long periods, the lowering rate of Gower Gulchprobably depends on knickpoint retreat, but the present-dayresponse of this non-steady-state system is a hybrid ofincision and narrowing in detachment-limited reaches and wideningin transport-limited reaches. This system demonstrates the importanceof evolving channel geometry in setting the transient responseof rivers to changes in forcing parameters.

  9. Sex-Based Differences in Rates, Causes, and Predictors of Death Among Injection Drug Users in Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kanna; Dong, Huiru; Marshall, Brandon D L; Milloy, Michael-John; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    In the present study, we sought to identify rates, causes, and predictors of death among male and female injection drug users (IDUs) in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, during a period of expanded public health interventions. Data from prospective cohorts of IDUs in Vancouver were linked to the provincial database of vital statistics to ascertain rates and causes of death between 1996 and 2011. Mortality rates were analyzed using Poisson regression and indirect standardization. Predictors of mortality were identified using multivariable Cox regression models stratified by sex. Among the 2,317 participants, 794 (34.3%) of whom were women, there were 483 deaths during follow-up, with a rate of 32.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 29.3, 35.0) deaths per 1,000 person-years. Standardized mortality ratios were 7.28 (95% CI: 6.50, 8.14) for men and 15.56 (95% CI: 13.31, 18.07) for women. During the study period, mortality rates related to infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) declined among men but remained stable among women. In multivariable analyses, HIV seropositivity was independently associated with mortality in both sexes (all P < 0.05). The excess mortality burden among IDUs in our cohorts was primarily attributable to HIV infection; compared with men, women remained at higher risk of HIV-related mortality, indicating a need for sex-specific interventions to reduce mortality among female IDUs in this setting.

  10. 3 CFR 13641 - Executive Order 13641 of April 5, 2013. Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Appropriations Act, 2013 (Public Law 113-6), the rates of basic pay or salaries of the statutory pay systems (as... hereof. Sec. 3. Certain Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Salaries. The rates of basic pay or salaries... specified in section 7 of this order.Barack ObamaThe White House, April 5, 2013. ED11AP13.002...

  11. 3 CFR 13594 - Executive Order 13594 of December 19, 2011. Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...(Public Law 111-322; December 22, 2010), the rates of basic pay or salaries of the statutory pay systems... hereof. Sec. 3. Certain Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Salaries. The rates of basic pay or salaries... Order Superseded. Executive Order 13561 of December 22, 2010, is superseded.Barack ObamaThe White...

  12. 3 CFR 13655 - Executive Order 13655 of December 23, 2013. Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...: Section 1. Statutory Pay Systems. The rates of basic pay or salaries of the statutory pay systems (as... Salaries. The rates of basic pay or salaries for the following offices and positions are set forth on the... specified in section 7 of this order.Barack ObamaThe White House, December 23, 2013. ED31DE13.195...

  13. 75 FR 53198 - Rate Adjustment for the Satellite Carrier Compulsory License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... (collectively, the ``Copyright Owners'') and DIRECTV, Inc., DISH Network, LLC, and National Programming Service... proceeding and a significant interest in the outcome of that proceeding objects under clause (II... related to the programming on such stream. (b) Rates--(1) Private home viewing. The rates applicable...

  14. 75 FR 39891 - Rate Adjustment for the Satellite Carrier Compulsory License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... Owners'') and DIRECTV, Inc., DISH Network, LLC, and National Programming Service, LLC (collectively, the... proceeding and a significant interest in the outcome of that proceeding objects under clause ] (II).'' Any... programming on such stream. (b) Rates. (1) Private home viewing. The rates applicable to Satellite...

  15. 38 CFR 3.22 - DIC benefits for survivors of certain veterans rated totally disabled at time of death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... payments under the provisions of 10 U.S.C. 1174(h)(2); (v) VA was withholding payments because the veteran... from the amount to be reported. (h) Relationship to survivor benefit plan. For the purpose of 10 U.S.C... veteran's release from active duty and for at least 5 years immediately preceding death; or (iii) Rated...

  16. 38 CFR 3.22 - DIC benefits for survivors of certain veterans rated totally disabled at time of death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... payments under the provisions of 10 U.S.C. 1174(h)(2); (v) VA was withholding payments because the veteran... from the amount to be reported. (h) Relationship to survivor benefit plan. For the purpose of 10 U.S.C... veteran's release from active duty and for at least 5 years immediately preceding death; or (iii) Rated...

  17. Using a detailed uncertainty analysis to adjust mapped rates of forest disturbance derived from Landsat time series data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, W. B.; Yang, Z.; Stehman, S.; Huang, C.; Healey, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    Forest ecosystem process models require spatially and temporally detailed disturbance data to accurately predict fluxes of carbon or changes in biodiversity over time. A variety of new mapping algorithms using dense Landsat time series show great promise for providing disturbance characterizations at an annual time step. These algorithms provide unprecedented detail with respect to timing, magnitude, and duration of individual disturbance events, and causal agent. But all maps have error and disturbance maps in particular can have significant omission error because many disturbances are relatively subtle. Because disturbance, although ubiquitous, can be a relatively rare event spatially in any given year, omission errors can have a great impact on mapped rates. Using a high quality reference disturbance dataset, it is possible to not only characterize map errors but also to adjust mapped disturbance rates to provide unbiased rate estimates with confidence intervals. We present results from a national-level disturbance mapping project (the North American Forest Dynamics project) based on the Vegetation Change Tracker (VCT) with annual Landsat time series and uncertainty analyses that consist of three basic components: response design, statistical design, and analyses. The response design describes the reference data collection, in terms of the tool used (TimeSync), a formal description of interpretations, and the approach for data collection. The statistical design defines the selection of plot samples to be interpreted, whether stratification is used, and the sample size. Analyses involve derivation of standard agreement matrices between the map and the reference data, and use of inclusion probabilities and post-stratification to adjust mapped disturbance rates. Because for NAFD we use annual time series, both mapped and adjusted rates are provided at an annual time step from ~1985-present. Preliminary evaluations indicate that VCT captures most of the higher

  18. Statistical methods to adjust for date and age misreporting to improve estimates of vital rates in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Pullum, T W

    1991-02-01

    Misreporting of dates and ages poses serious difficulties for the estimation of the age distribution and birth and death rates in many developing countries. The pervasiveness of these problems is illustrated with data from a well-designed on-going survey in Pakistan, the Pakistan Demographic Survey. Methods for reconciling discrepancies, based on the assumptions of constant misreporting and survivorship patterns, are presented. The reasoning behind these methods could be applied much more generally. Research into the cultural interpretations of age and dates, and the nature of possible biases, is called for.

  19. 75 FR 8730 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; FHA- Disclosure of Adjustable Rate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; FHA- Disclosure of... applicable to variable rate mortgages secured by a principal dwelling under TILA. Regulation Z,'' at 15...

  20. 78 FR 48374 - Great Lakes Pilotage Rates-2014 Annual Review and Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... consideration to the public interest and the costs of providing the services.'' 46 U.S.C. 9303(f). Rates must be... pilotage systems that has existed since 2008. Based on historic traffic levels, we believe this weighting... for pilotage services, giving consideration to the public interest and the costs of providing...

  1. 77 FR 45539 - Great Lakes Pilotage Rates-2013 Annual Review and Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... public interest and the costs of providing the services.'' Rates must be established or reviewed and... 1 Area 2 Reported expenses for 2010 St. Lawrence Total River Lake Ontario Pilot Costs: Other pilotage costs: Pilot subsistence/Travel $212,715 $167,880 $380,595 License insurance 23,880 18,847...

  2. Automatic learning rate adjustment for self-supervising autonomous robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arras, Michael K.; Protzel, Peter W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1992-01-01

    Described is an application in which an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) controls the positioning of a robot arm with five degrees of freedom by using visual feedback provided by two cameras. This application and the specific ANN model, local liner maps, are based on the work of Ritter, Martinetz, and Schulten. We extended their approach by generating a filtered, average positioning error from the continuous camera feedback and by coupling the learning rate to this error. When the network learns to position the arm, the positioning error decreases and so does the learning rate until the system stabilizes at a minimum error and learning rate. This abolishes the need for a predetermined cooling schedule. The automatic cooling procedure results in a closed loop control with no distinction between a learning phase and a production phase. If the positioning error suddenly starts to increase due to an internal failure such as a broken joint, or an environmental change such as a camera moving, the learning rate increases accordingly. Thus, learning is automatically activated and the network adapts to the new condition after which the error decreases again and learning is 'shut off'. The automatic cooling is therefore a prerequisite for the autonomy and the fault tolerance of the system.

  3. Associations and Trends in Cause-Specific Rates of Death Among Persons Reported with HIV Infection, 23 U.S. Jurisdictions, Through 2011

    PubMed Central

    Adih, William K.; Selik, Richard M.; Hall, H. Irene; Babu, Aruna Surendera; Song, Ruiguang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Published death rates for persons with HIV have not distinguished deaths due to HIV from deaths due to other causes. Cause-specific death rates would allow better assessment of care needs. Methods: Using data reported to the US national HIV surveillance system, we examined a) associations between selected decedent characteristics and causes of death during 2007-2011, b) trends in rates of death due to underlying causes among persons with AIDS during 1990-2011, and among all persons with diagnosed HIV infection (with or without AIDS) during 2000-2011. Results: During 2007-2011, non-HIV-attributable causes of death with the highest rates per 1,000 person-years were heart disease (2.0), non-AIDS cancers other than lung cancer (1.4), and accidents (0.8). During 1990-2011, among persons with AIDS, the annual rate of death due to HIV-attributable causes decreased by 89% (from 122.0 to 13.2), and the rate due to non-HIV-attributable-causes decreased by 57% (from 20.0 to 8.6), while the percentage of deaths caused by non-HIV-attributable causes increased from 11% to 43%. During 2000-2011, among persons with HIV infection, the rate of death due to HIV-attributable causes decreased by 69% (from 26.4 to 8.3), and the rate due to non-HIV-attributable causes decreased by 28% (from 10.5 to 7.6), while the percentage of deaths caused by non-HIV-attributable causes increased from 25% to 48%. Conclusion: Among HIV-infected persons, as rates of death due to HIV-attributable causes decreased, rates due to non-HIV-attributable causes also decreased, but the percentages of deaths due to non-HIV-attributable causes, such as heart disease and non-AIDS cancers increased. PMID:27708746

  4. Effect of marital status on death rates. Part 1: High accuracy exploration of the Farr-Bertillon effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Peter; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2016-05-01

    The Farr-Bertillon law says that for all age-groups the death rate of married people is lower than the death rate of people who are not married (i.e. single, widowed or divorced). Although this law has been known for over 150 years, it has never been established with well-controlled accuracy (e.g. error bars). This even let some authors argue that it was a statistical artifact. It is true that the data must be selected with great care, especially for age groups of small size (e.g. widowers under 25). The observations reported in this paper were selected in the way experiments are designed in physics, that is to say with the objective of minimizing error bars. Data appropriate for mid-age groups may be unsuitable for young age groups and vice versa. The investigation led to the following results. (1) The FB effect is very similar for men and women, except that (at least in western countries) its amplitude is 20% higher for men. (2) There is a marked difference between single/divorced persons on the one hand, for whom the effect is largest around the age of 40, and widowed persons on the other hand, for whom the effect is largest around the age of 25. (3) When different causes of death are distinguished, the effect is largest for suicide and smallest for cancer. For heart disease and cerebrovascular accidents, the fact of being married divides the death rate by 2.2 compared to non-married persons. (4) For young widowers the death rates are up to 10 times higher than for married persons of same age. This extreme form of the FB effect will be referred to as the "young widower effect". Chinese data are used to explore this effect more closely. A possible connection between the FB effect and Martin Raff's "Stay alive" effect for the cells in an organism is discussed in the last section.

  5. The Impact of Extreme-Risk Cases on Hospitals’ Risk-Adjusted Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Mortality Ratings

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Matthew W.; Brennan, J. Matthew; Ho, Kalon K.; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Messenger, John C.; Weaver, W. Douglas; Dai, David; Peterson, Eric D.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The goal of this study was to examine the calibration of a validated risk-adjustment model in very high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) cases and assess whether sites’ case mix affects their performance ratings. BACKGROUND There are concerns that treating PCI patients with particularly high-risk features such as cardiogenic shock or prior cardiac arrest may adversely impact hospital performance ratings. However, there is little investigation on the validity of these concerns. METHODS We examined 624,286 PCI procedures from 1,168 sites that participated in the CathPCI Registry in 2010. Procedural risk was estimated using the recently published Version 4 National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) PCI risk-adjusted mortality (RAM) model. We calculated observed/expected mortality using several risk classification methods, and simulated hospital performance after combining their highest risk cases over 2 years into a single year. RESULTS In 2010, crude in-hospital PCI mortality was 1.4%. The NCDR model was generally well calibrated among high risk, however there was slight overprediction of risk in extreme cases. Hospitals treating the highest overall expected risk PCI patients or those treating the top 20% of high-risk cases had lower (better) RAM ratings than centers treating lower-risk cases (1.25% vs. 1.51%). The observed/expected ratio for top-risk quintile versus low-risk quintile was 0.91 (0.87 to 0.96) versus 1.10 (1.03 to 1.17). Combining all the high-risk patients over a 2-year period into a single year also did not negatively impact the site’s RAM ratings. CONCLUSIONS Evaluation of a contemporary sample of PCI cases across the United States showed no evidence that treating high-risk PCI cases adversely affects hospital RAM rates. PMID:25499301

  6. Does Sex Matter? Thirty-Day Stroke and Death Rates Following Carotid Artery Stenting in Women vs. Men: Results from the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial (CREST) Lead-in Phase

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Virginia J.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Lutsep, Helmi L.; Mackey, Ariane; Milot, Genevieve; Sam, Albert D.; Tom, MeeLee; Hughes, Susan E.; Sheffet, Alice J.; Longbottom, Mary; Avery, Jason B.; Hobson, Robert W.; Brott, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several carotid endarterectomy (CEA) randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and series have reported higher perioperative stroke and death rates for women compared to men. The potential for this same relationship with carotid artery stenting (CAS) was examined in the lead-in phase of the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial (CREST). METHODS CREST compares efficacy of CEA and CAS in preventing stroke, myocardial infarction, and death in the peri-procedural period and ipsilateral stroke over the follow-up period. CREST included a “lead-in” phase of symptomatic (≥50% stenosis) and asymptomatic (≥70% stenosis) patients. Patients were examined by a neurologist pre-procedure, at 24-hours, and at 30-days. Review of stroke and death was by an independent events committee. The association of sex with peri-procedural stroke and death was examined in 1,564 patients undergoing CAS (26.5% symptomatic.) RESULTS Women comprised 37% of the lead-in cohort and did not differ from men by age, symptomatic status, or characteristics of the internal carotid artery. The 30-day stroke and death rate for women was 4.5% (26/579) (95% CI: 3.0–6.5%) compared to 4.2% (41/985) (95% CI: 3.0–5.6%) for men. The difference in stroke and death rate was not significant, nor were there any significant differences by sex after adjustment for age, arterial characteristics or cardiovascular risk factors. CONCLUSIONS These results do not provide evidence that women have a higher CAS stroke and death rate compared to men. The potential differential peri-procedural risk by sex will be prospectively addressed in the randomized phase of CREST. PMID:19211486

  7. Cause of death and neoplasia in mice continuously exposed to very low dose rates of gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, I B; Tanaka, S; Ichinohe, K; Matsushita, S; Matsumoto, T; Otsu, H; Oghiso, Y; Sato, F

    2007-04-01

    Four thousand 8-week-old SPF B6C3F1 mice (2000 of each sex) were divided into four groups, one nonirradiated (control) and three irradiated. The irradiated groups were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays at dose rates of 21, 1.1 and 0.05 mGy day(-1) for approximately 400 days with total doses equivalent to 8000, 400 and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept until natural death, and pathological examination was performed to determine the cause of death. Neoplasms accounted for >86.7% of all deaths. Compared to the nonirradiated controls, the frequency of myeloid leukemia in males, soft tissue neoplasms and malignant granulosa cell tumors in females, and hemangiosarcoma in both sexes exposed to 21 mGy day(-1) were significantly increased. The number of multiple primary neoplasms per mouse was significantly increased in mice irradiated at 21 mGy day(-1). Significant increases in body weights were observed from 32 to 60 weeks of age in males and females exposed to 1.1 mGy day(-1) and 21 mGy day(-1), respectively. Our results suggest that life shortening (Tanaka et al., Radiat. Res. 160, 376-379, 2003) in mice continuously exposed to low-dose-rate gamma rays is due to early death from a variety of neoplasms and not from increased incidence of specific neoplasms.

  8. Age and double product (systolic blood pressure x heart rate) reserve-adjusted modification of the Duke Treadmill Score nomogram in men.

    PubMed

    Sadrzadeh Rafie, Amir H; Dewey, Frederick E; Sungar, Gannon W; Ashley, Euan A; Hadley, David; Myers, Jonathan; Froelicher, Victor F

    2008-11-15

    The Duke Treadmill Score (DTS) is an established clinical tool for risk stratification. Our aim was to determine if other variables could improve the prognostic power of the DTS and if so, to modify the DTS nomogram. From a total of 1,959 patients referred for exercise testing at the Palo Alto VA Medical Center from 1997 to 2006 (a mean follow-up of 5.4 years), we studied 1,759 male veterans (age 57 +/- 12 years) free of heart failure. Double product (DP) was calculated by multiplying systolic blood pressure and heart rate; variables and their products were subtracted to obtain the differences between at rest and maximal exercise (reserve) and recovery. Of all the hemodynamic measurements, DP reserve was the strongest predictor of cardiovascular death (CVD) (Wald Z-score -3.84, p <0.001) after adjustment for potential confounders. When the components of DTS were entered in the Cox hazard model with DP reserve and age, only DP reserve and age were chosen (p <0.00001). Using the Cox coefficients, a score calculated by [age - DTS - 3 x (DP reserve/1,000)] yielded an area under the curve of 0.84 compared with 0.76 for the DTS. Using this equation, a nomogram was constructed by adding age and DP reserve to the original DTS nomogram improving estimation of annual CVD. In conclusion, we propose an age and DP reserve-adjusted DTS nomogram that improves the prognostic estimates of average annual CVD over the DTS alone.

  9. The use of estimated glomerular filtration rate for dose adjustment of medications in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Elinder, Carl-Gustaf; Bárány, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof

    2014-07-01

    Adverse drug effects as a consequence of inappropriate dosage are a common cause of hospitalization among the elderly. Older individuals are at a particular risk of overdosing because their kidney function decreases with advancing age and the elderly are often prescribed several pharmaceutical drugs. In addition, serum creatinine levels decrease owing to a reduction in muscle mass with age. Therefore, drug dosing based on the serum creatinine level only, instead of using assessment of the renal function, may result in overdosing of frail elderly patients. Renal function, i.e., the glomerular filtration rate can, with simple formulas, be estimated from analysis of creatinine and/or plasma cystatin C (eGFR). Such estimations performed with modern and validated formulas, as a rule present renal function normalized to the body surface area (mL/min/1.73 m(2)). A good estimation of how much the normal dosing interval should be prolonged, or the dose reduced, to obtain a desired plasma concentration of drugs that are mainly eliminated by glomerular filtration can be obtained by calculating the ratio between the patient's eGFR and the normal renal function (about 90-125 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). Increased knowledge and use of eGFR by prescribing physicians will reduce the risk of overdosing drugs in the elderly.

  10. Rich Global Dynamics in a Prey-Predator Model with Allee Effect and Density Dependent Death Rate of Predator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Moitri; Banerjee, Malay

    In this work we have considered a prey-predator model with strong Allee effect in the prey growth function, Holling type-II functional response and density dependent death rate for predators. It presents a comprehensive study of the complete global dynamics for the considered system. Especially to see the effect of the density dependent death rate of predator on the system behavior, we have presented the two parametric bifurcation diagrams taking it as one of the bifurcation parameters. In course of that we have explored all possible local and global bifurcations that the system could undergo, namely the existence of transcritical bifurcation, saddle node bifurcation, cusp bifurcation, Hopf-bifurcation, Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation and Bautin bifurcation respectively.

  11. Quality of Death Rates by Race and Hispanic Origin: A Summary of Current Research, 1999. Vital and Health Statistics. Series 2: Data Evaluation and Methods Research. No. 128.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHHS/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    This report summarizes current knowledge and research on the quality and reliability of death rates by race and Hispanic origin in official mortality statistics of the United States produced by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). It provides a quantitative assessment of bias in death rates by race and Hispanic origin and identifies…

  12. Prior event rate ratio adjustment for hidden confounding in observational studies of treatment effectiveness: a pairwise Cox likelihood approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nan Xuan; Henley, William Edward

    2016-12-10

    Observational studies provide a rich source of information for assessing effectiveness of treatment interventions in many situations where it is not ethical or practical to perform randomized controlled trials. However, such studies are prone to bias from hidden (unmeasured) confounding. A promising approach to identifying and reducing the impact of unmeasured confounding is prior event rate ratio (PERR) adjustment, a quasi-experimental analytic method proposed in the context of electronic medical record database studies. In this paper, we present a statistical framework for using a pairwise approach to PERR adjustment that removes bias inherent in the original PERR method. A flexible pairwise Cox likelihood function is derived and used to demonstrate the consistency of the simple and convenient alternative PERR (PERR-ALT) estimator. We show how to estimate standard errors and confidence intervals for treatment effect estimates based on the observed information and provide R code to illustrate how to implement the method. Assumptions required for the pairwise approach (as well as PERR) are clarified, and the consequences of model misspecification are explored. Our results confirm the need for researchers to consider carefully the suitability of the method in the context of each problem. Extensions of the pairwise likelihood to more complex designs involving time-varying covariates or more than two periods are considered. We illustrate the application of the method using data from a longitudinal cohort study of enzyme replacement therapy for lysosomal storage disorders. © 2016 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. An in vivo root hair assay for determining rates of apoptotic-like programmed cell death in plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana we demonstrate that dying root hairs provide an easy and rapid in vivo model for the morphological identification of apoptotic-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD) in plants. The model described here is transferable between species, can be used to investigate rates of AL-PCD in response to various treatments and to identify modulation of AL-PCD rates in mutant/transgenic plant lines facilitating rapid screening of mutant populations in order to identify genes involved in AL-PCD regulation. PMID:22165954

  14. Multiple confidence intervals for selected parameters adjusted for the false coverage rate in monotone dose-response microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jianan; Liu, Wei; Bretz, Frank; Shkedy, Ziv

    2016-12-26

    Benjamini and Yekutieli () introduced the concept of the false coverage-statement rate (FCR) to account for selection when the confidence intervals (CIs) are constructed only for the selected parameters. Dose-response analysis in dose-response microarray experiments is conducted only for genes having monotone dose-response relationship, which is a selection problem. In this paper, we consider multiple CIs for the mean gene expression difference between the highest dose and control in monotone dose-response microarray experiments for selected parameters adjusted for the FCR. A simulation study is conducted to study the performance of the method proposed. The method is applied to a real dose-response microarray experiment with 16, 998 genes for illustration.

  15. Aging and Death Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinder, Margaret M.; Hayslip, Bert, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The elderly death rate is somewhat higher than the death rate in general. Numbers of schools with gerontological curricula and frequency of death education courses are positively related to elderly death rates. The contention that elderly deaths have less social impact is not supported. (JAC)

  16. Reduced death rates from cyclones in Bangladesh: what more needs to be done?

    PubMed

    Haque, Ubydul; Hashizume, Masahiro; Kolivras, Korine N; Overgaard, Hans J; Das, Bivash; Yamamoto, Taro

    2012-02-01

    Tropical storms, such as cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons, present major threats to coastal communities. Around two million people worldwide have died and millions have been injured over the past two centuries as a result of tropical storms. Bangladesh is especially vulnerable to tropical cyclones, with around 718 000 deaths from them in the past 50 years. However, cyclone-related mortality in Bangladesh has declined by more than 100-fold over the past 40 years, from 500 000 deaths in 1970 to 4234 in 2007. The main factors responsible for these reduced fatalities and injuries are improved defensive measures, including early warning systems, cyclone shelters, evacuation plans, coastal embankments, reforestation schemes and increased awareness and communication. Although warning systems have been improved, evacuation before a cyclone remains a challenge, with major problems caused by illiteracy, lack of awareness and poor communication. Despite the potential risks of climate change and tropical storms, little empirical knowledge exists on how to develop effective strategies to reduce or mitigate the effects of cyclones. This paper summarizes the most recent data and outlines the strategy adopted in Bangladesh. It offers guidance on how similar strategies can be adopted by other countries vulnerable to tropical storms. Further research is needed to enable countries to limit the risks that cyclones present to public health.

  17. Reduced death rates from cyclones in Bangladesh: what more needs to be done?

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Masahiro; Kolivras, Korine N; Overgaard, Hans J; Das, Bivash; Yamamoto, Taro

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Tropical storms, such as cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons, present major threats to coastal communities. Around two million people worldwide have died and millions have been injured over the past two centuries as a result of tropical storms. Bangladesh is especially vulnerable to tropical cyclones, with around 718 000 deaths from them in the past 50 years. However, cyclone-related mortality in Bangladesh has declined by more than 100-fold over the past 40 years, from 500 000 deaths in 1970 to 4234 in 2007. The main factors responsible for these reduced fatalities and injuries are improved defensive measures, including early warning systems, cyclone shelters, evacuation plans, coastal embankments, reforestation schemes and increased awareness and communication. Although warning systems have been improved, evacuation before a cyclone remains a challenge, with major problems caused by illiteracy, lack of awareness and poor communication. Despite the potential risks of climate change and tropical storms, little empirical knowledge exists on how to develop effective strategies to reduce or mitigate the effects of cyclones. This paper summarizes the most recent data and outlines the strategy adopted in Bangladesh. It offers guidance on how similar strategies can be adopted by other countries vulnerable to tropical storms. Further research is needed to enable countries to limit the risks that cyclones present to public health. PMID:22423166

  18. Canadian National Breast Screening Study: 1. Breast cancer detection and death rates among women aged 40 to 49 years.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A B; Baines, C J; To, T; Wall, C

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of the combination of annual screening with mammography, physical examination of the breasts and the teaching of breast self-examination in reducing the rate of death from breast cancer among women aged 40 to 49 years on entry. DESIGN: Individually randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Fifteen urban centres in Canada with expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. PARTICIPANTS: Women with no history of breast cancer and no mammography in the previous 12 months were randomly assigned to undergo either annual mammography and physical examination (MP group) or usual care after an initial physical examination (UC group). The 50,430 women enrolled from January 1980 through March 1985 were followed for a mean of 8.5 years. DATA COLLECTION: Derived from the participants by initial and annual self-administered questionnaires, from the screening examinations, from the patients' physicians, from the provincial cancer registries and by record linkage to the Canadian National Mortality Data Base. Expert panels evaluated histologic and death data. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of referral from screening, rates of detection of breast cancer from screening and from community care, nodal status, tumour size, and rates of death from all causes and from breast cancer. RESULTS: Over 90% of the women in each group attended the screening sessions or returned the annual questionnaires, or both, over years 2 to 5. The characteristics of the women in the two groups were similar. Compared with the Canadian population, the participants were more likely to be married, have fewer children, have more education, be in a professional occupation, smoke less and have been born in North America. The rate of screen-detected breast cancer on first examination was 3.89 per 1000 in the MP group and 2.46 per 1000 in the UC group; more node-positive tumours were found in the MP group than in the UC group. During years 2 through 5 the ratios of observed

  19. Differences in age-standardized mortality rates for avoidable deaths based on urbanization levels in Taiwan, 1971-2008.

    PubMed

    Chen, Brian K; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2014-02-05

    The World is undergoing rapid urbanization, with 70% of the World population expected to live in urban areas by 2050. Nevertheless, nationally representative analysis of the health differences in the leading causes of avoidable mortality disaggregated by urbanization level is lacking. We undertake a study of temporal trends in mortality rates for deaths considered avoidable by the Concerted Action of the European Community on Avoidable Mortality for four different levels of urbanization in Taiwan between 1971 and 2008. We find that for virtually all causes of death, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMRs) were lower in more urbanized than less urbanized areas, either throughout the study period, or by the end of the period despite higher rates in urbanized areas initially. Only breast cancer had consistently higher AMSRs in more urbanized areas throughout the 38-year period. Further, only breast cancer, lung cancer, and ischemic heart disease witnessed an increase in ASMRs in one or more urbanization categories. More urbanized areas in Taiwan appear to enjoy better indicators of health outcomes in terms of mortality rates than less urbanized areas. Access to and the availability of rich healthcare resources in urban areas may have contributed to this positive result.

  20. Differences in Age-Standardized Mortality Rates for Avoidable Deaths Based on Urbanization Levels in Taiwan, 1971–2008

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brian K.; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2014-01-01

    The World is undergoing rapid urbanization, with 70% of the World population expected to live in urban areas by 2050. Nevertheless, nationally representative analysis of the health differences in the leading causes of avoidable mortality disaggregated by urbanization level is lacking. We undertake a study of temporal trends in mortality rates for deaths considered avoidable by the Concerted Action of the European Community on Avoidable Mortality for four different levels of urbanization in Taiwan between 1971 and 2008. We find that for virtually all causes of death, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMRs) were lower in more urbanized than less urbanized areas, either throughout the study period, or by the end of the period despite higher rates in urbanized areas initially. Only breast cancer had consistently higher AMSRs in more urbanized areas throughout the 38-year period. Further, only breast cancer, lung cancer, and ischemic heart disease witnessed an increase in ASMRs in one or more urbanization categories. More urbanized areas in Taiwan appear to enjoy better indicators of health outcomes in terms of mortality rates than less urbanized areas. Access to and the availability of rich healthcare resources in urban areas may have contributed to this positive result. PMID:24503974

  1. Vigorous exercise in leisure time and the death rate: a study of male civil servants.

    PubMed Central

    Chave, S P; Morris, J N; Moss, S; Semmence, A M

    1978-01-01

    In 1968-70, 17,944 middle-aged male executive grade civil servants in Great Britain provided a record of their leisure-time activities for two sample days and they have been followed until the end of 1977. In a 20% sample (3591 men), 268 have died. Men who had reported "vigorous exercise" (VE) during the two days suffered fewer deaths from coronary heart disease throughout the years 1968-77; there was no significant difference in mortality from other causes. VE men recorded more physical activity in general, and they saw themselves as physically more active than the rest. Total physical activity scores, however, were weakly related to coronary mortality. Men reporting vigorous exercise smoked somewhat less than other men, but the two factors were independently associated with mortality from coronary heart disease. PMID:744813

  2. How Elephant Seals (Mirounga leonina) Adjust Their Fine Scale Horizontal Movement and Diving Behaviour in Relation to Prey Encounter Rate

    PubMed Central

    Jouma’a, Joffrey; Picard, Baptiste; Guinet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the diving behaviour of diving predators in relation to concomitant prey distribution could have major practical applications in conservation biology by allowing the assessment of how changes in fine scale prey distribution impact foraging efficiency and ultimately population dynamics. The southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina, hereafter SES), the largest phocid, is a major predator of the southern ocean feeding on myctophids and cephalopods. Because of its large size it can carry bio-loggers with minimal disturbance. Moreover, it has great diving abilities and a wide foraging habitat. Thus, the SES is a well suited model species to study predator diving behaviour and the distribution of ecologically important prey species in the Southern Ocean. In this study, we examined how SESs adjust their diving behaviour and horizontal movements in response to fine scale prey encounter densities using high resolution accelerometers, magnetometers, pressure sensors and GPS loggers. When high prey encounter rates were encountered, animals responded by (1) diving and returning to the surface with steeper angles, reducing the duration of transit dive phases (thus improving dive efficiency), and (2) exhibiting more horizontally and vertically sinuous bottom phases. In these cases, the distance travelled horizontally at the surface was reduced. This behaviour is likely to counteract horizontal displacement from water currents, as they try to remain within favourable prey patches. The prey encounter rate at the bottom of dives decreased with increasing diving depth, suggesting a combined effect of decreased accessibility and prey density with increasing depth. Prey encounter rate also decreased when the bottom phases of dives were spread across larger vertical extents of the water column. This result suggests that the vertical aggregation of prey can regulate prey density, and as a consequence impact the foraging success of SESs. To our knowledge, this is one of

  3. 20 CFR 10.420 - How are cost-of-living adjustments applied?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of recurrence of disability, where the pay rate for compensation purposes is the pay rate at the time... effective date of that pay rate began more than one year prior to the date the cost-of living adjustment took effect. (d) In cases of death, entitlement to cost-of-living adjustments under 5 U.S.C....

  4. 20 CFR 10.420 - How are cost-of-living adjustments applied?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of recurrence of disability, where the pay rate for compensation purposes is the pay rate at the time... effective date of that pay rate began more than one year prior to the date the cost-of-living adjustment took effect. (d) In cases of death, entitlement to cost-of-living adjustments under 5 U.S.C....

  5. Canadian National Breast Screening Study: 2. Breast cancer detection and death rates among women aged 50 to 59 years.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A B; Baines, C J; To, T; Wall, C

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of annual mammography over and above annual physical examination of the breasts and the teaching of breast self-examination among women aged 50 to 59 on entry. DESIGN: Individually randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Fifteen urban centres in Canada with expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. PARTICIPANTS: Women with no history of breast cancer and no mammography in the previous 12 months were randomly assigned to undergo either annual mammography and physical examination (MP group) or annual physical examination only (PO group). The 39,405 women enrolled from January 1980 through March 1985 were followed for a mean of 8.3 years. DATA COLLECTION: Derived from the participants by initial and annual self-administered questionnaires, from the screening examinations, from the patients' physicians, from the provincial cancer registries and by record linkage to the Canadian National Mortality Data Base. Expert panels evaluated histologic and death data. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of referral from screening, rates of detection of breast cancer from screening and from community care, nodal status, tumour size and rates of death from all causes and from breast cancer. RESULTS: Over 85% of the women in each group attended the screening sessions after screen 1. The characteristics of the women in the two groups were similar. Compared with the Canadian population the participants were more likely to be married, have fewer children, have more education, be in a professional occupation, smoke less and have been born in North America. The rate of screen-detected breast cancer on first examination was 7.20 per 1000 in the MP group and 3.45 per 1000 in the PO group, more node-positive tumours were found in the MP group than in the PO group. At subsequent screens the detection rates were a little less than half the rates at screen 1. During years 2 through 5 the ratios of observed to expected cases of invasive breast cancer

  6. Running Head: Control and Adjustment of the Rate of Photosynthesis Above Present CO{sub 2} Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J. Timothy

    1996-12-01

    The adjustment of photosynthesis to different environmental conditions and especially to elevated CO{sub 2} is often characterized in terms of changes in the processes that establish (limit) the net CO{sub 2} assimilation rate. At slightly above present ambient pCO{sub 2} light-saturated photosynthetic responses to CO{sub 2} depart limitation by the catalytic capacity of tissue rubisco content. An hypothesis attributing this departure to limited thylakoid reaction/electron transport capacity is widely accepted, although we find no experimental evidence in the literature supporting this proposition.. The results of several tests point to the conclusion that the capacity of the thyiakoid reactions cannot be generally responsible for the deviation from rubisco limitation. This conclusion leaves a significant gap in the interpretation of gas exchange responses to CO{sub 2}. Since the inputs to the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle (CO{sub 2} and photon-capture/electron-transport products) do not limit photosynthesis on the shoulder of the A=f(c{sub i}) curve, the control of photosynthesis can be characterized as: due to feedback. Several characteristics of gas exchange and fluorescence that occur when steady-states in this region are perturbed by changes in CO{sub 2} or O{sub 2} suggest significant regulation by conditions other than directly by substrate RuBP levels. A strong candidate to explain these responses is the triose-phosphate flux/ inorganic phosphate regulatory sequence, although not all of the gas exchange characteristics expected with ''TPU-limitation'' are present (e.g. oxygen-insensitive photosynthesis). Interest in nitrogen allocation between rubisco and light capture/electron transport as the basis for photosynthetic adjustment to elevated CO{sub 2} may need to be reconsidered as a result of these findings. Contributors to the feedback regulation of photosynthesis (which may include sucrose phosphate synthase and fructose bisphosphatase activities

  7. 26 CFR 1.1014-6 - Special rule for adjustments to basis where property is acquired from a decedent prior to his death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in contemplation of death. Depreciation in the amount of $750 per year was allowable for each of the..., 1955, was $38,750 ($40,000, value on the date of H's death, less $1,250, depreciation allocated to W... shares of the common stock of X Corporation, with a basis of $10,000 at the time of the transfer. At...

  8. 26 CFR 1.1014-6 - Special rule for adjustments to basis where property is acquired from a decedent prior to his death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in contemplation of death. Depreciation in the amount of $750 per year was allowable for each of the..., 1955, was $38,750 ($40,000, value on the date of H's death, less $1,250, depreciation allocated to W... shares of the common stock of X Corporation, with a basis of $10,000 at the time of the transfer. At...

  9. 26 CFR 1.1014-6 - Special rule for adjustments to basis where property is acquired from a decedent prior to his death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... in contemplation of death. Depreciation in the amount of $750 per year was allowable for each of the..., 1955, was $38,750 ($40,000, value on the date of H's death, less $1,250, depreciation allocated to W... shares of the common stock of X Corporation, with a basis of $10,000 at the time of the transfer. At...

  10. Method for projecting age-specific mortality rates for certain causes of death

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.W.; Crawford, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for projecting mortality rates for certain causes on the basis of observed rates during past years. This method arose from a study of trends in age-specific mortality rates for respiratory cancers, and for heuristic purposes it is shown how the method can be developed from certain theories of cancer induction. However, the method is applicable in the more common situation in which the underlying physical processes cannot be modeled with any confidence but the mortality rates are approximable over short time intervals by functions of the form a exp(bt), where b may vary in a continuous, predictable fashion as the time interval is varied. It appears from applications to historical data that this projection method is in some cases a substantial improvement over conventional curve-fitting methods and often uncovers trends which are not apparent from observed data.

  11. A method for projecting age-specific mortality rates for certain causes of death

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.W.; Crawford, D.J.

    1981-09-01

    A method is presented for projecting mortality rates for certain causes on the basis of observed rates during past years. This method arose from a study of trends in age-specific mortality rates for respiratory cancers, and for heuristic purposes it is shown how the method can be developed from certain theories of cancer induction. However, the method is applicable in the more common situation in which the underlying physical processes cannot be modeled with any confidence but the mortality rates are approximable over short time intervals by functions of the form a exp(bt), where b may vary in a continuous, predictable fashion as the time interval is varied. It appears from applications to historical data that this projection method is in some cases a substantial improvement over conventional curve-fitting methods and often uncovers trends which are not from observed data.

  12. Debris-flow deposits and watershed erosion rates near southern Death Valley, CA, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, K.M.; Menges, C.M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Debris flows from the steep, granitic hillslopes of the Kingston Range, CA are commensurate in age with nearby fluvial deposits. Quaternary chronostratigraphic differentiation of debris-flow deposits is based upon time-dependent characteristics such as relative boulder strength, derived from Schmidt Hammer measurements, degree of surface desert varnish, pedogenesis, and vertical separation. Rock strength is highest for Holocene-aged boulders and decreases for Pleistocene-aged boulders weathering to grus. Volumes of age-stratified debris-flow deposits, constrained by deposit thickness above bedrock, GPS surveys, and geologic mapping, are greatest for Pleistocene deposits. Shallow landslide susceptibility, derived from a topographically based GIS model, in conjunction with deposit volumes produces watershed-scale erosion rates of ???2-47 mm ka-1, with time-averaged Holocene rates exceeding Pleistocene rates. ?? 2003 Millpress.

  13. Alcohol-Related Vehicular Death Rates for College Students in the Commonwealth of Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, James; Bauerle, Jennifer; Keller, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Determine rate of college student alcohol-related vehicular traffic fatalities in Virginia during 2007. Participants: Undergraduates at colleges and universities in Virginia. Methods: Institutions with membership in the American College Health Association were invited to participate in a survey. Data collected from institutional reports…

  14. Slip Rates, Recurrence Intervals and Earthquake Event Magnitudes for the southern Black Mountains Fault Zone, southern Death Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronterhouse Sohn, M.; Knott, J. R.; Bowman, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    The normal-oblique Black Mountain Fault zone (BMFZ) is part of the Death Valley fault system. Strong ground-motion generated by earthquakes on the BMFZ poses a serious threat to the Las Vegas, NV area (pop. ~1,428,690), the Death Valley National Park (max. pop. ~20,000) and Pahrump, NV (pop. 30,000). Fault scarps offset Holocene alluvial-fan deposits along most of the 80-km length of the BMFZ. However, slip rates, recurrence intervals, and event magnitudes for the BMFZ are poorly constrained due to a lack of age control. Also, Holocene scarp heights along the BMFZ range from <1 m to >6 m suggesting that geomorphic sections have different earthquake histories. Along the southernmost section, the BMFZ steps basinward preserving three post-late Pleistocene fault scarps. Surveys completed with a total station theodolite show scarp heights of 5.5, 5.0 and 2 meters offsetting the late Pleistocene, early to middle Holocene, to middle-late Holocene surfaces, respectively. Regression plots of vertical offset versus maximum scarp angle suggest event ages of <10 - 2 ka with a post-late Pleistocene slip rate of 0.1mm/yr to 0.3 mm/yr and recurrence of <3300 years/event. Regression equations for the estimated geomorphically constrained rupture length of the southernmost section and surveyed event displacements provides estimated moment magnitudes (Mw) between 6.6 and 7.3 for the BMFZ.

  15. TACImager: a high frame rate 320 x 256 SPAD time to amplitude converter array with adjustable time zoom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Neil; Parmesan, Luca; Dutton, Neale A. W.; Calder, Neil J.; Henderson, Robert K.

    2016-10-01

    Single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) in the form of high-resolution imaging pixel arrays are used in 3D cameras, motion-tracking, biomedical and time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) applications. Rapid spatial and temporal zoom onto objects of interest is an attractive feature. We present here novel high-speed time-zoom functionality achieved with the digital readout mode of the TACImager, a 256 x 256 TCSPC image sensor array based on sample and hold Time to Amplitude Converter (TAC) pixels. A column-parallel flash Analogue to Digital Converter (ADC) is implemented in the TACImager to support fast digital readout, allowing per-pixel, 3-bin TCSPC histogramming at frame rates of 4 kfps. New results related to this high-speed mode of operation are presented. The TACImager utilises a global ramp voltage as a timing reference, allowing time-zoom to be achieved through dynamic adjustment of comparator voltages, ramp offset voltages and ramp waveforms. We demonstrate the influence of fixed pattern noise in the pixels and column parallel ADCs on the results.

  16. Centenarian Rates and Life Expectancy Related to the Death Rates of Multiple Sclerosis, Asthma, and Rheumatoid Arthritis and the Incidence of Type 1 Diabetes in Children.

    PubMed

    Lens-Pechakova, Lilia S

    2016-02-01

    The autoimmune diseases are among the 10 leading causes of death for women and the number two cause of chronic illness in America as well as a predisposing factor for cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Patients of some autoimmune diseases have shown a shorter life span and are a model of accelerated immunosenescence. Conversely, centenarians are used as a model of successful aging and have shown several immune parameters that are better preserved and lower levels of autoantibodies. The study reported here focused on clarifying the connection between longevity and some autoimmune and allergic diseases in 29 developed Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, because multidisciplinary analyses of the accelerated or delayed aging data could show a distinct relationship pattern, help to identify common factors, and determine new important factors that contribute to longevity and healthy aging. The relationships between the mortality rates data of multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), asthma, the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) from one side and centenarian rates (two sets) as well as life expectancy data from the other side were assessed using regression models and Pearson correlation coefficients. The data obtained correspond to an inverse linear correlation with different degrees of linearity. This is the first observation of a clear tendency of diminishing centenarian rates or life expectancy in countries having higher death rates of asthma, MS, and RA and a higher incidence of T1D in children. The conclusion is that most probably there are common mechanistic pathways and factors affecting the above diseases and at the same time but in the opposite direction the processes of longevity. Further study, comparing genetic data, mechanistic pathways, and other factors connected to autoimmune diseases with those of longevity could clarify the processes involved, so as to promote longevity and limit the expansion of those

  17. Human actuarial aging increases faster when background death rates are lower: a consequence of differential heterogeneity?

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Kristen; Smith, Ken R; Blevins, James K

    2012-01-01

    Many analyses of human populations have found that age-specific mortality rates increase faster across most of adulthood when overall mortality levels decline. This contradicts the relationship often expected from Williams' classic hypothesis about the effects of natural selection on the evolution of senescence. More likely, much of the within-species difference in actuarial aging is not due to variation in senescence, but to the strength of filters on the heterogeneity of frailty in older survivors. A challenge to this differential frailty hypothesis was recently posed by an analysis of life tables from historical European populations and traditional societies that reported variation in actuarial aging consistent with Williams' hypothesis after all. To investigate the challenge, we reconsidered those cases and aging measures. Here we show that the discrepancy depends on Ricklefs' aging rate measure, ω, which decreases as mortality levels drop because it is an index of mortality level itself, not the rate of increase in mortality with age. We also show unappreciated correspondence among the parameters of Gompertz-Makeham and Weibull survival models. Finally, we compare the relationships among mortality parameters of the traditional societies and the historical series, providing further suggestive evidence that differential heterogeneity has strong effects on actuarial aging.

  18. Rates of 47, + 13 amd 46 translocation D/13 Patau syndrome in live births and comparison with rates in fetal deaths and at amniocentesis.

    PubMed

    Hook, E B

    1980-11-01

    Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) is rare in newborns. Data on rates in 167,774 live births from 17 separate studies are reviewed, and the following pooled rates found for: (1) 47,trisomy 13, 8.3 X 10(-5) (1/12,000); and (2) 46, (D/13 Robertsonian translocations), 4.2 X 10(-5) (1/24,000)--mutants, 1.2 X 10(-5) (1/80,000) to 1.8 X 10(-5) (1/56,000); and familial cases, 2.4 X 10(-5) (1/42,000) to 3.0 X 10(-5) (1/33,000). The rate of trisomy 13 (47, + 13) in liveborns (ignoring possible biases in studies and heterogeneity in rates) is, with 95% confidence, between 4.6 X 10(-5) (1/21,700) and 14.0 X 10(-5) (1/7,000), with the most likely figure close to 8 X 10(-5) (1/12,000). Numbers are insufficient to construct a comparably narrow confidence interval for translocation cases. The rates of 47, + 13 may be estimated in (1) spontaneous abortuses, about 0.8%--1.0% (100-fold greater than in liveborns); (2) early neonatal deaths, about 0.4% (50-fold greater than in liveborns); and (3) amniocentesis, higher than in liveborns, at least for mothers 40 years and over.

  19. Impact of urine concentration adjustment method on associations between urine metals and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in adolescents

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Vargas, Gonzalo García; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Rothenberg, Stephen J.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Parsons, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; and others

    2014-07-15

    Positive associations between urine toxicant levels and measures of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have been reported recently in a range of populations. The explanation for these associations, in a direction opposite that of traditional nephrotoxicity, is uncertain. Variation in associations by urine concentration adjustment approach has also been observed. Associations of urine cadmium, thallium and uranium in models of serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated GFR (eGFR) were examined using multiple linear regression in a cross-sectional study of adolescents residing near a lead smelter complex. Urine concentration adjustment approaches compared included urine creatinine, urine osmolality and no adjustment. Median age, blood lead and urine cadmium, thallium and uranium were 13.9 years, 4.0 μg/dL, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.04 g/g creatinine, respectively, in 512 adolescents. Urine cadmium and thallium were positively associated with serum creatinine-based eGFR only when urine creatinine was used to adjust for urine concentration (β coefficient=3.1 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}; 95% confidence interval=1.4, 4.8 per each doubling of urine cadmium). Weaker positive associations, also only with urine creatinine adjustment, were observed between these metals and serum cystatin-C-based eGFR and between urine uranium and serum creatinine-based eGFR. Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration is necessary. - Highlights: • Positive associations between urine metals and creatinine-based eGFR are unexpected. • Optimal approach to urine concentration adjustment for urine biomarkers uncertain. • We compared urine concentration adjustment methods. • Positive associations observed only with urine creatinine adjustment. • Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment needed.

  20. 5 CFR 843.311 - Annuity based on death of a separated employee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... beginning on the day after the death of the separated employee. (ii) The rate of the adjusted annuity equals... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Annuity based on death of a separated... SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEATH BENEFITS AND EMPLOYEE...

  1. QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Rate* for Suicide,(†) by Sex - National Vital Statistics System, United States, 1975-2015.

    PubMed

    2017-03-17

    There was an overall decline of 24% in the age-adjusted suicide rate from 1977 (13.7 per 100,000) to 2000 (10.4). The rate increased in most years from 2000 to 2015. The 2015  suicide rate (13.3) was 28% higher than in 2000. The rates for males and females  followed the overall pattern; however, the rate for males was approximately 3-5 times higher than the rate for females throughout the study period.

  2. Multi-parametric heart rate analysis in premature babies exposed to sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, Maristella; Signorini, Maria G; Fifer, William P; Sahni, Rakhesh

    2014-01-01

    Severe premature babies present a risk profile higher than the normal population. Reasons are related to the incomplete development of physiological systems that support baby's life. Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis can help the identification of distress conditions as it is sensitive to Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) behavior. This paper presents results obtained in 35 babies with severe prematurity, in quiet and active sleep and in prone and supine position. HRV was analyzed in time and frequency domain and with nonlinear parameters. The novelty of this approach lies in the combined use of parameters generally adopted in fetal monitoring and "adult" indices. Results show that most parameters succeed in classifying different experimental conditions. This is very promising as our final objective is to identify a set of parameters that could be the basis for a risk classifier to improve the care path of premature population.

  3. The impact of in-house attending surgeon supervision on the rates of preventable and potentially preventable complications and death at the start of the new academic year.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kenji; Hauch, Adam; Branco, Bernardino C; Cohn, Stephen; Teixeira, Pedro G R; Recinos, Gustavo; Barmparas, Galinos; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of in-house attending surgeon supervision on the rate of preventable deaths (PD) and complications (PC) at the beginning of the academic year. All trauma patients admitted to the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center over an 8-year period ending in December 2009 were reviewed. Morbidity and mortality reports were used to extract all PD/PC. Patients admitted in the first 2 months (July/August) of the academic year were compared with those admitted at the end of the year (May/June) for two distinct time periods: 2002 to 2006 (before in-house attending surgeon supervision) and 2007 to 2009 (after 24-hour/day in-house attending surgeon supervision). During 2002 to 2006, patients admitted at the beginning of the year had significantly higher rates of PC (1.1% for July/August vs 0.6% for May/June; adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 3.2; P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in mortality (6.5% for July/August vs 4.6% for May/June; adjusted OR, 1.1; 95% CI,0.8 to 1.5; P = 0.179). During 2007 to 2009, after institution of 24-hour/day in-house attending surgeon supervision of fellows and housestaff, there was no significant difference in the rates of PC (0.7% for July/August vs 0.6% for May/June; OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.8 to 1.3; P = 0.870) or PD (4.6% for July/August vs 3.7% for May/June; OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.9 to 1.7; P = 0.250) seen at the beginning of the academic year. At an academic Level I trauma center, the institution of 24-hour/day in-house attending surgeon supervision significantly reduced the spike of preventable complications previously seen at the beginning of the academic year.

  4. Diabetes Mellitus is Associated with Increased Death Rates Among HIV-Infected Patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Rodrigo C; Pacheco, Antonio G; Paula, Adelzon; Cardoso, Sandra W; Moreira, Ronaldo I; Ribeiro, Sayonara R; Nunes, Estevão P; Guimarães, Maria R; Mello, Fernanda C; Veloso, Valdilea G; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major cause of morbidity worldwide and a known factor leading to increased risk of death, especially in conjunction with other risk factors. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of DM among HIV-infected patients and its association with overall mortality. All HIV-infected patients 18 years or older who were followed in the Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas (INI) cohort from January 1991 to December 2011 were included. Time-updated covariables included DM status, calendar year, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and CD4 cell counts. Fixed demographic covariables included gender and age at entry. Poisson models were used to calculate mortality rate ratios (RR) with robust variances. Among the 4,871 patients included, 1,192 (24.4%) died (mortality rate = 4.72/100 person-years [PY]; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.46-5.00). Death rates were significantly higher among those presenting with DM compared with those who did not (6.16/100 vs. 4.61/100 PY, respectively. p = 0.001). In the final model, DM was significantly associated with mortality (RR = 1.74; 95% CI = 1.57-1.94; p < 0.001). When the analysis was restricted to those on cART or the period post-1996, the association between DM and mortality was even stronger (RR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.91-2.46; p < 0.001 and RR = 1.95; 95% CI = 1.75-2.18; p < 0.001, respectively). Among the major groups of cause of deaths (CODs), the proportion of AIDS-related conditions in patients with DM was lower (74.27% vs. 58.93%, respectively; p < 0.001); whereas in non-AIDS-related conditions, nonimmunodeficiency-related causes (22.44% vs. 34.82%, respectively; p = 0.004) were more common in patients with DM. In conclusion, DM was associated with increased mortality rates even after controlling for HIV-related variables associated to this outcome. Differences in the underlying CODs were identified, reinforcing the necessity to

  5. Heart rate and blood pressure in sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP).

    PubMed

    Nei, Maromi; Mintzer, Scott; Skidmore, Christopher; Sperling, Michael R; Ho, Reginald T

    2016-05-01

    Epilepsy is associated with interictal and ictal autonomic dysfunction. Seizures can immediately cause increases in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). However, it is unknown whether uncontrolled seizures, particularly when frequent, might chronically elevate the BP or HR. Additionally, it is unknown whether the interictal BP and HR is altered in individuals who are at risk for SUDEP, compared with other individuals with epilepsy. SUDEP often occurs in patients with highly refractory epilepsy. Such individuals might be at risk for a state of chronically heightened sympathetic tone, which might affect the HR and BP interictally. This study compared the resting awake interictal HR and BP in individuals who subsequently died due to SUDEP and compared these to HR and BP in two control epilepsy groups (refractory and controlled). While the overall HR and BP are similar between groups, there is a trend toward a higher diastolic BP and more stable HR in individuals who subsequently died due to SUDEP, compared with epilepsy controls. These data suggest that there may be specific types of interictal autonomic dysfunction in individuals at risk for SUDEP. Such abnormalities might serve as markers for those at elevated risk for SUDEP.

  6. Carbon monoxide poisoning deaths in the United States, 1999 to 2012☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Kanta; Clower, Jacquelyn; Shin, Mi kyong; Bailey, Cathy; King, Michael; Yip, Fuyuen

    2015-01-01

    Background Unintentional, non-fire related (UNFR) carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning deaths are preventable. Surveillance of the populations most at-risk for unintentional, non-fire related (UNFR) carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is crucial for targeting prevention efforts. Objective This study provides estimates on UNFR CO poisoning mortality in the United States and characterizes the at-risk populations. Methods We used 1999 to 2012 data to calculate death rates. We used underlying and multiple conditions variables from death records to identify UNFR CO poisoning cases. Results For this study, we identified 6136 CO poisoning fatalities during 1999 to 2012 resulting in an average of 438 deaths annually. The annual average age-adjusted death rate was 1.48 deaths per million. Fifty four percent of the deaths occurred in a home. Age-adjusted death rates were highest for males (2.21 deaths per million) and non-Hispanic blacks (1.74 deaths per million). The age-specific death rate was highest for those aged ≥85 years (6.00 deaths per million). The annual rate of UNFR CO poisoning deaths did not change substantially during the study period, but we observed a decrease in the rate of suicide and unintentional fire related cases. Conclusion CO poisoning was the second most common non-medicinal poisonings death. Developing and enhancing current public health interventions could reduce ongoing exposures to CO from common sources, such as those in the residential setting. PMID:26032660

  7. Impact of urine concentration adjustment method on associations between urine metals and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in adolescents☆

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Vargas, Gonzalo García; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Rothenberg, Stephen J.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Parsons, Patrick J.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Navas-Acien, Ana; Guallar, Eliseo

    2014-01-01

    Positive associations between urine toxicant levels and measures of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have been reported recently in a range of populations. The explanation for these associations, in a direction opposite that of traditional nephrotoxicity, is uncertain. Variation in associations by urine concentration adjustment approach has also been observed. Associations of urine cadmium, thallium and uranium in models of serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated GFR (eGFR) were examined using multiple linear regression in a cross-sectional study of adolescents residing near a lead smelter complex. Urine concentration adjustment approaches compared included urine creatinine, urine osmolality and no adjustment. Median age, blood lead and urine cadmium, thallium and uranium were 13.9 years, 4.0 μg/dL, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.04 g/g creatinine, respectively, in 512 adolescents. Urine cadmium and thallium were positively associated with serum creatinine-based eGFR only when urine creatinine was used to adjust for urine concentration (β coefficient=3.1 mL/min/1.73 m2; 95% confidence interval=1.4, 4.8 per each doubling of urine cadmium). Weaker positive associations, also only with urine creatinine adjustment, were observed between these metals and serum cystatin-C-based eGFR and between urine uranium and serum creatinine-based eGFR. Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration is necessary. PMID:24815335

  8. A Case for Adjusting Subjectively Rated Scores in the Advanced Placement Tests. Program Statistics Research. Technical Report No. 94-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    A case is presented for adjusting the scores for free response items in the Advanced Placement (AP) tests. Using information about the rating process from the reliability studies, administrations of the AP test for three subject areas, psychology, computer science, and English language and composition, are analyzed. In the reliability studies, 299…

  9. 42 CFR 484.220 - Calculation of the adjusted national prospective 60-day episode payment rate for case-mix and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calculation of the adjusted national prospective 60-day episode payment rate for case-mix and area wage levels. 484.220 Section 484.220 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  10. 42 CFR 484.220 - Calculation of the adjusted national prospective 60-day episode payment rate for case-mix and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calculation of the adjusted national prospective 60-day episode payment rate for case-mix and area wage levels. 484.220 Section 484.220 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  11. Adjustment for gas exchange threshold enhances precision of heart rate-derived VO2 estimates during heavy exercise.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Robert W; Symons, J David; Taylor, Julie E; Eisenman, Patricia A; White, Andrea T

    2008-02-01

    Overestimates of oxygen uptake (VO2) are derived from the heart rate reserve-VO2 reserve (HRR-VO2R) model. We tested the hypothesis that adjusting for differences above and below gas exchange threshold (HRR-GET model) would tighten the precision of HR-derived VO2 estimates during heavy exercise. Seven men and 7 women of various VO2 max levels, on 2 separate days, cycled for 6 min at intensities equal to power at GET, 15% the difference between GET and VO2 max (15% above), and at 30% above GET. A second bout at 15% above GET (15% above (bout 2)) after 3 min of recovery was performed to assess estimates during interval training. Actual VO2 was compared with estimates derived from the HRR-VO2R and the HRR-GET. VO2 values were summed over the 6 min duration of data collection (6 min LO2) and compared with Bland-Altman plots. HRR-VO2R yielded 6 min LO2 (+/-2 SD) overestimates of 2.0 (+/-2.5), 1.9 (+/-2.7), and 1.3 (+/-3.3) for GET, 15% over, and 30% over, respectively, whereas corresponding 6 min LO2 difference values for the HRR-GET model were -0.42 (+/-1.6), -0.23 (+/-1.1), and -0.55 (+/-1.8), respectively. For 15% above (bout 2), the 6 min LO2 difference for HRR-VO2R was 1.8 (+/-2.9), whereas the difference for HRR-GET was 0.17 (+/-1.4). The 6 min LO2 values relative to the subjects' VO2 max did not vary (r=0.05 to 0.36); therefore, fitness level did not affect estimates. Sex did not affect accuracy of either estimate model (sex X estimate model interaction, p>0.95). We observed accurate estimates from the HRR-GET model during heavy exercise.

  12. Invariant death.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    In nematodes, environmental or physiological perturbations alter death's scaling of time. In human cancer, genetic perturbations alter death's curvature of time. Those changes in scale and curvature follow the constraining contours of death's invariant geometry. I show that the constraints arise from a fundamental extension to the theories of randomness, invariance and scale. A generalized Gompertz law follows. The constraints imposed by the invariant Gompertz geometry explain the tendency of perturbations to stretch or bend death's scaling of time. Variability in death rate arises from a combination of constraining universal laws and particular biological processes.

  13. Measurement of OH, O, and NO densities and their correlations with mouse melanoma cell death rate treated by a nanosecond pulsed streamer discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Ippei; Shirakawa, Yuki; Hirakata, Kenta; Akiyama, Taketoshi; Yonemori, Seiya; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2015-10-01

    Mouse melanoma cells in a culture medium are treated using a nanosecond pulsed streamer discharge plasma and the correlations between the rate of cell death and the densities of reactive species (OH, O, and NO) in the plasma are measured. The plasma is irradiated onto the culture medium surface with a vertical gas flow of an O2/N2 mixture from a glass tube at various gas flow rates and O2 concentrations. The densities of the reactive species are measured very close to the culture medium surface, where the reactive species interact with the culture medium, using laser-induced fluorescence. In the case of the N2 discharge (O2 = 0%), an increase in gas flow rate decreases OH density because it lowers the water vapor concentration by diluting the vapor, which is required for OH production. The increase in gas flow rate also leads to a decreased cell death rate. In the case of the O2/N2 discharge, on the other hand, an increase in O2 concentration at a fixed flow rate does not affect the rate of cell death, although it considerably changes the O and NO densities. These findings indicate that some reactive species derived from water vapor such as OH are responsible for the melanoma cell death, whereas those from O2, such as O and NO, are less likely responsible. They also indicate the importance of water evaporation from the culture medium surface in cell treatment.

  14. Reducing Potentially Excess Deaths from the Five Leading Causes of Death in the Rural United States

    PubMed

    Garcia, Macarena C; Faul, Mark; Massetti, Greta; Thomas, Cheryll C; Hong, Yuling; Bauer, Ursula E; Iademarco, Michael F

    2017-01-13

    In 2014, the all-cause age-adjusted death rate in the United States reached a historic low of 724.6 per 100,000 population (1). However, mortality in rural (nonmetropolitan) areas of the United States has decreased at a much slower pace, resulting in a widening gap between rural mortality rates (830.5) and urban mortality rates (704.3) (1). During 1999–2014, annual age-adjusted death rates for the five leading causes of death in the United States (heart disease, cancer, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD), and stroke) were higher in rural areas than in urban (metropolitan) areas (Figure 1). In most public health regions (Figure 2), the proportion of deaths among persons aged <80 years (U.S. average life expectancy) (2) from the five leading causes that were potentially excess deaths was higher in rural areas compared with urban areas (Figure 3). Several factors probably influence the rural-urban gap in potentially excess deaths from the five leading causes, many of which are associated with sociodemographic differences between rural and urban areas. Residents of rural areas in the United States tend to be older, poorer, and sicker than their urban counterparts (3). A higher proportion of the rural U.S. population reports limited physical activity because of chronic conditions than urban populations (4). Moreover, social circumstances and behaviors have an impact on mortality and potentially contribute to approximately half of the determining causes of potentially excess deaths (5).

  15. Death rate in a small air-lift loop reactor of vero cells grown on solid microcarriers and in macroporous microcarriers.

    PubMed

    Martens, D E; Nollen, E A; Hardeveld, M; van der Velden-de Groot, C A; de Gooijer, C D; Beuvery, E C; Tramper, J

    1996-01-01

    The death rate of Vero cells grown on Cytodex-3 microcarriers was studied as a function of the gas flow rate in a small air-lift loop reactor. The death rate may be described by first-order death-rate kinetics. The first-order death-rate constant as calculated from the decrease in viable cells, the increase in dead cells and the increase in LDH activity is linear proportional to the gas flow rate, with a specific hypothetical killing volume in which all cells are killed of about 2·10(-3) m(3) liquid per m(3) of air bubbles. In addition, an experiment was conducted in the same air-lift reactor with Vero cells grown inside porous Asahi microcarriers. The specific hypothetical killing volume calculated from this experiment has a value of 3·10(-4) m(3) liquid per m(3) of air bubbles, which shows that the porous microcarriers were at least in part able to protect the cells against the detrimental hydrodynamic forces generated by the bubbles.

  16. Death rates in HIV-positive antiretroviral-naive patients with CD4 count greater than 350 cells per microL in Europe and North America: a pooled cohort observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether antiretroviral (ART) naive HIV-positive individuals with high CD4 counts have a raised mortality risk compared with the general population, but this is relevant for considering earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Methods Pooling data from 23 European and North American cohorts, we calculated country-, age-, sex-, and year-standardised mortality ratios (SMRs), stratifying by risk group. Included patients had at least one pre-ART CD4 count above 350 cells/mm3. The association between CD4 count and death rate was evaluated using Poisson regression methods. Findings Of 40,830 patients contributing 80,682 person-years of follow up with CD4 count above 350 cells/mm3, 419 (1.0%) died. The SMRs (95% confidence interval) were 1.30 (1.06-1.58) in homosexual men, and 2.94 (2.28-3.73) and 9.37 (8.13-10.75) in the heterosexual and IDU risk groups respectively. CD4 count above 500 cells/mm3 was associated with a lower death rate than 350-499 cells/mm3: adjusted rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) for 500-699 cells/mm3 and above 700 cells/mm3 were 0.77 (0.61-0.95) and 0.66 (0.52-0.85) respectively. Interpretation In HIV-infected ART-naive patients with high CD4 counts, death rates were raised compared with the general population. In homosexual men this was modest, suggesting that a proportion of the increased risk in other groups is due to confounding by other factors. Even in this high CD4 count range, lower CD4 count was associated with raised mortality. PMID:20638118

  17. Resting heart rate trajectories and myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, ischaemic stroke and death in the general population: The Tromsø Study.

    PubMed

    Sharashova, Ekaterina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Løchen, Maja-Lisa; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B; Njølstad, Inger; Brenn, Tormod

    2017-01-01

    Background Resting heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but long-term individual resting heart rate trajectories and their effect on cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality have not yet been described. Methods This large population-based longitudinal study included 14,208 men and women aged 20 years or older, not pregnant and not using blood pressure medications, who attended at least two of the three Tromsø Study surveys conducted between 1986-2001. Resting heart rate was measured using an automated Dinamap device. Participants were followed up from 2001 to 2012 with respect to myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, ischaemic stroke, cardiovascular disease death and total death. The Proc Traj statistical procedure was used to identify resting heart rate trajectories. Results Five common long-term resting heart rate trajectories were identified: low, moderate, decreasing, increasing and elevated. In men, an elevated resting heart rate trajectory was independently associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction when low resting heart rate trajectory was used as a reference (hazard ratio 1.83, 95% confidence interval 1.11-3.02). Risk of total death in men was lowest in the low resting heart rate trajectory group and highest in the increasing and elevated resting heart rate trajectory groups. In women, the association between resting heart rate trajectories and myocardial infarction was similar to that in men, but it was not significant. Conclusions Among the five long-term resting heart rate trajectories we identified, increasing and elevated trajectories were associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction and total death in men. Our results suggest that changes in long-term individual resting heart rate in the general population may provide additional prognostic information.

  18. Predation or scavenging? Thoracic muscle pH and rates of water loss reveal cause of death in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin E; Young, Christine V; Holway, David A

    2010-08-01

    The difficulty of directly observing predatory events hinders a complete understanding of how predation structures food webs. Indirect approaches such as PCR-based and isotopic analyses clarify patterns of resource consumption but fail to distinguish predation from scavenging. Given that facultative scavenging is a ubiquitous and phylogenetically widespread foraging strategy, an improved ability to discriminate prey from carrion is needed to enhance an understanding of the demographic effects of consumption and the true nature of trophic interactions. Using physiological properties of muscle tissue - specifically pH and rate of water loss - we develop a novel method to discriminate prey from carrion collected by scavenging hymenopteran predators. Our focal system is the western yellowjacket (Vespula pensylvanica), a common scavenging predator in Hawaii and western North America. Prior to consumption, the physical properties of hymenopteran muscle tissue change in a quantifiable and deterministic manner post mortem and can be used to estimate the time and putative cause of death of diet items. Applying this method in laboratory and field situations resulted in the correct identification of prey and carrion in 49 out of 56 cases (88%). Although further investigation is needed to determine how post-mortem physiology of diet items changes in the guts of consumers, the approaches developed in this study can be used to distinguish predation from scavenging by central-place foragers (particularly arthropods). Such information will provide a more definitive characterization of species interactions and food webs.

  19. Metabolic Rates of ATP Transfer Through Creatine Kinase (CK Flux) Predict Clinical Heart Failure Events and Death

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, Paul A.; Panjrath, Gurusher S.; Lai, Shenghan; Hirsch, Glenn A.; Wu, Katherine; Najjar, Samer S.; Steinberg, Angela; Gerstenblith, Gary; Weiss, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from heart failure (HF) are high, and current risk stratification approaches for predicting HF progression are imperfect. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is required for normal cardiac contraction, and abnormalities in creatine kinase (CK) energy metabolism, the primary myocardial energy reserve reaction, have been observed in experimental and clinical HF. However, the prognostic value of abnormalities in ATP production rates through CK in human HF has not been investigated. Fifty-eight HF patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy underwent 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to quantify cardiac high-energy phosphates and the rate of ATP synthesis through CK (CK flux) and were prospectively followed for a median of 4.7 years. Multiple-event analysis (MEA) was performed for HF-related events including all-cause and cardiac death, HF hospitalization, cardiac transplantation, and ventricular-assist device placement. Among baseline demographic, clinical, and metabolic parameters, MEA identified four independent predictors of HF events: New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), African-American race, and CK flux. Reduced myocardial CK flux was a significant predictor of HF outcomes, even after correction for NYHA class, LVEF, and race. For each increase in CK flux of 1 μmol g−1 s−1, risk of HF-related composite outcomes decreased by 32 to 39%. These findings suggest that reduced CK flux may be a potential HF treatment target. Newer imaging strategies, including noninvasive 31P MRS that detect altered ATP kinetics, could thus complement risk stratification in HF and add value in conditions involving other tissues with high energy demands, including skeletal muscle and brain. PMID:24337482

  20. 48 CFR 252.216-7008 - Economic price adjustment-wage rates or material prices controlled by a foreign government...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-wage rates or material prices controlled by a foreign government-representation. 252.216-7008 Section... Clauses 252.216-7008 Economic price adjustment—wage rates or material prices controlled by a foreign... Adjustment—Wage Rates or Material Prices Controlled by a Foreign Government—Representation (MAR 2012) (a)...

  1. Trends in Unintentional Fall-Related Traumatic Brain Injury Death Rates in Older Adults in the United States, 1980-2010: A Joinpoint Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kuan-Chin; Liang, Fu-Wen; Cheng, Tain-Junn; Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2015-07-15

    Unintentional fall-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) death rate is high in older adults in the United States, but little is known regarding trends of these death rates. We sought to examine unintentional fall-related TBI death rates by age and sex in older adults from 1980 through 2010 in the United States. We used multiple-cause mortality data from 1980 through 2010 (31 years of data) to identify fall-related TBI deaths. Using a joinpoint regression program, we determined the joinpoints (years at which trends change significantly) and annual percentage changes (APCs) in mortality trends. The fall-related TBI death rates (deaths per 100,000 population) in older adults ages 65-74, 75-84, and 85 years and above were 2.7, 9.2, and 21.5 for females and 8.5, 18.2, and 40.8 for males, respectively, in 1980. The rate was about the same in 1992, yet increased markedly to 5.9, 23.4, and 68.9 for females and 11.6, 41.2, and 112.4 for males, respectively, in 2010. For males all 65 years years of age and above, we found the first joinpoint in 1992, when the APC for 1980 through 1992, -0.8%, changed to 6.2% for 1992-2005. The second joinpoint occurred in 2005, when the APC decreased to 3.7% for 2005-2010. For all females 65 years of age and above, the first joinpoint was in 1993 when the APC for 1980 through 1993, -0.2%, changed to 7.6% from 1993 to 2005. The second joinpoint occurred in 2005 when the APC decreased to 3.8% for 2005-2010. This descriptive epidemiological study suggests increasing fall-related TBI death rates from 1992 to 2005 and then a slowdown of increasing trends between 2005 and 2010. Continued monitoring of fall-related TBI death rate trends is needed to determine the burden of this public health problem among older adults in the United States.

  2. Test facility for advanced electric adjustable frequency drives and generators of typical industrial ratings. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    A test facility has been developed, for electric adjustable-speed motors and variable-speed generators, that is unique in US universities in terms of its range (5 to 300 hp currently with 0.1 to 1,000 hp final capability) and flexibility (standard NEMA frame and novel geometry machines can be accommodated). The basic facility was constructed with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute. The instrumentation obtained under this DOE grant has been integrated into the facility which was completed in Fall 1997. The facility has already provided useful studies for DOE, EPRI, as well as several West Coast industries and electric energy utilities.

  3. Death rate in a small air-lift loop reactor of vero cells grown on solid microcarriers and in macroporous microcarriers.

    PubMed

    Martens, D E; Nollen, E A; Hardeveld, M; Velden-de Groot, C A; Gooijer, C D; Beuvery, E C; Tramper, J

    1997-01-01

    The death rate of Vero cells grown on Cytodex-3 microcarrierswas studied as a function of the gas flow rate in a smallair-lift loop reactor. The death rate may be described byfirst-order death-rate kinetics. The first-order death-rateconstant as calculated from the decrease in viable cells, theincrease in dead cells and the increase in LDH activity islinear proportional to the gas flow rate, with a specifichypothetical killing volume in which all cells are killed ofabout 2.10(-3)m(3) liquid per m(3) of air bubbles.In addition, an experiment was conducted in the sameair-lift reactor with Vero cells grown inside porous Asahimicrocarriers. The specific hypothetical killing volumecalculated from this experiment has a value of 3.10(-4)m(3) liquid per m(3) of air bubbles, which shows thatthe porous microcarriers were at least in part able to protectthe cells against the detrimental hydrodynamic forcesgenerated by the bubbles.

  4. Adjustable Nyquist-rate System for Single-Bit Sigma-Delta ADC with Alternative FIR Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, Vincent; Dadouche, Foudil; Berviller, Hervé

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new smart and compact system dedicated to control the output sampling frequency of an analogue-to-digital converters (ADC) based on single-bit sigma-delta (ΣΔ) modulator. This system dramatically improves the spectral analysis capabilities of power network analysers (power meters) by adjusting the ADC's sampling frequency to the input signal's fundamental frequency with a few parts per million accuracy. The trade-off between straightforwardness and performance that motivated the choice of the ADC's architecture are preliminary discussed. It particularly comes along with design considerations of an ultra-steep direct-form FIR that is optimised in terms of size and operating speed. Thanks to compact standard VHDL language description, the architecture of the proposed system is particularly suitable for application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) implementation-oriented low-power and low-cost power meter applications. Field programmable gate array (FPGA) prototyping and experimental results validate the adjustable sampling frequency concept. They also show that the system can perform better in terms of implementation and power capabilities compared to dedicated IP resources.

  5. A poly(glycerol sebacate)-coated mesoporous bioactive glass scaffold with adjustable mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dan; Yang, Kai; Tang, Wei; Liu, Yutong; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-07-01

    Various requirements in the field of tissue engineering have motivated the development of three-dimensional scaffold with adjustable physicochemical properties and biological functions. A series of multiparameter-adjustable mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) scaffolds with uncrosslinked poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) coating was prepared in this article. MBG scaffold was prepared by a modified F127/PU co-templating process and then PGS was coated by a simple adsorption and lyophilization process. Through controlling macropore parameters and PGS coating amount, the mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior of the composite scaffold could be modulated in a wide range. PGS coating successfully endowed MBG scaffold with improved toughness and adjustable mechanical strength covering the bearing range of trabecular bone (2-12MPa). Multilevel degradation rate of the scaffold and controlled-release rate of protein from mesopore could be achieved, with little impact on the protein activity owing to an "ultralow-solvent" coating and "nano-cavity entrapment" immobilization method. In vitro studies indicated that PGS coating promoted cell attachment and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, without affecting the osteogenic induction capacity of MBG substrate. These results first provide strong evidence that uncrosslinked PGS might also yield extraordinary achievements in traditional MBG scaffold. With the multiparameter adjustability, the composite MBG/PGS scaffolds would have a hopeful prospect in bone tissue engineering. The design considerations and coating method of this study can also be extended to other ceramic-based artificial scaffolds and are expected to provide new thoughts on development of future tissue engineering materials.

  6. The association of culling and death rate within 30 days after calving with productivity or reproductive performance in dairy herds in Fukuoka, Southern Japan

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Akira; NAKADA, Ken; KATAMOTO, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of peripartum disorders in dairy herds negatively influences productivity and reproductive performance. Concrete data from local areas are helpful for explaining the importance of peripartum management to dairy farmers. This study was conducted to clarify the association of culling and death rate within 30 days after calving with productivity or reproductive performance in 179 dairy herds in Fukuoka, Southern Japan. A database was compiled from the records of the Livestock Improvement Association of Japan, the Dairy Cooperative Association and the Federation of Agricultural Mutual Relief Association. In this study, we created a comprehensive database of dairy farm production data for epidemiological analysis and used a general linear mixed model to analyze the association of culling and death rate within 30 days after calving with milk production or reproductive performance. The database can be used to describe, analyze and predict the risk of production. A cross-sectional analysis with contrasts was applied to investigate the association of cows served by AI/all cows, pregnant cows/cows served by AI, days open, milk yield and somatic cell counts with culling and death rate within 30 days after calving. The days open value significantly increased with increasing rate of culling and death within 30 days after calving (P for trend <0.001). No significant differences were found for the other comparisons. Our data suggest that proper feeding and management in the dry period may lead to improved postpartum reproductive performance in this dairy cow cohort. PMID:26666177

  7. Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) for Injuries Using Death Certificates and Hospital Discharge Survey by the Korean Burden of Disease Study 2012

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A system for assessing the burdens imposed by disease and injury was developed to meet healthcare, priority setting, and policy planning needs. The first such system, the Global Burden of Disease (GBD), was implemented in 1990. However, problems associated with limited data and assumed disability weightings remain to be resolved. The purpose of the present study was to estimate national burdens of injuries in Korea using more reliable data and disability weightings. The incidences of injuries were estimated using the Korean National Hospital Discharge Survey and the mortality data from the Korean National Statistical Office in 2010. Additionally, durations of injuries and age at injury onset were used to calculate disability-adjusted life years (DALY) using disability weightings derived from the Korean Burden of Disease (KBD) study. Korea had 1,581,072 DALYs resulting from injuries (3,170 per 100,000), which was 22.9% higher than found by the GBD 2010 study. Males had almost twice as heavy an injury burden as females. Road injury, fall, and self-harm ranked 1st, 2nd, and 3rd in terms of burden of injury in 2010. Total injury burden peaked in the forties, while burden per person declined gradually from early adulthood. We hope that this study contributes to the reliable evaluation of injury burden and a better understanding of injury-related health status using nation-specific, dependable data. PMID:27775258

  8. 48 CFR 252.216-7003 - Economic price adjustment-wage rates or material prices controlled by a foreign government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-wage rates or material prices controlled by a foreign government. 252.216-7003 Section 252.216-7003... Economic price adjustment—wage rates or material prices controlled by a foreign government. As prescribed... Prices Controlled by a Foreign Government (MAR 2012) (a) As represented by the Contractor in its...

  9. 48 CFR 252.216-7003 - Economic price adjustment-wage rates or material prices controlled by a foreign government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Economic price adjustment—wage rates or material prices controlled by a foreign government. As prescribed in 216.203-4-70(c), use the following clause: Economic Price Adjustment—Wage Rates or Material Prices... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Economic price...

  10. 76 FR 5811 - Adjusted Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) Rate for the First Quarter of Fiscal Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... Assistance Percentage Rates for Federal Matching Shares for Medicaid and Title IV-E Foster Care, Adoption... of the ARRA provides for a temporary increase in FMAP rates for Medicaid and title IV-E Foster Care... (including Foster Care, Adoption Assistance and Guardianship Assistance programs) only to the extent of...

  11. Using textual cause-of-death data to study drug poisoning deaths.

    PubMed

    Ossiander, Eric M

    2014-04-01

    Death certificate data are often used to study the epidemiology of poisoning deaths, but the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes used to tabulate death data do not convey all of the available information about the drugs and other substances named on death certificates. In the United States and some other countries, the SuperMICAR computer system is used to assign ICD codes to deaths. The SuperMICAR system also stores a verbatim record of the text entered for the cause of death. We used the SuperMICAR text entries to study the 7,817 poisoning deaths that occurred among Washington State residents between 2003 and 2010. We tabulated the drugs named on death certificates and computed age-adjusted and age-specific death rates for the top-named drugs and for prescription and illicit drugs. Methadone was named on 2,149 death certificates and was the most frequently named substance, followed by alcohol, opiate, cocaine, oxycodone, and methamphetamine. For both men and women and at all ages, prescription drugs were involved in more deaths than were illicit drugs. Among the 25 drugs named most frequently, only 4 have unique ICD codes; the other 21 can be identified only by using the SuperMICAR data.

  12. The Contributions of Selected Diseases to Disparities in Death Rates and Years of Life Lost for Racial/Ethnic Minorities in the United States, 1999–2010

    PubMed Central

    Peace, Frederick; Howard, Virginia J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Differences in risk for death from diseases and other causes among racial/ethnic groups likely contributed to the limited improvement in the state of health in the United States in the last few decades. The objective of this study was to identify causes of death that are the largest contributors to health disparities among racial/ethnic groups. Methods Using data from WONDER system, we measured the relative (age-adjusted mortality ratio [AAMR]) and absolute (difference in years of life lost [dYLL]) differences in mortality risk between the non-Hispanic white population and the black, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Asian/Pacific Islander populations for the 25 leading causes of death. Results Many causes contributed to disparities between non-Hispanic whites and blacks, led by assault (AAMR, 7.56; dYLL, 4.5 million). Malignant neoplasms were the second largest absolute contributor (dYLL, 3.8 million) to black–white disparities; we also found substantial relative and absolute differences for several cardiovascular diseases. Only assault, diabetes, and diseases of the liver contributed substantially to disparities between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics (AAMR ≥ 1.65; dYLL ≥ 325,000). Many causes of death, led by assault (AAMR, 3.25; dYLL, 98,000), contributed to disparities between non-Hispanic whites and American Indians/Alaska Natives; Asian/Pacific Islanders did not have a higher risk than non-Hispanic whites for death from any disease. Conclusion Assault was a substantial contributor to disparities in mortality among non-Asian racial/ethnic minority populations. Research and intervention resources need to target diseases (such as diabetes and diseases of the liver) that affect certain racial/ethnic populations. PMID:25078566

  13. External Validation of a Case-Mix Adjustment Model for the Standardized Reporting of 30-Day Stroke Mortality Rates in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ping; Pan, Yuesong; Wang, Yongjun; Wang, Xianwei; Liu, Liping; Ji, Ruijun; Meng, Xia; Jing, Jing; Tong, Xu; Guo, Li; Wang, Yilong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose A case-mix adjustment model has been developed and externally validated, demonstrating promise. However, the model has not been thoroughly tested among populations in China. In our study, we evaluated the performance of the model in Chinese patients with acute stroke. Methods The case-mix adjustment model A includes items on age, presence of atrial fibrillation on admission, National Institutes of Health Stroke Severity Scale (NIHSS) score on admission, and stroke type. Model B is similar to Model A but includes only the consciousness component of the NIHSS score. Both model A and B were evaluated to predict 30-day mortality rates in 13,948 patients with acute stroke from the China National Stroke Registry. The discrimination of the models was quantified by c-statistic. Calibration was assessed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results The c-statistic of model A in our external validation cohort was 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.79–0.82), and the c-statistic of model B was 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.81–0.84). Excellent calibration was reported in the two models with Pearson’s correlation coefficient (0.892 for model A, p<0.001; 0.927 for model B, p = 0.008). Conclusions The case-mix adjustment model could be used to effectively predict 30-day mortality rates in Chinese patients with acute stroke. PMID:27846282

  14. A fast rise-rate, adjustable-mass-bit gas puff valve for energetic pulsed plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Loebner, Keith T. K. Underwood, Thomas C.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2015-06-15

    A fast rise-rate, variable mass-bit gas puff valve based on the diamagnetic repulsion principle was designed, built, and experimentally characterized. The ability to hold the pressure rise-rate nearly constant while varying the total overall mass bit was achieved via a movable mechanical restrictor that is accessible while the valve is assembled and pressurized. The rise-rates and mass-bits were measured via piezoelectric pressure transducers for plenum pressures between 10 and 40 psig and restrictor positions of 0.02-1.33 cm from the bottom of the linear restrictor travel. The mass-bits were found to vary linearly with the restrictor position at a given plenum pressure, while rise-rates varied linearly with plenum pressure but exhibited low variation over the range of possible restrictor positions. The ability to change the operating regime of a pulsed coaxial plasma deflagration accelerator by means of altering the valve parameters is demonstrated.

  15. 5 CFR 9701.337 - Treatment of employees whose rate of pay falls below the minimum adjusted rate of their band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Treatment of employees whose rate of pay... a result of that rating, DHS must— (1) If the employee demonstrates performance that meets or... action procedures established in subpart F of this part. (b) If DHS fails to initiate a removal...

  16. Neonatal Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Loss & grief > Neonatal death Neonatal death E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... cope with your baby’s death. What is neonatal death? Neonatal death is when a baby dies in ...

  17. 77 FR 66966 - Fiscal Year (FY) 2014-2015 Proposed Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments; Public Hearing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... customers with Contract High Water Mark (CHWM) contracts from proposing changes to the TRM's ratesetting... Water Mark (RHWM) Process Under the Tiered Rate Methodology (TRM), BPA has established FY 2014-2015... service to their load above high water mark. About 75 percent of BPA's power revenues are paid under...

  18. 76 FR 32204 - Adjusted Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) Rates for the Second and Third Quarters of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... Foster Care, Adoption Assistance and Guardianship Assistance programs. AGENCY: Office of the Secretary... of the ARRA provides for a temporary increase in FMAP rates for Medicaid and title ] IV-E Foster Care... available for expenditures under part E of title IV of the Act (including Foster Care, Adoption...

  19. Impact of the 1998 Football World Cup on Suicide Rates in France: Results from the National Death Registry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Encrenaz, Gaelle; Contrand, Benjamin; Leffondre, Karen; Queinec, Raphaelle; Aouba, Albertine; Jougla, Eric; Miras, Alain; Lagarde, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) World Cup in 1998 had a short-term impact on the number of suicides in France. Exhaustive individual daily data on suicides from 1979 to 2006 were obtained from the French epidemiological center on the medical causes of death (CepiDC-INSERM;…

  20. Improving preemptive transplant education to increase living donation rates: reaching patients earlier in their disease adjustment process.

    PubMed

    Hays, Rebecca; Waterman, Amy D

    2008-12-01

    Patients who receive a preemptive kidney transplant before starting dialysis avoid the medical complications related to dialysis and have the highest graft success and lowest mortality rates. Because only 2.5% of incident patients receive kidney transplants preemptively, improved psychosocial education may assist more patients in accessing preemptive transplant. This article outlines (1) unique psychosocial issues affecting patients with chronic kidney disease stage 4 (glomerular filtration rates > 20 mL/min per 1.73 m2) and (2) how an educational program about preemptive living donor transplant should be designed and administered to increase access to this treatment option. Early referral patients may be overwhelmed in coping with and learning about their disease and, therefore, not ready to make a treatment decision, or they may be highly motivated to obtain a transplant to avoid dialysis and return to a normal life. An education program that defines the quality-of-life and health benefits possible with early transplant is outlined. The program is focused on minimizing the disruption of starting 2 treatment techniques and maximizing early transplant health, graft survival, employability, and retention of insurance coverage. Once the benefits of preemptive living donor transplant are outlined, educators can focus on demystifying the living donor evaluation process and assisting interested patients in planning how to find a living donor. To reach all patients, especially racial minorities, education about preemptive transplant should be available in primary-care physicians' and community nephrologists' offices, at dialysis centers, and through other kidney organizations.

  1. Rate of phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue complex formation in acidic persulfate digested sample matrix for total dissolved phosphorus determination: importance of post-digestion pH adjustment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Jia-Zhong

    2008-10-19

    Acidic persulfate oxidation is one of the most common procedures used to digest dissolved organic phosphorus compounds in water samples for total dissolved phosphorus determination. It has been reported that the rates of phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue complex formation were significantly reduced in the digested sample matrix. This study revealed that the intermediate products of persulfate oxidation, not the slight change in pH, cause the slowdown of color formation. This effect can be remedied by adjusting digested samples pH to a near neural to decompose the intermediate products. No disturbing effects of chlorine on the phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue formation in seawater were observed. It is noted that the modification of mixed reagent recipe cannot provide near neutral pH for the decomposition of the intermediate products of persulfate oxidation. This study provides experimental evidence not only to support the recommendation made in APHA standard methods that the pH of the digested sample must be adjusted to within a narrow range of sample, but also to improve the understanding of role of residue from persulfate decomposition on the subsequent phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue formation.

  2. Hospital deaths and adverse events in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adverse events are considered a major international problem related to the performance of health systems. Evaluating the occurrence of adverse events involves, as any other outcome measure, determining the extent to which the observed differences can be attributed to the patient's risk factors or to variations in the treatment process, and this in turn highlights the importance of measuring differences in the severity of the cases. The current study aims to evaluate the association between deaths and adverse events, adjusted according to patient risk factors. Methods The study is based on a random sample of 1103 patient charts from hospitalizations in the year 2003 in 3 teaching hospitals in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The methodology involved a retrospective review of patient charts in two stages - screening phase and evaluation phase. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between hospital deaths and adverse events. Results The overall mortality rate was 8.5%, while the rate related to the occurrence of an adverse event was 2.9% (32/1103) and that related to preventable adverse events was 2.3% (25/1103). Among the 94 deaths analyzed, 34% were related to cases involving adverse events, and 26.6% of deaths occurred in cases whose adverse events were considered preventable. The models tested showed good discriminatory capacity. The unadjusted odds ratio (OR 11.43) and the odds ratio adjusted for patient risk factors (OR 8.23) between death and preventable adverse event were high. Conclusions Despite discussions in the literature regarding the limitations of evaluating preventable adverse events based on peer review, the results presented here emphasize that adverse events are not only prevalent, but are associated with serious harm and even death. These results also highlight the importance of risk adjustment and multivariate models in the study of adverse events. PMID:21929810

  3. Experimental investigation and theoretical analysis of pulse repetition rate adjustable deep ultraviolet picosecond radiation by second harmonic generation in KBe2BO3F2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi; Zhang, Fengfeng; Zhang, Shenjin; Wang, Zhimin; Yang, Feng; Xu, Fengliang; Peng, Qinjun; Cui, Dafu; Zhang, Jingyuan; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan

    2014-06-01

    We reported on an experimental investigation and theoretical analysis of pulse repetition rate (PRR) adjustable deep ultraviolet (DUV) picosecond (ps) radiation by second harmonic generation (SHG) in KBe2BO3F2 (KBBF) crystal. Third harmonic radiation at 355 nm of a ps Nd:YVO4 laser output with PRR of 200 kHz-1 MHz was employed as the pump source. The dependence of the 177.3 nm output power on the 355 nm pump power was measured at different PRRs, and the maximum 177.3 nm average output power of 695 μW was obtained at the PRR of 200 kHz. The measured data agreed well with the results of the ps KBBF SHG theoretical simulations. Using simulations, the pulse width and the spectral bandwidth of the generated radiation at 177.3 nm were estimated to be 5.88 ps and 7.84 pm, respectively.

  4. 78 FR 62712 - Rate Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Service in Response to Commission Order No. 1059, September 26, 2013 (Exigent Request). See also Docket...,'' is ``premised on the recent recession as an exigent event.'' Id. at 1, 2. In Order No. 1059, the..., December 20, 2011, at 6 (Order No. 1059). If the Postal Service wishes to pursue its Exigent Request,...

  5. Psychostimulant-Related Deaths as Reported by a Large National Database

    PubMed Central

    Calcaterra, Susan; Binswanger, Ingrid A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Increased methamphetamine use occurred during the last decade and little is known about factors associated with death. Objective This study assesses trends in psychostimulant deaths in the United States. Methods Using the CDC Wonder Database we reviewed all deaths among 15-64 year olds from 1999 to 2009. We identified decedents who died with “psychostimulants with abuse potential, excluding cocaine” using the ICD code T43.6 to identify methamphetamine-related deaths. We determined trends in death rates and the most common underlying causes of death. We calculated age-stratified and age-adjusted death rates/100,000 person-years (p-y) and (95% confidence interval [CI]) among those who died with psychostimulants from 2005 to 2009. Results The rate of psychostimulant-related deaths increased three fold from 1999 (0.37/100,000 (p-y) (95% CI 0.354-0.39) to 2005 (1.05/100,000 p-y (95% CI 1.01-1.10). Deaths steadily declined from 2006 to 2008, but rose again in 2009 to 0.97/100,000 p-y (95% CI 0.92-1.01). Across all age groups, men had a 2-3 times higher rate of death than women. American Indians/Alaska Natives were twice as likely to die a psychostimulant-related death as compared to non-Hispanic whites. The Northwestern/Western region of the US had the highest rates of psychostimulant-related deaths, while the Northeastern region had the lowest death rates. “Accidental poisonings” (ICD-10: X40-49) was the most frequently listed cause of death among those who died with psychostimulants. Conclusions Psychostimulant related deaths declined from 2006 to 2008 but are rebounding. Interventions targeting those at highest risk of death must be implemented and studied to prevent increasing deaths. PMID:23577906

  6. Reproductive Justice and the Pace of Change: Socioeconomic Trends in US Infant Death Rates by Legal Status of Abortion, 1960–1980

    PubMed Central

    Gruskin, Sofia; Singh, Nakul; Kiang, Mathew V.; Chen, Jarvis T.; Waterman, Pamela D.; Gottlieb, Jillian; Beckfield, Jason; Coull, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    US infant death rates for 1960 to 1980 declined most quickly in (1) 1970 to 1973 in states that legalized abortion in 1970, especially for infants in the lowest 3 income quintiles (annual percentage change = −11.6; 95% confidence interval = −18.7, −3.8), and (2) the mid-to-late 1960s, also in low-income quintiles, for both Black and White infants, albeit unrelated to abortion laws. These results imply that research is warranted on whether currently rising restrictions on abortions may be affecting infant mortality. PMID:25713932

  7. The death of marriage? The effects of new forms of legal recognition on marriage rates in the United States.

    PubMed

    Dillender, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    Some conservative groups argue that allowing same-sex couples to marry reduces the value of marriage to opposite-sex couples. This article examines how changes in U.S. legal recognition laws occurring between 1995 and 2010 designed to include same-sex couples have altered marriage rates in the United States. Using a difference-in-differences strategy that compares how marriage rates change after legal recognition in U.S. states that alter legal recognition versus states that do not, I find no evidence that allowing same-sex couples to marry reduces the opposite-sex marriage rate. Although the opposite-sex marriage rate is unaffected by same-sex couples marrying, it decreases when domestic partnerships are available to opposite-sex couples.

  8. Impact of the 1998 football World Cup on suicide rates in France: results from the national death registry.

    PubMed

    Encrenaz, Gaëlle; Contrand, Benjamin; Leffondré, Karen; Queinec, Raphaëlle; Aouba, Albertine; Jougla, Eric; Miras, Alain; Lagarde, Emmanuel

    2012-04-01

    Our objective was to determine whether the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) World Cup in 1998 had a short-term impact on the number of suicides in France. Exhaustive individual daily data on suicides from 1979 to 2006 were obtained from the French epidemiological center on the medical causes of death (CepiDC-INSERM; France). These data were analyzed using the seasonal ARIMA model. The overall effect of the World Cup was tested together with potential specific impact on days following the French team games. Between 11th June and 11th July, a significant decline of 95 suicides was observed (-10.3%), this effect being the strongest among men and people aged between 30 and 44. A significant decrease was also observed for the days following French team games (-19.9%). Our results are in favor of an effect of nationwide sport events on suicidal behaviors and are consistent with other studies. Many of the theories explaining the relationship between sports and suicide are related to sense of belongingness and social integration, highlighting the importance of social link reinforcement in suicide prevention.

  9. Rate of deaths due to child abuse and neglect in children 0-3 years of age in Germany.

    PubMed

    Banaschak, Sibylle; Janßen, Katharina; Schulte, Babette; Rothschild, Markus A

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the issue of (fatal) child abuse and neglect, largely due to the media attention garnered by some headline-grabbing cases. If media statements are to be believed, such cases may be an increasing phenomenon. With these published accounts in mind, publicly available statistics should be analysed with respect to the question of whether reliable statements can be formulated based on these figures. It is hypothesised that certain data, e.g., the Innocenti report published by UNICEF in 2003, may be based on unreliable data sources. For this reason, the generation of such data, and the reliability of the data itself, should also be discussed. Our focus was on publicly available German mortality and police crime statistics (Polizeiliche Kriminalstatistik). These data were classified with respect to child age, data origin, and cause of death (murder, culpable homicide, etc.). In our opinion, the available data could not be considered in formulating reliable scientific statements about fatal child abuse and neglect, given the lack of detail and the flawed nature of the basic data. Increasing the number of autopsies of children 0-3 years of age should be considered as a means to ensure the capture of valid, practical, and reliable data. This could bring about some enlightenment and assist in the development of preemptive strategies to decrease the incidence of (fatal) child abuse and neglect.

  10. Improving teacher-child relationship quality and teacher-rated behavioral adjustment amongst externalizing preschoolers: effects of a two-component intervention.

    PubMed

    Vancraeyveldt, Caroline; Verschueren, Karine; Wouters, Sofie; Van Craeyevelt, Sanne; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Colpin, Hilde

    2015-02-01

    The school-based Playing-2-gether is a 12-week intervention with two components aimed at decreasing child externalizing behavior through improving teacher-child interactions. The first component is rooted in attachment theory and aimed at enhancing teacher-child relationship quality, and the second is based on learning theory and aimed at improving teachers' behavior management. In this three-wave randomized study, effects of Playing-2-gether on the teacher-child relationship quality and on teacher-rated child behavioral adjustment were investigated. To this aim, 175 dyads consisting of male preschoolers with relatively high levels of externalizing problem behavior and their teachers were randomly assigned to Playing-2-gether (n = 89) or an education-as-usual control condition (n = 86). Teacher-rated questionnaires were collected at pre-test, after the first intervention component, and at post-test. At post-test, the intervention group showed a larger decrease in teacher-child conflict, child conduct problems, and child hyperactivity/inattention. Supplementary analyses showed that all positive effects were already visible after the first intervention component and that teacher-child conflict, child conduct problems and hyperactivity/inattention did not further reduce during the second component. In addition, an increase in closeness was found following the first component, but subsequently disappeared at post-test.

  11. Use of Glucose Rate of Change Arrows to Adjust Insulin Therapy Among Individuals with Type 1 Diabetes Who Use Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pettus, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study was performed to understand and to compare differences in utilization of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and the rate of change (ROC) arrow to adjust insulin therapy among individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D), comparing those treated with multiple daily insulin injections (MDI) with those treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Research Design and Methods: We surveyed 222 T1D individuals who regularly used real-time CGM to obtain information about general CGM use and response to glucose ROC arrows in managing their diabetes. Results: The survey was completed by 222 T1D individuals. Respondents included CSII (n = 166) and MDI (n = 56) users. MDI and CSII respondents reported similar substantial increases in correction dosages (from 220 mg/dL to 120 mg/dL) in response to increasing glucose (one ROC arrow up: rising 2–3 mg/dL/min): +120% and +108%, respectively (P = 0.13). MDI and CSII respondents reported similar substantial increases in correction dosages in response to rapidly increasing glucose (two arrows up: rising >3 mg/dL/min): +146% and +138%, respectively (P = 0.72). When correcting from 220 mg/dL to 120 mg/dL, MDI respondents reported larger correction dosage reductions than CSII respondents in response to decreasing glucose (one ROC down arrow: decreasing 2–3 mg/dL/min) and rapidly decreasing glucose (two ROC down arrows: decreasing >3 mg/dL/min): −50% versus −37%, respectively (P = 0.024) and −52% versus 38%, respectively (P = 0.034). Similar between-group differences were observed in mealtime dosage adjustments. Conclusions: CGM users often rely on ROC information when determining insulin doses and tend to make larger changes than current recommendations suggest regardless of insulin delivery method. PMID:26784128

  12. [Age-related dynamics of roach infection rate with Ligula intestinalis (Cestoda: Ligulidae) plerocercoids and probability of its usage for the calculation of host death rate].

    PubMed

    Pronin, N M; Pronina, S V

    2014-01-01

    Results of special parasitological dissections of roach samples from catches with the same fishing gear and at the same station (Monakhovo Cove, Chivyrkui Bay of the Lake Baikal) and at the same time in different years (1998-2002) are given. Stability of age-related dynamics of roach infection rate with Ligula intestinalisis in different years with the maximum of prevalence and mean abundance in fish of 3+ age, and the following sharp decrease in these rates in elder age groups, was revealed. Basing on prevalence decreasing of a single roach generation, the rate of fish mortality during its growth from age group 3+ to 4+ was estimated as 15.9-20.7%.

  13. Brain death.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of brain death should be based on a simple premise. If every possible confounder has been excluded and all possible treatments have been tried or considered, irreversible loss of brain function is clinically recognized as the absence of brainstem reflexes, verified apnea, loss of vascular tone, invariant heart rate, and, eventually, cardiac standstill. This condition cannot be reversed - not even partly - by medical or surgical intervention, and thus is final. Many countries in the world have introduced laws that acknowledge that a patient can be declared brain-dead by neurologic standards. The U.S. law differs substantially from all other brain death legislation in the world because the U.S. law does not spell out details of the neurologic examination. Evidence-based practice guidelines serve as a standard. In this chapter, I discuss the history of development of the criteria, the current clinical examination, and some of the ethical and legal issues that have emerged. Generally, the concept of brain death has been accepted by all major religions. But patients' families may have different ideas and are mostly influenced by cultural attitudes, traditional customs, and personal beliefs. Suggestions are offered to support these families.

  14. Acute cell death rate of vascular smooth muscle cells during or after short heating up to 20s ranging 50 to 60°C as a basic study of thermal angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, Machiko; Shimazaki, Natsumi; Ogawa, Emiyu; Machida, Naoki; Arai, Tsunenori

    2014-02-01

    We studied the relations between the time history of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) death rate and heating condition in vitro to clarify cell death mechanism in heating angioplasty, in particular under the condition in which intimal hyperplasia growth had been prevented in vivo swine experiment. A flow heating system on the microscope stage was used for the SMCs death rate measurement during or after the heating. The cells were loaded step-heating by heated flow using a heater equipped in a Photo-thermo dynamic balloon. The heating temperature was set to 37, 50-60°C. The SMCs death rate was calculated by a division of PI stained cell number by Hoechst33342 stained cell number. The SMCs death rate increased 5-10% linearly during 20 s with the heating. The SMCs death rate increased with duration up to 15 min after 5 s heating. Because fragmented nuclei were observed from approximately 5 min after the heating, we defined that acute necrosis and late necrosis were corresponded to within 5 min after the heating and over 5 min after the heating, respectively. This late necrosis is probably corresponding to apoptosis. The ratio of necrotic interaction divided the acute necrosis rate by the late necrosis was calculated based on this consideration as 1.3 under the particular condition in which intimal hyperplasia growth was prevented in vivo previous porcine experiment. We think that necrotic interaction rate is larger than expected rate to obtain intimal hyperplasia suppression.

  15. Increasing rates of brain tumours in the Swedish national inpatient register and the causes of death register.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael

    2015-04-03

    Radiofrequency emissions in the frequency range 30 kHz-300 GHz were evaluated to be Group 2B, i.e., "possibly", carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) at WHO in May 2011. The Swedish Cancer Register has not shown increasing incidence of brain tumours in recent years and has been used to dismiss epidemiological evidence on a risk. In this study we used the Swedish National Inpatient Register (IPR) and Causes of Death Register (CDR) to further study the incidence comparing with the Cancer Register data for the time period 1998-2013 using joinpoint regression analysis. In the IPR we found a joinpoint in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC) +4.25%, 95% CI +1.98, +6.57% during 2007-2013 for tumours of unknown type in the brain or CNS. In the CDR joinpoint regression found one joinpoint in 2008 with APC during 2008-2013 +22.60%, 95% CI +9.68, +37.03%. These tumour diagnoses would be based on clinical examination, mainly CT and/or MRI, but without histopathology or cytology. No statistically significant increasing incidence was found in the Swedish Cancer Register during these years. We postulate that a large part of brain tumours of unknown type are never reported to the Cancer Register. Furthermore, the frequency of diagnosis based on autopsy has declined substantially due to a general decline of autopsies in Sweden adding further to missing cases. We conclude that the Swedish Cancer Register is not reliable to be used to dismiss results in epidemiological studies on the use of wireless phones and brain tumour risk.

  16. Increasing Rates of Brain Tumours in the Swedish National Inpatient Register and the Causes of Death Register

    PubMed Central

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency emissions in the frequency range 30 kHz–300 GHz were evaluated to be Group 2B, i.e., “possibly”, carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) at WHO in May 2011. The Swedish Cancer Register has not shown increasing incidence of brain tumours in recent years and has been used to dismiss epidemiological evidence on a risk. In this study we used the Swedish National Inpatient Register (IPR) and Causes of Death Register (CDR) to further study the incidence comparing with the Cancer Register data for the time period 1998–2013 using joinpoint regression analysis. In the IPR we found a joinpoint in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC) +4.25%, 95% CI +1.98, +6.57% during 2007–2013 for tumours of unknown type in the brain or CNS. In the CDR joinpoint regression found one joinpoint in 2008 with APC during 2008–2013 +22.60%, 95% CI +9.68, +37.03%. These tumour diagnoses would be based on clinical examination, mainly CT and/or MRI, but without histopathology or cytology. No statistically significant increasing incidence was found in the Swedish Cancer Register during these years. We postulate that a large part of brain tumours of unknown type are never reported to the Cancer Register. Furthermore, the frequency of diagnosis based on autopsy has declined substantially due to a general decline of autopsies in Sweden adding further to missing cases. We conclude that the Swedish Cancer Register is not reliable to be used to dismiss results in epidemiological studies on the use of wireless phones and brain tumour risk. PMID:25854296

  17. Why history matters for quantitative target setting: long-term trends in socioeconomic and racial/ethnic inequities in US infant death rates (1960–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Nancy; Singh, Nakul; Chen, Jarvis T.; Coull, Brent A.; Beckfield, Jason; Kiang, Mathew V.; Waterman, Pamela D.; Gruskin, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Policy-oriented population health targets, such as the Millennium Development Goals and national targets to address health inequities, typically are based on trends of a decade or less. To test whether expanded timeframes might be more apt, we analyzed 50-year trends in US infant death rates (1960–2010) jointly by income and race/ethnicity. The largest annual percent changes in the infant death rate (between −4% and −10%) occurred, for all racial/ethnic groups, in the lowest income quintile between the mid-1960s and early 1980s, and in the second lowest income quintile between the mid-1960s and 1973; since the 1990s, they have hovered, in all groups, between −1% and −3%. Hence, to look back only 15 years, in 2014, to 1999, would ignore gains achieved prior to the post-1980 onset of neoliberal policies. Target setting should be informed by a deeper and more long-term appraisal of what is possible to achieve. PMID:25971237

  18. Chiropractic Adjustment

    MedlinePlus

    ... structural alignment and improve your body's physical function. Low back pain, neck pain and headache are the most common ... treated. Chiropractic adjustment can be effective in treating low back pain, although much of the research done shows only ...

  19. Adjustment disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... from other people Skipped heartbeats and other physical complaints Trembling or twitching To have adjustment disorder, you ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  20. The Unique Impact of Abolition of Jim Crow Laws on Reducing Inequities in Infant Death Rates and Implications for Choice of Comparison Groups in Analyzing Societal Determinants of Health

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jarvis T.; Coull, Brent; Waterman, Pamela D.; Beckfield, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We explored associations between the abolition of Jim Crow laws (i.e., state laws legalizing racial discrimination overturned by the 1964 US Civil Rights Act) and birth cohort trends in infant death rates. Methods. We analyzed 1959 to 2006 US Black and White infant death rates within and across sets of states (polities) with and without Jim Crow laws. Results. Between 1965 and 1969, a unique convergence of Black infant death rates occurred across polities; in 1960 to 1964, the Black infant death rate was 1.19 times higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.18, 1.20) in the Jim Crow polity than in the non–Jim Crow polity, whereas in 1970 to 1974 the rate ratio shrank to and remained at approximately 1 (with the 95% CI including 1) until 2000, when it rose to 1.10 (95% CI = 1.08, 1.12). No such convergence occurred for Black–White differences in infant death rates or for White infants. Conclusions. Our results suggest that abolition of Jim Crow laws affected US Black infant death rates and that valid analysis of societal determinants of health requires appropriate comparison groups. PMID:24134378

  1. Beta2-microglobulin is a better predictor of treatment-free survival in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia if adjusted according to glomerular filtration rate.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Julio; Pratt, Guy; Phillips, Neil; Briones, Javier; Fegan, Chris; Nomdedeu, Josep; Pepper, Chris; Aventin, Anna; Ayats, Ramon; Brunet, Salut; Martino, Rodrigo; Valcarcel, David; Milligan, Donald; Sierra, Jorge

    2009-06-01

    Even in the era of newer and sophisticated prognostic markers, beta(2)-microglobulin (B2M) remains a simple but very powerful predictor of treatment-free survival (TFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). However, B2M levels are heavily influenced by the patient's glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and this study aimed to evaluate whether GFR-adjusted B2M (GFR-B2M) had improved prognostic value compared to unadjusted B2M in a cohort of over 450 consecutive CLL patients from two separate institutions. Multivariate analysis identified a significantly shorter TFS in patients who were ZAP-70 + (P < 0.001), with increased GFR-B2M (P < 0.001), and del(11q) or del(17p) as detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH; P < 0.001). When OS was evaluated by multivariate analysis, age 65 years or older (P < 0.001) and poor risk FISH abnormalities (P < 0.001) had a confirmed adverse prognostic impact, but the predictive value of GFR-B2M was lost in the validation analysis. In all survival models, B2M did not attain independent significance unless GFR-B2M was eliminated from the analysis. In conclusion, GFR-B2M is a better predictor of TFS than unadjusted B2M in CLL patients.

  2. Probability versus representativeness in infancy: can infants use naïve physics to adjust population base rates in probabilistic inference?

    PubMed

    Denison, Stephanie; Trikutam, Pallavi; Xu, Fei

    2014-08-01

    A rich tradition in developmental psychology explores physical reasoning in infancy. However, no research to date has investigated whether infants can reason about physical objects that behave probabilistically, rather than deterministically. Physical events are often quite variable, in that similar-looking objects can be placed in similar contexts with different outcomes. Can infants rapidly acquire probabilistic physical knowledge, such as some leaves fall and some glasses break by simply observing the statistical regularity with which objects behave and apply that knowledge in subsequent reasoning? We taught 11-month-old infants physical constraints on objects and asked them to reason about the probability of different outcomes when objects were drawn from a large distribution. Infants could have reasoned either by using the perceptual similarity between the samples and larger distributions or by applying physical rules to adjust base rates and estimate the probabilities. Infants learned the physical constraints quickly and used them to estimate probabilities, rather than relying on similarity, a version of the representativeness heuristic. These results indicate that infants can rapidly and flexibly acquire physical knowledge about objects following very brief exposure and apply it in subsequent reasoning.

  3. High Emergency Lung Transplantation: dramatic decrease of waiting list death rate without relevant higher post-transplant mortality.

    PubMed

    Roux, Antoine; Beaumont-Azuar, Laurence; Hamid, Abdul Monem; De Miranda, Sandra; Grenet, Dominique; Briend, Guillaume; Bonnette, Pierre; Puyo, Philippe; Parquin, François; Devaquet, Jerome; Trebbia, Gregoire; Cuquemelle, Elise; Douvry, Benoit; Picard, Clément; Le Guen, Morgan; Chapelier, Alain; Stern, Marc; Sage, Edouard

    2015-09-01

    Many candidates for lung transplantation (LT) die on the waiting list, raising the question of graft availability and strategy for organ allocation. We report the experience of the new organ allocation program, "High Emergency Lung Transplantation" (HELT), since its implementation in our center in 2007. Retrospective analysis of 201 lung transplant patients, of whom 37 received HELT from 1st July 2007 to 31th May 2012. HELT candidates had a higher impairment grade on respiratory status and higher Lung Allocation Score (LAS). HELT patients had increased incidence of perioperative complications (e.g., perioperative bleeding) and extracorporeal circulatory assistance (75% vs. 36.6%, P = 0.0005). No significant difference was observed between HELT and non-HELT patients in mechanical ventilation duration (15.5 days vs. 11 days, P = 0.27), intensive care unit length of stay (15 days vs. 10 days, P = 0.22) or survival rate at 12 (81% vs. 80%), and 24 months post-LT (72.9% vs. 75.0%). Lastly, mortality on the waiting list was spectacularly reduced from 19% to 2% when compared to the non-HELT 2004-2007 group. Despite a more severe clinical status of patients on the waiting list, HELT provided similar results to conventional LT. These results were associated with a dramatic reduction in the mortality rate of patients on the waiting list.

  4. Voodoo death.

    PubMed

    Lester, David

    2009-01-01

    Scholarly writing on voodoo death is reviewed. Criticisms that voodoo deaths in indigenous societies have never been well documented are refuted with cases medically documented in developed nations. The work of Cannon and Richter on sudden death in animals is reviewed and dismissed as irrelevant for understanding voodoo death. The role of starvation and dehydration is discussed, and it is suggested that the given-up/giving-up hypothesis best fits the phenomenon of voodoo death. Hypotheses for future research are suggested.

  5. The rate and pattern of bed incision and bank adjustment on the Colorado River in Glen Canyon downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, 1956-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grams, P.E.; Schmidt, J.C.; Topping, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Closure of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963 transformed the Colorado River by reducing the magnitude and duration of spring floods, increasing the magnitude of base flows, and trapping fine sediment delivered from the upper watershed. These changes caused the channel downstream in Glen Canyon to incise, armor, and narrow. This study synthesizes over 45 yr of channel-change measurements and demonstrates that the rate and style of channel adjustment are directly related to both natural processes associated with sediment deficit and human decisions about dam operations. Although bed lowering in lower Glen Canyon began when the first cofferdam was installed in 1959, most incision occurred in 1965 in conjunction with 14 pulsed high flows that scoured an average of 2.6 m of sediment from the center of the channel. The average grain size of bed material has increased from 0.25 mm in 1956 to over 20 mm in 1999. The magnitude of incision at riffles decreases with distance downstream from the dam, while the magnitude of sediment evacuation from pools is spatially variable and extends farther downstream. Analysis of bed-material mobility indicates that the increase in bed-material grain size and reduction in reach-average gradient are consistent with the transformation of an adjustable-bed alluvial river to a channel with a stable bed that is rarely mobilized. Decreased magnitude of peak discharges in the post-dam regime coupled with channel incision and the associated downward shifts of stage-discharge relations have caused sandbar and terrace erosion and the transformation of previously active sandbars and gravel bars to abandoned deposits that are no longer inundated. Erosion has been concentrated in a few pre-dam terraces that eroded rapidly for brief periods and have since stabilized. The abundance of abandoned deposits decreases downstream in conjunction with decreasing magnitude of shift in the stage-discharge relations. In the downstream part of the study area where riffles

  6. Prospective cohort study of stress, life satisfaction, self-rated health, insomnia, and suicide death in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yoshihisa; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Tokui, Noritaka; Yoshimura, Takesumi

    2005-04-01

    The association between many psychosocial factors and risk of suicide was examined. A cohort was conducted over 14 years of follow up among the general population (15,597 people) in Japan. A baseline survey of psychosocial characteristics was conducted by self-administrated questionnaire. The relative risks of occasional emotional stress, difficulty maintaining sleep, and reporting unhealthy as their self-rated health are 3.2 (95% CI: 1.3, 7.6), 2.4 (95% CI: 1.3, 4.3) and 2.6 (95% CI: 1.1, 6.2), respectively. The importance of these observations lie in its potential for improving physician and public awareness of psychosocial factors as an early indication of mental health morbidity.

  7. Estimating In Vivo Death Rates of Targets due to CD8 T-Cell-Mediated Killing▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ganusov, Vitaly V.; De Boer, Rob J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite recent advances in immunology, several key parameters determining virus dynamics in infected hosts remain largely unknown. For example, the rate at which specific effector and memory CD8 T cells clear virus-infected cells in vivo is hardly known for any viral infection. We propose a framework to quantify T-cell-mediated killing of infected or peptide-pulsed target cells using the widely used in vivo cytotoxicity assay. We have reanalyzed recently published data on killing of peptide-pulsed splenocytes by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and memory CD8 T cells specific to NP396 and GP276 epitopes of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) in the mouse spleen. Because there are so many effector CD8 T cells in spleens of mice at the peak of the immune response, NP396- and GP276-pulsed targets are estimated to have very short half-lives of 2 and 14 min, respectively. After the effector numbers have diminished, i.e., in LCMV-immune mice, the half-lives become 48 min and 2.8 h for NP396- and GP276-expressing targets, respectively. Analysis of several alternative models demonstrates that the estimates of half-life times of peptide-pulsed targets are not affected when changes are made in the model assumptions. Our report provides a unifying framework to compare killing efficacies of CD8 T-cell responses specific to different viral and bacterial infections in vivo, which may be used to compare efficacies of various cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-based vaccines. PMID:18815293

  8. 20 CFR 10.410 - Who is entitled to compensation in case of death, and what are the rates of compensation payable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... entitled to receive death benefits until death, marriage, or reaching age 18. Regarding entitlement after... monthly pay until death or remarriage before reaching age 55. Upon remarriage, the surviving spouse will... remarriage. If remarriage occurs at age 55 or older, the lump-sum payment will not be paid and...

  9. The national financial adjustment policy and the equalisation of health levels among prefectures

    PubMed Central

    Takano, T; Nakamura, K

    2001-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES—The objectives of this study were to examine (1) trends concerning financial assistance from the national government to local governments, (2) trends regarding death rates and life expectancies among prefectures, and (3) the effect of the national financial adjustment policy in equalising both the revenues of local governments and variations in the health levels among prefectures in terms of death rates and life expectancies.
DESIGN—The study analysed prefectural income, the amount of national taxes collected, financial assistance from the national government to local governments, and age adjusted death rates and life expectancies of all of the prefectures in Japan during the period from 1965 through 1995.
MAIN RESULTS—(1) Under the financial adjustment policy, financial assistance from the national government to the local governments, which consists of the sum of the local allocation tax and treasury disbursements, increased from 1831 billion yen in 1965 to 31 116 billion yen in 1995. (2) During the same period, the age adjusted death rate per 100 000 people decreased from 1168.9 (1965) to 545.3 (1995). The range of variation in the age adjusted death rate among prefectures diminished as the coefficient of variation of the death rate declined from 0.060 in 1965 to 0.043 in 1995. (3) There was a significant statistical correlation between higher prefectural incomes and lower mortality rates during from 1965 until 1975 (p < 0.05), whereas this correlation was indistinct in the 1980s and has not been observed since 1990. (4) The relative health level of Tokyo has declined in terms of its ranking among all the prefectures with regard to life expectancy, from being the best in 1965 to below average in 1995.
CONCLUSIONS—The national financial adjustment policy to balance the revenues of local governments has increased the health levels of rural prefectures. It is probable that the policy reduced the disparity in death

  10. Invariant death

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    In nematodes, environmental or physiological perturbations alter death’s scaling of time. In human cancer, genetic perturbations alter death’s curvature of time. Those changes in scale and curvature follow the constraining contours of death’s invariant geometry. I show that the constraints arise from a fundamental extension to the theories of randomness, invariance and scale. A generalized Gompertz law follows. The constraints imposed by the invariant Gompertz geometry explain the tendency of perturbations to stretch or bend death’s scaling of time. Variability in death rate arises from a combination of constraining universal laws and particular biological processes. PMID:27785361

  11. Cot Deaths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrrell, Shelagh

    1985-01-01

    Addresses the tragedy of crib deaths, giving particular attention to causes, prevention, and medical research on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Gives anecdotal accounts of coping strategies used by parents and families of SIDS infants. (DT)

  12. [Multicentric study of deaths by homicide in Latin American countries].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Edinilsa Ramos; de Melo, André Nascimento; Silva, Juliana Guimarães e; Franco, Saúl Alonso; Alazraqui, Marcio; González-Pérez, Guillermo Julián

    2012-12-01

    This article is a descriptive epidemiological study of deaths by homicide in Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Mexico) from 1990 to 2007. Deaths due to external causes and homicides, as codified in the 9th and 10th revisions of the International Classification of Diseases/ICD, were analyzed considering sex, age and manner of assault. The numbers, ratios and adjusted rates for deaths by homicide are presented. A linear regression model was used to ascertain the trend of homicide rates by age group. During the period, 4,086,216 deaths from external causes and 1,432,971 homicides were registered in these countries. Deaths from external causes rose 54.5% in Argentina but fell in the other countries (37% in Mexico, 31.8% in Colombia, and 8.1% in Brazil). The ratio for deaths by homicide for both sexes was 9.1 in Colombia, 4.4 in Brazil and 1.6 in Mexico, using the Argentinian rates as a benchmark. There were differences in the evolution of homicide rates by age and sex in the countries: the rate rose in Brazil and fell in Colombia for all age groups. The need to prioritize young males in public policies related to health care and prevention is stressed, as well as the need for the region to adopt inclusive policies and broaden and consolidate democracy and the rights of inhabitants.

  13. Shaft adjuster

    DOEpatents

    Harry, H.H.

    1988-03-11

    Abstract and method for the adjustment and alignment of shafts in high power devices. A plurality of adjacent rotatable angled cylinders are positioned between a base and the shaft to be aligned which when rotated introduce an axial offset. The apparatus is electrically conductive and constructed of a structurally rigid material. The angled cylinders allow the shaft such as the center conductor in a pulse line machine to be offset in any desired alignment position within the range of the apparatus. 3 figs.

  14. Shaft adjuster

    DOEpatents

    Harry, Herbert H.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method for the adjustment and alignment of shafts in high power devices. A plurality of adjacent rotatable angled cylinders are positioned between a base and the shaft to be aligned which when rotated introduce an axial offset. The apparatus is electrically conductive and constructed of a structurally rigid material. The angled cylinders allow the shaft such as the center conductor in a pulse line machine to be offset in any desired alignment position within the range of the apparatus.

  15. Risk-adjusted outcomes in Medicare inpatient nephrectomy patients

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Donald E.; Pine, Michael; Nedza, Susan M.; Locke, David G.; Reband, Agnes M.; Pine, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Without risk-adjusted outcomes of surgical care across both the inpatient and postacute period of time, hospitals and surgeons cannot evaluate the effectiveness of current performance in nephrectomy and other operations, and will not have objective metrics to gauge improvements from care redesign efforts. We compared risk-adjusted hospital outcomes following elective total and partial nephrectomy to demonstrate differences that can be used to improve care. We used the Medicare Limited Dataset for 2010 to 2012 for total and partial nephrectomy for benign and malignant neoplasms to create prediction models for the adverse outcomes (AOs) of inpatient deaths, prolonged length-of-stay outliers, 90-day postdischarge deaths without readmission, and 90-day relevant readmissions. From the 4 prediction models, total predicted adverse outcomes were determined for each hospital in the dataset that met a minimum of 25 evaluable cases for the study period. Standard deviations (SDs) for each hospital were used to identify specific z-scores. Risk-adjusted adverse outcomes rates were computed to permit benchmarking each hospital's performance against the national standard. Differences between best and suboptimal performing hospitals defined the potential margin of preventable adverse outcomes for this operation. A total of 449 hospitals with 23,477 patients were evaluated. Overall AO rate was 20.8%; 17 hospitals had risk-adjusted AO rates that were 2 SDs poorer than predicted and 8 were 2 SDs better. The top performing decile of hospitals had a risk-adjusted AO rate of 10.2% while the lowest performing decile had 32.1%. With a minimum of 25 cases for each study hospital, no statistically valid improvement in outcomes was seen with increased case volume. Inpatient and 90-day postdischarge risk-adjusted adverse outcomes demonstrated marked variability among study hospitals and illustrate the opportunities for care improvement. This analytic design is applicable for comparing

  16. Risk-adjusted outcomes in Medicare inpatient nephrectomy patients.

    PubMed

    Fry, Donald E; Pine, Michael; Nedza, Susan M; Locke, David G; Reband, Agnes M; Pine, Gregory

    2016-09-01

    Without risk-adjusted outcomes of surgical care across both the inpatient and postacute period of time, hospitals and surgeons cannot evaluate the effectiveness of current performance in nephrectomy and other operations, and will not have objective metrics to gauge improvements from care redesign efforts.We compared risk-adjusted hospital outcomes following elective total and partial nephrectomy to demonstrate differences that can be used to improve care. We used the Medicare Limited Dataset for 2010 to 2012 for total and partial nephrectomy for benign and malignant neoplasms to create prediction models for the adverse outcomes (AOs) of inpatient deaths, prolonged length-of-stay outliers, 90-day postdischarge deaths without readmission, and 90-day relevant readmissions. From the 4 prediction models, total predicted adverse outcomes were determined for each hospital in the dataset that met a minimum of 25 evaluable cases for the study period. Standard deviations (SDs) for each hospital were used to identify specific z-scores. Risk-adjusted adverse outcomes rates were computed to permit benchmarking each hospital's performance against the national standard. Differences between best and suboptimal performing hospitals defined the potential margin of preventable adverse outcomes for this operation.A total of 449 hospitals with 23,477 patients were evaluated. Overall AO rate was 20.8%; 17 hospitals had risk-adjusted AO rates that were 2 SDs poorer than predicted and 8 were 2 SDs better. The top performing decile of hospitals had a risk-adjusted AO rate of 10.2% while the lowest performing decile had 32.1%. With a minimum of 25 cases for each study hospital, no statistically valid improvement in outcomes was seen with increased case volume.Inpatient and 90-day postdischarge risk-adjusted adverse outcomes demonstrated marked variability among study hospitals and illustrate the opportunities for care improvement. This analytic design is applicable for comparing provider

  17. Incidence rates and deaths of tuberculosis in HIV-negative patients in the United States and Germany as analyzed by new predictive model for infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yudong; Ding, Fan; Suo, Siqingaowa; Bu, Ri-e; Zarlenga, Dante S; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    Incidence and mortality due to tuberculosis (TB) have been decreasing worldwide. Given that TB is a cosmopolitan disease, proper surveillance and evaluation are critical for controlling dissemination. Herein, mathematical modeling was performed in order to: 1) demonstrate a correlation between the incidence of TB in HIV-free patients in the US and Germany, and their corresponding mortality rates; 2) show the utility of the newly developed D-R algorithm for analyzing and predicting the incidence of TB in both countries; and 3) inform us on population death rates due to TB in HIV-negative patients. Using data published by the World Health Organization between 1990 and 2009, the relationship between incidence and mortality that could not be ascribed to HIV infection was evaluated. Using linear, quadratic and cubic curves, we found that a cubic function provided the best fit with the data in both the US (Y = 2.3588+2.2459X+61.1639X(2)-60.104X(3)) and Germany (Y = 1.9271+9.4967X+18.3824X(2)-10.350X(3)) where the correlation coefficient (R) between incidence and mortality was 0.995 and 0.993, respectively. Second, we demonstrated that fitted curves using the D-R model were equal to or better than those generated using the GM(1,1) algorithm as exemplified in the relative values for Sum of Squares of Error, Relative Standard Error, Mean Absolute Deviation, Average Relative Error, and Mean Absolute Percentage Error. Finally, future trends using both the D-R and the classic GM(1,1) models predicted a continued decline in infection and mortality rates of TB in HIV-negative patients rates extending to 2015 assuming no changes to diagnosis or treatment regimens are enacted.

  18. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Marta; Cherubini, Paolo; Fravolini, Giulia; Marchetti, Marco; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Schärer, Michael; Synal, Hans-Arno; Bertoldi, Daniela; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto; Egli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Due to the large size (e.g. sections of tree trunks) and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the timescales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the chronosequence approach and the five-decay class system that is based on a macromorphological assessment. For the decay classes 1-3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose, and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model, a regression approach, and the stage-based matrix model. In the decay classes 1-3, the ages of the CWD were similar and varied between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch, with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative of deadwood age. This seems to be due to a time lag between the death of a standing tree and its contact with the soil. We found distinct tree-species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were estimated to be in the range 0.018 to 0.022 y-1 for spruce and to about 0.012 y-1 for larch. Snapshot sampling (chronosequences) may overestimate the age and mean residence time of CWD. No sampling bias was, however, detectable using the stage-based matrix model. Cellulose and lignin time trends could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 years for spruce and 50 years for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than

  19. Bereavement after sibling death: a population-based longitudinal case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bolton, James M; Au, Wendy; Chateau, Dan; Walld, Randy; Leslie, William D; Enns, Jessica; Martens, Patricia J; Katz, Laurence Y; Logsetty, Sarvesh; Sareen, Jitender

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine mental disorders and treatment use among bereaved siblings in the general population. Siblings (N=7243) of all deceased children in the population of Manitoba, Canada who died between 1984 and 2009 were matched 1:3 to control siblings (N=21,729) who did not have a sibling die in the study period. Generalized estimating equations were used to compare the two sibling groups in the two years before and after the index child's death on physician-diagnosed mental disorders and treatment utilization, with adjustment for confounding factors including pre-existing mental illness. Analyses were stratified by age of the bereaved (<13 vs. 13+). Results revealed that, in the two years after the death of the child, bereaved siblings had significantly higher rates of mental disorders than control siblings, even after adjusting for pre-existing mental illness. When comparing the effect of a child's death on younger versus older siblings, the rise in depression rates from pre-death to post-death was significantly higher for siblings aged under 13 (p<0.0001), increasing more than 7-fold (adjusted relative rate, ARR=7.25, 95% CI: 3.65-14.43). Bereaved siblings aged 13+ had substantial morbidity in the two years after the death: 25% were diagnosed with a mental disorder (vs. 17% of controls), and they had higher rates of almost all mental disorder outcomes compared to controls, including twice the rate of suicide attempts (ARR=2.01, 95% CI: 1.29-3.12). Siblings in the bereaved cohort had higher rates of alcohol and drug use disorders already before the death of their sibling. In conclusion, the death of a child is associated with considerable mental disorder burden among surviving siblings. Pre-existing health problems and social disadvantage do not fully account for the increase in mental disorder rates.

  20. A Multicenter Experience from Lebanon in Childhood and Adolescent Acute Myeloid Leukemia: High rate of Early Death in Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Roula A.; Horkos, Jessy G.; Bustros, Youssef D.; Farhat, Hussein Z.; Abla, Oussama

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a disease with marked heterogeneity. Despite major improvement in outcome, it remains a life-threatening malignancy. Demographic and clinical data on pediatric AML is lacking among the Lebanese population. Purpose We aimed to identify clinical, molecular and outcome data in children with AML in Lebanon. Methods A retrospective chart review of children with AML diagnosed in three Lebanese hospitals during the past 8 years was conducted. Results From May 2002 through March 2010, we identified 24 children with AML in Saint George Hospital University Medical Center, University Medical Center Rizk Hospital, and Abou-Jaoude Hospital. Males and females were equally represented; median age at diagnosis was 9 years (range 1–24) and median WBC at diagnosis was 31 × 109/L (range: 2.1–376 × 109/L). Twenty five percent of patients (6 out of 24) had acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Karyotype was normal in 33% of patients; t(8;21), inv (16), t(8;9), t(7;11), t(9;11), complex chromosomal abnormality, monosomy 7 and trisomy 8 were the most common cytogenetic abnormalities encountered. Patients were treated on different European and North American protocols. Twelve patients (50%) achieved morphologic CR after cycle 1, 6 of them (50%) had bone marrow relapse within 11 months from diagnosis. Nine patients underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant, and 3 of them are alive at 5 years post-transplant. Early death rate was 16.6% of patients, mainly those with APL and a presenting WBC > 10 × 109/L. Fifty per cent of APL patients had an early death due to DIC despite starting ATRA therapy. Overall, median survival for AML patients who died from disease progression was 25.8 months (range: 1–60 months). Overall disease-free survival was 30.4%. Patients < 10 years of age had a 50% survival rate compared to 0% in patients > 10 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the needs in Lebanon for better supportive care of children with APL

  1. Changes in Age-Adjusted Mortality Rates and Disparities for Rural Physician Shortage Areas Staffed by the National Health Service Corps: 1984-1998

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathman, Donald E.; Fryer, George E.; Green, Larry A.; Phillips, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses whether the National Health Service Corps's legislated goals to see health improve and health disparities lessen are being met in rural health professional shortage areas for a key population health indicator: age-adjusted mortality. In a descriptive study using a pre-post design with comparison groups, the authors calculated…

  2. Changes in Age-Adjusted Mortality Rates and Disparities for Rural Physician Shortage Areas Staffed by the National Health Service Corps: 1984-1998

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathman, Donald E.; Fryer, George E.; Green, Larry A.; Phillips, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study assesses whether the National Health Service Corps's legislated goals to see health improve and health disparities lessen are being met in rural health professional shortage areas for a key population health indicator: age-adjusted mortality. Methods: In a descriptive study using a pre-post design with comparison groups, the…

  3. Coronary artery bypass grafting in Canada: hospital mortality rates, 1992-1995

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, W A; Quan, H; Brant, R

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rates of in-hospital death after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) have been studied in many regions of Canada as possible indicators of hospital-specific quality of care. This nationwide study examined observed and risk-adjusted death rates for 23 Canadian hospitals performing CABG. METHODS: Hospital discharge data were obtained from the Canadian Institute for Health Information and were used to identify all CABG procedures performed in Canadian hospitals in fiscal years 1992/93 through 1995/96. Cases from Quebec hospitals were not studied because hospitals in that province do not report to the institute. Observed death rates were evaluated, and a logistic regression model was used to calculate a risk-adjusted death rate for each hospital for the 4-year period studied. Changes over time in hospital-specific death rates were also examined. RESULTS: A total of 50,357 CABG cases were studied, with an overall death rate of 3.6%. Interhospital comparisons showed that average severity of illness varied considerably across hospitals. Despite risk adjustment accounting for this variable severity, there was considerable variation in adjusted death rates across the 23 hospitals, from 1.95% to 5.76% (p < 0.001 for difference across hospitals). For some hospitals, death rates decreased between 1992/93 and 1995/96, whereas for others the rates were stable or increased. INTERPRETATION: Risk-adjusted rates of in-hospital death after CABG vary widely across Canadian hospitals. There may be differences in quality of care across hospitals, and focused quality-improvement initiatives may be necessary in some institutions. PMID:9834717

  4. Childhood parental death and lifetime suicide attempt of the opposite-gender offspring in a nationwide community sample of Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hong Jin; Hong, Jin Pyo; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David; Nyer, Maren; Inamori, Aya; Sohn, Jee Hoon; Seong, Sujeong; Cho, Maeng Je

    2013-12-01

    Although previous studies have shown that childhood parental death influences suicide attempts of their offspring, few studies have examined influence of gender and age at exposure. Koreans show the third highest suicide rate in the world, and many children and adolescents lost their parents during and after the Korean War. A total of 12,532 adults, randomly selected through a one-person-per-household method, completed the Korean version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and questionnaire for suicidal ideation, plan, and attempt (response rate 80.2%). A total of 2,332 subjects experienced biological parental death in childhood (18.6%). Male suicide attempts were associated with age of exposure to maternal death from 0 to 4 years (adjusted OR = 4.48, 95% CI 1.32-15.18) and from 5 to 9 years (adjusted OR = 5.52, 95% CI 1.97-16.46), but not with paternal death, after adjusting for age, education years, marital status, monthly income, and psychiatric comorbidities. Female suicide attempts were associated with paternal death from 5 to 9 years (adjusted OR = 2.20, 95% CI 1.13-4.27), but not with maternal death. Childhood parental death is significantly associated with lifetime suicide attempt in the opposite-gender offspring, especially when exposure occurs before age 10.

  5. 20 CFR 10.410 - Who is entitled to compensation in case of death, and what are the rates of compensation payable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... death, marriage, or reaching age 18. Regarding entitlement after reaching age 18, refer to § 10.417. ... remarriage before reaching age 55. Upon remarriage, the surviving spouse will be paid a lump sum equal to 24... age 55 or older, the lump-sum payment will not be paid and compensation will continue until death....

  6. 20 CFR 10.410 - Who is entitled to compensation in case of death, and what are the rates of compensation payable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... death, marriage, or reaching age 18. Regarding entitlement after reaching age 18, refer to § 10.417. ... remarriage before reaching age 55. Upon remarriage, the surviving spouse will be paid a lump sum equal to 24... age 55 or older, the lump-sum payment will not be paid and compensation will continue until death....

  7. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, M.; Cherubini, P.; Fravolini, G.; Ascher, J.; Schärer, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Bertoldi, D.; Camin, F.; Larcher, R.; Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    Due to the large size and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the time scales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests have been poorly investigated and are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the five-decay class system commonly employed for forest surveys, based on a macromorphological and visual assessment. For the decay classes 1 to 3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) and some others not having enough tree rings, radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model. In the decay classes 1 to 3, the ages of the CWD were similar varying between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative for deadwood age. We found, however, distinct tree species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were 0.012 to 0.018 yr-1 for spruce and 0.005 to 0.012 yr-1 for larch. Cellulose and lignin time trends half-lives (using a multiple-exponential model) could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 yr for spruce and 50 yr for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than 100 years in larch CWD.

  8. Complicated grief after suicide bereavement and other causes of death.

    PubMed

    Tal, Ilanit; Mauro, Christine; Reynolds, Charles F; Shear, M Katherine; Simon, Naomi; Lebowitz, Barry; Skritskaya, Natalia; Wang, Yuanjia; Qiu, Xin; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Avanzino, Julie; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Karp, Jordan F; Robinaugh, Don; Zisook, Sidney

    2016-11-28

    The authors compared baseline demographic characteristics, clinical features, and grief-related thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals bereaved by suicide, accident/homicide and natural causes participating in a complicated grief (CG) treatment clinical trial. Severity of CG and depression and current depression diagnosis did not vary by loss type. After adjusting for baseline demographic features, time since death and relationship to the deceased, those with CG after suicide had the highest rates of lifetime depression, preloss passive suicidal ideation, self-blaming thoughts, and impaired work and social adjustment. Even among this treatment-seeking sample of research participants with CG, suicide survivors may face unique challenges.

  9. Capping risk adjustment?

    PubMed

    Eugster, Patrick; Sennhauser, Michèle; Zweifel, Peter

    2010-07-01

    When premiums are community-rated, risk adjustment (RA) serves to mitigate competitive insurers' incentive to select favorable risks. However, unless fully prospective, it also undermines their incentives for efficiency. By capping its volume, one may try to counteract this tendency, exposing insurers to some financial risk. This in term runs counter the quest to refine the RA formula, which would increase RA volume. Specifically, the adjuster, "Hospitalization or living in a nursing home during the previous year" will be added in Switzerland starting 2012. This paper investigates how to minimize the opportunity cost of capping RA in terms of increased incentives for risk selection.

  10. Deaths: Final Data for 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Sherry L.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents final 1998 data on U.S. deaths and death rates according to demographic and medical characteristics such as age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, educational attainment, injury at work, state of residence, and cause of death. Trends and patterns in general mortality, life expectancy, and infant and maternal…

  11. Patterns of United States mortality for ten selected causes of death

    SciTech Connect

    Selvin, S.; Sacks, S.T.; Merrill, D.W.

    1980-11-06

    Income, ethnicity, education, and occupation are examples of socio-economic factors associated with the occurrence of disease, whether an investigation focuses on an individual or on an aggregation of individuals. In this study, data aggregated to the county level are used to explore two issues - geographic variation and geographic covariation of ten selected causes of death in the United States. The counties of the United States are characterized by 15 socio-economic variables and age-adjusted mortality rates for the ten selected causes of death. The observed variation among the US counties, as measured by the socio-economic variables, is first assessed, then the geographic variation and covariation are described for each cause of death and, finally, the covariation among causes of death is analyzed after adjusting for the influences of the measured sources of county variation.

  12. Trends in Socioeconomic Inequalities in Motor Vehicle Accident Deaths in the United States, 1995-2010.

    PubMed

    Harper, Sam; Charters, Thomas J; Strumpf, Erin C

    2015-10-01

    Motor vehicle accident (MVA) mortality has been declining overall, but little is known about trends by socioeconomic position. We examined trends in education-related inequalities in US MVA death rates from 1995 to 2010. We used mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics and population estimates from the Current Population Survey, and we calculated vehicle- and person-miles traveled using data from the National Household Travel Survey. We used negative binomial regression to estimate crude and age-, sex-, and race-adjusted mortality rates among adults aged 25 years or more. We found larger mortality decreases among the more highly educated and some evidence of mortality increases among the least educated. Adjusted death rates were 15.3 per 100,000 population (95% confidence interval (CI): 10.7, 19.9) higher at the bottom of the education distribution than at the top of the education distribution in 1995, increasing to 17.9 per 100,000 population (95% CI: 14.8, 21.0) by 2010. In relative terms, adjusted death rates were 2.4 (95% CI: 1.7, 3.0) times higher at the bottom of the education distribution than at the top in 1995, increasing to 4.3 times higher (95% CI: 3.4, 5.3) by 2010. Inequality increases were larger in terms of vehicle-miles traveled. Although overall MVA death rates declined during this period, socioeconomic differences in MVA mortality have persisted or worsened over time.

  13. A crossover adjustment for improving sea surface height mapping from in-situ high rate ship-borne GNSS data using PPP technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinyun; Dong, Zhenghua; Tan, Zhengguang; Liu, Xin; Chen, Chuanfa; Hwang, Cheinway

    2016-08-01

    Ship-borne global navigation satellite system (GNSS) technique can overcome the weakness of satellite altimetry and tide gauge in measuring sea surface heights (SSHs) over coastal seas. Ship-borne GNSS technique can be used to calibrate SSHs determined by the satellite altimetry and tide gauge. The ship-borne GNSS data are processed with the single-epoch precise point positioning (PPP) method to estimate SSHs which are filtered by the Gaussian filter to weaken and/or remove effects of sea wind and wave field. Tidal corrections are also taken into consideration to improve SSHs. One crossover adjustment method is put forward to calculate the bias and drift along the ship route and assess the accuracy of SSHs. We processed the in-situ ship-borne GPS data over the offshore sea around Keelung to compute precisely SSHs with the single-epoch PPP. Statistical results of SSH differences of crossover points indicate that the root mean squares error of SSHs determined by the ship-borne GPS is up to level of 12.9 cm over the offshore sea ~30 km far away to land.

  14. Life Experience with Death: Relation to Death Attitudes and to the Use of Death-Related Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluck, Susan; Dirk, Judith; Mackay, Michael M.; Hux, Ashley

    2008-01-01

    The study examines the relation of death experience to death attitudes and to autobiographical memory use. Participants (N = 52) completed standard death attitude measures and wrote narratives about a death-related autobiographical memory and (for comparison) a memory of a low point. Self-ratings of the memory narratives were used to assess their…

  15. New insight on antimicrobial therapy adjustment strategies for gram-negative bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Shuzhen; Tang, Wei; Shi, Guochao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Gram-negative bacterial infections, especially multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infection, are becoming a serious threat to public health. Although it is widely accepted that both appropriate initial empirical therapy and targeted therapy are important, but for patients needing therapy adjustment, few studies have explored whether adjustment strategy based on microbiologic susceptibility test (MST) brings better outcome compared with empirical adjustment. A total of 320 patients with gram-negative bacterial infection (airway, blood, or pleural effusion) were selected and a prospective cohort study was conducted. Baseline characteristics and outcomes (microbiologic, clinical, and economic) were documented during follow-up. MDR and nosocomial infections were common among subjects. Initial therapies consistent with MST could result in reduced in-hospital mortality, treatment failure rate, infection-related death, percentages of patients needing therapy adjustment, and daily hospitalization cost with increased successful treatment rate compared with inconsistent with MST, and microbiologic outcomes were also better with appropriate therapies. For patients needing therapy adjustment, relying on MST gained no significant benefit on mortality, clinical, or microbiologic outcomes compared with depending on clinical experience. But for patients with MDR infection, adjustment relying on MST gained more benefit than non-MDR infection. Appropriate initial therapy significantly improved the prognosis of patients with gram-negative bacterial infections, but improvement was not that obvious for patients needing therapy adjustment which was based on MST compared with clinical experience, and more beneficial effects of adjustment relying on MST were obtained for patients with MDR bacterial infection. PMID:28353572

  16. Death foretold.

    PubMed

    Biderman, A; Herman, J

    2000-01-01

    We briefly trace the history of a belief in the possibility that a person in apparent good health may accurately predict his or her own demise. The phenomenon is referred to as death foretold and we present presumed examples of it from the Bible, world literature, medical writings and newspaper reports without pretending to completeness. In two widely quoted scientific papers, death foretold is subsumed under the wider heading of decease due to psychic stress. We speculate on a possible link between the two, taking into consideration the fact that most people who prophesy their end are of an advanced age.

  17. [Incidence of proliferative retinopathy and sex-related differences in death rate among patients with diabetes mellitus and sight impairment treated with insulin (according to the data from national diabetic registry)].

    PubMed

    Tron'ko, N D; Khalangot, N D; Kravchenko, V I; Kul'chinskaia, Ia B; Gur'ianov, V G; Mis'ko, L A

    2004-01-01

    The article presents the analysis of the occurrence of diabetes mellitus-linked sight impairment and proliferative retinopathy after data of National Diabetes Population Register among patients receiving insulin therapy. The number of women with above mentioned impairments has been found to prevail significantly over that of men. This tendency is also observed among the patients aged to 50 y. o., although in this age group the number of men with diabetes mellitus prevails over that of women. This discrepancy can be explained through higher death rate linked with diabetes mellitus among men as compared with women. Death rate statistics concerning patients with diabetes mellitus complicated with sight impairment for 2003 y. confirms this supposition.

  18. An index of unhealthy lifestyle is associated with coronary heart disease mortality rates for small areas in England after adjustment for deprivation.

    PubMed

    Scarborough, P; Allender, S; Rayner, M; Goldacre, M

    2011-03-01

    Indices of socio-economic deprivation are often used as a proxy for differences in the health behaviours of populations within small areas, but these indices are a measure of the economic environment rather than the health environment. Sets of synthetic estimates of the ward-level prevalence of low fruit and vegetable consumption, obesity, raised blood pressure, raised cholesterol and smoking were combined to develop an index of unhealthy lifestyle. Multi-level regression models showed that this index described about 50% of the large-scale geographic variation in CHD mortality rates in England, and substantially adds to the ability of an index of deprivation to explain geographic variations in CHD mortality rates.

  19. Controlling Type I Error Rate in Evaluating Differential Item Functioning for Four DIF Methods: Use of Three Procedures for Adjustment of Multiple Item Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jihye

    2010-01-01

    In DIF studies, a Type I error refers to the mistake of identifying non-DIF items as DIF items, and a Type I error rate refers to the proportion of Type I errors in a simulation study. The possibility of making a Type I error in DIF studies is always present and high possibility of making such an error can weaken the validity of the assessment.…

  20. Sudden infant death syndrome in Japan 1995-1998.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T

    2002-09-14

    This study examined the effects of birth characteristics, which reported on birth certificates, on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) based on vital statistics between 1995 and 1998 in Japan. One thousand eight hundred and fifty-nine cases of SIDS and 4,787,537 live births were analyzed. The mortality rate from SIDS was 0.388 SIDS deaths per 1000 live births. Based on multivariate analysis using Poisson regression model, risk factors associated with significantly increased SIDS rates included low birth weight, being a male infant, young maternal age, late birth in multiparity, maternal stillbirth experience, residential region of Kyusyu, Tokai or Hokuriku, and employment status as "unemployed or unknown". However, there was no significant difference between single and multiple birth groups after adjusting other characteristics. A decreasing postnatal age of death was observed as birth weight increased. However, there was no difference in postconceptional age of death between birth weight groups. Preterm infants died of SIDS at a later postnatal age than term infants, but there appeared to be little difference in postconceptional age of death amongst preterm infants. This association between birth characteristics and SIDS were consistent with other studies from western countries, suggesting that recommendations for SIDS in western countries are also applicable for Japan.

  1. Consanguinity and Neonatal Death: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaman, Reza; Gholami Taramsari, Mahshid; Khosravi, Ahmad; Amiri, Mohammad; Holakouie Naieni, Kourosh; Yunesian, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Although numerous studies have found higher rates of abortion and still births following consanguinity (familial marriages), the question of whether consanguinity significantly increases the risk of neonatal death has inadequately been addressed.This study aims to evaluate familial marriage effects on neonatal death in rural areas in Iran. Materials and methods: In this nested case-control study, 6900 newbornswho were born in rural areas of Kohgiluyeh and Boyerahmad Province (South-West of Iran)were followed till the end of neonatal period, and neonatal death was the outcome of interest. Subsequently 97 cases and 97 controls were selected in study cohort by using risk set sampling model. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) were estimated by usinga conditional logistic regression model. Results: In the final model, prematurity (OR = 5.57), low birthweight (LBW) (OR = 7.68), consanguinity (first cousins) (OR = 5.23), C-section (OR = 7.27), birth rank more than 3 (OR = 6.95) and birthsinterval less than 24 months (OR = 4.65) showed significant statistical association with neonatal mortality (p < 0.05). Conclusion: According to our findings, after adjusting the effects of other significant risk factors, familial marriageto first cousins is considered asan important risk factor for neonatal death. PMID:25530772

  2. Effects of uncertainty in SAPRC90 rate constants and selected product yields on reactivity adjustment factors for alternative fuel vehicle emissions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bergin, M.S.; Russell, A.G.; Yang, Y.J.; Milford, J.B.; Kirchner, F.; Stockwell, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    Tropospheric ozone is formed in the atmosphere by a series of reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}). While NOx emissions are primarily composed of only two compounds, nitrogen oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), there are hundreds of different VOCs being emitted. In general, VOCs promote ozone formation, however, the rate and extent of ozone produced by the individual VOCs varies considerably. For example, it is widely acknowledged that formaldehyde (HCHO) is a very reactive VOC, and produces ozone rapidly and efficiently under most conditions. On the other hand, VOCs such as methane, ethane, propane, and methanol do not react as quickly, and are likely to form less urban ozone than a comparable mass of HCHO. The difference in ozone forming potential is one of the bases for the use of alternative fuels. The fuels considered in this study included compressed natural gas, LPG, mixtures of methanol and gasoline, ethanol and gasoline, and a reformulated gasoline.

  3. Adjusted Age-Adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index Score as a Risk Measure of Perioperative Mortality before Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Ming; Yin, Wen-Yao; Wei, Chang-Kao; Wu, Chin-Chia; Su, Yu-Chieh; Yu, Chia-Hui; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of patients at risk of death from cancer surgery should aid in preoperative preparation. The purpose of this study is to assess and adjust the age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index (ACCI) to identify cancer patients with increased risk of perioperative mortality. Methods We identified 156,151 patients undergoing surgery for one of the ten common cancers between 2007 and 2011 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Half of the patients were randomly selected, and a multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to develop an adjusted-ACCI score for estimating the risk of 90-day mortality by variables from the original ACCI. The score was validated. The association between the score and perioperative mortality was analyzed. Results The adjusted-ACCI score yield a better discrimination on mortality after cancer surgery than the original ACCI score, with c-statics of 0.75 versus 0.71. Over 80 years of age, 70–80 years, and renal disease had the strongest impact on mortality, hazard ratios 8.40, 3.63, and 3.09 (P < 0.001), respectively. The overall 90-day mortality rates in the entire cohort varied from 0.9%, 2.9%, 7.0%, and 13.2% in four risk groups stratifying by the adjusted-ACCI score; the adjusted hazard ratio for score 4–7, 8–11, and ≥ 12 was 2.84, 6.07, and 11.17 (P < 0.001), respectively, in 90-day mortality compared to score 0–3. Conclusions The adjusted-ACCI score helps to identify patients with a higher risk of 90-day mortality after cancer surgery. It might be particularly helpful for preoperative evaluation of patients over 80 years of age. PMID:26848761

  4. Legionnaires' Disease and Associated Comorbid Conditions as Causes of Death in the U.S., 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Wickramasekaran, Ranjana N.; Sorvillo, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent U.S. outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease (LD) underscore the virulent nature of this infectious pneumonia. To date, only a paucity of literature has described the mortality burden of LD. This study updates LD mortality using U.S. multiple-cause-of-death data from 2000–2010. Methods We calculated crude and age-adjusted rates for LD mortality for age, sex, race, state, Census region, and year. We conducted Poisson regression to assess seasonal and temporal trends. We generated matched odds ratios (MORs) to describe the association between LD-related deaths and other comorbid conditions listed on the death certificates. Results We identified a total of 1,171 LD-related deaths during 2000–2010. The age-adjusted mortality rate remained relatively static from 2000 (0.038 per 100,000 population, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.031, 0.046) to 2010 (0.040 per 100,000 population, 95% CI 0.033, 0.047). The absolute number increased from 107 to 135 deaths during this period, with adults ≥45 years of age having the highest caseload. Overall, LD mortality rates were 2.2 times higher in men than in women. White people accounted for nearly 83.3% of all LD-related deaths, but the age-adjusted mortality rates for black and white people were similar. Comorbid conditions such as leukemia (MOR=4.8, 95% CI 3.5, 6.6) and rheumatoid arthritis (MOR=5.6, 95% CI 3.3, 9.4) were associated with LD diagnosis on death certificates. Conclusion Comorbid conditions that could lead to an immunocompromised state were associated with fatal LD on U.S. death certificates. Characterization of LD mortality burden and related comorbidities has practice implications for clinical medicine and public health surveillance. PMID:25931626

  5. Fear of death.

    PubMed

    Penson, Richard T; Partridge, Rosamund A; Shah, Muhammad A; Giansiracusa, David; Chabner, Bruce A; Lynch, Thomas J

    2005-02-01

    Shortly before his death in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) founded The Kenneth B. Schwartz Center at MGH. The Schwartz Center is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and advancing compassionate health care delivery, which provides hope to the patient and support to caregivers and encourages the healing process. The center sponsors the Schwartz Center Rounds, a monthly multidisciplinary forum where caregivers reflect on important psychosocial issues faced by patients, their families, and their caregivers, and gain insight and support from fellow staff members. For many, cancer is synonymous with death. Fearing death is a rational response. For too long, medicine has ignored this primeval fear. Increasingly, clinicians recognize and address end-of-life issues, facing patients' and our own emotional vulnerabilities in order to connect and explore problems and fears. Listening and learning from the patient guides us as we acknowledge much of the mystery that still surrounds the dying process. Rarely is there a simple or right answer. An empathetic response to suffering patients is the best support. Support is vital in fostering the adjustment of patients. A silent presence may prove more helpful than well-meant counsel for many patients. Through an examination of eight caregiver narratives of their patients' experiences, the role of the health care provider in the dying process, particularly in regard to challenging fear, is reviewed.

  6. Birthday and date of death.

    PubMed Central

    Angermeyer, M C; Kühn, L; Osterwald, P

    1987-01-01

    The relation between birthday and date of death has so far been studied from two different perspectives: birthdays were either conceived of as emotionally invested deadlines motivating people to ward off their death which causes a 'dip' in death rates before their birthday, or they were considered as stressful events leading to an increase of mortality on or after their birthday. Using a collection of biographies of famous people from the whole world and another of well-known Swiss citizens we tested hypotheses derived from these assumptions. Neither the 'death-dip' hypotheses nor the 'birthday stress' hypothesis was supported by our results. PMID:3655631

  7. Sudden cardiac death rate in an area characterized by high incidence of coronary artery disease and low hardness of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, D; Dini, F L; Azzarelli, A; Giaconi, A; Volterrani, C; Lunardi, M

    1995-02-01

    From January 1992 to January 1993 the incidence of sudden cardiac death among the population of the Media Valle del Serchio area (Tuscany, Italy), composed of a population of 35,000, was found to be twice that of the European average; 32 cases have been reported over this period in that area (9 per 10,000 in the examined year), with a male/female (M/F) ratio of 2.5:1 (23 M, 9 F). In Italy the mean incidence of sudden death was calculated as 6/10,000 and in Europe 5/10,000. In the examined population hypertension was the coronary risk factor present most frequently (87%). A previous diagnosis of coronary artery disease was documented in 21 cases (66%); 5 of these exhibited previous myocardial infarction and 3 previous myocardial infarction associated with left ventricular heart failure. In 7 subjects no previous cardiovascular disorders were discovered. Prodromal symptoms had been reported in 20 cases (62%), which included chest pain in 8 and dyspnea in 8. In the examined geographic area a high prevalence of coronary artery disease was verified through the records of the Public Health Service, which documents the main causes of mortality in Tuscany, and through the hospitalization data and the services provided for ischemic heart disease at the local coronary care unit compared with the national average. Moreover, research was accomplished on physical and chemical properties of drinking water in the same area, and this revealed a very low total hardness due to the paucity of calcium and magnesium salts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. [Accompany death].

    PubMed

    Salvador Borrell, Montserrat

    2010-11-01

    One of the roles of nursing is to take care of the patients in terminal situation. The time, the experience, the formation, and the personal and professional attitudes that the nurse has will propitiate that taking care of moribund patients might turn into one of the more rewarding human experiences in life. There for, it is indispensable that nurses assume death as a natural and inevitable reality to achieve. The principal aim of the study is to evaluate the competence of confrontation and the autoefficiency of the welfare among nurses who work with adult patients at the end of the life. Descriptive study realized in the units of Oncology, Hametology and Palliative Care of the following centers: La Fe, Clínico, Dr. Peset, H. General, Arnau de Vilanova and Dr. Moliner de Portacoelli in Valencia (Spain). The following instruments were used: the Bugen Scale of confrontation of the Death (1980-1981) and the Robbins Scale of Autoefficiency (1992). Data suggests that major coping gives major autoeffciency and vice versa. The realized study opens numerous questions, specially related with training and the burden of preparation along the whole professional career, in order to achieve competence for coping and autoefficiency.

  9. A whole genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting milk protein percentage in Israeli-Holstein cattle, by means of selective milk DNA pooling in a daughter design, using an adjusted false discovery rate criterion.

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, M O; Lipkin, E; Khutoreskaya, G; Tchourzyna, E; Soller, M; Friedmann, A

    2001-01-01

    Selective DNA pooling was employed in a daughter design to screen all bovine autosomes for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting estimated breeding value for milk protein percentage (EBVP%). Milk pools prepared from high and low daughters of each of seven sires were genotyped for 138 dinucleotide microsatellites. Shadow-corrected estimates of sire allele frequencies were compared between high and low pools. An adjusted false discovery rate (FDR) method was employed to calculate experimentwise significance levels and empirical power. Significant associations with milk protein percentage were found for 61 of the markers (adjusted FDR = 0.10; estimated power, 0.68). The significant markers appear to be linked to 19--28 QTL. Mean allele substitution effects of the putative QTL averaged 0.016 (0.009--0.028) in units of the within-sire family standard deviation of EBVP% and summed to 0.460 EBVP%. Overall QTL heterozygosity was 0.40. The identified QTL appear to account for all of the variation in EBVP% in the population. Through use of selective DNA pooling, 4400 pool data points provided the statistical power of 600,000 individual data points. PMID:11290723

  10. The Kenyan Political Conflict and Children's Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kithakye, Mumbe; Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Terranova, Andrew M.; Myers, Sonya S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined pre- and postconflict data from 84 children, ages 3-7 years, living in Kibera, Kenya, during the December 2007 political conflict. Results indicate that children's disaster experiences (home destruction, death of a parent, parent and child harm) are associated with adjustment difficulties and that emotion regulation is an…

  11. 76 FR 22157 - Postal Service Rate Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... flats that include, in or on the mailpiece, a two dimensional barcode readable by mobile smart phones... dimensional barcodes, though readable by smart phones, are not eligible to receive the discount. Id. The... mobile smart phones to market, promote, or educate.'' Id. at 2-3. The 3 percent discount may be...

  12. 76 FR 53160 - Postal Service Rate Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... (LC/AO) items weighing up to 2 kilograms tendered as Expr s Items and branded with the Common Logo... features and a common logo.' '' Id. at 6-7, Attachment 2 at 1 (footnote omitted). Article 12 of the Expr...

  13. 38 CFR 10.28 - Proof of death evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of death evidence... COMPENSATION Adjusted Compensation; General § 10.28 Proof of death evidence. Evidence required in establishing proof of death under the act, as amended, shall conform with the requirements set forth in...

  14. 38 CFR 10.28 - Proof of death evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of death evidence... COMPENSATION Adjusted Compensation; General § 10.28 Proof of death evidence. Evidence required in establishing proof of death under the act, as amended, shall conform with the requirements set forth in...

  15. 38 CFR 10.28 - Proof of death evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of death evidence... COMPENSATION Adjusted Compensation; General § 10.28 Proof of death evidence. Evidence required in establishing proof of death under the act, as amended, shall conform with the requirements set forth in...

  16. 38 CFR 10.28 - Proof of death evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of death evidence... COMPENSATION Adjusted Compensation; General § 10.28 Proof of death evidence. Evidence required in establishing proof of death under the act, as amended, shall conform with the requirements set forth in...

  17. 38 CFR 10.28 - Proof of death evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of death evidence... COMPENSATION Adjusted Compensation; General § 10.28 Proof of death evidence. Evidence required in establishing proof of death under the act, as amended, shall conform with the requirements set forth in...

  18. Encountering Death: Structured Activities for Death Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Ira David; And Others

    This book is intended to be used as a supplement to standard textbooks on death and dying for college students. Chapter 1 "Encountering Death in the Self" builds the foundation for increased self-awareness for the study of death and dying. Chapter 2 "Encountering Death in the Family" provides activities which are appropriate for a wide variety of…

  19. Influence of Clinical Status on the Association Between Plasma Total and Unbound Bilirubin and Death or Adverse Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

    PubMed Central

    Oh, William; Stevenson, David K.; Tyson, Jon E.; Morris, Brenda H.; Ahlfors, Charles E.; Bender, G. Jesse; Wong, Ronald J.; Perritt, Rebecca; Vohr, Betty R.; Van Meurs, Krista P.; Vreman, Hendrik J.; Das, Abhik; Phelps, Dale L.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess the influence of clinical status on the association between total plasma bilirubin and unbound bilirubin on death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18–22 months corrected age in extremely low birth weight infants. Method Total plasma biirubin and unbound biirubin were measured in 1,101 extremely low birth weight infants at 5±1 day of age. Clinical criteria were used to classify infants as clinically stable or unstable. Survivors were examined at 18–22 months corrected age by certified examiners. Outcome variables were death or neurodevelopmental impairment, death or cerebral palsy, death or hearing loss, and death prior to follow-up. For all outcomes, the interaction between bilirubin variables and clinical status was assessed in logistic regression analyses adjusted for multiple risk factors. Results Regardless of clinical status, an increasing level of unbound bilirubin was associated with higher rates of death or neurodevelopmental impairment, death or cerebral palsy, death or hearing loss and death before follow-up. Total plasma bilirubin values were directly associated with death or neurodevelopmental impairment, death or cerebral palsy, death or hearing loss, and death before follow-up in unstable infants, but not in stable infants. An inverse association between total plasma bilirubin and death or cerebral palsy was found in stable infants. Conclusions In extremely low birth weight infants, clinical status at 5 days of age affects the association between total plasma and unbound bilirubin and death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18–22 months of corrected age. An increasing level of UB is associated a higher risk of death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes regardless of clinical status. Increasing levels of total plasma bilirubin are directly associated with increasing risk of death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in unstable, but not in stable infants. PMID:20105142

  20. Incidence of serious injury and death during sport and recreation activities in Victoria, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Gabbe, B; Finch, C; Cameron, P; Williamson, O

    2005-01-01

    Background: Participation in sport and recreation is widely encouraged for general good health and the prevention of some non-communicable diseases. However, injury is a significant barrier to participation, and safety concerns are a factor in the decision to participate. An understanding of the sport/recreation activities associated with serious injury is useful for informing physical activity choices and for setting priorities for the targeting of injury prevention efforts. Objectives: To describe the epidemiology of serious injuries sustained in sport/recreation activities by adults in Victoria, Australia. Methods: The Victorian State Trauma Registry and the National Coroner's Information Service were used to identify and describe sport/recreation related serious injuries, including deaths, occurring during the period July 2001 to June 2003. Age adjusted rates of serious injury and death were calculated using participation figures for each sport and general population data. Results: There were 150 cases of serious injury and 48 deaths. The rates of serious injury and death were 1.8 and 0.6 per 100 000 participants per year respectively. Motor, power boat, and equestrian sports had the highest rates of serious injury. Most deaths were due to drowning. Conclusion: Although the risk of serious injury through sport/recreation participation is low, motor, power boat, and equestrian sports should be priorities for further research into injury prevention. Most sport/recreation related deaths are due to drowning, highlighting this area for prevention efforts. PMID:16046347

  1. Life-style and death patterns of the Missouri RLDS church members.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, L; Land, G

    1981-12-01

    Members of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (RLDS) are dissuaded from the use of tobacco, alcohol, and hot drinks. A well-balanced diet is also stressed. This study compares the 1972-78 mortality experience of the Missouri RLDS with three other population groups. The findings show Missouri RLDS experiencing age-adjusted death rates which are 22.6 percent lower than rates for Missouri non-RLDs whites; 19.6 per cent lower than the non-RLDS of Independence, Missouri; and 14.4 per cent lower than Utah residents. The RLDS display lower death rates than the two Missouri comparison groups for each of seven selected causes-particularly lung cancer, pneumonia/influenza, and violent deaths. Comparisons between the Missouri RLDS and Utah residents show an inconsistent pattern, with Utah residents having non-significantly lower death rates for lung cancer and ischemic heart disease, but with the Missouri RLDS having significantly lower rates for pneumonia/influenza and violent deaths. These inconsistencies are of interest because 72 per cent of Utah's population belong to the Mormon Church which advocates life-styles similar to the RLDS. If these disparate mortality patterns persist under a more direct comparison between the Missouri RLDS and Utah Mormons, they could provide the opportunity to assess the impact of similar life-styles in separate settings.

  2. Estimates for the sensitivity and false-positive rates for second trimester serum screening for Down syndrome and trisomy 18 with adjustment for cross-identification and double-positive results.

    PubMed

    Benn, P A; Ying, J; Beazoglou, T; Egan, J F

    2001-01-01

    Second trimester screening for fetal Down syndrome and trisomy 18 is available through separate protocols that combine the maternal age-specific risk and the analysis of maternal serum markers. We have determined the extent to which additional Down syndrome affected pregnancies may be identified through trisomy 18 screening, and the extent to which additional cases of trisomy 18 may be screen-positive for Down syndrome. The combined false-positive rate, taking into consideration those pregnancies that are screen-positive by both protocols, has also been determined. Sensitivity and false-positive rates were determined by computer simulation of results that incorporated previously published statistical variables into the model. Using second trimester risk cut-offs of 1:270 for Down syndrome and 1:100 for trisomy 18, it was found that few additional cases of Down syndrome are identified through trisomy 18 screening. However, approximately 6-10% of trisomy 18 affected pregnancies will be screen-positive for Down syndrome but screen-negative for trisomy 18. For women aged 40 or more, the false-positive rate for trisomy 18 exceeds 1% and approximately half of these cases will also be screen-positive for Down syndrome. For a population with maternal ages equivalent to that in the United States in 1998, after adjusting for the cross-identification, the sensitivity for three-analyte trisomy 18 screening is 78%. If this testing is performed in conjunction with Down syndrome "triple" screening, the Down syndrome sensitivity is 75% and the combined false-positive rate is 8.5%. If the three-analyte trisomy 18 screening is performed with the Down syndrome "quad" screen, the trisomy 18 sensitivity remains at 78%, the Down syndrome sensitivity is 79%, and combined false-positive rate is 7.5%. Sensitivity and false-positive rates are also provided for other widely used Down syndrome and trisomy 18 risk cut-offs. Sensitivity and false-positive rates that take into consideration

  3. Does case mix matter for substance abuse treatment? A comparison of observed and case mix-adjusted readmission rates for inpatient substance abuse treatment in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    PubMed Central

    Phibbs, C S; Swindle, R W; Recine, B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a case mix model for inpatient substance abuse treatment to assess the effect of case mix on readmission across Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: The computerized patient records from the 116 VAMCs with inpatient substance abuse treatment programs between 1987 and 1992. STUDY DESIGN: Logistic regression was used on patient data to model the effect of demographic, psychiatric, medical, and substance abuse factors on readmission to VAMCs for substance abuse treatment within six months of discharge. The model predictions were aggregated for each VAMC to produce an expected number of readmissions. The observed number of readmissions for each VAMC was divided by its expected number to create a measure of facility performance. Confidence intervals and rankings were used to examine how case mix adjustment changed relative performance among VAMCs. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: Ward where care was provided and ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes were used to identify patients receiving treatment for substance abuse (N = 313,886). PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The case mix model explains 36 percent of the observed facility level variation in readmission. Over half of the VAMCs had numbers of readmissions that were significantly different than expected. There were also noticeable differences between the rankings based on actual and case mix-adjusted readmissions. CONCLUSIONS: Secondary data can be used to build a reasonably stable case mix model for substance abuse treatment that will identify meaningful variation across facilities. Further, case mix has a large effect on facility level readmission rates for substance abuse treatment. Uncontrolled facility comparisons can be misleading. Case mix models are potentially useful for quality assurance efforts. PMID:9018215

  4. Leading Causes of Death among Asian American Subgroups (2003–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Katherine G.; Jose, Powell O.; Kapphahn, Kristopher I.; Frank, Ariel T. H.; Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Thompson, Caroline A.; Eggleston, Karen; Cullen, Mark R.; Palaniappan, Latha P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Our current understanding of Asian American mortality patterns has been distorted by the historical aggregation of diverse Asian subgroups on death certificates, masking important differences in the leading causes of death across subgroups. In this analysis, we aim to fill an important knowledge gap in Asian American health by reporting leading causes of mortality by disaggregated Asian American subgroups. Methods and Findings We examined national mortality records for the six largest Asian subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) and non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) from 2003-2011, and ranked the leading causes of death. We calculated all-cause and cause-specific age-adjusted rates, temporal trends with annual percent changes, and rate ratios by race/ethnicity and sex. Rankings revealed that as an aggregated group, cancer was the leading cause of death for Asian Americans. When disaggregated, there was notable heterogeneity. Among women, cancer was the leading cause of death for every group except Asian Indians. In men, cancer was the leading cause of death among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese men, while heart disease was the leading cause of death among Asian Indians, Filipino and Japanese men. The proportion of death due to heart disease for Asian Indian males was nearly double that of cancer (31% vs. 18%). Temporal trends showed increased mortality of cancer and diabetes in Asian Indians and Vietnamese; increased stroke mortality in Asian Indians; increased suicide mortality in Koreans; and increased mortality from Alzheimer’s disease for all racial/ethnic groups from 2003-2011. All-cause rate ratios revealed that overall mortality is lower in Asian Americans compared to NHWs. Conclusions Our findings show heterogeneity in the leading causes of death among Asian American subgroups. Additional research should focus on culturally competent and cost-effective approaches to prevent and treat specific diseases among these

  5. 20 CFR 10.406 - What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in disability cases?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are the maximum and minimum rates of... Impairment § 10.406 What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in disability cases? (a... monthly pay does not include locality adjustments.) Compensation for Death...

  6. 20 CFR 10.406 - What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in disability cases?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are the maximum and minimum rates of... Impairment § 10.406 What are the maximum and minimum rates of compensation in disability cases? (a... monthly pay does not include locality adjustments.) Compensation for Death...

  7. Ergonomic evaluation of the Apple Adjustable Keyboard

    SciTech Connect

    Tittiranonda, P.; Burastero, S.; Shih, M.; Rempel, D.

    1994-05-01

    This study presents an evaluation of the Apple Adjustable Keyboard based on subjective preference and observed joint angles during typing. Thirty five keyboard users were asked to use the Apple adjustable keyboard for 7--14 days and rate the various characteristics of the keyboard. Our findings suggest that the most preferred opening angles range from 11--20{degree}. The mean ulnar deviation on the Apple Adjustable keyboard is 11{degree}, compared to 16{degree} on the standard keyboard. The mean extension was decreased from 24{degree} to 16{degree} when using the adjustable keyboard. When asked to subjectively rate the adjustable keyboard in comparison to the standard, the average subject felt that the Apple Adjustable Keyboard was more comfortable and easier to use than the standard flat keyboard.

  8. Cell death and tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Wang, Min-Xia; Murrell, George A C

    2003-10-01

    Apoptosis and necrosis are presently recognized as the two major types of physiological and pathological cell death. Apoptosis is a tightly regulated cell deletion process that differs morphologically and biochemically from necrotic cell death. Tendinopathy is defined as a tendon injury that originates from intrinsic and extrinsic etiological factors. Excessive apoptosis has recently been described in degenerative tendon. The increased number of apoptotic tendon cells in degenerative tendon tissue could affect the rate of collagen synthesis and repair. Impaired or dysfunctional protein synthesis may lead to weaker tendon tissue and eventually increase the risk for tendon rupture. Clearly, there are many details to insert into this pathway, but there is hope that if the fine details of the pathway can be fleshed out, then strategies may be able to be developed to break the cycle at one or more points and prevent or treat tendinopathy more effectively.

  9. Adjustment to Cancer: A Psychosocial and Rehabilitative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollum, Paul S.

    1978-01-01

    Initial reaction to cancer is typically shock and denial followed by various coping strategies. A surgical or chemotherapeutic period is entered with concomitant adjustment reactions. The third adjustment period comes after treatment and may evolve into a prolonged death crisis which brings difficult changes and pressures to the patient and his or…

  10. Nonlinear Hydrostatic Adjustment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannon, Peter R.

    1996-12-01

    The final equilibrium state of Lamb's hydrostatic adjustment problem is found for finite amplitude heating. Lamb's problem consists of the response of a compressible atmosphere to an instantaneous, horizontally homogeneous heating. Results are presented for both isothermal and nonisothermal atmospheres.As in the linear problem, the fluid displacements are confined to the heated layer and to the region aloft with no displacement of the fluid below the heating. The region above the heating is displaced uniformly upward for heating and downward for cooling. The amplitudes of the displacements are larger for cooling than for warming.Examination of the energetics reveals that the fraction of the heat deposited into the acoustic modes increases linearly with the amplitude of the heating. This fraction is typically small (e.g., 0.06% for a uniform warming of 1 K) and is essentially independent of the lapse rate of the base-state atmosphere. In contrast a fixed fraction of the available energy generated by the heating goes into the acoustic modes. This fraction (e.g., 12% for a standard tropospheric lapse rate) agrees with the linear result and increases with increasing stability of the base-state atmosphere.The compressible results are compared to solutions using various forms of the soundproof equations. None of the soundproof equations predict the finite amplitude solutions accurately. However, in the small amplitude limit, only the equations for deep convection advanced by Dutton and Fichtl predict the thermodynamic state variables accurately for a nonisothermal base-state atmosphere.

  11. Liberalized abortion in Oregon: effects on fertility, prematurity, fetal death, and infant death.

    PubMed

    Quick, J D

    1978-10-01

    An analysis of Oregon Vital Statistics data from 1965 to 1975 was conducted to assess the impact of Oregon's 1969 abortion legislation, which substantially increased the number of reported medically induced abortions. This increase was associated with a slight increase in the age-adjusted 1970 fertility rate and there was no decrease in births to women in the age groups obtaining proportionately the most abortions. A significant and persistent 11 per cent reduction in premature births to women over age 20 (p less than .001) and a 22 per cent reduction in spontaneous fetal deaths (p less than .05) were associated with liberalized abortion. Decreases in neonatal and postneonatal infant mortality were observed, but were indistinguishable from an ongoing trend toward improved infant health. A gradual 25 per cent decline in the age-adjusted fertility rate occurred between 1969 and 1975, but the increase in the number of reported abortions could account for only one-fourth of this decrease. A seven-fold increase in the use of family planning clinics between 1970 and 1973 and more liberalized laws regarding provision of family planning service appeared to account for a much higher proportion of the decreased fertility than did liberalized abortion.

  12. Parental bereavement after the death of an offspring in a motor vehicle collision: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Bolton, James M; Au, Wendy; Walld, Randy; Chateau, Dan; Martens, Patricia J; Leslie, William D; Enns, Murray W; Sareen, Jitender

    2014-01-15

    Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) are the leading cause of death in young people in North America. The effects of such deaths on parents have not been systematically studied. Administrative data sets were used to identify all parents (n = 1,458) who had an offspring die in a MVC between 1996 and 2008 in the province of Manitoba, Canada. They were matched to general population control parents who had not had offspring die from any sudden cause during the study period. Generalized estimating equations were used to compare the rates of physician-diagnosed mental and physical disorders, social factors, and treatment utilization in the 2 parent groups in the 2 years before and after offspring death, with adjustment for confounding factors. The risk of depression among bereaved parents almost tripled (adjusted prevalence ratio = 2.85, 95% confidence interval: 2.44, 3.33; P < 0.001) during the 2 years after death of an offspring. Significant increases in the risk of anxiety disorders (adjusted prevalence ratio = 1.45, 95% confidence interval: 1.26, 1.67; P < 0.001) were also observed. When compared with nonbereaved parents, bereaved parents had significant increases in the risks of depression (P < 0.001), anxiety disorders (P < 0.001), marital break-up (P = 0.015), and physician visits for mental illness (P < 0.001) in the post-death period. In conclusion, parents who lose an offspring in a MVC experience considerable mental illness and marital disruption.

  13. Effects of endurance exercise training on heart rate variability and susceptibility to sudden cardiac death: protection is not due to enhanced cardiac vagal regulation.

    PubMed

    Billman, George E; Kukielka, Monica

    2006-03-01

    Low heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with an increased susceptibility to ventricular fibrillation (VF). Exercise training can increase HRV (an index of cardiac vagal regulation) and could, thereby, decrease the risk for VF. To test this hypothesis, a 2-min coronary occlusion was made during the last min of a 18-min submaximal exercise test in dogs with healed myocardial infarctions; 20 had VF (susceptible), and 13 did not (resistant). The dogs then received either a 10-wk exercise program (susceptible, n=9; resistant, n=8) or an equivalent sedentary period (susceptible, n=11; resistant, n=5). HRV was evaluated at rest, during exercise, and during a 2-min occlusion at rest and before and after the 10-wk period. Pretraining, the occlusion provoked significantly (P<0.01) greater increases in HR (susceptible, 54.9+/-8.3 vs. resistant, 25.0+/-6.1 beats/min) and greater reductions in HRV (susceptible, -6.3+/-0.3 vs. resistant, -2.8+/-0.8 ln ms2) in the susceptible dogs compared with the resistant animals. Similar response differences between susceptible and resistant dogs were noted during submaximal exercise. Training significantly reduced the HR and HRV responses to the occlusion (HR, 17.9+/-11.5 beats/min; HRV, -1.2+/-0.8, ln ms2) in the susceptible dogs; similar response reductions were noted during exercise. In contrast, these variables were not altered in the sedentary susceptible dogs. Posttraining, VF could no longer be induced in the susceptible dogs, whereas four sedentary susceptible dogs died during the 10-wk control period, and the remaining seven animals still had VF when tested. Atropine decreased HRV but only induced VF in one of eight trained susceptible dogs. Thus exercise training increased cardiac vagal activity, which was not solely responsible for the training-induced VF protection.

  14. Death: 'nothing' gives insight.

    PubMed

    Ettema, Eric J

    2013-08-01

    According to a widely accepted belief, we cannot know our own death--death means 'nothing' to us. At first sight, the meaning of 'nothing' just implies the negation or absence of 'something'. Death then simply refers to the negation or absence of life. As a consequence, however, death has no meaning of itself. This leads to an ontological paradox in which death is both acknowledged and denied: death is … nothing. In this article, I investigate whether insight into the ontological paradox of the nothingness of death can contribute to a good end-of-life. By analysing Aquinas', Heidegger's and Derrida's understanding of death as nothingness, I explore how giving meaning to death on different ontological levels connects to, and at the same time provides resistance against, the harsh reality of death. By doing so, I intend to demonstrate that insight into the nothingness of death can count as a framework for a meaningful dealing with death.

  15. Sudden infant death syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Crib death; SIDS ... However, SIDS is still a major cause of death in infants under 1 year old. Thousands of ... affects boys more often than girls. Most SIDS deaths occur in the winter. The following may increase ...

  16. The Kenyan political conflict and children's adjustment.

    PubMed

    Kithakye, Mumbe; Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Terranova, Andrew M; Myers, Sonya S

    2010-01-01

    This study examined pre- and postconflict data from 84 children, ages 3-7 years, living in Kibera, Kenya, during the December 2007 political conflict. Results indicate that children's disaster experiences (home destruction, death of a parent, parent and child harm) are associated with adjustment difficulties and that emotion regulation is an important protective factor postdisaster. Specifically, severity of the disaster experience was associated with increased aggression and decreased prosocial behavior. Emotion regulation was associated with less aggression and more prosocial behavior postconflict. Findings are discussed in the context of a developmental, systems-oriented perspective of the impact of disasters on child adjustment.

  17. [Unobserved death of an infant: cot death?].

    PubMed

    van Wouwe, J P; Dandachli, T H; Huber, J

    1999-10-02

    Three children, two girls aged 8 and 12 months and one boy aged 7 weeks, were found dead unexpectedly. Autopsy revealed pneumonia in two children, following which the diagnosis of 'natural, explained death' was made; one child showed no abnormalities and the diagnosis read 'natural, unexplained death' (cot death). Autopsy may currently only be performed with parental permission or, in case of doubt about unnatural cause of death, by order of the public prosecutor. The authors propose routine performance of a protocolled autopsy by GP, pediatrician, pathologist and medical examiner in order to avoid subsequent and possibly incorrect doubt about the cause of death.

  18. 5 CFR 841.705 - Increases on basic employee death benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Increases on basic employee death... Adjustments § 841.705 Increases on basic employee death benefits. (a) COLA's on the basic employee death... death benefit are entitled to COLA's if the employee or Member died on or after the effective date....

  19. 5 CFR 841.705 - Increases on basic employee death benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Increases on basic employee death... Adjustments § 841.705 Increases on basic employee death benefits. (a) COLA's on the basic employee death... death benefit are entitled to COLA's if the employee or Member died on or after the effective date....

  20. 5 CFR 841.705 - Increases on basic employee death benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Increases on basic employee death... Adjustments § 841.705 Increases on basic employee death benefits. (a) COLA's on the basic employee death... death benefit are entitled to COLA's if the employee or Member died on or after the effective date....

  1. 5 CFR 841.705 - Increases on basic employee death benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Increases on basic employee death... Adjustments § 841.705 Increases on basic employee death benefits. (a) COLA's on the basic employee death... death benefit are entitled to COLA's if the employee or Member died on or after the effective date....

  2. 5 CFR 841.705 - Increases on basic employee death benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Increases on basic employee death... Adjustments § 841.705 Increases on basic employee death benefits. (a) COLA's on the basic employee death... death benefit are entitled to COLA's if the employee or Member died on or after the effective date....

  3. Delay Adjusted Incidence

    Cancer.gov

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  4. Cardiovascular Deaths among Alaskan Natives, 1980-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middaugh, John P.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes death certificate data to discover the number of deaths of Alaskan natives caused by cardiovascular disease. Rates from cardiovascular diseases and atherosclerosis from 1980-86 among Alaskan natives were lower than rates among other Alaskans, while death rates from other causes were higher. Discusses the possible impact of diet. (JS)

  5. Deaths from heart failure: using coarsened exact matching to correct cause-of-death statistics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Incomplete information on death certificates makes recorded cause-of-death data less useful for public health monitoring and planning. Certifying physicians sometimes list only the mode of death without indicating the underlying disease or diseases that led to the death. Inconsistent cause-of-death assignment among cardiovascular causes of death is of particular concern. This can prevent valid epidemiologic comparisons across countries and over time. Methods We propose that coarsened exact matching be used to infer the underlying causes of death where only the mode of death is known. We focus on the case of heart failure in US, Mexican, and Brazilian death records. Results Redistribution algorithms derived using this method assign the largest proportion of heart failure deaths to ischemic heart disease in all three countries (53%, 26%, and 22% respectively), with larger proportions assigned to hypertensive heart disease and diabetes in Mexico and Brazil (16% and 23% vs. 7% for hypertensive heart disease, and 13% and 9% vs. 6% for diabetes). Reassigning these heart failure deaths increases the US ischemic heart disease mortality rate by 6%. Conclusions The frequency with which physicians list heart failure in the causal chain for various underlying causes of death allows for inference about how physicians use heart failure on the death certificate in different settings. This easy-to-use method has the potential to reduce bias and increase comparability in cause-of-death data, thereby improving the public health utility of death records. PMID:20388206

  6. Case-mix adjusted hospital mortality is a poor proxy for preventable mortality: a modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Girling, Alan J; Hofer, Timothy P; Wu, Jianhua; Chilton, Peter J; Nicholl, Jonathan P; Mohammed, Mohammed A; Lilford, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Risk-adjustment schemes are used to monitor hospital performance, on the assumption that excess mortality not explained by case mix is largely attributable to suboptimal care. We have developed a model to estimate the proportion of the variation in standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) that can be accounted for by variation in preventable mortality. The model was populated with values from the literature to estimate a predictive value of the SMR in this context—specifically the proportion of those hospitals with SMRs among the highest 2.5% that fall among the worst 2.5% for preventable mortality. The extent to which SMRs reflect preventable mortality rates is highly sensitive to the proportion of deaths that are preventable. If 6% of hospital deaths are preventable (as suggested by the literature), the predictive value of the SMR can be no greater than 9%. This value could rise to 30%, if 15% of deaths are preventable. The model offers a ‘reality check’ for case mix adjustment schemes designed to isolate the preventable component of any outcome rate. PMID:23069860

  7. Inverse Susceptibility to Oxidative Death of Lymphocytes Obtained From Alzheimer's Patients and Skin Cancer Survivors: Increased Apoptosis in Alzheimer's and Reduced Necrosis in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Monica; Salech, Felipe; Ponce, Daniela P.; Merino, Daniela; Sinning, Mariana; Xiong, Chengjie; Roe, Catherine M.; Quest, Andrew F. G.

    2012-01-01

    A paucity of cancer in individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and low rates of AD in cancer survivors has been reported in epidemiological studies. Deregulation in opposite directions of biological mechanisms, such as susceptibility to cell death, might be shared in the two disorders. We analyzed lymphocytes from AD and skin cancer patients as well as healthy controls and found significantly increased vulnerability of AD lymphocytes to H2O2-induced apoptotic death and higher resistance to death of skin cancer lymphocytes, due to reduced necrosis, as compared with healthy controls by pairwise comparisons adjusted for age and sex. H2O2-induced death in lymphocytes was caspase independent and significantly reduced by PARP-1 inhibition in all three groups. These differences in the susceptibility to cell death observed for lymphocytes from AD and skin cancer patients may be one of the mechanisms that help explain the inverse correlation detected between these diseases in epidemiological studies. PMID:22367434

  8. Death Does Matter—Cancer Risk in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shih-Feng; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Jan, Ren-Long; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chu, Chin-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a high mortality rate. We hypothesized that not accounting for death as a competing risk overestimates the event rate caused by ESRD. Thus, we examined the cancer risk for patients with ESRD (ESRDPos) after death as a competing risk event had been adjusted for. Patients with newly diagnosed ESRD (n = 64,299) between 1999 and 2007, together with age- and sex-matched controls without ESRD (ESRDNeg) (n = 128,592) were enrolled (1:2). In a Cox proportional hazards model that included death as a competing risk, ESRDPos patients in Taiwan had a lower overall incidence (subdistribution hazard ratio [sdHR] = 1.29) of cancer than did ESRDNeg patients in a Cox model that did not include death as a competing risk (HR = 1.70). After competing mortality had been adjusted for, ESRDPos patients ≥70 (sdHR = 0.82) and ESRDPos patients on long-term dialysis (> 5 follow-up years, sdHR = 0.62), had a lower risk for developing cancer than did ESRDNeg patients. This finding supported our hypothesis that standard survival analyses overestimate the event rate, especially when the mortality rate is high. It also showed that ESRDPos patients, when they grow older, were far less likely to develop cancer and far more likely to die because of underlying illnesses that might also affect the risk of death because of ESRD. PMID:26817891

  9. Twin Legacies: Victor and Vincent McKusick/Twin Studies: Twinning Rates I; Twinning Rates II; MZ Twin Discordance for Russell-Silver Syndrome; Twins' Language Skills/Headlines: Babies Born to Identical Twin Couples; Identity Exchange; Death of Princess Ashraf (Twin); Yahoo CEO Delivers Identical Twins.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2016-04-01

    The lives of the illustrious monozygotic (MZ) twins, Victor A. and Vincent L. McKusick, are described. Victor earned the distinction as the 'Father of Medical Genetics', while Vincent was a legendary Chief Justice of the Maine Supreme Court. This dual biographical account is followed by two timely reports of twinning rates, a study of MZ twin discordance for Russell-Silver Syndrome (RSS) and a study of twins' language skills. Twin stories in the news include babies born to identical twin couples, a case of switched identity, the death of Princess Ashraf (Twin) and a new mother of twins who is also Yahoo's CEO.

  10. Gallbladder Cancer Incidence and Death Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... C. Richardson Frances Babcock Vicki Benard Djenaba A. Joseph Jacqueline W. Miller Thomas B. Richards Mona Saraiya ... MPH Keisha Houston, DrPH, MPH Commander Djenaba A. Joseph, MD, MPH Jun Li, MD, PhD, MPH Captain ...

  11. Improving the accuracy of death certification

    PubMed Central

    Myers, K A; Farquhar, D R

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Population-based mortality statistics are derived from the information recorded on death certificates. This information is used for many important purposes, such as the development of public health programs and the allocation of health care resources. Although most physicians are confronted with the task of completing death certificates, many do not receive adequate training in this skill. Resulting inaccuracies in information undermine the quality of the data derived from death certificates. METHODS: An educational intervention was designed and implemented to improve internal medicine residents' accuracy in death certificate completion. A total of 229 death certificates (146 completed before and 83 completed after the intervention) were audited for major and minor errors, and the rates of errors before and after the intervention were compared. RESULTS: Major errors were identified on 32.9% of the death certificates completed before the intervention, a rate comparable to previously reported rates for internal medicine services in teaching hospitals. Following the intervention the major error rate decreased to 15.7% (p = 0.01). The reduction in the major error rate was accounted for by significant reductions in the rate of listing of mechanism of death without a legitimate underlying cause of death (15.8% v. 4.8%) (p = 0.01) and the rate of improper sequencing of death certificate information (15.8% v. 6.0%) (p = 0.03). INTERPRETATION: Errors are common in the completion of death certificates in the inpatient teaching hospital setting. The accuracy of death certification can be improved with the implementation of a simple educational intervention. PMID:9614825

  12. Brain Death Determination.

    PubMed

    Spinello, Irene M

    2015-09-01

    In the United States, each year 1% to 2% of deaths are brain deaths. Considerable variation in the practice of determining brain death still remains, despite the publication of practice parameters in 1995 and an evidence-based guideline update in 2010. This review is intended to give bedside clinicians an overview of definition, the causes and pitfalls of misdiagnosing brain death, and a focus on the specifics of the brain death determination process.

  13. Remotely Adjustable Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouns, H. H.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    Outlet pressure adjusted to match varying loads. Electrohydraulic servo has positioned sleeve in leftmost position, adjusting outlet pressure to maximum value. Sleeve in equilibrium position, with control land covering control port. For lowest pressure setting, sleeve shifted toward right by increased pressure on sleeve shoulder from servovalve. Pump used in aircraft and robots, where hydraulic actuators repeatedly turned on and off, changing pump load frequently and over wide range.

  14. Adjustable Pitot Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Robbins, W. Eugene; Horsley, Lewis A.

    1991-01-01

    Probe readily positionable in core of uniform flow in hypersonic wind tunnel. Formed of pair of mating cylindrical housings: transducer housing and pitot-tube housing. Pitot tube supported by adjustable wedge fairing attached to top of pitot-tube housing with semicircular foot. Probe adjusted both radially and circumferentially. In addition, pressure-sensing transducer cooled internally by water or other cooling fluid passing through annulus of cooling system.

  15. Weighted triangulation adjustment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Walter L.

    1969-01-01

    The variation of coordinates method is employed to perform a weighted least squares adjustment of horizontal survey networks. Geodetic coordinates are required for each fixed and adjustable station. A preliminary inverse geodetic position computation is made for each observed line. Weights associated with each observed equation for direction, azimuth, and distance are applied in the formation of the normal equations in-the least squares adjustment. The number of normal equations that may be solved is twice the number of new stations and less than 150. When the normal equations are solved, shifts are produced at adjustable stations. Previously computed correction factors are applied to the shifts and a most probable geodetic position is found for each adjustable station. Pinal azimuths and distances are computed. These may be written onto magnetic tape for subsequent computation of state plane or grid coordinates. Input consists of punch cards containing project identification, program options, and position and observation information. Results listed include preliminary and final positions, residuals, observation equations, solution of the normal equations showing magnitudes of shifts, and a plot of each adjusted and fixed station. During processing, data sets containing irrecoverable errors are rejected and the type of error is listed. The computer resumes processing of additional data sets.. Other conditions cause warning-errors to be issued, and processing continues with the current data set.

  16. Eartkquake Death Tolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopoff, Leon; Sornette, Didier

    1995-12-01

    In the risk and insurance literature, the (one-point) distributions of losses in natural disasters have been proposed to be characterized by “fat tail” power laws, i.e. very large destruction may occur with a non-vanishing rate. A naive hypothesis of uncorrelated Poissonian occurrence would suggest that the losses are solely characterized by the properties of the underlying power law distributions, i.e. the longer we wait, the more dramatic will be the largest disaster, which could be as much as a finite fraction of the total population or the total wealth of a country. We find indeed that the numbers Z of deaths in the very largest earthquakes of this century can be described by a power law distribution P(Z)simeq Z^{-(1+δ)} with δ=1.0±0.3, implying an unbounded behavior for the most devastating earthquakes. However, the distribution of the number of deaths per capita in each country in this century has a well-defined maximum value, suggesting that the naive extrapolation of the power law distribution is incorrect and that the understanding of correlations is necessary to ascertain the level of risk from natural disasters. The one-point distributions only provide an upper bound of the expected risk. We propose a speculative model to explain the correlations between deaths in large earthquakes and their countries of occurrence: we suggest that large ancient civilizations that have matured into large present-day populations were the beneficiaries of isolation from marauders due to the relative geographic protection by tectonic processes largely of an orogenic nature.

  17. Counseling With The Elderly: Dealing with Death and Dying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslin, Alice L.

    For the elderly client, the adjustment to aging and a realistic perspective toward death go hand in hand. The counselor must help the client to realize the usefulness of his present life and to make realistic preparations (wills, burial arrangements) for his death. Such work can be done effectively via group or individual therapy sessions,…

  18. Death Does Matter--Cancer Risk in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study With Competing Risk Analyses.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shih-Feng; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Jan, Ren-Long; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chu, Chin-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a high mortality rate. We hypothesized that not accounting for death as a competing risk overestimates the event rate caused by ESRD. Thus, we examined the cancer risk for patients with ESRD (ESRD) after death as a competing risk event had been adjusted for. Patients with newly diagnosed ESRD (n = 64,299) between 1999 and 2007, together with age- and sex-matched controls without ESRD (ESRD) (n = 128,592) were enrolled (1:2). In a Cox proportional hazards model that included death as a competing risk, ESRD patients in Taiwan had a lower overall incidence (subdistribution hazard ratio [sdHR] = 1.29) of cancer than did ESRD patients in a Cox model that did not include death as a competing risk (HR = 1.70). After competing mortality had been adjusted for, ESRD patients ≥70 (sdHR = 0.82) and ESRD patients on long-term dialysis (> 5 follow-up years, sdHR = 0.62), had a lower risk for developing cancer than did ESRD patients. This finding supported our hypothesis that standard survival analyses overestimate the event rate, especially when the mortality rate is high. It also showed that ESRD patients, when they grow older, were far less likely to develop cancer and far more likely to die because of underlying illnesses that might also affect the risk of death because of ESRD.

  19. Whither brain death?

    PubMed

    Bernat, James L

    2014-01-01

    The publicity surrounding the recent McMath and Muñoz cases has rekindled public interest in brain death: the familiar term for human death determination by showing the irreversible cessation of clinical brain functions. The concept of brain death was developed decades ago to permit withdrawal of therapy in hopeless cases and to permit organ donation. It has become widely established medical practice, and laws permit it in all U.S. jurisdictions. Brain death has a biophilosophical justification as a standard for determining human death but remains poorly understood by the public and by health professionals. The current controversies over brain death are largely restricted to the academy, but some practitioners express ambivalence over whether brain death is equivalent to human death. Brain death remains an accepted and sound concept, but more work is necessary to establish its biophilosophical justification and to educate health professionals and the public.

  20. Modifiable Practices Associated with Sudden Death among Hemodialysis Patients in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study

    PubMed Central

    Thumma, Jyothi; Fuller, Douglas S.; Tentori, Francesca; Li, Yun; Morgenstern, Hal; Mendelssohn, David; Tomo, Tadashi; Ethier, Jean; Port, Friedrich; Robinson, Bruce M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Sudden death is common in hemodialysis patients, but whether modifiable practices affect the risk of sudden death remains unclear. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study analyzed 37,765 participants in 12 countries in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study to explore the association of the following practices with sudden death (due to cardiac arrhythmia, cardiac arrest, and/or hyperkalemia): treatment time [TT] <210 minutes, Kt/V <1.2, ultrafiltration volume >5.7% of postdialysis weight, low dialysate potassium [KD <3]), and prescription of Q wave/T wave interval–prolonging drugs. Cox regression was used to estimate effects on mortality, adjusting for potential confounders. An instrumental variable approach was used to further control for unmeasured patient-level confounding. Results There were 9046 deaths, 26% of which were sudden (crude mortality rate, 15.3/100 patient-years; median follow-up, 1.59 years). Associations with sudden death included hazard ratios of 1.13 for short TT, 1.15 for large ultrafiltration volume, and 1.10 for low Kt/V. Compared with KD ≥3 mEq/L, the sudden death rate was higher for KD ≤1.5 and KD=2–2.5 mEq/L. The instrumental variable approach yielded generally consistent findings. The sudden death rate was elevated for patients taking amiodarone, but not other Q wave/T wave interval–prolonging drugs. Conclusions This study identified modifiable dialysis practices associated with higher risk of sudden death, including short TT, large ultrafiltration volume, and low KD. Because KD <3 mEq/L is common and easy to change, KD tailoring may prevent some sudden deaths. This hypothesis merits testing in clinical trials. PMID:22403271

  1. Coverage-adjusted entropy estimation.

    PubMed

    Vu, Vincent Q; Yu, Bin; Kass, Robert E

    2007-09-20

    Data on 'neural coding' have frequently been analyzed using information-theoretic measures. These formulations involve the fundamental and generally difficult statistical problem of estimating entropy. We review briefly several methods that have been advanced to estimate entropy and highlight a method, the coverage-adjusted entropy estimator (CAE), due to Chao and Shen that appeared recently in the environmental statistics literature. This method begins with the elementary Horvitz-Thompson estimator, developed for sampling from a finite population, and adjusts for the potential new species that have not yet been observed in the sample-these become the new patterns or 'words' in a spike train that have not yet been observed. The adjustment is due to I. J. Good, and is called the Good-Turing coverage estimate. We provide a new empirical regularization derivation of the coverage-adjusted probability estimator, which shrinks the maximum likelihood estimate. We prove that the CAE is consistent and first-order optimal, with rate O(P)(1/log n), in the class of distributions with finite entropy variance and that, within the class of distributions with finite qth moment of the log-likelihood, the Good-Turing coverage estimate and the total probability of unobserved words converge at rate O(P)(1/(log n)(q)). We then provide a simulation study of the estimator with standard distributions and examples from neuronal data, where observations are dependent. The results show that, with a minor modification, the CAE performs much better than the MLE and is better than the best upper bound estimator, due to Paninski, when the number of possible words m is unknown or infinite.

  2. Car design and risk of pedestrian deaths.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, L S

    1990-01-01

    Fatal pedestrian injury rates by cars with relatively sharp front-corner designs were compared to such rates by cars of similar-size with relatively smooth front-corner designs. The relative risk of death by front-corner impact was 26 percent greater among the sharp-cornered cars. Pedestrian death rates from impact with other points on the cars and insurance claim frequencies among the studied cars were similar between the two sets of cars. PMID:2327543

  3. Avoidable global cancer deaths and total deaths from smoking.

    PubMed

    Jha, Prabhat

    2009-09-01

    On the basis of current consumption patterns, approximately 450 million adults will be killed by smoking between 2000 and 2050. At least half of these adults will die between 30 and 69 years of age, losing decades of productive life. Cancer and the total deaths due to smoking have fallen sharply in men in high-income countries but will rise globally unless current smokers, most of whom live in low- and middle-income countries, stop smoking before or during middle age. Tripling the taxes on tobacco could rapidly raise cessation rates and deter the initiation of smoking. Higher taxes, regulations on smoking and information for consumers could avoid at least 115 million smoking-associated deaths in the next few decades, including around 25 million cancer deaths.

  4. Contribution of Excessive Alcohol Consumption to Deaths and Years of Potential Life Lost in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Roeber, Jim; Kanny, Dafna; Brewer, Robert D.; Zhang, Xingyou

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading cause of premature mortality in the United States. The objectives of this study were to update national estimates of alcohol-attributable deaths (AAD) and years of potential life lost (YPLL) in the United States, calculate age-adjusted rates of AAD and YPLL in states, assess the contribution of AAD and YPLL to total deaths and YPLL among working-age adults, and estimate the number of deaths and YPLL among those younger than 21 years. Methods We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Alcohol-Related Disease Impact application for 2006–2010 to estimate total AAD and YPLL across 54 conditions for the United States, by sex and age. AAD and YPLL rates and the proportion of total deaths that were attributable to excessive alcohol consumption among working-age adults (20-64 y) were calculated for the United States and for individual states. Results From 2006 through 2010, an annual average of 87,798 (27.9/100,000 population) AAD and 2.5 million (831.6/100,000) YPLL occurred in the United States. Age-adjusted state AAD rates ranged from 51.2/100,000 in New Mexico to 19.1/100,000 in New Jersey. Among working-age adults, 9.8% of all deaths in the United States during this period were attributable to excessive drinking, and 69% of all AAD involved working-age adults. Conclusions Excessive drinking was responsible for 1 in 10 deaths among working-age adults in the United States. AAD rates vary across states, but excessive drinking remains a leading cause of premature mortality nationwide. Strategies recommended by the Community Preventive Services Task Force can help reduce excessive drinking and harms related to it. PMID:24967831

  5. Age-adjusted mortality and its association to variations in urban conditions in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Takano, Takehito; Fu, Jia; Nakamura, Keiko; Uji, Kazuyuki; Fukuda, Yoshiharu; Watanabe, Masafumi; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the association between health and urbanization in a megacity, Shanghai, by calculating the age-adjusted mortality ratio by ward-unit of Shanghai and by examining relationships between mortalities and urban indicators. Crude mortality rates and age-adjusted mortality ratios by ward-unit were calculated. Demographic, residential environment, healthcare, and socioeconomic indicators were formulated for each of the ward-units between 1995 and 1998. Correlation and Poisson regression analyses were performed to examine the association between urban indicators and mortalities. The crude mortality rate by ward-unit in 1997 varied from 6.3 to 9.4 deaths per 1000 population. The age-adjusted mortality ratio in 1997 by ward-units as reference to the average mortality of urban China varied from 57.8 to 113.3 within Shanghai. Age-adjusted mortalities were inversely related with indicators of a larger floor space of dwellings per population, a larger proportion of parks, gardens, and green areas to total land area; a greater number of health professionals per population; and a greater number of employees in retail business per population. Spacious living showed independent association to a higher standard of community health in Shanghai (P < 0.05). Consequences of health policy and the developments of urban infrastructural resources from the viewpoint of the Healthy Cities concept were discussed.

  6. Recirculating valve lash adjuster

    SciTech Connect

    Stoody, R.R.

    1987-02-24

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine with a valve assembly of the type including overhead valves supported by a cylinder head for opening and closing movements in a substantially vertical direction and a rotatable overhead camshaft thereabove lubricated by engine oil pumped by an engine oil pump. A hydraulic lash adjuster with an internal reservoir therein is solely supplied with run-off lubricating oil from the camshaft which oil is pumped into the internal reservoir of the lash adjuster by self-pumping operation of the lash adjuster produced by lateral forces thereon by the rotative operation of the camshaft comprising: a housing of the lash adjuster including an axially extending bore therethrough with a lower wall means of the housing closing the lower end thereof; a first plunger member being closely slidably received in the bore of the housing and having wall means defining a fluid filled power chamber with the lower wall means of the housing; and a second plunger member of the lash adjuster having a portion being loosely slidably received and extending into the bore of the housing for reciprocation therein. Another portion extends upwardly from the housing to operatively receive alternating side-to-side force inputs from operation of the camshaft.

  7. Is the link between alcohol and cardiovascular death among young Russian men attributable to misclassification of acute alcohol intoxication? Evidence from the city of Izhevsk

    PubMed Central

    Shkolnikov, V; McKee, M; Chervyakov, V; Kyrianov, N

    2002-01-01

    Background: Research on the aetiology of sudden cardiac death among young men in Russia strongly suggests an association with binge drinking. However, the possibility remains that such deaths are misclassified as being attributable to cardiovascular disease when they are really caused by acute alcohol poisoning. Objective: To describe postmortem levels of blood alcohol in Russian men dying from various causes and so determine whether deaths from alcohol poisoning are being misclassified as cardiovascular deaths. Setting: Ishevsk, capital of the Udmurt Republic, situated in the Ural region of the Russian Federation. Methods: The study was part of a larger one on adult mortality. The study sample was 309 deaths among men aged 20–55 dying between August 1998 and March 1999 from other than neoplasms, infectious diseases or unspecified causes and on whom necropsy records could be obtained. Information on cause of death was extracted from death certificates and data on postmortem blood alcohol concentration (BAC) from forensic records. Blood alcohol concentrations were adjusted where necessary to allow for delay in necropsy. Results: Medium or greater levels of intoxication occurred in a quarter of those recorded as dying from cardiovascular disease but in over half of those dying from external causes. BAC levels consistent with at least strong intoxication were seen in 13.5% of deaths from cardiovascular disease and 27.1% from external causes. No cardiovascular deaths had BAC at levels usually thought to be fatal while this level was seen in 26% of deaths from accidental poisoning. Conclusion: Evidence of recent consumption of alcohol is common among Russian men dying under the age of 55, with severe intoxication common where death is from external causes. However, the high death rates from cardiovascular disease in Russia cannot be explained by misclassification of deaths attributable to acute alcohol poisoning. This study thus resolves one of the outstanding

  8. Prognostic Contribution of Exercise Capacity, Heart Rate Recovery, Chronotropic Incompetence, and Myocardial Perfusion Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography in the Prediction of Cardiac Death and All-Cause Mortality.

    PubMed

    Arbit, Boris; Azarbal, Babak; Hayes, Sean W; Gransar, Heidi; Germano, Guido; Friedman, John D; Thomson, Louise; Berman, Daniel S

    2015-12-01

    Chronotropic incompetence, measured by the percentage (%) of heart rate (HR) reserve achieved (%HR reserve), abnormal HR recovery, reduced exercise capacity (EC), and myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT MPS) abnormalities are known predictors of all-cause mortality (ACM) and cardiac death (CD). The aim of this study was to determine if EC, %HR reserve, and HR recovery add incremental value to MPS in the prediction of ACM and CD. A total of 11,218 patients without valvular disease and not on β blockers underwent symptom-limited exercise MPS. %HR reserve was (peak HR - rest HR)/(220 - age - rest HR) × 100, with %HR reserve <80 defined as low. HR recovery was peak HR - recovery HR. An HR recovery <22 beats/min at 2 minutes after peak exercise was considered abnormal. Poor EC was defined as exercise duration ≤6 minutes (7 metabolic equivalents). Summed stress scores (SSSs) were calculated using a 20-segment, 5-point MPS model. Statistical analysis was performed using Cox regression models. There were 445 deaths (148 CD) during a mean follow-up of 3.2 ± 2.5 years. In multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of ACM were age, χ(2) = 154.81; EC, χ(2) = 74.00; SSS, χ(2) = 32.99; %HR reserve, χ(2) = 24.74; abnormal electrocardiogram at rest, χ(2) = 23.13; HR recovery, χ(2) = 18.45; diabetes, χ(2) = 17.75; and previous coronary artery disease, χ(2) = 11.85 (p ≤0.0006). The independent predictors of CD were SSS, χ(2) = 54.25; EC, χ(2) = 49.34; age, χ(2) = 46.45; abnormal electrocardiogram at rest, χ(2) = 30.60; previous coronary artery disease, χ(2) = 20.69; Duke treadmill score, χ(2) = 19.50; %HR reserve, χ(2) = 11.43; diabetes, χ(2) = 10.23 (all p ≤0.0014); and HR recovery, χ(2) = 5.30 (p = 0.0214). The exercise variables showed increases in Harrell's C static and net improvement reclassification, with EC showing the strongest incremental improvement in predicting ACM and CD (respective C-index 76

  9. Are Death Anxiety and Death Depression Distinct Entities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Katherine A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Administered Death Anxiety Scale and Death Depression Scale to 200 individuals. Two scales correlated 0.55. Factor analysis of combined 32 items revealed factors: "death anxiety" having highest factor loadings with Death Anxiety Scale, "death depression" having highest factor loadings with Death Depression Scale, "death of…

  10. Experiment on performance of adjustable jet pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. M.; Long, X. P.; Zhang, S. B.; Lu, X.

    2012-11-01

    When the water level of upper or lower reaches of hydraulic power station changes, the adjustable jet pump which is different from traditional fixed jet pump can maintain stable pressure and flow rate for the system of technical water supply of hydraulic power plant. The model test indicates that the efficiency of the adjustable jet pump is slightly lower than fixed jet pump near rating operation point. With the decrease of opening degree, both efficiencies are more and more close to each other. The fundamental performance of I-type adjustable jet pump is better than II-type and the cavitation performance of I-type adjustable jet pump is worse than II-type. Test data also indicate that the performance of adjustable jet pump is very different from fixed jet pump, so the theory of fixed jet pump is not able to be copied to adjustable jet pump. It is necessary to farther study on the performance of the adjustable jet pump. This paper has reference value for analogous design of system of circulation water supply to turbine units in hydraulic power station.

  11. Children's Experience with Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeligs, Rose

    Children's concepts of death grow with their age and development The three-year-old begins to notice that living things move and make sounds. The five-year-old thinks that life and death are reversable, but the six-year-old knows that death is final and brings sorrow. Children from eight through ten are interested in the causes of death and what…

  12. 12 CFR 160.35 - Adjustments to home loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... property to be occupied by the borrower, adjustments to the interest rate, payment, balance, or term to...) Adjustments to the interest rate shall correspond directly to the movement of an index satisfying the... rate pursuant to a formula or schedule that specifies the amount of the increase, the time at which...

  13. 34 CFR 668.191 - New data adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New data adjustments. 668.191 Section 668.191 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Two Year Cohort Default Rates § 668.191 New data adjustments. (a) Eligibility. You may request a new data adjustment for your most recent cohort...

  14. 34 CFR 668.210 - New data adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New data adjustments. 668.210 Section 668.210 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cohort Default Rates § 668.210 New data adjustments. (a) Eligibility. You may request a new data adjustment for your most recent cohort of...

  15. 14 CFR Appendix - Example of SIFL Adjustment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Example of SIFL Adjustment Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY Policies Relating to Rates and Tariffs Treatment of deferred Federal income taxes for rate purposes. Pt. 399, Subpt....

  16. The association between MMF and risk of progressive renal dysfunction and death in adult liver transplant recipients with HCV.

    PubMed

    Lake, John; Patel, Dharmesh; David, Kristin; Richwine, Jason; Morris, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The impact of a three-drug regimen including mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) vs. a two-drug (no MMF) regimen on progressive renal dysfunction (PRD) in liver transplant recipients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has not been well described. Adults with HCV who received a primary liver transplant between January 1, 2000 and December. 31, 2005 and were discharged from the hospital on a three-drug regimen [CNI+MMF+steroids (S)] (n = 4 946) were compared with those discharged on two-drug regimen (CNI+S) (n = 3 884). Time to PRD (defined by a post-transplant 25% decline in estimated GFR, based on the four-variable MDRD equation) and recipient death were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the risk for post-transplant PRD and death after controlling for baseline characteristics and extended steroid use. The two groups were similar in baseline characteristics. The percentage of recipients on three- vs. two-drug regimen without PRD was higher, 36.8% vs. 31.9%, (p < 0.001), at three yrs post-transplant; three-drug therapy was associated with a 6% lower adjusted risk of PRD. The death rate and adjusted risk for death was lower for recipients on a three- vs. two-drug regimen. Liver transplant recipients with HCV on a MMF-containing regimen are at a lower risk for PRD and death compared with recipients on a regimen not including MMF.

  17. Electrocardiographic Measures and Prediction of Cardiovascular and Noncardiovascular Death in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Haochang; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Yang, Wei; Arkin, Joshua M.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Townsend, Raymond R.; Go, Alan S.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2016-01-01

    Limited studies have assessed the resting 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) as a screening test in intermediate risk populations. We evaluated whether a panel of common ECG parameters are independent predictors of mortality risk in a prospective cohort of participants with CKD. The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study enrolled 3939 participants with eGFR<70 ml/min per 1.73 m2 from June 2003 to September 2008. Over a median follow-up of 7.5 years, 750 participants died. After adjudicating the initial 497 deaths, we identified 256 cardiovascular and 241 noncardiovascular deaths. ECG metrics were independent risk markers for cardiovascular death (hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval): PR interval ≥200 ms (1.62, 1.19–2.19); QRS interval 100–119 ms (1.64, 1.20–2.25) and ≥120 ms (1.75, 1.17–2.62); corrected QT (QTc) interval ≥450 ms in men or ≥460 ms in women (1.72, 1.19–2.49); and heart rate 60–90 beats per minute (1.21, 0.89–1.63) and ≥90 beats per minute (2.35, 1.03–5.33). Most ECG measures were stronger markers of risk for cardiovascular death than for all-cause mortality or noncardiovascular death. Adding these intervals to a comprehensive model of cardiorenal risk factors increased the C-statistic for cardiovascular death from 0.77 to 0.81 (P<0.001). Furthermore, adding ECG metrics to the model adjusted for standard risk factors resulted in a net reclassification of 12.1% (95% confidence interval 8.1%–16.0%). These data suggest common ECG metrics are independent risk factors for cardiovascular death and enhance the ability to predict death events in a population with CKD. PMID:26160896

  18. Mortality rates among Arab Americans in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Dallo, Florence J; Schwartz, Kendra; Ruterbusch, Julie J; Booza, Jason; Williams, David R

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) calculate age-specific and age-adjusted cause-specific mortality rates for Arab Americans; and (2) compare these rates with those for blacks and whites. Mortality rates were estimated using Michigan death certificate data, an Arab surname and first name list, and 2000 U.S. Census data. Age-specific rates, age-adjusted all-cause and cause-specific rates were calculated. Arab Americans (75+) had higher mortality rates than whites and blacks. Among men, all-cause and cause-specific mortality rates for Arab Americans were in the range of whites and blacks. However, Arab American men had lower mortality rates from cancer and chronic lower respiratory disease compared to both whites and blacks. Among women, Arab Americans had lower mortality rates from heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes than whites and blacks. Arab Americans are growing in number. Future study should focus on designing rigorous separate analyses for this population.

  19. Multiple cause of death mortality patterns among Californians

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.C.

    1989-11-28

    The purpose of this study was to describe mortality patterns among the elderly using single versus multiple cause of death data and examine ways that multiple cause of death data can best be processed, analyzed and presented. Deaths among white California aged 65 and older for the years 1970, 1975 and 1980 were analyzed. Overall, mortality rates decreased over time, at all ages and for both sexes but more so for females, although the number of causes of death increased with age. Underlying cause mortality rates were compared to rates based on any mention of a cause on the death certificate; diabetes and atherosclerosis were more frequent causes of both than would be indicated by single cause statistics, and heart diseases other than ischemic heart disease increased in mentions on the death certificated while ischemic heart disease underlying mortality rates decreased. Pairs of causes of death showed increased likelihood of occurrence of a number of combinations of chronic diseases. In all pair combinations studied, the addition of another serious chronic disease lowered the mean age of death resulted in an older mean age of death. This result combined with higher number of causes per death but lower mortality rates among females raised interesting questions about interpreting more causes on death certificates as an indication of a sicker person at time of death. This study confirmed morbidity and mortality work on other that mortality of older adults in decreasing but that the number of causes of death per person is increasing. 82 refs., 30 figs., 59 tabs.

  20. Use of death certificates for mesothelioma surveillance.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, L K; Martin, T R; Kligler, B

    1992-01-01

    Data from the Massachusetts Cancer Registry and death certificates were linked for mesothelioma cases reported to the registry from 1982 through 1987 to determine the extent to which the cause of death information that is given on the death certificate is useful in identifying mesothelioma cases for disease surveillance. Only 12 percent of all persons reported with mesothelioma who had died were detected using underlying cause of death codes for cancers of the peritoneum and pleura, which are commonly used to identify mesothelioma cases. The rate increased to 83 percent when death certificates were reviewed manually for any mention of mesothelioma. Surveillance using only the coded cause of death data currently available will result in a large underascertainment of mesothelioma cases. PMID:1641448

  1. Struck-by-lightning deaths in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adekoya, Nelson; Nolte, Kurt B

    2005-05-01

    The objective of the research reported here was to examine the epidemiologic characteristics of struck-by-lightning deaths. Using data from both the National Centers for Health Statistics (NCHS) multiple-cause-of-death tapes and the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI), which is maintained by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the authors calculated numbers and annualized rates of lightning-related deaths for the United States. They used resident estimates from population microdata files maintained by the Census Bureau as the denominators. Work-related fatality rates were calculated with denominators derived from the Current Population Survey of employment data. Four illustrative investigative case reports of lightning-related deaths were contributed by the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator. It was found that a total of 374 struck-by-lightning deaths had occurred during 1995-2000 (an average annualized rate of 0.23 deaths per million persons). The majority of deaths (286 deaths, 75 percent) were from the South and the Midwest. The numbers of lightning deaths were highest in Florida (49 deaths) and Texas (32 deaths). A total of 129 work-related lightning deaths occurred during 1995-2002 (an average annual rate of 0.12 deaths per million workers). Agriculture and construction industries recorded the most fatalities at 44 and 39 deaths, respectively. Fatal occupational injuries resulting from being struck by lightning were highest in Florida (21 deaths) and Texas (11 deaths). In the two national surveillance systems examined, incidence rates were higher for males and people 20-44 years of age. In conclusion, three of every four struck-by-lightning deaths were from the South and the Midwest, and during 1995-2002, one of every four struck-by-lightning deaths was work-related. Although prevention programs could target the entire nation, interventions might be most effective if directed to regions with the majority of fatalities because they have the

  2. Fetal deaths in Brazil: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Barbeiro, Fernanda Morena dos Santos; Fonseca, Sandra Costa; Tauffer, Mariana Girão; Ferreira, Mariana de Souza Santos; da Silva, Fagner Paulo; Ventura, Patrícia Mendonça; Quadros, Jesirée Iglesias

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the frequency of and factors associated with fetal death in the Brazilian scientific literature. METHODS A systematic review of Brazilian studies on fetal deaths published between 2003 and 2013 was conducted. In total, 27 studies were analyzed; of these, 4 studies addressed the quality of data, 12 were descriptive studies, and 11 studies evaluated the factors associated with fetal death. The databases searched were PubMed and Lilacs, and data extraction and synthesis were independently performed by two or more examiners. RESULTS The level of completeness of fetal death certificates was deficient, both in the completion of variables, particularly sociodemographic variables, and in defining the underlying causes of death. Fetal deaths have decreased in Brazil; however, inequalities persist. Analysis of the causes of death indicated maternal morbidities that could be prevented and treated. The main factors associated with fetal deaths were absent or inadequate prenatal care, low education level, maternal morbidity, and adverse reproductive history. CONCLUSIONS Prenatal care should prioritize women that are most vulnerable (considering their social environment or their reproductive history and morbidities) with the aim of decreasing the fetal mortality rate in Brazil. Adequate completion of death certificates and investment in the committees that investigate fetal and infant deaths are necessary. PMID:25902565

  3. Parity, Age at First Birth, and Risk of Death from Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Brian K; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2015-08-05

    We undertook this study to examine whether there exists an association between parity and age at first birth and risk of death from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Our sample included a total of 1,292,462 women who had a first and singleton childbirth between 1 January 1978 and 31 December 1987. We followed each subject from their first childbirth to 31 December 2009, and determined their vital status by merging natality data with Taiwan's national death certificate database. Hazard ratios (HR) of death from NHL associated with parity and age at first birth were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. In all, 412 NHL deaths were recorded during 34,980,246 person-years of follow-up. NHL mortality rate was 1.18 cases per 100,000 person-years. Older age at first birth (>23 vs. ≤23 years) was linked to an increased risk of death from NHL (adjusted HR = 1.41; 95% CI = 1.13-1.75). Controlling for age at first birth, the adjusted HR were 0.74 (95% CI = 0.55-0.98) for women with 2 births, and 0.71 (95% CI = 0.53-0.95) for women with 3 births or more, respectively, when compared with women with only 1 birth. A statistically significant downward trend in the adjusted HR for NHL death was detected with increasing parity (p for trend = 0.05). The HR of death from NHL was decreased by 7% (HR = 0.93; 95% CI = 0.87-0.99) for each additional parity. Our findings are consistent with reproductive factors (parity and early age at first birth) conferring a protective effect against the risk of NHL death.

  4. Psychological Adjustment and Homosexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonsiorek, John C.

    In this paper, the diverse literature bearing on the topic of homosexuality and psychological adjustment is critically reviewed and synthesized. The first chapter discusses the most crucial methodological issue in this area, the problem of sampling. The kinds of samples used to date are critically examined, and some suggestions for improved…

  5. Self Adjusting Sunglasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Corning Glass Works' Serengeti Driver sunglasses are unique in that their lenses self-adjust and filter light while suppressing glare. They eliminate more than 99% of the ultraviolet rays in sunlight. The frames are based on the NASA Anthropometric Source Book.

  6. Self adjusting inclinometer

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    An inclinometer utilizing synchronous demodulation for high resolution and electronic offset adjustment provides a wide dynamic range without any moving components. A device encompassing a tiltmeter and accompanying electronic circuitry provides quasi-leveled tilt sensors that detect highly resolved tilt change without signal saturation.

  7. Infant death scene investigation.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Pamela D; Ragan, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The sudden unexpected death of an infant is a tragedy to the family, a concern to the community, and an indicator of national health. To accurately determine the cause and manner of the infant's death, a thorough and accurate death scene investigation by properly trained personnel is key. Funding and resources are directed based on autopsy reports, which are only as accurate as the scene investigation. The investigation should include a standardized format, body diagrams, and a photographed or videotaped scene recreation utilizing doll reenactment. Forensic nurses, with their basic nursing knowledge and additional forensic skills and abilities, are optimally suited to conduct infant death scene investigations as well as train others to properly conduct death scene investigations. Currently, 49 states have child death review teams, which is an idea avenue for a forensic nurse to become involved in death scene investigations.

  8. 38 CFR 3.351 - Special monthly dependency and indemnity compensation, death compensation, pension and spouse's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; improved pension; death. The annual rate of death pension payable to a surviving spouse who does not qualify for an annual rate of death pension payable under § 3.23(a)(6) based on need for aid and... dependency and indemnity compensation, death compensation, pension and spouse's compensation ratings....

  9. 38 CFR 3.351 - Special monthly dependency and indemnity compensation, death compensation, pension and spouse's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; improved pension; death. The annual rate of death pension payable to a surviving spouse who does not qualify for an annual rate of death pension payable under § 3.23(a)(6) based on need for aid and... dependency and indemnity compensation, death compensation, pension and spouse's compensation ratings....

  10. 38 CFR 3.351 - Special monthly dependency and indemnity compensation, death compensation, pension and spouse's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; improved pension; death. The annual rate of death pension payable to a surviving spouse who does not qualify for an annual rate of death pension payable under § 3.23(a)(6) based on need for aid and... dependency and indemnity compensation, death compensation, pension and spouse's compensation ratings....

  11. Disability-adjusted Life Years for Diabetes in Cuban Children and Adolescents, 1990-2010.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Alonso, Emma

    2016-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Shifts in diabetes onset to earlier ages, globally and in Cuba, signify greater risk of early complications and premature death, with consequent economic and social repercussions for families and health systems. OBJECTIVE Describe the trend in diabetes burden in Cuban children and adolescents in the period 1990 to 2010, in terms of disability-adjusted life years. METHODS A descriptive epidemiological study was conducted of diabetes burden in Cuba, analyzing the years 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005 and 2010 for the age group 0-19 years. Disability-adjusted life years were obtained from the sum of potential years of life lost plus years lived with disability. The first is calculated based on total deaths in the country in which diabetes was recorded as underlying cause; the second from the product of severity, as assigned to diabetes in similar studies, and incidence and average duration, provided by the DISMOD II program, which estimates six internally consistent epidemiological indicators. RESULTS Mortality indicators improved, with a decrease in the rate of potential years of life lost in boys from 21.9/100,000 population in 1990 to 0 in 2010, and in girls from 38.8/100,000 in 1990 to 4.9/100,000 in 2010 (1% of disability-adjusted life years in girls in 2010, corresponding to one death). In contrast, years lived with disability increased by 134.5% in boys and 156.4% in girls. The net result was that disability-adjusted life years increased by >100% in both sexes (from 137.2 to 321.9/100,000 in boys and from 157.3 to 403.3/100,000 in girls, increases of 102.3% and 108.1%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Disability-adjusted life years lost for diabetes in Cuban children and adolescents have increased, due to disability, while mortality has decreased. KEYWORDS Diabetes mellitus, childhood, adolescence, disability-adjusted life years, potential years of life lost, years lived with disability, Cuba.

  12. [The diagnosis of death].

    PubMed

    Echeverría, Carlos; Goic, Alejandro; Lavados, Manuel; Quintana, Carlos; Rojas, Alberto; Serani, Alejandro; Vacarezza, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    This paper undertakes an analysis of the scientific criteria used in the diagnosis of death and underscores the importance of intellectual rigor in the definition of medical concepts, particularly regarding such a critical issue as the diagnosis of death. Under the cardiorespiratory criterion, death is defined as "the irreversible cessation of the functioning of an organism as a whole", and the tests used to confirm this criterion (negative life-signs) are sensitive and specific. In this case, cadaverous phenomena appear immediately following the diagnosis of death. On the other hand, doubts have arisen concerning the theoretical and the inner consistency of the criterion of brain death, since it does not satisfy the definition of "the irreversible cessation of the functioning of an organism as a whole", nor the requirement of "total and irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain, including the brain stem". There is evidence to the effect that the tests used to confirm this criterion are not specific enough. It is clear that brain death marks the beginning of a process that eventually ends in death, though death does not occur at that moment. From an ethical point of view, the conflict arises between the need to provide an unequivocal diagnosis of death and the possibility of saving a life through organ transplantation. The sensitive issue of brain death calls for a more thorough and in-depth discussion among physicians and the community at large.

  13. Adjustable Autonomy Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schrenkenghost, Debra K.

    2001-01-01

    The Adjustable Autonomy Testbed (AAT) is a simulation-based testbed located in the Intelligent Systems Laboratory in the Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division at NASA Johnson Space Center. The purpose of the testbed is to support evaluation and validation of prototypes of adjustable autonomous agent software for control and fault management for complex systems. The AA T project has developed prototype adjustable autonomous agent software and human interfaces for cooperative fault management. This software builds on current autonomous agent technology by altering the architecture, components and interfaces for effective teamwork between autonomous systems and human experts. Autonomous agents include a planner, flexible executive, low level control and deductive model-based fault isolation. Adjustable autonomy is intended to increase the flexibility and effectiveness of fault management with an autonomous system. The test domain for this work is control of advanced life support systems for habitats for planetary exploration. The CONFIG hybrid discrete event simulation environment provides flexible and dynamically reconfigurable models of the behavior of components and fluids in the life support systems. Both discrete event and continuous (discrete time) simulation are supported, and flows and pressures are computed globally. This provides fast dynamic simulations of interacting hardware systems in closed loops that can be reconfigured during operations scenarios, producing complex cascading effects of operations and failures. Current object-oriented model libraries support modeling of fluid systems, and models have been developed of physico-chemical and biological subsystems for processing advanced life support gases. In FY01, water recovery system models will be developed.

  14. Precision adjustable stage

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Silva, Leonard L.

    1988-01-01

    An improved mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A stage center block is mounted on each of two opposite sides by a pair of spaced ball bearing tracks which provide stability as well as simplicity. The use of the spaced ball bearing pairs in conjunction with an adjustment screw which also provides support eliminates extraneous stabilization components and permits maximization of the area of the center block laser transmission hole.

  15. Religious Coping and Behavioral Disengagement: Opposing Influences on Advance Care Planning and Receipt of Intensive Care Near Death

    PubMed Central

    Maciejewski, Paul K.; Phelps, Andrea C.; Kacel, Elizabeth L.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Balboni, Michael; Wright, Alexi A.; Pirl, William; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examines the relationships between methods of coping with advanced cancer, completion of advance care directives, and receipt of intensive, life-prolonging care near death. Methods The analysis is based on a sample of 345 patients interviewed between January 1, 2003, and August 31, 2007, and followed until death as part of the Coping with Cancer Study, an NCI/NIMH-funded, multi-site, prospective, longitudinal, cohort study of patients with advanced cancer. The Brief COPE was used to assess active coping, use of emotional-support, and behavioral disengagement. The Brief RCOPE was used to assess positive and negative religious coping. The main outcome was intensive, life-prolonging care near death, defined as receipt of ventilation or resuscitation in the last week of life. Results Positive religious coping was associated with lower rates of having a living will (AOR=0.39, p=0.003) and predicted higher rates of intensive, life-prolonging care near death (AOR, 5.43; p<0.001), adjusting for other coping methods and potential socio-demographic and health status confounds. Behavioral disengagement was associated with higher rates of DNR order completion (AOR, 2.78; p=0.003) and predicted lower rates of intensive life-prolonging care near death (AOR, 0.20; p=0.036). Not having a living will partially mediated the influence of positive religious coping on receipt of intensive, life-prolonging care near death. Conclusion Positive religious coping and behavioral disengagement are important determinants of completion of advance care directives and receipt of intensive, life-prolonging care near death. PMID:21449037

  16. Increases in heroin overdose deaths - 28 States, 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Rose A; Paulozzi, Len J; Bauer, Michael J; Burleson, Richard W; Carlson, Rick E; Dao, Dan; Davis, James W; Dudek, Jennifer; Eichler, Beth Ann; Fernandes, Jessie C; Fondario, Anna; Gabella, Barbara; Hume, Beth; Huntamer, Theron; Kariisa, Mbabazi; Largo, Thomas W; Miles, JoAnne; Newmyer, Ashley; Nitcheva, Daniela; Perez, Beatriz E; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Sabel, Jennifer C; Skiba, Jessica; Slavova, Svetla; Stone, Kathy; Tharp, John M; Wendling, Tracy; Wright, Dagan; Zehner, Anne M

    2014-10-03

    Nationally, death rates from prescription opioid pain reliever (OPR) overdoses quadrupled during 1999-2010, whereas rates from heroin overdoses increased by <50%. Individual states and cities have reported substantial increases in deaths from heroin overdose since 2010. CDC analyzed recent mortality data from 28 states to determine the scope of the heroin overdose death increase and to determine whether increases were associated with changes in OPR overdose death rates since 2010. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that, from 2010 to 2012, the death rate from heroin overdose for the 28 states increased from 1.0 to 2.1 per 100,000, whereas the death rate from OPR overdose declined from 6.0 per 100,000 in 2010 to 5.6 per 100,000 in 2012. Heroin overdose death rates increased significantly for both sexes, all age groups, all census regions, and all racial/ethnic groups other than American Indians/Alaska Natives. OPR overdose mortality declined significantly among males, persons aged <45 years, persons in the South, and non-Hispanic whites. Five states had increases in the OPR death rate, seven states had decreases, and 16 states had no change. Of the 18 states with statistically reliable heroin overdose death rates (i.e., rates based on at least 20 deaths), 15 states reported increases. Decreases in OPR death rates were not associated with increases in heroin death rates. The findings indicate a need for intensified prevention efforts aimed at reducing overdose deaths from all types of opioids while recognizing the demographic differences between the heroin and OPR-using populations. Efforts to prevent expansion of the number of OPR users who might use heroin when it is available should continue.

  17. A good death.

    PubMed

    2011-10-26

    Definitions of a good death often include being at home. Dying at home may be optimal for the patient but could place a significant burden on families and leave them with traumatic memories. Death in hospital should not mean that it is a 'bad death'. How someone dies is more important than where they die and nurses should be taught to provide good end of life care in all settings.

  18. [The extraordinary death].

    PubMed

    Plattner, Thomas; Zollinger, Ulrich

    2008-07-01

    The examination of a deceased person is an important duty for physicians. It comprises the certification of death, the certification of the identity of the deceased, a thorough examination of the body, an estimation of the moment of death and ends with the decision, if death was caused by a certain or possible violent cause in which case it must be reported to the authorities. Problems and pitfalls are discussed on the basis of practical case presentations.

  19. Outcomes for newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia dosed on actual or adjusted body weight

    PubMed Central

    Bivona, Cory; Rockey, Michelle; Henry, Dave; Grauer, Dennis; Abhyankar, Sunil; Aljitawi, Omar; Ganguly, Siddhartha; McGuirk, Joseph; Singh, Anurag; Lin, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data from solid tumor malignancies suggest that actual body weight (ABW) dosing improves overall outcomes. There is the potential to compromise efficacy when chemotherapy dosages are reduced, but the impact of dose adjustment on clinical response and toxicity in hematologic malignancies is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of utilizing a percent of ABW for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) induction chemotherapy dosing. Methods This retrospective, single-center study included 146 patients who received 7 + 3 induction (cytarabine and anthracycline) for treatment of AML. Study design evaluated the relationship between percentage of ABW dosing and complete response (CR) rates in patients newly diagnosed with AML. Results Percentage of ABW dosing did not influence CR rates in patients undergoing induction chemotherapy for AML (p = 0.83); nor did it influence rate of death at 30 days or relapse at 6 months (p = 0.94). When comparing patients dosed at 90–100 % of ABW compared to <90 % ABW, CR rates were not significantly different in patients classified as poor risk (p = 0.907). All favorable risk category patients obtained CR. Conclusions Preemptive dose reductions for obesity did not influence CR rates for patients with AML undergoing induction chemotherapy and did not influence the composite endpoint of death at 30 days or disease relapse at 6 months. PMID:26231954

  20. Patterns and Trends in Accidental Poisoning Deaths: Pennsylvania’s Experience 1979-2014

    PubMed Central

    Balmert, Lauren C.; Buchanich, Jeanine M.; Pringle, Janice L.; Williams, Karl E.; Burke, Donald S.; Marsh, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to examine county and state-level accidental poisoning mortality trends in Pennsylvania from 1979 to 2014. Methods Crude and age-adjusted death rates were formed for age group, race, sex, and county for accidental poisonings (ICD 10 codes X40-X49) from 1979 to 2014 for ages 15+ using the Mortality and Population Data System housed at the University of Pittsburgh. Rate ratios were calculated comparing rates from 1979 to 2014, overall and by sex, age group, and race. Joinpoint regression was used to detect statistically significant changes in trends of age-adjusted mortality rates. Results Rate ratios for accidental poisoning mortality in Pennsylvania increased more than 14-fold from 1979 to 2014. The largest rate ratios were among 35–44 year olds, females, and White adults. The highest accidental poisoning mortality rates were found in the counties of Southwestern Pennsylvania, those surrounding Philadelphia, and those in Northeast Pennsylvania near Scranton. Conclusions The patterns and locations of accidental poisoning mortality by race, sex, and age group provide direction for interventions and policy makers. In particular, this study found the highest rate ratios in PA among females, whites, and the age group 35–44. PMID:26963396